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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas Jacob Violand

E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J a n u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 1

RECORDER W e b s i t e : N K Y. c o m

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

Fort Thomas sees rise in car break-ins

Volume 11, Number 36 © 2011 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Campbell County Connects blog

The Campbell County Connects blog has moved to a new location. Continue to follow us at cincinnati.com/ blogs/campbellcountyconnects.

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Tire amnesty

It’s been more than a decade since the last tire hoards were removed from two sites south of Alexandria in 1997, but the legacy of those cleanups remains as the rotating state tire amnesty program visits Campbell County this spring. NEWS, A3

Sweet ending

Campbell County Middle School has found the “scoop” on how to motivate students to read more by giving away an ice cream sundae party for the classroom that checks out the most books. The six-week “Book Scoop Contest” ends Feb. 11. Students’ individual scoop points for reading books and magazines are tallied into the totals for their language arts teacher’s class. SCHOOLS, A5

Go, go, go Joseph

The Fort Thomas Independent Schools’ Community Theatre is bringing their production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat to the stage with a little twist. “We are staying true to the script, but using our costuming to add some hippie ’70s flare,” said Director John Williamson. The musical, written by Andrew Lloyd Weber and Tim Rice in the 1960s, is the biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors. LIFE, B1

Find your community, online

Find your community’s website by visiting NKY.com/local and looking the place you live under the “Kentucky communities” menu. You’ll find local news, sports, photos and events, tailored to where you live. You can even submit your own articles and photos using Share, our online submission tool.

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AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Driving through the snow

Patrick Davidson enjoys the snow by taking a ride on his four-wheeler in Fort Thomas.

The Fort Thomas Police Department is asking residents to keep an eye out for suspicious activity after an increase in car break-ins in the city. Lieutenant Rich Whitford said the department has received reports of seven or eight cars being broken into on Tremont Avenue and Sunset Avenue recently. These two streets were also a hot spot for break-ins around this time last year, Whitford said. “We’re not sure if there is a connection there, or if it’s just coincidence,” Whitford said. Just as it was at this time last year, unlocked cars are being broken into late at night or early in the morning. “We’re asking residents to please keep their vehicles secured and try not leave anything of value out in the open,” Whitford said. Officer Chris Armstrong, who covers Sunset Avenue as part of the department’s Neighborhood Focus Area program, said it is rare that the department sees anyone actually break a window to enter a car.

Armstrong said unlocked cars parked both on the street and in residents’ driveways have been broken into recently. “They seem to just look for unlocked cars so they can get in and out easily without being detected,” Armstrong said. While the officers are increasing patrols, they can’t be everywhere all the time, so getting the word out to residents to lock their doors is the main way to stop the break-ins, Armstrong said. Whitford said the department is investigating whether it may be the same person or people breaking into the cars as last year and why Tremont and Sunset have been hit both years. “It may be because both streets are near major thoroughfares, or it may be someone who lives in the area that is doing it,” Whitford said. No arrests were made after the break-ins last year. Whitford said anyone who sees anything suspicious should report it to the department at 441-6562 or the Campbell County dispatch at 292-3622. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas

Highlands club collecting cell phones to help gorillas By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

The Green Club at Highlands High Schools is holding a cell phone drive in an effort to help gorillas in Africa. This is the second year the club has teamed up with the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden on this project. Nancy Bardgett, the club’s sponsor, said by recycling unwanted cell phones and chargers the project helps reduce the need to mine coltan, the ore used in the production of those items. Mining coltan, which is primarily located in Africa, is disrupting gorilla habitats. The zoo takes the phones collected by the students, sells them to companies that recycle them and gives the money to gorilla conservation organizations. “By participating in this proj-

ect, we’re not only keeping these items out of the landfills, but we are helping gorilla conservation,” Bardgett said. Bardgett said the club decided to hold its cell phone drive shortly after Christmas, when many people get new phones. Last year the club collected three big boxes of phones for the project. “We’re trying to expand our reach this year by putting collection boxes in all Fort Thomas schools and other places in the community,” said Taylor Rosenhagen, co-president of the club. With the help of the studentrun Highlander News television program, the club was also able to film a feature about the project in the gorilla enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo. Anyone interested in donating phones or chargers can drop them off at any of the Fort Thomas

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Green Club members Stephanie Holstein, Will Bardgett, Taylor Rosenhagen and Keena Wiegand put cell phones in one of the collection boxes. Independent Schools through the end of February.

For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas

Vote on repeal of indoor smoking ban is Feb. 16 By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County Fiscal Court will act upon an ordinance at the Feb. 16 meeting that, if approved, will repeal the indoor smoking ordinance prohibiting smoking in workplaces indoors passed in December of 2010, said Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery at the county’s quarterly “Mayors’ Meeting” Tuesday morning in Newport. So far, all the cities have received notification of the law

that was passed in December, Pendery said. The first reading of the repeal ordinance was at the Jan. 19 Fiscal Court meeting in Newport, he said. “That will be acted upon at a meeting on the 16th of February at 7 p.m.,” Pendery said. Instead of the typical 5:30 p.m. meeting time for the third Wednesday of the month meeting in the county administration building at 1098 Monmouth St., Newport, the time for the vote on the repeal ordinance has been

changed to later in the evening to accommodate the number of people expected to attend the meeting, said Melissa Williams, director of administration for the county. The indoor smoking ban was passed by a 3-1 vote margin at the final meeting for former commissioners Dave Otto, and Mark Hayden in December. Otto and Hayden both voted for the law, along with Pendery. Commissioner Ken Rechtin was the lone dissenting vote against the indoor smoking ban. New commissioners Pete Gar-

rett and Brian Painter, who replaced Otto and Hayden, asked for an ordinance to repeal the law passed by the previous Fiscal Court at their first meeting on Jan. 5, after being elected to office in the November elections. Hayden and Otto both voted for the new law, along with Campbell County Judge-executive Steve Pendery, with Commisioner Ken Rechtin voting against the indoor smoking ban. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/campbellcounty

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Fort Thomas Recorder

News

January 27, 2011

Campbell County stocking up on salt supplies

One-day snapshot will tally county’s homeless population

By Amanda Joering Alley and Chris Mayhew

cmayhew@nky.com

ajoering@nky.com cmayhew@nky.com

Public works departments in Campbell County are keeping an eye on salt stock levels, and putting in orders to meet the needs of any future snow storms. In Alexandria, the city has already used about 300 tons of salt for the season, said Sam Trapp, director of public works. “We usually use about 400 tons a year, so we’re a little bit ahead of the pace,” he said. The city has between 50 and 60 tons on site, Trapp said. And an order has been placed with the city’s supplier to have about 60 of the 150 tons on contract delivered as soon as possible, he said. About 30 tons of salt were used to fight the Jan. 20 snow, which is the typical amount for any winter weather event, he said. Since most of the snows in December and January haven’t come over the weekend, there hasn’t been much overtime required, Trapp said. “I’d like to think that this was the last snow for the year,” Trapp said of Jan. 20. In Fort Thomas, Public Works Director Ron Dill said since the city is fortunate to

have a large storage area for salt, they still have plenty on hand even after all the snow the area has received this season. Dill said they’ve made sure to reorder in advance when the supply starts to get low because his concern is that the supplier will run out. “We have reached the point that they are running out so we’re on back-order,” Dill said. “If this pattern continues, later in the season we may all be begging for salt from other places.” Bellevue’s Public Works Director Rick Mallery said the city has used more salt than usual at this point, but it hasn’t become a problem yet. Mallery said the city had plenty to get through the most recent snow storm and is waiting on 70 tons of salt

By Chris Mayhew

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Alexandria public works department employee Brett Finnell dumps bucket full of salt and sand mix from the city’s salt barn in the background before heading back out to plow and treat the streets in the midst of the snowfall at 3:45 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 20. to keep the supply up. In Cold Spring, the city has about 150 tons stockpiled for future use, said Dave Rodgers, public works supervisor. “We’ve actually used about 200 tons to date, which is typically about our entire year,” Rodgers said. The city typically uses about 15 tons per snowfall, but this time the city salted on three different occasions for a total of about 45 tons,

he said. “I heard the weather forecaster the other day say that we’ve already reached our annual snowfall total for the year,” Rodgers said. According to the National Weather Service office in Wilmington, Ohio, snowfall totals for Jan. 20, in Campbell County ranged between 4 inches to 4.5 inches. For more about your community, visit www. nky.com/campbellcounty

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Fort Thomas public works employee Josh York put more salt into employee Jack Perkins’ truck to be spread throughout the city as snow began to fall Thursday, Jan. 20.

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News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman | District Manager . . . . . . . . . 442-3461 | ckellerman@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.

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Organizers of an annual homeless count admit finding people who don’t have a permanent address is always challenging, but worth the effort in order to ensure funding to better serve and help people in need. Campbell County will again be part of the statewide count, in its eighth straight year, when 50 surveyors attempt to record a “snapshot” of how many homeless people there are and relevant demographic information from 12:01 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 27 to midnight. The Northern Kentucky Area Development District is leading the organizing of the count for the eight counties it represents. To find the homeless, the surveyors go everywhere from where day laborer’s go for work, to libraries and a variety of other places where they’re likely to visit, said Michael Hurysz, human services specialist, for NKADD. “It is a challenge, basically we go to places that the homeless congregate,” Hurysz said. Teams of surveyors visit the shelters, soup kitchens, and work on the streets and the riverfront areas, he said. The 2010 count, performed during wintry weather on Jan. 28, 2010, identified 122 persons as homeless in Campbell County, and an additional 97 “chronically housed” people, most of whom said

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2010 homeless count data

In Campbell, Kenton and Boone counties, the Jan. 28, 2010 homeless count recorded a total of 644 persons as homeless. By county, the numbers of homeless people counted included: 122 persons in Campbell, 406 persons in Kenton, and 116 persons in Boone. In Campbell County, the breakdown of the 122 people revealed the following demographic information. • 12 military veterans. • 24 were children. • 58 admitted to chronic substance abuse. • 50 identified as severely mentally ill. • 30 were victims of domestic violence. • 15 were identified as “chronically” homeless, a measure that includes having been homeless for more than one year. • 2 had HIV/AIDS For more detailed information about the 2010 count and a link to the full report visit the Kentucky Housing Corporation’s website, www.kyhousing.org. they were living with friends or relatives after being unable to maintain their own housing. The total tally of homeless people counted in Kentucky on Jan. 28, 2010 was 6,623 persons, with 3,446 of those people counted outside of Fayette County (Lexington) and Jefferson County (Louisville). The numbers from the homeless counts are reported to the Kentucky Housing Corporation, which sends them to creator of the homeless count initiative, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Hurysz said. For Northern Kentucky, the homeless count has been one of several factors that has helped secured additional funding for homeless programs by pointing out the fact that the region does have a substantial homeless population, he said. “It tells us the needs of the homeless,” Hurysz said. “It also points out the needs for additional resources. It points out gaps in resources, and it’s useful when we ask for funding to help the homeless.” One new resource the count helped support is the “Herth program,” new to Northern Kentucky, he said. “Basically it’s to prevent people from becoming homeless to house them if they are homeless,” Hurysz said. One of the sites in Campbell County the surveyors will be visiting during the 2011 count is the Henry Hosea House in Newport and its soup kitchen there, said Karen Yates, executive director of the house. The teams won’t limit themselves to shelters and soup kitchens though, and they’re out at all different times of the day, Yates said. “They even have people go out at night under the bridges and over the riverbanks,” she said. For more about your community, visit www. nky.com/campbellcounty


News

January 27, 2011

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Alexandria area tire heaps fueled need for state amnesty By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

It’s been more than a decade since the last tire hoards were removed from two sites south of Alexandria in 1997, but the legacy of those cleanups remains as the rotating state tire amnesty program visits Campbell County this spring. It’s anticipated the amnesty event will be either the last weekend in May or the first weekend in June, said David Plummer, solid waste coordinator for Campbell County. What it took to clean up two massive tire dumps, including a visit from the state’s waste management director in 1995, helped lead the Kentucky General Assembly to pass a law requiring that $1 from the sale of each passenger tire go into the Kentucky Waste Tire Trust Fund. “Campbell County was one of the original catalysts for creating the original tire fund,” Plummer said. The first tire amnesty in Northern Kentucky in 1999 netted 279,000 tires. The program is now run through

FILE

Workers from a tire recycling firm perform last minute cleanup of the “Windy Ridge” tire dump site off Licking Pike in Alexandria in June of 1996. the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. For general information about the state program visit, http://transportation.ky.gov/enviroach/ wastetire.htm. According to a 1995 Enquirer story, Campbell County was one of three Kentucky counties to share nearly $1.5 million in state funding to clean up dumps that posed health and safety threats. Campbell County had two ridge top dump sites where nearly 4 million

tires had been collected. The two tire dumps were both started by Charles Wanner with the reported intention to resell them. Wanner died in 1989 before the sites were cleaned up. The larger site, an estimated 3 million tires, was located off Licking Pike near Alexandria, and another site was located off Gilbert Ridge Road near Alexandria. Cleanup of the Gilbert Ridge Road site was finished in 1997. The tire dumps had been the sites of

fires, and also had to be fenced-in and sprayed to cut down on mosquito and rodent populations. One of the tire dumps was next to Fran Reitman’s backyard, and with others she formed the group Citizens Against Tires in the early 1990s. Reitman said her children had to be evacuated from her home because of the fires and other health hazards, and the mosquito population made being in the backyard

not an option. “You were covered in mosquitoes,” Reitman said. Reitman, who owns and runs an auto salvage and parts business in Camp Springs with other family members, said it especially bothered her that her family business has to properly dispose of tire. “So I thought, why does this man have millions of tires and nobody’s controlling him,” she said. The state tire fund and the $1 per tire fee was a step in the right direction, Reitman said. It sometimes costs her business as much as $2 per tire to properly dispose of each tire, Reitman said. The tire dump problem was fixed by working with the Fiscal Court, which sprayed for mosquitoes and also worked to get the tires cleaned up, she said. Reitman said the cleanup did handle the tires on the surface of the properties, but it’s also possible that tires are still buried there. “It was truly an effort where county government worked together with people to solve a problem,” she said.

Each year, Campbell County also collects tires at its spring and fall clean up events, but the number is limited because there is a cost associated with disposing of them properly, Plummer said. There were 67 tons of tires recycled in last year’s county cleanups where items including general debris and scrap metal are collected, he said. “Tires are one of the biggest expenses at our cleanups,” Plummer said. For people holding on to tires who don’t know what to do with them, the tire amnesty can be a dramatic boon to helping keep unused tires from sitting around, he said. “There’s no limit, you can bring as many tires as you want,” Plummer said of the state tire amnesty program. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/alexandria

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CCF Recorder

News

January 27, 2011

Recorder staff win state press honors Community Recorder sports reporter James Weber and former Recorder staff reporter Paul McKibben won a total of seven awards at the Kentucky Press Association convention Jan. 22 in Louisville. James Weber won five awards in three sports categories. Weber won second place in Best Sports Story for “Mustangs honor coach with 10-inning title” in the Camp-

bell County Recorder. The Bishop Brossart baseball team pulled out a victory in honor of a former assistant coach who died three days earlier. Weber won second place in Best Sports Feature Story for the Campbell County Recorder story “Highlands athlete back in the swing of things.” Weber wrote about tennis player Drew Freyberger’s recovery from back surgery and his return to the

court. Judges called it an “inspiring story of athlete overcoming serious medical issue.” Weber won third place in Best Sports Feature Story for a Boone County Recorder story about the relationship between Boone County High School athlete Adam Sunderhaus and his cousin who has a disability. In the Best Sports Picture category, Weber won first place for a Campbell County

Recorder photo of Highlands football player Jordan Streeter who lost his helmet trying to score a touchdown. Judges wrote, “The expression on the players’ faces tells a story in itself.” Weber’s photo of Newport High School basketball players fighting for a rebound won second place for the Campbell County Recorder. McKibben, who is now a reporter at The Cincinnati Enquirer, won first place and

third place in the Best Feature Story category. Both were in the Boone County Recorder. McKibben’s first-place story was about former Immaculate Heart of Mary School Principal Ed Colina’s new calling. Since selling his home and car, he’s worked three years in Africa setting up a relief organization. According to judges, it was a “well-written, inspiring story about local man, who gave

McKibben

Weber

up everything to help others thousands of miles away.” McKibben’s story “Detective more than just a cop” won third in Best Feature Story. He profiled Boone County detective Josh Quinn who’s involved in many community groups and plays bagpipes at funerals.

BRIEFLY Conservation district meeting

Supervisors of the Campbell County Conservation District will meet Monday, February 7, 2010, 9:00 a.m. at the Campbell County Conservation Office, 8351 E. Main St., Suite 104, Alexandria, KY 41001. The public is encouraged and invited to attend.

or shine, teams take turns walking around a track to help raise money and awareness for the American Cancer Society. The event includes food, games, entertainment and more. Everyone is welcome, regardless of whether they've joined a team or registered. For more information visit relayforlife.org/campbellky.

Campbell County Relay Dog helps for Life June 17-18 young readers

This year’s Campbell County Relay For Life will take place from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. June 17-18, at Newport High School. During the event, held rain

Children in grades 1-5 can improve their reading skills by reading to a dog during Puppy Tales Monday, Feb. 7, at the Cold Spring Branch of the Campbell County Public

Library. Reading to a dog increases a child’s confidence, which helps them improve their reading skills. Puppy Tales will begin at 3:30 p.m., and parents may sign their children up for a 15minute reading slot. After the session, children will receive a certificate and a picture with the dog. Register by calling 859781-6166.

Council workshop

Slick moves

Highland Heights is holding a council workshop at 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 29 at the city building, 176 Johns Hill Road. This meeting is not open to the public.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Kylie Koeninger, 7, of Alexandria, careens downhill lurching from side to side in her front yard Stillwater Drive Wednesday, Jan. 12, during a snow day off school.

Wuchner to run for Kentucky state auditor a small gathering in the Capitol. Wuchner’s filing papers were signed by state Rep.

Marie Rader, R-McKee, and longtime conservative activist and a founder of the Boone County Tea Party,

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2008, she received the Defender of Economic Freedom Award from Kentucky Club for Growth. “The office of the auditor is entrusted with being a principled watchdog of the taxpayers’ dollars. Kentucky taxpayers can trust that I will work to restore our commonwealth’s fiscal health. I started my career as a bedside nurse, helping patients deal with the very challenges I would later face as a breast cancer survivor. “Later moving into hospital administration and strategic planning, I worked to streamline efficiencies and develop more affordable ways to provide excellence in health care,” she said. “As a state representative for the 66th District, I

fought for improved health care for children Wuchner and seniors, meaningful support for our military families, excellence in education, Second Amendment rights and prevention of child abuse and fatalities. “In this past session alone, I stood with my fellow House Republicans against $1 billion in new debt and $300 million in job-killing taxes.” Her personal time has been committed to family, raising money and awareness for breast cancer and women’s health, and serving as an ambassador for issues close to her heart; child abuse and neglect, and children with the learning difference known as dyslexia, Wuchner said.

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Emily Shelton. “I’m honored to have the support of my family, friends and colleagues, traditional Republican activists and Tea Party leaders,” Wuchner said. “Kentucky families are struggling, state government is struggling and, now more than ever, those who seek to lead must find possibilities where there seem to be only problems. “ As a wife and mother, nurse, state legislator and cancer survivor, I have faced challenges and sought solutions in adversity. I believe Kentucky needs a strong fiscal conservative to help state government get its house in order.” Conservative organizations that rank fiscal policy have consistently ranked Wuchner at the top. In

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“I am proud to continue OKI’s work of ensuring the safety and economic vitality of our transportation network,” said incoming OKI Board President, Clermont County Ohio Commissioner Edwin Humphrey. “Our transportation network not only serves the citizens of our region but links us to the global economy. We must seize every opportunity to better our roads, highways, waterways, bike and pedestrian paths.” The new officers for the OKI Board of Directors will serve a two-year term (2011 and 2012) and include: • President: Clermont County Commissioner Edwin Humphrey • First Vice President: Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune • Second Vice President: Kenton County Fiscal Court Judge Executive Steve Arlinghaus • Treasurer: Resident Atlarge Member Kenneth Reed • Past President: Campbell County Judge Executive Steve Pendery “It has been a pleasure to

serve as the OKI Board President over the past two years,” said Campbell County Judge Executive Steve Pendery. “I am positive that the incoming OKI Board officers will build upon the collaboration and partnerships we have established over the years to build this great organization.” OKI’s Board of Directors consists of 117 people of which, 80 are elected officials. OKI is federally mandated and funnels about $40 million in transportation funds to construction and planning projects throughout its eight-county, three-state region that includes: Ohio’s Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties; Kentucky’s Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties and Dearborn County Indiana. OKI is a council of local governments, business organizations and community groups committed to developing collaborative strategies, plans and programs to improve the quality of life and economic development potential of the Tri-State.


SCHOOLS

CCF Recorder

January 27, 2011

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | mshaw@nky.com | 578-1053

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

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RECORDER

Local schools prepare for Catholic Schools Week

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Schools throughout the county will be joining schools across the nation in celebration of Catholic Schools Week Sunday, Jan. 30 through Saturday, Feb. 5. From prayer services to a variety of appreciation events, students, staff and parents will be spending the week celebrating catholic education. St. Thomas School Principal Sharon Bresler said Catholic Schools Week is special because it is a time when all the Catholic schools in the country to take time celebrate. “I think it really shows the unity of all the Catholic schools and gives us a chance to celebrate who we are,” Bresler said. At St. Thomas, the school has events planned to show appreciation for students, parents, employees and volunteers throughout the week.

To go along with this year’s theme, “Catholic Schools: A+ for America,” students designed buttons, one of which will be chosen and enough will be made for everyone at the school to wear one throughout the week. “The kids really look forward to this week every year,” Bresler said. At St. Catherine of Siena School, Principal Doug Lonneman said they too have a variety of activities planned throughout the week, including a family dinner night, to show appreciation to parents. Lonneman said every person involved in Catholic schools, from students and parents to employees and parishioners, are important and necessary to keep the schools going. “This week really gives us the opportunity to thank everyone,” Lonneman said. “Catholic families really make sacrifices, both financially and by giving of their time and talents.”

PROVIDED

Sacrament of Reconciliation

Fourth-graders at St. Joseph School, Cold Spring, helped the second graders get excited about the upcoming Sacrament of Reconciliation as part of their service learning. The fourth-graders made booklets to guide the second-graders and let them know what to expect. They then read them to their second-grade partners helping them to feel comfortable and excited about the sacrament. Shown: Alex Howard and Joe Whelan read their steps to reconciliation booklet to Chloe Hicks.

Fort Thomas Schools ask for calendar input By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Officials at Fort Thomas Independent Schools are reaching out to parents, faculty, staff and students to help with developing the district’s calendar for the 20112012 school year. A survey on the district’s website is giving those involved with the school a chance to pick their preferences on when school will begin and end, when various breaks should be taken and how long breaks should last. Assistant Superintendent Rita Byrd said it’s been a couple years since the district has done this kind of survey. “People like to have the opportunity to give their input, and that’s why we are doing this survey,” Byrd said. The survey includes whether to

begin school in mid-August and finish by Memorial Day or begin in late August and finish in June, whether there should be one or two days off school for fall break and President’s Day, how long winter break should be and when to take spring break. There is also a section to leave further comments and give other suggestions. Byrd said they have received more than 500 responses. District officials will take the results of the survey into account when developing the calendar, which they hope to present to the school board for approval in February, Byrd said. Byrd said there are some potential state regulations that may be coming about that may force the district to change some things in the calendar if it doesn’t meet the guidelines.

St. Catherine to start all-day kindergarten By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

St. Catherine of Siena School in Fort Thomas is spreading the word about a big change at their school with an open house. Starting in the 2011-2012 school year, St. Catherine will be offering all-day kindergarten. Principal Doug Lonneman said there are two main reasons the school decided to switch from half to full-day kindergarten; more working parents and to better prepare students. “In the past three to four years the percent of working parents at our school has gone up from about 50 percent to 85 percent,” Lonneman said. “Also, studies are showing that all-day kindergarten is more beneficial to kids because they get more content and more enrichment time.” Catherine Ampfer, a teacher at the school whose children also attend, said the all-day kindergarten is a win-win for parents and students.

Lonneman said most kindergarten students are already attending the school’s Kindercare program the other half of the day, meaning they’re there all day already. The all-day kindergarten will end up being less expensive for parents than half-day and Kindercare, Lonneman said. Out-of-parish tuition for kindergarten will be $2,000. At the open house, from 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 27, visitors can learn more about the kindergarten and school as a whole by touring the school and talking with teachers and current parents. “Usually potential parents hear the official version, but it’s nice to be able to talk to a parent that’s actually going through it,” Ampfer said. “We just want people to look at our school and see if it’s a good fit for their child and family.” Lonneman said he hopes the allday kindergarten will be a selling point for the school and help meet the needs of the community. For more information contact the school at 572-2680.

Second-grader Maddie Enginger listens to Jenna Fryer and Caroline Schack read their book about reconciliation.

PROVIDED

Alexandria school churns drive to read with ice cream incentive By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Campbell County Middle School has found the “scoop” on how to motivate students to read more by giving away an ice cream sundae party for the classroom that checks out the most books. The six-week “Book Scoop Contest” ends Feb. 11. Students’ individual scoop points for reading books and magazines are tallied into the totals for their language arts teacher’s class, and the winner will be determined based upon the highest percentage of materials checked out by a classroom, said Rhonda Wells, assistant media specialist in the school’s media center/library. “There’s some competition going on, and I’ve had some kids coming in and asking ‘How do I get some scoops,’” Wells said.

There are books from all subject areas that have been marked that if a student checks them out they instantly receive a scoop, and about 100 of those have been given out in the contest’s first three weeks, she said. The idea for the ice cream contest came about in a search for a fun way to get students thinking about reading, she said. In the first months of 2010, the school hosted a contest called “Book blizzard” and there pretty much was a blizzard, Wells said. The media center staff has joked that they don’t think this year’s ice cream theme resulted in the recent snows, Wells said. In the first 21 days of the contest, 1,647 books, magazines and other media have been checked out, and that’s a slight increase over what the number typically is, even with snow days and a holi-

day happening over that time span, she said. There is a board tracking each classes’ weekly progress in the contest, Wells said. “Several students will check out the board, they want to be in the lead,” she said. The books the students check out usually are not required classroom texts, Wells said. However, each class keeps a reading log where students are expected to read a certain number of books, said Principal David Sandlin. The contest’s ice cream party will be purchased using book fair proceeds, and it’s a good way to get students into the library, Sandlin said. “It puts something in their hands on these snow days,” he said. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/alexandria


A6

CCF Recorder

January 27, 2011

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CCF Recorder

January 27, 2011

ST. HENRY SCHOOL Preschool - Grade 8

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SPORTS

A8

CCF Recorder

BRIEFLY

The week at Highlands

• The Highlands girls basketball team beat WaltonVerona 48-40, Jan. 17. Highlands’ top-scorer was Jesse Daley with 14 points. The Boone County girls basketball team beat Highlands 68-42, Jan. 21. Highlands’ top-scorer was Jesse Daley with 18 points. • In boys basketball, Highlands beat Shroder 50-48, Jan. 18. Highlands was led by Conor Crowley and Patrick Towles with 11 points each. On Jan. 22, Boone County beat Highlands 71-64. Crowley was Boone’s top-scorer with 20 points, followed by Ryan Egan with 19 points. • In boys swimming, Highlands placed fifth with a score of 154 in the NKAC Championships, Jan. 22. Highlands’ Connor Downard won the 200 meter freestyle in 1 minute, 49.69 seconds; and Downard won the 100 meter backstroke in 56.14 seconds. • In girls swimming, Highlands placed third with a score of 196 in the NKAC Championships, Jan. 22.

January 27, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7118

The week at Dayton

• On Jan. 18, Villa beat Dayton 45-32. Dayton���s Schowalter led her team with 11 points. • In girls basketball, Dayton beat Ludlow 62-50, Jan. 22. Dayton’s top-scorers were Nicole Schowalter and Hannah Schoulteis with 15 points each.

The week at Newport

• The St. Henry girls basketball team beat Newport 70-31, Jan. 18. Newport’s Jamie Harrison led her team with 13 points. On Jan. 21, Newport lost 48-34 to Grant County. Newport’s top-scorer was Margaret Faison with 11 points.

The week at Bellevue

The Bellevue girls basketball team lost 81-65 to Pendleton County, Jan. 19. Bellevue’s top-scorer was Megan Arnzen with 17 points.

|

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

NewCath, Brossart go to state By James Weber

jweber@nky.com

The week at Campbell

• The Campbell County boys basketball team beat Harrison County 70-53, Jan. 18. Campbell’s top-scorer was Nate McGovney with 19 points. On Jan. 21, Campbell County beat Holmes 70-69 in overtime. Campbell was led by Nate Losey with 21 points. • In girls basketball, Campbell County beat Schott 57-47, Jan. 18. Campbell’s top-scorer was Taylor Griffin with 15 points. On Jan. 22, Campbell County lost 55-49 to Harrison County. Campbell’s top-scorer was Taylor Griffin with 12 points. • In wrestling, Ryle beat Campbell County 49-17, Jan. 19. Campbell’s Yenter pinned D. Pruett in 3 minutes, 45 seconds; Collins beat Meiman in a 17-7 major decision; Bachman beat Stephens in a 15-4 major decision; and Franck beat Williamson 9-2. Also on Jan. 19, Campbell County beat Withrow 44-31. Campbell’s Maggard won by forfeit; Yenter pinned Underwood in 3 minutes, 5 seconds; Fausz pinned Harkness in 2 minutes, 53 seconds; Fryer pinned Snow in 1 minute, 21 seconds; Hamilton won by forfeit; Collins beat Tombs in a 16-1 technical fall; Bachman pinned Nelson in 1 minute, 45 seconds; and Statmiller beat Isaac 10-9. • In boys swimming, Campbell placed 10th with a score of 32 in the NKAC Championships, Jan. 22. • In girls swimming, Campbell County placed 13th with a score of 17 in the NKAC Championships, Jan. 22.

YOUTH

TONY TRIBBLE/CONTRIBUTOR

Newport Central Catholic’s Nathan Grosser shoots over Ludlow’s Chris Yates during the All “A” Classic Jan. 19

Newport Central Catholic and Bishop Brossart will be in familiar territory next week. The boys basketball teams from both schools punched tickets to the All “A” Classic state tournament in their regionals Jan. 22-23. Both teams already have plenty of trophy space reserved for championship trophies in the All “A” NewCath (13-4) won the Ninth Region title over Holy Cross, 76-47 over Holy Cross Jan. 22 at Lloyd. The Thoroughbreds won the regional for the sixth time in eight years. Brady Hightchew led NCC with 22 points. Jake Giesler had 17 and Zach Ryan 16. Hightchew was tournament most valuable player. Giesler and Brian Doyle were also all-tournament picks. Giesler scored his 1,000th career point during the semifinals the night before. NCC will play a firstround game in the All “A” state tourney 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 3 at Eastern Kentucky University’s McBrayer Arena in Richmond. NCC will play the Region 3 champion, either Owensboro Catholic or Edmonson County. Those teams play Jan. 27. Other Campbell County members of the Ninth Region all-tourney team were Travis Jones of Newport, D.J. Slater of Bellevue and D.J. Walker of Dayton. Bishop Brossart (10-5)

TONY TRIBBLE/CONTRIBUTOR

Newport Central Catholic’s Jake Giesler shoots over Anthony Camerena of Ludlow during the All “A” Classic Jan. 19. won the 10th Region title over Deming, 59-56 in overtime Jan. 23 at NKU’s Regents Hall. The Mustangs won the 10th Region for the eighth time in nine years. Justin Saunders had 11 points for Brossart, as did Dylan Dierig. Joe Jennings had 10 points, Travis Norton eight, Austin Trentman seven, Zach Fardo seven and Daniel Schultz five. Schultz and Jennings were all-tourney picks, and Saunders was the MVP. Jeremy Hammons made the all-tourney team for Silver Grove. Brossart plays West

Carter in the final firstround game in the All “A” state tourney, scheduled for 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 3 (expect it to run late). The NewCath girls team is already in the state tourney for the fifth straight year. NewCath (11-3) will play St. Patrick 5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 2, in a first-round game. The Recorder will have more on the All “A” state tourney next week. See more Recorder sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/ blogs/presspreps.

Bishop Brossart hires girls soccer coach Bishop Brossart High School hired Brad Gough, 27, as the new girls soccer head coach. He replaces Terry Bray, who resigned this fall after guiding the Lady ’Stangs for one season and reaching the regional tournament. Gough, a Cincinnati resident, has played soccer since he was 6 years old and was assistant women’s coach at Cincinnati Christian University last year, helping guide them to the highest conference finish in school history. He was recommended by the

soccer search committee that interviewed five top candidates from a list of 17 applicants. Gough has also been a high school head coach for two years at Bellevue and guided them to their best finishes in school history, increasing team size and participation. He has been involved in club soccer as head coach and trainer for the Tristate Futbol Alliance and coaches both the U15 and U16 girls teams and the U12 and U10 boys teams.

Gough was a high school soccer player at St. Henry High School and was a starting member of the 2000 Kentucky high school state runnerup team. He officiated soccer from 1993 to 2004 at all levels including USL Professional Soccer and is scheduled to get his E License in February. He has a Regional Goal Keeper Coaching and a Regional Special Topics diploma in attacking play from the NSCAA. He is currently finalizing the schedule for 2011 and putting

together his coaching staff. He plans to meet with all parents and athletes in the next few weeks. Gough Gough and his wife, Maggie, are expecting their first child in March. His wife is employed at Northern Kentucky University. The Lady ’Stangs finished strong last year with a youthful team defeating Newport Central Catholic in District play before falling to Notre Dame Academy in the fourth overtime period in region play.

Lickert: Exciting, positive things at CCHS By Adam Turer kysports@communitypress.com

One of northern Kentucky’s most successful young coaches is on the move. After leading the football program at Holmes High School for the past four seasons, Stephen Lickert was introduced as the new Campbell County High School head coach on Wednesday, Jan. 19. Lickert replaces Troy Styer, who resigned following the 2010 season. “This is an opportunity for me to go to a 6A school,” said Lickert. “There are a lot of exciting and positive things going on at Campbell County.” Two of the things Lickert is most excited about include the number of Camels interested in playing football and the facilities

improvements on the horizon at Campbell County High School. After winning district champiLickert onships at the smaller 4A school, Lickert hopes he can elevate the Camels to district championships against the area’s largest programs. “Coach Lickert brings a strong will to win to CCHS,” said CCHS principal Renee Boots in a press release. “We are very pleased to have him lead the Camels.” Just 31 years old, Lickert is now leading his third program. He revitalized the programs at Dayton and Holmes and aims to do the same at Campbell County. He has a championship pedigree, winning a state

championship as a player at Highlands and a national championship as a player at Georgetown College. When the Campbell County job opened up, Lickert seized his chance to take over a program in Class 6A. “When you have an opportunity like this, you jump on it and see where it takes you,” he said. Leaving Holmes was not easy for Lickert. In his four years leading the Bulldogs, he took the program to three straight playoff appearances and back-toback district championships. “It’s always tough,” Lickert said. “You leave a group of kids that you love and care about.” The eventful week at Campbell County was slowed by two snow days, but Lickert was able to meet with Camels players once

after his introduction. He met with the program’s seniors to discuss their goals and expectations. Lickert has not yet started the process of evaluating and assembling his coaching staff, but expects to begin the process soon. He was excited to meet the Camels players and is excited to have so many players on the roster. “I shared my vision of the program with them,” Lickert said. “We’re going to bring the same basic offensive and defensive system from Holmes, but we’ll do right by our kids based on the personnel we have here.” Lickert will finish the year teaching at Holmes. Next year, he will teach at Campbell County. “The toughest part now is not being able to be with

the Campbell County kids every day,” he said. Several coaching mentors have helped Lickert reach this point of his career. He credits Georgetown head coach Bill Cronin, Scott High School head coach and former Georgetown defensive coordinator Dave Campbell, and Holmes Athletic Director Ron Madrick with helping shape his coaching career. Lickert hopes to use his experience to jumpstart the Campbell County program right away. He has high expectations for the program and believes his new players share the same expectations. “We’re going to get after it,” Lickert said. “We’re not using this year as a learning experience; we’re going to use this season to improve and win some games.”


Sports & recreation

CCF Recorder

January 27, 2011

A9

Bowling at halfway point this season By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Here is an update on Northern Kentucky bowling through matches of Jan. 13.

Boys

District 1: Cooper 38-11, Boone County 28-14, Simon Kenton 27-15, Conner 13-29, Ryle 11-31. District 2: Campbell County 39-3, Scott 26-16, Dixie Heights 25-17, Covington Catholic 23-19,

Highlands 16-26. District 3: Newport 49-7, Brossart 36.5-12.5, NewCath 34-22, Bellevue 2432, Dayton 15-34. District 4: Walton-Verona 24-25, Holy Cross 17-32, Lloyd 15.5-33.5, St. Henry 15-34, Beechwood 4-38, Villa Madonna 3-32. Top averages: Chris Hamilton (Dixie Heights) 201.18, Zach Lawson (Scott) 195.75, Chris Fecher (Simon Kenton) 195.67, Jordan Racke (Campbell

County) 193.55, Paul Hoeh (Newport) 192.25), Andrew Marsee (Newport) 191.14.

Girls

District 1: Cooper 28-14, Conner 25-17, Boone 2319, SK 12-37, Ryle 8-34. District 2: Campbell 411, Notre Dame 36-13, Scott 23-12, Dixie 16-26, Highlands 13-29. District 3: Newport 3719, Brossart 36-13, New-

Cath 35-21, Dayton 24-18. District 4: Lloyd 29-20, Holy Cross 17-32, St. Henry 17-32, VMA 6-29, Beechwood 1-41. Top averages: Katlyn Hoeh (Newport) 186.38, Julie Ampfer (Campbell) 176.92, Megan Kindoll (Scott) 172.6, Alli Haggard (Conner) 168.75, Erica Biddle (Campbell) 164.75, Sara DeMoss (Campbell) 163.92. See more sports coverage at www.cincinnati.com/ blogs/presspreps

Grave Diggers second in state

TONY TRIBBLE/CONTRIBUTOR

Newport’s Ron Rice, left, blocks a shot by Saint Henry’s Darius Meiman (32) during the All “A” Classic at Newport Central Catholic Jan. 19.

PROVIDED

Highlands coach nominated for national football award Head coach Dale Mueller of Highlands High School in Fort Thomas is among 28 football coaches from across the nation who have been named as nominees for the inaugural Don Shula NFL Coach of the Year Award. The award was created to honor exemplary football coaches at all levels of the sport who display the integrity, achievement and leadership demonstrated by the winningest coach in NFL history, Don Shula. The coaches were nominated by NFL teams and by USA Football, the sport’s national governing body on youth and amateur levels. Mueller’s nomination was supported by the Bengals. Mueller is among 16 high school coaches nominated, six coaches from the NFL, three from colleges and three from youth/middle school football. The national winner will be announced during Super Bowl week. The eight-person selection panel includes Don Shula, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, former NFL head coaches Tony Dungy and John Madden, and General Raymond Odierno, commander of the U.S. Joint Forces Command. The national winner will receive $25,000 in addition to a trip to the Super Bowl.

Mueller, a Fort Thomas native and a Highlands graduate, has had remarkable success at his alma mater. In 17 seasons, 19942010, as head coach, he has won 10 state championships, with a record of 215-34 (.863 winning percentage). Although Highlands’ student enrollment is that of a Kentucky Class 3A school, the Bluebirds have accepted the option to play in the Class 5A ranks the past four seasons and have won the

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state title each year. They were 14-0 in 2010. Mueller was the 2008 season winner of the Paul Brown Excellence in Coaching Award, given annually by the Bengals to an outstanding high school football coach in the region. In addition to his football

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success at Highlands, Mueller is an academic instructor, having taught courses that range from entry-level algebra to advanced physics. Dale and his wife, Patty, have four children and will celebrate their 33rd wedding anniversary in August.

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The All “A” Ninth Region Tournament was Jan. 17-22 at Lloyd Memorial High School. Newport Central Catholic defeated Holy Cross 76-47 for the title. Dayton lost to Holy Cross in the first round, Bellevue lost to Lloyd in the quarterfinals, Newport lost to rival NewCath in the semifinals. All-Tournament Team: MVP-Brady Hightchew (NewCath), Jake Giesler (NewCath), Brian Doyle (NewCath), Jake Burger (Holy Cross), Jerry Arlinghaus (Holy Cross), Donnie Cheatum (Lloyd), Travis Jones (Newport), Conner McLaughlin (St. Henry), D.J. Slater (Bellevue), D.J. Walker (Dayton), Tyler Fangman (Beechwood), Karl Weickgenannt (Villa Madonna), Cory Hill (Heritage Academy).

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EAMON QUEENEY/STAFF

Dayton High School Greendevil T.R. Smith (23) drives to the basket during the game with Holy Cross Jan. 17. Holy Cross defeated Dayton 81-39 in the Ninth Region All “A” Classic boys basketball tournament.

The Campbell County South Soccer U-12 boys team, the Grave Diggers, sponsored by the Alexandria Funeral Home, were awarded the secondplace recreational team in the state of Kentucky at the Commonwealth Cup tournament in Berea. The team went undefeated during their regular season. Pictured are Mark Welch, Sean Langworthy, Brandon Phelps, Nick Neltner, Dakota Hamilton, Ezra Crist, Morgan Drake, Jordan Bryan, Christian Henderson, Steven Hagedorn, Nathaniel Tucker, Joshua Haller, Andrew Walburg, coach Allen Steffen and assistant coach Mike Langworthy.

5 1 3 -7 7 1 -8 8 2 7 Uglytub.com

Looking king to playy ggirls irls AAU Basketball? Baske

BRIEFLY The week at Silver Grove

Take ke Your our Game Ga Above The Rest!

• The Silver Grove boys basketball team lost 90-45 to Deming, Jan. 17. Silver Grove’s Jeremy Hammons led the team with 23 points. • In girls basketball on Jan. 22, Scott beat Silver Grove 71-31. Payton Govan was Silver Grove’s top-scorer with 13 points.

Now forming spring & summer teams

The week at NewCath

MATTHEW BECK/CONTRIBUTOR

Bellevue’s Brandon Hoffman passes the ball to a teammate after getting Lloyd’s Donnie Cheatum to leave his feet. Bellevue lost to Lloyd Jan. 18 71-47 in the All “A” tournament.

The Newport Central Catholic girls basketball team beat Mason County 65-52, Jan. 22. NewCath’s top-scorer was Kiley Bartels with 21 points.

Register Online: www.angelsbasketballclub.com CE-0000444131


VIEWPOINTS

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Fort Thomas Recorder

January 27, 2011

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | mshaw@nky.com | 578-1053

RECORDER

We need to curb hidden federal rate costs

Every day, Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky families pay hidden costs of unfunded federal requirements, referred to as “mandates.” Here’s how it typically works. Years ago, Congress delegated some of its authority (and our voices) to unelected federal agencies. Federal agencies, which in most cases are just doing their jobs, issue regulations which require local service providers to spend more to comply. We then fund federal mandates through fee payments, often without knowing all the reasons why we pay what we pay. Unfortunately, federal regulations increase the cost of things we cannot afford to do without, such as water, sewer and power. They hit working families the hardest because they affect all rate payers, regardless of income. Our local utilities have no choice but to comply. Unfunded federal mandates for sewer and water in

Northern Kentucky alone are estimated to cost over a billion dollars in the next decade – more than $10,000 per family. A recent water Rob Hudson mandate highlights the probCommunity lem. A federal Recorder agency decided guest that water columnist providers in the nation need to reduce a by-product in their systems. The new mandate expands an old mandate to all testing sites within our extensive local water system. The federal agency estimated the rule would cost 72 million dollars annually for the country. However well-intended, they seem to have missed the mark. Compliance costs for Northern Kentucky alone will eventually

exceed 85 million dollars. Although it will be paid out over a period of years, that’s an added cost of over $1,000 for every local ratepayer. To support the new rule, the agency found that the health benefits would be uncertain. Based on the federal government’s statistics, the new rule won’t prevent a single annual death in Northern Kentucky. Nearly 40 years after the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1972, the EPA has announced several new initiatives. There is no end in sight. This is a tough issue because the thought of drinking unsafe water terrifies us. We shouldn’t question the good faith of those who view these regulations as public protection. But we should be thinking about whether we can afford to pay for more regulations. We assess risks, costs and benefits because they are part of life, and

we try to be reasonable about it. I know this is true because we keep driving every chance we get, even though we have serious motor vehicle accidents in our region about every day. Let’s face it – most regulations are so complex that only experts understand them. In response, Congressman Davis’s REINS Act is finally getting the attention it deserves. The REINS Act would require Congressional approval of all new regulations before significant costs can be imposed. With the REINS Act, at least Congress would have to pass judgment on future regulations, and they might stop a few of the bad ones. Without change, a perfect storm will blow in on local ratepayers. We’re paying for aging infrastructure replacement and federal mandates, at the same time, in a down economy. The utility providers have direct mandates, but other federal energy

and chemical mandates force their general costs to rise further. About 10 percent of the recent water rate increase covered a mere downpayment on a single new mandate. Some people are taking the approach of trying to vilify local agencies, partly because they’re the easy targets who mail out the utility bills. People challenge them over peanuts while a billion dollars of federal mandates remain unchecked. We should support Congressman Davis’s efforts and tackle the problem’s root cause. A chorus of intelligent voices, singing the same tune about costly federal mandates, would be better than having noisy local squabbles. Rob Hudson is a partner with Frost Brown Todd, LLC, in Florence, Kentucky, where his practice focuses on labor and government relations. He is a former Chair of the Northern Kentucky Chamber and the Covington Business Council.

ric caused the shootings in Tucson? Absolutely not. “From the available data broadcast by responsible media outlets, it is clear that the shooter was a wack-job. If you saw his video of the inside of his community college, and listened to his comments as he was walking through the school, and read the item about his social networking nonsense (including his image in a red thong), you would know that he is a nut. “We cannot protect ourselves from dingbats like him unless we identify them, and neutralize them, and that's not likely to happen in today's atmosphere. “When the Left started to indict conservative rhetoric for what happened they conveniently ignored a lot of the same (and worse) kind of talk from their own. “There isn't enough space to list specific examples, but they are easily found on the Internet.” Bill B.

were victims of this ill-fated act.” O.H.R.

CH@TROOM Last week’s question

Next question

Do you think political rhetoric caused the deadly shootings in Tucson, Ariz.? Why or why not? “The shootings in Tucson were caused by a mentally ill young man with a gun and too many bullets. “While I think that the Tea Party rhetoric and other political extremists fill the airwaves and Internet with outrageous ideas that could make an impression on someone with no critical thinking skills, I blame the gun laws in this country. “No way should that young man have had a gun in his possession, let alone the ability to fire so many shots from it. “Let's spend our time changing the gun laws, collecting the guns, melting them and creating new American sculpture, not more gravesites.” E.E.C. “Absolutely not! What caused the shootings to occur was the warped pysche of the kid that pulled the trigger, his very own actions.

What grade would you give President Barack Obama for his first two years in office? Do you plan to vote for him in 2012? Send your answer to “mshaw@nky.com” with Chatroom in the subject line. “When we as Americans start blaming everything that happens on something or someone other than the person responsible, we fall farther down the hill of personal responsibility, integrity and moral ground. “The result, it's harder to climb back up.” Mike in Anderson Township “You used the word ‘caused.’ Since a crime was committed we must consider legal causation. “Without knowing the motivation of the assailant, we really cannot determine what caused him to shoot the victims. If there was a direct legal causation then there would be others who would be directly responsible for the carnage.

“So far there is no evidence that there were co-conspirators involved. There could well be a pathological issue for the crimes. If that is the case then it is doubtful that ‘political rhetoric’ would even be a contributing factor. “Any veiled threat of harm in a political venue is out of place. American culture is filled with political assassinations (and assassination attempts.) “Most Americans are ignorant of the fact that we have had four sitting presidents killed (Garfield, McKinley, Lincoln and Kennedy) while in office. More than another half dozen (Reagan, Truman, T. Roosevelt, F. Roosevelt, Nixon and Ford) were the targets of attempted assassinations. Gov. George Wallace was shot in a political setting. “This amount of extreme behavior has only been displayed in the United States. If you do not know history it is bound to be repeated, which it has been repeatedly. “It is just more ignorance in action.” J.S.D. “Do I think that political rheto-

Meth bill is government overkill While the Kentucky Senate did pass meaningful legislation dealing with school choice, tax reform and state sovereignty during the first week of this year’s General Assembly session, there was still too much of business-as-usual activity in Frankfort. There’s no better example of this than a bill filed by Rep. Linda Belcher, D-Shepherdsville, which mirrors similar legislation filed by Sen. Tom Jensen, R-London, requiring prescriptions for cold medicines simply because some have ingredients used to make methamphetamine. Such sensational bills allows politicians to feign doing something meaningful while avoiding real action on tough issues such as the state’s $31 billion unfunded pension liability. But let’s face it – dealing with complex and politically difficult pension issues doesn’t garner near as many warm fuzzies as, say, fighting a politically correct and popular, if losing,

drug war. Meth is a big problem in Kentucky. In 2009, the commonwealth ranked third in the nation in the rate of meth-lab inciJim Waters dents behind MisCommunity souri and Indiana. than 1,000 Recorder More meth labs and guest dumpsites were columnist found in 2010 and more than 4,000 have been discovered since 2000. It’s also dangerous, involving combustible ingredients that explode and destroy. These statistics and incidents get the lion’s share of attention. But what often goes unreported is the fact that most of the methmaking operations involve a relatively small number of people in concentrated areas.

The U.S. Department of Justice reports that nearly half of methmaking operations in Kentucky were concentrated in six counties while 14 counties accounted for more than 70 percent of reported sites. In fact, 44 counties reported no meth activity at all. Yet, Belcher wants to force all law-abiding citizens to ante up not only the money for a prescription, but a trip to the doctor’s office too – just to get a simple, useful and effective cold medicine. It’s not the first time that Kentucky has tried to legislate a solution to the meth problem. During the past decade, several laws and regulations have been enacted to deal with anhydrous ammonia, also a key meth ingredient. “We made that difficult to get – and that was going to stop the manufacture of meth in Kentucky,” said Rep. Bill Farmer, RLexington, on a recent “Kentucky Tonight” show on the issue. “Well, it didn’t work.”

“I don't think so, this was a time bomb ready to explode regardless of the political target. Unfortunately, innocent people

E-mail: ky

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RECORDER

“Absolutely not. Blame the criminal. It really frustrated the Left that they couldn't find any connection between this psycho and conservative politics or media.” P.C. “The media's rush to judgment is nothing new. The bottom line is that this is a terrible politicization of a tragic event.” J.J.

About letters & columns

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Community Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: mshaw@communitypress.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. Farmer also pointed out that past attempts to deal with other drug-making activity didn’t work either. When OxyContin became more difficult to get, there were pain clinics popping up all over the state. If Belcher’s bill passes, expect allergy “clinics” to suddenly appear – involving more individuals in the illegal drug trade and making addicted criminals more dangerous as they become increasingly determined to do whatever it takes to access ingredients. Belcher’s proposal is a perfect example of government overkill that not only fails to effectively

A publication of

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas

“Oh puhleeze! In 1984 a man walked into a McDonald's restaurant in San Diego. He murdered 21 people and wounded 19 before the SWAT Team killed him. “While the Tucson man did actually target the Congresswoman, to say he did it in response to political rhetoric does not explain the murdering of several others including the little girl. “We have two incidents occurring 26 years apart that only prove crazy people haven't changed, but those placing blame have changed – for the worse.” R.V.

Fort Thomas Recorder Editor . .Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

address the problem, but can make it worse. Making these prescription-only drugs would prohibit law-enforcement from using the current tracking system, which blocked sales of 10,000 grams of meth ingredients each month. Meth is certainly addictive and dangerous. But sometimes I wonder if we don’t have the equivalent in lawmaking – politicians addicted to the idea that government can control every single thing. That could be dangerous, too. Jim Waters is vice president of policy and communications for the Bluegrass Institute.

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Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

RECORDER

T h u r s d a y, J a n u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 1

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

Theater brings 1970s flare to musical parable

CATCH A STAR

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

PROVIDED

Jacob Violand, 9, of Fort Thomas, shops for animal treats, food and toys at a store the week after Christmas.

Fort Thomas 9-year-old donates Christmas money As the holiday season tailed off, 9-year-old Fort Thomas resident Jacob Violand came up with a “pawfect” way to spend Christmas money given to him by donating it to a nokill animal shelter. Violand donated $85 and four bags of items he purchased at a pet store including food, toys and treats with a $50 gift card to the The Pet Castle Animal Rescue in Florence the week after Christmas. “There wasn’t anything that I really wanted to buy, and I just love animals,” he said. Violand said he plans to donate money to help animals at least a few more times. “It really makes me feel good about myself, and I think I made a difference,” he said. The family has a yellow Labrador retriever, two cats, and a guinea pig, and all of them are from rescues, said Jacob’s mother Ellen Violand. Jacob talks about wanting to become a veterinarian,

and he’s always asking to bring another one home, but they have enough, she said. He wasn’t prompted to donate the money, but his decision brought proud tears to her eyes, Ellen said. “I’m just absolutely blown away that he came up with this on his own and just completely proud of him,” she said Ellen said she even asked Jacob if he wanted to keep a small portion of the money for himself, and he declined, and said he wanted it all to go to animals. After talking it over, they decided to search for a no-kill shelter, and when they took the money and four bags of donations to the Pet Castle, the staff talked to Jacob about how it will help prevent animals from being euthanized, she said. “I think because he’s always grown up with animals in our house that he’s just very attached to animals,” she said. He has a lot of compassion to animals, and he just wanted to help out.”

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Volunteers Needed

• Life Coach for Mentoring Plus, Dayton. Call 859982-5895. Meet with a teen one evening weekly at the Newport Salvation Army to lend support as a positive role model. • Physical education monitor for Notre Dame Urban Education Center, Covington. Call 859-2614487. Instruct and assist children with their daily physical education activity, which may include simple ball games, use of a Wii system, exercise equipment or group games. Provide supervision of children and compliance with rules. Set up and clean up at end of session. The program encourages children to be active and in good physical shape. • Math coaches for elementary schools for North-

ern Kentucky Education Council, Florence. Call 859282-9214. Each volunteer will work on a one-to-one basis with second grade student for 35 minutes per week on basic math skills that are essential for academic progress. Training (3-hours) will be held in late January and commitment is through end of this academic year. • Mailroom operations assistant for Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, Cincinnati. Call 513-287-7025. The Cincinnati Museum Center mailroom operations assistant will sort incoming and outgoing mail, pick up and deliver mail throughout the beautiful historic Union Terminal, prepare outgoing mail with proper postage and deliver copy paper and mailing supplies. Schedule can be flexible, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into The Recorder.

The Fort Thomas Independent Schools’ Community Theatre is bringing their production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat to the stage with a little twist. “We are staying true to the script, but using our costuming to add some hippy 70s flare,” said Director John Williamson. The musical, written by Andrew Lloyd Weber and Tim Rice in the 1960s, is the biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors. Williamson said after seeing how big the hit was when the middle school students performed it several years ago, he thought it would be perfect for the community theater. The production includes a large cast of 25 adults and 40 children from throughout the area. Kevin Duke, a 26-yearold Highlands High School graduate, said he participated in theater in high school and had Williamson as a teacher at the time, so he thought it would be fun to be part of the district’s community theater, which was formed a couple years ago. “We are really having a lot of fun, and even with our whirlwind rehearsal schedule, everything is coming together,” Duke said. In total, the cast is only rehearsing for about four weeks, which is unheard of considering most productions rehearse for around eight weeks, Williamson said. Vickie Pelgen, whose daughter goes to Highlands and is involved in theater,

said until this show, she hasn’t done theater work since high school. “I guess I just missed it,” Pelgen said. “I think it’s going great, everybody is working really hard, and I think it’s going to be a fabulous show.” Emily Carroll-Martin, a 1996 Highlands graduate who went on to get a theater degree in college, said she wishes there would have something like the Fort Thomas Community Theatre when she was younger. “I’m really glad to see that they got something like this started here,” CarrollMartin said. The show will be performed at 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 3; Friday, Feb. 4; Saturday, Feb.5 and Monday, Feb. 7 and at 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 6, in the high school’s Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $12 for adults and $8 for students/children and can be purchased in advance at www.showtix4u.com. Tickets may also be purchased at the door one hour before each show. For more about your community, visit www.nky.com/fortthomas

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

From left: Lyttle German, Robert Breslin and Coleman Holmes act out a scene of the Fort Thomas Community Theatre’s production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Amanda Sims and Kevin Duke rehearse a scene.

NKU Chase team second at arbitration competition Northern Kentucky University Chase College of Law’s Arbitration Team took second place at the American Bar Association’s National Arbitration Competition held Jan. 21-22, in Chicago, Ill. The Chase Arbitration Team earned the right to compete in the national competition by winning a regional competition in November. “The team was ready to win from day one,” said Professor Richard Bales, director of Chase’s Center for Excellence in Advocacy and coach of the arbitration team. “They couldn’t have done it without the incredibly valuable assistance of the many Chase friends and alumni who contributed their time and talent to helping the students prepare for the competition.” The team of Alyse Bender, Jessica Biddle, Jonathan Davis and MyLinda Sims defeated teams from Stetson University College of Law, Chapman University School of Law and Fordham University School of Law. In the final round, the Chase team lost a split decision to Georgia State University College of Law. "The Arbitration Team has taught me how to dis-

NKU Chase Arbitration Team: MyLinda Sims, Alyse Bender, Jessica Biddle and Jonathan Davis. sect legal issues as a cohesive group, how to cultivate creative solutions to those issues, and ultimately, how to present a persuasive and professional case for a particular resolution to those issues," said Davis, a thirdyear Chase student. “It has been a privilege to be a part of an amazing team and to represent Chase on a national level,” said Sims, a third-year Chase student. “I believe our expe-

rience in the ABA National Arbitration Competition has provided us a tremendous opportunity beyond the classroom to obtain practice skills, which will aid us in our future legal careers.” The team owes special thanks to the following practitioners and professors who offered judging feedback prior to the national competition: Professor Ljubomir Nacev, David Bender, Rebecca Cull and

PROVIDED

Marielle Peck. Many other practitioners and professors provided judging feedback to the team prior to the November regional competition. “The experience gained from working together as a team to build a case and advocate for a client is invaluable,” said Biddle, a third-year Chase student. “I will continue to be proud of my teammates’ efforts in representing Chase.”


B2

CCF Recorder

January 27, 2011

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, J A N . 2 8

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Painting Workshop and Wine Tasting, 6:30 p.m., Elk Creek Tasting Room in Crestview Hills Town Center, 2837 Town Center Boulevard, Elk Creek Winery. Create 16-inch by 20-inch acrylic painting in less than two hours. Includes all art supplies, wine tasting and more. $49.99. Reservations required. Presented by The Twisted Brush. 859-3310619; www.the-twisted-brush.com. Crestview Hills.

ART EXHIBITS

Filly Tracks Art Show, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Newport on the Levee, Paintings, screen prints, photography and more from local artists. Benefits select horse rescues. Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Isolation & Togetherness, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Works by Matthew Andrews, Dominic Sansone, Mallory Felktz, Marcia Alscher, Alan Grizzell, Patrick Meier, Sherman Cahal and Janie Marino. Free. Through Feb. 18. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Twelve Angry Men, 8 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Play by Reginald Rose adapted by Shermen Sergel. Directed by Jim Waldfogle, produced by Dee Dunn. $12, $10 students and seniors. Presented by Wyoming Players. Through Feb. 5. 513588-4910; www.wyomingplayers.com. Newport. Blithe Spirit, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., Noel Coward classic. Newly married novelist takes part in seance in order to drum up new material for himself. But soon he is tormented by the ghost of his dead first wife. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through Feb. 5. 513-4748711; www.footlighters.org. Newport. S A T U R D A Y, J A N . 2 9

ART EXHIBITS

Filly Tracks Art Show, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Art on the Levee Gallery, Free. 859-261-5770; www.artonthelevee.com. Newport. Isolation & Togetherness, Noon-3 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

St. Elizabeth Cardio Mobile Health Unit, Noon-6 p.m., Bank of Kentucky Highland Heights, 2800 Alexandria Pike, CardioVascular Mobile Health Unit. Screenings for peripheral arterial disease, carotid artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm. $79 for all three screenings. Reservations required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 859-301-9355. Highland Heights. Eilen Jewell, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Doors open 7:30 p.m. $15, $13 advance. 859491-6659; www.ticketweb.com. Covington. Acoustic Show, 8-10 p.m., Duck Creek Country Club, 1942 Industrial Road, With vocalist Shannon Combs and guitarist James Combs. 859-442-7900. Cold Spring.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Winter Blues Fest, 6 p.m., Southgate House, 24 E. Third St., Twenty-five bands perform on main and parlour stages and Juney’s Lounge. Scheduled to appear: Blues in the Schools Band, John Redell and Company, the Juice, Richie and the Students, the Blue Birds Big Band, Kayneevol, Electric Souls, the Leo Clarke Band, 46 Long, Blue Sacrifice, Balderdash, Tempted Souls Band and Them Bones. Open Blues Jam 12:30 a.m. each night. Ages 18 and up. Benefits Blues in the Schools program. $20, $15 members. Presented by Cincy Blues Society. 859-4312201; www.cincyblues.org or www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Reckless, 10 p.m., Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 859-356-1440. Independence. 500 Miles to Memphis, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave., $10. 9 p.m. doors open. Cover starts at 8:30 p.m. 859-261-6120. Covington.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 859-2612365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

Session 9, 10 p.m., Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 859-342-7000. Erlanger. Lt. Dan’s New Legs, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200. Newport. DV8, 9 p.m., Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, 859-371-0200. Florence.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

John Witherspoon, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $25. Ages 18 and up. 859-9572000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

The Odd Couple, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Sign language interpreted and closed captioned. $15-$19. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Twelve Angry Men, 8 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, $12, $10 students and seniors. 513588-4910; www.wyomingplayers.com. Newport. Blithe Spirit, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport. S U N D A Y, J A N . 3 0

FOOD & DRINK Wine Tasting, 1-6 p.m., StoneBrook Winery, $5. 859-635-0111; www.stonebrookwinery.com. Camp Springs.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Sunday Jazz in the Afternoon, 4:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., With the Phil DeGreg Trio. 859-261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

FOOD & DRINK

Tea Leaf Readings and Tea Tastings, Noon2 p.m., Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 E. 10th St., Also, sample a variety of Kentucky Proud food items. Free. 859-2614287. Newport.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, 2-4 p.m., Erlanger Branch Library, 401 Kenton Lands Road, Behind-the-scenes look and select scenes by Cincinnati Ballet and Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. Suggested for ages 11 and up. Free. Registration required. 859962-4002; www.kentonlibrary.org/events. Erlanger.

MUSIC - BLUES

Surf & Blues Winterfest, 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave., Music by the Maladroits, the AmpFibians, the Surfer Tiki Bandits and the Southgate Boys. Includes beach drink specials. Dinner available 6 p.m. Family friendly. 859-261-1029. Latonia.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

ON STAGE - COMEDY

John Witherspoon, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $22. Ages 21 and up. 859957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Twelve Angry Men, 2 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, $12, $10 students and seniors. 513588-4910; www.wyomingplayers.com. Newport. Blithe Spirit, 2 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport. M O N D A Y, J A N . 3 1

BUSINESS MEETINGS

Women’s Initiative: Business Women Connect Happy Hour, 4-7 p.m., Metropolitan Club, 50 E. RiverCenter Blvd., Invite friends and coworkers to mix, mingle and meet new friends while enjoying happy hour drinks and appetizers. Open to all area professional women. Ages 21 and up. Free. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-578-8800; www.nkychamber.com. Covington.

Winter Blues Fest, 6 p.m., Southgate House, Scheduled to appear: Blues In the Schools Band, the Blues Merchants, Miss Lissa and Company, Chuck Brisbin and the Tuna Project, G. Miles and the Hitmen, Bad Men on a Mission, the Gear Shifts, B. Hatfield Blues Band, Blues Therapy Rx and others. $20, $15 members. 859-431-2201; www.cincyblues.org or www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

MUSIC - ROCK

The Pole Cats, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200; www.jeffersonhall.com. Newport. Unleashed, 10 p.m., Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 859-342-7000; www.peecox.com. Erlanger.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

John Witherspoon, 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $25. Ages 21 and up. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Beginner Yoga, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Lifepath Center of the Healing Arts, 734 Bromley-Crescent Springs Road, Upstairs, yoga studio. $10 (if 12 class pass is purchased). Registration required. 859-992-6300; www.lifepath-2001.com. Crescent Springs.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Adventure Club, 4 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Artreach presents: The Rockin’ Adventures of Peter Rabbit. Grades 1-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166; www.ccpl.org. Fort Thomas.

PROVIDED

Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple” will play weekends Jan. 28-Feb. 13 at The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. In theatre’s most celebrated buddy comedy, hilarity ensues as neurotic, neat freak Felix Ungar and slovenly sportswriter Oscar Madison, two divorced men, attempt to share a New York apartment. Directed by Drew Fracher. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays, Jan. 28-Feb. 13. Tickets are $15-$19. For more information or to purchase tickets call 859-957-1940 or visit www.thecarnegie.com. Pictured, from left, is Nick Rose as Oscar Madison, Don Volpenhein as Speed, Brandon Wentz as Roy, Reggie Willis as Murray and Mike Sherman as Vinnie. Not pictured is Brian Griffin as Felix Ungar.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Stories, songs and activities. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas. Tot Time, 11 a.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Short stories, games, dancing and baby signing. Ages 18 months2 1/2 years. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m., Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 859-781-6166. Cold Spring.

BUSINESS CLASSES

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. 859-6523348. Newport.

COMMUNITY DANCE SwinGallery, 8-11:30 p.m., Step-N-Out Studio, 721 Madison Road, All ages. No partner required. Free beginner East Coast Swing lesson 8-9 p.m. Dancing to music by DJ 911:30 p.m. Family friendly. $5. Presented by SwinGallery. 513-290-9022. Covington. LITERARY - STORY TIMES

T U E S D A Y, F E B . 1 Northern Kentucky International Trade Association Trade Education, 8:30-10 a.m., Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Center, 300 Buttermilk Pike, Suite 330, “Taxation, International Accounting and Financial Reporting Standards.” Learn to whom does Foreign Corrupt Practices Act apply, what do the FCPA Anti-Bribery Provisions prohibit, what are the Accounting and Record Keeping provisions required by FCPA, and procedures for making third party agreements. $25. Registration required. Presented by Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. 859-578-8800; www.nkychamber.com/cwt/External/WCPage s/WCEvents/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1119. Fort Mitchell.

T H U R S D A Y, F E B . 3

Lap Time, 9:30 a.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Quiet rhymes, bounces, lullabies and books with your baby. Ages birth to walkers. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Jo Koy, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Ages 18 and up. Special engagement. No coupons or passes accepted. $22. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Blithe Spirit, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Baby Time, 10 a.m., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Walkers to age 2. Free. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033. Fort Thomas.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Twelve Angry Men, 8 p.m., Monmouth Theatre, $12, $10 students and seniors. 513588-4910; www.wyomingplayers.com. Newport. Blithe Spirit, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, $20. 513-474-8711; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

RECREATION

Women’s Bridge, 10:30 a.m., Covington Art Club, 604 Greenup St., Kate Scudder House. Bring lunch; drinks provided. $2. Through Aug. 16. 859-431-2543. Covington. Dart Tournament, 8-10:30 p.m., Oakbrook Cafe, 6072 Limaburg Road, Free. 859-2828570; oakbrookcafe.com. Burlington.

HOLIDAY - BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Newport Branch Book Club Discusses Gloryland, 7 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. 859-572-5035; www.ccpl.org. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m., Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859572-5033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m., Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport. W E D N E S D A Y, F E B . 2

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Weight Loss Class, 5:45-6:15 p.m., Lakeside Christian Church, 195 Buttermilk Pike, $30 per month, $20 per month with three month membership. First class free. Presented by Equipped Ministries. 859-802-8965. Lakeside Park.

PHOTO BY TONY BAILEY

The Cyclones Classic, inspired by the National Hockey League Winter Classic, comes to Fountain Square at noon Saturday, Jan. 29. The all-day youth pond hockey tournament, from noon to 5:30 p.m., is followed by a hockey skills clinic led by the Cincinnati Cyclones at 6 p.m. A free Cyclones exhibition game begins on the square at 7 p.m. The ice rink reopens for skating at 8:15 p.m. Visit www.myfountainsquare.com. Pictured are members of the Cincinnati Cyclones.

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Play Art, 4 p.m., Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St., Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

The “World Famous” Lipizzaner Stallions come to The Bank of Kentucky Center at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 28. The performance includes traditional movements and exercises, leaps and maneuvers. Tickets are $31.50, $26.50 and $24.50 for adults, $31.50, $14.25 and $13.25 for ages 60 and older and 2-12. Call 800745-3000 or visit www.bankofkentucky.com/Lipizzaner.asp.


Life

January 27, 2011

CCF Recorder

B3

It’s understandable to doubt God’s love in our hard times Does he or doesn’t he? Does God really love us? Love me? We’re told in the scriptures that he does. And sometimes we think so, and sometimes we wonder. Our problem is we’re confused about all the aspects of real love and how they’re expressed. In our understanding of love, it’s not a “many splendored thing,” but rather specific. It’s always romantic, sensual, accompanied by music, roses, and dinners on the town. Hearing that God loves us leads us to expect we’ll soon be living on Easy Street. Televangelists imply that God will heal all sicknesses, give us twice as much money as we donate to them, and take all the problems out of our lives. Many a person’s spiritual life is made worse by this kind of thinking – that God’s love always goes easy on us. Actually his grace

wants to gradually transform us. A sculptor, operating on our premise, could never strike the blows which bring out a beautiful statue from a cold block of marble. The marble could complain the sculptor is being too uncaring and harsh – not knowing the final figure he has in mind. Parents, believing only in love’s comfortableness would: not have their child inoculated because it brings tears; enrolled in school because of homesickness; expect chores at home in order to earn money for video games. Good parents may seem harsh at times to their children. Their genuine love for their child’s growth and well-being is only appreciated later on. God’s love is expressed in many ways. It can be playful, sacrificial, formative, giving, passionate, as

well as demanding. Love is not meant only for stroking egos but for forming them. We accept the medicine because we trust in the love of the one who administers it. Why is it, then, when we look for signs of God’s love we expect them to always make us more comfortable? Sometimes they do. At other times they call forth more from us. They chip off pieces of our ego. An insightful prayer says: “I asked God to take away my sickness and give me health, but he permitted my illness to continue longer so I could learn compassion; I prayed for a better paying job, and instead he gave me an appreciation for the one I have now; I prayed to be loved more intensely, and he taught me how to love others more.” It takes a long time and a lot of

spiritual maturity to learn how to trust in a love that doesn’t always give us what we want. So human-like, St. Teresa of Avila chided God about this once: “No wonder you have such few friends, treating them the way you do.” There are always doubts and ambiguity about what God allows in our lives. “Why this? Why that?” we ask. Every adverse thing that happens we consider a disaster, a permitted evil, and a sign of an unloving God. Professor Belden Lane of St. Louis University, sees it differently. In his book, “The Solace of Fierce Landscapes,” he states his approach to the perceived evils in his life: “I wouldn’t be satisfied with answers to the problem of evil if I had them.

“What I desire most of all is the assurance of God’s love… that Father Lou won’t let go. In struggling with Guntzelman God, none of us Perspectives minds losing so long as we know ourselves to be loved.” Like a child lacking insight, we all struggle with God occasionally about what’s good for us and what’s not. We accuse God of being uncaring when he allows us to be roughed up by life at times. We think we know what’s best for us. Sometimes we do. But only perfect love knows perfectly. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@ communitypress.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Music on the Avenue starts Feb. 4 at St. John’s church St. John United Church of Christ, 520 Fairfield Ave., in Bellevue, presents its 12th annual Music on the Avenue Series over five Fridays at 8 p.m. Feb. 4 through March 4. Concerts are free of charge and showcase jazz, classical, and con-

temporary performers. Performers introduce music and instruments to the audience, to enrich the musical experience. An art show and reception follows the Feb. 4 concert. Featured this year: • Feb. 4 - 20th century art songs of Griffes, Ives, Quilter, and

Gurney. Audrey Luna, soprano and Brad Caldwell, piano. • Feb. 11 - Jazz Improvisation &amp;amp; The American Songbook. Kim Pensyl, trumpet and Phil DeGreg, piano perform. • Feb. 18 - guitarist/composer James Lentini performs original

compositions and classical pieces with wife and soprano soprano. • Feb. 25 - Miami University Steel Band performs contemporary and popular music. • March 4 - The PhillipsHofeldt Trio (piano, violin, cello) performs chamber music by

Beethoven, Mendelssohn, and Schoenfield Contact Theo Baldwin at 2612066 or e-mail MOTA@StJohn Church.net. Additional concert information and pictures are also available Facebook at: www.facebook.com/MusicOnTheAvenue.

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B4

CCF Recorder

Life

January 27, 2011

It’s a free-for-all: dairy-free, gluten-free dishes I have been getting requests for dairy-free baked goods, and also other requests relating to gluten free substitutions for flour. So today I’m sharing some easy recipes that allow those on restricted diets to enjoy some “lovin’ from the oven.”

Dairy-free dinner rolls

These rolls are dairyfree, cholesterol-free and low-fat. Don’t be squeamish about the ingredients here. Powdered creamer is used by more than a few bakers to achieve a nice-tasting, dairy-free dinner roll. They taste as good as they look. The diabetic exchange is 11⁄2 starch, 1⁄2 fat for each roll. You can do this by hand or machine. 1 tablespoon rapid rise yeast plus a couple pinches sugar 21⁄4 cups warm water (110-115 degrees) 1 ⁄3 cup sugar 1 ⁄3 shortening 1 ⁄4 cup powdered nondairy creamer

CE-0000443733

21⁄4 teaspoons salt 5 - 6 cups bread flour Preheat oven Rita 3 5 to0 Heikenfeld d e g r e e s . Rita’s kitchen D i s s o l v e yeast and pinches of sugar in warm water. In a mixing bowl, add sugar, shortening, creamer, salt and 5 cups flour. Add yeast and mix well on low speed. Turn to medium and beat until smooth. Add more flour if necessary to make a soft but sticky dough. Either knead it for six to eight minutes by machine or by hand. If doing by hand, turn out on floured surface. Knead until smooth, like a baby’s bottom. Place in bowl coated with cooking spray, turning once to coat top. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour. Punch down and turn out onto lightly floured sur-

face; divide into 18 to 24 pieces. Shape each piece into a roll. Place 2 inches apart on sprayed baking sheets. Cover and let rise until doubled, 30 to 45 minutes. Bake for 12 to 20 minutes or until golden brown.

meat 4 no-cook lasagna noodles 11⁄3 cups Mozzarella

Dairy-free cookies

These chocolate chip cookies are dairy-free and cholesterol free. OK, this has tofu in it but again, try it. You may surprise yourself. From Marian, who loves chocolate chip cookies with a healthy twist. 1 cup unsalted margarine 1 cup unrefined cane sugar 2 tablespoons light molasses 1 ⁄4 cup light, firm tofu, puréed 1 teaspoon vanilla 13⁄4 cups unbleached flour 1 ⁄4 cup whole wheat flour 1 ⁄2 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⁄4 teaspoon salt 1 ⁄2 teaspoon cinnamon (opt.)

Dairy-free rolls are easy to make. 12 oz. chocolate chips Preheat oven to 350. Beat margarine, sugar and molasses until light and fluffy. Add tofu and vanilla; beat for a minute. Mix flours, soda, salt and cinnamon together. Add to creamed mixture and mix lightly until blended. Fold in chips. Drop by rounded teaspoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheet and bake eight to 10 minutes. Don’t overbake.

Gluten-free flour mix

Store this in airtight jar and you’ll have plenty n hand when you need it. Use in place of flour for breading

COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

chops, coating meat or to thicken gravy and soup.

Mix together:

2 cups white rice flour 2 ⁄3 cup potato starch flour 1 ⁄3 cup tapioca flour

Easy lasagna for two

Carol Williams (no, not the Channel 9 news anchor), an Eastside reader needs recipes for two. So if you have some to share, please do. “We’re empty nesters and I have too many leftovers,” she said. 1 cup ricotta cheese 1 ⁄2 cup Parmesan 1 egg 14 oz. pasta sauce with

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Combine ricotta, Parmesan and egg. Set aside. Spread 1⁄3 cup sauce in bottom of spayed loaf pan. Top with one noodle. Spread 1 ⁄3 cup sauce to edges. Top with 1⁄3 reserved cheese mixture and 1⁄3 cup Mozzarella. Repeat layers twice, topping with remaining noodle and sauce. Bake, covered, 25 minutes. Uncover and sprinkle with rest of Mozzarella. Bake about 10 minutes more. Let sit 10 minutes before cutting. Tips from Rita’s kitchen: Use regular lasagna noodles and boil just until tender, but not all the way done. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. E-mail columns@ communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.


Community

CCF Recorder

January 27, 2011

B5

Children’s Home gives Presidential Awards At a recent All Staff Celebration and Retreat, The Children’s Home of Cincinnati announced this year’s annual Presidential Award winners: Rachel Smith, Glenda Conyers and Ron Hamilton. Nominations were made by their peers and final selections were made by the executive team of the agency. The Children’s Home annually recognizes three employees for “Living the

Agency’s Core Values” of Compassion, Commitment, Collaboration, Innovation and Excellence. These values are evidenced by the following behaviors: • Creates a positive environment • Incredible passion for the task at hand • Exhibits motivation and enthusiasm in the workplace • Connects with and engages people in a genuine way

Rachel Smith, Supporting Partnerships to Assure Ready Kids (SPARK) Coordinator, is a four-year employee and resides in Covington. Glenda Conyers, Early Childhood Mental Health Manager of five years, resides in Southgate. Ron Hamilton, a ten year Children’s Home employee works as a Community Psychiatric Support Treatment (CPST) Provider. He resides in North Avondale.

Indoors a good garden plot for winter herbs g r o u p t o g e t h e r, grow on trays with gravel and water, use a humidifier in home, Ron Wilson the and feel free In the to rinse the garden plants in the sink every c o u p l e weeks. • Use soil-less potting soil when potting your herbs, and make sure the pot has good drainage. Pots that are 4 to 6 inches work great for herbs indoors. And if you have a sunny windowsill, a window box works nicely for growing several herbs. • Don’t feed very often – Herbs don’t require much feeding, so use about half the recommended rate of Miracle Gro, once a month, or mix a slow release fertilizer such as Osmocote in the soil. • Pinch and use as needed. Harvesting from your herbs encourages new growth, so harvest leaves / new growth on a regular basis. Many herbs can be

grown indoors, including bay, rosemary, chives, mint, parsley, sage, scented geraniums, basil, cilantro, thyme and more. And you’ll find them available already growing, or ready to get started by seed. Growing herbs indoors is easy and cheaper than buying fresh herbs. Hey, would you rather pay $3.99 for a semi-fresh bunch of herbs, or $3.99 for a plant that will provide you with fresh herbs all winter long? Grow green onions indoors – Did you know you can re-grow the green onions purchased in the produce section? Purchase green onions that have white roots at the bottom of the bulb. Cut up and use the top part of the green onions as you normally would, leaving the bottom inch or so (with roots) and just a tad a green showing. Grab a wide but shallow pot with good drainage, fill it with a soil-less potting mix, and plant the bottoms of the onions, about 1 to 2 inches apart, and deep enough to only leave a bit of the green showing above

the soil line. Place your pot in a sunny window, and water about once a week, or whenever the soil feels dry to the touch. In a short period of time, your onions will begin to regrow, and will be ready for their second harvest. Let the green tops reach 5 to 6 inches, and then harvest the new shoots individually with a pair of scissors. Leave the onions in the soil, and they will continue to re-grow new green shoots, even after the sec-

ond and third harvest, and for quite some time. And in between crops, feel free to head outside and harvest onion tips from the wild onions growing in the lawn and landscape beds Late winter, spring, fall, even cooler summers, they’re growing like crazy, they’re very edible, and hey, they’re free! Ron Wilson is marketing manager for Natorp’s Garden Stores and is the garden expert for 55KRC-AM and Local 12. Reach him at columns@ communitypress.com.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Rashunda Gilliam, 37, of St. Louis and Peter Alcatsa, 50, of Africa, issued Jan. 12. Sarah Clements, 19, of Columbus and Christopher Hartzler, 21, of Springfield, issued Jan. 12. Linda Blankenship, 57, and Troy Blankenship, 48, both of Cincinnati, issued Jan. 14.

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If you’d like to do a little indoor gardening, and you love to cook, here are a few plants that are pretty easy to grow. They’re herbs, and you know what? Growing herbs in the winter is one of the true delights of indoor gardening. Attractive plants, they smell great, and of course, there’s nothing like the flavor that fresh culinary herbs add to your food. Now, to grow herbs successfully indoors, you’ll need to provide them with the essentials: Good light – Herbs would like as much light as possible to grow indoors. Growing them in a southern window is perfect. If you don’t have strong daily light, you can supplement with florescent lights, and yes, regular florescent lights work just fine. Keep the light within 3 to 5 inches of the foliage and turned on around 14 hours a day. • Cool to average room temperatures – Herb won’t need a lot of heat. As a matter of fact, cooler rooms can be better. They do like humidity, so

PROVIDED

From left to right: Glenda Conyers, Rachel Smith, Ellen Katz (President & CEO), Ron Hamilton.

$200 min.

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Bring your child to visit from 9:00-10:30a.m. Take a tour, meet the teachers and spend time in kindergarten. Call the school office to register 635-9539 St. Mary School, 9 S. Jefferson Alexandria, KY

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MID WINTER SALE Readers on vacation

PROVIDED

Joe, Kim, Megan, and Joey Stubbs; Ed and Danielle Stubbs; Rhiannon Spicer; Jeff, Christy, Dixie, and JD Schultz; Terry and Pam Spicer; Phil, Robin, and Bailey Beiting; and Jeff, Elaine, and Mitch Mefford were in the Riviera Maya, Mexico with their Campbell County Recorder Nov. 20.

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Artist to lecture at NKU Feb. 1 Special Collections. This copy of “The Whiteness” will be displayed in the library’s Schlachter Archives immediately after the lecture, with further comments by Illouz. In honor of the visit by Illouz, the Schlachter Archives will also be exhibiting a selection of “Moby-Dick” artworks from Northern Kentucky. The exhibition will include prints, paintings and sculpture by NKU students and alumni as well as by artists from Greece, Canada and Australia. The exhibit will run from

Feb. 1 to May 1 and is open to visitors Monday through Friday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. A reception will follow the Illouz lecture near the exhibition space. Admission to the lecture is free but space is limited. Reservations are accepted at specialevents@nku.edu. The lecture is sponsored by the NKU Department of English, the Friends of Steely Library, the Northern Kentucky Print Club and the Cincinnati Book Arts Society. For further information contact Robert Wallace at wallacer@nku.edu.

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Northern Kentucky University will host a free public lecture by French book artist and printmaker Claire Illouz titled “Why Artist Books?” 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 1, in the Eva G. Farris Reading Room of the W. Frank Steely Library at NKU. Illouz makes limited-edition artist books. One of her most celebrated books is “The Whiteness,” a meditation in images and words on Herman Melville’s “MobyDick.” The Steely Library owns one of 25 copies in the world in its Eva G. Farris

January 15 - February 26, 2011

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

January 27, 2011

Great American Insurance to present Scripps spelling bee Great American Insurance Group will present the Scripps Spelling Bee to benefit the Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati (LNGC) Tuesday, March 1, at Xavier University’s Cintas Center. Teams of three from area businesses and organizations will square off in an old-fashioned spelling bee conducted in rounds of increasing difficulty. Three talented corporate spellers will eventually be granted the title of “Best Spellers in Cincinnati.” Proceeds support LNGC’s children and adult programs. LNGC is reaching out to community organizations and corporations to partake in this electrifying event and increase the literacy cause. Organizations can participate in a variety of different ways including organizing a team to spell at the event or being an event sponsor. “The spelling bee is our largest fundraiser of the year. We could not provide the much needed services without the support of our corporate sponsors,” said Kathy Ciarla, LNGC’s presi-

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dent. “We are extremely grateful to Great American Insurance Group for being our presenting sponsor. Their commitment to improving the lives of those who struggle with basic literacy is commendable,” she said. “Great American Insurance Group is helping to create a stronger community,” said Ciarla. Corporations and organizations interested in joining in on the fun March 1 can be Gold Team Sponsors, Silver Team Sponsors or Bronze Team Sponsors. Organizations that cannot attend but would like to be event sponsors can be a Book Mark Sponsors or a Patron Sponsors. “Functional illiteracy cost the U.S. an estimated $225 billion a year in lost productivity, posing a special problem to business and industry,” said Ciarla. “Every day, LNGC works to assist those in need. By supporting this event, organizations are helping create a more competitive work force,” she said.

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Publishes every Tuesday in The Kentucky Enquirer, every Thursday in The Community Recorder. Search ads online any day, any time at NKY.com.

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Since 1986, The Literacy Network has served as a contact center for adult literacy, providing a full-time referral hotline (621-READ) for prospective tutors and learners. The Network acts as an umbrella agency for over 60 sites in Greater Cincinnati where adults may go to improve their basic education and literacy skills. The Network provides free adult and children’s basic reading classes for people with profound reading disabilities and a tutor training program for volunteers interested in working with adults. Also, the Literacy Network offers the Cincinnati Reads program, which recruits and trains reading tutors to work one-on-one with kindergarten through fourth-grade students in the Cincinnati Public Schools. If your company or organization would like to compete to be the “Best Spellers in Cincinnati” or sponsor this beneficial event, contact LNGC at 513621-7323 or visit www.LNGC.org.

Flu vaccine still available in N. Ky. Reports of influenza are on the rise this New Year in Northern Kentucky. Since October, more than 100 individuals have been diagnosed with flu in Boone, Campbell, Grant and Kenton counties. Fortunately, the flu vaccine is still widely available and should offer protection for the peak flu season. “With our busy schedules, fitting in an appointment for flu vaccination each year can be a challenge,” said Lynne Saddler, MD, MPH, District Director of Health with the Northern Kentucky Health Department. “But without the vaccine, you risk catching a virus that makes most people sick for several days and can cause serious complications, particularly in the elderly, young children and those with chronic health conditions. Flu cases typically peak in February and can continue into March. So, if you get a flu shot now, you’ll be protected through the peak flu season.” The Health Department continues

Summerfair Cincinnati will host the Emerging Artist Exhibit, featuring the artwork of students from five area colleges and universities. Fifteen local art students have been selected to display their artwork in the exhibition, display Friday, Jan. 28 through Sunday, Feb. 20, with an artist opening reception Jan. 28, at the Anderson Center. The Emerging Artist Exhibition will feature students who were nominated by their professors and juried into the exhibit. They represent the next generation of artists emerg-

quently, including before you handle or eat food and after using the restroom. Avoid touching your eye, nose or mouth. “Most importantly, if you are sick, stay home. Limiting your contact with others will keep you from infecting them.” This year’s vaccine is effective against the viruses that are most likely to cause the flu, including the H1N1 swine flu. It also offers some protection against similar viruses that can cause flu-like illnesses. The classic symptoms of influenza include sudden onset of chills, fever, headache, muscle aches, sore throat, dry cough and extreme fatigue. Children should not be treated with aspirin, as it can lead to Reye’s Syndrome. For more information on the flu, please call the Health Department’s flu information line at 859-392-0678 or visit www.nkyhealth.org.flu

ing in the local arts community. “The art these students submit is outstanding,” said Sharon Strubbe, executive director of Summerfair Cincinnati. “This exhibit is a wonderful opportunity for the students to showcase their best work, and for the community to see the young upand-coming talent that Cincinnati has to offer.” The exhibition will showcase a diverse collection of art, where art enthusiasts can expect to see everything from photography and sculptures to fabric design, printmaking and

much more. The event will open to the public Friday, Jan. 28 during the Anderson Center’s normal business hours (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) followed by the artist opening reception that same night from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The reception is free to attend and open to the public, and the artists will be available to answer questions about their artwork. Students from Northern Kentucky University who will be participating are: • Peta Niehaus • Dean Reynolds • Spencer Sturr New to the exhibit this

year are the Summerfair Cincinnati Purchase Award, a $1,000 scholarship that will be awarded to one junior or senior-level college student participating in the Emerging Artist program, and the Malton Gallery’s Gallery Choice Award, an opportunity to showcase a collection of work at the gallery presented to one artist for outstanding artistic concepts, development and execution. Additional information about Summerfair Cincinnati and the Emerging Artist exhibit can be found by visiting www.summerfair.org or calling 513-531-0050.

twitter.com/crkysports

Xaviier U Xavier University nive ni vers rsitityy wi willll uundergo nder nd ergo go a comprehensive com ompr preh ehen ensi sive ve eevaluation valu va luat atio ionn vi visi visit sitt April Apririll 4-6, Ap 4-66, 2011 201 0111 by a team representing repr presenti entiting en tinng ng Commission Central Colleges The Higher High Hi gher er Learning Lea earn rnin inng Co Comm mmis issi sion on ooff th thee North Nort No rthh Ce Cent ntra rall Association Asso As soci ciat atio ionn of C olleges andd Schools. Schools. The Commission Co issi iis one of six ix accrediting diti agencies ie in the United States Stat that provides id iinstitutional tituti al accreditation. Xavier has been continuously accredited by the Commission since 1935. As part of the evaluation, the public is invited to submit comments regarding the University to the Commission. Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. They should include the name, address and telephone number of the person providing the comments, and must be received by March 1, 2011. Comments are not treated as confidential.

CE-0000443430

to offer flu shots by appointment at its county health centers in Boone, Campbell, Grant and Kenton counties, and plenty of vaccine is still available. The vaccine is $25, and Medicare and Medicaid are accepted. Locations and phone numbers are as follows: • Boone County Health Center, 7505 Burlington Pike, Florence, Ky., 859-363-2060 • Campbell County Health Center, 1098 Monmouth St., Newport, Ky., 859-431-1704 • Grant County Health Center, 234 Barnes Road, Williamstown, Ky., 859824-5074 • Kenton County Health Center, 2002 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky., 859-431-3345 “Even if you’ve already received your flu shot, you still need to take steps to protect yourself and others from flu and other communicable diseases,” said Saddler. “Be sure to sneeze or cough into your elbow. Wash your hands fre-

Summerfair spotlights college art students

PUBLIC COMMENT ON XAVIER UNIVERSITY REACCREDITATION REQUESTED

SEND COMMENTS TO: Public Comment on Xavier University, The Higher Learning Commission, 230 S. LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, Ill. 60604.

PROVIDED

The 2010 Literacy Network Spelling Bee Winners from Ascendum, Jamie Ahmed, Deepak Dixit and Allan Bergen, celebrate their victory.

Water wonders

Saint Mary of Alexandria sixth-grade students, Justin Dawn and Alexa Schaufler, work their way through the water cycle in science class. PROVIDED


Community

CCF Recorder

January 27, 2011

B7

Kettle campaign raised more than $650,000 Not only do the funds collected support the annual Christmas programs, such as Toy Shop, they are also used throughout the year to support the extensive programs offered by The Salvation Army. generous people of this community, as well as all the volunteer bell-ringers, who made this outcome a reality,” he said. In the days just ahead of Christmas, the Campaign was still $100,000 short of the goal. “We were delighted to tally the collection from the final days of the campaign and learn that we had surpassed the goal. It was an occasion to give thanks,” said Foreman.

The Salvation Army’s annual Red Kettle Campaign is a major component of its annual funding initiatives. Not only do the funds collected support the annual Christmas programs, such as Toy Shop, they are also used throughout the year to support the extensive programs offered by The Salvation Army. “The Salvation Army in Greater Cincinnati offers many programs, for those of all ages” said Fore-

man. “We rely upon the kettle donations to help us serve others throughout the year, whether they need emergency financial assistance, a place to stay, a meal, or have some other need for support,” he said. The Salvation Army extends gratitude to every donor who put a contribution in the kettles. In addition, it appreciates the efforts of its volunteers and staff who worked tirelessly in an effort to make the 2010 Kettle Campaign a great success. Hundreds of volunteers stepped forward to be bell-ringers, including first-time volunteers as well as others who have enjoyed ‘working a kettle’ for many years.

Working, learning at 4-H camps 4-H summer camping in Kentucky is one of the largest co-educational camping programs in the United States. All Kentucky camps are accredited through the American Camp Association. Kentucky’s camps encompass 300 to 1,500 acres at four locations. Over 8,000 youth ages 9 to 14 participate each summer, along with hundreds of teen and adult volunteer leaders and Cooperative Extension agents. If you are looking for a summer job that gives you the opportunity to be a positive and encouraging influence in many children’s lives, consider working at a 4-H camp.

All staff members are required to have training and certification in CPR and first aid before they begin working at camp. Lifeguards and health care providers must have current certifications prior to employment. The camp staff does not stay in the cabins with the children, but live in separate staff quarters. Meals and excess medical insurance are also provided during each camp session. Training for managers takes place April 29 to May 1. Camp instructors’ training is set for May 22-25 at Lake Cumberland 4-H Educational Center in Jabez and May 26-27 on-site at each

camp respectively. Pre-employment criminal background checks are conducted on all new camp employees. Interviews for the 2011 season (including returning staff) are set for mid to late March. The deadline to apply is March 4. The four camps have different staffing needs which are listed at www.kentucky4h.org/camp, under the employment opportunities tab. Applications must be completed online at http://uky.edu/hr/ukjobs. Camping schedules vary by location, but employment generally begins May 22 and extends through late July or the first week of

August. Camp employees work 40 hours or more a week. Working at 4-H camp is a terrific opportunity to do something worthwhile with your summer. You enhance your résumé with the experience and serve as a role model for young campers. Direct your questions to the Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service 859-572-2600. Educational programs of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability, or national origin. Submitted by Donna Fox, extension specialist for 4-H camps

This week at the Campbell County libraries Carrico/Fort Thomas

• Family Movie 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 29 The whole family is invited to enjoy the animated story of a villain and the little girl who changes his ways. Ages 12-18. No registration required. • Adventure Club: ArtReach presents: The

Aquarium host Family Winter Days Newport Aquarium is continuing its “Winter Family Days” promotion in the new year. Now through Feb. 28, two children (ages 2-12) will be admitted free with each adult paying full price. The special discount is valid every day of the week during regular operating hours for the Aquarium (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.). Children under 2 are admitted free every day. Strollers are welcome during this time. As an added bonus, children who visit during “Winter Family Days” will receive a coupon for a free kid’s meal at Bob Evans Family Restaurants. For information on “Winter Family Days” and daily activities, visit www. newportaquarium.com.

Rockin’ Adventures of Peter Rabbit 4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 31 An ArtReach Theatre presentation of The Rockin’ Adventures of Peter Rabbit. Ages 6-11. Registration required. The Campbell County Public Library operates three branches. The Cold Spring Branch is located at

3920 Alexandria Pike in Cold Spring; phone 859781-6166. The Carrico/Fort Thomas Branch is located at 1000 Highland Ave. in Fort Thomas; phone 859-5725033. The Newport Branch is located at 901 E. Sixth St. in Newport; phone 859572-5035. Hours for all three branches are 9 a.m.-9 p.m.

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Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.7 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; and 1-5 p.m. Sunday. The website address is www.cc-pl.org; 24-hour reference service, www.askwhyky.org; 24hour circulation service, 859-572-5041; and 24hour storytelling service, 859-572-5039.

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Cincy Blazers Youth Baseball, Inc. DBA Kentucky-Ohio Heat Baseball 20 West Pike Street Covington, KY 41011 Tel. 859-581-4263 Lic. # ORG0002188

Local listings, growing companies and career advice. Get career advice from the employment experts at CareerBuilder, plus Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky job listings. It’s like having your very own career coach.

Also, many members of The Salvation Army’s local Advisory Board worked to secure kettle sponsorships that drove the total past the goal. “We are grateful to all of them,” commented Matt Pearce, Development Director at The Salvation Army. “We couldn’t have achieved this great result without everyone’s support.” The Salvation Army also thanks those retailers, such as Kroger and Walmart, which allowed the kettles and bellringers to be present at their stores throughout the Christmas season. “They’ve been great partners for many years, and this campaign is only possible through their collaboration,” said Pearce.

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The Salvation Army in Greater Cincinnati raised a total of $651,129.62 from its 2010 Kettle Campaign, against a goal of $625,000. The campaign is a major fundraising effort that has been undertaken annually at Christmastime for more than 100 years. In 2009, the Kettle Campaign goal was $600,000, with a total of $617,000 raised. The organization raised the bar for the 2010 campaign, cognizant of the sustained increase in need for the services it offers. “This achievement is such a blessing,” noted Major Ronald R. Foreman, Divisional Commander at The Salvation Army. “We are very grateful to the

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In Memoriam Mrs. Virginia K. (Klopp) Leisure Mrs. Virginia K. (Klopp) Leisure, age 97, of Madison, Indiana, entered this life on September 28, 1913 in Petersburg, Kentucky. She was the daughter of the late, Frank & Etta Belle Hoffman Klopp. She was raised in Petersburg and was a graduate of the Petersburg High School. She was united in marriage in May 1941 to Ronald O. Leisure in New Washington, Indiana. This union was blessed with three sons and two daughters. She was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother and in her later years a caregiver. She enjoyed her grandchildren, gardening, cooking, her animals and being with family. She was a member of the Smyrna Monroe Presbyterian Church. Virginia died Monday, January 17, 2011 at 5:40 a.m. at the King’s Daughters’ Hospital in Madison, Indiana. : A LOVING FAMILY : Virginia will be missed by her loving sons: Ronald K. Leisure & his wife, Mary Lou of Kokomo, Indiana, Thomas G. Leisure & his wife, Jane of Scottsburg, Indiana, Robert L. Leisure & his wife, Mary of Rochester, Michigan; her loving daughters: Anna Belle Robinson & her husband, Cliff of Madison, Indiana, Nina Sonner & her husband, Alvin of Madison, Indiana; her grandchildren: Wendi, Steve, Susan, Brittany, Cameron, Kristen, Carrie, Jacob, Anne Marie, Jeremy, Michelle, & Melissa; her great grandchildren: Sydney, Savannah, Pierce, Tate, Mitch, Payton, Paisley, Megan, Courtney, Ellie, Forrest & Lacey; several nieces, nephews & other relatives. She was preceded in death by her parents, Frank J. & Etta Belle Hoffman Klopp; her husband, Ronald O. Leisure died, March 28, 1976; her granddaughter, Angela Christine Robinson died in 1976; her great grandson, Dustin Hopewell; her sisters, Ormel Pawlmore, Eloyse Schacklette, Marie Moore & Leola Carpenter; her brothers, Ruthford, Bill & Robert Klopp. : PRIVATE FUNERAL CEREMONY : Private funeral services was conducted Thursday, January 20, 2011 by the Rev. Richard McDole at the Morgan & Nay Funeral Centre, 325 Demaree Drive in Madison, Indiana.

: MEMORIAL EXPRESSIONS : Memorial contributions may be made to the Fairmount Cemetery. Cards are available at the funeral home. CE-1001617505-01

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B8

ON

RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

January 27, 2011

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053 BIRTHS

POLICE

|

REAL

POLICE REPORTS

FORT THOMAS

At 721 Highland Ave., Jan. 12.

Theft by unlawful taking from auto

Arrests/citations

At Sunset Avenue, Jan. 11.

Jennifer Little, 28, 1086 Davjo Drive, warrant at Highlands Nursing Home, Jan. 16. Randall Simon, 25, 12852 Herringer Road, warrant at 700 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 16. Maggie Rice, 23, 21 Wallace Ave. No. 3, warrant at 700 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 15. Kerry Rogers, 33, 12609 Spruce St., operating a motor vehicle on suspended license at I-471, Jan. 16.

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS / SOUTHGATE Arrests/citations

Incidents/investigations Second degree criminal mischief At 960 Highland Ave., Jan. 16.

Theft by unlawful taking

At 150 Manor Lane, Jan. 14. At 950 South Fort Thomas Ave., Jan. 12.

Gary Armstrong, 28, 3853 Canyon Court 3A, second degree disorderly conduct at I-471 and I-275, Jan. 1. Nicholas Abplanalp, 53, 3635 Kernan Boulevard, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 85 North Grand Ave., Jan. 1. Gary Fields, 53, Main Street, DUI at 2557 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 11. Linda Austin Simon, 63, 153 Margarete Lane No. 2, DUI at 153 Margarete Lane No. 2, Jan. 11. Ivan Bingham, 41, 1916 Westmont

Lane, possession of marijuana, second degree possession of a controlled substance, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 2611 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 8. Bryan Hogie, 21, 7 Renshaw Road No. 5, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 7 Renshaw Road Apt. 5, Jan. 8. Sean Turner, 20, 7 Renshaw Road No. 5, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia at 7 Renshaw Road Apt 5, Jan. 8. Stephen Woods, 25, 3829 Canyon Court 2D, receiving stolen property at Alexandria Pike and Moock Road, Jan. 5. Joshua Lee Cromer, 19, 221 Forrest St. No. 2, receiving stolen property, theft by unlawful taking, first degree criminal mischief, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 2128

Alexandria Pike, Jan. 5. Johnny Vallandingham, 43, 2423 Mudlick Road, possession of drug paraphernalia at 260 West Walnut St., Jan. 2.

Incidents/investigations Fraudulent use of a credit card

At 124 Bon Jan Lane, Jan. 7.

Theft of identity

At 12 Skyview Terrace, Jan. 5.

NEWPORT

Arrests/citations

Cynthia Powers, 33, 5530 Bosworth Place, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia at U.S. 27 and Bluegrass Ave., Jan. 17. Jeremy Woods, 31, 1305 Parkway Ave., first degree criminal mischief,

ESTATE

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

E-mail: k

ws@

unit

About police reports

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

James Leo Burkhardt

Betty Jane Johnson

James Leo Burkhardt, 52, of Alexandria, died Jan. 22, 2011, at his home. He was a press operator at Queen City Printing for more than 25 years, an avid collector of model cars and a passionate fan of the Minnesota Vikings. His father, William Burkhardt, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Gina Burkhardt; daughter, Jessica Raney; son, Chris Burkhardt; stepson, Justin Cooper; mother, Loretta Burkhardt; brothers, Dan Burkhardt and Ron Burkhardt; sisters, Ann Adams, Theresa Brugger and Pam Buckmaster; and one grandchild. Internment was at St. Joseph Cemetery, Cold Spring. Memorials: In James’ honor to the American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Betty Jane Johnson, 87, of Fort Thomas, formerly of Temple Terrace, Fla., died Jan. 21, 2011, at her residence. She was a secretary with the Hillsborough County Florida School System, member of Southgate Senior Citizens and St. John’s United Church of Christ, and a volunteer at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas and Echo House. Her husband, Sam Johnson, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Kevin W. Johnson of Brandon, Fla., and Kimber L. Johnson of Wellesley, Mass.; and three grandchildren. Private Services will be held at a later date. Burial will be in Evergreen Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Arthur James Heck

Stella Mae Kincaid

Arthur James Heck, 81, of Melbourne, died Jan. 18, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired construction worker and a U.S. Army Korean War veteran. He was a member of St. Joseph Church, Camp Springs, the American Legion, VFW Post No. 3205 and Camp Springs VFD. His wife, Bernadette Heck, died previously. Survivors include son, Greg Heck of Cold Spring; daughter, Monica Heck of Melbourne; brother, Richard Heck; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Interment was at St. Joseph Cemetery. Memorials: New Perceptions INC., 1 Sperti, Edgewood, KY 41017 or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Stella Mae Kincaid, 70, of Dayton, died Jan. 20, 2011, at her residence. She had worked at the DAV as a machine runner. A son, Wayne Kincaid, died previously. Survivors include her son, John Kincaid of Dayton; sister, Sue Ann Lanigan of Bethel, Ohio; one grandchild; and two great-grandchildren.

Thelma R. Kuntz

Thelma R. Kuntz, 87, of Southgate, died Jan. 22, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and a member of John R. Little VFW Post No. 3186 Women’s Auxiliary. Her husband, Carl Kuntz, and daughter, Julie Ann Wever, died previously.

Charles ‘Buddy’ Lloyd

Charles T. “Buddy” Lloyd, 86, of Grant’s Lick, formerly of Melbourne, died Jan. 18, 2011, at his home. He was a ceramic tile setter and retired from the maintenance department of Matheson, Coleman and Bell Chemical Company in Norwood, Ohio. He was a life-long parishioner of St. Philip’s Church, Melbourne, a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters and a U.S. Army World War II veteran. His wife, Rita Alice Hardy Lloyd; and daughters Mary Alice Lloyd and Rita Marie Lloyd died previously. Survivors include sons, Thomas Lloyd of Alexandria and David Lloyd of Elko, Nev.; daughter, Susan Schultz of Grant’s Lick; sister, Elizabeth Moher of Melbourne; eight grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Philip’s Church, 1404 Mary Ingles Hwy., Melbourne, KY 41059.

Indulge your heart’s every desire.

Peggy McAtee

Peggy Von Blon McAtee, 93, formerly of Fort Thomas, died Dec. 23, 2010, in Atlanta, Ga. Her husband, Oreville Herk McAtee, died previously. Survivors include her son, Jerry L. McAtee of Marietta, Ga.; and granddaughter, Dana McAtee Zahnle of Alpharetta, Ga. A private family memorial was held in Marietta, Ga.

Louise V. Meyer

Louise V. Meyer, 84, of Bellevue, died Jan. 15, 2011, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home, Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker, a member of Divine Mercy Parish, Bellevue, St. Anthony Church, their Mother’s Club and volunteered at St. Anthony Bingo. Her husband, Ralph “Skeeter” Meyer, died previously. Survivors include sons, Jack Meyer and Ralph Meyer, both of Bellevue, and Joe Meyer of Delhi, Ohio; daughters, Mary Leedy and Patty Bucher, both of Bellevue; sisters, Erma Messman of Fort Thomas and Mary Allgier of Fairfield, Ohio; 15 grandchildren; and 17 great-grandchildren. Entombment was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Alzheimers’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203 or charity of donor’s choice.

Charles ‘Rick’ Powell

Charles “Rick” Richard Powell, 51, of Latonia, died Jan. 18, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a route driver for Rumpke of Ohio, former owner/operator of

RINKS BINGO R

At 1700 block of Monmouth St., Jan. 12. At 130 Pavilion Way, Jan. 11.

At 600 block of Monmouth, Jan. 8.

At 932 Central Ave., Jan. 7. At 207 West 10th St., Jan. 13.

Incidents/investigations First degree rape

Powell Sanitation, owner/operator and D.J. of CRP Entertainment, owner and sponsor of Stock Cars Florence Speedway, Florence, and Go Cart Raceway, Maysville. His father, Charles Edward Powell, died previously. Survivors include his son, James Powell of Independence; daughter, Angel Powell of Newport; mother, Shirley Ayers Folkersen of Las Vegas; brothers, Terry Powell of Florence and Mark Powell of Latonia; sisters, Mildred Pyke of Dayton and Sherry Akemon of Latonia; and three grandchildren. Internment was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: American Diabetes Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 304, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Doyle Sherrill

Doyle Sherrill, 66, of Alexandria, died Jan. 17, 2011, at Highland Springs, Fort Thomas. He was the owner of Geo-therm Heating and Cooling, served in the U.S. Army at the Nike Missile Base, Indiana, and was an avid fisherman and a great mechanic. A brother, Donald Sherrill, and two sisters, Rita Thompson and Greta Lou Sherrill, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Kathy “Kate” Sherrill; sisters, Glenda Pfaff of Crossville, Tenn., and Emily Bryant of Terre Haute, Ind.; and brothers, John Henry Sherrill of Cleveland, Ohio, Clinton Sherrill of Terre Haute, Ind., and Andrew Sherrill and Samuel Sherrill, both of Crossville, Tenn. Memorials: CARE Mission, 11093 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Earl J. Stumpf

Earl J. Stumpf, 84, of Fort Thomas, died Jan. 22, 2011, at his home. He was a retired line foreman with Cincinnati Bell Telephone, served in the U.S. Navy and was a member of the Masonic Lodge Fort Thomas Chapter No. 177 RAM. His wife, Mary Ragan Stumpf, died previously. Survivors include son, James

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First degree robbery

receiving stolen property at 600 block of Monmouth, Jan. 15. Alisha Glenn, 26, 15 Woolum, fourth degree assault at 15 Woolum, Jan. 13. Michael Reed, 33, 537 Patterson St. No. 303, fourth degree assault, first degree sexual abuse at 537 Patterson, Jan. 12. Stephen Hughes, 53, 4246 Oakwood Ave., first degree promoting contraband, first degree possession of drug paraphernalia at New Linden and Park, Jan. 12.

DEATHS Survivors include sons, Kim Kuntz of Plano, Texas, and Karl Kuntz of Westerville, Ohio; brother-in-law, George Kuntz of Covington; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Visitation will be 5-8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 27, at Dobbling Funeral Home, Fort Thomas. Funeral Ceremony will be 10 a.m. Friday, Jan. 28, at St. Therese Church, Southgate. Burial will be in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105 or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

RECORDER

720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

At 121 West 10th St., Jan. 11.

Second degree burglary

At 114 West Seventh St., Jan. 12.

Theft by unlawful taking

At 411 Elm St. Apt. 414, Jan. 11.

Theft by unlawful taking, third degree criminal mischief

At 300 block of Riverboat Row, Jan. 11.

Theft of property lost or mislaid Third degree burglary

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 2830404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. McCarthy; daughter, Maureen McCarthy; five grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 S. Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41071.

Margaret E. Vulhop

Margaret E. Vulhop, 91, of Florence, formerly of Newport, died Jan. 18, 2011, at her residence. She was a housekeeper at the Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport and a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the D.A.V. Post No. 155 in Henry County, Ladies Auxiliary of the Alexandria V.F.W. Post No. 3205 and Daughters of The Revolution. Survivors include sons, Donald Vulhop of Newport and Bill Vulhop Jr. of Laurinburg, N.C.; daughters, Susan Bachman and Ethel Withorn, both of Alexandria; sister, Virginia Schultz of Velrico, Fla.; 16 grandchildren; 25 great-grandchildren; and five great-great-grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Kenneth E. Walthers

Kenneth E. Walthers, 74, of Falmouth, formerly of Williamstown, died Jan. 18, 2011, at his residence. He worked as a switchman technician for Cincinnati Bell Telephone Company for 30 years and was a farmer. He was a member of Short Creek Baptist Church in Falmouth and the Telephone Pioneers of America. Survivors include his wife, Carolyn Walthers of Falmouth; daughter, Donna Bailey of Florence; sons, Kenneth “Bubby” Walthers of Falmouth, Mark Walthers of Williamstown, Gordon Walthers of Alexandria and Brian Walthers of Falmouth; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Burial was in Williamstown Cemetery. Memorials: Short Creek Baptist Church, 6212 Hwy. 22 W., Falmouth, KY 41040 or Mt. Moriah Christian Church, 314 Hwy. 17 N., Falmouth, KY 41040.

Everett ‘Jack’ Warner

Everett “Jack” Warner, 79, of California, died Jan. 16, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas, after a long battle with C.O.P.D. His brother, George Guy Jr.; a sister, Barbara Faye Dunaway; daughter, Brenda Fay McCord; and former wife, Lois June Moore Warner, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Betty; children, Kearney Willoughby of Winchester, Pamela Lambert of Mulberry, Fla., Debra Willoughby of Beattyville, Ky., Richard Warner of Covington, Sammie Warner of Newport, Rosemary Warner Stewart of Silver Grove and Spc. Ronnie Warner of Fort Riley, Kan.; sister, Kearney May Meyers; brother, Alton H. “Shug” Warner; sister-in-law, Audrey Rekers; motherin-law, Louise Harrison of Alexandria; 10 grandchildren; and 19 greatgrandchildren.

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Community

CCF Recorder

January 27, 2011

B9

Appalachian Festival seeks volunteer coordinator for 2011

CERT graduates

PROVIDED

Campbell County and Fort Thomas Police Graduated 10 Volunteers in Community Emergency Response Training (CERT). Volunteers completed 10 days of training to be certified to assist themselves, neighbors and their community in the event of an emergency disaster. Left to right are: Paul Kremer, Eric Markus, Angie Markus, Sandie Kremer, Denise Seward, Jon Engelhard, Dana Dixon, Vera Powell, Sammy Roberts (not pictured Julie Kremer).

Chase grants $70,000 to Cincinnati Museum Center Cincinnati Museum Center has received a $70,000 grant from Chase to support its youth program, which serves 130 youth ages 1318 in the Greater Cincinnati area. Joey D. Williams, Chase West Ohio president and Cincinnati Museum Center trustee, presented the grant from the JPMorgan Chase Foundation to Douglass McDonald, president and CEO of Cincinnati Museum Center. Cincinnati Museum Center’s Youth Program serves as a model throughout the national museum community. The youth program is a tuition-free diversity development initiative focusing on high school retention, science education, arts and cultural education and preparing its participants for college. As the students volunteer in the museums, they learn valuable life and work skills. The ultimate goal of the program is high school graduation with a plan for the future. Since 1998, 99 percent of all youth program graduates continue on to a four-year college.

Shriners to recognize region’s firefighters

Syrian Shriners and Shriners Hospitals for Children are seeking nominations for the 10th annual Syrian Shrine Firefighters Awards. “For more than 40 years, Shriners have supported children who are injured by fire and this is our way of saying ‘thank you’ to all those firefighters who put their lives at risk to help others every day,” said Jim Zimpher, Syrian Shrine Potentate. Awards are presented in three categories: Burn prevention, leadership and heroism. An awards ceremony will be held at Shriners Hospital for Children at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 2. Deadline for nominations is Feb. 18. Nomination forms can be obtained by calling 513872-6000 or via e-mail at lhoelker@shrinenet.org.

The 42nd annual Appalachian Festival is seeking a volunteer coordinator (a committee chair position) to direct volunteer workers at the three-day festival. The upcoming festival is Mother’s Day Weekend, May 6-8, at Coney Island. The festival is also seeking volunteers who are at least 18 years old to help in

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all aspects of presenting this year’s edition of one of the area’s most popular springtime events. The 42nd annual festival celebrates the area’s rich mountain heritage with down-home entertainment, crafts, food and cultural

attractions. More than 300,000 people in the area have Appalachian roots. Volunteers are needed for committee assignments and on-site help. Volunteers are particularly needed Friday, May 6, to

help with Children’s Day activities, such as kids’ crafts and games. Those interested in volunteering, or becoming the volunteer coordinator position, should call 513-2513378 or e-mail volunteer@ appalachianfestival.org.

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting to be held on Wednesday, February 2, 2011, at 7:00 p.m. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky, will call for second reading and consideration of passage the following ordinance, said ordinance having been read by title and a summary given for the first time at the January 19, 2011, regular meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE NO. O-01-11 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT ADOPTING A REVISED FEE SCHEDULE TO INCLUDE STATE-MANDATED FEES FOR HEATING, VENTILATION AND AIR CONDITIONING (HVAC) INSPECTION SERVICES The full text of Ordinance O-01-11 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours.

FLORIDA Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

FLORIDA

Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk 1001617835

SIESTA KEY Condos 2 & 3 BR, 2 BA, directly on worldfamous Crescent Beach. Owner offering 25% off Winter & Spring reservations! 847-931-9113

NEW YORK CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2 BR , 2 BA Gulf Front con do. Heated pool, balcony. Many upgrades. 513-771-1373, 448-7171 www.go-qca.com/condo

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $109/2 persons. Singles $94. Suites $119-$139. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH CAROLINA

Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach GULF BEACHES BEST VALUE! Gulf beach condo, 2BR, 2BA, pool. 513-770-4243. Local owner. Rent weekly. ww w.bodincondo.com

I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was PUBLIC HEARING prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell BUDGET HEARING County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Or- REGARDING PROPOSED USE OF AN dinance O-01-11.

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given by Campbell County Department of Housing that a public hearing will be held Wednesday, March 16, 2011, at 5:15 p.m. at the Campbell County Administration Building, located at 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky, in the Fiscal Court Chambers to obtain public input on the Annual Agency Plan for Campbell County Department of Housing. All interested parties are invited to be present to give or hear testimony relating to the above referenced plan. Further information concerning the plan is available for public review at Campbell County Department of Housing at 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 235, Monday - Friday from 8:30 a.m. -Noon and 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., excepting holidays. The Campbell County Fiscal Court will make every reasonable accommodation to assist qualified disabled persons in accessing available services or in attending Fiscal Court activities. If there is a need for the Fiscal Court to be aware of a specific requirement you are encouraged to contact this agency at (859) 261-5200 prior to the activity so suitable arrangements can be considered for the delivery of service. FAIR HOUSING AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES

SOUTH CAROLINA

7128

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

DESTIN, FLORIDA 50 Steps to the beach! Beautiful lowrise condos w/pools. 850-830-8133, email destinbeaches4u@yahoo.com or visit www.asummerbreeze.com

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC Fantastic Specials Available!!

100’s of Oceanfront/view Homes & Condos

Free brochure call 866-780-8334 www.northmyrtlebeachtravel.com

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin . D- 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

SANIBEL ISLAND ∂ Lakefront 3BR, 2BA home with screened lanai & 2 car garage; 1000 ft. from Gulf of Mexico! Monthly rentals, available now. Local owner, 513-232-4634

SANIBEL ISLAND Quality, beachfront condos. Excellent service! Great rates! www.SanibelIslandVacations.com 1-888-451-7277

1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III (NMHCIII) will be accepting sealed bids for lead hazard reduction services on 926 Hamlet St., located in the City of Newport, Kentucky. Bids are due no later than 12:00 p.m., local time, February 11, 2011, at the offices of the NMHCIII, located at 30 East 8th. St., Newport, KY 41071 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bids are to be marked "926 Hamlet lead hazard Project #11-01". The information for Bidders, Form of Bid, Form of Contract, Plans, Specifications and Forms of Bid Bond, Performance and Payment Bond, and other contract documents may be obtained by contacting Randy Schweinzger at (859) 581-2533, ext. 217. The hearing and/or speech-impaired may call our TDD line at (859) 581-2533, ext. 290. The NMHCIII will have a pre-bid walkthrough of the building at 10:00 a.m., local time, January 27, 2011. A certified check or bank draft, payable to Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III, U.S. Government Bonds, or a satisfactory bid bond executed by the Bidder and acceptable sureties in amount equal to five (5) percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for satisfactory performance and payment bonds. All Bidders shall include with their bid a statement from an acceptable surety that if their bid is accepted the surety will furnish to the Bidder the required performance and payment bond or bonds required by the contract documents. Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246 and Title VI. MBE/WBE firms are encouraged to bid. No bidder may withdraw their bid within 60 days after the actual date of opening thereof. The NMHCIII reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to reject any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of NMHCIII to do so. It is the intent of NMHCIII to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. NMHCIII is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1001616395

MUNICIPAL ROAD AID FUNDS A public hearing will be held by the City of Wilder, KY, 520 Licking Pike, on February 7, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. for the purpose of obtaining citizens comments regarding the possible uses of MRA Funds for FY 2011. Balance Carried Forward-$128,000; Anticipated Receipts$47,400; Anticipated Interest-$300; Total Resources Available for Appropriation $175,700. Citizens are invited to present oral or written comments at this time on proposed use of MRA Funds. Any person(s) who cannot submit comments or attend the public hearing but wish to submit comments should call the city clerk’s office at 5818884 so that arrangements can be made to secure their comments. Tracy Gibson, City Clerk 1001617866

ORDINANCE NO. 0-1- 2011

ORDINANCE CLOSING AND VACATING A PORTION OF COCHRAN AVENUE LOCATED IN THE CITY OF FT. THOMAS, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE BOARD OF COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORT THOMAS, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas has determined that a portion of Cochran Avenue located within the City of Fort Thomas should be closed. The legal description of the portion of the public way to be closed is described in Exhibit A and depicted on the plat on Exhibit B, both of which are attached hereto and incorporated by reference. SECTION II

The City has determined that the owners of the property, which abuts the portion of Cochran Avenue to be closed, are Stephen H. Schomaker and Sharon M. Schomaker, 31 Bonnie Lane, Ft. Thomas, Kentucky 41075, by virtue of deeds recorded in Deed Book 517, page 379, Group No. 30754/A3, PIDN: 999-99-16-335.00, abutting the easterly one-half of Cochran Avenue and in Deed Book 732, page 224, Group No. 30423/A1, PIDN: 999-99-12329.00, abutting the westerly one-half of Cochran Avenue. All references are to the Campbell County Clerk’s records at Newport, Kentucky. SECTION III

LEGAL NOTICE Manhattan Harbor, 1301 4th Ave., Dayton, KY intends to obtain title for auction purpose for the following vehicle, kept in storage since August, 2008, in exchange for balance due for storage fees ($5100.00) Name of title holder: Unknown; Storage Bill name: Tim Turner; Last known title: Regional Acceptance; 2004 Chevrolet Impala, vin 2g1wf52e749124737. 1616280

The City of Fort Thomas has provided Written Notice of the closing of a portion of Cochran Avenue to the property owners. A Receipt of Notice has been signed by the abutting property owners, Stephen H. Schomaker and Sharon M. Schomaker, and is attached hereto as Exhibit 1. Stephen H. Schomaker and Sharon M. Schomaker own the real estate abutting the portion of Cochran Avenue to be closed by virtue of deeds recorded in Deed Book 517, page 379, and Deed Book 732, page 224, of the Campbell County Clerk’s office, Newport, Kentucky. SECTION IV The owners of property abutting the portion of Cochran Avenue; namely, Stephen H. Schomaker and Sharon M. Schomaker, have given their written, notarized Consent to the closing of the portion of Cochran Avenue and a copy of the Consent is attached hereto, marked Exhibit 1, and is incorporated herein by reference. SECTION V That portion of Cochran Avenue described in SECTION I hereof is hereby declared closed without any further action pursuant to K.R.S. 82.405 (1) and (2). SECTION VI This ordinance shall be effective when read, passed and advertised according to law. Adopted and passed by the Board of Council of the City of Fort Thomas, Campbell County, Kentucky and approved and signed this 18th day of January, 2011. APPROVED : Mary H. Brown, Mayor FIRST READING : January 3, 2011 ADOPTED: January 18, 2011 ATTEST:

© 2011 CareerBuilder, LLC. All rights researved.

Melissa Kelly, City Clerk 1001617462


B10

CCF Recorder

January 27, 2011

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NORTHERN KENTUCKY RIGHT TO LIFE

ASHLEY FINDLEY ALLISON FINDLEY MR & MRS JAMES FINKE JEFFREY E. FINKE MARIA C. FINKE THOMAS R. FINKE JOSEPH R.L. FINKE DAVID J. FINKE PETER E. FINKE MARY FINN BOB FINN On this thirty-eighth anniversary of the infamous CATHERINE FIORE decision of the Supreme Court exercising its raw GLORIA FIORE ROSANNA FIORE judicial power over the lives of the defenseless BOB & CATHY FLAIG unborn, we join with a multitude of others in many LARRY & BETTY FOLTZ MARY FOSTER cities across this nation, to carry the message of JANET FOUSHEE ANN & DAVID FOUTCH Life to President Barrack Obama and to the 112th BETTY A FRAGGE Congress. We join the over 100,000 people who RONALD G FRAGGE, MD THE FRAMBES FAMILY marched in a circle of life around the capitol in STEVE FRANZEN Washington DC on January 22. DEBBIE FRANZEN NICHOLAS FRANZEN As much as we would like to be there, for many LEAH FRANZEN it is impossible to travel to Washington. Again, MCKINLEY FRANZEN VIC FREIHOFER we March on Paper. We openly lend our names REX FREIHOFER to urge The adoption of a mandatory Human Life FRED & PAMELA FREIHOFER & FAMILY A FRIEND Amendment to the Constitution of the United LEONARD FRITZ & FAMILY AL GARNICK States of America. LOIS GARNICK We pledge to strive to attain that goal in memorial RICHARD GAUTRAUD, M.D. & FAMILY RUTH GAVIN of those little ones who have no identity and bear THE GEDEON FAMILY no names but nonetheless are written on the WILLIAM & CHRISTINA GERDES FAMILY consciences of all Americans. We are all manner JUDITH A. GERDING of people - We are Democrats, Republicans, MARY JO GERMANN HANK GERMANN Independents, Conservatives, Liberals and all the NICK GERMANN shades in between. MEGAN GERMANN SARA GERMANN The beautiful red rose, symbol of short life HANK GIESKE VINCE & BETTY GIGLIO FAMILY and martyrdom, will again bloom in Washington MRS JANE GILKEY January 22. JOHN GILKEY PAUL GILKEY WE HAVE TAKEN A STAND! CATHERINE GINDELE WE WILL NOT COMPROMISE! CHRIS GINDELE ELLARIE GLENN AND WE WILL BE HEARD! DENNY & BARB GLENN KELSEY GLENN COURTNEY GLENN IN LOVING MEMORY OF ABBY KATHY BESSLER JACINTA BRUEGGEMANN SHAWN GLENN JACOB BESSLER DEAN & AILEEN ADAMS CATHERINE BRUEGGEMANN BRENDA GLENN BEN BESSLER DOMINIC & MELISSA BRUEGGEMANN GRACE ADAMS KEVIN GLENN ABBEY BESSLER NICHOLAS BRUEGGEMANN BETTY ADAMS MAGGIE GLENN TONY BESSLER THERESA BRUEGGEMANN JOHN ADAMS KERRY GLENN BRIDGET BESSLER GABRIEL BRUEGGEMANN JANET ALBERS MICHAEL GLENN JUDE BESSLER JEROME BRUEGGEMANN ROBERT ALBERS MATTHEW GLENN AL BESSLER IGNATIUS BRUEGGEMANN KACEE ALLEN MARK GLENN L NATE BESSLER REGINA BRUEGGEMANN OLIVIA ALLEN MICHELLE GLENN BRO BLAISE BETLEY CFP STANISLAUS BRUEGGEMANN MARCUS ALLEN PAT & PAM GLENN RICHARD BEYER JOACHIM BRUEGGEMANN STEVE & DIANE ALLEN’S DONNIE GLENN ANTHONY BEYER MERCEDES BRUEGGEMANN GRANDCHILDREN LAUREN GLENN VICTORIA BRUEGGEMANN MR & MRS MARTIN ALTER NICHOLAS BEYER NICHOLAS GLENN THERESA BEYER DIEGO BRUEGGEMANN ANTHONY ALTER KELLY GLENN MARY JO BEYER PATRICK BRUEGGEMANN ANNA ALTER BRENDA GLUCK JERRY & LOIS BIEDENBENDER ANNA BRUEGGEMANN COLIN ANICKA KEITH GLUCK BRUCE & MARY BIEDENHARN MARIA BRUEGGEMANN AMY ARLINGHAUS ANTHONY GLUCK JOE & RITA BIEDENHARN ELIZABETH BRUEGGEMANN DALE ARLINGHAUS LUCAS GLUCK JEFF & JEN BIEDENHARN JOSEPH BRUEGGEMANN EMILY ARLINGHAUS VALERIE GLUCK DAVID BIEDENHARN MICHAEL BRUEGGEMANN ERIC ARLINGHAUS HOLLY GLUCK DANNY BIEDENHARN GRACE BRUEGGEMANN MONICA ARLINGHAUS VERONICA GLUCK MARY & ZACHARY BITZER NICHOLAS BRUEGGEMANN NATALIE ARLINGHAUS NORBERT GOETZ MARY ANN BLACK MARK BRUEGGEMANN STEFANIE ARLINGHAUS INGA GOETZ PATRICK BLACK ANGELA BRUEGGEMANN PAUL & MARLYS COLLEEN & NORBIE GOETZ RICHARD & BARBARA BLANK DIANA M. BRUEGGEMANN ARLINGHAUS & FAMILY SAMANTHA GOETZ CHARLES & TAMMY ARMITAGE LORETTA BLEICHNER HOLLY BRUEGGEMANN LARRY GOETZ DIANNA ARNOLD PAUL & MARY ANN BLOM & FAMILY JOHN BRUEGGEMANN PHILLIP GOETZ ANGELA BOH MARK G. ARNZEN BENEDICT BRUEGGEMANN SARAH GOETZ AARON BOH KATHY ASHCRAFT LISA BRUEGGEMANN THE GOETZ FAMILY STEPHANIE BOH BARB & WAYNE BACH JOHN BRUEGGEMANN DOROTHY GOLD BERNADETTE BRUEGGEMANN JACK BOH BOB & ROSE BACON ROY GOLD CARMELITA BRUEGGEMANN DOUGLAS BOH ELISSA BAKER BEN GOLDADE MARY BRUEGGEMANN DENNIS BOH JIMMY BAKER THERESA GOLDADE BERNARD BRUEGGEMANN GARY BOLTE TATIANA BAKER MICHELLE GOLDADE BOB BRUEGGEMANN MATTHEW BOLTE BRODY BAKER ASHLEY GOLDADE NATASHA BRUEGGEMANN RUTH ANN BOLTE LUIS R. BALLESTER FRANCIS GOLDADE ISABELLA BRUEGGEMANN KATHERINE F. BALLESTER GINA BONDICK PETER GOODWIN M.D. NATALIE BRUGGER PAUL BONDICK LYNETTE M. BALLESTER DONNA GRADY BOB & HONEY BRUNSON NICHOLAS A. BALLESTER THE BOOHER FAMILY WILL GRADY MRS DOROTHY BANKEMPER WHITNEY BOONE SUSAN BUCHER EILEEN GRADY HELEN BARBARA THE BUCHER FAMILY LAWRENCE R. BORNE BILL GRADY PAUL BARCOMB LOIS BUERGER ROBERT BOWLING MARSHA J GRAN GINETTE BARCOMB TIM BUERGER JEANNINE BOWLING JOAN GREEN SOLOMON BARCOMB MARILYN BUESCHER JACK BOWLING JAMES GREEN CALEB BARCOMB AMY BUETER MEGAN BOWLING MICHAEL GREEN CONSTANCE BRADY-BALDWIN JOE BURWINKEL KATHLEEN BARCOMB THE. GREER FAMILY MRS STELLA BRANNEN & FAMILY JOYCE BURWINKEL MAX BARCOMB ELIZABETH GRENKI MARY FRANCES BRAY STAN BARCZAK MICHELE BURWINKEL JAMES & SUSAN GREVE LARRY BRENNAN CATHY BARCZAK ANDREW BURWINKEL BEVERLY GRIMME ADELLE BRENNAN MARY BARCZAK CHRISTOPHER BURWINKEL PAUL A GRIMME SHAE BRENNAN ELIZABETH BARCZAK BETH BURWINKEL BETTY L GRIMME RON BRESSER RACHEL BARCZAK PAUL A BUSAM, MD WAYNE GRIMME, SR DONNA BRESSER SARAH BARCZAK RITA BUSHELMAN THE ERIC & ANGELA JOSH BRESSER ROSE BARCZAK D.J. BUSHELMAN GROESCHEN FAMILY DOROTHY BRINKER IN LOVING MEMORY OF CASEY BUSHELMAN MARY K GRONOTTE MR & MRS ROBERT BROCKMAN MARIA BARCZAK SUSAN BUSHELMAN MARY ANNE GRONOTTE ANTHONY BROCKMAN IN LOVING MEMORY OF SHERI BUSHELMAN TIM GRONOTTE PHIL BROCKMAN WALTER BARCZAK BILL BUTLER ELIZABETH GRONOTTE MR & MRS BRIAN BROCKMAN JERILYN BUTLER IRENEUSZ BARCZAK FRANK & JOAN GROSS LAUREN BROCKMAN CHERLYN BARCZAK ANITA BUTLER BRENDA GROSS IN MEMORY OF JOE BARKET EMMA BROCKMAN MARY DOLORES BUTLER CURTIS TOM GROSS LUKE BROCKMAN MIKE BARNES JULIANNA BUTLER DOROTHY GROTHAUS MRS & MRS JOHN BROCKMAN MICHAEL BUTLER DEBBIE BARNES JACK GROTHAUS CHRIS & SUSAN BARNETT JACK BROCKMAN HELEN BUTLER PAUL W. GRUNENWALD, M.D. DANNY BROCKMAN JOHN M BARRY CHRISTOPHER BUTLER BARBARA GRUNENWALD, R.N. LUKE BROCKMAN LILLY C BARRY GABRIEL BUTLER THE HAACKE FAMILY RICH & MARLENE BROERING MARIA BUTLER MELISSA BARTELS IN LOVING MEMORY OF REV. RICHARD & RACHEL BROERING SUZANNE BUTLER PARKER BARTELS HENRY HAACKE STEVE & CHRISTY BROERING ANTHONY BUTLER NATALIE BARTELS IN LOVING MEMORY OF CRAIG & KAREN BARTH PAUL HAACKE COURTNEY BARTH TASHA HAASER JUSTIN BARTH HE ABY AT EEKS ANN & EBERT F. HAEGELE KYLE BARTH • Heart Beats • Brain Waves • Will Grasp Objects EBERT H. HAEGELE CAITLIN BARTH MICHAEL & LIZ HAEGELE WILLIAM R BAUEREIS HANNAH HAEGELE MR & MRS MARK BAUMGARTNER IN LOVING MEMORY OF KELLY BAUMGARTNER MEL HAIGIS MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER ELAINE HAIGIS JOSEPH & MARY LOU BAUTE THE HALL FAMILY JENNY BECKNELL KARA HANKS MATT BECKNELL BEN HANKS AUSTIN BECKNELL ELLIE BETH HANKS BLAKE BECKNELL PORTER HANKS COLIN BECKNELL PAULA HASS DONAVON BECKNELL CHRIS HASS WAYNE BEIL THE HAVENS FAMILY TIERSA BEIL STANLEY & BEVERLY HAY NICHOLAS BEIL JEROME HAY CRISTIN BEIL DAVID HAY CATHY BEIL GARY HAY NICK BEIL BRIAN HAY PHILOMENA BEIL BRENT HAY ISABELLA BEIL PAULA HAY WAYNE BEIL, II CARLA HAY WAYNE BEIL, III SARA HAY With permission, “Abortion, Questions and Answer” MARTENE A BEIMESCH T. HEGENER FAMILY Wilke-Hays Publishing Co., Cincinnati, OH GLENN & THERESE MR & MRS CHARLES F HEGGE BEIMESCH CAROL D. HEHEMANN NICK BELL MATTHEW BROERING JANET FEISER CAROLYN BUTLER IN LOVING MEMORY OF JOE CHRISTY BELL JOSEPH BROERING JEFF FEISER ANNE BUTLER HELMERS GENEVIEVE BELL KATHERINE BROERING LARRY FELTHAUS MARGARET BUTLER ROBERT HENRY CHRISTIANA BELL MARK BROERING DENNIS FESSLER JORDAN BYRNE THELMA HENRY GIOVANNI BELL KATIE BROERING NORMA FESSLER MARILYN CAHILL KEMBER HERRING ABRAHAM BELL RICHARD BROERING PAUL & CONNIE FESSLER MAGGIE & SHEA HICKS BON CAHILL ALEXANDER BELL RACHEL BROERING SR MONICA FESSLER OSB MRS CHARLES K. HIGDON MICHAEL CANNANE ANASTASIA L. BELL MR & MRS STEPHEN E FIEGER THE MARK HIGDON FAMILY MATTHEW BROERING KAY CAPETILLO LUCY BELL ANNE M. FIELD CARLA BROSE THE CAREY FAMILY THE KIRT HIGDON FAMILY MARTIN BELL CELINE FIELD DAVE & DONNA CARNOHAN BERNIE BROSSART THE GERALD M. HIGDON FAMILY MARY DENISE BELL BENEDICT FIELD & FAMILY PAT BROSSART TIMOTHY HILLEBRAND MONICA BELL DOMINIC FIELD RIVER CARPENTER FRED BROWN MR & MRS MICHAEL HILLEBRAND PATRICK BELL JONATHAN FIELD SKYE CARPENTER MARK BROWN KATRINA HILLEBRAND CLAUDIA BELL JOSEPH FIELD LANDEN CARPENTER ROBERT J. BROWN PATRICK HILLEBRAND ABRAHAM BELL, II KATHLEEN FIELD OUR CATHOLIC STORE BARBARA A. BROWN THE HILLEBRAND FAMILY PATRICIA BENDEL MARIA FIELD JULIE BROWN HENGEHOLD MICHAEL P CETRULO VON HILLIARD WILLIAM BENDEL & FAMILY PAUL BRUECKNER PAUL FIELD IN LOVING MEMORY OF MARJEAN HILS NANCY BENNETT PETER FIELD CAMILLO D CETRULO ROSE BRUECKNER JUDE HILS CAROLYN & STEVE BERBERICH MAE BRUEGGEMAN THOMAS FIELD IN LOVING MEMORY OF ROBERT HOFACRE MR MARK A BERGMAN JAMES & EMILY BRUEGGEMANN ESTELLE MCGRATH CETRULO AMY W. FINDLEY BETTE HOFACRE ART & CHARLOTTE BERLING JIM BRUEGGEMANN CHRIS FINDLEY IN LOVING MEMORY OF JEAN HOFFMAN VINCE BESSLER JACOB FINDLEY MARIA BRUEGGEMANN CATHLEEN M CETRULO LAWRENCE HOFFMAN IN LOVING MEMORY OF JOAN CETRULO ANDREWS ROBERT C CETRULO, J.D. ROSE CLASS FAMILY FRED & HARRIET CLAYTON LYNNE CLAYTON JANE COLE SR ELEANOR COLGAN, S.N. DEN. JANET COLLINS JOSEPH & PEGGY COLLOPY AGNES COLLOPY ELIZABETH COLVILLE, GLM KAREN COMBS TYLER COMBS THE COMBS FAMILY THOMAS W CONDIT KRISTINA M CONDIT MEGAN A CONDIT RITA CONNELLY JON CONNELLY THE ROBERT COOK FAMILY MR & MRS JESSE CRAIL JONAH CRAIL JOSIE CRAIL JUDE CRAIL GARY CRUM, PHD PAT CUETTE KATHRYN CUPITO TERRY CUPITO MICHAEL DANT HEATHER DANT JACK & MARION L DAUER THE DAUGHERTY FAMILY CONGRESSMAN GEOFF DAVIS PAT DAVIS IN LOVING MEMORY OF THE DECEASED MEMBERS OF: - THE HAEGELE FAMILY - ST CHARLES LEGION OF MARY - AT. AUGUSTINE LEGION OF MARY JEANNE DECKER FRANK DECKER ROBERT S. DEHNER BARBARA A. DEHNER ROBERT C. DEHNER JOHN A DEHNER JOSEPH M. DEHNER MICHAEL S. DEHNER STEPHEN P. DEHNER CHRISTOPHER DEHNER ANGELA DEHNER KUNKEL PAUL & PERI DENKE ALICIA DENKE JOHN DENKE ELENA DENKE CHRISTOPHER DENKE JAMES DENKE LUCIA DENKE MICHAEL & FRANCESCA DENKE THE KAY DIETRICH FAMILY SHARON M DIETZ IN LOVING MEMORY OF THOMAS X. DILLON TIMOTHY DILLON BRENDAN DILLON KATIE DILLON ANNE DILLON TERRY DILLON SEAN DILLON GRACE DILLON MARY ELLEN DILLON CLAIRE DILLON BRIAN DINEEN CAITLIN DINEEN SHANNON DINEEN ADRIENNE DINEEN AMY G DINEEN PENNY DIRR GEORGIANN DISCHAR BRANDON DOLHANCRYK ANNA DOLHANCRYK CHRISTOPHER DOLHANCRYK MRS JOHN DONADIO MRS J.B. DONADIO MOLLY DONNERMEYER MELISSA DONNERMEYER JOSH DONNERMEYER NATALIE DONNERMEYER HARRY & KATHY DONNERMEYER NICHOLAS DONVILLE BEVERLY DRAUD JON DRAUD SCOTT DRAUD & FAMILY DAVID DRESSMAN THOMAS & DARLA DRESSMAN GERI DURITSCH MARIE DURITSCH MR CLEM DWERTMAN F. ROBERT DWYER KATHY DWYER MATT DWYER DAN DWYER JOHN DWYER BILL EDWARDS BRENT ELLIOT MICHELLE ENGEL SHARON ENGEL RON & DEBBIE ENGELMAN JOSEPH & ELVERA ENZWEILER KAREN ENZWEILER JOSEPH & CINDY ENZWEILER, III LOU & MARILYN ESSELMAN DOTTIE M. FARRELL BERNIE T. FARRELL JOAN FASOLD DONALD FASOLD FRANK FEINAUER TRUDY FEINAUER BEVERLY FEINAUER ADAM FEINAUER BRIDGET FEINAUER KEITH FEINAUER

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GRACE E HOGAN MRS JEAN HOLLENKAMP FRED HOLLMANN MARIANN HOLLMANN ANNA HOLLMANN CHARLENE HOLTZ JOHN HOLTZ PAUL HOLTZ ELLEN HOLTZ BARBARA HOLZDERBER LAURA HORAN MARGIE HOWE ROBERT & HELEN HUBER MR & MRS LEE HUESMAN JOHN & MARLENE HUMMEL SARA & BEN HUMMEL JOHN HUMMEL ED HUMMEL CAROLE HUMMEL DAN HUTH IN LOVING MEMORY OF JACK HUTH IN LOVING MEMORY OF SHIRLEY HUTH MARGIE HUTH IN LOVING MEMORY OF THOMAS HUTH, M.D. MRS MARY P. HUTZEL RACHEL M. JACKMAN DR & MRS. MICHAEL A. JAINDL, SR MICHAEL JAINDL, JR DANIEL JAINDL ROBERT JAINDL JOSEPH JAINDL MARY JAINDL ANDREW JAINDL KENNETH JAINDL ELIZABETH JAINDL JERRY & KATHY JEHN PEGGY JENT FIREMAN JOE MARY ELLEN JOHNSON SANDRA JONES KATHERINE M. JONES JOHN W JONES CARROLL JONES AMI JONES MR & MRS MICHAEL JORBERT MIKE KEIPERT PATTI KEIPERT DAN & SANDY KELLER DAVE & JULIE KELLER CRAIG KELLEY PEGGY KELLY JACK KELLY JACK KENKEL, SR KATHLEEN KENNEDY CATHERINE KENNEDY MARY KENNEDY MARY THERESA KENNEDY THOMAS KENNEDY AMY KENNEDY OWEN KENNEDY LUCY KENNEDY OWEN KENNEDY, JR KATHLEEN KING KAITLYN KING LILLA KIRALY JUDY KITCHEN NICOLE KITCHEN KELLY KITCHEN PAUL L KLEIN LETTY A KLEIN JAMES KLUEMPER CHRIS & JORDAN KLUEMPER LEO J KNIPPER VIRGINIA C KNIPPER SHERI LYNN KNIPPER NIKOLAUS CHRISTIAN KNIPPER BENJAMIN GREGORY KNIPPER LUKE MATTHIAS JOSEF KNIPPER MARK WILLIAM KNIPPER, II MARK WILLIAM KNIPPER, SR SHARON KNOX TOM KNOX SARAH KNOX PHIL KOCH WILLIAM E. KOCH MICHAEL KOLB MR & MRS MARK KOLB DONALD KOLB DRUCILLA KOLB ELIZABETH KOLB DAVID L KRAMER BARBARA A. KRAMER BERNICE KREBS MARIE KREUTZJANS MONICA KRIVANEK RYAN KRIVANEK MR ANDY KRUMME MRS CLARE KRUMME ANDREW KRUMME ROBERT KRUMME PATRICK KRUMME CAROLINE KRUMME ANGIE KUHL KYLA KUHL REECE KUHL TY KUHL ZACH KUHL COLLEEN M. KUNATH CAITLIN KUNATH COLIN KUNATH CONOR KUNATH SEAN KUNATH AIDAN M. KUNATH ARTHUR M. KUNATH, M.D. JOSEPH KUNKEL BERNIE KUNKEL ANGELA KUNKEL ANTHONY & CATHERINE KUNKEL NORA KUNKEL VIRGINIA KUNKEL JAMES KUNKEL MARIANNE KUNKEL MARK KUNKEL ERIC KUNKEL LISA KUNKEL MARY KUNKEL MARIA KUNKEL RACHEL KUNKEL JULIANNA KUNKEL MELISSA KUNKEL KATHERINE KUNKEL NICHOLAS KUNKEL BRIDGET KUNKEL GERARD KUNKEL PAUL C. KUNKEL DONALD & THERESA KUNKEL ADAM KUNKEL MICHAEL KUNKEL LAURA KUNKEL ALBERT KUNKEL ZACHARY KUNKEL MATTHEW KUNKEL BILL & KAREN KUNKEL WILLIAM & MARIANNA KUNKEL ANDREW KUNKEL JOHN KUNKEL LEO KUNKEL JOAN KUNKEL JEROME KUNKEL CAELI KUNKEL

JOSEPH & MARY KUNKEL GEORGE KUNKEL BENJAMIN KUNKEL PAUL & ANNE KUNKEL AUDREY KUNKEL PATRICK KUNKEL CHRISTOPHER KUNKEL MARY KUNKEL ALEXANDER KUNKEL SEBASTIAN KUNKEL

CAROLYN & JEFF ROSENSTIEL SAMANTHA SUMME SAM ROSENSTIEL DARLENE H. SUMME BEN ROSENSTIEL ANTHONY T. SUMME AVA ROSENSTIEL PAM SUMME LOUISE ROTH MARK SUMME LESHIA RUDD BILLY SUMME KRISTEN RUGH MATTHEW SUMME BARB RUH SCOTT SUMME JIM RUH JANE & CHARLIE SUMME KATHLEEN RYAN FRED H. SUMME, J.D. PATRICK RYAN HANNAH SWENSON MIKE RYAN GLENN & DOTTIE SWIKERT MATT RYAN AL TALLARIGO DOLOURES RYAN JAN TALLARIGO MICHAEL RYAN JOE TALLARIGO SHAWN RYAN JOHN TALLARIGO JEROME KUNKEL MR & MRS JAMES SANDER JEN TALLARIGO XAVIER KUNKEL THE BONNIE SARGE FAMILY THE TELECK FAMILY SOPHIA KUNKEL LINK BETWEEN CONTRACEPTION AND ABORTION MARIA SAUERLAND JAY & KATHY THAMANN LARRY & ALICE KUNKEL “Decades of silence, interpreted by most of the faithful as consent to ERMA SCHADLER MARY LOIS THEMANN CHARLES KUNKEL MARI ANGELA SCHAPPACHER MARYBETH L. THEMANN their contraceptive practice, had left its mark. …The distance between SAMANTHA KUNKEL ELIZABETH SCHAPPACHER FR. DANIEL THEMANN Church teaching and the use of contraceptives continues to be perceived LAWRENCE KUNKEL SUSANNA SCHAPPACHER JOSEPH E. THEMANN by most of the population as neither a sin nor a rebellion. TONY KUNKEL VIRGINIA SCHAPPACHER CHRISTI THEMANN ANTHONY KUNKEL “…Even afterward…the condemnation of contraceptives would be VICTORIA SCHAPPACHER SR VIRGINIA MARIE THOMAS, S.J.W. AUSTIN KUNKEL NATHAN THORWORTH PETER SCHAPPACHER the subject of papal documents, but already at the level of the bishops it JOHN & CHRISTANNA KUNKEL MICHAEL SCHAPPACHER CHRISTINE THORWORTH would hardly appear in preaching.” GABRIELLA KUNKEL ETHAN THORWORTH LEO SCHAPPACHER, JR. “The clergy, for their part, would be almost completely silent on SEBASTIAN KUNKEL MADDIE THORWORTH LEO SCHAPPACHER, SR JOSEPH KUNKEL it and would continue to be very understanding and indulgent in the ESTELLE THORWORTH LAURA SCHARF KATERINA KUNKEL confessional,” concluded Sandro Magister, a Vatican analyst. MARY LOU TOELKE JEFF SCHARF TOMMY & MELISSA KUNKEL MARTI TUNGET ABBIGAIL SCHARF TIMOTHY KUNKEL GLENN TUNGET ANNA SCHARF The practice of artificial contraception is intrinsically evil. EMMA KUNKEL WILLIAM R. TWEHUES ANN SCHENK No circumstances and no method justify the practice of artificial ELIZABETH KUNKEL SANDRA L. TWEHUES THOMAS SCHEPER JACOB KUNKEL contraception. FATIMA URIBE RUTH SCHEPER GABRIEL KUNKEL MARY VENNEMANN MARGIE SCHEPMAN RAPHAEL KUNKEL ROBERT VENNEMANN JACK SCHEPMAN “Periodic continence, that is, the methods of birth regulation based MONICA KUNKEL IN LOVING MEMORY OF MS RUTH SCHERRER on self-observation and the use of infertile periods, is in conformity PATRICK KUNKEL STATE SENATOR JOHN SCHICKEL ELIZABETH VENNEMANN ANNA KUNKEL with the objective criteria of morality… In contrast, ‘every action which, JACK SCHIERER RICH VENNEMANN MARTIN KUNKEL whether in anticipation of the conjugal act, or in its accomplishment, or LOUIS SCHLOSSER LINDA VENNEMANN AMELIA KUNKEL RANDY VENNEMANN in the development of its natural consequences, proposes, whether as an ROSE SCHLOSSER OLIVIA KUNKEL LOUIS A SCHLOSSER DANIEL VENNEMANN end or as a means, to render procreation impossible’ is intrinsically evil.” DAVID & ELIZABETH KUNKEL ANN SCHLOSSER NICK VENNEMANN Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2370 CLARE KUNKEL DANIEL SCHLOSSER JOHN P VINCENT DAVID KUNKEL MARGARET SCHLOSSER THOMAS & CAROL VOET VINCENT KUNKEL “The Catholic Church clearly teaches that the use of artificial MARY E SCHNEIDER CHARLOTTE VOLPENHEIN ISSAC KUNKEL ERIC & MARY SCHNEIDER TOM VOLPENHEIN contraception in all its forms, including direct sterilization, is gravely PHILIP & MARIA KUNKEL YANDELL SCHNEIDER JIM VOLPENHEIN immoral, is intrinsically evil, is contrary to the law of nature and nature’s DOMINIC KUNKEL MR & MRS ANDREW SCHNEIDER CHARLES VOLPENHEIN God…Catholics who practice artificial birth control may not receive Holy LUKE KUNKEL CHARLIE SCHNEIDER BETTY J. VOORHEES PHILIP KUNKEL Communion without committing sacrilege.” Bishop G.P. Flavin, Bishop ELENA SCHNEIDER ANDREW WALKER NICHOLAS KUNKEL STEPHEN SCHNEIDER BETH WALKER of Lincoln, Nebraska REBECCA KUNKEL TOM & TRUDY SCHNEIDER CAROLINE WALKER CHRISTOPHER KUNKEL BUTCH & GINA SCHNEIDER & FAMILY JOSEPH WALKER Abortion and Contraception SARA KUNKEL ROBERT A SCHRODER KATIE WALKER ANTHONY KUNKEL BILL & AMY SCHULT & FAMILY MARIA WALKER JOSEPH KUNKEL, JR The acceptance of the practice of contraception has led to the KEN & PATRICIA SCHULTE MARGARET WALKER WILLIAM KUNKEL, JR GREGORY SCHUTTE ROBERT WALKER acceptance of abortion. SETH KUPER KRISTEN SCHUTTE STEPHEN WALKER MARY KUPER STEPHEN SCHUTTE PEYTON WALLACE Malcolm Potts, former Medical Director of the International DONALD J. KUPER ANDREW SCHUTTE VIVIAN WALLACE M. TRINETT KUPER Planned Parenthood Federation, stated in 1979: “As people turn to LILLY SCHUTTE EILEEN WALTERS DONNA S. LA EACE contraception, there will be a rise, not a fall, in the abortion rate.” RITA A SCHWEITZER JULIE WARTMAN MARY JO LA EACE DON & CRYSTAL SEBASTIAN JEREMY WARTMAN IN MEMORY OF RITA & KENDALL SEBASTIAN JENNIFER WARTMAN “In every nation, bar none, contraception has led to abortion, and GEORGE LA EACE ANDY SHAW KYLE WARTMAN PAUL LAJOYE from abortion to infanticide, the prelude to full-blown euthanasia!” CECILIA SHAW DEVIN WARTMAN BRIDGETTE LAJOYE Fr. Paul Marx, OSB, Ph.D., founder of Human Life International EMILY SHAW TYLER WARTMAN JULIANNE LAJOYE ANDREW SHAW, JR KARA WARTMAN ADRIANA LAJOYE MR & MRS GERALD L. SHAWHAN MACY WARTMAN “We cannot solve all the problems of the world, but let us never CHRISTINE LAJOYE MICHAEL SHAWHAN EVAN WARTMAN bring in the worst problem of all, that is to destroy love. And this is what JOSEPH LAJOYE KATE SHAWHAN MACY WARTMAN GINA LAJOYE happens when we tell people to practice contraception and abortion.” ANDREW SHAWHAN LARRY WARTMAN, JR STEVE LAJOYE Mother Teresa WILLIAM SHAWHAN LARRY WARTMAN, SR PAUL LAJOYE, JR. MONICA SHAWHAN JEREMY WARTMAN, SR JOHN LALLEY GABRIEL SHAWHAN LOUISE WEED Chemical Abortion SHIRLEY LALLEY MARY SHAWHAN JOHN WEED DOLORES C LANDWEHR & FAMILY CHRISTOPHER SHAWHAN JOHN WEED, JR JEFFREY S LEARMAN It has long been acknowledged by all drug manufacturers of DAN SHAWHAN PAUL & ELIZABETH ROBERT F. LEDERER EMILY SHAWHAN WEGENER oral contraceptives (birth control pills), and by the Food and Drug EVELYN LENHOFF FAMILY FRANCIS SHAWHAN JOHN & DONNA WEGENER Administration, that standard birth control pills also abort the newly DAVID & MELISSA LEYLAND DOMINIC SHAWHAN DAVE WELLER conceived child. ETERNAL LIFE ROSE SHAWHAN DAVID WELLER THE LINDSLEY FAMILY BENEDICT SHAWHAN CHRISTINA WELLER KAIYA LINKUGEL “There are over 30 ‘contraceptive’ pills on the market, each differing ANNE SHAWHAN MICHAEL WELLER ALBERT & ROSE LITTNER FAMILY MICHELLE SHAWHAN GERI WELLER a little from the others. They ‘prevent’ pregnancy through three separate TOM LITZLER TOM SHAWHAN MARLENE WENDLING functions: PAT LITZLER AMY SHAWHAN DOUGLAS WENK 1. They thicken the mucous plug at the cervix. If this is the KRISSY LIVINGSTON REGINA SHAWHAN JOHN WENK JOHN LIVINGSTON primary effect, then it truly is contraceptive because it prevents sperm MARY MARGARET SHAWHAN RYAN WENK JOHN PATRICK LIVINGSTON from entering. JOSEPH SHAWHAN ANDREW WENK DORA LIVINGSTON TIMOTHY SHAWHAN THOMAS WENK 2. They prevent release of the ovum. If this is the primary NELLIE LIVINGSTON MATTHEW SHAWHAN SUSAN WENK, M.D. effect, the function is ‘temporary’ sterilization. HOPE LIVINGSTON DAVID SHAWHAN MRS JANET WERMELING MARY ANN LOHRE 3. They render the lining of the womb hostile to the TOMMY SHAWHAN PAULA WESTWOOD DOUGLAS J. LOHRE implantation of the tiny new human at one week of life. This effect is STEPEHEN SHAWHAN GREG WESTWOOD JIM & BETH LOISELLE KATHLEEN SHAWHAN ABIGAIL WESTWOOD abortifacient. The reason is that at one week of life this tiny new boy or MICHELLE & OREN LONG FAMILY LUKE SHAWHAN MARY WESTWOOD girl cannot implant in the womb lining and dies.” J.C. Wilke, M.D. MARY LUEBBE IN MEMORY OF GAYLE WHALEY MIKE & DONNA SHEEHY IN LOVING MEMORY OF IN MEMORY OF JUDITH WHALEY ROSE SIEGRIST RICHARD & HELEN LYON “The close connection which exists, in mentality, between the ROSEMARY WHALEY JERRY SMITH TONY & ELVERA MAIER practice of contraception, and that of abortion, is becoming increasingly WILLIAM WHALEY JIM & ERIKA SMITH MARY ANN MALONEY ROBERT & JUDITH WHEELER BOBBY & NICOLE SMITH obvious. It is being demonstrated in an alarming way by the DR & MRS DAVID MANN EDWARD WHELAN L. BABY SMITH development of chemical products, intrauterine devices and vaccinations GIANNA MANN CAROL WHELAN MARY JO SOVA which, distributed with the same ease as contraceptives, really act as AUDREY MANN THOSE WHO WOULD HAVE BEEN TODD SOVA MRS ROSE MANNING abortifacients in the very early stages of the development of the life of TRACEY WICAL GAGE SOVA DON & MARY MANNING & FAMILY ANNETTE F. WICAL KEITH SOVA the new human being.” Pope John Paul II, Evangelium Vitae, Sec. 13 PAUL & KITTY MARCOTTE THE WILLENBRINK FAMILY CHRISTINE SOVA SR VIRGINIA MARIE THOMAS, SJ.W. PHIL & MARTHA SPALDING NANCY J WILLS The Solution GINNY MAROSI CHRISTOPHER SPALDING ANNA MARIE WILSON GINA MARTINI The Church, meaning its hierarchy, its clergy, its religious orders, EDWARD A. WILSON MARSHA SPEARS EMILY MASON its institutions, and, equally important, its laity, need to confidently JASON WILSON ANDREW SPOOR MICHAEL MASON TRISHA WILSON DEAN SPOOR and boldly express the consistent 2,000-year teaching of the Catholic FREDDIE MASON LAURA WILSON IRIS SPOOR Church, which has been, is now, and will be in the future, the ANGIE MATTISON HOPE WILSON RICHARD SPOOR unchanging truth for all ages and for all cultures and societies. JOEL MATTISON MELANIE WILSON ROBERT SPOOR MARK MCCLOREY EVAN ALEXANDER WILSON RICHARD SPOOR MICHELLE MCCLOREY Let us pray that we accept God’s grace to have the courage to MARIA ROSEANNE WILSON PAMELA SPOOR JOSEPH MCCLOREY PAUL WILSON ST. AUGUSTINE LEGION “Stand up for life!” as Pope John Paul II commanded. LUCY MCCLOREY ALICE R WINTERSHEIMER OF MARY ANDREW MCCLOREY JUSTICE DONALD C. ST. CHARLES LEGION HELEN MCCLOREY WINTERSHEIMER OF MARY JANE MCCLOREY STEPHEN REEN ANDY MOORE HANNAH NIEPORTE BLAISE Q. WINTERSHEIMER JOE STADTMILLER CLAIRE MCCLOREY JACKIE REGNER JIM MOORE SAMANTHA NIEPORTE JOEY SCOTT STAMBUSH CRAIG P. WINTERSHEIMER GREGORY MCCLOREY TIMOTHY M. REILLY NICOLE MORI CHRISTINE NIEPORTE MARK D. WINTERSHEIMER REGINA STAMBUSH PAUL MCDONOUGH CLAIRE MORICONI DR & MRS JAMES A NOLL MARY JANE REILLY GEORGE K WITTE JOSEPH STAMBUSH MARIANNE MCDONOUGH BOB MORICONI KATIE REILLY JOHN NOONAN THE STEVEN E.WITTMAN FAMILY RICARD P. STAMBUSH LAURIE MCKINLEY CHRIS MORICONI FR & MRS JOHN F NOVAK,III BRADY REILLY EDWIN WOESTE CARA P. STAMBUSH SCOTT MCKINLEY SGT & MRS JOHN F NOVAK,IV MARY KAY REILLY TONI MORICONI THOMAS C WOLFE WILLIAM A STARKS THE MCMAHON FAMILY MRS MARGARET O’BRIEN MS MARY BARBARA REINERT FLORA JO STARKS CHASE MORICONI JOSEPH & THERESA MRS JOAN MCNALLY THE REINERT FAMILY PAUL O’DANIEL MACY MORICONI WOLTERING WILLIAM N STARKS GARY MCNAY JOHN & MARYLORETTO RESING FIESTY JO STARKS SAMANTHA O’DANIEL DAN MOSER LAURA WOOLHISER DOROTHY MCPHERSON DOLORES RETTIG BRYAN O’DANIEL THERESE MOSER ANN V. YAEGEL MARK S JERRY STEGMAN RAY MCPHERSON IN LOVING MEMORY OF BROOKE O’DANIEL SUE MOSER YAEGEL JOHANNA STEGMAN ALOYSIUS MEESE GEORGE & BILL RETTIG LAURA & MIKE MUELLER BEVERLY O’DANIEL BARBARA ZERHUSEN RUTH M STELTENKAMP MRS EILEEN MEHURON ALEX RICHARDS ROBERT E OSSEGE LUCIA MUELLER MR & MRS WILLIAM TOM STELTENKAMP THE R.C. MENKE FAMILY JANE RIEHEMANN MARK OWENS JULIA MULREY ZERHUSEN STEVE STELTENKAMP THE JOHN MENKE FAMILY RUTH MURPHY MARILYN RIEHLE, GLM JAN PAOLUCCI JACK & DOLORES STEWART ANGELA ZERHUSEN THE TOM MENKE FAMILY JOE MURPHY THE RIEL FAMILY JOHN PAOLUCCI CARRIE BROWN STRITTHOLT EVAN ZERHUSEN THE MENKE FAMILY ROBERT & JUDITH PARSONS BOB & MARY LOU RINGO VIRGINIA STRUNK SHANE MURPHY JADEN ZERHUSEN KEN MERTLE MR & MRS GREG PATTERSON KRISTIN RINNE PATRICK MURPHY ROBERT STRUNK WILLIAM ZERHUSEN JAN MESSER WILL & ELLIE RITTER SUSAN PATTERSON CECILIA MURPHY MIKE STRUNK HANNAH ZERHUSEN IN LOVING MEMORY OF ISABELLA JOY PATTERSON THE JIM & TERRY ROESSLER FAMILY PETER & SHIRLEY SUDDETH ISABELLE ZERHUSEN XAVIER MURPHY HAROLD MESSICK GABRIELLE HOPE PATTERSON BLANCHE ROGERS KATHLEEN M MURPHY DAVEY SULLIVAN KELLY ZERHUSEN THE METTEY FAMILY ALEXANDRA FAITH PATTERSON LLOYD ROGERS PAUL MURPHY ANDREA SULLIVAN LILIAN ZERHUSEN GEORGE & DIANE MEYERRATKEN & FAMILY JAYNE MURPHY KENNETH ROGERS SEN RAND & KELLEY PAUL MICHAEL SULLIVAN MONICA ZERHUSEN RICHARD & ALLISON MEYERS REV. ROBERT MUSSMAN KEN ROGERS & FAMILY CAROLYN SULLIVAN ZACHARY ZERHUSEN VERA MEYERS DONNY & JANET NAEGELE JOHN & MARY BETH PEAVLER TRUDY ROGERS JOEY SULLIVAN KATIE ZUERNER GREG & PEGGY MEYERS KEVIN ROGERS CATHERINE PERRY DANIEL NAEGELE MAUREEN SULLIVAN JOE ZUERNER KEITH & DONNA MEYERS STEPHEN & MARY NAEGELE ELIZABETH PERRY JOY & JUSTINA ROGERS JOE SULLIVAN ANNE ZUERNER TIM MICHEL JOHN ROGERS JOSEPH PERRY THOMAS NAEGELE PATRICK SULLIVAN AMELIA ZUERNER KYNDAL MICHEL ANNA ROMITO MARGARET PERRY CHRISTOPHER NAEGELE THERESA SUMME KIRSTEN MICHEL MICHAEL PERRY MARY RUTH NAEGELE KASSIDY MICHEL STEPHEN PERRY DONALD NAEGELE KARLEY MICHEL DAVID A. PERRY, ESQ. MATTHEW NAEGELE Thanks to the generosity of the above LISA W MICHEL KYLE PETERS ROBERT NAEGELE JIM MIDDENDORF Northern Kentucky pro-lifers, this ad runs in DOROTHY PHIRMAN JAMES NAEGELE GAY MIDDENDORF WALT & KATHY PIESCHEL MARGARET NAEGELE Community Recorder Papers on Jan. 20th & Jan. 27th GREG MIDDENDORF GAYLE PIRON JEAN NEHUS and the The KY Enquirer on Jan. 22nd & Jan. 23rd DAVID MIDDENDORF DAN PIRON SHARON NEHUS ISABELLA MIDDENDORF DAVID PIRON ALLYSON NEHUS LILLIAN MIDDENDORF SARAH PIRON MARC NELTNER Name GREG & JAIME MIDDENDORF & FAMILY SUSAN NELTNER RICHARD & AUDREY PLYE DR JAY MIDDENDORF, D.V.M. REBECCA NELTNER REV ROBERT POANDL CHESTER MILLAY VIC & SUE PONZER & FAMILY WILL NELTNER DONNA MILLAY Address PEGGY PREMEC BRIDGET NELTNER JULIE MILLER PAIGE PREMEC LAURA NELTNER JOE PRIEST JOE NEYER JULIET PRIEST BRENDA NEYER City Zip Phone SERENA PRIEST IN LOVING MEMORY OF LARRY & ALVA PRIEST NORB NIENABER JEANNE NIENABER & FAMILY KATHY PURCELL BARB NIEPORTE JIM PURCELL Church VERN NIEPORTE REV. FR. ADAM PURDY BRYAN NIEPORTE JOHN DAVID RABE FAMILY Northern Kentucky Right To Life PATTY NIEPORTE MONICA RAHE 859-431-6380 JAKE NIEPORTE RYAN RAMDASS KEVIN NIEPORTE BRENDAN RAMDASS Your Contribution Brings You KATIE NIEPORTE BECCA RAMDASS ANN MILLER JUSTIN NIEPORTE JILL RAMDASS, RN The Newsletter & Special Mailings WILLIAM MILLER JOSH NIEPORTE STEVE RAWLINGS RUTH MILLER FRANCES NIEPORTE MELODY RAWLINGS Donation Membership (any amount) _____________ MARIETTA MILLER & FAMILY FRAN NIEPORTE KAITLYN RAWLINGS BYRON MILLS $20 RON NIEPORTE MEREDITH RAWLINGS _____________ Regular Membership GLORIA MILLS AARON NIEPORTE REV JAMES REBER GLENN & KIM MINTON GINA NIEPORTE LOIS REBER Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1202 • Covington, KY. 41012 GLENMARY LAY MISSIONERS LINDSAY NIEPORTE DORAN REED www.nkyrtl.org DAVID L MOLIQUE AVERY NIEPORTE GEORGIANA REED TOM MOORE SOPHIE REEN


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