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B1 Your Community Press newspaper serving Blue Ash, Montgomery, Sycamore Township, Symmes Township E-mail: nesuburban@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 0 9

Symmes Township road foreman Chip Brinkman

Volume 46 Number 23 © 2009 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Share your vacation photos

Whether you’re headed to the beach or the mountains this summer, we want to publish your vacation photos. To get started, go to Cincinnati.com/Share and follow the steps there to send your photos to us. Be sure to identify everyone in the photo and what community they live in. Photos will appear on your community page and may even make it into your local paper, so start sharing today!

Weight a minute ...

It had all started weeks earlier when 23 people joined at Madeira Health Care Fitness Center with the common goal of losing weight. This was a tight race by some serious competitors. Notably, there were two married couples, Lydia and Geoff Hirsh of Symmes Township and Peggy and Jay Linne of Madeira, and previous participant, Kathy Hyatt, who challenged to the end. SEE LIFE, B1

In the money

Ursuline Academy’s Class of 2009 raked in a total of more than $15.5 million worth of scholarships when members graduated last spring. Some 89 percent of the school’s 129 graduating seniors won scholarships. SEE SCHOOLS, A6

Collection time

In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $2.50 for delivery of this month’s Northeast Suburban Life. Your carrier retains half of this amount along with any tip you give to reward good service. For information about our carrier program, call Steve Barraco, 248-7110.

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Sycamore offers lunch break District meal prices unchanged for 2009-2010 By Jeanne Houck

jhouck@communitypress.com

Meal prices in all seven Sycamore Community Schools will not increase by even a penny when classes resume in late August. The Sycamore Board of Education voted to charge the same prices for the 2009-2010 school year that were charged during the 2008-2009 school year: “We are fortunate that we are able to hold the line on our meal prices in these tough economic times,” said Erika Daggett, chief information officer for the schools. “Our child nutrition services manager and department are to be commended for being able to recommend no price increase for next year.” Sycamore Community Schools Child Nutrition Services is a selfsupporting district department funded by money students and staff pay for meals and by federal reimbursement from the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. No state or local taxes are used for food, equipment, supplies and salaries, Daggett said. Child Nutrition Services operates out of kitchens in all of the district’s schools. In addition to serving meals to students - including making lunch during the school year for more than 5,000 students daily districtwide – Child Nutrition Services caters district-sponsored events. Daggett said the department has instituted a point-of-sale system in which students can pur-

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO RMALONEY@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

Prices for meals and milk in the Sycamore Community Schools will be the same during the upcoming school year as they were last year. chase food by entering their student identification number into a personal identification number pad, which immediately and confidentially alerts the cafeteria cashier of the child’s food allergies, eligibility for federally-funded, reduced-price meals and the student’s account balance. “Parents can also add funds to their child’s meal account electronically via our Web site, thus eliminating any concerns associated with students handling paper money and eliminating the possibility of losing a check,” Daggett said.

Holding the line

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A Blue Ash Elementary School student enters her student identification number into a personal identification number pad to pay for lunch in the cafeteria. All Sycamore Community schools now have the same point-of-sale system in their cafeterias.

Sycamore schools meals prices for the 2009-2010 school year: • Breakfast – $1.25 • Reduced-price breakfast – 30 cents • Elementary school lunch – $2.50 • Secondary school lunches – $3 • Special secondary school lunches – $3.50 • All reduced-price lunches – 40 cents • Milk – 50 cents

Arrest solves at least eight Blue Ash cases By Jeanne Houck jhouck@communitypress.com

Eight Blue Ash residents have identified their property among what police say are stolen good found in the apartment of an accused burglar. A Hamilton County grand jury recently indicted the accused man – Jason Ward, 26, of Northside – on one count of burglary and four counts of receiving stolen property. Prosecutors said the charges relate to crimes in Blue Ash and Madeira. Although Ward is scheduled for a jury trial Sept. 15 in Common Pleas Court, the investigation of him continues. “There were 28 cases solved so far as a result of the arrest of Jason Ward,” Blue Ash police Capt. Jim Schaffer said. “Eight of the 28 were solved in Blue Ash alone. “The other 20 were from Madeira, Sycamore Township,

FILE PHOTO

Blue Ash police arrested Jason Ward for breaking into people’s cars. Among the items they confiscated from him were 19 cell phones, 47 iPods, 12 cameras, two laptops, five Gameboys, knives, flashlights, calculators, jewelry, CDs and backpacks. Symmes Township, Montgomery, Miami Township in Clermont County and Loveland,” he said. Schaffer said about a dozen more people are arranging to see whether property found in Ward’s home when he was arrested July 2

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belongs to them. Police said they found cell phones, watches, iPods, Game Boys, cameras, computers, knives, flashlights, calculators, jewelry and CDs in Ward’s apartment. “As you can see, this is still an ongoing investigation,” Schaffer said. Ward is being held on a $20,000 bond in the Hamilton County Justice Center in downtown Cincinnati. He was arrested at his home following a spate of crimes between June 21 and July 2, during which time police said Ward stole pickup trucks in Madeira and Sycamore Township and was scared away from a Blue Ash home after the homeowner found him scrounging around in a car in her garage. Ward ran off with coins from the Blue Ash home on Muirwoods Court June 21, police said.

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Police said officers who tried to track down Ward with a police dog found a Ford Ward pickup truck nearby that had been reported stolen in Madeira. The truck held items belonging to Ward, whose fingerprints were found at the Blue Ash home, police said. Police said that on June 25, Madeira police officers responding to a reported theft in progress from a vehicle at Kaywood Drive and Rollymeade Avenue saw a Ford pickup truck pull into the Camargo Canyon subdivision. The truck driver pulled into a driveway and fled on foot. Madeira police determined the man was Ward and that the pickup truck had been stolen in Sycamore Township June 24, police said.

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News

Northeast Suburban Life July 29, 2009

Shell station getting facelift By Amanda Hopkins

“It’s too small for what they want, but they are fitting in what they can.”

ahopkins@communitypress.com

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

The Shell gas station on Montgomery Road near Interstate 71 will be torn down this fall. A newer, bigger Shell station will be built on the site and include a convenience store, a Subway and a Dunkin’ Donuts.

The Shell gas station on Montgomery Road near Interstate 71 will get some updating this fall. Sycamore Township Board of Trustees approved a plan presented by Gilligan Oil Co. to tear down the gas station at 10809 Montgomery Road. Township planning and zoning administrator Greg Bickford said that the current station is around 2,700 squre feet, but has only 500 to 1,000 square feet of usable space. The new station will be about 4,000 square feet and

Greg Bickford Sycamore Township Planning and Zoning administrator

will include a convenience store, a Subway restaurant and possibly a Dunkin Donuts. “It’s too small for what they want, but they are fitting in what they can,” Bickford said. Bickford said it is a small site and other amenities such as a car wash could not be added. The large highway sign will be torn down and a smaller sign for the gas station will be put up along Montgomery Road. New pumps and a new canopy will be added as well as more landscaping around the side and back of the building. The station itself will be made from brick and stone. “It is definitely an improvement,” Bickford said. The building is expected to be torn down sometime in the fall and Bickford said construction may be completed as early as next spring.

Sycamore Twp. offering gas aggregatin By Amanda Hopkins ahopkins@communitypress.com

Sycamore Township will soon be offering gas aggregation through Integrys Energy Services. The gas aggregation program through Integrys is an opt-out program, which means that the residents can choose not to participate within a certain time period. The aggregation programs puts all of the township residents into a large buying group that helps to keep prices of natural gas lower for the community. Representatives from Integrys told township officials that last year at this

Montgomery, Sycamore schools win high ratings Community Press Staff Report Cincinnati Magazine’s annual “Rating of the Burbs” lists the city of Montgomery among the top 20 communities in the Tristate. The Sycamore Community Schools earned the No. 1

Index

Life...........................................B1 Police.......................................B9 Real estate ..............................B9 Schools....................................A6 Sports ......................................A7

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The Blue Ash Police Department is offering a free seminar Wednesday, Aug. 19, on crimes against the elderly and identity theft. The program will run from 10 a.m. to noon at the Sycamore Senior Center at 4455 Carver Road in Blue Ash. Registration is suggested. Call Kathy Timms at the senior center at 984-1234 to register or with questions.

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time, natural gas cost about $14 a unit. The price is now around $3. They said the gas aggregation program could stabilize the price of natural gas for the township to keep it from that large of a jump in cost. Sycamore Township Board of Trustees President Tom Weidman stressed that natural gas service would remain the same with the aggregation program. “We’re offering the general public what we think is a reasonably good price,” Weidman said. Integrys is planning to mail a letter to township residents July 23 explaining the program and the prices.

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News Dick Maloney | Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7134 | rmaloney@communitypress.com Rob Dowdy | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7574 | rdowdy@communitypress.com Jeanne Houck | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-7129 | jhouck@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor. . . . . . 248-7118 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Mark Chalifoux | Sports Reporter . . . . . . 576-8255 | mchalifoux@communitypress.com Advertising Mark Lamar | Territory Sales Manager. . . . 248-7685 | mlamar@enquirer.com Gina Kurtz | Field Sales Account Executive. 248-7138 | gkurtz@communitypress.com Angela Paolello Marcotte Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . . 936-4715 | amarcotte@communitypress.com Kimtica Jarman Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . . 936-4707 | kjarman@communitypress.com Hather Gadker Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . . 768-8249 | hgadker@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576-8240 Ann Leonard | District manager . . . . . . . . . 248-7131 | amleonar@communitypress.com Stephen Barraco | Circulation Manager . . 248-7110 | sbarraco@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.


July 29, 2009 Northeast Suburban Life

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Northeast Suburban Life

News

July 29, 2009

Montgomery residents will get chance to speak about livestock laws By Jeanne Houck jhouck@communitypress.com

It will likely be September before the public gets a chance to weigh in on whether farm animals should be allowed in Montgomery. A lawyer for the city is putting recommendations about the issue made by the Montgomery Planning Commission into the form of an ordinance, said Frank Davis, Montgomery's community development director. He said the planning commission is expected to approve the ordinance Aug. 3 and send it to Mont-

gomery City Council for a vote. A public hearing on the ordinance likely will be Sept. 23, Davis said. “Three readings of the ordinance at each (city council) business session, held on the first Wednesday of each month, are required before the ordinance can be passed,” he said. “The first reading would be at the first business session after the public hearing is held. The final vote on this issue will be on the third reading of the ordinance.” It may seem like a laborious and lengthy process, but Davis said, “This

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process allows time for public input on the issue.” Earlier this month, Montgomery City Council voted to prohibit animals such as horses, mules, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, geese, ducks, turkeys and chickens in the city. The action was prompted by a question posed earlier this year by a resident who asked whether she could raise chickens for fresh eggs for her family. City officials could find no prohibition in the zoning code and decided legislation was in order. In addition to banning the animals, council directed the planning commission to study whether some of them should be allowed in the city and if so, under what conditions. About 70 percent of Montgomery is zoned for single-family residential use. Some nearby communities allow farm animals on large tracts of land. Valerie Taylor of Montgomery hopes that Montgomery decides to allow at least chickens in the city – even though she doesn’t intend to raise them herself. “I just hate to see us take away our residents’ ability to live more sustainably when there’s not really any good reason for it,” she said.

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AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

The buildings at 8464 through 8472 Blue Ash Road are in danger of being declared a nuisance by Sycamore Township. There are signs posted on the windows declaring the buildings not approved for occupancy.

Blue Ash building unapproved for retail By Amanda Hopkins

“If the owner doesn’t bring (the building) to compliance, the next step is declaring a nuisance.”

ahopkins@communitypress.com

The buildings at 8464, 8466, 8468, 8470 and 8472 Blue Ash Road are falling apart and could be headed for nuisance status. Sycamore Township Planning and Zoning Administrator Greg Bickford said that the buildings near the corner of Blue Ash and Kugler Mill roads are in disrepair and that the owner has not cooperated in cleaning up the property. Signs are posted on the windows declaring the buildings not approved for occupancy. All Wright Electric and Satellite Thirteen Skate Shop were two of the businesses housed in the buildings.

Greg Bickford Sycamore Township Planning and Zoning Administrator

Bickford said that repair orders will be issued to fix the building, but if they are not followed the township may have to step in even further. The building code is being violated with crum-

bling walls, structural problems, a leaky roof and a lack of proper access to the buildings. “If the owner doesn’t bring (the building) to compliance, the next step is declaring a nuisance,” Bickford said. If a nuisance is declared, the building could be condemned by the fire chief and even torn down if the owner does not bring the building up to code.

CHCA graduate earns National Merit Scholarship By Amanda Hopkins ahopkins@communitypress.com

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On top of a Pascal Carter full tuition scholarship through Denison University, recent Cincinnati Hill Christian Academy graduate Hannah Frank, a resident of Colerain To w n s h i p , was recognized with a National Merit coll e g e s p o nFrank sored scholarship earlier this month. The $2,000 scholarship will help pay for Frank’s room and board. She said she is most excited about the whole college experience, but especially living in the dorms with the other students. While she is anticipating move-in day at Denison Aug. 28, she said she’ll still miss waking up on Saturday mornings to make pancakes. With no homework or classes to prepare for just yet, Frank has spent her summer working an internship for UGIVE. Her job has been to help organize a large service event called Step Up Cincinnati which will send groups of students to different locations to perform service on Sept. 19. Some of the service locations include Starfire, FreestoreFoodbank, Crayons to Computers and the Cincin-

FILE PHOTO

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy graduate Hannah Frank of Colerain Township displays keychains from Guatemala for Erik Haslem, a senior from Maineville. Frank recently was awarded a National Merit Scholarship from Denison University. nati Zoo. Frank was actively involved in service throughout her time at CHCA serving on the board for Student Organized Service and leading an arts and crafts group at the Armleder School. “(I started in service) because of a desire to make friends and get involved,”

Frank said. “It’s a great outlet.” She also helped plan many one-time service events including the Shanty Town and Poverty Day and performed in orchestra, served as officer in the National Honor Society and was part of the math group Mu Alpha Theta.


A team effort

July 29, 2009

Northeast Suburban Life

Coach Deb Klemt shares a hug with batboy and team manager, Robby Knodle. Jessica Brown, Sycamore High School senior third base, makes a sparkling play on a hot grounder and prepares to throw out the batter at first.

Sycamore’s Kat Pember makes perfect contact in game action versus Princeton.

The 2009 Sycamore Lady Aves varsity fastpitch softball team hang out together beneath their scoreboard. Standing, from left, are Shelly Pohl, Caitlin Hauff, Ashley Jones, Carrie Tveita and Laikyn McClelland. Kneeling, from left, are Candice Hayes, Katie Zimmer, Adrienne Wessinger and Emily Cohen. Sitting, from left, are Megan Stoy, Kristen Myers, Lex Newbolt, Charlotte Harris, Michelle McDonald and Kat Pember. Up front is Jessica Brown.

True success

Sycamore’s Laikyn McClelland, sophomore, slides safely home against Kings.

Wins and losses don’t always reflect the true success of high school varsity athletics. Case in point, the 2009 Sycamore Lady Aves fastpitch team played spirited, competitive softball all spring with camaraderie, friendship and fun. ALL PHOTOS BY TERRENCE HUGE/CONTRIBUTOR

Chatting amiably with the umpire is Aves Assistant Coach Mary Luning.

Watching her line-drive fall for a base hit to right field is Sycamore’s Laikyn McClelland.

Sycamore faces arguably the city’s top pitcher, Emily Schwaeble, of Colerain, who recorded 18 strikeouts in this no-hit game. Batting for the Aves is Carrie Tveita.

Girls from the Sycamore junior varsity team perform a few cheers prior to the start of a playoff game against Walnut Hills. The Aves won 17-7. In front, from left, are Hannah Belfeld, Kristen Myers, Maddie Kroell, Tori Smith and Charlotte Harris.

Happy with the results so far against Princeton is Paula Chiricosta, who acts as game scorekeeper at both Sycamore softball and basketball games. Charging toward home is Sycamore’s Katie Zimmer, junior outfielder, in a game against Kings.

Aviator head coach, Deb Klemt, enjoys a special moment of congratulations with senior, Jessica Brown, on Senior Day. Klemt is also the food and fashion teacher at Sycamore. Shelly Pohl, Sycamore junior pitcher, serves up a fastball in game action against Anderson.

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July 29, 2009

SCHOOLS

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

ACTIVITIES

| HONORS communitypress.com

Ursuline graduates nab $15.5 million scholarships Community Press Staff Report Ursuline Academy’s Class of 2009 raked in a total of more than $15.5 million worth of scholarships when members graduated last spring. Some 89 percent of the school’s 129 graduating seniors won scholarships. “The happy marriage between highly motivated, service-driven students and our dedicated faculty produces wonderful outcomes each year,” said Robin Galvin, director of communications at the school in Blue Ash. “We’re so proud of the effort put forth by all of them. For every young woman who is recognized for a particular area of achievement, there are many others whose personal accomplishments are known only to them,” Galvin said. “We congratulate each one.” Here are the scholarship winners: • Emily Morganne Albrinck – Provost Scholarship, Ohio State University. • Natalie Elizabeth Andrews – President’s Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton. • Kellie Michelle Asmus – Gateway Scholarship, Ohio University. • Victoria Anne Barker – Dean’s Scholarship, University of Miami; Merit Scholarship, Florida Institute of Technology; Cooper Scholars Award, University of South Carolina; Merit Scholarship, University of Tampa; Science Scholarship, University of Tampa. • Gwen Ann Barron – Regents Scholarship, Eastern Kentucky University; Cincinnatus Century Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Trustees Scholarship, Ohio State University. • Hillary Marie Barron – Agriculture Scholarship, University of Kentucky. • Paige Jean Bartoszek – President’s Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton. • Paige Adele Bassano – Founders Scholarship, Bowling Green State University. • Andrea Dorothy Bazzoli – Prestige Scholarship, Indiana University; Deans’ Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Loyola Scholarship, Loyola University Chicago. • Rebecca Anne Bergh – Trustees Award, Baldwin-Wallace College; Music Scholarship, University of Evansville; Gateway Scholarship, Ohio University; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Music Talent Award, University of Dayton; Academic and Music Talent Scholarship, Nazareth College. • Jenna Marie Bertke – Engineering Scholarship, Pennsylvania State University; Women in Engineering Scholarship, The Ohio State University; Provost Scholarship, The Ohio State University; Cincinnatus University Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Engineering Award Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Dean’s Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; Undergraduate Scholarship, University of Michigan. • Sarah Elizabeth Blood – Classics Scholarship, Friends of the Classics Foundation. • Maria Maged Botros – Trustee Scholarship, Xavier University; Dean’s Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; Presidential Honors Award, John Carroll University; Choose Ohio First Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Provost Scholarship, Ohio State University. • Nancy Mariam Boulos – Loyola Scholarship, Loyola University Chicago; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; McMicken Scholarship, University of Cincinnati. • Breanne Elizabeth Boyd – Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University; Presidential Scholar, American University; Honors College Balfour Scholarship, Indiana University; Founders Scholarship, Kent State University; Honors Scholar in Residence Scholarship, Kent State University; Honors Scholarship, Kent State University; Trustee Scholarship, Kent State University. • Emily Anne Broderick – Honor Award, Xavier University; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Academic Achievement Award, Wittenberg University. • Rebecca Jean Callahan – Presidential Finalist Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Provost Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Cincinnatus Century Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Leadership Award, Clarkson University; Damen Scholarship, Loyola University Chicago; Trustee Scholarship, Xavier University. • Olivia Jane Capuano – Co-op Scholarship, National Commission for Cooperative Education; Athletic Scholarship, Marshall University; Athletic Scholarship, University of Cincinnati. • Alexandria Jeanette Cobb – Parker Scholarship, University of Kentucky; Education Ministry Scholarship, Mt. Zion Educational Ministry. • Hannah May Cook – Gateway Scholarship, Ohio University. • Meredith Rose Cornely – Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Ignatian Scholarship, Saint Louis University. • Lauren Elizabeth Crucitt – Prestige Scholarship, Indiana University; Freshman Scholarship, Florida State University; Academic Scholarship, Florida State University; Woodrow Scholars Award, University of South Carolina; Trustees Scholarship, Ohio State University. • Alexa Marise D’Sa – Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University; Honors College Scholarship, Indiana University; National Merit Scholarship, Luxottica Retail Corporation; Star Award, General Electric Corporation; National Merit Scholarship, Fordham University. • Grace Maechling Debbeler – President’s Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Trustees Scholarship, The Ohio State University; University Scholarship, Saint Louis University. • Alexandra Marie DeChristopher – Academic Scholarship, United Italian American Society;

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: RMALONEY@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

Several Ursuline Academy seniors are honored at graduation. From left: Regan Harrell of Kenwood, recipient of the Centennial Spirit Award for being the senior who most captures the spirit of Ursuline; Andrea Bazzoli of Blue Ash, commencement speaker elected by her classmates to speak; Lisa Guay, Senior Scholar, one of the top three students in the class; President Sharon Redmond; Rebecca Callahan of Milford, Christian Leadership Award for best exhibiting leadership, kindness and compassion; Gwen Barron of Springfield Township, Archbishop McNicholas Memorial Award for being an outstanding senior; Catherine Mollman of Colerain Township, Senior Scholar, and Erika Stelljes, Senior Scholar. A total 129 students graduated, of which 89 percent were offered more than $15.5 million in scholarships.

• • •

• •

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Presidential Scholarship, Xavier University; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Science Scholar Scholarship, Indiana University-Purdue University. Alyson Marie Eagan – Cooper Scholars Award, University of South Carolina; Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University; Ignatious Magis Scholarship, Marquette University; Academic Scholarship, Clemson University; Provost Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Presidential Scholarship, University of Vermont; Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Cincinnatus Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Watson Memorial Scholarship, IBM Corporation. Ashley Rose Enyeart – Gateway Excellence Scholarship, Ohio University; Residence & Dining Scholarship, Ohio University; Trustee Scholarship, Kent State University; Honors Scholarship, Kent State University; Room & Board Scholarship, Kent State University. Andrea Lauren Fey – Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton. Meghan Fitch – University Scholarship, Seton Hall University; Dean’s Scholarship, American University. Melanie Elizabeth Flege – Ignatian Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Gateway Scholarship, Ohio University; ROTC Scholarship, U.S. Army; Room & Board Scholarship, Saint Louis University. Kathryn Lynn Florez – Hudson & Holland Scholarship, Indiana University; Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University; Hutton Honors Scholarship, Indiana University; Academic Scholarship, Fordham University; Ignatius Scholarship, Marquette University. Emily Marie Foster – Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Ignatius Magis Scholarship, Marquette University; Academic Scholarship, Catholic University. Erin Elizabeth Frederick – Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Honor Award, Xavier University; Creative Writing Scholarship, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. Christy Elizabeth Frietch – Kershner Scholarship, Miami University; Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University; Matthies Scholarship, Wittenberg University; Cooper Scholars Award, University of South Carolina; Ohio Achievement Scholarship, Miami University; Ohio Merit Scholarship, Miami University; Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Provost Scholarship, Ohio State University; Chamber of Commerce Scholarship, City of Evendale. Paige Marie Garber – Presidential Recognition Scholarship, Ohio Northern University; Provost’s Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; Colonel Scholarship, Centre College. Leah Alexandra Gilligan – Provost Scholarship, Saint Louis University. Lisa Marie Guay – Smith Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; Academic Scholarship, Brown University; Mesmer Scholarship, Washington University; Distinguished Merit Scholarship, Ohio State University; Distinguished Scholar Award, University of Delaware; Chemical Engineering Scholarship, University of New Hampshire; CEPS Engineering Scholarship, University of New Hampshire; Presidential Scholarship, University of New Hampshire; Academic Scholarship, Procter & Gamble Corporation; Academic Excellence Scholarship, University of Connecticut; Matthews Scholarship, University of Illinois; University Achievement Scholarship, University of Illinois; Rhees Scholarship, University of Rochester; Merit Scholarship, Clarkson University; Academic Scholarship, Clarkson University; National Merit Finalist Award, University of Arizona; Engineering Scholarship, University of Arizona; Vester Ivy Scholarship, Linda Vester Greenberg & Glenn Greenberg. Courtney Anne Gula – Knight’s Achievement Award, University of Central Florida; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton. Kelsey Diane Haines – Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Ohio Merit Scholarship, Miami University; Presidential Scholarship, Ball State University; National Teaching Fellows Scholarship, Elon University; Honors Fellows Scholarship, Elon University; Presidential Scholarship, Elon University. Julia Lauren Hall – Presidential Scholarship, College of Mount St. Joseph; Academic Achievement Scholarship, College of Mount St. Joseph. Regan Genevieve Harrell – University Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Academic Scholarship, Duquesne University; Scholars Program, Ohio State University. Jessica Christina Harvey – President’s Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Academic Achievement Award, Tulane University; Presidential Scholarship, Butler University; Loyola Scholarship, Loyola University Chicago; Deans’ Scholarship, Saint Louis University.

• Erika Eugenia Helgeson – Duncan Scholarship, University of Kentucky; Trustee Scholarship, Kent State University. • Kristen Mary Hodovanic – Damen Scholarship, Loyola University Chicago; Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University; McMicken Scholarship, Miami University; Ohio Achievement Scholarship, Miami University; Ohio Merit Scholarship, Miami University; Provost Scholarship, Ohio State University; Cincinnatus Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Trustees Scholarship, Purdue University; Provost Scholarship, University of Kentucky. • Ashley Marie Holbrook – Honor Award, Xavier University; Utz-Sahms Scholarship, Ursuline Athletic Boosters. • Madison Erin Hubbard – Recognition Scholarship, Indiana University; Woodrow Scholars Award, University of South Carolina; Trustees Scholarship, Ohio State University. • Christina Emily Jackson – Academic Excellence Scholarship, Pennsylvania State University; Merit Scholarship, Pennsylvania State University; President’s Award, Otterbein College; Scholar Award, Otterbein College; Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University; Hutton Honors Scholarship, Indiana University; Presidential Scholarship, Elon University; Honor Fellows Scholarship, Elon University; Elon College Fellows Scholarship, Elon University; Musical Theater Scholarship, Young Arts Presidential Scholarship, Baldwin-Wallace College. • Michelle Anne Jahn – Provost Scholarship, Ohio State University; Provost Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Trustee Scholarship, Kettering University; Academic Scholarship, Clemson University; Cincinnatus University Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Engineering Scholarship, University of Cincinnati. • Katelyn Eileen Johnson – Star Award, General Electric Corporation; Cincinnatus Century Scholarship, University of Cincinnati. • Jaclyn Elizabeth Kirsch – Deans’ Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Trustees Scholarship, Ohio State University; Distinguished Scholar Award, DePauw University. • Anna Lillian Kohnen – Presidential Scholar, Colby College; Chancellor’s Achievement Scholarship, University of Colorado; Chancellor Scholarship, University of Denver; Vester Ivy Scholarship, Linda Vester Greenberg & Glenn Greenberg. • Emma Schulte Kokenge – Senior Scholarship, Montgomery Women’s Club; Provost Scholarship, Ohio State University; Deans’ Scholarship, Saint Louis University; President’s Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton. • Kinsey Rose Kowalski – Cincinnatus Century Scholarship, University of Cincinnati. • Katherine Lynn Kraemer – Provost Scholarship, The Ohio State University; Provost’s Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; Trustee Scholarship, Xavier University; Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University; Founders Scholar, Denison University; Founders Scholarship, Kent State University; Trustee Scholarship, Kent State University; Room & Board Scholarship, Kent State University; Honors Scholarship, Kent State University; Honors Scholar in Residence, Kent State University. • Brittany Nicole Krekeler – Trustees Scholarship, Ohio State University; Prestige Scholarship, Indiana University; McMicken Scholarship, Miami University; Deans Merit Scholarship, Purdue University. • Erika Marie Krekeler – Trustee Scholarship, Kent State University. • Robin Michelle Krisher – Crimson and Gold Scholarship, University of Denver; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Trustee Scholarship, Kent State University, President’s Merit Scholarship, Seton Hall University. • Johanna Lea Krogh- Presidential Scholarship, St. Norbert College; Norbertine Scholars Award, St. Norbert College. • Amy Elizabeth Krzmarzick – Provost Scholarship, Saint Louis University; President’s Award, DePauw University; Academic Scholarship, DePauw University; Trustees’ Scholarship, Xavier University; Ohio Achievement Scholarship, Miami University; Ohio Merit Scholarship, Miami University; Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Academic Scholarship, Villanova University. • Abigail Mary Laden – Trustee Scholarship, Allegheny College. • Hanna Martin Lafranconi – Loyola Scholars, Loyola University Chicago. • Victoria Ann Lang – Lindner Honors Plus Program, University of Cincinnati; Cincinnatus Founders Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Demakes Legacy Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Academic Scholarship, Blue Ash Woman’s Club; Presidential Finalist Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Dean’s Scholarship, Northeastern University; Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University; Hutton Honors

Scholarship, Indiana University; Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Trustee Scholarship, Xavier University; Kershner Scholarship, Miami University; Ohio Merit Scholarship, Miami University. • Meagan Alicia Lechleiter – President’s Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Academic Honors Scholarship, Savannah College of Art and Design. • Mary Elizabeth LeMasters – Music Talent Scholarship, Northern Kentucky University; Leadership Award, Xavier University. • Anne Kathryn Lennon – Trustee Scholarship, Xavier University; Athletic Scholarship, Xavier University; Ohio Achievement Scholarship, Miami University; Matthies Scholarship, Wittenberg University; Provost Scholarship, Ohio State University. • Elizabeth Malant Luther – Billiken Residence Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Gautrelet Scholarship, Spring Hill College; Academic Award, Ohio Dominican University. • Emily Clare Mack – Trustees Scholarship, University of Findlay; Competition Scholarship, University of Findlay; Excellence Scholarship, Eastern Kentucky University. • Paige Paulina MacMorland – Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Trustees Scholarship, Ohio State University; Dean’s Scholarship, Saint Louis University. • Dominique Rosa Manetta – Academic Scholarship, Loyola University Chicago; Academic Scholarship, Indiana University; Academic Scholarship, Northeastern University; Academic Scholarship, Saint Louis University. • Lauren Elizabeth McMahon – Academic Scholarship, Bellarmine University; Academic Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Academic Scholarship, Wittenberg University. • Lindsey Hazel Mercer – Century Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; President’s Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Scholars Award, DePaul University. • Michelle Allison Merchak – Academic Scholarship, Ohio Dominican University; Fellows Program, Centre College; Provost Scholarship, Wittenberg University; Founders Scholarship, Eastern Kentucky University; Honors Program Scholarship, Eastern Kentucky University. • Rachel Jean Merchak – Academic Scholarship, Ohio Dominican University; Presidential Scholarship, Washington & Jefferson College; Liberal Arts Scholarship, Emory University; Trustee’s Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; Roach Scholarship, Miami University; President’s Award, DePauw University; John Carroll Scholarship, Georgetown University; Academic Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania; Academic Scholarship, Washington & Lee University; Ohio Achievement Scholarship, Miami University; Ohio Merit Scholarship, Miami University; Academic Scholarship, Georgetown University. • Catherine Mary Mollmann – Presidential Finalist Scholarship, Saint Louis University; President’s Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Trustees Scholarship, Purdue University; Merit Scholarship, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology; Mesmer Scholarship, Washington University; Star Award, General Electric Corporation. • Mary Elizabeth Morand – Merit Award, Palm Beach Atlantic University. • Jennifer Evangeline Murren – Ignatian Scholarship, Saint Louis University; University Scholarship, Saint Joseph University. • Kiley Elizabeth Naylor – Athletic Scholarship, University of Virginia. • Ellen Marie Neumann – Cincinnatus Century Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Shubert Honors Award, Ohio Wesleyan University; Trustee Scholarship, Ohio Wesleyan University; Dean’s Scholarship, American University; Academic Scholarship, Oberlin College; Women as Leaders Scholarship, Ohio Wesleyan University. • Sarah Maryann O’Connor – Trustee Scholarship, Xavier University; Provost Scholarship, Ohio State University. • Kourtney Brielle Parchment – Presidential Scholarship, Xavier University; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Laval Scholarship, Duquesne University; Academic Scholarship, Duquesne University; Arts & Sciences Scholarship, New York University; Eckhouse Scholarship, New York University; Academic Scholarship, Advocates for Youth Education; Academic Scholarship, Greater Cincinnati African American Scholarship Foundation; Vester Ivy Scholarship, Linda Vester Greenberg & Glenn Greenberg. • Terri Elizabeth Poxon-Pearson – Century Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Presidential Scholarship, American University; Elon College Fellows, Elon University; Honor Fellows, Elon University; Trustee Scholarship, Xavier University; President’s Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; Presidential Scholarship, Elon University; Chancellor Scholarship, Xavier University; Cooper Scholars Award, University of South Carolina. • Mary Clare Price – Hampton Award, Butler University; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Presidential Honors Award, John Carroll University; Magis Scholarship, Marquette University. • Melissa Kathryn Ridgley – Faculty Award, Drexel University. • Lindsay Kay Runyan – Athletic Scholarship, Kent State University; Trustee Scholarship, Kent State University. • Karalyn Marie Russo – Honors Award, Xavier University. • Margaret Sahms- Athletic Scholarship, High Point University; Athletic Scholarship, GardnerWebb University; Athletic Scholarship, Bellarmine University; Athletic Scholarship, Queens College; Athletic Scholarship, Wingate University; Athletic Scholarship, Appalachian State University. • Margaret Mary Schildmeyer – Academic Scholarship, Xavier University. • Kathleen Marie Schings – Maximus Scholarship, Ohio State University; Star Award, General Electric Corporation; Utz-Sahms Scholar-

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ship, Ursuline Athletic Boosters; Ohio Merit Scholarship, Miami University; Dillman Scholarship, Miami University. Meghan Morrissey Schmitt – Ignatious Magis Scholarship, Marquette University;Academic Excellence Scholarship, Marquette University; Academic Scholarship, Villanova University; Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University. Abby Marie Schneider – Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton. Holly Elaine Schnicke – Gateway Scholarship, Ohio University. Kelly Elizabeth Schroer – Gateway Scholarship, Ohio University; School of Music Scholarship, Ohio University; Trustee Award, University of Louisville; School of Music Scholarship, University of Louisville; Academic Scholarship, Transylvania University; Music Scholarship, Transylvania University; Dean’s Scholarship, DePaul University; Performing Arts Scholarship, DePaul University; Dean’s Scholarship, Loyola University New Orleans; Music Scholarship, Eastern Kentucky University. Katherine Mary Scoville – Academic Scholarship, University of St. Thomas; Journalism Institute Scholar, Indiana University; Gateway Excellence Scholarship, Ohio University; Residence & Dining Scholarship, Ohio University; Academic Scholarship, Villanova University; Dean’s Scholarship, American University. Chelsea Leanne Sensibaugh – Academic Achievement Scholarship, Wittenberg University. Christina Jie Shen – Cincinnatus Scholar, University of Cincinnati; Bolton Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University. Emma Catherine Shreve – Border State Scholarship, Marshall University; Cincinnatus Century Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Presidential Scholarship, College of Charleston; Academic Scholarship, College of Charleston; Provost Scholarship, University of Kentucky; Founders Scholarship, Kent State University. Molly Elizabeth Smith – Trustee Scholarship, University of Miami; Heald Scholarship, Illinois Institute of Technology; University Scholarship, Illinois Institute of Technology; Cincinnatus Scholarship, University of Cincinnati. Emily Elizabeth Spotts – Horrigan Scholarship, Bellarmine University; Provost Scholarship, Saint Louis University; Damen Scholarship, Loyola University Chicago; Academic Scholarship, Thomas More College; Ignatius Scholarship, Marquette University; Presidential Scholarship, LeMoyne College; Trustee Scholarship, Xavier University. Elizabeth Ransom Steffer – Treece Scholars, Xavier University; Buschmann Award, Xavier University. Emily Rose Steinway – Century Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Davis Scholarship, Miami University; Ohio Merit Scholarship, Miami University; McGuffey Scholarship, Miami University; Gosser Scholarship, United Auto Workers; Distinction Scholarship, Indiana University. Erika Michelle Stelljes – UC 21 Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Presidential Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; National Merit Scholarship, Case Western Reserve University; Academic Scholarship, Procter & Gamble Corporation; Cincinnatus Scholarship, University of Cincinnati; Trustees Scholarship, Purdue University; Academic Scholarship, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology; Choose Ohio First Scholarship, University of Cincinnati. Jacqueline Lee Stubbers – Honor Award, Xavier University. Stephanie Dawn Szarwark – Visual Arts Scholarship, University of Dayton; Academic Scholarship, University of Dayton; Academic Scholarship, Kemba Credit Union; Trustees Scholarship, Ohio State University. Kelly Arlene Tappel – Trustees’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Academic Scholarship, Clemson University; Engineering Scholarship, University of Dayton; Provost Scholarship, Saint Louis University. Serra Kathryn Temizer – Alumni Award, Denison University; Old Gold Honors Award, DePauw University; Tuition Award, Fordham University; Dean’s Award, Ohio Wesleyan University; Academic Scholarship, Wittenberg University. Shannon Marie Trame – Horrigan Scholarship, Bellarmine University; Academic Achievement Award, College of Mount St. Joseph; Presidential Scholarship, College of Mount St. Joseph; Loyola Scholarship, Loyola University Chicago; Dean’s Scholarship, University of Evansville; Provost Scholarship, University of Kentucky; Trustee Scholarship, Xavier University; Century Award, University of Cincinnati. Paige Elizabeth Umberger – Alumni Award Scholarship, Denison University; Cunningham Scholarship, General Electric Credit Union; Academic Scholarship, Ferguson Enterprises. Lauren Elizabeth Volker – Academic Award, Thomas More College; Elizabeth Ann Weingartner Academic Scholarship, DePauw University; Academic Scholarship, Denison University; Academic Scholarship, Wittenberg University; Academic Scholarship, Ohio Northern University; Academic Scholarship, Ohio University. Amy Marie Wells – Century Award, University of Cincinnati; Ohio Merit Scholarship, Miami University; Provost Scholarship, Ohio State University. Madeline Louise White – Presidential Scholarship, Valparaiso University; Dean’s Scholarship, Ohio Northern University; Ignatius Leadership Scholarship, Marquette University; Ignatius Magis Scholarship, Marquette University; Old Gold Honors Award, DePauw University. Melissa Nicole Wintz – Gateway Scholarship, Ohio University. Ashley Marie Young – Gateway Scholarship, Ohio University; Academic Scholarship, Wittenberg University; Deans’ Merit Scholarship, University of Dayton; Residence & Dining Scholarship, Ohio University. Laura Ann Zorko – Recognition Scholarship, Indiana University; Trustees Scholarship, Ohio State University.


SPORTS

July 29, 2009

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7118

Northeast Suburban Life

A7

RECREATIONAL

communitypress.com

Flames find themselves in World Series By Tony Meale

tmeale@communitypress.com

The Cincinnati Flames U10 baseball team has scorched through the competition this season, ripping off wins at a torrid pace. At 42-16, they were one of six U.S. teams to qualify for the World Series in Puerto Rico, July 24-27. “We’re very fortunate to be coached by Brian Conley,” team manager Roche Croy said of Conley, who spent time in the Cincinnati Reds’ minor-league system and was a hitting coach for the Dayton Dragons for four years. “The kids play the game like high school kids or college kids or even pros would. They don’t play it like most kids their age do.” The Flames faced some of the best competition in the country this season. They won an American Amateur Baseball Congress regional tournament in Toledo earlier this year, going 6-0 in the process. “We hit the baseball real well,” Croy said. “We had 48 hits in our first two games.” Leading the Flames offensively has been the coach’s son, Cal Conley, a switch-hitting catcher who dabbles at shortstop and leads the team in every hitting category. He has gone yard from both sides of the plate. “He’ll be something special,” Croy said. Other Flames contributing offensively are first baseman Logan Sabo, who is the fastest player on the team, and outfielder and second baseman Darren

Cincinnati Flames roster

Joey Cloran, Liberty Township Cal Conley, Loveland Austin Croy, Mason Matthew Davenport, Liberty Township Michael Grause, Western Hills Eric Hooper, West Chester Township Andrew Juelg, West Chester Township Tyler McDonough, Liberty Township Justin Moyer, Liberty Township Logan Sabo, Symmes Township Reid Strobl, West Harrison, Ind. Darren Baker, California (joins team in mid-season) Baker, who is the son of Cincinnati Reds Manager Dusty Baker. Tyler McDonough and Austin Croy have also made key contributions. The Flames also boast a plethora of talent on the mound; they are led by fireballers Andrew Juelg, who has a circle changeup in his repertoire, and Justin Moyer, who possesses a knuckle changeup. “They’re some of the better pitchers in the country,” Croy said. “They are high-velocity pitchers who know how to spot the ball well.” Because they won the AABC Tournament in Toledo – one of six regional tournaments in the country – the Flames qualified for the World Series in Puerto Rico. The six U.S. regional winners will be joined by the national champions from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic to play in

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO MLAUGHMAN@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

The Cincinnati Flames U10 baseball team has been one of the country’s best this season. From left: front, Logan Sabo, Joey Cloran, Trevor Conley (brother of team member Cal Conley), Carson Croy (brother of team member Austin Croy), Tyler McDonough, Cal Conley and Austin Croy; second row, Reid Strobl, Michael Grause, Matthew Davenport, Andrew Juelg, Justin Moyer and Eric Hooper. Back, Roche Croy, Dave Juelg and Brian Conley. Darren Baker is not pictured. an eight-team, double-elimination tournament July 24-27. “One of the most exciting things will be taking the kids (to Puerto Rico) so they find out just how good the baseball is down there,” Croy said. “The breed of baseball and enthusiasm and love for the game is something they’ll never see

again.” Croy said that seeing the eyepopping poverty in Puerto Rico will also be good for his players. “We’re going to give our uniforms to the (Puerto Rican team) as gifts,” he said. Still, the World Series should be an enjoyable experience for the Flames, as they hail from a city

that has a special place in the hearts of many Puerto Ricans. “The people there absolutely love the Reds; they love the Big Red Machine and how guys like Pete Rose and Johnny Bench played with such hustle and enthusiasm,” Croy said. “We’ll wear our Cincinnati uniforms with pride and dignity.”

Moeller QB picks Notre Dame By Mark Chalifoux mchalifoux@communitypress.com

College football superpowers engaged in a heated recruiting battle to land Moeller High School quarterback Andrew Hendrix and a winner has finally emerged from the pack. Hendrix has committed to Notre Dame. “I’m very relieved,” Hendrix said, “Towards the end, a lot of schools put on a lot of pressure, recruiting sites call a lot when you get down to your final decision, but once you make it things cool down.” Hendrix took a visit to Notre Dame in mid-June and stayed overnight with some of the players. He said that visit helped him finalize his decision. “That really put it over the top.

They were guys I could relate to and were a lot like myself and my classmates at Moeller,” he said. “The camaraderie they have with each other and knowing I could see myself as a part of it really put it over the top.” Ohio State was another bigtime program that heavily recruited Hendrix. Hendrix said he’s been a lifelong Buckeyes fan and not much of a Fighting Irish fan. That will change. “Now I’m definitely a fan,” he said. “I love the direction the program is going in. They started 11 freshmen two years ago and seven freshmen last year, so they will be deep this year. I’ll be going into a program that knows winning and will hopefully keep steamrolling and we’ll be talking about a national championship race soon.”

Academics are another sticking point for Hendrix, who is one of the top students in his class. “That is one of their strong points,” he said. “That and the network of alumni is phenomenal. That’s a huge plus when you’re out of college and looking for a job; the network is so big.” Moeller head coach John Rodenberg said he fielded more than a few calls from colleges about Hendrix and he thinks Notre Dame is a great fit for his quarterback. He said the team is excited anytime a player gets a scholarship to a big school. “Guys can see that with hard work you can be put in front of big schools when they are coming in, and being at Moeller is a great opportunity for that,” he said. “It gets the whole weight room fired up.”

Hendrix is one of several Division I prospects on the Crusaders’ football team and Rodenberg said he loves to see any of his players go on to the next level. “I work these guys hard and it’s my responsibility to the player and parents to take care of them,” he said. “That means making sure they are staying on top of their academics and helping them get better athletically. “I’m just as happy when a kid signs with Wittenberg or Mount St. Joe’s. Anytime a player gets an opportunity to fulfill a dream is awesome and having a chance to further your career and live your dream is what its about.” Hendrix said he’s most excited to finally be able to focus solely on the team and not on himself. “I’m putting 100 percent of what I have into working out with

FILE PHOTO

Moeller High School quarterback Andrew Hendrix was one of the most heavily recruited quarterbacks in the country. Hendrix decided to play his college football at Notre Dame after a recruiting battle between several college football superpowers. the team,” he said. “Other guys are tuning down their process too and we have a lot of dedicated guys. “I’m really excited for the start of the season. I think we have a really special class and a special team.”

Sycamore athletes encourage youth

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: MLAUGHMAN@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

The Sycamore Junior High School Athletic Board gets ready to help students at Winton Hills Academy. In front is Alex Miller. In middle, from left, are Tanner Strickland, Kelly McDonald, Becca Melvin, Bianca Rhodenbaugh, Alex Martinson, Mary Beth Reinhold, Samantha Wolkoff, Nichole Hamburg and Jessica Rabin. Back row: Sycamore Junior High Athletic Director Lisa Meyer, Ti Domhoff, Lindsey Neville, Stephanie Adamec, Jonathan Sussman, Yuri Karev, Colin Knowles, Emily Kissela, Matt Russel, Amelia Wells, Sarah Fretwell and parent representative Sharon Petko-Bunney.

The Athletic Board of Sycamore Junior High School is one of the most prestigious organizations in which students can be involved. The board members are selected by their seventh-grade coaches for demonstrating good character, sportsmanship, a tenacious work ethic and leadership. These students are a reflection of what we all believe the ultimate “Sycamore Aviator” should be. In addition, these young people demonstrate the traits of kindness, caring and respect for others. Recently, this group went to Winton Hills Academy and assisted with a field day for kindergarten through fourth grade. They supervised 10 stations of activities for the students demonstrating compassion and encouragement to the young children.

The PTO and Sharon PetkoBunney, parent, were in charge under the leadership of Lisa Meyer, athletic director. This activity is a small but sure way of giving back to our larger Cincinnati community and particularly to those in need. Sycamore students knew they had made a difference in the lives of young children. The athletic board is made up of Becca Melvin, Jessica Rabin, Tanner Strickland, Emily Kissela, Ti Domhoff, Biana Rhodenbaugh, Matt Russel, Mary Beth Reinhold, Samantha Wolkoff, Alex Miller, Kelly McDonald, Colin Knowles, Nichole Hamburg, Amelia Wells, Alex Martinson, Yuri Karev, Jonathan Sussman, Sarah Fretwell, Stephanie Adamec and Lindsey Neville.


A8

Northeast Suburban Life

Sports & recreation

July 29, 2009

New hockey organization checks in By Mark Chalifoux mchalifoux@communitypress.com

There will be a new hockey organization at Sports Plus, 10765 Reading Road, No. 3, for kids in the area as the Queen City Hockey Association holds tryouts for its first season of operation. Steve Penman, the president of the new organization, said his goal for the QCHA is to make it a comprehensive program. But, for that to happen, he said things would have to start slow. “We look to have four or five house league teams and have five A/AA travel teams and one tier 1 AAA hockey team,� Penman said of the plans for the first year

of operation. “We don’t have girls yet, unfortunately, and all of the age brackets aren’t filled yet. We’ll probably end up with somewhere around 100 players in the first year of the association.� Still, the impetus for the creation of the organization, Penman said, was to create a more comprehensive hockey program that would give more options for players who wanted to play at a higher level. Penman is no stranger to Cincinnati hockey as he’s been involved as a parent of players, as a coach and as the owner of the Queen City Steam, the city’s only Junior A hockey team. There is another hockey organization in the city, the

14U CINCINNATI RUSH BASEBALL TEAM

Currently looking for players for the 2010 season. We are an American League Team playing in the Southwest Ohio League. Our home field is located just minutes away from 275 and Montgomery Road. Players can not turn 15 before May 1, 2010.

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Contact: Scott Dickerson Cell: 513-256-3372 e-mail: cincinnatirush@gmail.com

Cincinnati Amateur Hockey Association. CAHA is the longtime youth hockey organization in the city. “We’re not trying to be another CAHA; they have done a nice job around here,� Penman said. “We want to take it to another level, particularly at the higher level of play. CAHA does not have AAAlevel hockey and we want to have a comprehensive program so the best players around here had a final outlet of where they could play as sophomores through seniors in high school.� The area’s major high school programs, such as Moeller or St. Xavier, are run through the OHSAA and not local organizations. “Some kids leave town to play hockey and we want to offer a different level of play for those who choose to go farther in hockey,� he said. “We will eventually have everything from the beginning player to all levels, including AAA, from age 8 on up through high school. It will take years to reach that goal though, it will not happen overnight.� Sports Plus is a partner in

the new QCHA. Penman said Sports Plus was a natural pick for him when he was looking for a rink for the Steam because of the facility and the surrounding entertainment for families. “People could bring their kids and have other things to do and it’s wonderful for teams coming in from out of town because there’s a lot to do nearby,� he said. “I feel Sports Plus is the most comprehensive ice facility in Cincinnati and our partnership with them has been everything, really.� Penman said Sports Plus has been a tremendous partner and is assisting in joint marketing efforts in addition to providing help with ice. Ultimately, Penman said the organization’s goal is to provide a hockey avenue at an affordable price but at a proficient level of play. “Cost is becoming a much more important issue than ever in today’s economy and you need the right program in place with the right partner, which Sports Plus is for us,� he said. Tryout information is available at cincinnati youthhockey.com.

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Knighted

The boys U9 CU Sycamore Black Knights captured the championship in the boys’ U9 Red division at the Creek Classic in Beavercreek, May 30 and 31. Team members are, from left: bottom row, Jack Stefani of Blue Ash, Justin Banke of Montgomery and Behruz Bozorov of Symmes Township; second row, assistant coach Kevin Banke, Ethan Long, Brian Cron of Montgomery, Sean Kopchak of Sycamore Township, Jake Hipskind of Hyde Park and head coach Doug Long; top row are Jack Trumpy of Montgomery, Braeden Long and Justin Grender of Sharonville. Not pictured, trainer Bobby Puppione.

SIDELINES Fall baseball sign-ups

The Kings Sports fall ball league is seeking teams and players for the 2009 season. The season begins the weekend of Aug. 29 and will run six weeks, through Oct. 11. All games are played at the Blue Ash Sports Center. Players at all ages can sign up and be assigned to a team for the fall season. The league offers coach pitch through high school teams with registration fees at $65 to $85 per player. Teams play eight to 10 games through the fall, all on weekends. Visit www.kingsfallball.com, e-mail kingsbaseball@hotmail.com or call 252-8625.

High school physicals

Beacon Orthopaedics at Harrison is conducting high school physicians from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. July 29. The physicals are for coaches, parents and athletes from grades seven to 12. Cost is $20 per physical; 50 percent is returned to school for sports medicine supplies. Complete comprehensive physicals are required for pre participation in sports before practice begins for

the upcoming 2009-2010 school year. Beacon Physicians and area specialists will examine: Height and weight, eyes, blood pressure screening, chest, lungs, abdomen, neck and back, upper and lower extremities. Ohio High School forms are requested with signed consent by parent or guardian: No exceptions. Forms may be obtained through school’s athletic department. Athletic shorts and shirts are required.

Baseball tryouts

The Cincinnati Riverbats baseball will hold tryouts for the spring 2010 baseball season 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Aug. 1-Aug. 2 at Lakota Plains Junior High School, 5500 Princeton Road, Liberty Township. Tryouts are for elite level players that will play in the 11-U age group. To qualify, players cannot turn 12 years old before May 1. The 11-U team will play a 45-55 game schedule and will also play in two or three World Series events. Contact coach Rick Kates at 3104500 or rickkates@yahoo.com or visit www.cincinnatiriverbats.org.

OHIO OHIO HEAT HEAT BASEBALL BASEBALL PROGRAM PROGRAM

OHIO HEAT

AMERICAN DIVISION TEAMS

15u OHIO HEAT American

     

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VIEWPOINTS

July 29, 2009

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

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There they go again Visitors to Cincinnati.com/ blueash posted these comments to a story about Rhinestahl Corp. planning to move from Blue Ash to Mason: “Another example of an employer not considering the city or even Hamilton County.” VirginianCSA “The exodus continues. I thought

CH@TROOM July 22 questions

Symmes Township trustees met last week to discuss the 2 0 0 9 F l o w e r Show and how to improve the event. W h a t changes would you like to see made if the show is to remain in Symmes Park? “In addition to having the major companies committed, decent parking for all attendees, especially the disabled. This means at least some hard surfaced parking area to permit the use of walkers, wheelchairs.” F.J.B.

Are you worried about a possible worsening of the swine flu pandemic this fall and winter? Why or why not? “The authorities have been working on a vaccine to combat it. “At this point I do not think they are sure of the medication necessary to solve the problem. “It would seem to me controlling the visitation of the areas experiencing the problem and making sure those that do, receive the vaccine, should help. “The greatest problem in the development of a vaccine is discovery of the type of flu we are experiencing.” F.J.B. “Honestly, I’m not worried about a possible worsening of the swine flu this fall and winter, because worrying won’t do a darn thing to avert the crisis, if indeed it does happen, though I hope it doesn’t. “I’m more worried about the damage being done to the structures of our country, like banking, the auto industry, and health care, by an ambitious narcissist who has no idea of the long-term negative effects that his unchecked meddling will produce.” B.B. “No, I’m not worried about swine flu going pandemic. This issue is already being engineered as something that will happen. “Fear and anxiety is being generated by officials to promote experimental, toxic, filler-laden vaccinations as the weapon of choice. CDC labs can only test 100 flu samples/day and they don’t count any death unless its own lab confirms the infection. “Pandemics are a regular feature of life on earth, and they occur with surprising regularity throughout world history. “There are common-sense rec-

“The once vibrant city of Blue Ash is no longer shining. All fingers point to the same city council that has been in office for years. Every single one of them is self centered and could careless about the residents and obviously now have lost their touch with the businesses. If new

Next questions Have you seen coyotes or other wild animals in your neighborhood? What can or should be done to lessen the threat of coyotes? What do you like and dislike about the health care proposals currently before Congress? Every week The Northeast Suburban Life asks readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answer to nesuburban@ communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line. ommendations for avoiding and treating the flu. Do your research and stay calm.” K.D. “H1N1 (swine) flu should be a concern for all of us regardless of age or place in life. Last spring’s start-up was mild in comparison to what the experts are predicting for fall season. “I think we continue our personal missions to wash hands often and encourage those people experiencing symptoms to stay away from schools, churches and the workplace. It is all of our responsibilities to be vaccinated and stay informed. “We need to help each other during yet another tough time in our history.” E.E.C.

July 15 questions

Do you think the economic stimulus plan is working, or should the federal government implement another round of stimulus packages? “The stimulus is obviously not working. Obama said we had to do it right away so that the unemployment rate would not go above 8 percent. Yet we are currently at 9.5 percent and certainly willl head north of 10 percent very soon. “But that should not surprise anybody, since, as the Republicans correctly pointed out, very little of the spending was planned to occur right away. Incredibly, most of the almost $800 million was not even budgeted for this fiscal year! How could they possibly think that would jumpstart the economy in 2009? “The only thing this is ‘stimulating’ is tired old liberal programs that they have wanted to implement for years and Democrat donors and special interest groups who will be the recipients of most of this money. “The stimulus needs to be reworked immediately into tax cuts for individuals and small businesses, which create most of our jobs. That money will then get put into the economy and stop this current slide.” T.H.

people are not elected into office this coming November then there will be absolutely no hope for this city. Even then, it may be too late. A huge fortune was spent on the recreation center while parts of the city are looking ‘tired’ and the rest run down. Makes no sense. Poor judgement. Poor leadership.” FreeToSpeak99 “Lower taxes, better services and amenities, excellent schools ... pretty simple stuff.” SeawayPlayboy

A9

CH@TROOM

communitypress.com

VOICES FROM THE WEB businesses would be tripping over each other to get into Blue Ash’s new rec center. I think this company knows the real deal with ol’ BA. The city knows residents will always vote ‘yes’ to increase taxes on businesses. Waltz has to go!” waltzhastogo

Northeast Suburban Life

“And this surprises you? I didn’t think so.” NOTaMajorMarket “New high tech jobs in Mason without a streetcar! “How can that be?” VirginianCSA ‘Mason has an array of restaurants and shopping, some within walking distance. Sure, downtown has all of that, but this is a manufacturing plant so obviously downtown wouldn’t work. Warren County and Mason work not only

Your input welcome

You can comment on stories by visiting Cincinnati.com and choosing your community’s home page: Cincinnati.com/blueash Cincinnati.com/montgomery Cincinnati.com/sycamoretownship Cincinnati.com/symmestownship with new businesses, but with established ones. I know from working there they try to meet with various company CEOs throughout the year to get their input.” perfectsense

Oh deer … time to slow down Recent posts and response from Jamie Green’s Moments in Montgomery blog at Cincinnati.com/Montgomery

What’s wrong with this picture

“Surprise is the greatest gift which life can grant us.” – Boris Pasternak quote (Russian poet, 1890-1960) “As I was driving down Montgomery Road the other day about 7 p.m. in full daylight, I almost stopped my car in the

middle of the road to stare. A gentleman was mowing his grass. Nothing unusual about that you might say. Then, you notice the two deer calmly munching on what must have been delicious clover . These deer were not more than 10 feet from the busy traffic of Montgomery Road and less than 30 feet from the noisy lawn mower. What surprised me the most was how calm they seemed – munching away and looking around like they did not sense any danger. “I, of course, did not stop to gawk because the cars behind me would have honked up a storm or worse yet caused a fender bender collision. But it did give me

About Moments in Montgomery

Montgomery resident Jamie Green is author of the Moments in Montgomery blog. To read her thoughts and post your comments, visit Cincinnati.com/Montgomery. a moment to observe some beauty and calmness in a very mixed up picture. It also reminded me that I need to take a moment out of my hectic day to enjoy some calmness of my own even if everything around me is a little chaotic.”

Trucking bill bad for country Rep. Jean Schmidt recently introduced legislation to increase the federal weight limit on tractortrailer trucks to 97,000 pounds from the current 80,000-pound limit and to increase the use of double trailers on our nations highways. I have serious concerns with Ms. Schmidt’s proposal. First and foremost, bigger trucks will result in more rollover accidents making our highways less safe for everyone. Ohio’s decision this past spring to raise the speed limit for heavy trucks to 65 mph combined with Schmidt’s proposal is a recipe for a public safety disaster. A basic physics equation holds that momentum equals mass times velocity. When you have significantly larger and heavier trucks traveling at higher speeds, the damage caused by accidents will be exponential, resulting in greater loss of life and limb. Indeed Gerald Donaldson, senior research director for the Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety says of Schmidt’s proposal: “More lives would be lost in large truck crashes” and “More bridges would be placed at an increased risk for catastrophic failure.” The danger is so great that

truck drivers themselves are upset at the prospect of having to deal with much larger vehicles. The Te a m s t e r s David union opposes legisKrikorian Schmidt’s lation, as do the Community families of truck Press guest accident viccolumnist tims. My second major concern is that our nation’s roads and bridges are already in bad shape and increasing the weight load and use of double trailers will result in even more degradation of our infrastructure. The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Highway Cost Allocation Study reports that large trucks already pay just half of the cost of the damage they cause to our highways. Taxpayers pay the difference. Schmidt’s bill therefore amounts to an unfunded federal mandate that will put even more stress on our federal, state and municipal budgets. Schmidt’s proposed legislation

is good for profits at large trucking businesses and companies like International Paper that are lobbying hard for Schmidt’s legislation. As a business owner myself, I am in favor of pro-business legislation, but not at the expense of the safety of our citizens and our country’s national interest. Rail transportation has been proven to be significantly cheaper over long hauls consuming far less energy. In terms of cost, safety and environmental impact, investment in our railway system to transport larger loads, faster is the best alternative. Schmidt’s legislation would undermine our railway system and indeed many rail groups oppose it. The federal government’s job is to promote the national interest and in this case we should be focusing efforts on modernizing our railway infrastructure. Schmidt would have us looking backwards; I think you agree that it’s time to look ahead. Above all public safety must not be compromised. David Krikorian is a Democratic candidate for Congress from Ohio’s Second District. He lives in Madeira.

GOVERNMENT CALENDAR BLUE ASH

City council – meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday of the month in the municipal building, 4343 Cooper Road.The next meeting is Thursday, Aug. 13.

MONTGOMERY

City council – meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month in city hall, 10101 Montgomery Road. The next meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 5. Work sessions begin at 7 p.m. two weeks before each regular session. The next work session is scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 19. Call 891-2424. Planning commission – meets at 7:30 p.m. the first and third Mondays of each month at city hall, 10101 Montgomery Road. The next meeting is scheduled for Monday, Aug. 3.

SYCAMORE SCHOOLS

Board of education – The board meets at 7:30 a.m. the first Wednesday of every month at Blue Ash Elementary School, 9541 Plainfield Road, in the Raymond Walters wing, and at 7:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at E.H. Greene Intermediate School, 5200 Aldine Drive, Blue Ash (unless otherwise announced). The next meeting is at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 5, at Blue Ash Elementary School, 9541 Plainfield Road, in the Raymond Walters wing. Call 686-1700.

SYCAMORE TOWNSHIP

The next meeting will be Thursday, Aug. 6. Call 791-8447.

SYMMES TOWNSHIP

Board of zoning appeals – meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday of the month (only if there is business) in the township administrative building, 9323 Union Cemetery Road. The next meeting is scheduled for Monday, Aug. 3. Call 683-6644. Trustees – meet at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month in the administrative building, 9323 Union Cemetery Road. The next meeting will be Tuesday, Aug. 4. Call 683-6644.

Trustees – meet at 7 p.m. first and third Thursday of the month at the governmental complex, 8540 Kenwood Road.

A publication of Northeast Suburban Life Editor .Dick Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com . . . . . .248-7134

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 248-8600 | 394 Wards Corner Road, Loveland, Ohio 45140 | e-mail nesuburban@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com


Northeast Suburban Life

July 29, 2009

From veterinary care to timely vaccinations—and clean and comfortable living conditions to plenty of fresh food and water—healthy, well-cared-for flocks and herds are essential to livestock farming. That’s why it comes as no surprise that Ohio livestock farmers go above and beyond to make sure their animals receive the best possible care.

For an Ohio livestock farmer,

taking animal care seriously just makes sense.

For Ohio livestock farmers, caring for animals is not just a job…

it’s a way of life.

Learn more about animal care on Ohio farms at www.ohiolivestock.org

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We d n e s d a y, J u l y 2 9 , 2 0 0 9

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

CATCH A STAR

AMANDA HOPKINS/STAFF

Chip Brinkman is retiring as Symmes Township road foreman after 19 years with the township. His last working day was July 22 and his retirement begins Aug. 31. The township will host an open house from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 7 at the Township Safety Center to honor Brinkman.

Symmes road foreman retiring By Amanda Hopkins ahopkins@communitypress.com

After 19 years with Symmes Township and 30 total in the business, road foreman Chip Brinkman is headed for retirement at the end of August. Brinkman’s last day in the office was July 22, but he had saved enough vacation days to take off his last few weeks on the job. Brinkman, who grew up in Deer Park and now lives in West Chester Township, began his career while he was still a student at Moeller High School with Amberley Village, working with the road crew for 11 years and finding his way from the very bottom to the top. In October 1990, Brinkman took the job with Symmes Township when it was only he and another employee. Now, in 2009, Brinkman oversees nine employees and works on everything from doing permits, checking on nuisance complaints and laying out the road program. Brinkman said the best thing about working in the township was the crew “I was blessed to have a good crew,” Brinkman said. “What more could you

Retirement open house

The Symmes Township Board of Trustees is hosting an open house Friday, Aug. 7, for Jerome “Chip” Brinkman, who is retiring after 19 years with the township. Brinkman, who started with Symmes Township in October 1990, has served as the township road foreman for the past 10 years. The open house will be from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Symmes Township Safety Center, 8871 Weekly Lane. ask for?” After his retirement from the township, Brinkman said he hopes to find another job doing the same type of work until his wife retires in seven years. Where it will be, he still is unsure. “The Lord’s going to open the door. I just don’t know which one yet,” Brinkman said. After his wife retires, Brinkman said they plan to upgrade their camper and travel across the country. “I want to see the whole thing,” Brinkman said. The board of trustees will host an open house from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 7, at the Township Safety Center to honor Brinkman.

THINGS TO DO Summer studio

Art Institute of Cincinnati is hosting Summer Studio from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 3, at Art Institute of Cincinnati, 1171 E. Kemper Road, Springdale. Workshops are open to high school students and educators with an interest in design. It is daily through Aug. 7. The cost is $25. Registration is required. Call 751-1206.

Mexican fiesta

Chabad Jewish Center is hosting a Mexican Fiesta from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 2, in Cafe Chabad at Chabad Jewish Center, 3977 Hunt Road, Blue Ash. The Mexican buffet includes fish tacos, fajitas, tortillas, burritos, nachos, guacamole and more. There is a cash bar available. The

event is open to adults only. The cost is $22; half price admission for friends. Reservations are required, available online. Call 793-5200.

Museum luncheon

Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum is hosting the Herbal Delights Luncheon from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Aug. 3, at the Richardson History House at the Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 201 Riverside Drive. Proceeds to benefit the Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum. The cost is $20. Reservations are required. Call 683-5692.

Share your events Go to communitypress.com and click on Share! to get your event into the Northeast Suburban Life.

Participants Lydia and Geoff Hirsh of Symmes Township.

Symmes couple finds weight loss secret

The final meeting of the weight loss challenge had all the all the suspense of a whodunit, without the crime scene. It came down to the final weigh in on the final day at 6 p.m. Who would be the biggest loser? With only 1.02 percent separating first and fifth place finishers, the tally was in after eight weeks of monitoring diet and exercise. Who lost the highest percentage of their initial body weight? It had all started weeks earlier when 23 people joined at Madeira Health Care Fitness Center with the common goal of losing weight. These weight loss challenges, hosted by MHCC and wellness coach Beth Steur, run on the premise of making healthy nutritional and lifestyle changes that will maximize weight loss. Adherence is promoted through a weekly meet-

The American Hospital Association’s Hospitals & Health Networks magazine has named TriHealth as one of the nation’s “100 Most Wired Hospitals and Health Systems” in 2009. More than 1,300 hospitals were considered for the award. In addition, TriHealth was one of just 25 to also be named “Most Wireless.” The “Most Wired” distinction is given to hospitals with an impressive use of information technology for: • safety & quality; • customer service; • public health and safety; • business processes; • workforce management.

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ing, e-mails and competition for a cash prize for the top three finishers. “Most people know what they are supposed to do to lose weight,” Steur said. “We offer support and some helpful hints and try to help people figure out what works for them. Sometimes it’s adding more protein, or eating more for breakfast. Sometimes it’s changing behaviors about food.” This was a tight race by some serious competitors. Notably, there were two married couples, Lydia and Geoff Hirsh of Symmes Township and Peggy and Jay Linne of Madeira, and previous participant, Kathy Hyatt who challenged to the end. Ultimately, the top prize went to Lydia Hirsh, who lost 12.75 pounds and 7.822 percent of her body weight; second place, Kathy Hyatt, with a loss of 11.75 pounds and 6.953 percent;

and third place to Peggy Linne, who lost 11 pounds and 6.832 percent ; honorable mentions to Jay Linne, who lost 13 pounds and 6.824 percent, and Geoff Hirsh, who lost 14 pounds and 6.796 percent. Beyond the competition, their stories are fueled by being healthier, losing some weight and getting more out of life. The next weight loss challenge will begin July 28 and run 12 weeks. Meetings and weigh-ins will be on Tuesdays at Madeira Health Care Center. The cost of the program is $35 with $25 of that going to the prize money for the top three finishers. For more information or to register, contact Lauran McHaffie at 561-6400 or madeirafitness@premierhcm.com; or Beth Steur at 390-7468 or bsteur@cinci.rr.com.

TriHealth among ‘most wired’ and ‘most wireless’ in the nation

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The “Most Wireless” distinction, given to just 25 hospitals in the nation, recognizes those who score highest for the number of products available and utilized in a wireless environment. This is the third time TriHealth has received the “Most Wired” award and the second time for “Most Wireless.” Six Ohio hospitals/systems were named “Most Wired.” TriHealth is the only hospital/hospital system in Ohio and Kentucky to win the double honor of “Most Wired” and “Most Wireless.” TriHealth chief information officer Rick Moore believes the double distinction is a result of TriHealth’s infor-

mation technology plan that has been implemented over the past five years. “We have an impressive number of physicians using electronic medical records for patient care and using electronic signature technology for signing patient reports and electronic prescribing. We are pleased that, since our last award in 2005, most of our progress was noted in the area of safety and quality,” he said. Moore also believes the technologically-advanced new towers at Bethesda North and Good Samaritan hospitals, and Bethesda Medical Center at Arrow Springs, were reasons for the “Most Wireless” distinction.


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Northeast Suburban Life

July 29, 2009

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 3 0

ART EXHIBITS

Lost Paintings of Charley Harper, 10 a.m.8 p.m. Fabulous Frames Sycamore, 10817 Montgomery Road. More than 50 original commissioned works acquired from the Ford Motor Company’s private corporate art collection. Through Aug. 8. 489-8862. Sycamore Township.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Health Screenings, 9 a.m.-noon, Owens Chiropractic and Rehabilitation Center, 7319 Montgomery Road. Blood pressure, weight, foot and spinal screenings. Free. Registration required. 784-0084. Silverton.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Blue Ash Concert Series, 8 p.m.-11 p.m. Oldies and classic rock music by the Remains. Blue Ash Towne Square. Cooper and Hunt roads. Bring seating. Free. Presented by City of Blue Ash. 745-6259. Blue Ash.

Fitness for Two, 5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Deep water strengthening, toning and cardiovascular conditions for moms-to-be. $45 for four weeks. Registration required. 985-6730. Montgomery.

FARMERS MARKET

Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 8255 Spooky Hollow Road. Grass-fed Black Angus beef, freerange chicken, produce, lamb, turkey, eggs and honey. 891-4227. Indian Hill. Turner Farm, 2:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 7400 Given Road. Large variety of local and seasonal vegetables. Flowers such as zinnias, cosmos, sunflowers, strawflowers, blue salvia and more. 561-7400. Indian Hill.

FOOD & DRINK

Irresistible Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Graeter’s, 7369 Kenwood Road. Discounts, smoothie tastings, giveaways, “Cone Hole,” “Pin the Cherry on the Sundae,” trivia and more. All ages. 721-3323. Kenwood.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Little Miss and Mister Series Story Time, 11 a.m. Barnes & Noble, 7800 Montgomery Road. 794-9440. Kenwood. F R I D A Y, J U L Y 3 1

ART EXHIBITS

Lost Paintings of Charley Harper, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Fabulous Frames Sycamore, 4898862. Sycamore Township.

CIVIC

Computer and TV Recycling Drop-Off, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 2trg, 946-7766. Blue Ash.

FARMERS MARKET

Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 891-4227. Indian Hill. Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 561-7400. Indian Hill.

FOOD & DRINK

Friday Night Grillouts, 5 p.m.-8 p.m. Music by Ben Alexander. Lake Isabella, 10174 Loveland-Madeira Road. Outdoor covered patio or air-conditioned dining area. Includes specialty, à la carte and children’s dinners. Music, fishing demonstrations and naturalist’s wildlife programs. $3.75$8.85; parking permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 791-1663. Symmes Township. Wine Bar Tasting, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. The Wine Store, 9905 Montgomery Road. 50 cents per taste. 984-9463. Montgomery.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Through The Garden Restaurant, 791-2199. Blue Ash. Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Shooters Sports Grill, 774-7007. Loveland. Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Old Saloon, 7450654. Kenwood. Happy Hour, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Apsara Restaurant, 984-9804. Blue Ash.

S U N D A Y, A U G . 2

FARMERS MARKET

RECREATION

EXERCISE CLASSES

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All-Night Fishing, 8 p.m. Lake Isabella, 10174 Loveland-Madeira Road. Rent rowboat or bring your own. Four horsepower or less electric and gas motors permitted. Fishing ticket good for 12 hours. Light visible 360 degrees required on boats after dark. All ages. $9.50 for 12-hour permit, free ages 12 and under and ages 60 and up; rowboat rental $9.39 six hours, $11.27 12 hours; vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 791-1663. Symmes Township. S A T U R D A Y, A U G . 1

ART EXHIBITS

Lost Paintings of Charley Harper, 10 a.m.6 p.m. Fabulous Frames Sycamore, 4898862. Sycamore Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Fitness for Two, noon-12:45 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 985-6730. Montgomery. Pilates Reformer, 10:40 a.m.-11:40 a.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Designed to strengthen and lengthen, focusing on the core. $35 per class, introduction series required. Registration required. 985-6730. Montgomery.

FARMERS MARKET

Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 891-4227. Indian Hill. Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 561-7400. Indian Hill.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Bar Tasting, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. The Wine Store, 984-9463. Montgomery.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Through The Garden Restaurant, 791-2199. Blue Ash. Happy Hour, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Apsara Restaurant, 984-9804. Blue Ash.

PUBLIC HOURS

Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 1 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 201 Riverside Drive. Bonaventure House with exhibits, gift shop and library, 1797 Rich Log Cabin and 1879 Bishop-Coleman Gazebo. $3. 683-5692. Loveland. Gattle’s, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Gattle’s, 8714050. Montgomery. Lake Isabella Fishing Boathouse, 7 a.m.-7 a.m. Lake Isabella, 521-7275. Symmes Township. Loveland Castle, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Loveland Castle, 683-4686. Symmes Township. Kenwood Towne Centre, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Kenwood Towne Centre, 745-9100. Kenwood.

Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 891-4227. Indian Hill.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Through The Garden Restaurant, 791-2199. Blue Ash. Happy Hour, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Apsara Restaurant, 984-9804. Blue Ash.

PUBLIC HOURS

Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 1 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 683-5692. Loveland. Lake Isabella Fishing Boathouse, 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Lake Isabella, 521-7275. Symmes Township. Loveland Castle, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Loveland Castle, 683-4686. Symmes Township. Kenwood Towne Centre, noon-6 p.m. Kenwood Towne Centre, 745-9100. Kenwood.

RECREATION

Private Sports Lessons, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Choose from basketball, baseball, soccer, volleyball, football, and lacrosse. Ages 5 and up. $250 for six. Presented by Sports Progression. 335-5283. Montgomery. Little Miami River Kayak Trip, 11 a.m. Lake Isabella, 10174 Loveland-Madeira Road. Begins at Lake Isabella, continues 7.5 miles down river. All equipment provided. Bring lunch. Must complete Quick Start program prior to trip. $25, $20 ages 6-18. Registration required, available online. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-2345. Symmes Township.

RELIGIOUS COMMUNITY

Pastor’s Prayer Time, 9 a.m.-9:25 a.m. Living Word Fellowship, 9781 Fields Ertel Road. Steve and Tara Peele, senior pastors. Presented by Equipping Ministries International. 742-1100. Loveland. Mexican Fiesta, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Chabad Jewish Center, 3977 Hunt Road, Cafe Chabad. Mexican buffet includes fish tacos, fajitas, tortillas, burritos, nachos, guacamole and more. Cash bar available. Music by Zumba. Adults only. $22; Half price admission for friends. Reservations required, available online. 793-5200. Blue Ash.

SUPPORT GROUPS

RECREATION

All-Night Fishing, 8 p.m. Lake Isabella, 7911663. Symmes Township. Lady Distance Classic 5K/10K & Family Festival, 7:15 a.m.-11 a.m. Blue Ash Recreation Center, 4433 Cooper Road. Check-in begins 6 a.m. Race: women and children only. Family festival includes pony rides, moon bounce, tattoo art and hands on activities. $30 for race. Registration required, available online. Presented by Fleet Feet Sports. 793-8383. Blue Ash. Private Sports Lessons, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Choose from basketball, baseball, soccer, volleyball, football, and lacrosse. Ages 5 and up. $250 for six. Presented by Sports Progression. 335-5283. Montgomery.

Learning, Education, Networking, and Support (LENS), 12:15 p.m. Church of the Saviour United Methodist Church, 8005 Pfeiffer Road. Information and support for anyone dealing with mental illness/brain disorder. Presented by National Alliance on Mental Illness of Hamilton County. 3513500. Montgomery. M O N D A Y, A U G . 3

ART EXHIBITS

Lost Paintings of Charley Harper, 10 a.m.8 p.m. Fabulous Frames Sycamore, 4898862. Sycamore Township.

CIVIC

Computer and TV Recycling Drop-Off, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 2trg, 946-7766. Blue Ash.

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: RMALONEY@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

Go Bananas is hosting Bobcat Goldthwait at 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 3, at Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place, Montgomery. The comedian, writer and director performs. The cost is $15. Call 984-9288.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Old Saloon, 7450654. Kenwood. Happy Hour, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Apsara Restaurant, 984-9804. Blue Ash.

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

No Saints, No Saviors, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Shady O’Grady’s Pub, 9443 Loveland-Madeira Road. Allman Brothers Tribute Band. 7912753. Loveland.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Bobcat Goldthwait, 8 p.m. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place. Comedian, writer and director. $15. 984-9288. Montgomery.

PUBLIC HOURS

Gattle’s, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Gattle’s, 8714050. Montgomery. Lake Isabella Fishing Boathouse, 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Lake Isabella, 521-7275. Symmes Township. Loveland Castle, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Loveland Castle, 683-4686. Symmes Township. Kenwood Towne Centre, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Kenwood Towne Centre, 745-9100. Kenwood. T U E S D A Y, A U G . 4

ART EXHIBITS

Lost Paintings of Charley Harper, 10 a.m.8 p.m. Fabulous Frames Sycamore, 4898862. Sycamore Township.

CIVIC

Computer and TV Recycling Drop-Off, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 2trg, 946-7766. Blue Ash.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Team In Training Meeting, 6:30 p.m. Montgomery Inn Montgomery, 9440 Montgomery Road. Learn more about Team In Training. Meet past participants, coaches, cancer survivors and Team In Training staff members. Free. Presented by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Team In Training. 3612100. Montgomery.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

FARMERS MARKET

Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 891-4227. Indian Hill. Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Turner Farm, 5617400. Indian Hill.

FOOD & DRINK

Irresistible Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Graeter’s, 721-3323. Kenwood.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Blue Ash Concert Series, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Music by Miami University Steel Band. Blue Ash Towne Square. 745-6259. Blue Ash.

MUSIC - KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke Night, 9 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel Blue Ash, 5901 Pfeiffer Road. Lobby Lounge. 793-4500. Blue Ash.

PUBLIC HOURS

Gattle’s, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Gattle’s, 8714050. Montgomery. Lake Isabella Fishing Boathouse, 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Lake Isabella, 521-7275. Symmes Township. Loveland Castle, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Loveland Castle, 683-4686. Symmes Township. Kenwood Towne Centre, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Kenwood Towne Centre, 745-9100. Kenwood.

W E D N E S D A Y, A U G . 5

ART EXHIBITS

Lost Paintings of Charley Harper, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Fabulous Frames Sycamore, 489-8862. Sycamore Township.

CIVIC

Computer and TV Recycling Drop-Off, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 2trg, 946-7766. Blue Ash.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Fitness for Two Yoga, 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Road. Prenatal yoga. $45 for four weeks. Registration required. 985-6730. Montgomery.

FARMERS MARKET

Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 891-4227. Indian Hill. Turner Farm, 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m.Turner Farm, 561-7400. Indian Hill.

FOOD & DRINK

Irresistible Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Graeter’s, 721-3323. Kenwood.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Divorce Care for Kids, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Montgomery Community Church, 11251 Montgomery Road.Ages 5-12. Free. 5872437. Montgomery. Grief Share Support, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Montgomery Community Church, 11251 Montgomery Road. Free. 587-2437. Montgomery.

EDUCATION

Baby-sitting Training Camp, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Daily through Aug. 5. American Red CrossBlue Ash Chapter, 10870 Kenwood Road. Earn certification in Child and Infant CPR/AED and First Aid. Bring bag lunch. Ages 11-15. $150. Presented by American Red Cross Cincinnati Area Chapter. 7924000. Blue Ash.

FARMERS MARKET

Greenacres Farm Store, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Greenacres Farm Store, 891-4227. Indian Hill.

FOOD & DRINK

PROVIDED

Macy’s Music Festival Cincinnati will be held at Paul Brown Stadium at 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 31 and Saturday, Aug. 1. Fantasia, pictured, Anita Baker, John Legend, Robin Thicke and more are scheduled to perform. For tickets, visit www.macysmusicfestival.com.

Herbal Delights Luncheon, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum, 201 Riverside Drive. Richardson History House. With Nancy and Mike Rumping portraying Simon and Betsy Kenton. Tea time dress. Vendors, tours, dulcimer music and raffle. Benefits Greater Loveland Historical Society Museum. $20. Reservations required. 683-5692. Loveland. Irresistible Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Graeter’s, 721-3323. Kenwood.

PROVIDED

The Cincinnati Shakespeare Company puts on the comedy about a man who really likes the thought of getting married in “Engaged.” It is July 30-Aug. 2 and Aug. 6-9, at the company, 719 Race St., downtown. Tickets are $20-$26. Call 513-3812273 or visit www.cincyshakes.com.


Community | Life

July 29, 2009

Northeast Suburban Life

Summertime and the living is … ? I wouldn’t be surprised if Psalm 23 was written in summertime. You know how it goes, “He makes me lie down in green pastures; he leads me beside still waters; he refreshes my soul.” Summer invites tranquility, feeling at one with nature, choosing some positive and relaxing times in our lives. Here are some of the lessons of summer. Slow down: “There is more to life than increasing its speed,” said Gandhi. Most of us moderns feel obsessively driven. We stay on the treadmill all year long. We fear the silence of solitude or experience a certain personal guilt if our list of expectations isn’t accomplished immediately. Contemplative monk Thomas Merton considered excessive busy-

The Wellness Community hosts Evening of Hope Partygoers can enjoy the casual elegance of the second annual “Evening of Hope ... Celebration of Life” presented by Mercy Health Partners. This spectacular autumn event benefiting the free cancer support programs at The Wellness Community (TWC) will be Saturday, Oct. 3, at Historic Laurel Court, 5870 Belmont Ave. Following a special VIP reception at 6 p.m., all attendees will enjoy dinner and music by the Rusty Griswolds beginning at 7:30 p.m. In addition to the great food and great band, partygoers will also have the opportunity to bid on great silent auction items. Tickets are $100 for the main event only or $150 if the VIP reception is included. To order tickets or for information, visit www. thewellnesscommunity.org/ cincinnati/events/ or call 791-4060. In keeping with the “Evening of Hope” theme, The Wellness Community will take advantage of the evening event to honor a special couple, Julie Geisen Scheper and Chuck Scheper, who have leveraged their own experiences with cancer to bring hope to many others struggling it and other health difficulties. As former participants at The Wellness Community, the Schepers have become coaches and mentors for many people in the community dealing with cancer and have actively promoted TWC’s mission. Mr. Scheper is the chief operating officer for Great American Financial Resources and serves as chairman of the National Board of The Wellness Community. Following a 25year career in counseling, Mrs. Scheper is very active as a volunteer advocate. In addition to co-chairs April Davidow of downtown and Linda Green of Indian Hill, other event committee members include Aaron Bley of Harrison, Betsy Baugh of Springfield Township, Judy Dombar of Blue Ash, Kate Gonzalez, Flannery Higgins, Pete Horton, Rita Jones, Christy Neyer of East Walnut Hills, Molly Sandquist and Anita Schneider of Amberley Village. Call 791-4060 or visit www.thewellnesscommunity.org/cincinnati.

ness a way of doing violence to ourselves, “There is a pervasive form of contemporary violence … and that is activism and overwork. The rush and pressure of modern life are a form, perhaps the most common form, of its innate violence. To allow oneself to be carried away by a multitude of conflicting concerns, to surrender to too many demands, to want to help everyone in everything, is to succumb to violence. It destroys our own inner capacity for peace.” Summertime is freneticisms antidote. It’s the time for which hammocks and lawn chairs were made, bicycles, tree-lined walking paths, picnic baskets and the song lyrics “slow down, you move too fast, you gotta make the morning last.” Notice: St. Benedict, the monk

who founded the Benedictine Order, had a novel approach to help his novices live in the present moment – which is the only place we really live. During their novitiate he asked them to temporarily take a special vow – Fidelity To The Present Moment. It meant a deliberate, concentrated giving of attention to what is immediately before you. “Age quod agis,” in Latin, “Do what you are doing.” He wanted them to notice and feel even the mundane. If washing dishes, notice the look and feel of the swirling soapy water, the sound, the smoothness, the comforting circular motion of their hand. This vow of attention required them to let go of the tendency of trying to do multiple things at once

(no praise for multitaskers), of acting thoughtlessly, or to live in the past and worry over the future. The present moment has a fullness all its own. Take off your shoes: Literally and figuratively summer says “Take off your shoes and walk in the grass, feel the earth on which you live, take a deep breath. Life’s too short for tight shoes. Loosen up and stop frowning. Touch the earth, the trees and flowers. At least for awhile resign as General Manager of The Universe.” Many burdens we carry are not even ours to carry. Summertime says “Take that load off your shoulders and let me refresh you.” Enjoy: That’s what the table server says as he or she places our food before us, “Enjoy!” We like the invitation. God says the same

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thing as he spreads before us the smorgasbord of life that Genesis says he found so good. One of my favorite prayers in a Sunday Father Lou Mass says: Guntzelman “Lord, open our eyes to see Perspectives your hand at work in the splendor of creation and in the beauty of human life. Touched by your hand, our world is holy. Help us to cherish the gifts that surround us, to share your blessings with our brothers and sisters, and to experience the joy of life in your presence.” To which I say a great, “Amen!” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reach him at columns@community press.com or contact him directly at P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242. Please include a mailing address or fax number if you wish for him to respond.

Make sure debt is yours before you pay it During these tough economic times many people are faced with unpaid debts. In addition to bills you truly owe, you may also be hit with collection letters from companies who just hope you’ll pay. Some of these are socalled Zombie debts, those more than seven years old that have been sold to debt collection companies. Such bills often don’t belong to you, but are sent anyway because so many years have gone by and people have moved. Nancy Beasley of Sharonville got such a bill

for a debt dating back to 1994. “I went to the Web site of the bill colleccomHoward Ain tion pany and Hey Howard! there’s no Web site listed. All I found were links to complaints,” she said. This bill collector wanted Beasley to pay more than $2,000, for a bill belonging to a company of which she never heard.

“So I called the company and told them and they said they would erase the debt. I just want other people to be aware of these letters coming out,” Beasley said. Clara E. Martin of Anderson Township also got a collection letter for a debt that’s four years old. It was for an unpaid parking lot fee. But, upon close examination she found the license number for the car listed never belonged to her. “If they had the correct license number then I would say, ‘Well, this could possibly be something legitimate.’ But it’s not,” she

How to enter: You can enter your baby into the contest through mail or online. To mail in an entry complete the form and include a clear, color or black/white photo of your baby along with a $20 entry donation to Newspapers In Education. NO PHOTOS WILL BE RETURNED. To enter online visit our Web site at MomsLikeMe.com/cincycontests and complete the entry form. All photos must be received by 5:00pm Monday, August 17, 2009. PHOTOS WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE ENQUIRER. How to win: Sunday, August 30, 2009 all entrants will appear in The Enquirer and the first of three voting rounds will begin. We ask that all votes be accompanied by a donation to the Newspapers In Education program. Our Baby Idol contest is just one of the many fun and innovative programs we use to raise money to promote p literacyy in our local schools.

said. Although she wrote the bill collector and disputed the bill, it didn’t seem to make any difference. “Just recently I received another letter from them. This letter is not different than the first one, so this is not in response to what I wrote,” Martin said. So I told Martin to send another letter to the bill collector saying she doesn’t owe the debt – and send the letter by registered mail so they have to sign for it. That way you have proof they received it. She did that and has not

heard from them again. Under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you need to send such a letter to protect your rights. If you feel the debt is not yours, tell the bill collector in writing to provide proof it belongs to you. Do not admit the debt is yours unless you are sure. Troubleshooter Howard Ain answers consumer complaints and questions weekdays at 5:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. newscasts on WKRC-TV Local 12. You can write to him at Hey Howard, 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Prizes: There will be one (1) First Place Winner, one (1) Randomly Selected Winner and one (1) Runner-Up Winner. First Place Winner and Randomly Selected Winner will each receive a $500.00 Kroger gift card, a Gold Level Cincinnati Zoo family membership for the 2010 season and a $100 Portrait Innovations gift card. Runner-Up Winner will receive a $500 Kroger gift card. Rules: All photographs must be of a baby or infant born on or after July 26, 2006. Baby’s name, Parent’s name and phone number should be written on the back of the photo. You must be the parent or legal guardian of the baby in the photograph in order to enter the contest. Professional photographs are allowed, with faxed copyright release from the photographer. We reserve the right to refuse a photograph submission that the staff defines as unacceptable or inappropriate.

My Name Name__________________________________________ Phone _____________________________________________ Address_____________________________________________________ City/State/Zip _______________________________ E-mail ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Baby’s Birth Date: __________________ Baby’s Name: __________________________ Baby’s First Initial of Last Name: _______ Yes! Enter my baby in the contest and accept my donation of $20 to benefit Newspapers In Education. (check box on the right)

I am enclosing a check

I am enclosing a money order

Make checks payable to Newspapers In Education.

I am paying with a credit card: Visa MasterCard Discover Amex # ______________________________ Exp. Date ____________ Signature ____________________________________________

Photo Release — I hereby grant The Enquirer Publishing and all its entities permission to use the images of my child ________________________, solely for the purposes of Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, Inc.’s Baby Idol 2009 promotional material and publications, and waive any rights of compensation or ownership thereto. Parent Signature ________________________________________ Date _________________________________________________

Mail to: The Enquirer 2009 Baby Idol, 312 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202. Photo deadline: 8/17/2009 NO PURCHASE OR DONATION REQUIRED TO ENTER. ALL FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS APPLY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand Baby Idol 2009 Contest is open to Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky residents who are 18 years or older and a parent or legal guardian of a child at the time of entry. Employees of The Enquirer Lend-A-Hand, The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Co., Inc., and each of their respective affiliated companies, and advertising and promotional agencies, and the immediate family members of, and any persons domiciled with, any such employees, are not eligible to enter or to win. Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 8/30/09 and ends at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 10/5/09. Beginning at 12:01 a.m. (EST) 7/26/09 and ending at 11:59 p.m. (EST) 8/17/09, Enter by submitting a photo of your baby and a completed entry form. Entries must be submitted by a parent or legal guardian, 18 years or older. Children must have been born on or after 07/26/06 and Sponsor reserves the right to verify proof of age. Entries with incomplete or incorrect information will not be accepted. Only one (1) entry per child. Multiple births can be submitted as 1 entry with 1 photo. Enter online at MomsLikeMe.com/cincycontests. Enter by mail or in-person: complete an Official Entry Form available in The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Kentucky Enquirer, The Community Press and Recorders in Ohio & KY and at The Enquirer Customer Service Center, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202. All entries must be received by 11:59 p.m. (EST) 8/17/09. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries and votes received. 1 First Place Winner will receive a $500.00 Kroger gift card, a Cincinnati Zoo Gold Level family membership for the 2010 season (ARV:$164.00), and a $100 Portrait Innovations gift card. 1 Randomly Selected Winner will receive a $500.00 Kroger, a Cincinnati Zoo Gold Level family membership for the 2010 season (ARV:$164.00), and a $100 Portrait Innovations gift card. 1 Runner Up Winner will receive a $500 Kroger gift card. Winners will be notified by telephone or email on or about 10/7/09. Participants agree to be bound by the complete Official Rules and Sponsor’s decisions. For a copy of the prize winners list (available after 10/11/09) and/or the complete Official Rules send a SASE to Baby Idol 2009 c/o The Enquirer, 312 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 or contact Kristin Garrison at 513.768.8135 or at kgarrison@enquirer.com.


Northeast Suburban Life

Community | Life

July 29, 2009

Chocolate ’chips’ in to elevate zucchini bread

Are You Considering Cataract Surgery?

I’ve been picking my Italian round zucchini, my Lebanese zucchini and my regular zucchini every day. I’ll make stuffed zucchini for supper tonight and if I have time, a chocolate zucchini bread. I wanted to share that recipe since it’s a little different than the norm.

Do you notice...

• Blurry Vision? • Colors that Appear Faded? • Difficulty Seeing to Read or Drive? • Glare and Halos Around Lights?

Chocolate zucchini bread/cake

...You may have Cataracts!

From an anonymous reader. I haven’t tried this yet but it looks delicious. Let me know how you like it. It’s a cross between a bread and a cake, so either name is appropriate.

TRUST the Best for Cataracts...

11⁄2 cups shredded zucchini 1 cup flour 1 ⁄2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⁄4 teaspoon baking powder 1 ⁄4 teaspoon salt 1 ⁄2 to 3⁄4 teaspoon cinnamon 1 ⁄4 teaspoon allspice 1 ⁄2 cup canola oil 1 ⁄2 cup sugar 1 ⁄2 cup light brown sugar 2 large eggs

If you’re a senior and worried about Cataracts, you’ll find dedicated professionals who care about your vision at Cincinnati Eye Institute. CEI offers the latest advancements for improving your vision after Cataract surgery - ReSTOR, ReZOOM, and Crystalens - lenses that may reduce your dependency on glasses. And with the experience of treating over 13,000 Cataracts a year, now is the time to see the tri-state’s leaders in eye care!

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0000347105

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1 teas p o o n vanilla 3 ⁄4 cup s e m i s w e e t chocolate chips

Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

Preheat oven to 3 5 0 degrees. Spray 9by-5 loaf pan. Set aside shredded zucchini. Whisk together flour, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and allspice. Set aside. Beat oil, sugars, eggs, and vanilla until well blended and fold in zucchini. Add flour mixture, mixing just until combined. Fold in chips. Bake until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, about 55 to 65 minutes. Place on wire rack to cool 10 minutes, then remove and finish cooling.

Mary Simon’s Catalina dip

From Rose Kutschbach – her mom’s recipe, an all-time favorite. “Mom passed away in ’95 but memories will always be there for us,” she told me. Well said! 1 pound cream cheese, softened 16 oz. Catalina salad dressing Garlic salt to taste

Mix with mixer until smooth and creamy, but thick consistency. Use vegetables, crackers, chips or pretzels for dipping.

Baked pasta and chicken

I made this for the grandkids and they (and the adults) loved it.

2 cups whole wheat or regular pastina (or any short pasta) Olive oil 2 chicken breasts, cut up – a good 3 cups or so 1 nice onion, chopped – about 11⁄2 cups 2-3 teaspoons garlic or bit more to taste 28 oz. diced tomatoes with juice 3 cups mozzarella Parsley, chopped Salt and pepper to taste Topping: 1 cup bread crumbs and Parmesan cheese mixed Butter or substitute Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cook pasta until just tender, about five minutes. Drain and set aside. Meanwhile, film bottom of pan with olive oil over medium heat. Add chicken and cook for a couple of minutes. Add onions and garlic, stirring to combine, and cook until onions are soft and chicken is cooked, about five minutes. Put into bowl with pasta. Add tomatoes, mozzarella,

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Two unusual zucchini: Lebanese and Italian round. parsley, salt, and pepper. Stir to combine. Put in sprayed casserole. Sprinkle crumb mixture on top, dot with small bits of butter. Bake until golden brown, about 30 minutes.

Tips from Rita’s kitchen

*Water vs. Juice for kids in sports: For Bill, a Northeast Suburban Life reader, whose kids are playing sports. Hydration is paramount. If an activity lasts less than one hour, water is fine. If it lasts 60 to 90 minutes or longer, a 6 to 8 percent carbohydrate sports drink or diluted fruit juice (to dilute juice from concentrate – and try to use 100 percent juice – use at least twice the water recommended) is good. * Information from “The Official Snack Guide for Beleaguered Sports Parents” which yours truly, along with three talented colleagues, wrote!

Coming soon

Boccone Dolce for Jean Jimmy Gherardi’s not so Hidden Valley Ranch dressing Tink’s Blueberry Buckle Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional and family herbalist, an educator and author. E-mail her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Or call 513-248-7130, ext. 356. Visit Rita at www.Abouteating.com.

Jewish community lecture event Everyone encounters difficulties and struggles, but do they make people stronger and more resilient, or do they weaken the spirit and destroy morale? These are just some of the questions to be tackled and resolved Aug. 6 by Rabbi Abba Perelmuter, noted speaker and founding

rabbi of Long Beach, Calf.’s popular Shul by the Shore, with the lecture “Making Your Way Through the Hard Life: Are You a Wonderer on a Journey?” at Chabad Jewish Center of Blue Ash. The lecture is a program of the Goldstein Family Learning Academy, Chabad’s educational wing.

The lecture will be 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 6, at Chabad Jewish Center, 3977 Hunt Road in Blue Ash. The event is open to the public; admission is free with online reservations before Aug. 1; $10 at the door. Call 793-5200, e-mail rabbi@ ChabadBA.com or visit www.ChabadBA.com.

Montgomery ENT Center We would like to announce

Dr. Amy Holland

our newly licensed Audiologist.

Joining our experienced team of specialists.

Dr. Grosinger

Dr. Byrd

Wilmington Office 1150 W. Locust Suite 500

937-382-2000

Dr. White

Cincinnati Office 9200 Montgomery Rd., Suite 2B

513-891-8700

Check our Website SPECIALS! www.montgomeryent.com


Community

July 29, 2009

Northeast Suburban Life

B5

BUSINESS UPDATE Mary Ray has joined the Montgomery office of Coldwell Banker West Shell.

New business

Nancy’s Naturals Salon & Day Spa, a new full-service salon, has opened at 9526 Main St. in downtown Montgomery, north of Remington Road. Services, available to both women and men, include cosmetology, medical massage therapy, manicures, pedicures, facials and reflexology. Nancy’s Naturals is open daily, Monday through Saturday. For an appointment, call 787-4269 or visit www.nancysnaturals.org.

Top wealth manager

The Financial Management Group, Inc. , an independent, fee-only financial advisory firm, has been named by Wealth Manager magazine as one of the “Top Wealth Managers” in the U.S. Each year, Wealth Manager evaluates and ranks advisory firms across the county based on their client services, value of client assets and uniqueness of their service models. This is the ninth consecutive year that FMG has been ranked top in the country. The firm is at 10979 Reed Hartman Highway in Blue Ash.

For more information, call 984-6696 or visit www.fmgonline.com.

Carter hired

Jeff Carter has joined McCord Insurance Agency as an agent. A graduate of Northern Kentucky University, Carter has more than six years of experience in personal and commercial insurance. McCord is an independent insurance agency at 9200 Montgomery Road in Montgomery. The agency provides insurance and risk management solutions to the business community. For more information, call 793-8998.

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: RMALONEY@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

SVdP receives check

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul was presented with a $ 2,500 check from Alternate Solutions Homecare of Blue Ash to support SVDP’s annual Fan Drive. The Fan Drive relies on the community at large to donate fans and window unit air conditioners, as well as monetary donations to purchase fans and air-conditioning units, to help provide proper cooling and ventilation to those in need this summer. Monetary donations are being accepted at all Huntington Bank branch locations throughout Greater Cincinnati from through Aug. 9, or can be sent directly to St. Vincent de Paul, 1125 Bank St., Cincinnati, OH 45214. For Fan Drive donation drop off points visit www.SVDPcincinnati.org. From left, accepting the check; Julie Rack, St. Vincent de Paul Development Director and resident of West Chester; presenting the check, Michelle Duvall, Alternate Solutions Homecare licensed practical nurse, and resident of Morrow; Albin Waldbillig, Alternate Solutions Homecare registered nurse and resident of Hamilton.

Amenities & Services

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO RMALONEY@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

Look for this tiny velociraptor, or one of his relatives, in Loveland the week of July 13 or in Blue Ash the week of July 27.

The raptors have escaped Cincinnati Museum Center’s Raptor Wranglers have spotted one of their escaped Velociraptors in your community! Be the first to find a ferocious, feathered, two-inch hatchling in your neighborhood, and you’ll be rewarded with two free tickets to “Dinosaurs Unearthed,” two tickets to the Robert D. Lindner Family OMNIMAX Theater’s current film, “Dinosaurs Alive,” and entered into a drawing for an annual family membership. Become a friend of Museum Center on Facebook to receive three clues as to the whereabouts of this escaped baby raptor. Catch ’em quick, before their parents leave Cincinnati for good! Week of July 27 – Blue Ash

Movies, dining, events and more Metromix.com

The New Senior Living Community In A Neighborhood You Love. Yours.

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The regular price on all men’s & women’s SAS shoes in stock. Also Women’s Sandals & Handbags.

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Coupon valid thru 8/31/09.

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Not valid with any other offers.

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JOIN THE MOMVERSATION. Created for and by moms, MomsLikeMe.com is where moms who live near you hang out - and let it all out. New moms. Working moms. Stay-at-home moms. Where you can share stories, swap advice, make friends and even make plans to meet up live.

• Scheduled transportation to appointments • Housekeeping

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Ray hired

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Northeast Suburban Life

Lloyd Memorial High School Class of 1974 – is having its 35th class reunion Friday, July 31 through Sunday, Aug. 2. The class will meet at 5:15 p.m., in front of the high school for a tour of the school at 5:30 p.m. A party at Florence Nature Park will follow from 6-

July 29, 2009

11:30 p.m., rain or shine. Cost is $4 per person. Classmates and guests are welcome, and should bring their own drinks, coolers and a snack to share. From 7-11 p.m., Aug. 1, will be the reunion with dancing at Brodnick Hall at St. Timothy Church in Union. Cost is

Reunions $25 per person. Beer is $1, but soft drinks are included. Live music by Power House and a hot meal. At 10:30 a.m., Aug. 2, will be Christian Fellowship at the Railroad Park in Erlanger, led be classmates Scott Denham and Larry Bubb. Contact Debbie Schneider at 513-

977-3035 or e-mail debbie.schneider@scripps.com. New Richmond High School Class of 1999 – will have its 10-year reunion at 7 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 1, at Great Scott in Amelia. RSVP to nrhs.classof99@gmail.com and

join the group on Facebook and MySpace. Princeton Class of 1999– will be having its 10-year reunion. Classmates will meet 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 1, at Sharon Woods. Contact info for the committee is as follows: Kelli Martin, 678-516-6460; Will Munn, 513227-4481; Anna Dickson, 917605-4579; Rhonda Bristol, 513602-2891. Christman Family Reunion and Pig Roast – to be conducted Saturday, Aug. 8, on the 98-year-old Christman farm at 1955 Ethelynn Lane, Goshen. Come after 1 p.m. Bring lawn chairs and a covered dish, and something to keep it hot or cold as dinner isn’t until 4-5 p.m. Drinks and tableware will be provided. There will be games, swimming and a lot of time for visiting. Call Bill Christman at 7222870, Dick Christman at 257-5811 or Bob Christman at 722-3103. Amelia High School Class of 1984 – is having its 25th year reunion from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, with a picnic at Sycamore Park in Batavia (www.parks.clermontcountyohio.gov/sycamore+pa rk+map+8x11.pdf). Admission is free. Classmates should bring their own lunch. Afterward, food and spirits are planned at Great Scotts (www.1greatscott.com) from 6 p.m. to close. Separate tabs are available. RSVP to Wini Foster at 866-433-7543, or e-mail whatif0103@yahoo.com. Glen Este High School Class of 1979 – The Glen Este High School Class of 1979 reunion committee is planning its 30-year reunion for Aug. 8 at the Eastgate Holiday Inn. Any classmates interested in attending the reunion should contact Kelly Clements Blom at kkb7761@aol.com or 513-9320164 with your name, e-mail address (please put “Reunion” in as your subject), mailing address and telephone number. Princeton High School Class of 1974 – Is planning a 35th class reunion for Saturday, Aug. 8, at the Fairfield Banquet and Convention Center. Pricing is $85 per couple or $45 for a single if the tickets are bought before July 1. After that date, a couple is $95 and singles are $50. For more information, e-mail Debbie (Owens) Fuson at princetonhs1974@yahoo.com. Taylor High School Class of 1989 – The 1989 graduating class of Taylor High School is conducting its 20-year reunion at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 8, at The Madison, 740 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. Cost is $45 per person, and dinner will be served. Come out for an evening of catching up with old friends, dancing, eating, drinking and having fun. Amelia High School Class of 1989 – The 1989 senior class of Amelia High School is conducting its 20th class reunion Aug. 9 at Coney Island’s Moonlight Pavilion. If you are a member of the class or know of anyone who is, contact Connie Weisenborn-Heilman at Connie heilman@hotmail.com or at 513-752-7390. Milford High School Class of 1989 – is having its 20-year reunion Friday, Aug. 14 and Saturday, Aug. 15. A pre-reunion gathering is scheduled for 7 p.m. Friday, at Greenies in Milford at 1148 Ohio 28, Milford. On Saturday, the reunion will be from 7 to midnight, at the Radisson Hotel Cincinnati Riverfront Bluegrass Ballroom. Dress is summer dressy/semi formal. Tickets must be purchased before the event, and will not be available at the door. Mention the Milford High School 1989 Class Reunion when making reservation to get a discounted rate. Reservations must be made by July 15. Everyone that reserves a hotel room at the Radisson will receive a welcome bag. The reunion committee is putting a slide show together for viewing during the reunion. Old and new photos can be e-mailed to Jeff Jounson at 89milfordeagles@gmail.com. Reunion dinner is $45. Cost includes dinner, beer, wine, soft drinks, dancing and door prizes. To sponsor the event, contact Jennifer Lewis at jllawrence@lawrencefirm.com. Visit www.milfordclassof1989.com. St. Dominic Class of 1988 – is having a reunion from 7-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 15, at St. Dominic. Email Angela (Fischer) Seiter at angelaseiter@hotmail.com for information or to register. Clermont Northeastern High School Alumni – is planning a second alumni weekend for Aug. 14-16. Weekend activities include a Friday evening social hour, a Saturday evening dinner/dance at the Fastiques and Sunday picnics and gatherings for various classes. Cost for the dinner and dance, which starts at 6:30 p.m. is $25 per guest. The Class of 1959 is gathering at Lake Lorelei on Sun-

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day, Aug. 16. Alumni are also asked to contact friends and family who are also alumni about the weekend. To sign up, e-mail cnegrads@aol.com, or Shirley Shipley at skship66@yahoo.com. Norwood High School Class of 1979 – Is conducting its 30-year reunion from 7:30-11:30 p.m. Aug. 15, at the Blue Ash Banquet Center. For information, contact Karen (Faulkner) Parker at 513351-6616 or e-mail her at kparker@fuse.net. Clermont Northeastern High School – Alumni weekend is scheduled for the weekend of Aug. 14 and 15. Friday night, all the classes are invited to meet their friends at the following locations: 1958-1969: Quaker Steak and Lube, 59- Chamber Drive, Milford; 1970-1979: Putters, 5723 Signal Hill Court, Milford; 19801989: Greenies, 1148 Ohio 28, Milford; 1990-1999: Buffalo Harry’s, 1001 Lila Ave., Milford; 2000-2009, Buffalo Wild Wings, 175 River’s Edge Drive, Milford. Saturday night is a dinner dance, starting at 6:30 p.m. with a social hour at the Fastiques Building at the fairgrounds. Send name, telephone number, address, e-mail address and graduating class to: Clermont Northeastern Alumni Association, 5327 Hutchinson Road, Batavia, OH 45103. Cost is $25 per person. Deadline is July 31 for reservations. Our Lady of Visitation Class of 1989 – is celebrating its 20-year reunion at 8 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 22, at Top Shelf Sports Bar and Grille, 6507 Harrison Ave. For questions or to RSVP contact Katie Abrams-Muldoon at katie_abrams@yahoo.com. Classes of 1964 Amelia and Glen Este and other 1960 classes – will celebrate their 45th reunion on Aug. 29, at Pattison Park in Owensville. Classmates from other 1960s classes are invited and welcome to attend. E-mail for more information: JerryBargo@aol.com or call Jerry at 859-341-8123 or Ken Ellis at 513-753-4035. Greenhills High School class of 1984 – Committee members including Angelo Zolotas, Karen (Lampert) Pizzimenti, Diane (Witherby) Shapiro and Karen (Henry) Bender are planning a reunion for August. Class members are asked to update their address, phone number and e-mail address by emailing the information to: ghs25threunion@aol.com. Anderson High School Class of 1954 – is conducting its 55th year reunion, Friday, Sept. 11, Saturday, Sept. 12 and Sunday, Sept. 13. For details call Wayne Wykoff at 513-321-7109, or Kirs Schwegler Wilshire at 859-441-7560. From 7-10 p.m., Friday, the group will meet at AJ’s Roadhouse. On Saturday, at 7 p.m., the group will meet at Vito’s Restaurant in Ft. Thomas and on Sunday, there will be a picnic at noon at Woodland Mound Park off Nordyke Road. Withrow High School Class of 1944 – Will celebrate the 65th anniversary of its graduation with a reunion luncheon on Wednesday, Sept. 16, at the Touch of Elegance, 5959 Kellogg Ave. Any class members and families of that year are invited to attend. Contact Bob McGrath at 513-871-3631, or e-mail him at RMGrath@fuse.net. Clermont Northeastern Class of 1999 – will celebrate its 10-year reunion Friday, Sept. 18. Organizers are still looking for some classmates. Contact Maryann Huhn at 859-391-3375, or e-mail cne1999@yahoo.com. Include name, e-mail address, mailing address and telephone number. Glen Este Class of 1969 – is conducting its 40th Reunion on Sept. 26 at Ivy Hills Country Club. Those who are in this class and haven’t been contacted are asked to notify Cathy Wilmers Recker at 2651283 right away.

The Bellevue High School Class of 1969 – is looking for graduates and close friends to celebrate the 40th anniversary of its graduation. The reunion is being planned for the weekend of Oct. 2 in Bellevue. Anyone knowing graduates or wishing further information should contact sandrawetzel@cinci.rr.com. The 1959 graduating class of Resurrection School – in Price Hill is planning a 50-year reunion for Oct. 10. If you are a member of the class or know someone who was, please call either Eleanor (Kraft) McSwiggin at 941-4619, Bob Honkomp at 921-3762 or Jack Lisk at 921-3670 for more information. Amelia High School Class of 1959- a reunion is scheduled for 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7, at the Holiday Inn, Eastgate. For more information, call Rosalind (Fell) MacFarland at 752-8604.


Religion Armstrong Chapel United Methodist Church

“Divorce Care,” a 13-week program that addresses emotional issues associated with divorce, is being offered Sept. 8-Nov. 30. The sessions are offered free of charge from 7-9 p.m. at the church. Experts on topics such as anger, resentment and loneliness will conduct the meetings in a support group setting.Contact Melanie Stearns at 561-4220. The chapel is at 5125 Drake Road, Indian Hill; 561-4220.

Chabad Jewish Center

The center is hosting a Mexican Fiesta from 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 2, in Cafe Chabad. The Mexican buffet includes fish tacos, fajitas, tortillas, burritos, nachos, guacamole and more. There is a cash bar available. Music is by Zumba. The event is open to adults only. The cost is $22; Half price admission for friends. Reservations are required, and are available online. Call 793-5200 or visit www.chabadba.com. The address is 3977 Hunt Road, Blue Ash; 793-5200.

Church of God of Prophecy

The church hosts Sunday School at 10 a.m. and worship is at 11 a.m. Sundays. Bible Study is at 7 p.m. Wednesdays. The church is at 8105 Beech Ave., Deer Park; 793-7422.

Church of the Saviour United Methodist

School Supplies are being collected for the children at Wesley Chapel in Over-the-Rhine. Vendors are needed for the Fall Craft Show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7. Crafters and vendors are invited to call the church for details. Summer Reading Group will discuss “Rebecca” by Daphne DuMaurier from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Monday, Aug. 31. Call the church for details. COS Readers will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 27, at the Harper’s Point Panera to discuss this year’s classic, “The Great Gatsby,” by F.Scott Fitzgerald. Contact the church for details. Looking ahead, September’s book will be “The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief,” by Francis S. Collins. Disciple Bible Study is open for registration for fall classes. Disciple Bible Study is an intensive 32-34 week study of the Bible that includes elements of fellowship, prayer, video, Bible study and discussion. Call the church for details and a list of classes. Give Moms a Break is from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings. It is open to children 6 months-kindergarten. The cost is $10 for one child and $15 for families of two or more. Reservations can be made by calling the church office. The church is at 8005 Pfeiffer Road,

About religion items

The Community Press welcomes news about a special service, rummage sale, dinner, bazaar, festival, revival, musical presentation or any special activity that is open to the public. Deadline: Two weeks before publication date. E-mail: nesuburban@ communitypress.com with “religion” in subject line. Fax: 248-1938. Montgomery; 791-3142; www.cos-umc.org.

Connections Christian Church

The church has contemporary worship at 10:30 a.m. Sundays. The church is at 7421 East Galbraith Road, Madeira; 791-8348.

Epiphany United Methodist Church

Worship times are: Contemporary worship at 5 p.m. Saturdays, contemporary worship at 9 a.m. Sundays and traditional worship at 10:30 a.m. Sundays. Epiphany has an informal support/care group for those who have family members suffering with dementia and Alzheimer’s. The group meets Thursday mornings, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Please call Pastor Lisa to make your reservation. Epiphany is offering Career Transitioning Ministry. It offers practical, personal and spiritual support for those who have lost their jobs or are concerned about losing their job, and for those who are able and willing to help those people. The group meets at 7 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays at Epiphany United Methodist; and the second and fourth Tuesdays at River Hills Christian Church. The event is open to all. Contact Arlene Johnston at ajohnston@buckhorninc.com; Larry Poole at ltsofc@aol.com; or Matt Baker at mbaker78@cinci.rr.com. The church is at 6635 LovelandMiamiville Road, Loveland; 6779866.

Loveland Presbyterian Church

All youth groups now meet at 6 p.m. every Sunday night beginning with supper, a short worship service and group sessions. The church is at 360 Robin Ave., Loveland; 683-2525; www.LPCUSA.org.

Loveland United Methodist

The new service times are 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. for the Traditional Service, 9:40 to 10:40 a.m. for the Contemporary Service and Sunday School and 11 a.m. to noon for the Blended Service and Sunday School.

Membership At Loveland UMC – The first step is to attend an “Explore LUMC Breakfast,” where you’ll have an opportunity to learn more about Loveland UMC. Childcare is provided. Breakfast is held 9-10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 19; and Saturday, Nov. 14. Join the United Methodist Women from 9:45 a.m. to 11 a.m. the first Thursday morning of each month for UMW, a time of fellowship, devotion and ministry at LUMC. The purpose of the UMW is “to know God and to experience freedom as whole persons through Jesus Christ; to develop a creative, supportive fellowship; and to expand concepts of mission through participation in the global ministries of the church.” The church is at 10975 S. Lebanon Road, Loveland; 683-1738.

Mount Washington Presbyterian Church

The church’s summer worship schedule is at 8:30 a.m., worship will be on the east lawn. At 10 a.m., worship will be in the sanctuary. Office hours will also change for the summer. They are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The church is at 6474 Beechmont Ave.; 231-2650; www.mwpcchurch.org.

New Church of Montgomery

The church conducts worship at 10:30 a.m., Sundays and Divine Providence Study Group the first four Sundays of the month from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. The church is located at 9035 E. Kemper Road, Montgomery; 4899572.

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church Summer worship hours are 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday worship times are 9 and 10:30 a.m. The annual Reds Game is at 1:10 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 2, versus the Colorado Rockies. A free concert

July 29, 2009

follows the game. The cost is $11. Pieces For Peace meets at 7 p.m. every Monday. Work on quilts for those in need, no experience needed. All are welcome. The church will host Lifeshapes, which are discipleship classes, at 7 p.m. Wednesdays. Lifeshapes are a series of eight lessons that teach tools to grow discipleship. L.I.F.E. (Loveland Inter Faith Effort) is collecting items for the program Fundamental Learning Materials for students in need. LIFE is currently collecting: Book bags, colored pencils, filler paper, erasers, book covers, folders (all types), glue, glue sticks, pencil boxes, pencils, pens, markers, scissors, 3-ring binders, 3-by-5 index cards, highlighters, compasses and protractors. No crayons, spiral notebooks or college rule filler paper. Bring them directly to the pantry at the church. The church is at 101 South Lebanon Road, Loveland; 683-4244.

River Hills Christian Church

Thriving Moms is a group for moms of infants through high school students; meets weekly to receive encouragement and instruction, make friends and have fun; held 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.; child care provided. There is a Christian counselor as the parent coach, as well as a mentor mom. Call 583-0371. The church is at 6300 Price Road, Loveland; 677-7600.

St. Paul Community United Methodist Church

Northeast Suburban Life

the scripture reading Ephesians 4:25-5:2. Communion will be offered on this day. The church is at 8221 Miami Road, Madeira; 891-8181; www.stpaulcommunityumc.org.

Sycamore Christian Church

Sunday Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Bible Study is at 9 a.m. every Sunday. The church is hosting Ladies WOW Study Group (Women on Wednesdays) at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month. The event includes light refreshments and a study of Beth Moore’s “Stepping Up.” The church hosts Adult and Youth Bible Studies at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. The church is at 6555 Cooper Road, Sycamore Township; 891-7891, www.sycamorechristianchurch.

Trinity Church

Open registration is currently being conducted at Trinity Child Development Center, 3850 East Gal-

Prosser - Hammer

Elizabeth Hurd of Harpswell, Maine and Paul Prosser of Cundy’s Harbor Maine are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Ellen "Ellie" Prosser to Mark Hammer, son of Victoria Hammer and Michael Hammer of Cincinnati, Ohio.

711 East Columbia • Reading

SmokeFree Bingo Do O ors 5:00pen pm

aries Prelimin 5 Start 6:4

PROGRESSIVE GAME $7600 & GROWING

Call Cathy at 513-494-1391 to get on mailing list for monthly specials. Ca specials

Save the Animals Foundation BINGO

11330 Williamson Rd. off Cornell, in Blue Ash TUESDAY & FRIDAY Evenings - Doors Open 6pm

Preliminary Games 7:00pm - Reg Games 7:30pm OVER 25 DIFFERENT INSTANTS

To place your

BINGO ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290

braith Road. Half-day preschool classes will begin in the fall for 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds. The registration fee is $50 and health forms are required by the State of Ohio. Space is limited. Call 791-4015 for more information and a tour of the center. Trinity Child Development Center (TCDC) has met the qualifications for the National Guard Child Care Program. Families of loved ones currently deployed in support of the Global War on Terror can have their preschool tuition paid by the Advocates for the National Guard Bureau of the Departments of the Army and Air Force. TCDC will be able to give a qualifying family the toll free phone number of the Advocates Program that will take them through the application process and collect all of their paperwork. Tuition is paid directly from the program to TCDC. Call 791-4015. The church is at 3850 East Galbraith Road, Dillonvale; 791-7631.

Adams-Gelbaugh

St. Paul Church services are 8:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. for Traditional Worship and 9:30 a.m. for Contemporary Worship with Praise Band. Childcare is provided for all services. The church is continuing the summer series “Being an Efficiently Effective Family for Christ” Sunday, Aug. 2, with the message “Fending Off Family Feuds-I” based on

MT. NOTRE DAME H.S. - EVERY TUESDAY EVE.

B7

The bride-elect attended Roanoke College and is a student at the University of Maine. The groom-elect is a 1998 graduate of Indian Hill High School and 2003 graduate of Miami University Farmer School of Business. Mark is the grandson of Margie Hammer of Cincinnati, Ohio, and the late Walter Hammer and Janet Van Velzel of Lakeland, Florida, formerly of Cincinnati, Ohio, and the late Arthur Van Velzel. An October wedding is planned in St. Petersburg, Florida. The couple will reside in Tampa, Florida.

David Keith Adams, Loveland and Gwen Marie Gelbaugh, Upper Sandusky, would like to announce their engagement and up coming wedding. The groom is the son of David and Karen Adams, Loveland. His fiance is a daughter of Ken and Cheryl Gelbaugh, Upper Sandusky. The couple is planning a 2:00pm ceremony on September 5th in Upper Sandusky, Oh. Adams is a 2004 graduate of Loveland High school and a 2008 graduate of the University of Findlay. Keith is employed as a restaurant manager in Findlay. Gelbaugh is a 2004 graduate of Upper Sandusky High school and is also a 2008 graduate of the University of Findlay. She is employed at First Federal Bank, Findlay.

DIRECTORY Jenny Eilermann

513.768.8614

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD

EPISCOPAL

LUTHERAN

MONTGOMERY ASSEMBLY OF GOD

ST. PATRICK’S-LEBANON

PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

9:30 am Sunday School 10:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 6:30 pm Sunday Eve Service 7:00 pm Wednesday Family Night

932-7691 Holy Eucharist 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am Nursery Care Provided 5 min. from K-71 via Rt. 48

7950 Pfeiffer Rd.

793-6169

www.montgomeryag.org

AMERICAN BAPTIST

Wednesday Evening 6:00pm - Buffet Dinner Worship and Small Group 6:45pm - Programs and

232 E. Main St (corner of East & Main) Rev. Jacqueline E. Matisse, Pastor

EVANGELICAL FREE 5910 Price Road, Milford 831-3770

Sunday Morning 9:30am & 11:00am Classes for all ages.

Classes for all ages.



EPISCOPAL Saint Anne, West Chester

6461 Tylersville Rd. (1/2 mile W. of Cin-Day)

513-779-1139

Sun 8:00 & 9:30 a.m. Nursery Sun 9:15 -10:45 www.saintanne-wc.org

www.faithchurch.net

Services 8:00 am, 9:15 am & 11:00am Steve Lovellette, Senior Pastor Nursery proivided at all services

Take I-275 to exit 57 toward Milford, Right on McClelland, Right on Price, church soon on Right

LUTHERAN ASCENSION LUTHERAN CHURCH

7333 Pfeiffer Road, Montgomery (East of I-71 on Pfeiffer Rd) Worship Schedule 10:00 a.m. Worship and Holy Communion Baby sitter provided Pastor: Josh Miller ascensionlutheranchurch.com

Good Shepherd (E LCA) www.goodshepherd.com

7701 Kenwood Rd.

1001428021-01

513.891.1700

(across from Kenwood Towne Centre) Saturday night at 5:00 and Sunday morning at 8:00, 9:00, 9:30 & 11:00am Pastors: Larry Donner, Pat Badkey, Jesse Abbott

churchads@enquirer.com

UNITED METHODIST

FAITH BIBLE CHURCH 8130 East Kemper Rd.

101 South Lebanon Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 683-4244 Lead Pastor Jonathan Eilert Pastor Grant Eckhart Saturday Service 5:00pm Sunday Services 8:00, 9:30 & 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am http://www.princeofpeaceelca.org

(1 mile west of Montgomery Rd) Services & Sunday School: 9:00am & 10:45am Nursery Available www.fbccincy.or 513-489-1114

8005 Pfeiffer Rd Montgmry 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "Friends for the Journey: Everyone needs a Deborah"

Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

6635 Loveland-Miamiville Rd. (across from Oasis Golf Course) Ph. 513-677-9866 www.epiphanyumc.org Contemporary Services: Saturdays 5pm & Sundays 9:00am Traditional Service: Sunday - 10:30 am

PRESBYTERIAN (USA) LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH A Loving, Praying, Caring Church Join us for Sunday Services Worship Service........................10:00am Church School............................11:15am CONNECT Youth Service.............6-8pm Fellowship/Coffee Hour after Worship Nursery Provided/Youth Group Activities 360 Robin Ave. (off Oak St.), Loveland OH

683-2525

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Mason United Methodist Church 6315 S. Mason-Montgomery Rd. (near Tylersville Rd. intersection) 513-398-4741 8:30 & 11:00 AM Traditional Worship 9:45 AM Contemporary Worship 1:30 PM Esperanza Viva, Hispanic Worship 9:40 & 11:00 AM Sunday School Childcare available www.masonumc.org

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11am Traditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Contemporary Worship & Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

8221 Miami Rd. (corner of Galbraith)

513-891-8181

NEW 9:30am Service -Innovative & High energy

Traditonal Services 8:45 & 11:00am Sunday School 9:30 & 11:00am www.stpaulcommunityumc.org

KENWOOD FELLOWSHIP

www.LPCUSA.org

LPCUSA@fuse.net

7205 Kenwood Rd., Cinti, OH 45236

513-891-9768 Ken Bashford, Pastor

www.KenwoodFellowship.org

Sunday Morning Worship 10:30am

Fellowship & Lunch Follows Worship

Children’s Church...10:30-11:30am Sunday School For All Ages 9:30am Our mission is to worship God & share Jesus’ transforming love and salvation.

NorthStar Vineyard Community Church

Sunday 9:00 & 10:30 a.m. Loveland High School, off of Rich Rd. 683-1556 www.northstarvineyard.org

PRESBYTERIAN BLUE ASH PRESBYTERIAN

4309 Cooper Rd. At Reed Hartman Hwy 791-1153 • www.bapcweb.net Rev. Michael Brewer, Pastor • 9:00 AM Sunday School for all ages • 10:30 AM Worship Nursery Care Provided Fellowship Hour following Worship Service

MADEIRA-SILVERWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH www.MSPConline.org

8000 Miami Ave. 791-4470 Summer Worship at 10:30am Children’s Church during worship Child Care Available

Montgomery Presbyterian Church 9994 Zig Zag Road Mongtomery, Ohio 45242

Worship Service 10:30am Nursery Care Available website: www.MPChurch.net

891-8670


B8

Northeast Suburban Life

Community

July 29, 2009

Avoiding the dog-bite days of summer

Blue Ash company founder to climb Mount Rainier On Aug. 5, two employees of BioRx in Blue Ash, Jeff Salantai and Eric Hill, will climb M o u n t Rainier as part of a national fundraiser Salantai called Summit For Someone. The fundraiser benefits at-risk inner city youth who do not have the privilege of

experiencing life outside the city. Plus, all proceeds exceeding $8,000 will be donated to “Save One Life.” Save One Life provides financial support, in the form of direct sponsorship, to children and young adults with bleeding disorders in developing countries who do not have the means to acquire their much needed treatments. Salantai, who is the account manager in Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma

BUFFALO TRACE BALLOON RACE

Let Your Spirit S O A R !

Balloon Races | Balloon Glow Tethered Balloon Rides Balloon Education Center Arts & Crafts Show | Kid Zone Aeronautical Displays Skydivers | Live Entertainment

Friday & Saturday • July 31st & August 1 Maysville Community and Technical College Title Sponsor:

0000348503

EVENT BENEFIT: PROCEEDS

Platinum Plus Sponsors: The Ledger Independent Limestone Cablevision & WFTM Soft 96 Platinum Sponsors: Maysville Community & Technical College Ferrellgas & City of Maysville Mason Family Drug/Fleming Drug Call 606-584-3979 for more details or visit www.buffalotraceballoonrace.com

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO RMALONEY@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

The climb to the top of Mount Rainier is expected to last three days. for BioRx, has severe Hemophilia A. He attempted to climb Mount Rainier two years ago, without achieving the summit. “It turns out the mountain was much more demanding and taxing than I had expected,” Salantia said. “Therefore, I have decided to pursue it again.” He challenged Eric Hill, one of the co-founders of BioRx, to accompany him on his second attempt. Hill said, “We will be attempting the 14,410 foot summit in hopes of capturing the peak of one of the largest peaks in the U.S. If successful, we think Jeff may be the first person with hemophilia to summit this mountain.” They will not have an easy climb by any means. The climb is a technical three-day hike and ice climb at high altitude. It is a physically demanding climb, with less than 40 percent actually reaching the Summit. Hill and Salantai began training in January for the Aug. 5 event. To make a donation to help support Summit For Someone or Save One Life through Jeff and Eric’s climb,

About BioRx Based in Cincinnati Ohio, BioRx is a national pharmacy specializing in highly customized care for the bleeding disorders community. As one of the nation’s fastest growing providers of hemophilia clotting factors and other specialty pharmaceuticals the company’s clinical staff reaches patients and physicians in 50 states. To learn more about BioRx and its products and services visit www.biorx.net. go to the Summit For Someone Web site at www.summitforsomeone.org and click on the “Donate” button, located on the left navigation bar. Then click on “Donate to Climber” and search for “Jeff Salantai.” Follow the instructions to make a secured donation via a credit card. Your gift is a tax deductible donation. Or, if you prefer, you may donate by writing a check to Save One Life and mention “Jeff Salantai and Eric Hill’s Climb” on the memo line. Mail the check to: Save One Life Inc., PO Box 922, Byfield, MA 01922.

Dog bites are a largely fences or in cars. They may preventable public health be protective of their territoproblem, yet 4.7 million ry. • Never take bones, Americans are bitten by a balls or other toys from a dog every year. Children are by far the dog. Dogs are possessive. If a child is attacked by a most common victims but parents can teach children dog, regardless of whether how to safely interact with the animal is a family pet, dogs, and also learn what teaching the child what to they should do if anyone is do during an attack can minimize the risk and ever bitten by a dog. In Hamilton County from severity of the injury: • Drop to the ground. 2005-2007, 1,589 dog • Curl up in a ball. bites were reported, half of • Protect which occurred your head and in children ages Never tease a dog face; cover your 0-19 years old. ears. Understand• Try to remember what ing the right behavior to use and understanding a dog’s the dog looked like and body language can make a where it went. “If you or your child is difference when a child bitten by a dog, wash the interacts with a dog. A child’s sudden move- wound thoroughly with ments could startle a dog soap and water and contact and put him on the defen- your family doctor right sive. Barking, growling, away,” Hamilton County stiff legs and hair standing Health Commissioner Tim up on the back are all signs Ingram said. “It is also important that a dog is unsafe. you contact Hamilton Children should: • Never approach a County Public Health so we strange dog. Don’t make can determine that the eye contact and back away dog’s rabies vaccinations are up to date.” slowly. Ohio law requires that all • Never tease a dog. • Never sneak up on a animal bites be reported to dog that is eating or sleep- the local health department ing. Animals may bite and that the biting animal be quarantined for at least when they are frightened. • Always ask the 10 days. In Hamilton County, but owner’s permission before petting a dog. Let the dog outside the cities of Cincinsniff your hand, and then nati, Norwood, Sharonville, gently pet the dog’s back or Springdale and St. Bernard, report bites to Hamilton sides. • Stay away from dogs County Public Health at that are chained, behind 946-7832.

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531 Loveland-Madeira Rd., Loveland, Ohio 45140


ON

THE

RECORD

BLUE ASH

Arrests/citations

Kathy D. Hart, 51, 9723 Kenwood Rd., petty theft, petty theft at 9723 Kenwood Rd., July 17. Stephen J. Baden, 41, 9306 Wynnnecrest Dr., disorderly conduct; intoxication at 9306 Wynnecrest Dr., July 20.

Incidents/investigations Assault (knowingly harm), criminal damaging/endangering Someone damaged a driver's side window, value $200, on a vehicle at 5550 Florence Ave., July 15.

Assault (knowingly harm), criminal mischief

Someone damaged cell phone, value $50 at 11090 Oak Ave., July 16.

Criminal mischief

A woman said someone damaged the rear window of a vehicle, $300 value at 11073 Labelle Ave., July 16.

Disorderly conduct

At 4454 Edenton Ln., July 18.

Domestic dispute

At 4617 Belleview Ave., July 15. At 10104 Kenwood Rd., July 20.

Found property

At Cooper Rd. and Highland Ave., July 20.

General information

At 11427 Reed Hartman Highway, July 15.

Lost property

A man reported a lost CCW permit at 9210 Plainfield Rd., July 15.

Menacing

At 4765 Glendale-Milford Rd., July 17.

Passing bad checks

Someone passed a bad check for $250 at 9210 Plainfield Rd., July 20.

Petty theft

Someone broke into vehicles at Blue Ash Recreation Cener and took a Nokia cell phone, value $70; a car key and keyless remote, $50; a car key and keylless remote, value $50; a Russian watch, value $50, and an 18-pack of Miller Lite, value $15 at 4433 Cooper Rd., July 16. A man said someone took $20 at 9489 Fallson Ct., July 16. Someone took $206.97 worth of medication from Kroger at 4100 Hunt Rd., July 19.

Petty theft (less than $500)

A male juvenile said someone took a motor bike, value $350 at 11090 Oak Ave., July 16.

Receiving stolen property

A stolen 1940 Walnut Hills High School class ring was recovered

July 29, 2009

BIRTHS | DEATHS | POLICE | Editor Dick Maloney | rmaloney@communitypress.com | 248-7134

at 7106 Kenwood Rd., June On the Web 24. Our interactive CinciNavigator map allows you to Chantha Em, 18, 3635 Maypinpoint the loction of police reports in your field Ave., theft neighborhood. Visit: at 7913 MontCincinnati.com/columbiatownship gomery Rd., Cincinnati.com/deerpark June 25. Cincinnati.com/madeira Juvenile male, 17, theft at 7913 Cincinnati.com/silverton Montgomery Cincinnati.com/sycamoretownship Rd., June 25. Juvenile female, at 4440 Lake Forest Dr. apartment 16, theft at 7875 Montgomery 114, July 20. Rd., July 6. Robbery (physical harm) Juvenile female, 15, theft at 7875 At 4775 Cornell Rd., July 14. Montgomery Rd., July 6. Theft ($500 or more) Lashonda Forte, 22, 1612 Pelham, A man said someone took a Huntingtheft at 7875 Montgomery Rd., ton Bank Visa card; a Social June 30. Security card; a Social Security Kacie Davis, 20, 7914 Greenland card for his daughter; a HuntingPlace, theft at 7875 Montgomery ton Bak Visa crd; a CitiBank Rd., June 30. Chase card; a military ID card; $80 Juvenile female, 27, theft at 7875 cash; a Juniper Visa card; four Montgomery Rd., June 30. Blue Ash Recreation cards, and a Kelly Maglocci, 19, 862 Miami Ridge brown leather tri-fold wallet at Dr., underage consumption, oper4433 Cooper Rd., July 14. ating motor vehicle intoxicated at Theft, misuse of credit cards 8871 Weekly Lane, June 28. A man said someone tok $100; an Incidents/investigations Ohio driver's license, value $25; a Assault JP Morgan MasterCard, and a Reported at 7501 School Rd., July 1. Chase Bank Visa debit card at Breaking and entering 4924 Twinbrook Ct., July 14. Business entered through broken glass door at 11360 Montgomery Rd., July 1. Business entered and copper wire, Arrests/citations laptops, computers of unknown Patrick B. Beausejour, 20, 10490 value removed at 7754 E. Kemper Carriage Tr., disorderly conduct at Rd., July 5. 10603 Brandywine, July 15. Sliding window damaged at 7752 Incidents/investigations School Rd., June 25.

10167 Byerstone Ln.: Wyrick Beckham & Diana to Mason Michael G. & Barbara H.; $560,000. 10237 Ryans Way: Kneir Donald E. to Kukreja Kamlesh U.; $575,000. 11 Carpenters Run: Flaim Stephen P. Tr to Sperber Thomas S. Jr. & Mary T.; $412,000. 3803 Chimney Hill Dr.: Willike Keith & Denise Renee Smith to Dannenfelser Scott E. & Jeanette N.; $345,000 . 3803 Mohler Rd.: Willike Keith & Denise Renee Smith to Dannenfelser Scott E. & Jeanette N.; $345,000. 4266 Fox Hollow Dr.: Platt Kevin T. & Hiromi Y. to Murta Connie S.; $219,500. 4639 Northfield Rd.: First Financial Bank National Association to Presley Jason & Jennifer; $129,500. 4646 Leadwell Ln.: Wakefield Cooper S. & Daisy to Yi-Wang Pin- & Chun-Yu Wang; $180,000. 4736 Elizabeth Pl.: Herrick Donna to Duran Angeles & Juan F. Llnares Rodrique; $220,000. 5360 Meyers Ln.: Lorenz Mildred M. Tr to Lash Justin G. & Jennifer L.; $181,000. 9882 Timbers Dr.: Mathis Maureen to Nashif Ahid D. & Joann; $105,000.

MONTGOMERY

9680 Ross Ave.: Garry Brasch Custom Homes Inc. to Roth Katherine & Brian D.; $700,865. 9882 Knollbrook Te.: Pocklington Jeffrey D. & Daniela A. to Ralston Robert O. & Susann R.; $262,000.

SYCAMORE TOWNSHIP

10929 Barrington Ct.: Huron Earl J. & Melanie M. to Agarwal Rachana; $146,000.

ESTATE

MONTGOMERY

Identity fraud

A woman said someone obtained her credit card information at 8841 Wellerstation Rd., July 7.

Theft

A man said someone took his bicycle, value $275, from a bike rack at 5757 Cooper Rd., July 15. A man said someone took Fifth Third Bank checks totalling $1,071.85 at 9939 Montgomery Rd., July 14.

Burglary

Residence entered at 6428 Westover Circle, June 27.

Criminal damaging, theft

Laptop valued at $2,000 removed at 7221 Tiki Ave., June 28.

Disorderly conduct

Reported at 8440 Blue Ash Rd., June 30.

Menacing

Reported at 4056 Longford Dr., June 28.

Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate. 11903 Fourth Ave.: Fannie Mae to Ponder Mark H.; $70,000. 11966 Stillwind Dr.: Oliverio Michael L. & Louis J. to Martin Heather N. & Lindsay T. Anderson; $172,500. 12131 Eaglescout Ct.: Robbins Dortha to Johnson John & Kimberly; $128,500. 6544 Lisa Ln.: Hodge Joseph W. & Jean B. to Gailey Jason A. & Jennifer L.; $286,000. 8015 Queens Ave.: Broughton Franklin @(10) to Anderson John S.; $107,500. 8733 Kenwood Rd.: Kenwood Road Developers LLC to Cambruzzi Robert A.; $550,000.

SYMMES TOWNSHIP

Lovelad-Madeira Rd.: Eppert-Trimbell Investment Corp. to Kenda LLC; $1,225,000. 10153 Fields Ertel Rd.: Redd Robert W. & Betty L. to Bennett David P. & Gwendolyn F.; $248,000. 10276 Meadowknoll Dr.: Ralston Robert & Susann to Friedman Thomas & Joan; $295,000. 10461 Hopewell Hills Dr.: Kesig Ricky D. & Margaret A. to Banner Eric A. & Kathleen B.; $267,000. 10690 Loveland Madeira Rd.: EppertTrimbell Investment Corp. to Kenda Llc; $1,225,000. 11359 Donwiddle Dr.: Krekeler Rosa M. to Coons Douglas & Sarah; $220,735. 8516 Whisperwoods Ln.: Guan Chun Hua to Wang Wang Yu; $338,000.

On the Web Compare home sales on your block, on your street and in your neighborhood at: Cincinnati.com/blueash Cincinnati.com/montgomery Cincinnati.com/sycamoretownship Cincinnati.com/symmestownship

Arrests/citations

Machines damaged at 4777 E. Galbraith Rd., July 3.

Camera $150 at 7800 Montgomery Rd., July 1. $8.83 removed at 8057 Montgomery Rd., June 30. Merchandise valued at $63.66 removed at 7875 Montgomery Rd., July 3. Equipment valued at $600 removed at 8375 Plainfield Rd., June 27. $88.21 removed at 7714 Montgomery Rd., June 25. Credit cards removed from purse and used without consent at 7788 Montgomery Rd., June 25. Vehicle removed at 3954 Tramore Dr., June 23. Credit card and currency of unknown value removed at 5901 E. Galbraith Rd., June 24. Jewelry valued at $8,250 removed at 4500 E. Galbraith Rd., July 7. GPS unit, Bluetooth, Ipod, golf clubs and sunglasses of unknown value removed at 8967 Blossom Dr., July 5. DVD of unknown value removed at 7250 Timber Knoll Dr., June 29.

Violation of protection order

Reported at 8946 Blue Ash Rd., July 2.

Criminal damaging

Mailbox damaged at 7949 Keller Rd.,

Clark Sauer, 19, 7940 Shawnee Run Rd., underage consumption, operating motor vehicle intoxicated at 7999 Ohio 126, June 30. Alexander Mays, 19, 8212 W. Villard Ave., solicit at 10266 Meadow Knoll, June 6. Thomas Wilson, 34, 401 Edgecomb Dr., theft at 9201 Fields Ertel Rd., June 23. Judy Russo, 48, 401 Edgecomb Dr., theft at 9201 Fields Ertel Rd., June 25. Juvenile male, 16, underage consumption at 12024 Mason Way Ct., July 6.

Incidents/investigations Assault

Reported at 10684 Betty Ray Dr., July 7.

Burglary

Vehicle entered and currency, gift cards, medication and cell phone valued at $500 removed at 8031 Glendale Milford Rd., June 23. Residence entered at 7535 State Route 126, June 26.

Criminal damaging

Vehicle window damaged at 11370 Donwiddle Dr., June 27.

Misuse of credit card

Debit card removed and used without consent at 9148 Union Cemetery Rd., July 2.

CITY OF BLUE ASH, OHIO HAMILTON COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE

Arrests/citations

About real estate transfers

SYMMES TOWNSHIP

Tampering with a coin machine

SYCAMORE TOWNSHIP

Genetta Jennings, 21, 568 Delta Ave., theft at 7875 Montgomery Rd., July 4. Juvenile male, 17, theft at 4090 E. Galbraith Rd., June 25. Juvenile male, 16, domestic violence

About police reports

July 7. Vehicle scratched at 7875 Montgomery Rd., July 3. Mirror of vehicle damaged at Mirror and Charity, June 28.

Theft

CITY OF BLUE ASH, OHIO HAMILTON COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Manager, Municipal Building, City of Blue Ash, Hamilton County, 4343 Cooper Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242, until 2:00 P.M. local time on MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2009, for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as BLUE ASH 2009 SIDEWALK PROGRAM , and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. Contract documents, bid sheets, plans and specifications can be obtained at Blue Ash Municipal Building for $ 40.00 per set, (non-refundable). Plans requested by mail will be an additional $10.00 per set. Checks shall be made payable to City of Blue Ash, Ohio. Specifications will also be on file in the City of Blue Ash Municipal and Safety Center, 4343 Cooper Road, Blue Ash, Ohio 45242, the plan room of the F. W. Dodge Corporation, Allied Construction Industries, (ACI), and CDS Associates, Inc., 11120 Kenwood Road, Cincinnati, Ohio. Each bidder is required to furnish with his proposal, a Bid Guaranty and Contract Bond in accordance with Section 153.54 of the Ohio Revised Code. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Ohio to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the owner that this project be completed no later than MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009 . When the total overall project exceeds $73,891, all bidders must comply with the prevailing wage rates on Public Improvements in Hamilton County and the City of Blue Ash, Ohio, as ascertained and determined by the Administrator of the Ohio Bureau of Employment Services (OBES) as provided in Section 4115.05 through 4115.034 of the Revised Code of the State of Ohio. It is anticipated that the Prevailing Wage Law will apply to this project. The Council of the City of Blue Ash, Ohio, reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. The Council of the City of Blue Ash shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products. By the order of the Council of the City of Blue Ash, Ohio. William M. Duncan, Public Works Director 1001485911

B9

communitypress.com

POLICE REPORTS

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS BLUE ASH

REAL

Northeast Suburban Life

Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Manager, Blue Ash Municipal & Safety Center, City of Blue Ash, Hamilton County, 4343 Cooper Road, Blue Ash, Ohio 45242 until 10:00 A.M. local time on Tuesday, August 11, 2009 for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as the BLUE ASH 2009 MICROSURFACING PROGRAM - HAZELWOOD, and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. Contract documents, bid sheets, plans, and specifications can be obtained from the City of Blue Ash at $30.00 per set (non-refundable); plans requested by mail will be an additional $10 per set. Checks shall be made out to the City of Blue Ash, Ohio. Plans will also be on file in the plan room of the F.W. Dodge Corporation and Allied Construction Industries (ACI). Each bidder is required to furnish with his proposal, a Bid Guaranty and Contract Bond in accordance with Section 153.54 of the Ohio Revised Code. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Ohio to provide said surety. The successful Bidder and all subcontractors must comply with the prevailing wage rates established by the Davis-Bacon Wage Determination of the U.S. Department of Labor, with all EEO requirements in the payment of prevailing federal minimum wages and with the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act regarding compensation for overtime and safe working conditions. On contracts of $25,000 or more, general contractors will be required to achieve 10% Minority Business Entrepreneur participation in the contract, or clearly demonstrate and document a good faith effort to achieve MBE participation to be eligible for contract award. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the Owner that this project shall be completed no later than October 31, 2009. The Council of the City of Blue Ash shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products. The Council of the City of Blue Ash, Ohio, reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. By order of the Council of the City of Blue Ash, Ohio. __________________________________ _ William M. Duncan, Public Works Director 1001487512

BINGO

To place your ad visit CommunityClassified.com

The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: Blue Ash, Chief Chris Wallace, 745-8573. Montgomery, Chief Don Simpson, 985-1600. Sycamore Township, 7927254. Symmes Township, Lt. Dan Reid 683-3444.

Theft

Computer and equipment valued at $2,050 removed at 9985 Morgans Trace, July 2. $10 removed at 9976 Humphrey Rd., July 9. Credit cards, currency of unknown value removed at 10570 Stablehand Dr., July 4. $50 removed at 10320 Stablehand Dr., July 1. Vehicle entered and wallet and contents valued at $4,749 taken and used without consent at 8675 Kemper Rd., July 1. Vehicle entered and computer, tools, iPod, jewelry valued at $1,000 removed at 9651 Humphrey Rd., July 3. Vehicle entered and Ipod valued at $250 removed at 11989 River Oaks Dr., July 7. Jewelry valued at $12,000 removed at 8925 Cypress Point Dr., June 15.

Vehicular vandalism

Vehicle windshield damaged at 9817 Fields Ertel Rd., June 29.

CITY OF BLUE ASH, OHIO NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that at 7:00PM on Thursday the 10th day of September, 2009, a public hearing will be held on the following ordinance in the Council Chambers of the Blue Ash Municipal & Safety Center, 4343 Cooper Road, Blue Ash, Ohio 45242, before a regular meeting of the Council of the City of Blue Ash: ORDINANCE NO. 2009-43 APPROVING A MAJOR MODIFICATION TO THE "CORNELL OFFICE CENTER" PLANNED DEVELOPMENT (FORMERLY KNOWN AS "SHOPPES OF HAZELWOOD"), LOCATED ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF CORNELL ROAD BETWEEN CENTENNIAL AND KEMPER AVENUES, TO PERMIT SUBDIVISION OF THE EXISTING PARCEL AND CONSTRUCTION OF AN ESTIMATED 4,500 SQUARE FOOT COMMERCIAL BUILDING Susan K. Bennett Deputy Clerk of Council

1001487422

CITY OF BLUE ASH, OHIO HAMILTON COUNTY LEGAL NOTICE Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Manager, Blue Ash Municipal & Safety Center, City of Blue Ash, Hamilton County, 4343 Cooper Road, Blue Ash, Ohio 45242 until 10:00 A.M. local time on Tuesday, August 11, 2009 for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as the BLUE ASH 2009 MICROSURFACING PROGRAM - RESIDENTIAL, and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. Contract documents, bid sheets, plans, and specifications can be obtained from the City of Blue Ash at $30.00 per set (non-refundable); plans requested by mail will be an additional $10 per set. Checks shall be made out to the City of Blue Ash, Ohio. Plans will also be on file in the plan room of the F.W. Dodge Corporation and Allied Construction Industries (ACI). Each bidder is required to furnish with his proposal, a Bid Guaranty and Contract Bond in accordance with Section 153.54 of the Ohio Revised Code. Bid security furnished in Bond form shall be issued by a Surety Company or Corporation licensed in the State of Ohio to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirements of the Owner that this project shall be completed no later than October 31, 2009. The Council of the City of Blue Ash shall authorize acceptance of the bid made by the responsible bidder who, in Council’s judgment, offers the best and most responsive proposal to the City, considering quality, service, performance record, and price; or Council may direct the rejection of all bids. The City may award based on "functional equivalence" concerning specified work or products. The Council of the City of Blue Ash, Ohio, reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. By order of the Council of the City of Blue Ash, Ohio. William M. Duncan, Public Works Director 1001487505


B10

Northeast Suburban Life

Community

July 29, 2009

FIRE/EMS RUNS Sycamore Township Fire/EMS runs for June 20-July 5: June 20, Fields Ertel, wires down June 21, Dearwester, medical emergency June 21, Beech, medical emergency June 21, Galbraith, fall June 21, Lancaster, medical emergency June 21, Donegal, medical emergency June 22, Reed Hartman,, alarm activation June 22, Thomas Structure, fire June 22, Kenwood, fall June 22, New England, medical emergency June 22, Keller, medical emergency June 22, Montgomery, medical emergency June 22, Sturbridge, fall June 22, Orchard @ Kenwood, motor vehicle accident June 22, Reading, medical emergency June 22, Wexford, medical emergency June 22, Chaucer, medical emergency June 22, Galbraith, medical emergency June 22, Northcreek, medical emergency June 23, Killarney, medical emergency June 23, Kenwood, medical emergency June 23, Galbraith, medical emergency June 23, Bayberry, good intent June 23, Lyncris, medical emergency June 23, Interstate 275 @ Montgomery, motor vehicle accident June 23, Tralee, fall June 24, Northbound I71, vehicle fire June 24, Pfeiffer, alarm activation June 24, Galbraith, smoke scare June 24, Galbraith, fall June 24, Highland, medical emergency June 24, Kenwood, no patient contact June 24, Trebor, medical emergency June 24, Dearwester, medical emergency June 24, Interstate 71 @ Montgomery, motor vehicle accident June 24, Cornell @ 275, motor vehicle accident June 24, Montgomery, fall June 25, Montgomery, overheated motor June 25, St. Clair, medical emergency June 25, Reed Hartman, good intent June 25, Cornell, medical emergency June 25, Bobby, fall June 25, Lake Thames, medical emergency June 25, Montgomery, medical emer-

About Fire, EMS reports

gency June 25, Dearwester, fall June 25, Dearwester, medical emergency June 25, Reading, no patient contact June 25, Galbraith, medical emergency June 25, Galbraith @ Kenwood, smoke scare June 25, Sixth, open burn June 26, Theodore, tree down June 26, Kugler Mill, wires down June 26, Wicklow, wires down June 26, Blue Ash, alarm activation June 26, Montgomery, alarm activation June 26, Matson, wires down June 26, Montgomery, alarm activation June 26, Fields Ertel, CO alarm June 26, Needlewood, medical emergency June 26, Kemper, fall June 26, Penelope, medical emergency June 26, Hunt, medical emergency June 26, Galbraith @ Wexford, medical emergency June 26, Hedgewood, alarm activation June 26, Hauck, alarm activation June 27, Montgomery, medical emergency June 27, Blue Ash, medical emergency June 27, First @ School, good intent June 27, Reed Hartman, medical emergency June 27, School, medical emergency June 28, Galbraith,, smoke scare June 28, Montgomery,, alarm activation June 28, Montgomery,, alarm activation June 28, School, medical emergency June 28, Galbraith, medical emergency June 28, Dearwester,, fall June 28, Roundhill, medical emergency June 28, Reading, medical emergency June 28, Blue Ash, medical emergency June 28, Montgomery, medical emergency June 29, Galbraith,, alarm activation June 29, Sheppard, overheated HVAC June 29, Montgomery,, smoke scare June 29, Kemper,, alarm activation June 29, Eastbound Ronald Reagan, motor vehicle accident June 29, Galbraith,, fall June 29, Fields Ertel @ Reed Hartman, medical emergency June 29, Tiki, medical emergency June 29, Buckland, motor vehicle

TENN

FLORIDA

ESSE

E

Inspirational speaker

The Community Press obtains fire and emergency medical dispatches from the Sycamore Township Fire EMS Department, 489-1212 (North Station) and 792-8565 (South station).

Dr. O’dell M. Owens, Hamilton County coroner, was the featured speaker at Montgomery Woman’s Club general meeting. Owens inspired all present to be aware and to get involved. He talked about Project Grad (Graduation Really Achieves Dreams), a collaborative of the Cincinnati Public School system. He also talked about RISE Learning Solutions Inc. a national non-profit organization that uses technology to bring world-class training to adults who care for pre-school aged children. He is passionate about getting disadvantaged youth motivated to reach their full potential. He encouraged our members to become mentors. He stated that he would like his epitaph to read “He made a difference.” From left: Nancy Rolfert of College Hill, Owens and Annette Phipps of Montgomery. Montgomery Woman’s club meetings are open to all and are held on the third Thursday of each month September-May and alternate between daytime and evening. For additional information, visit www.montgomerywomansclub.org or call 852-1901.

accident June 29, Montgomery, medical emergency June 29, Montgomery, medical emergency June 30, Winesap, medical emergency June 30, Gwilada, medical emergency June 30, Guam, medical emergency June 30, Kemper, medical emergency June 30, I 275 @ Kemper, motor vehicle accident June 30, Matson, medical emergency June 30, Montgomery, motor vehicle accident July 1, Towne Commons Way,, smoke scare July 1, Carnaby,, alarm activation July 1, Kugler Mill, medical emergency July 1, New England, medical emergency July 1, Reed Hartman, medical emergency July 1, Reed Hartman, medical emergency July 1, Lake Thames, medical emergency July 2, Kenwood,, no patient contact July 2, Kenwood,, no patient contact July 2, Montgomery, possible stroke July 2, Montgomery, motor vehicle accident July 2, St. Clair,, no patient contact July 2, Fifth, medical emergency July 2, Silvercrest @ Montgomery, motor vehicle accident July 3, Sixth @ Fields Ertel,, open burn July 3, Lake Thames,, fall July 3, Dearwester,, no patient contact July 3, Hosbrook, medical emergency July 3, Wicklow, motor vehicle accident July 4, Montgomery,, vehicle fire July 4, Elizabeth, structure fire July 4, Kenwood, motor vehicle accident July 4, Montgomery, medical emergency July 4, Eldora,, fall July 4, Kenwood @ I 71, motor vehicle accident July 5, Galbraith,, alarm activation

PROVIDED. SUBMIT PHOTOS TO: RMALONEY@COMMUNITYPRESS.COM

Metro offers traffic-saving deals Cost-conscious commuters are riding out the recession and savings thousands of dollars by riding Metro. Based on the local average gas price of $2.35 per gallon and a $120 monthly parking cost, it costs a commuter driving 30 miles round-trip per day from the suburbs to downtown more than $7,200 a year – that’s more than $600 a month – to drive. A Metro pass good for unlimited use is just $90 a month for Hamilton County service. In this example, the savings by riding Metro is more than $500 per month or $6,000 a year. To calculate your cost of driving, go to www.gometro.com/costofdriving.ht

ml, plug in the numbers and see for yourself. Metro monthly passes start at just $55 for city of Cincinnati and $90 per month for Hamilton County; outlying counties are higher, but the distance is also greater so the savings increase. “Everyone is looking for ways to save money these days,” Metro chief administrative officer Sallie Hilvers said. “By riding Metro, commuters can keep more dollars in their wallets and reduce wear and tear on their vehicles. The savings really add up.” The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) found similar savings occurring nationwide. Go to www.publictrans-

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BeautifulBeach.com leads you to NW Florida’s Beach Vacation Rentals along the beaches of South Walton. Luxurious gulf-front homes, seaside condos and cottages. Dune Allen Realty, 50 yrs of excellent service and accommodations. 888-267-2121 or visit www.BeautifulBeach.com

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach GULF BEACH’S BEST VALUE! Beach front condo, 2 BR, 2 BA. Pool. Fall rates. 513-770-4243 www.bodincondo.com DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

DESTIN. Beautiful, luxury 2 BR, 2 BA Oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Covered prkng, sleeps 6. Local own er. www.us-foam.com/destin Ofc513-528-9800, eves 513-752-1735 DESTIN. Edgewater Beach Condos on the Gulf. 1-3 BR, beachfront, pvt balconies, FREE Wi-Fi, beach set-up (in season) & use of new fitness ctr. New massage/facial salon, 2 pools (1 heated), FREE $20 gift cert to pool grill (weekly rentals in season). Call or visit our website for lastminute specials. 800-822-4929 www.edgewaterbeach.com

DESTIN. New, nicely furnished 2 br, 2 ba condo. Gorgeous Gulf view. Pools, golf course. Discount Summer & Fall rates. Book now. 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Dinsey. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

Feature of the Week

The Doolin House Bed & Breakfast

Somerset, Kentucky’s Premiere Inn Located Just Minutes from Lake Cumberland

There is a joke among friends here, “It’s a Phoenix that has risen from the ashes. ”When Charles and Allison Hahn Sobieck purchased the property at 502 North Main Street (in Somerset, Kentucky), there was a lot of work to be done, to say the least. With the vision of a B & B and a home in ruins, there were little choices. The dilapidated structure was removed, then reconstructed as it had been in the 1850’s. It’s a brand new home. A bit of an unusual concept for a bed and breakfast. “We reconstructed the home from scratch. This gave us the benefit of designing every amenity possible along the way, ”said Allison Sobieck, owner. Every room is equipped with many amenities you don’t often find in a traditional bed and breakfast, but rather a fine hotel. Every room has a full sized closet with a pair of micro-fiber robes hanging in them, 400- count Egyptian cotton sheets, cable TV with DVD players, queen sized beds, and a host of other things. For instance, 2 rooms have gas fireplaces and 3 rooms have whirlpool tubs. We even offer many add on amenities such as massage, dinner, flowers, etc…

For more information, Visit the website at: www.doolinhouse.com or call 606-678-9494

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH CAROLINA EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 800-245-7746 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

FLORIDA

INDIANA

Hilton Head Island, SC

Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations. site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com BROWN COUNTY. Treat your family to a visit to Indiana’s family playground! Comfort Inn, in the ! of all of Nashville’s attractions. 812-988-6118 choicehotels.com

A Beautiful Log Cabin Resort w/heated indoor pool, minutes from Dollywood, Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg and the Smoky Mtns. Breathtaking mountain views, hot tubs, Jacuzzis, pool tables & pet friendly cabins are offered. Excellent rates, discounts available. Call 1-888-HSR-TENN (477-8366) hiddenspringsresort.com CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617 GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

TIME SHARES Hilton Head Island Vacation Resort. Choose 1 or 2 bdrm condos. Oceanfront, ocean view or nr ocean. Great locations & rates. Golf pkgs, too. www.hhi-vr.com. 877-807-3828

Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo, beach view from balcony. Bright & airy, nicely appointed, all amenities. Cinci owner. 232-4854. The Best Crescent Beach Vacation!

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge.Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618

1001479591-01

NAPLES - New all incl golf/tennis comm, beaut furn 2 BR/2 BA condo overlooking 27 hole champ GC, mo rentals at reasonable rates, not avail Jan-Mar 2010. 513-312-5799, Doug.

PANAMA CITY BEACH Family Atmosphere! Your Best Vacation Value! 800-354-1112 www.Summerhouse.com

LEELANAU VACATION RENTALS Over 120 condos, cottages and homes on Lake Michigan, Glen Lake and other inland lakes. Call 231-334-6100 or visit www.leelanau.com/vacation

NEW YORK

The rooms are only half of the reason to come to The Doolin House. Owners Charles and Allison just happen to both be chefs. Some of the breakfast specialties include Caramel Banana French Toast and Southern Eggs Benedict (2 fried green tomatoes topped with 2 slices of smoked bacon, 2 eggs over easy and Hollandaise). Chuck is usually in charge of breakfast and tries to do new and different things every day. Chef Chuck pointed out, “It’s fun to experiment with breakfast. It’s the one meal that encompasses all foods. It’s perfectly acceptable to see smoked salmon or a pork cutlet at the breakfast table. ”For those in no rush to rise and shine, breakfast in bed is served at no additional charge. When you need a weekend get away that’s not too far from home or you are planning your summer vacation to beautiful Lake Cumberland, remember that The Doolin House Bed and Breakfast is only a phone call away.

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

Bed & Breakfast Anna Maria Island. Save $$$ on a beach getaway. Only $499/wk + tax. All new inside, very comfy, just steps from the beach. 513-236-5091 www.beachesndreams.net

portation.org. to calculate individual savings with or without car ownership. In addition to saving money, riding public transportation takes cars off the road, reduces carbon emissions and mitigates America’s dependence on foreign oil. Regarding parking costs, the national average for the monthly unreserved parking rate in a city’s downtown business district is $143, according to the 2008 Colliers International Parking Rate Study. Over the course of a year, parking costs alone can amount to an average of $1,720. Metro is a non-profit public service of the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority, providing about 22 million rides per year.

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

WHOLESALE TIMESHARES 60-80% Off Retail! Qualified Buyers Only! Call for Free Info Pack! www.holidaygroup.com/cn 1-800-731-0307


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