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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, J u n e 1 8 , 2 0 0 9

Paul and Jamie Bertram of Bertram Eye Care

Vol. 13 Issue 12 © 2009 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Stitches

Kenton County 4-H students are coming together this summer to help those in their community. Read about how a group of about 21 students are sewing and helping others. LIFE, B1

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Whether you’re headed to the beach or the mountains this summer, we want to publish your vacation photos. To get started, go to NKY.com/Share and follow the steps there to send your photos to us. Be sure to identify everyone in the photo and which community they live in. Photos will appear on your community page and may even make it into your local newspaper, so start sharing today!

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Parks, council to coordinate By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

The Elsmere Park Board and city council are pledging to move forward together with plans to enhance the city’s parks after some miscommunication in recent weeks. Geraldine Fey, the park board director, spoke at the June 9 council meeting about the need for both groups to work more closely after the council declined to approve a bid for the repaving of a basketball court at Rosella Porterfield park. Wanting more time to research the issue, the council decided to send the issue to the Parks Oversight Committee, who will then make a formal recommendation to the council. However, Fey said that delaying a decision may affect the board’s budget as they approach the end of the fiscal year June 30. “If I had known it was going to have to go through all of this, I would have sent it to the council before the meeting tonight so we could get it going,” said Fey. “We’re all volunteers on the board, and we don’t know all the ins and outs of the procedures, and we’d like to get some more guidance from the council on things like this.” Fey also said she sometimes feels as though the park board’s contributions are overlooked by the council. “Our kids can go to Boone County or Florence and see beautiful parks, and that’s what we want here,” she said. “We just want our efforts to be appreciated, because we work hard to do what we do and it sometimes feels like we get some static from the council when we come here.” Council member Nancy Bowman said the council does appreciate the work of the park board, and said the communication between the two will be improved as they move forward. “I know the board has been very proactive in trying to get things done, and we are very grateful for what you’ve done,” she said. The next regularly scheduled council meeting will be June 23 at 7:30 p.m.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

All the buzz

Tyler Herald, a rising fifth-grader at Howell Elementary, carefully constructs his bumblebee during a summer program at Lindeman sponsored by the Erlanger/Elsmere Family Resource Center. The students participated in a variety of activities, includng crafts and a petting zoo.

Retro dance class offers fun By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

The ’80s are back...at least for one night. Better Bodies Gym in Fort Mitchell is hosting a special ’80s Retro Jamz class June 25, a spinoff of their popular Jamz dance class. The class will be open to the public, and everyone is encouraged to wear their ’80s-style workout gear as they dance to classic ’80s songs, including “Footloose,” “Walking on Sunshine,” “Walk like an Egyptian” and even “U Can’t Touch This.” “We want this to be a fun night, and we’re going to have the songs playing that everyone can’t help but dance to,” said Marcella Kinser, who coordinates group

programs at Better Bodies and Silverlake Recreation Center. “We want people to see what our Jamz class is all about, and this will be a great way to do that.” Kinser said the Jamz class was started a little over a year ago by Chet Lee, an instructor who was struck with an idea while attending a wedding. “I was looking at all these people out there on the dance floor, and they were really getting into it and working up a sweat,” he said. “So I thought it would be a cool idea to have a dance class with songs you’d hear at a wedding or an event like that - songs everyone loves dancing to.” Lee and Kinser worked to set up the class early last summer, and it has since taken off. Lee said

he keeps the music as updated as possible, playing a variety of current hits. “We have all of the newest dance songs, but we also throw in some classics too,” said Lee. Kinser said the classes, which are held a few times each week, are usually full, and some even have waiting lists. For the ’80s class, Lee said he’ll be joined by a few other Better Bodies instructors. There will also be door prizes available for those dressed in their ’80s workout gear. The ’80s Retro Jamz class will be held on June 25 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. It is free to attend, and open to the public. For more information, call 344-9995 or visit betterbodiesnky.com.

Webb returning as Lloyd band director By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Lloyd Memorial High School will have a new band director next year...kind of. The school is welcoming back Randy Webb, who stepped down from the position two years ago to return to his hometown of Winchester. Webb, who had directed the band for 12 years, said he’s excited about returning to the school, even if things look a bit different. He will replace Andy Shears, whose contract was not renewed. “It’s like returning home, but if that home had been remodeled and expanded a little,” he joked,

referring to the ongoing construction of the new school, which is being done in phases around the current building. “But it does feel like a comfortable place for me, and I’m excited to be back here.” Webb also said he didn’t realize how much Lloyd felt like home until he was no longer there. “I grew up in Winchester, and I thought going back there would be a homecoming for me,” he said. “But when I left here, I realized that this felt like home to me as well. I missed the community and the area, and I’m glad to be back.” Webb said his biggest initial challenge will be building the band’s numbers. He said he wants

to focus on working with some of the students at Tichenor Middle School to prepare them for joining the high school band. “That’s one thing I really missed when I was gone, was being able to work with kids and watch them develop from sixth grade through twelfth grade,” he said. “I think that’s the big focus now, is getting our numbers up and keeping them up as we move forward.” To help re-introduce himself as director, Webb and the band boosters are organizing a “Meetand-Greet” picnic on June 19 at the Lloyd football field. Webb said the picnic is intended for “past, present and future band mem-

bers”, in hope of recapturing a family atmosphere. “We’ve got a tradition of success here, and I think it’s important to embrace that and build from it,” he said. “We want to have a program that our entire community is proud of, and that starts with creating the right atmosphere.” The picnic will begin at 6:00 p.m., and is open to anyone interested in the band program. For more information about the picnic or the Lloyd Band, call 727-5910 or visit www.lloydhighschoolband.com.


Erlanger Recorder

News

June 18, 2009

BRIEFLY Library

ERLANGER - The Erlanger Branch of the Kenton County Public Library will welcome the Kentucky Shakespeare Festival on June 20 for a performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream�, starting at 2:00 p.m. The performance is geared toward all ages, and will include storytelling, puppets, music and audience participation. The show is free to attend, and no registration is required. For more information, call 962-4000 or visit www.kentonlibrary.org.

Meetings

Run for literacy

PROVIDED.

The Kenton County Public Library’s Race to Read 5K Saturday June 13 brought together nearly 1,000 participants and volunteers to help raise money for early childhood literacy. Erlanger resident Tim Menoher finished first in the male division with a time of 15:33, while Ashley Ruberg of Northbend finished as the top female runner at 19:21.

ERLANGER – The Erlanger city council will hold a special meeting on June 23 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss municipal road aid funds. Because it is a special meeting, discussion will be limited only to the items on the agenda. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, contact the city at 727-2525. ELSMERE - The Elsmere city council will meet on June 23 at 7:30 p.m. in the council chambers. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, contact the city at 342-7911.

Your Family is Our Family

Party

ERLANGER - Erlanger Baptist Church is holding a Community Block Party on June 24, starting at 6:00 p.m. The event will feature free food, music, inflatables, and games, as well as a variety of vendors and booths from

local organizations. There will also be horse rides, blood pressure screening, martial arts, pet adoptions and a display from the Creation Museum. The event was originally scheduled for June 10, but was canceled due to rain. Erlanger Baptist Church is located at 116 Commonwealth Avenue. For more information, call 727-2588.

Horses

ERLANGER - The ErlangerElsmere Family Resource Center is sponsoring a special program July 8-10 titled “Off To The Races!� where children can learn about horses and horse racing. The program, which will be held at Arnett Elementary, is open to all Erlanger/ Elsmere students entering kindergarten through fifth grade. It is free to attend, but space will be limited. For more information, or to register, contact the Family Resource Center at 342-2351.

Lions

ERLANGER - The Erlanger Lions will hold their annual summer carnival July 16-18 at Lions Park, located at the end of Sunset Drive. The carnival, which will open each day at 6:00 p.m., will feature food, music, amusement rides, pony rides and a casino room. Guests can also purchase wrist bands for $12 on Thursday and Friday to allow them unlimited rides. For information about the carnival, call 282-9969 or visit www.erlangerlions.org.

Index

Improving your health through knowledge, compassion and commitment.

Calendar ......................................B2

Deaths .........................................B9

Classifieds.....................................C

Schools........................................A6

Father Lou.................................. B3

Sports ..........................................A7

Life...............................................B1

Viewpoints ..................................A9

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

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Find news and information from your community on the Web Elsmere – nky.com/elsmere Erlanger – nky.com/erlanger Kenton County – nky.com/kentoncounty News Brian Mains | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1062 | bmains@nky.com Jason Brubaker | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1060 | jbrubaker@nky.com Regan Coomer | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1061 | rcoomer@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . 513-248-7118 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Michael Hornback | Advertising Manager. . . . 578-5501 | mhornback@nky.com Deb Kaya | Recorder Specialist . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-5507 | dkaya@nky.com Kelly Robinson | Retail Account Executive . . . . 578-5505 | krobinson@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager . . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Cathy Kellerman | District Manager . . . . . . . . 442-3461 | ckellerman@nky.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com Jim Cooper | Auto Account Executive . . . . . . . 513-768-8420 | jcooper@nky.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


June 18, 2009

Erlanger Recorder

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Erlanger Recorder

News

June 18, 2009

Poetry slam to bring word art to Covington By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Sam Phillips is pounding the streets of Covington preaching the word of poetry. The poet, Covington resident and Northern Kentucky University alum is the founder of The Running Word, a twice-monthly open mic held at The Bean Haus in MainStrasse. The more than a year-old poetry night draws crowds ranging from 15 to 30 people, and Phillips feels like it’s time for the next step in his city’s literary scene. Enter Phillips’ first-ever Covington City Lights Poetry Slam, to be held at 5 p.m. June 24 at The Blue Bar in Covington. “I would like the poetry slam to be part of a revolution for this area to just rise

Slam sign up

up in more spoken word arts other than just poetry,” Phillips said. Phillips feels like there are plenty of yet-to-befound poets and “word art” smiths out there who just need an opportunity to step up to the mic. “It’s important to be able to have that outlet. More artists are looking to go beyond just writing in their journals or keeping it to themselves,” he said. Getting the experience of reading your words in front of people can “enhance” your work, Phillips said, making you aware of how your performance can “attract people more to what you’re trying to say.” The poetry slam will feature 15 or so poets reciting or reading their poetry, Phillips said, adding it will not be in a “battle” format

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The Covington City Lights Poetry Slam will be held at 5 p.m. Wednesday June 24 at The Blue Bar, 266 Pike Street. Tickets are available at The Blue Bar and The Bean Haus in Covington before the event at $5, otherwise tickets can be purchased day of for $6. Rules and other information: Each poet will be given three minutes to present their piece. Each poet should have two in which poets compete against one another on stage at the same time. “People should come with their own personal style and read how they like to read – that’s what slam poetry is. Using personal style to deliver your art,” Phillips explained. Each poet will have three minutes to read. When finished, five people will be chosen from the audience to judge and assign points to the best poet. The highest score will win, Phillips said. Phillips hopes the slam becomes an annual event in Covington. The first year will feature a prize of $25 for the third place winner, a $50 prize for the second place winner and $100 for the first place winner, who

pieces prepared to present. Each poem must be of the poet’s own creation. No poet may use props, costumes or musical instruments. To compete in the poetry slam, send your name, number, e-mail, address and 30 words about yourself to covington citylightspoetryslam@gmail.com. Deadline is 5:59 p.m. June 24 at the door. will also have a poem published in NKU’s NKUExpressed. The slam’s namesake says it all for Phillips, who is dedicated to promoting not only the word, but also the poets. “The city lights of Covington are the artists,” he said. Covington resident and poet Lisa Carbert read her poetry for the first time at The Running Word just a few weeks ago. Now the 22-year-old is going to be a slammer in Covington City Lights Poetry Slam. “I always write and to actually have a place to go and compete against other poets and get my poetry out there is really cool,” she said.

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Taylor Mill ALS countdown ending By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

The city of Taylor Mill’s countdown to providing Advanced Life Support to its residents is drawing to a close. Starting July 1, the city will launch ALS service using one new ambulance and using the other as a Basic Life Support backup. One ALS medic will work per shift. “We’re actually moving forward. We’re getting ready for July 1,” said Fire Chief Dennis Halpin. Taylor Mill City Commission had decided to provide ALS after the cost of TransCare tier service increased to an amount close to that of what it will cost the city to provide the service in-house. First-year costs will be about $136,000, which includes the purchase of drugs and other ALS equipment. Projected second year cost is $61,000. If Taylor Mill had remained with TransCare it would have paid $108,000 for service during the 09-10

fiscal year. “We all know we made the best move for the residents of the city,” said Mayor Mark Kreimborg at the June 11 meeting. “On July 1 we’ll have a paramedic on board administering the drugs they need to save people’s lives.” Halpin reported to Kreimborg and commission at the meeting that the city has received the medication, monitors and a defibrillator needed for the ALS ambulance. Two full-time and two volunteer firefighters graduated from paramedic training Monday June 12 to work on the ALS ambulance, Halpin said, while four more will graduate in February 2010. A paramedic has to go through a year of training and memorize about 300 pages of ALS protocol, Halpin said. The city has planned an open house for residents to check out the ALS-equipped ambulance and meet the staff at 2 p.m. June 28. “July 1 we’re ready to party,” Halpin said.

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News

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

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Teen pianist takes silver By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Cassidy Gephart, 13, just won second place at The World Championship Old-time Piano Playing Contest in Peoria, Ill.

Thirteen-year-old Cassidy Gephart of Covington is a champ in the 35th annual World Championship Old-time Piano Playing Contest held in Peoria, Ill. Last year Gephart was the first female Junior Champion, while this year over Memorial Day Weekend the sports lover was given second place for her rendition of “Bluin’ the Black” and “Short’n Bread.” The competition for adults and juniors requires pianists to perform folk songs, rags and more written before 1929 dressed in period clothing. Gephart, who has been classically trained since the age of 3, found the compe-

tition to be a refreshing change. “The atmosphere was way different because of the competitors – you get pointers from other people instead of rivalry.” The week before the oldtime piano competition, Gephart practiced three hours a day. As a child Gephart was first taught by her mother Lori, director of the nonprofit Junior Music Experience, but now she is taught by Northern Kentucky University’s Artist in Residence, Dr. Sergei Polusmiak. “I knew she was talented when she was little,” Gephart’s mother said. “Anybody can learn to play, but some people have God-given ability and she does have it.” At the age of 9, Gephart

performed in the World Piano Competition’s 2004 Concert at Carnegie Hall in New York City. Gephart, who now occasionally teaches smaller children the piano, knows she’s already accomplished something many others strive to do in their lifetimes, but she’s looking forward to her future. “I know there’s people who try to get to Carnegie Hall and spend all their lives trying to get there,” she said. “I just know far for other people isn’t what far for me could be.” In her spare time Gephart plays volleyball, softball, soccer and more. Gephart hopes to play sports in the fall, when she starts ninth grade at Notre Dame Academy.

Council rethinking zone rcoomer@nky.com

Fort Wright City Council hopes to take the mystery out of a 200-acre stretch along Ky-17. Council will hear the second reading of an ordinance July 1 that will revert the zoning on a 200-acre area, zoned as a form district, along Madison Pike. If passed, the Town Center Form District will change back to the original 12 zones, lifting certain restrictions. “Personally, I’m very happy it will be undone,” said council member Dave Hatter, who originally voted against the form district. The form district was created to make development on Madison Pike easier. If a developer met district guidelines set by the city, the development process would be faster, said City Administrator Gary Huff.

More information

Fort Wright City Council will hear a second reading revoking the Town Center Form District on Ky-17 at the July 1 meeting. If approved, the 200-acre area will revert to the 12 original zones. The city’s economic development committee is working with the Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission to refine the area into a few working zones. Three years later, no development has occurred. Hatter said he felt the district was too stringent, especially in terms of property size – 5 acres is the district minimum, which would exclude development of even a 4.99 acre parcel. As for Huff, he said the city told the Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission, which weighed in on the issue, that the form

district was “difficult to implement” and “cumbersome to understand.” The form district includes 50 pages of requirements ranging from the minimum size of the parcel to the color of blinds used by the business. Soon council hopes to tailor the area to a few zones that will best implement city development. When Huff was asked why development didn’t proceed in the area, he was matter of fact. “The example is nothing was built on the form district. That’s the best example,” he said. Since becoming city administrator, only two developers have looked at the area, and the talks were very preliminary, Huff said. Refining the 12 zones will “allow the city to implement zoning along Madison Pike that will attract development,” he said.

Bridge bids satisfactory By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Bids to remedy the problem with Old Richardson Road Bridge in Independence were opened Thursday, June 11. After bid amounts were revealed, City Administrator Dan Groth and Public Works Director Gary Cooper shook hands. “We’re pleased with the prices that came in,” Cooper said. Seven contractors bid on one or all three of the bridge project phases, which include the design/build phase of the one lane steel suspension bridge, removal of the old bridge and finally installation of the suspension bridge. The city had to find a solution when the state recommended closure of the bridge last summer – especially when families on Crowe Road used the bridge as a safer way to get to Old Madison Pike. The other option for residents was to make the leftturn only on to Madison Pike, an outlet which residents believe have more safety issues than the bridge itself. “We’ll be going through all the bids in detail,” Groth said, adding council will make a decision at a June 29

special meeting at the city building. Five companies bid on one phase only, with the low bid for the design and build of the new bridge came from E & H Bridge at $106,886. Two companies bid on all three phases. One of those companies, Lonkard Construction, had the lowest bid for phases two and three at $20,000 and $25,000 respectively. Construction and removal of the old bridge was made possible by $175,000 from the state’s emergency

Municipal Road Aid Fund, which Groth applied to after the problem came to the city’s attention. The city doesn’t plan to close the old bridge until contractors are ready to “tear it out,” sometime in July, Groth estimated. Completion is hoped to occur before school begins in August, Groth said, because children on Crowe Road cross the bridge to get on their school bus during the school year. “I’m very happy with the results I’ve seen,” Groth said.

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SCHOOLS A6

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

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NEWS

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ACTIVITIES

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HONORS

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

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JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Cole Berry pets one of the goats as the others look for attention as well. Honey Hill Farm owner Sally Powell says, "the goats absolutley love being around kids." JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Sally Powell of Honey Hill Farm calls a goat over for students Cole Berry and Ronnie Brown to see. Powell brought her petting zoo to Lindeman Elementary on June 12 as part of the Erlanger/Elsmere Family Resource Center’s summer programs.

Kids learn from mobile zoo By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Sally Powell fought to hold back a smile as she watched the students extend their hands toward the goats in the cage, some more anxiously than others. “No I’m sorry- they’re not for sale,” she said, grinning. “But they do love the attention you guys give them- keep it up!” Powell, the owner of Honey Hill Farm, brought her small pet-

ting zoo to Lindeman Elementary June 12 as part of the Erlanger/ Elsmere Family Resource Center’s summer program. The students were able to feed, pet, and play with a variety of animals including goats, donkeys, alpacas, ducks, rabbits and even a miniature horse. “This is awesome!” exclaimed rising third-grader Ronnie Brown. “It feels really cool to feed them, because it tickles when they lick your hand.”

Powell, who takes her zoo all over the area for various events, said the animals love the attention from the children, a point further illustrated when a baby goat attempted to follow the kids back into the school. “See- Diego is just wondering where they all went and why they’re not petting him anymore,” she said. “But this is a lot of fun for them, and it’s great to see the kids have fun with it too.” For information, call 342-2351.

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Josh Eckler feeds one of the goats during the Honey Hill Farm petting zoo visits to Lindeman Elementary.

Katherine Hayes awarded Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Katherine Hayes has been awarded a Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship to help pay for her college education. This scholarship award is $1,500 a year. Hayes, a 2009 graduate of Villa Madonna Academy, will attend American University in Washington, D.C., to major in international relations. “Ever since seventh grade I have dreamed of studying international relations at a university

in Washington, D.C.,” she said. “The Byrd Scholarship will assist me in achieving this goal.” While at Villa Madonna, Hayes was a member of the National Honor Society, academic team, Student World Affairs Council, Foreign Language Club and tennis team. She is one of only 84 seniors in the state this year to receive a Byrd Scholarship, a federally funded program administered by

the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA). KHEAA also administers other student aid programs, including the Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship, where students earn money for college by making good grades in high school. Hayes is the daughter of Dorothy and Charles Hayes of Erlanger. She is the granddaughter of Dorothy Funke of Erlanger and Kathy Hayes of Defuniak

Springs, Fla. The Byrd Scholarship is named for longtime U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia, who authored the legislation establishing the program in 1985. Kentucky receives enough funding to award scholarships to 84 high school seniors each year, with 14 chosen from each of the state’s six congressional districts. Recipients are chosen by an independent panel, based on aca-

demic achievement, community service, school involvement and counselor recommendation. KHEAA and its sister agency, The Student Loan People, administer scholarship, grant, low-cost loan, savings and workstudy programs to help Kentuckians pay for college. They also provide free college planning and financial aid information to students, parents and counselors. Visit www.GoHigherKY.org

Bear with us

PROVIDED

Fourth-grader Wyatt Vonderhaar gives a teddy bear to Deputy Heckel.

PROVIDED

Boone County Sheriff Deputy Christie Heckel and Officer Matthew Ledbetter from U.S. Customs and Border Protection visited the students of Mary, Queen of Heaven School in Erlanger. The students collected teddy bears to donate to the sheriff’s office where they will be given to children they encounter in a traumatic situation. Officer Ledbetter brought Rocco, a German shepherd, to show the students how dogs are used to sniff out hidden drugs. Here kindergartner Lexie Skaggs gives a bear to Officer Ledbetter.


SPORTS

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 513-248-7118

RECREATIONAL

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

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RECORDER

Silverlake to host top swimmers at meet By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Silverlake Recreation Center in Erlanger will be busy as the Northern Kentucky Clippers club swimming team hosts the annual David Webb Invitational June 20-22. The meet will have more than 600 swimmers, including many of the top names in the region. The Clippers train many of the top high school swimmers in Northern Kentucky. Clippers head coach Jason Roberts said most of those top

swimmers will be at the meet, which is one of the final opportunities to meet qualifying standards for various championship meets later this summer. “It’s a good fine-tuning meet,” Roberts said. “We have some great talent coming in from Kentucky and Ohio. It should be a fast and exciting meet.” Teams entered include Cincinnati Aquatic Club, Coffman Family Y, Colonel Aquatics, Kettering City Swim Team, Kingfish Aquatics, Mason, Oak Hills, Ohio State Swimming, Springfield Y, Sycamore Flying Fish, and Uni-

versity of Rio Grande. Sessions are 1 and 5:30 p.m. Friday, 8:10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Saturday, and 8:10 a.m., 1:10 p.m. and 6:25 p.m. Sunday. Parking will not be available at Silverlake. A shuttle bus will pick up swimmers and patrons at Dixie Heights High School. The meet is named after David Webb, the founder of the Clippers and former aquatics director at Scott. The Clippers are capping off a memorable school year with several KHSAA state championships and nine graduating seniors sign-

ing to continue their careers in college. The signees are Michael Walsh of Covington Catholic (undecided), Jackie Sherrard of Scott (Louisville), Audrey Lawson of Notre Dame (LSU), Zane Rowland of CovCath (WKU), Rachel Roberts of Notre Dame (Air Force), Ryan Adams of Ryle (Union), Shannon Wofford of Highlands (Centre), Nick Kunkel of CovCath (LSU), and Austin Brown of Ryle (Transylvania) The Clippers hosted a meet May 30-31. The top three Clipper scorers in each age group at

that meet.

10 & under girls: Amanda Smith, Mikayla Herich, Katie Summe. 10 & under boys: Nick Smith, Thomas Steiber, Josh Smith. 9-10 girls: Madeleine Vonderhaar, MIkayla Herich, Katie Summe. 9-10 boys: Thomas Steiber, Josh Smith, Nick Smith. 11-12 girls: KayLee Witkiewicz, Olivia Hagen, Maddie Heist. 11-12 boys: Bryce Day, Owen Downard, Robbie Newman. 13-14 girls: Molly Hinken, Sharli Brady, Kenzie Margroum. 13-14 boys: Max Williamson, Chase Vennefron, Eric Huffman. 15 and over girls: Ellen Williamson, Caitlyn Forman, Mary Bank. 15 and over boys: Nick Kunkel, Shane Coltharp, Cole Garriott.

Frontier days Florence Freedom first baseman Jordan Baker successfully steals second against Kalamazoo during Florence’s loss on June 13. Baker was enjoying his first week with the team. The Freedom were one game behind Kalamazoo for first place in the Frontier League East Division June 15.

ALL PHOTOS JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Freedom pitcher Everett Saul suffered his first loss of the season June 13 against Kalamazoo. He is 3-1.

Freedom catcher Justin Pickett dives back into first base June 13.

Florence Freedom third baseman Johnny Welch throws out a Kalamazoo runner at first June 13.

Freedom second baseman Billy Mottram swings the bat June 13. Mottram continues to tear up Frontier League pitching.


A8

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

Sports & recreaction

CovCath grad Maile enjoying baseball at all levels By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Luke Maile prefers the

smell of grass of a baseball field to stopping and smelling the roses. His recent graduation

from Covington Catholic High School has not slowed down his busy schedule, but the catcher has found a

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League Baseball first-year player draft. Maile, who has signed with the University of Kentucky, will make a decision about whether to go pro or Wildcat later this summer as he meets with scouts and Red Sox personnel. “I’m definitely excited about it,” he said. “It’s fun to be in the conversation for something like that.” Maile hit .514 this season for the Colonels with 12 home runs and 55 RBI. He left CovCath with a dugout’s full of school offensive records. Teammate Zach Isler was named first team all-state. Beechwood’s A.J. Smith and

Scott’s E.J. Murray were honorable mention. Maile was named Ninth Region Player of the Year for the third straight year and is currently playing for a different band of Colonels - the Kentucky Colonels summer team. Maile will receive the Mr. Baseball award June 21 before the statewide East/West All-Star game at UK in Lexington. The game is 1 p.m. Before that, he played in Northern Kentucky’s all-star game June 15 and is helping with youth baseball camps. “I’m happy any time I’m on the baseball field, so I’ll enjoy it,” he said.

Swim league to start 46th season

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little time to savor the aroma of his recent honors. He has added some big ones recently. Maile was named Mr. Baseball for the state of Kentucky June 15. “I’m very humbled by it,” Maile said. “It’s tough to dwell on stuff like that during the season. You’re just trying to make your team better. Now that it’s here, I can enjoy it.” This was on top of recently being named Gatorade’s Player of the Year in the state and earning a cover shot on ESPN Rise Magazine. And a few days after being drafted by the Boston Red Sox in the 43rd round of the Major

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Mark Koors expects some close competition in the Northern Kentucky Swim League this season. The NKSL league president said conditions are prime for more parity in the 10-team youth league, which begins its 46th sea-

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son June 16. More than 1,000 kids will participate in the league this season. Participants range from some of the area’s top high school swimmers to youngsters just starting out. Beechwood Swim Club in Fort Mitchell won the team championship at last year’s finals by a wide margin.

Five Seasons, Brookwood and Florence finished next in a close battle for second. Koors said Beechwood has dominated in recent years but other clubs are catching up. The 10 clubs in the league are Beechwood (Fort Mitchell), Bluegrass (Fort Wright), Brookwood (Edgewood), Cherry Hill (Erlanger), Five Seasons (Crestview Hills), Florence, Fort Thomas, Ludlow Bromley, Oakbrook (Florence), and Taylor Mill. The league is split into two divisions for the regular season. Division A is Beechwood, Five Seasons, Florence, Brookwood and Bluegrass. Division B is Fort Thomas, Ludlow-Bromley, Taylor Mill, Cherry Hill and Oakbrook.


VIEWPOINTS

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

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CH@TROOM

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

A9

RECORDER

Moving up

Kendra Chambers, Faith Turney, Katie Adams and Carley Brueckner of Independence share a smile as they celebrate fifth grade recognition night at Summit View Elementary. PROVIDED

Get off the dime and tweet (114)

CH@TROOM Last week’s question

Which are you more likely to attend this summer, a Cincinnati Reds game or a Florence Freedom minor league game? Why?

Next question What features would you like to see included in a health care reform plan? Send your response to kynews@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line.

“I’ve already been to a Reds game but I’ll probably go to a Freedom game also. Each offers something different. I’m excited that the Reds are winning and going to the games are great but the Freedom offers a closer view of the game, cheaper tickets and affordable food. We’re lucky to have so many options.” J.H. “Florence Freedom. It’s cheaper, less crowded and more enjoyable watching guys who love the game play.” K.P. “Florence Freedom, without a doubt. Close to home, free parking, cheap tickets, great baseball entertainment, family fun, great deals/sponsors. What a fantastic addition to Northern Kentucky.” T.F. “I prefer the Florence Freedom. Parking is easier and much cheaper, seats are closer to the action, cost of seat is reasonable, players play because they enjoy the game ... and it’s all fun.” C.J.W., Florence “Both. I will probably attend more Reds games than Freedom games. I enjoy baseball especially when teams are competitive. Both teams are having good seasons.” G.G. “Neither! I enjoy the slots on the riverboats and that is where I'm spending my money.” Duke “It’s no contest ... Florence Freedom! It cheaper, more fun and parking is free!” L.J.H. “Reds.”

R.M.

“Thanks for asking. Go Cincinnati Reds – for a new and young team they are doing Cincinnati proud. I am looking forward to going to the five games my family and I already have purchased tickets for.” L.M.R. “I would have to say a Reds game. The Reds are having a pretty good season so far and I like the attitude of some of the newer players. They are a harder working group of players.” “I do like to go to some Cincinnati Steam games at the field across from Western Hills High School. This is a summer season league for college players during their off season. It’s fun to watch younger players who are playing for the love of the game, instead of a paycheck.” J.W. “I will do to at least five games this year. I am a Reds fan all the way. Even though Pete Rose did not get what he deserved from Cincinnati.” T.R. “I will attend two or three Freedom games rather than the Reds. Frankly, it’s cheaper and more fun, especially for the kids. I don’t enjoy going to a Reds game. I end up missing half the game passing food, drinks and change up and down the rows and trying to see around vendors who sell everything but used cars.” W.H. “I would more likely attend a Reds game - just because it is a tad closer and because I am used to going to Reds games.” D.K.

What’s all this buzz about Twitter and tweeting anyway? (85) As you can see, I’m practicing counting my characters in case I decide to really jump into this Twitter business. (27) It reminds me of the old days when we used to “count” headlines by hand to make them fit the space. (41) In even older days people paid for telegrams by the word, didn’t they? (70) Now, you’ve got 140 characters to say your piece on Twitter (see Twitter.com). (62) The numbers at the ends of my sentences are how many characters I’ve got left before I hit 140, just like on the Twitter Web site. (10) It’s like text messaging in public for an unlimited audience. (79) I’ve had a Twitter account for some time now (it’s free at the moment), but don’t have texting enabled on my phone, so it’s kind of like having a bicycle without tires. (-28 – ooh, that one won’t tweet (115)) I post my tweets from the Web, which saps some of the immediacy of it all but keeps from tweeting something really stupid. (18) I hope. (133) “Tweets” are the little messages you send on “Twitter” (there is such clever cuteness on the Internet, isn’t there?) that answer the

RECORDER

About letters & columns We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: kynews@ communitypress.com Fax: 859-283-7285 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. at a time can’t hurt, can it? (72) Gary Presley is a senior editor for Community Press. (88) You can e-mail him at gpresley@nky.com, or call him at (513) 591-6165. (70) Follow him at twitter.com/gpresley at your own risk of boredom (four posts in six months – but a couple to go with this column!). (11)

Rediscovering ‘No Agenda’ play Remember how long summer seemed when we were kids? The months stretched out before us, promising romps in the sprinkler, popsicles on the front porch, and evenings of firefly catch-andrelease. Today's kids also look forward to the lazy, hazy days of summer, but somehow seem quicker to pronounce, “I'm bored,” the dreaded whine that baffles parents. With toy boxes overflowing and the bells and whistles of every electronic game beckoning, we parents can't comprehend how our kids find time to be bored. Have they lost their ability to play? Do they really need adults to plan their much-anticipated leisure time? Have our children become victims of our over-scheduled, multi-tasking society? Kids are, in fact, caught up in the vortex that is modern American life, but the good news is that they still have it in them to play just for the sake of playing. It is our job as parents to recognize the value and the power of play. Countless research studies and our own observation of children have shown that they learn best from play. They become con-

A publication of

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

question, “What are you doing? (23) Dang! (135) Tweets can only be 140 characters long, so the trick is to fit what you want to say in that space. (42) Gary Presley If I were tweeting right now Editor’s (which I am), I Notebook could say “Typing about tweeting” or “Plugging Twitter in the paper” or something like that. (3) There might be a little OCD pandemic on the horizon as people obsess while counting their characters. (39) As with most forms of communication, there is a lot of junk and a little art. (63) I just stumbled on tweets “from” Darth Vader (twitter.com/DarthVader) – what a hoot! (56) Of course, you can also follow us at twitter.com/communitypress. (76) Not as much of a hoot as Vader, but a good local news fix for local news wonks. (61) A lot of tweeting is, of course, a bit hollow, like much of the Internet and this column. (51) Still, keeping in touch a little tweet

fident, caring people from the pleasures of play. But in our culture that is obsessed with competition and the mad rush to prepare children for college before they are out of diapers, we have de-valued play. Anxiety has put an agenda on play. The days of watching a snail wind its slimy way across the dirt have been replaced by reaching the next level on computerized “learning” games. So summer now presents us with the opportunity to re-introduce what I call “no agenda play.” This type of play is a natural fit with the natural world. Children's outdoor play is different from time spent indoors, with different sensory experiences and different standards of play. Children have greater freedom to run, shout, interact with and manipulate the environment. They are free to do messy activities that are often not tolerated indoors. Play in nature has unending diversity and a feeling of timelessness. The joys of dirt, water, wind,

Chris Kelley Community Recorder guest columnist

General Manager/Editor . . . .Susan McHugh smchugh@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-591-6161 Erlanger Recorder Editor . . . . . . . . . . .Brian Mains bmains@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1062

Children's outdoor play is different from time spent indoors, with different sensory experiences and different standards of play. sky and green grass are not just landscape background for children. Nature is exploration and experimentation for children, promoting the sense of wonder that they need to be lifelong learners. Building a trench in the sand or dirt or a rock dam over a stream involves planning, transforming, evaluating, and adapting, as well as practicing patience and creativity. Children who play in nature experience fewer emotional, behavioral and attentional problems. So what role can parents play in turning summer's added hours of daylight into self-initiated, significant play? We can turn off the television, sit on the porch, and talk with our kids as they make mudpies. Chris Kelly is director of Training for Children Inc.

s

A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-0404 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@nky.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


A10

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

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RECORDER

Web site: NKY.com

T h u r s d a y, J u n e 1 8 , 2 0 0 9

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

Rachel Samotis and Layne Machcinski work on their pillowcases on June 10. About 20 kids participated in the 4-H sewing camp, where the kids made pillowcases for children at the Women’s Crisis Center.

REGAN COOMER/STAFF

Paul and Jamie Bertram of Bertram Eye Care at 705 Buttermilk Pike in Crescent Springs offer a family experience in eye care.

Doctors hope to provide personalized eye care By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Paul and Jamie Bertram want their private practice, opened two months ago, to become a part of the Crescent Springs community. Bertram Eye Care, located at 705 Buttermilk Pike, was a spot in Northern Kentucky that just spoke to the optometrist duo. “We had looked at several properties. We love this area. We love the community. It just fits,” Jamie Bertram said. The husband-and-wife team offers eye exams, glasses, contact lenses, eye disease treatment and surgery co-management. Most

insurance providers are accepted there, Paul Bertram said. “We have more of a private eye care experience where people are going to receive personalized eye care,” Paul Bertram said. Getting to know their customers and their families will be a focus for them, he added. Bertram Eye Care hopes to get to know residents even better at a grand opening celebration to be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday July 18. Customers can meet with the doctors and maybe even grab a door prize or two. For more information on the practice or its services, call 341-EYES (3937).

THINGS TO DO Experience Zeppelin

Witness the next best thing to Led Zeppelin when ZOSO: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience performs at the Madison Theater, Saturday June 20, at 9 p.m. ZOSO plays around 280 shows a year and has been a Led Zeppelin tribute band since 1995. Tickets are $12. For information, visit www. madisontheateronline.com.

Go antiquing

Spend your Father’s Day, Sunday, June 21, looking for deals at the Burlington Antique Show from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Boone County Fairgrounds. Early shoppers can come between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m to negotiate with dealers. The cost is $5 to come early and $3 during normal hours. Children under 12 can attend the show at no cost. The show will feature more than 300 vendors with

antiques and vintage collectibles. For details, visit www. burlingtonantiqueshow.com.

Listen to Sinatra

Don Fangman will be singing Sinatra at the Knotty Pine on the Bayou, Thursday, June 25, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Fangman will also perform songs by Dean Martin, Michael Buble, Andrea Bocelli and Neal Diamond. For more information on the performer, visit fangsingsfrank.com. The restaurant is located at 6720 Licking Pike in Cold Spring.

Share your events Go to nky.com and click on Share! to get your event into the Erlanger Recorder.

A stitch in time …

4-H campers using summer to give back By Jason Brubaker jbrubaker@nky.com

Using nothing but needles, thread and a little creativity, some local students are using their summer to make a difference. Approximately 21 students with the Kenton County 4-H program spent a week sewing homemade pillow cases, which will be donated to children at the Women’s Crisis Center, a shelter that supports women and children who have been involved in domestic and sexual abuse situations. Part of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension program, the sewing camp was for Kenton County children between the ages of 9-18, and featured all levels of sewing experience. “We’ve got kids in here who have never picked up a sewing needle, and others who have done a lot of sewing,” said Mary Averbeck, a development agent. “But they’re all in here using their time and talent to make a difference in their community, and that’s the most important thing.” Averbeck said that close to 500 women and children stayed at the Women’s Crisis Center shelters in fiscal year 2008, where they were given some personal belongings as they looked for a more permanent home. Knowing that, Averbeck said she felt making pillowcases for the children to carry those belongings would be a good way for the kids to give

JASON BRUBAKER/STAFF

The students show off some of the pillowcases they made, which will be donated to the Women's Crisis Center. back to children less fortunate than themselves. “It’s a good awareness program for them, because there are people out there who don’t have anything who need our help,” she said. “This was just one way we could help out and maybe put a smile on their faces.” Using colorful patterns and a variety of designs, the students worked all week to prepare the pillowcases, with most students creating more than one to donate. The pillowcase designs range from polka dots to stripes to flowers, with each of the kids putting their unique touch on them. “It’s been kind of hard,” admitted

13-year old Stacey Rider as she measured some corners on her pillowcase. “I’ve done some sewing before, but nothing like this. It’s been pretty fun though.” Averbeck said she’s even recruited a few other local clubs to participate in the donation, meaning more children at the center will be receiving pillowcases. “I just think it’s always wonderful to see children helping other children, and this is a fantastic thing they’re doing,” said Kim Adams, the Executive Director of the WCC. “It really touches my heart to know that we have people who are giving back like this.”

Got a question? Moms have answers Hundreds of local moms ask and answer questions every month on CincyMomsLikeMe.com. Here are some questions that have come up lately. Got one of your own? Feel free to join the site (it’s free) and ask it! Go to MomsLikeMe.com/ cincywelcome to find out how to get started.

If the rash appeared after a fever, it’s most likely a virus, and the ER docs will just say Karen that it has to run its Gutiérrez course. One type of virus managing that causes a rash is editor called roseola.

cincinnati.momslikeme.com

Horrible rash - What should I do? A boy has a rash all over his body, and his mom wonders where she should take him to the emergency room. Answers: Rashes aren’t a reason to go to the ER unless there are other issues, such as very high fever, breathing difficulty or serious lethargy.

Nice campgrounds within three hours of here? http://cincinnati.momslikeme.com/members/JournalActions.aspx?g=246535&m=571 3263

At what age did your child learn to ride a bike? http://cincinnati.momslikeme.com/ members/JournalActions.aspx?g=246 518&m=5731854

Is the dining plan at Disney World worth it? http://cincinnati.momslikeme.com/ members/JournalActions.aspx?g=246 535&m=5755740 What to do with four cans of evaporated milk about to expire? http://cincinnati.momslikeme.com/ members/JournalActions.aspx?g=246 538&m=5752902 Put in Bay (Port Clinton) or Gatlinburg for vacation? http://cincinnati.momslikeme.com/ members/JournalActions.aspx?g=246 535&m=5720019 Karen Gutiérrez is managing editor of CincyMomsLikeMe.com. Reach her at Cincinnati@momslikeme.com, and follow local mom topics on Twitter.com/1cincymom.


B2

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, J U N E 1 9

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Different Directions, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Works by U.S. Army veteran and POW Paul Pomeranz and Anna VanMetre, Mike Calway-Fagan, Tammy Gambrel and Alton Falcone. Through June 26. 491-2030. Covington.

ART EXHIBITS

Hodgepodge, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Frank Duveneck Arts & Cultural Center, 1232 Greenup St. Paintings by Kentucky artist Fredrick Wessel. Through June 26. Free. Through June 26. 491-3942. Covington. The Artist as Diarist, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sandra Small Gallery, 124 W. Pike St. Photographs by John Chewning, watercolors and collages by Ellie Fabe plus oil pastels by Lynda Riddle and a variety of prints, collages and canvasses by Paula Wiggins. Through July 10. 2912345. Covington. Re-Cycled, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Artisans Enterprise Center, 25 W. Seventh St. Elizabeth Laskey and Paige Wideman turn found objects into art works. Through July 3. 292-2322. Covington. Photography by Kari Strunk, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Bean Haus, 640 Main St. Artist’s work includes nature and baseball themes. Free. Through June 30. 431-2326. Covington.

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.NKY.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.NKY.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Different Directions, noon-3 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 4912030. Covington.

Zack and Keenan, 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Reserve Restaurant and Piano Lounge, 431-7373. Newport. Top Shelf Trio, 8 p.m.-midnight, Reserve Restaurant and Piano Lounge, Newport on the Levee, Cybele, vocalist, Brian BatchelorGlader, pianist, with guest saxophonist. 4317373. Newport.

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

MUSIC - ROCK

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

SINGLES

S A T U R D A Y, J U N E 2 0

Hand-woven Baskets by that Kentucky Lady, noon-2 p.m. Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 E. 10th St. Basket-making demonstration with Elizabeth Worley. 2614287. Newport.

Tandem Squares, 8 p.m. Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Plus level Westernstyle square dance club for experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513-929-2427. Covington.

COOKING CLASSES

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, Ky. 18 and Camp Ernst Road, From apples to zucchini, and everything in between. With perennial plants, there are annuals and hanging baskets for all occasions. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 586-6101. Burlington. Kinman Farms, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Kinman Farms, 4175 Burlington Pike, Fresh produce, baked goods, pumpkins, flowers, and more. 6892682. Boone County.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Italian Whites. Liquor Direct Covington, 670 W. Third St. Free. 291-2550. Covington. Fish Fry, 4:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Knights of Columbus #3908, Father Bealer Council, 605 Lytle Ave. Includes fish, shrimp, chicken, hamburgers, hot dogs and sides. Drinks available. Carry-out available. Benefits charities of Knights of Columbus #3908. $1.25-$7. Presented by Knights of Columbus #3908, Fr. Bealer Council. 342-6643. Elsmere.

Cork and Fork Cooking Class, 2 p.m. Argentine Bean Bistro and Wine Bar, 2875 Town Center Blvd. Cooking demonstrations with wine pairings. With Arthur Leech. $30. Reservations required. 426-1042. Crestview Hills.

FARMERS MARKET

Northern Kentucky Regional Farmer’s Market, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Promenade. Mushrooms, onions, apples, baked goods, pumpkins, cut flowers and more. Presented by Northern Kentucky Regional Farmer’s Market. 292-2163. Covington. Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 5866101. Burlington. Kinman Farms, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Kinman Farms, 689-2682. Boone County.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Tasting, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. New from Spain: New regions of Bierzo, Zamora, Jumilla or more. Liquor Direct Covington, 291-2550. Covington.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Reserve Restaurant and Piano Lounge, 431-7373. Newport.

MUSIC - BLUES

MUSIC - BLUES

MUSIC - CONCERTS

MUSIC - CLASSIC ROCK

Ricky Nye Inc. 8:30 p.m.-12:30 p.m. Featuring Eric Neuhausser on tenor sax. Chez Nora, 530 Main St. 491-8027. Covington. Summer Concert Series, 6 p.m. Soul Progression. Crestview Hills Town Center, 2929 Dixie Highway, Clock tower. Bring seating. Free. 341-4353. Crestview Hills. The Sundresses, 7:30 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. With Slow Claw, The Guitars, The Host, Lemon G, Wake The Bear and Wonky Tonk. $8. 800-745-3000. Covington.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Cef Michael Band, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. 261-2365. Covington.

Ricky Nye and Bekah Williams, 7 p.m.-11 p.m. Chez Nora, 530 Main St. 491-8027. Covington.

Corner Pocket, 10 p.m. Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 342-7000. Erlanger. The Javelin Dance, 8 p.m. Mad Hatter, 620 Scott Blvd. With Watson Park and others. $5. Covington. Plenty of Fish Meet and Greet Singles Party, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 261-1029. Latonia.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Recovery By Grace, 9 a.m.-10:30 a.m. Grace Community Church, 5th and Greenup Streets, Christian-based confidential 12-step meeting for people with any type of hurt, hang-up or habit. Light breakfast included. Free. Presented by Immanuel United Methodist Church. 4319888. Covington. S U N D A Y, J U N E 2 1

ANTIQUES SHOWS

Burlington Antique Show, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Boone County Fairgrounds, 5819 Idlewild Road, More than 300 vendors with antiques and vintage collectibles. Early buying, 6-8 a.m. with $5 admission. $3, free ages 11 and under. Presented by Burlington Antique Show. 513-922-6847. Burlington.

ART EXHIBITS

Photography by Kari Strunk, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Bean Haus, 431-2326. Covington.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Southern Stars Square Dance Club, 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Family square dance club. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513-9292429. Covington.

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 586-6101. Burlington. Kinman Farms, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Kinman Farms, 689-2682. Boone County.

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 261-2365. Covington.

Beginner Square Dance Class, 7:30 p.m. Promenade Palace, 3630 Decoursey Pike, Casual dress. Smooth-soled shoes required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 513929-2427. Covington.

HOLIDAY - FATHER’S DAY

Father’s Day Special, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. BehringerCrawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Historic Devou family home with artifacts, interactive displays and hands-on activities. Free admission to any father who visits museum today. $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, members free. 491-4003. Covington.

W E D N E S D A Y, J U N E 2 4

BARS/NIGHTCLUBS

DJ/Ladies Night, 9 p.m. Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 342-7000. Erlanger.

Prime and Wine, 4 p.m.-midnight, Reserve Restaurant and Piano Lounge, Newport on the Levee, 12 oz.Applewood Smoked Prime Rib with salad, potato, vegetable, dessert and glass of wine. $25. Reservations requested. 4317373. Newport.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Josh’s Taverne & Grill, 344-7850. Fort Mitchell. Happy Hour, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Keystone Bar and Grill, 261-6777. Covington. Happy Hour, 2 p.m.-7 p.m.Tickets Sports Cafe, 431-1839. Covington. Happy Hour, 11 p.m.-2:30 a.m.Tickets Sports Cafe, 431-1839. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUEGRASS

Bluegrass Jam, 8 p.m.-11 p.m. Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St. First floor.With Scott Risner. 491-6659. Covington.

MUSIC - KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Different Directions, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 491-2030. Covington.

ART EXHIBITS

Hodgepodge, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Frank Duveneck Arts & Cultural Center, 491-3942. Covington. Re-Cycled, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.Artisans Enterprise Center, 292-2322. Covington. Photography by Kari Strunk, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Bean Haus, 431-2326. Covington.

T H U R S D A Y, J U N E 2 5

COMMUNITY DANCE

Swing Dancing, 8 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Step-NOut Studio, 721 Madison Road, Music by DJ. Free beginner lesson before open dancing. All ages. $5. Presented by CincySwing.Com Ltd.. 513-290-9022. Covington.

EDUCATION

FOOD & DRINK

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

Zoso, The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience, 9 p.m. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave. $12. 800-745-3000. Covington.

MUSIC - JAZZ

DANCE CLASSES

T U E S D A Y, J U N E 2 3

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Sidewinder Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Deadwood Saloon and Cafe, 508 Madison Ave. 4913323. Covington. Whiskey Creek, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence.

M O N D A Y, J U N E 2 2

Karaoke, 10 p.m.The Avenue Lounge, 411 Madison Ave.With Will Corson.Ages 21 and up. 261-6120. Covington.

Swan, 9:30 p.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, $3. 426-0490. Fort Wright.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

FILE PHOTO

People walk past the “Night Cat” statue by artist Douwe Blumberg during last June’s Riverspan on the Purple People Bridge. This year’s exhibition, June 19-21, features more than 800 original works of sculpture. Costs vary and can be seen at www.riverspansculpture.org. Percentage of sales and admission benefit operation, lighting and maintenance of the Purple People Bridge. For more information, call 513-241-3769.

FOOD & DRINK

Wine Wednesday, 4 p.m.-midnight, Reserve Restaurant and Piano Lounge, Newport on the Levee, $4 glasses of house wine. 4317373. Newport.

HEALTH / WELLNESS

Wee Wednesdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Burlington Family Chiropractic, 2612 Burlington Pike, Children ages 12 and under receive free adjustment. Restrictions apply, call for details. Walk-ins welcome. Free with consultation and exam on prior visit. Appointment recommended. 746-2225. Burlington. Health Screening, 9 a.m.-noon, Burlington Family Chiropractic, 2612 Burlington Pike, Blood pressure, height, weight, foot and spinal screenings. Walk-ins welcome. Free. Appointment recommended. 746-2225. Burlington.

MUSIC - BLUES

Dick & the Roadmasters Original Blues Jam, 6 p.m.-midnight, Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave. All ages. 261-1029. Latonia.

MUSIC - KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Karaoke, 9 p.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

SPORTS

Florence Freedom Baseball, 7:05 p.m. vs. Lake Erie Crushers. Champion Window Field, 7950 Freedom Way, VIP includes wait service. $10 VIP, $8.50, $6 lawn. Presented by Florence Freedom Professional Baseball. 594-4487. Florence.

(Almost) Every Other Thursday Science, 10 a.m.-11 a.m. A Journey of Exploration & Imagination on America’s Waterways. With RiverWorks Discovery. Pioneer Park, 3951 Madison Pike, Shelterhouse 1. All ages. Free. Presented by Kenton County Parks and Recreation. 525-7529. Covington.

FOOD & DRINK

‘Tini Thursdays, 4 p.m.-midnight, Reserve Restaurant and Piano Lounge, Newport on the Levee, $5 specialty martinis. 431-7373. Newport.

MUSIC - ACOUSTIC

Acoustic Bizarre, 10 p.m. Peecox, 635 Donaldson Highway, 342-7000. Erlanger.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

Music@BCM, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Pat Kelly and the PsychoAcoustic Orchestra, jazz big band. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Includes coffee and other beverages, snacks and cash bar. Rain or shine option of going indoors in case of inclement weather. $5, $3 ages 3-12. Reservations requested. 491-4003. Covington.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Lee Stolar Trio, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. With John Von Ohlen. 261-2365. Covington.

MUSIC - KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC Karaoke, 8 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Shimmers, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

RECREATION

Board Game Night, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Bean Haus, 640 Main St. Come and play one of our board games or bring own games. Free. 432-2326. Covington.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Line Dancing, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. $6. Presented by H & B Dance Co.. 727-0904. Kenton County.

FARMERS MARKET

Boone County Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Boone County Farmers Market, 586-6101. Burlington. Kinman Farms, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Kinman Farms, 689-2682. Boone County.

HAPPY HOURS

Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Josh’s Taverne & Grill, 344-7850. Fort Mitchell. Happy Hour, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Keystone Bar and Grill, 261-6777. Covington.

MUSIC - BLUEGRASS

Kentucky Myle, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

Fat Tuesday, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Royal Palm Orchestra with Bill Gemmer, director. 261-2365. Covington.

PROVIDED The Mormon Tabernacle Choir, pictured, joins the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra to kick off the orchestra’s 25th anniversary summer season at Riverbend Music Center at 8 p.m. Thursday, June 18. Also appearing with the orchestra will be former astronaut Neil Armstrong as a narrator and Cincinnati Bengal Ben Utecht as a vocalist. For tickets, call 513-381-3300 or visit www.cincinnatipops.org.

SHOPPING SPECIAL EVENTS

Impresa Quarter Fest, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m. Edgewood Senior Center, 550 Freedom Park Drive, $1. Presented by Impresa Business Network. 818-0803. Edgewood.

PROVIDED Catch the last few days of the Krohn Conservatory’s international butterfly show “Flowers with Wings – Butterflies and Culture of India,” open through Sunday, June 21. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Cost is $6; $5, seniors; and $4, children, 5-17; free, 4 and under. Visit www.butterflyshow.com.


Life

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

B3

Ever wonder how normal you are? “Why can’t you just be normal?” “Why aren’t you like the other (husbands/wives/kids/ whomever)?” Hearing that can make our self-respect hit the skids. For if we are not deemed normal, doesn’t that mean we are considered as abnormal, weird, odd, or peculiar in front of the rest of the world? Analyst Dr. Lawrence Jaffe notes that “Patient after patient speaks to me of the frustration in not being able to be ‘normal.’ What a relief to realize that normality is a statistical concept with no empirical validity … This is no such thing as being normal. But what a long road it is that leads finally to that realization.” Normality is an abstraction derived from the study of statis-

tics. It doesn’t exist in reality. Science may say the average or “normal” stone in a certain riverbed is 4 inches long and 2 inches wide. Yet, a search may never find a stone exactly that size in the stream (what a relief to the rest of the stones!) Stones don’t try to conform themselves to some desirable proportion. But humans do. We forget we are unprecedented. Isaac Singer writes, “Every human character occurs only once in the whole history of human beings.” Such uniqueness makes it impossible to say who’s normal. Government, science and religion have their own “normal” molds. The government mold says

we’re fairly normal if we pay our taxes and obey federal regulations; science considers us normal when we match their statistics and research; religion tends to see normality as being asexual, unquestioning and docile. Seldom do we hear the encouraging words of St. Francis de Sales: “Be yourself! But be your best self!” “The scientist is always looking for an average,” wrote Carl Jung, “yet the truth is that the carriers of life are individuals, not average numbers. When everything is statistical, all individual qualities are wiped out … If you wipe out the mythology of a man and his entire historical sequence, he becomes a statistical average, a number; that is, he becomes nothing.” Individuation (not individual-

ism) means becoming what we have in us to become. God does not create us and then wonder, “Why did I do that?” We are created as a divine idea with a purpose and a destination. There would be no individuation if there were not roadblocks, detours, and personal efforts – just as there would be no path if there was no wilderness around it that was hewn out by our steps. The singularity of each of our paths is part of what makes finding and staying on it so difficult. Nothing is as important as carrying our own cross, said Jesus Christ. Jaffe wrote, “That means the same as finding and following the path of individuation which has been prepared for you from eternity. This is the most difficult path

New video cameras save money, space and time on vacation shocked at the brilliant, colorful pictures it took – in high definition. M y Howard Ain experience Hey Howard! with that camera prompted me to buy the Flip Ultra HD camera, which can hold up to two hours of video, instead of one hour, before the pictures have to be downloaded. It comes with a rechargeable battery that can be replaced with two AA batteries should you run out of power and need to keep shooting. I took that camera on a recent trip to Hawaii and was simply amazed at the pictures I got. At one point, I ran out of power while on a road trip and couldn’t stop to recharge the battery. That’s when the ability to use two AA batteries came in very handy – it allowed me to continue taking pictures

when I wouldn’t have been able to do so otherwise. I have since downloaded the video to my computer and looked at the pictures side-by-side with video I had previously taken with my other camera. Even though the older pictures were good, these new pictures were far superior and were taken with a camera so small I can put it in my pocket – and often did while on my trip. One other thing, the new Flip camera cost just a fraction of what I paid for that state-of-the art camera years ago. The Flip Ultra HD cost me less than $200. Other companies make similar small cameras – like Kodak, whose camera uses memory cards that you can change when they become full. Replaceable cards are an advantage because it means there’s no need to stop and download your videos should your camera’s storage fill up. Bottom line, if you love to take pictures of your fam-

Father Lou Guntzelman Perspectives

Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reach him at columns@communitypress.com or contact him directly at P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242. Please include a mailing address or fax number if you wish for him to respond.

DAVE GUIDUGLI’S SUMMER CAMP

Camp is Designed to Increase Speed, Quickness, Recovery Time, Agility, Change of Direction, Mental Toughness & Explosiveness

JUNE 29-JULY 1 • 9-3

ily check out the new pocket-sized high definition video cameras. They don’t have all the bells and whistles you’ll find on larger more expensive cameras, but the trade-off in size and price makes them well worth considering. Troubleshooter Howard Ain answers consumer complaints and questions weekdays at 5:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. newscasts on WKRC-TV Local 12. You can write to him at Hey Howard, 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

TOWER PARK Ft Thomas

Meet at picnic shelter in front of the Armory

Cost: $150

Please bring your own lunch on Mon & Tues lunch provided on Wednesday.

IN C FO ON R TA M C AT T IO N :

If you’re like me, you love to take videos during family vacations – I’ve been doing it for years. But if you haven’t checked lately you will be shocked at how small the cameras have become – and much less expensive, too. At first home pictures consisted of black and white stills and movies. That soon gave way to color photos and movies – then videotape. The first video camera I owned was quite large and required a separate video recorder that I carried over my shoulder. When technology changed, I bought a small, excellent, video camera with the tape inside the unit. The size was so small I could hold it in one hand. It cost more than $1,800, but the video was so good I took it on a trip to China and came back with great pictures. I thought video couldn’t get much better – but I was wrong. I recently got a Flip Video HD camera and was

but paradoxically also the easiest because it is the only one that will allow you to die with the knowledge that you lived your life through and through.”

DAVE GUIDUGLI 859.441.0958

51 Tower Hill Rd • Ft Thomas, KY 41075 Cell: 859.512.8200 • Email: djguidugli@yahoo.com

www.daveguidugli.com

SHARE your stories, photos and events at nky.com

CALLING ALL LOCAL PHOTOS FANS

Medicine may be our livelihood but people are our passion. You can

Vote to shape the best local, hard-bound photography book ever. PHOTO BY CONTRIBUTOR PAUL ARMSTONG

GO TO: Enquirer Media is asking for submissions from local photographers for a chance to get published . We’re giving away tons of prizes too! The

best part is, your votes determine which photos will be published in the book, and which photos win prizes. It’s the best of the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky area in photos, and you are in control. So login for free at

our staff. Staff members such as Dr. Kahn, whose life work at The Spine Institute revolves around seeing his patients like Michael Waters walk again. Talk again. Live again. Sure, we’re practicing

Your community is going to be featured in a hard-bound, fine-art book, and you can get involved! in our upcoming art book,

feel it the minute you walk through our doors. See it in the eyes of

advanced, award-winning medicine. Nationally-ranked medicine, in fact. But we have bigger things in mind. Like helping a young man get back to walking. And living.

and start shaping the Capture Cincinnati

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The Christ Hospital. Caring Above All. www.caringaboveall.com

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B4

Erlanger Recorder

Life

June 18, 2009

Let sunlight cook next batch of preserves Rita Heikenfeld Rita’s kitchen

What a fun day. Jalean and Jessie, my daughtersi n - l a w, and their kids went with me to A & M Farms in B r o w n County to

pick strawberries. The aroma that hit us when we got out of our cars was berry heaven! Those folks are so familyoriented. The little ones got to help pick and some ate more than they put in their trays. I’m glad the kids weren’t weighed before and after. The berries were ripe and so delicious. The best part was going back to my house where we made 50 jars of jams and sauces. And we got it all done by mid-afternoon. We’ll serve the jam for Father’s Day breakfast. One of my fond memories is seeing my dad, Charlie Nader’s, smile when I’d bring him a jar of sun-cooked strawberry

preserves for Father’s Day.

Sun-cooked strawberry preserves

1 quart or pound strawberries, sliced thickly 3 cups sugar or more to taste 1 ⁄2 cup water 2 tablespoons lemon juice

Cook sugar, water and lemon juice until boiling and cook until sugar dissolves. Put berries in, lower to simmer and cook just until they start to lose their color and shrink a bit. Pour into sprayed shallow baking pan (I use cookie sheets with sides) in single layers. Set in sun for three to four days. When berries are plump and turn darker red and syrup has jelled, pack into jars without reheating. Store in refrigerator up to a month or in freezer up to six months. If it rains, bring inside. If insects are a problem, cover with cheesecloth.

Rita’s creamed peas

8 oz. or so fresh peas,

like being busy and making people happy,” he said.

cooked 1 tablespoon each: cornstarch and butter 1 cup milk 3-4 tablespoons cream cheese with chives

Memories of Virginia Bakery

Mix cornstarch and milk together. Melt butter and add milk mixture. Cook until thick. Stir in cream cheese and season to taste. Pour over peas and mix. COURTESY RITA HEIKENFELD

Guru in our backyard

Chef Scott Riehle’s Apple Blue Cheese Canapés: Scott is a young, immensely creative chef at St. Francis Friary on Vine Street in Cincinnati. I visited the friary recently. It has beautiful, serene walled gardens where the friars sometimes take their meals. Scott cooks for 11 resident friars plus unexpected guests from around the world. Scott told me, “Some like meat and potatoes, some are more sophisticated since they were missionaries in far-flung places. “This is one of my favorite appetizers to make

Rita’s grandsons Will, (left) Luke and Jack Heikenfeld help pick berries at A&M. for guests. Omit the bacon with cooking spray. Place and it becomes a wonderful provolone on bread. Finish vegetarian option.” topping with remaining The friary is lucky to ingredients. have this west-side chef, Bake 10 to 12 minutes who’s cooking philosophy is: until cheese melts and bread “If you’re not having fun, is slightly toasted. Serve you’re doing it wrong!” warm. 1 Granny Smith apple (Peeled, cored, cut into thin slices) 4 oz. crumbled blue cheese 1 small red onion, sliced thin 5 strips cooked, crumbled bacon 5 Provolone cheese slices, quartered 20 slices, 1⁄4-inch, French baguette Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Spray baking sheet

Happy Father’s Day

To another guru in our backyard: Gert Buchheim. You may remember Jay and his dad, Gert, when they owned Maya’s restaurant in Blue Ash. Well Gert, a trained pastry chef, is still baking five days a week for Golf Manor Synagogue. He makes kosher pastries, which are dairy-free, along with heirloom cakes and confections. Gert is an octogenarian. “I

Here’s your chance to get your 2 cents in. Tom Thie, owner of Virginia Bakery, and author Cynthia Beischel are writing a book about this Cincinnati icon. To share your memories and be considered for an interview, e-mail VirginiaBakeryRemembered@gmail .com or write to PO Box 46844, Cincinnati, OH 45246-0844. Whether or not your story is included, you will be acknowledged in the book.

Readers’ requests

Be patient! I know I’m overdue, but don’t have room to include the readers’ requests. They’ll be published soon. Thanks for being patient! Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional and family herbalist, an educator and author. E-mail her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Or call 513-2487130, ext. 356. Visit Rita at www.Abouteating.com.

FREE FOOD INFLATABLES Erlanger Baptist Church MUSIC Rescheduled for

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calling (859) 292-0244 or v i s i t www.starsforchildren.com to receive a registration packet. The registration deadline is June 20. STARS is an outreach program of the St. Elizabeth Hospice Program and Linnemann Funeral Homes After Care Department. The goal of the STARS program is to help children and teens so that they, like stars, may shine in the darkness brought on by death.

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BUSINESS UPDATE New consultant

Luanna Compton of Erlanger has become an independent consultant with Tastefully Simple, Inc., a national direct-sales of gourmet foods. As a consultant, Compton will offer the company’s gourmet foods and beverages to guests at home taste-testing parties, where guests will receive samples, easy meal ideas, recipes and serving suggestions. For more information about Tastefully Simple products or to hold a taste-

testing party, contact Compton at lou913@insightbb.com.

Klare promoted

Marsh, Inc., has promoted Dave Klare to creative director. Previously a P.O.P design director/senior designer, Klare will be responsible for leading the global merchandising creative team as well as developing strategic growth plans. He earned an Associate of Arts in design/advertising

from the Cincinnati Academy of Design and a Bachelor of Science in marketing/business management from Northern Kentucky University. Klare lives in Villa Hills.

your stories, photos and events at nky.com

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New Classes

New Teachers

THE ORIGINAL

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY FRIDAY, JUNE 19TH

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Larry J. Naiser 30+Years Experience Board Certified

(859) 363-8300

13229 Dixie Highway • Walton, KY 41094 (1 mile south of exit #171 off Interstate 75)

Encourage Recycling! Keep Kentucky Green!

SEWING

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New Vendors

New & exciting classes by these teachers and more!

CRAFTS EXPO

June 25, 26, 27, 2009 Classes begin June 24 Cincinnati, OH

Sharonville Convention Center 11355 Chester Rd., Sharonville, OH 45246

Sign up for classes today! Vendor Mall Hours: Thurs. & Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Classes begin at 8:30 a.m.

Admission: $7 3 Days ONLY $12 Kids: Under 16 FREE

Sewing machines sponsored by Sew-EZY Sewing Studio

Thank our sponsors

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Parking FREE

munity and social services organizations, home or building code inspectors, maintenance workers, and state/local municipal agencies. The class is free, but registration is required by June 18. To register or for more information, please call the Northern Kentucky Health Department at 859-3414151 or visit http://www.nkyhealth.org.

Since 1917

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and play with grief work activities. The children have an opportunity to meet others who have experienced a death and learn safe and healthy ways to express their grief. The STARS Summer Day Camp is limited to 40 participants and is for elementary and middle school aged children. The cost is $20 per child or $40 per family. Cost includes breakfast and lunch. Scholarships are available for children who have a financial need. Families may register by

forming renovation work safely and safe disposal of possible lead contaminated debris. The class is designed for homeowners doing renovation, repainting or remodeling work where lead-based paint may be encountered, as well as for building supervisors and landlords, c o n t r a c t o r s , homeowner/property owner association members, com-

The Northern Kentucky Health Department will host a Lead Safe Work Practices class from 6 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 18, 2009, at the Mary Ann Mongan Branch of the Kenton County Public Library, 502 Scott Blvd., Covington. Attendees will learn about the health effects of lead, personal protective equipment, setting up work areas to reduce dust, per-

elinor peace bailey

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy, but facing this confusing process as a child can be even more difficult. The STARS program helps kids better understand their loss and find strength through their grief journey. STARS will hold its annual Summer Day Camp on July 1 from 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m. at Town & Country Sports Complex, 1018 Town Drive in Wilder. The goal of the camp is to provide a one-day structured program that integrates fun

B5

Training offers tips for working with lead

Cynthia Guffey

St. Elizabeth Hospice offers STARS Camp

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

www.cdmshows.com BRING THIS AD TO THE EXPO AND ENTER TO WIN $25

CE 09

PUBLIC NOTICE JOHN DOE 1234 NOWHERE BLVD. KY ELSMERE, 41018 ROOM# 0056 UNKNOWN GOODS. TONYA WHITFIELD 159 ASHLAND COVINGTON, KY 41015 ROOM# 0087 UNKNOWN GOODS. LADON PAYNE 128 B KATHLEEN DR FT MITCHELL, KY 41017 ROOM# 0141 UNKNOWN GOODS. DONNA CULLUM 237 SHORT MAPLE ELSMERE, KY 41018 ROOM# 0190 UNKNOWN GOODS. BRUCE STUCKEY 7518 US42 FLORENCE, KY 41042 0200 UNROOM# KNOWN GOODS. BRITTANY SETTLES 4219 BEECHGROVE INDEPEND KY 41051 ENCE, ROOM# 0223 UNKNOWN GOODS. TIM WOLFF 24 OLD STEVENSON MILL WALTON, KY 41094 ROOM# 0224-37 UNKNOWN GOODS. THE ABOVE ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THEIR THAT GOODS STORED AT U-HAUL, LOCATED AT 4425 DIXIE HIGHWAY ELSMERE, KY 41018, WILL BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION ON JULY 14TH, 2009 AT OR AFTER 9AM. 1001475693

Trivia Contest Cincinnati.Com wants to test your Dinosaur knowledge!

Answer the trivia question below, fill out the entry form and mail it in for your chance to win a family four pack of tickets to the exhibit, Dinosaurs Unearthed and the OMNIMAX film, Dinosaurs Alive at Cincinnati Museum Center.

To enter online, visit Cincinnati.Com, search: giveaways. For tickets, visit cincymuseum.org “buy tickets” or call: 513.287.7001 or 800.733.2077 ext. 7001

DINOSAURS TRIVIA CONTEST ENTRY FORM

The Earth is estimated to be about 4.5 billion years old. To describe Earth’s long history, scientists use a ________ timescale. They then divide time into eras and each era is divided into periods. Different Earth events and organisms characterize each period. A) Geologic

B) Human

C) Dinosaur

Name ___________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip ______________________________________________________ Phone Number _____________________________________________________ Answer __________________________________________________________ Complete this form and mail it to: The Enquirer, P.O. Box 5776, Cincinnati, OH 45202-5776. To enter online, visit Cincinnati.Com, search: giveaways. Deadline to enter is June 29, 2009. No purchase necessary. Must be a resident of Ohio, Kentucky or Indiana, who is 18 years or older to enter. For official rules visit Cincinnati.Com, search: giveaways. Deadline to enter is 6/29/09.

HOLY FAMILY ECUMENICAL

At Kentucky State Parks

CATHOLIC CHURCH + USA Center and Taylor Streets, Bellevue, KY Mass offered on Saturdays at 5:00 PM

Kentucky’s 52 state parks offer an abundance of adventures including hiking, biking, camping, fishing, golfing, horseback riding, tennis, boating and much, much more.

"All Christians are invited to worship together and receive Holy Communion at the table of the Lor d" Rev. Ed Kuhlman

859-801-2486

www.holyfamilyicc.com

• 17 resort parks featuring comfortable lodge accommodations and fabulous restaurants

LUTHERAN

• 24 state recreation parks

GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA) Pastor Vicki T. Garber www.gloriadei-nky.org Sunday Worship (Summer Schedule): Traditional............8:00 & 11:00 am Contemporary Outdoor (in the new meditative garden)....9:00 am Contemplative........5:30 pm Holy Communion at all services 2718 Dixie Hwy., Crestview Hills, KY 859-331-4694

• 11 state historic sites

1-800-255-PARK (7275) www.parks.ky.gov

“Save some Lincolns” at participating Kentucky State Resort Parks. Stay in a lodge room at Blue Licks Battlefield, Buckhorn Lake, Carter Caves, Greenbo Lake, Jenny Wiley, Kenlake, Pennyrile Forest, or Rough River Dam for $55 per night with this coupon. Good Sun.–Thurs., June 1–30 & Aug. 3–Sept. 30. Holidays Excluded. One coupon per stay (valid multiple nights). For online reservations, use code “SADV9.” Applicable taxes apply. For leisure travel only. Not to be combined with other offers. Limited number of rooms for this offer at each park.

0000341504

UNITED METHODIST TAYLOR MILL

UNITED METHODIST

5160 Taylor Mill Rd.,

½ mi south of 275 Sunday Worship, 10AM 1st Sunday of the Month Worship w/Communion 10am Rosedale Ministry 1pm 859-431-7504 www.TaylorMill UMC.com

To place your BINGO ad, visit CommunityClassified.com


B6

Erlanger Recorder

Community

June 18, 2009

St. E mobile van to visit Erlanger The St. Elizabeth Healthcare mobile mammography van will visit the St Vincent De Paul Retail Store on Thursday, June 25 from 1 4 p.m. Following the American Cancer Society's guidelines for the early detection of

breast cancer can help to improve the chances that the disease can be diagnosed at an early stage and can be treated successfully. Women age 40 and over should have a screening mammogram every year. Private insurance will be

billed, but all out of pocket expenses for the screening mammogram will be paid for, thanks to a generous grant from the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation Grant. Don't miss the opportunity to receive this impor-

tant health test in the comfort and privacy of the St. Elizabeth mobile van. To schedule an appointment or for more information, please call (859) 6557400. Call now, spaces are limited.

To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood.

nal o i s s e f o r &P Business

Call for entries for recognition awards The Cincinnati Horticultural Society is currently accepting nominations for the 2009 Amateur Gardener Recognition Awards. Each year the Cincinnati Horticultural Society, producers of the Cincinnati Flower Show, recognize local residents whose personal dedication and love of gardening cultivates amazing outdoor spaces that are an inspira-

tion to all who see them. If there is a friend, neighbor, or family member with a green thumb that you would like to honor, nomination forms are available a t www.cincyflowershow.com or call Julie Singer at 513872-9555, ext. 11 for more details. Entry deadline is July 10, 2009.

SHARE at NKY.com

SERVICE D RECTORY of Northern Kentucky

YOU NEED IN NO E HELP THE FAS H T D RTHERN KENTUCKY T E S T WA Y T O F I N

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• Ceiling Fans • Light Fixtures • Basements • Cabinets • Hardwood • Full Kitchen & Laminate & Bath • Painting Remodels • Wall Repair Flooring & much • Ceramic Tile • Carpentry more

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smiles remodeling

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• Free Estimates • Fully Insured • Over 20 Years Experience

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COREY 859-393-4856

cohornconcrete@aol.com

CONCRETE

NO JOB TOO SMALL FREE ESTIMATES Union, KY (859)384-3291 Cell (859) 307-0841

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K&M Construction

JORDAN

Home Improvement “Specialist”

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“For those Honey Do List that never get done.”

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Currently Offering

10% DISCOUNT AND 1 YEAR WARRANTY

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DRIVEWAYS • CONCRETE PAVING • REPAIR

BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK SERVICE -35 years experienceInground Swimming Pools are our speciality!

859-341-4143

QUALITY WORK AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 2O + YRS EXPERIENCE • FREE ESTIMATES

859-331-0527

COMPLETE

MP GRINDING U T S JERRY WILSON 859-525-9181

e & L aw n S e r scap vic d n es La

Y

A RDSCAPES ARDSCAPES

B Y DIANNE, DIANNE, L LC BY LLC

• Design • Installation • Maintenance

859-643-2524

Grass Cutting

by Vintage Home Services LLC Tired of pushing that old mower in the heat? Relax this summer. Enjoy more of your free time. Owner operated to insure the highest level of customer satisfaction. Free quotes. Fully insured

Vinny (859) 620-7448

Calls & Email responses within 24-48 hours Locally Family Owned & Operated

• Shredded Topsoil • Gravel • Fill Dirt, etc. • Friendly Service • Great Rates Single Axle Dump Trucks For Hire

Dump Site Available Serving all of Northern Kentucky for over 25 years.

we buy junk cars

DL WEBSTER

859-393-4890 BUYING JUNK CARS

COMPLETE BASEMENT REMODELING

WE CAN DO IT ALL! From to bottom, inside or out Over 25 years Experience

Room Additions

LIPPERT DESIGN BUILD

& Remodel 859-743-9624

WINDOWS • FOUNDATION REPAIR

FFully Fu lly Licensed & Insured • Pruning • Removals • Storm Damage • Stump Grinding

FREE

MOLES DRIVING YA’ NUTS?

www.molewackers.com We provide total MOLE CONTROL... guaranteed! 859-240-9609 or email us at wewackamole@molewackers.com

859-485-9210

we buy junk cars AWNINGS & SUNROOMS • CONCRETE

17 years in business specializing in exterior trim, decks, hardi-plank install, demolition & reframing any wood type siding replacement

R O O F I N G • M E TA L BU I L D I N G S

Specializing in new and old replacement of driveways, patios, sidewalks, steps, retaining walls, decorative concrete work, basement and foundation leaks & driveway additions. We also offer Bobcat, Backhoe, Loader, and Dumptruck work, regrading yards & lot cleaning.

Nov.-Apr. 6am-8pm, May-Oct. 6am-9:45pm Open at 7am on Sat. & Holidays Open at 10am on Sun. Closed Christmas Day Mile 477.6 Ohio River State Rt. 8 • Constance, KY to Anderson Ferry Rd. & US 50, Cin., OH

Gary McClure • Painting & Handyman 859•727•4072 C: 859•466•5765

H:

L ANDSCAPING & M OWING LANDSCAPING MOWING

MJB

Year d Si 1817 Year Round d Service S ii Since Si Round Service Since 1817

859•466•8678

ALL PRICES NEGOTIABLE! CLEANUP/HAUL-AWAY Garages • Basements • Attics Inside & Outside Debris Foreclosures/Estates Eviction Assistance LAWN SERVICE Mowing • Mulching • Trimming Spring/Fall Cleanup

CALL BILL (859)393-5639

OHN’S PAINTING & RESTORATION

www.jsmulchandmore.com

IAN’S

VIC KE RS

CO N RESTR DECKS MODUCT EL ION ROOM ADDITIONS IN BASEMENTS • GARAGES G & Free Estimates • Fully Insured Over 20 Yrs Experience Serving All Of NKY

J

DDELIVERY E L I V E R Y 7 DAYS D AY S A WEEK WEEK

Property Cleanup & Lawn Service, LLC

• Serving The Tristate Since 1974 • Fully Insured • Located in Union, KY

Accepting Credit Cards!

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McFalls Company, Inc.

we buy junk cars

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STUMP GRINDING

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accounting I antiques I appliance repair I attorneys I auto body I awnings I backhoe service I brick, block & cement I cabinets I chimney sweep/repair I cleaning I computer service I construction counter tops I decks, patios & sunrooms I dog groomers I doors I drywall I electrical I excavating I firewood I general contracting I heating/air conditioning I home improvement I insurance agents lawn/landscaping I locksmiths I painting/wallpaper I pest control I plumbing I metal/pole building I pools I remodeling I roofing I rubbish removal I sewer septic tax service I transportation service tree service I veterinarians I welding I window cleaning I windows I PLUS CUSTOM CATEGORIES DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU! To Advertise, Call Sheila Cahill—859-578-5547


Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

d e h s a l S es Starting at c i r P

B7

Pric es S lash ed Starting at

REMNANTS RE MN ANT S Starting at

$59

$79

12x8

12x13

$109 12x16

WALL-TO-WALL SALE Plushes • California Berbers • Berbers

GOOD

BETTER

$575

$675

BEST

$775

Installed With Pad! Based On 35 sq ft.

ENTIRE Inventory & Special Orders ON SALE! ng i t r a t S At

¢ 69

/sq ft

LAMINATE ng i t r a t S At

PORCELAIN!

OUTDOOR CARPET

ng Starti At

¢ 26

for 6X8’s

/sq ft

$

¢ 99

/sq ft

AREA RUGS ng i t r a t S At

$19

select colors

for 6X8’s

5 ODD LOT $5

We Now Carr y

Laminates Ceramics Carpets Rems

VERY LIMITED QUANTITIES

HARDWOOD! Prefinished

ng Starti At

$3.19 /sq ft

Hadley Square | 4401 Dixie Highway | Elsmere, KY Financing Available 859-342-5000 Hours: Mon., Wed., Fri. 9a-6p | Tues., Thur. 9a-8p | Sat. 9a-5:30p | Sun. Closed

0000341610

CERAMIC


B8

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

FURNITURE SOLUTIONS Your

Super Store

ore s M e tem I Se ce ite bs .net ran c e n a i W Cle ur ions t O u l On eso

LARGEST SELECTION of SAUDER in the TRI-STATE

Anniversary Sale June 18-27

tur i n r fu

This is our 10th Anniversary Celebration

J i Us U FFor Our O B l EEver!!! !!! But B t Hurry H IIn, Time Ti I Li it d Come Join Bestt S Sale Is Limited ENTIRE CHERRY OFFICE GROUP

Includes Executive Desk, Computer Credenza and Hutch

COMPUTER ARMOIRE

LIST $799.99 ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL – ALL 3 ITEMS

299.95

WHILE THEY LAST!

While Quantities Last!

END TABLE w/DRAWER SPECIAL

33

199

95

WHILE THEY LAST!

SPECIAL

$

00

$

Delivery & Assembly Available

BOOKCASE

ENTERTAINMENT CREDENZA

SPECIAL

$

While Quantities Last!

PINE OR WHITE 3 DRAWERS

$

4995

5 DRAWER CHEST PINE OR WHITE

$

ONLY

12595 Old Milford Shopping Center

9995

ONLY

125

THEY LAST!

14995

$

ANNIVERSARY SPECIALS

TWIN MATES BED

ONLY

SALE

SPECIAL

17995

While Quantities Last!

ANNIVERSARY SPECIALS

PINE OR WHITE

(2 shown)

CLASSIC CHERRY FINISH FILE DRAWER • CPU COMPARTMENT KEYBOARD TRAY WHILE REG. $219.99

SPECIAL

95

TWIN BOOKCASE HEADBOARD

3495 ea.

COMPUTER DESK w/HUTCH

CAROLINA OAK REG. $219.99

$

SPECIAL

While Quantities Last!

PLANKED CHERRY FINISH 23 1/2”W 70 3/8”H REG. $109.99

59

$

OAK FINISH, 39 7/8” WIDE HANGING ROD AND SHELVES

While Quantities Last!

$

29

95

WHILE THEY LAST!

MISSION CHERRY FINISH STACKABLE • 3 SHELVES 29 1/2”W 16 1/4”D 35 3/8”H LIST $69.99

WARDROBE/ STORAGE CABINET

5-YEAR FACTORY WARRANTY ON ALL SAUDER FURNITURE!

CAROLINA OAK FINISH REG. $69.99

$

$

SPECIAL

STORAGE CABINET

CORNER SHELF

CARAMEL BIRCH FINISH STACKABLE 31 1/4” HIGH LIST $59.99

95

FULL/QUEEN HEADBOARD

TV CREDENZA SHAKER CHERRY FINISH 47 1/2” WIDE

$

HARVEST CHERRY FINISH

95

125

39 95

$

ALL SAUDER PRODUCTS ON SALE FOR THIS EVENT!!!

EVERY SINGLE MATTRESS SET ON SALE!!! Milford, OH 513-231-9400

Wilder, KY 859-442-7225

OLD MILFORD SHOPPING CENTER

1-275, Exit #77, 1m S on AA Hwy (9) to Wilder Point Center Open M-F 10-8 • Sat 10-6 • Closed Sunday

Exit 59A, Milford Pkwy to Rt. 50 (Lila Ave.) Turn Left 989B Lila Avenue, Milford, OH Open M-F 10-8 • Sat 10-6 • Closed Sunday

*Prior sales & layaways excluded.

DELIVERY & ASSEMBLY AVAILABLE FINANCING OPTIONS AVAILABLE SEE STORE FOR DETAILS

0000341492

$

FRUITWOOD FINISH • BI-FOLD DOORS 2 FILE DRAWERS • WRITING SHELF KEYBOARD TRAY • 47 1/2” WIDE LIST $399.95


THE

RECORD

Norma Bellomy

Norma L. Bellomy, 64, of Erlanger, formerly of Huntington, W.V. died June 10, 2009. Survivors include her husband, Gregory S. Bellomy; parents, Charles and Ruth Lemley; sisters, Barbara Vassalotti of Palm Beach, Fla., Ruth Moslander of Barboursville, W.V., and Nancy L. Burger of Huber Heights, Ohio; and brother, Charles F. Moslander of Barboursville, W.V. Burial was in White Chapel Memorial Gardens, Barboursville, W.V. Beard Mortuary, Huntington, W.V., handled the arrangements.

Jimmie Brandenburg

Jimmie L. Brandenburg, 62, Crestview Hills, died June 9, 2009, Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He was an electrician with HK Systems, and a member of Hebron Baptist Church and the Florence Elks. His first wife, Judith Marie Brandenburg, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Marcia Brandenburg; sons, Kevin Brandenburg of Union, Todd Brandenburg of Elsmere, and Chad Brandenburg of Crestview Hills; stepson, Ryan Cranfield of Burlington; stepdaughter, Jennifer McDaniel of Florence; mother, Lula Newman of Florence; sisters, Josephine Horlein of Florence, LaVerne Kleinburg of Burlington, Geraldine Cearson of Florence, Wellena Miller of Cincinnati; brother, Melvin Brandenburg of Florence; half sister, Wanda Cook of Phoenix, Ariz.; seven grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Memorials: Special Olympics Area 7, c/o Special Olympics, P.O. Box 393, Florence, KY 41042; or Hebron Baptist Church Building Fund, c/o Hebron Baptist Church, 3435 Limaburg Road, Hebron, KY 41048.

Robert Brinegar

Robert Louis Brinegar, 72, of Vanceburg, formerly of Covington, died June 6, 2009. He was a truck driver, member of Rockfork Church and Teamsters Local 100. Survivors include his wife, Janice L. Brinegar; daughters, Linda Donato of Manchester, Patricia Vandergraiff of Maynardville, Tenn., Tonya

| DEATHS | Editor Brian Mains | bmains@nky.com | 578-1062

Tufa of Germany and Brenda Mae Brinegar of Newport; sons, Ionys Graetzsch and Robert E. Brinegar of Maynardville, Tenn., Albert Brinegar of Knoxville, Tenn., Kelly Brinegar of Rogersville, Tenn., Robert Roy Brinegar of Erlanger and Michael Whiteford of Lancaster, Pa.; sisters, Sophi Brinegar of Florence and Mildred Perotte of Jefferiesville, Fla.; 16 grandchildren; and eight greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Betty Fletcher

Betty R. Fletcher, 75, Erlanger, died June 7, 2009. She was a homemaker and a member of Summit Church of Christ in Cold Spring. Survivors include her husband, Ed Fletcher; daughters, Sharon Johnson of Newport and Lucinda Lauver of Covington; sons, Ed Fletcher Jr. of Florence, Waren Lee Fletcher of Erlanger and Leroy Baker of West Virginia, 14 grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Norma Kuntz

Norma Jean Kuntz, 77, Covington, died June 10, 2009. She was a homemaker and member of St. Patrick Church in Taylor Mill. Survivors include her husband, George A. Kuntz; son, George Austin Kuntz Jr. of Covington; daughters, Carol Jean Wirth of Hebron, LaDona Rekers of Independence, Angela Dye of Morning View, Debra Perkins of Dry Ridge, Sheila Genereux, Rhonda Mardis and Tina Carmony all of Covington; brother, Charles Baxter of Elsmere; sisters, Frances Colon, Sandy Cunningham, Annie Legg all of Newport, Joyce Riley of Dayton, Ohio, Cindy Cox and Josephine Lucas of Alexandria and Wilma Pellman of Bellevue; 16 grandchildren; 33 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Entombment was in Mother of God Cemetery Mausoleum, Fort Wright. Connley Brothers Funeral

BIRTHS

POLICE

|

REAL

ESTATE

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Elsmere and Erlanger

N K Y. c o m

B9

RECORDER

DEATHS Home, Latonia, handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Patrick Church, 3285 Mills Road, Taylor Mill, KY 41015.

Cincinnati, OH 45203; or the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, c/o Kenton Co. Animal Shelter, 1020 Mary Laidley Drive, Covington, KY 41015.

Mary Lemox

Mary Rutz

Mary Diane Lemox, 64, Erlanger, died June 9, 2009. She worked as a bookkeeper for 10 years with Towne Properties and was an associate member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Survivors include her husband, Dennis Lemox; daughters, Jodi Hamlin of Park Hills and Jamie Bruin of Dry Ridge; sister, Shirley Groger of Latonia; brothers, David Mains of Highland Heights, Robin Mains of Wilder, Dennis Mains of Cincinnati, Mark Mains of Covington, Bob Mains of Thailand, and Hardy Mains of Covington; four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens in Taylor Mill. Memorials: American Lung Association, 11113 Kenwood Road, Blue Ash, OH 45242.

Merrald Nordman

Merrald Nordman, 88, Erlanger, died June 13, 2009. She was a sales clerk with McAlpins Department Store for 35 years and a member of TriCity Seniors. Her husband Wilfred Walter Nordman died previously as did her close friend Bill Smith. Survivors include her daughters Anna Lee Winterman of Elsmere, Linda Riley of Florence and Adrienne Fields of Edgewood; 9 grandchildren; 12 great grandchildren & 2 great great grandchildren. Burial was in St. John Cemetery. Memorials: Village Care Center 2990 Riggs Ave , Erlanger , Ky. 41018.

Lee Prickett

Lee C. Prickett, 91, Erlanger, died June 9, 2009. He was a mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, a World War II Navy veteran and member of the Masonic Lodge. His son, Jan Prickett of Edgewood, survives. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026,

Mary Catherine Bintz Rutz, 87, Covington, a homemaker, died June 10, 2009. Survivors include her stepson, the Rev. Msgr. Gilbert J. Rutz of Erlanger; and stepdaughter, Mary Denise Rutz of Bullhead City, Ariz. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Linnemann Funeral Home handled the arrangements. Memorials: St. Charles Care Center, 500 Farrell Dr., Covington, KY 41011.

Eileen Settle

Eileen J. Nienaber Settle, 73, Crestview Hills, died June 10, 2009. She was a circuit clerk for Kenton County and member of St. Agnes Church in Fort Wright, Catholic Theater Guild and volunteer for Redwood School & Rehabilitation Center. Survivors include her husband, Gayle Settle; son, Harry Settle of West Chester; daughter, Sarah Settle of Ludlow: sister, Katherine Forrestor of Edgewood; and three grandchildren. Burial was in St. John Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Redwood School & Rehabilitation Center, 71 Orphanage Road, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Carrie Smith

Carrie Belle Smith, 87, formerly of Erlanger. She was a server for 44 years with the Maisonette in Cincinnati. Her second husband Robert K. Smith died previously. Survivors include her husband, Robert Wesley Underhill of Erlanger; son, Ralph Wesley Underhill of Erlanger; daughter, Cassandra “Sandy” Moore of Haysville, N.C.; three grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Erlanger.

Thomas Soper

Thomas J. Soper, 77, Fort Wright, died June 7, 2009.

He was a sales manager for Sears-Roebuck Co., a Korean War veteran, member of the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption in Covington and a tour guide for the Cathedral. Survivors include nieces and nephews and their families. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Middendorf Funeral Home, Fort Wright, handled the arrangements. Memorials: National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Ohio Valley Chapter, 4440 Lake Forest Drive, Suite 120, Cincinnati, OH, 45242.

Brayden Suda

Brayden Joseph Suda, stillborn, Edgewood, died May 29, 2009. Survivors include his mother, Nicole Marie Runion; father, Edwin Joseph Suda; sister, Hailey May Jones; brother, Matthew Robert Germann II, all of Latonia; grandparents, Gina L. Troy of Erlanger, Wesley and Susan Suda of Moscow, Ohio; and five great-grandparents. Burial was in St. Mary Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Connley Brothers Funeral Home, Latonia, handled the arrangements.

Viola Tyree

Viola Marie Turner Tyree, 88, Independence, died June 11, 2009, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare. She was a sales clerk for Woolworth, taught school in a one-room schoolhouse in Booneville and was a member of First Baptist Church of Independence. Her husband, Ruford Tyree, died in April. Survivors include her son, Danny H. Tyree of Independence; daughter Peggy Miller of Covington; sisters, Edith Tirey, Doris Guillam and Thel-

ma Phillips; brothers, Hershel and Clarence Turner, all of Winchester and Homer Turner of Fairfield; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Independence Cemetery. Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Ralph Vance

Ralph Earl Vance, 60, Covington, died June 13, 2009. He was a sheet metal worker for 2J Supply and an Army veteran. Survivors include his daughters, Jennifer Allphin of Burlington and Julie Vance of Tucson, Ariz.; sisters, Edith Lynch of Anchorage, Alaska and Mary Pritchett of Cincinnati; brothers, Dan Vance of Washington State, Dave Vance of Port Charlotte, Fla., Tony Vance of Alexandria and Donnie Vance of Belgium; and two grandchildren. Connley Brothers Funeral Home, Latonia, handled the arrangements.

Joyce Walker

Joyce E. Clark Walker, 70, of Foster, formerly of Crescent Springs, died June 8, 2009. She was housekeeper for Northern Kentucky University. Her husband, Robert L. Walker Sr., and son, Ronald K. Walker, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Robert L. Walker Jr. of Alexandria, Glenn Walker of Fort Thomas and John E. Walker of Newport; brothers, Floyd Hopper of Dayton and Kenneth Webber of Shreveport, La.; sister, Susan Webber of Indiana; 12 grandchildren; and 12-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill.

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And while the road has been rocky for some, here at The Bank of Kentucky we have remained strong and secure. We’re leading with innovative banking products and sound, prudent advice. It’s the type of personal guidance you just won’t find at the big banks. We’re simply continuing to build on our strong foundation so that you can rely on us to help you get where you want to be.

SM

0000338777

SERVING NORTHERN KENTUCKY For Over 40 YEARS.

Member FDIC

www.bankofky.com

0000342306

ON

Erlanger Recorder

June 18, 2009

578-8400

www.tomrechtin.com

KY Master HVAC M00135

*Rebate paid only on qualifying systems and range from $100 to $1200, depending on the product(s). See dealer for details.


B10

Erlanger Recorder

On the record

June 18, 2009

POLICE REPORTS COVINGTON

Arrests

Marquize D. Godfrey, 835 Poplar St., Apt. 912, second degree possession of a controlled substance, disregarding traffic control light, failure of owner to maintain required insurace, operating on suspended or revoked operating license at 500 Scott St., June 1. Harold L. Harris, No Address Given, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphrenalia at John Roebling Bridge, June 1. Michael J. Mcintosh, 151 Meadow Creek Dr., first degree burglary, second degree unlawful imprisonment, fourth degree assault at 729 Edgecliff Rd., June 1. Jose Torres, No Address Given, theft, serving warrant for court at 1616 Madison Ave., June 2. Deborah D. Martin, 141 W. Pike St., possession of marijuana at 719 Garrard St., June 2. Douglas E. Paul, 1934 Eastern Ave., fourth degree assault at 1934 Eastern Ave., June 3. Catherine A. Freeman, 1934 Eastern Ave., fourth degree assault at 1934 Eastern Ave., June 3. Vanessa M. Warder, 1534 St. Clair St., possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphrenalia at 1534 St. Clair St., June 3. Michael S. Koth, 5121 Ballantrae, first degree possession of a controlled substance, tampering with physical evidence, possession of drug paraphrenalia, public intoxication at 1 Madison Ave., June 3. Marlon E. West, 1615 Garrard St., trafficking in marijuana at 1900 Holman Ave., June 3. Kelly R. Bailer, 20 Elmwood Ct., alcohol intoxication in a public place, second degree disorderly conduct, resisting arrest at 2023 Garrard St., June 2. Samuel A. Ridder, 1527 Garrard St., #2, menacing, resisting arrest, alcohol intoxication in a public

place at 1527 Garrard St., June 7. Joseph M. Griffith, 722 E. 9Th St., operating on a suspended license, second degree fleeing or evading police, failure to surrender revoked operators license at E. 12th St., June 7. Tammy York, 1515 Morton, second degree disorderly conduct, menacing at 1515 May St., June 6. John F. Woolens, 1705 Race St., first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphrenalia, tampering with physical evidence at Pike and Holman, June 6. Colin P. Flannery, 3601 Glenn Ave., second degree assault at 3601 Glenn Ave., June 6. Bayron Perez Belasquez, 1604 Banklick St., no operators-moped license, failure to produce insurance card, at Bullock St., June 6. Nehemias Hernandez, 1604 Banklick St., third degree criminal possession of forged instrument at Bullock St., June 6. Brandon T. Spangler, 237 Surfwood Dr., alcohol intoxication in a public place, first degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphrenalia at 624 Main St., June 5. Brian J. Brown, 6414 Tyne Ave., third degree criminal trespassing, possession of marijuana at 800 block of Washington, June 5. Teron D. Wheeler, 1927 Reading Rd., #16, third degree criminal trespassing, possession of marijuana at 800 block of Washington, June 5. Anthony Reinstedler, 100 Claremont Ave., possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphrenalia at W. 7th St., June 5.

Assault

Reported at 2524 Gano Ct., June 5. Reported at 1316 Wheeler St., June 2. Reported at Garrard St., June 1.

Burglary

A cell phone and 12 pack of beer was stolen at 931 Western Ave., June 4. Victim reported that his home was entered and his belongings looked through at 1124 W. 33rd St., June 1. Rolled coins, cash, and a TV were stolen at 3938 Decoursey Ave., June 2. $4060 worth of building materials were stolen at 309 W. 16th St., June 3. A refrigerator was stolen at 211 Pleasant St., June 3. A building was entered through a window at 502 Fry St., June 5. Several power tools were stolen at 1319 Hermes St., June 7. A pack of cigarettes, cell phone, and $5 were stolen at 305 E. 11th St., June 7.

Burglary, criminal mischief

Three apartments have been broken into and vandalized at 116 Promontory Dr., Apt. A., June 3.

Criminal mischief

A vehicle's quarter panel and trunk lid were damaged at 1309 Scott St., June 1. Sugar was poured into a gas tank at 426 W. 13th St., June 1. Plants and flowers were pulled from their pots at 611 Madison Ave., June 2. A vehicle was damaged by thrown bricks at E. 16th St., June 3. A window of a residence was broken at 100 6th St., June 4. A garage door was damaged by someone driving into it at 518 Western Ave., June 7.

Incidents

Reported at 2718 Alexandria Ave., June 1. Reported at 1334 Maryland Ave., June 3. Reported at John Roebling Bridge, June 4.

TENN

BED AND BREAKFAST

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Criminal mischief, menacing

A woman kicked a door and threatened a woman at 2603 Alden Ct., June 4.

BED AND BREAKFAST

Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach GULF BEACH’S BEST VALUE! Beach front condo, 2 BR, 2 BA. Pool. Local owner 513-875-4155 www.bodincondo.com

DESTIN. Beautiful, luxury 2 BR, 2

BA Oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Covered prkng, sleeps 6. Local own er. www.us-foam.com/destin Ofc513-528-9800, eves 513-752-1735

DESTIN. Edgewater Beach Condos on the Gulf. 1-3 BR, beachfront, pvt balconies, FREE Wi-Fi, beach set-up (in season) & use of new fitness ctr. New massage/facial salon, 2 pools (1 heated), FREE $20 gift cert to pool grill (weekly rentals in season). Call or visit our website for lastminute specials. 800-822-4929 www.edgewaterbeach.com DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

BED AND BREAKFAST

Marijuana was located in the back yard of a residence at 1210 Lee St., June 4.

Harassing communications

A woman reported receiving continuous phone calls and gets berated at 719 9th St., June 2. A man reported receiving harassing text messages and voicemails at 392 Altamont Rd., June 2. A woman has received unwanted phone calls at 150 Indian Creek Dr., June 1. A woman reported being harassed over the phone at 3 Levassor Ave., June 4.

Harassment

A woman reported being harassed at 100 Ashland Dr., June 3.

Harassment, assault, menacing

Someone punched a woman to the ground, tried to run her over and threatened her further at 833 Crescent Ave., June 7.

Menacing

A woman exhibited threatening behavior toward another at 596 W. 3rd St., June 5.

Terroristic threatening

A woman received threatending phone calls at 1504 Morton Ave., June 1. A man was threatened at 1040 Hands Pike, June 1. A man has been making repeated threatening calls at 3712 Glenn Ave., June 3. A woman was threatened with having her truck blown up at 5968 Taylor Mill Rd., June 4.

Theft

A vehicle was stolen at 918 Highland

Ave., June 7. A sweatshirt and two wallets were stolen from a vehicle at 134 E. 13th St., June 7. A camera, debit card, $30 in cash, and a cell phone charger were stolen at 729 Edgecliff Rd., Apt. C-27, June 7. A pistol and $30 gift certificate was stolen at 1817 Euclid Ave., June 5. A vehicle was stolen at 1703 Greenup St., June 2.

Theft of a controlled substance

Prescription medication was stolen from a vehicle. at 1424 Kendall ST., June 3. Medication was stolen. at 608 W. 11th St., June 4. A purse, jewelry and prescription medication was stolen. at 731 Main St., June 7.

Theft of identity

Utility services were obtain under a false name at 1220 Greenup St., June 5.

Theft of legend drug

Medication was stolen at 2 Wallace Ave., #5, June 2.

Theft, criminal mischief

A MP3 player was stolen at 605 Philadelphia St., June 2. Window visors were stolen from a vehicle and its hood was scratched. at 4293 Winston Ave., June 4. A purse, MP3 player, camera and $200 in cash was stolen from a vehicle at 117 W. 6th St., June 6. A GPS unit and brief case was stolen form a vehicle at 643 Bakewell St., June 6.

Theft, fraudulent use of credit cards

A stolen credit card was used to buy merchandise at 2207 Scott Blvd., #1, June 5.

travelads@enquirer.com

FLORIDA

SOUTH CAROLINA

Bed & Breakfast Feature of the Week

Sunny Florida! Anna Maria Island. $499/wk + tax if booked by 6/30/09. All new inside, very comfy, just steps from the beach. 513-236-5091 www.beachesndreams.net

RAVENWOOD CASTLE: A MOST UNUSUAL GETAWAY Visit a “medieval castle” on a high hilltop on 115 secluded and forested acres of the most beautiful area of Southeast Ohiothe Hocking Hills! Owners Sue & Jim Maxwell are creating the most unusual guest experience of stepping back 800 years in a reconstruction of a “12th century Norman castle.” The Maxwells have traveled throughout England & Scotland & have always loved castles & the medieval era. Although the building is new, the couple has been collecting architectural antiques for several years. Each guest room or suite has a stained glass window, usually in the bedroom, a Victorian fireplace mantel with a gas log unit, antique light fixtures and some have beautiful old doors. The wood mouldings around the door & windows & the 5 stairways are inspired by centuries old motifs from Great Britain’s stately homes & castles. Most rooms also have a French door with a balcony, private deck overlooking the forest. There are also “medieval” themed cottages with fireplaces and whirlpools. Ravenwood has

FLORIDA DESTIN, FLORIDA 50 Steps to the beach! Beautiful lowrise condos w/pools. 850-830-8133, email destinbeaches4u@yahoo.com or visit www.asummerbreeze.com

MICHIGAN

its own food service for guests, so they can spend their entire visit immersed in solitude if they wish, surrounded by tall trees, huge rocks, the castle‘s own hiking trails and plenty of peace and quiet. Or guests can drive the few miles to outside attractions & other dramatic scenery in the Hocking Hills. Ravenwood offers popular “murder mystery” weekends and also plans “medieval dinners”, getaway workshops, and other special events. Facilities are also perfect for small weddings and other festive occasions. The building has no steps into the 1st floor level - a “drawbridge” leads from the driveway to the massive front door and the first floor guest rms. Nearby are caves, waterfalls, lots of hiking trails, a scenic railway, arts & crafts studios & shop, antique malls and much more. There are often midweek discounts and a special “Royal Family” Adventure Package in the summer.

For info call 800-477-1541 or visit www.ravenwoodcastle.com

FLORIDA PANAMA CITY BEACH Family Atmosphere! Your Best Vacation Value! 800-354-1112 www.Summerhouse.com

LONGBOAT KEY . Fabulous 2 br, 2 ba beach-to-bay complex. Pool, tennis, fishing dock, sun deck, private beach. Local owner offers great summer rates! 513-662-6678 www.bayportbtc.com , unit 829

Hilton Head Island, SC

LEELANAU VACATION RENTALS Over 120 condos, cottages and homes on Lake Michigan, Glen Lake and other inland lakes. Call 231-334-6100 or visit www.leelanau.com/vacation

ONEKAMA. Beautiful Lake Michigan home near Portage Point Inn. Sleeps 10. Fabulous golf. Pets allowed. Summer $3500/wk, off season rates reduced. 513-477-3874

NEW YORK

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $129/2 persons. Singles $124. Suites $139-$159. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 800-245-7746 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

SOUTH CAROLINA HILTON HEAD ISLAND 1-7 Bedroom Vacation Homes & Villas. Free color brochure. Call 1-866-386-6644 or visit www.seaturtlegetaways.com

SIESTA KEY. Gulf front condo, beach view.frrom balcony. Bright & airy, nicely appointed, all amenities. Cinci owner. 232-4854. Available weekly from July 4

HILTON HEAD. Beautiful 1 BR, 1 BA condo on beach nr Coligny. Sleeps 6. Many amenities, discounted rates! June-Aug $750/wk; Sept, Oct $550/wk, if booked by 6/20. Also, Marriott’s Grande Ocean timeshare wk of 7/26. 513-829-5099 Visit www.hhisland.info and plan a getaway with Seashore Vacations.

NORTH CAROLINA

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Dinsey. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

DESTIN. New, nicely furnished 2 br, 2 ba condo. Gorgeous Gulf view. Pools, golf course. Discount Summer & Fall rates. Book now. 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

Cultivation of marijuana

513.768.8614

FLORIDA Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent and Relax. Near Destin, between famous Seaside and Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials or call 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

A counterfeit $20 was passed at 221 W. 12th St., June 4.

Ave., June 1. A vehicle was stolen at 2002 Greenup St., June 1. A trash can was stolen at 720 Dalton Ave., June 1. Ten to fifteen movies were stolen from a display rack at 1602 Madison Ave., June 1. A go cart and bicycle was stolen at 4522 Decoursey Ave., June 1. Nine liquified petroleum tanks were stolen at 200 W. 43rd St., June 1. Electronic equipment was stolen at 10 Rivercenter Blvd., June 1. A drill, electric meter, various hand tools, and drill bits were stolen at 5775 Forsythia Ct., June 1. A vehicle was stolen at 300 block of 16th St., June 1. A battery and catalytic converter were stolen from a vehicle at 1415 Russell St., June 1. $1600 in cash and store product was stolen at 402 Scott St., June 2. A bicycle was stolen at 25 E. 4th St., June 1. $1350 in cash, a briefcase, folder, and two money orders were stolen at Scott St., June 1. A cell phone was stolen from a vehicle at 900 Philadelphia St., June 4. Paperwork was stolen from a vehicle at 3440 Heathermoor Blvd., June 4. Several items of stereo equipment was stolen at 117 6th St., June 3. A CD player and GPS unit were stolen from a vehicle at E. 16th St., June 3. A purse was stolen at 2032 Madison Ave., #1, June 3. A cosmetic bag was stolen at 6th St., June 6. A jacket was stolen at 808 Scott St., June 5. A 12 pack of beer was stolen at 3926 Winston Ave., June 5. $40 in cash was stolen at 32 E. 32nd St., June 5. A GPS unit was stolen from a vehicle at 827 Madison Ave., June 7. A tire, rim, and lug nuts were stolen from a vehicle at 16 Martin St., June 7. A wallet was stolen at 1717 Madison

Travel & Resort Directory Jenny Eilermann

Romantic Retreat. 1875 Homestead B&B in Brown County, Indiana. Luxury rooms, some with whirlpools & FP’s. Check our website, or call for rates & specials. 812-988-0853 www.1875homestead.com

Criminal possession of a forged instrument

HILTON HEAD’S Best Family Vacation Destination . Oceanfront 1, 2 & 3 bdrm villas. Discounted golf, complimentary tennis & health club. 800-845-9500 www.vthhi.com

Our beach is free. Specials available for golf, tennis, dining, more. Visit our

site or call toll free: 800-845-0077.

TENNESSEE A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge.Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617 GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com GATLINBURG Royal Townhouse Spring Special. $29.95 + tax SunThurs; $39.95 + tax Fri-Sat. Rooms limited & subject to availability. Restrictions & blackout dates apply. Advance reservations req’d. Present ad at check-in. 1-800-433-8792 CE Lakefront NORRIS LAKE 4 bedroom home in Deerfield Resort. Large wraparound decks w/private boat dock. Many dates available. Call owner, 513-236-8001

Hilton Head Island Vacation Resort. Choose 1 or 2 bdrm condos. Oceanfront, ocean view or nr ocean. Great locations & rates. Golf pkgs, too. www.hhi-vr.com. 877-807-3828 N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC Fantastic Specials Available!! 100’s of Oceanfront/view Homes & Condos

Call for free brochure 866-780-8334 www.northmyrtlebeachtravel.com

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Log Cabin Resort w/heated indoor pool, minutes from Dollywood, Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg and the Smoky Mtns. Breathtaking mountain views, hot tubs, Jacuzzis, pool tables & pet friendly cabins are offered. Excellent rates, discounts available. Call 1-888-HSR-TENN (477-8366) hiddenspringsresort.com

Nr Powell NORRIS LAKE. Valley Marina. 2 BR/1BA, very nicely furnished home. Covered porch, deck. $95/nt. 423-562-8353 www.norrislakehse.com www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618

TIME SHARES WHOLESALE TIMESHARES 60-80% Off Retail! Qualified Buyers Only! Call for Free Info Pack! www.holidaygroup.com/cn 1-800-731-0307


Erlanger Recorder - June 18, 2009