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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

COUNTY RECORDER

E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com T h u r s d a y, F e b r u a r y

4, 2010

Web site: NKY.com

B E C A U S E C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S

50¢

Longnecks owner to open Shortnecks

Elley Claybern, left, and teacher Peggy Herald.

Volume 31, Number 52 © 2010 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Share your news

Have a great photo from your kid’s latest field trip? Trying to drum up publicity for your group’s event? Visit NKY.com/Share to submit your photos, news and events. It’s a one-stop-shop for submitting information to The Community Recorder, The Kentucky Enquirer, NKY.com and many other publications and Web sites.

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

Science fair

About 70 Campbell County Middle School students are preparing to prove science is a hands-on word with the third annual school-wide science fair Feb. 10. The science experiments will be on display during an open house at the school, 8000 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 10. SCHOOLS, A6

Northern Kentucky women recognized

Every year five women are recognized for their leadership and impact on the Northern Kentucky region. Since 1984 the honorees of The Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky Awards have been nominated by people in the community. The deadline for the 26th annual awards is Feb. 12. NEWS, A2

Project Grad returns

The supervised after prom party for Campbell County High School students has been dropped in favor of the after graduation party. Both functions are geared toward giving students a safe after party alternative and businesses, community groups and parent volunteers participate with donations of time and products used as prizes during the event. SCHOOLS, A6 For the Postmaster

Published weekly every Thursday. Periodical postage paid at Newport, KY 41071 USPS 450130 Postmaster: Send address change to The Campbell County Recorder 654 Highland Suite 27, Fort Thomas, KY 41075 Annual Subscription: Weekly Recorder & Sunday Enquirer In-County $18.02; weekly Recorder only all other in-state $23.32 Out-of - state $27.56; Kentucky Sales Tax Included

To place an ad, call 283-7290.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Tea time

Amy Ast of Columbus, and formerly of Fort Thomas, pours a cup of hot tea during a visit to the Kentucky Haus Artisan Center in Newport while visiting family Saturday, Jan. 30. For more see B1.

Meet the judge-executive contenders By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

The race for Campbell County Judge-executive in 2010 starts with a Republican primary Tuesday, May 18. There are two Republicans, Steve Pendery, the incumbent since 1999, and challenger Kevin Sell. Andrea Janovic, the Democrat challenger, is also vying for the top office in county government. Pendery of Fort Thomas is the co-owner of Pendery Insurance and Risk Management Group. Pendery said the county has had 12 years of balanced budgets, and of the three counties, Campbell has by far the lowest spending rate in Northern Kentucky. Pendery is chairman of the board of the Northern Kentucky Tri-County Economic Development Corporation (Tri-Ed). During the worst economy since the Great Depression, the county has a budget surplus that is protecting the county, Pendery said. While in office, hundreds of millions of private investment and public infrastructure have been completed with more on the way, he said. Republican challenger Kevin Sell of Alexandria resigned as chairman of the Fourth Congressional District of the Republican Party to challenge Pendery. He retired in 2005 as a shift commander for the fire department at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

Crank up your car-buying knowledge.

Sell said he wants less taxes, less government spending, and more growth with the county being more aggressive with economic development initia- Pendery tives. “We cannot continue to spend money as usual, and on things such as a county administration building and a clock tower,” Sell said. Sell said the county has had 11 straight years of property tax increases, and that he will look at each department and service for spending cuts and will look at areas including the sheriff’s office and county police, housing authorities and other areas for potential consolidation. Janovic, the Democrats challenger, an attorney, was first elected to the Newport Independent Schools board in 2004. Janovic said the county needs a different leadership vision for the next decade. The direction of the county seems to be in courting millionaires, Janovic said. Living in Newport, Janovic said she has seen two of the least realistic developments along the river front, including the Ovation project, stall. “I can’t afford those condos and I don’t think most of the people in Campbell County can afford them either,” she said.

Sell

Janovic

Government needs to make sure it’s doing what it can to make sure small and family businesses don’t have to jump through hoops to stay open, but that doesn’t mean just tax breaks, Janovic said. “In my opinion people like that are the meat and potatoes of the community,” she said. “A lot of these businesses are very close to closure.”

Candidate Web sites:

Here is a list of campaign Web sites the candidates for Campbell County Judge-executive are preparing. Pendery said his Facebook page and Web site stevependery.com will be active by Thursday, Feb. 4. Sell’s Web site www.kevinsell.com, includes links to his Facebook and Twitter pages. Janovic said her Web site janovicforjudgeexecutive.com, is under development. To see full campaign statements and Web sites for Fiscal Court candidates visit the Campbell County Connects blog news.nky.com/ campbellconnects and check out the “FiscalCourt” tag.

Local resident Gary Anthonissen knows the long and short of the restaurant business. After being successful with his first restaurant and bar, Longnecks Sports Grill in Wilder, Shortnecks, a Anthonissen is now opensmaller, more ing another intimate business at 830 Monversion of mouth St. Longnecks S h o r t with the same necks, a smaller, more orange and intimate verblack color sion of Longscheme, is necks with the same orange scheduled to and black open. color scheme, is scheduled to open as early as this weekend. After spending years in sales and marketing in the corporate world, Anthonissen said he decided he wanted to venture out and do something on his own. After opening two liquor stores in the Northern Kentucky, Anthonissen opened Longnecks in August 2007. “We didn’t really know what we were doing, but we did it anyway,” Anthonissen said, Since its opening, Anthonissen said Longnecks has been very successful, leading him to fulfilling another one his dreams. “I’ve always wanted a little shotgun bar and burger joint,” Anthonissen said. “This is a small place with really great burgers, which is something this area doesn’t really have.” After the Monmouth Street location opened up, Anthonissen said he went for it. “We’ve put a lot of work into this place, and we’re very happy with how it turned out,” Anthonissen said. The complete revamp of the interior of the building, completed by Shane Harrison Contracting, took about five months to complete, and there are only a few final touches left to do before it opens, Anthonissen said. Once open, Shortnecks will offer special-recipe, handmade burgers at a reasonable price along with some of the Longnecks favorites including wings, pretzels and beer cheese, and the pot roast sandwich, he said. “While Longnecks is more of a sports bar, this is more of a lunch and happy hour place,” Anthonissen said. Shortnecks, which also features plenty of 58-inch, hi-definition plasma televisions, will be open daily from 11 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. For more information about Shortnecks, call 360-7451.

Go to Cars.com and become a more confident car shopper. Use our research tools to compare makes and models. Read consumer and expert reviews. Even compare vehicle safety ratings and resale values. Find the new car that’s right for you. Car shopping confidence, isn’t that music to your ears? ©2009 Classified Ventures, LLC™. All rights reserved.


Campbell County Recorder

News

February 4, 2010

Awards thank women for helping region By Regan Coomer rcoomer@nky.com

Every year five women are recognized for their leadership and impact on the Northern Kentucky region. Since 1984 the honorees of The Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky Awards have been nominated by people in the community. The deadline for the 26th annual awards is Feb. 12. “By nominating someone it’s telling them they’re doing a lot of the right

things and making a difference in the community,” said past winner Helen Carroll, currently the Community Relations manger for Toyota, one of the awards’ sponsors. “We need to continue promoting that level of accomplishment and achievement among the women in our community.” Completing a nomination form, which can be found at ownk.org, is easy, Carroll said. “It’s a simple process that can really make a huge impact in someone’s life,” she said. In the past, women hon-

ored have had notable achievement running the gamut, including leadership, volunteerism, politics and education. “It’s a veritable who’s who of Northern Kentucky represented from all walks of life,” said Event Coordinator Lisa Raterman, who also asked people to nominate. “The awards encourage women who have made a difference either through personal lives or professional endeavors and gives us an opportunity to thank them for making our community a little bit better or

brighter,” she said. The Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky Awards are also meant to inspire younger women just starting out in their careers. “It gives them the motivation to continue to grow themselves as they pick things to be involved in in the community,” Carroll said. The impact on the younger generation of women is one of the deciding factors in choosing new recipients. Other criteria include service, personal integrity, perseverance and

Outstanding Women nominations To nominate a woman you know for and Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky Awards, visit ownk.org to fill out a nomination form. Nominations must be received by Friday Feb. 12. Nominations can also be mailed to Lisa A. Raterman,

LARaterman Associations, 1615 Park Rd., Fort Wright, Ky., 41011. Winners will be notified in March. The awards will be presented at a luncheon to be held Tuesday, April 26 at Receptions in Erlanger. Call 5780009 for more information.

leadership. Choosing a career or activity to really care about will help today’s women change their community in the future, Carroll said. “Find what your passionate about,” Carroll advised. “If you find what you’re passionate about you’re more likely to put

your time and energy into it. Don’t be afraid of meeting a challenge.” The Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky Awards are co-sponsored by Northern Kentucky University, Thomas More College and Gateway Community and Technical College.

Unveiling event

Speers Court Apts.

Ken Reis (right), president of the Campbell County Historical Society, watches as State Rep. Dennis Keene speaks at the dedication of a historical marker for congressman buried in Evergreen Cemetery Saturday, Jan. 23. Other speakers included Ken Reis, former congressman Ken Lucas and event organizer Paul Whalen.

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AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

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SHARE your stories, photos and events at NKY.com

To place an ad call 513.242.4000 or 859.283.7290, or visit CommunityClassified.com

TO MEMBERS AND PATRONS OF SOUTHERN STATES COOPERATIVE, INC.

Index

Calendar ......................................B2 Classifieds.....................................C Life...............................................B1 Police reports..............................B8 Schools........................................A6 Sports ..........................................A8 Viewpoints ................................A10

The Bylaws of Southern States Cooperative, Inc. require that Members and Patrons maintain a valid mailing address with the Cooperative at all times. If your name appears in the list below, please contact the Cooperative by mail at Attn: Stock Records (6606 West Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23230), to provide your current address. Failure to do so within 180 days of this notice will result in a Member’s or Patron’s equities and other interest being forfeited to the Cooperative pursuant to Article XIV, Section 5 of the Bylaws. CHESTER ADAMS, FLOYD CALDWELL EST, HOWARD FETTERS, WILLIAM GOODMAN, CLYDE JOHNSTON, KENNETH MAXEY, JAMES PHIPPS, CHESTER PRITCHARD, C R SCHOOLER, AMOS TACKETT, EDWARD TURNER, ALEX WEBB

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COUNTY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Campbell County – nky.com/campbellcounty News Michelle Shaw | Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1053 | mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1051 | cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering | Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578-1052 | ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . . 513-248-7573 | mlaughman@nky.com James Weber | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . 578-1054 | jweber@nky.com Advertising Debbie Maggard | Advertising Manager. . . . . . 578-5501 | dmaggard@nky.com Michelle Schlosser | Account Rep . . . . . . . . 578-5521 | mschlosser@nky.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. . 442-3464 | sschachleiter@nky.com Judy Hollenkamp | Circulation Clerk . . . . . . . . 441-5537 | jhollenkamp@NKY.com Classified To place a Classified ad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283-7290 | www.communityclassified.com

To place an ad in Community Classified, call 283-7290.


E E R F CCF Recorder

February 4, 2010

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Ask about our Interior Design Services and Locations Ohio, call 513-774-9591 or in Kentucky, 859-572-6800 and talk to one of our designers!

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A4

CCF Recorder

February 4, 2010

Holy Cross Elementary

Prince of Peace School

3615 Church Street Covington, KY 41015 (859) 581-6599

627 Pike Street Covington, KY 41011 (859) 431-5153

Principal: Sr. Suzanne Rose, SND Call anytime for a personal tour

Principal: Mary Ellen Matts Every day is Open House Christ Centered Values Quality Academics Dedicated Staff Small Classes Diversity Family Atmosphere Strong, Stable Presence in City Safe Environment

Holy Family School th

338 East 16 Street Covington, KY 41014 (859) 581-0290

Principal: Polly Duplace Call anytime for a personal tour

St. Anthony School 485 Grand Avenue Covington, KY 41015 (859) 431-5987

Principal: Joanne Browarsky Call anytime for a personal tour

Holy Trinity School

St. Augustine School

Elementary Jr. High 235 Division St. 840 Washington Ave. Bellevue, KY 41073 Newport, KY 41017 (859) 291-6937 (859) 292-0487

1840 Jefferson Avenue Covington, KY 41014 (859) 261-5564

Principal: Jeffrey Finke Every day is Open House

www.acuecovington.org

Principal:Sr. Maria Therese Schappert, SND Open House: Feb. 7, Noon–1:30 p.m.

NOW ACCEPTING REGISTRATIONS FOR 2010-11 SCHOOL YEAR

Bishop Brossart HS

Serving as a Family to its Families for over 60 years

4 Grove Street, Alexandria, KY 41001

859.635.2108 www.bishopbrossart.org

Newport Central Catholic High School Central to your Faith Central to your Education Central to your Life

At Newport Central Catholic we believe in a faith-based and well rounded high school experience including strong academics, fine arts, sports and extracurricular activities. We provide the skills to help our students succeed in life spiritually, academically and socially.

Incoming Freshman Registration www.CovCath.org (859)491-2247

Covington L Latin i S School h lO Open H House

Sunday, February 14th, 2:00 & 3:00 PM sessions • #1 Private School in NKY by Cincinnati Magazine • $6.18 million: Scholarships earned, Class of 2009 • 28.1: Average ACT, Class of 2009

Go to www.covingtonlatin.org to RSVP.

13 Carothers Road, Newport, KY

NOTRE DAME ACADEMY Educating Women to Make A Difference

Notre Dame Academy Values Academic Excellence - The Whole Person - Faith in Action 1699 Hilton Drive, Park Hills, Kentucky 859.261.4300 www.ndapandas.org

Cat h o

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D epar t

m

A Co-Educational High School

t of

ese

on

oc

hools

For additional information on Catholic education opportunities in the Diocese of Covington please call (859) 392-1530 or visit us online at www.covingtondiocese.org.

en

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• Christ-Centered Education • Proven Academic Programs • Attention to Discipline

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Now accepting registrations for the 2010-2011 school year.

of Covi n

gt


CCF Recorder

February 4, 2010

Great Kids, St. Paul Catholic School Great School! Education

CALL NOW to register for the

2010 - 2011 SCHOOL YEAR

ST. HENRY SCHOOL

CALL TODAY for a tour or enrollment information.

A N ti na B ue Ribbon S hool Excellence

(859) 342-2551

2407 Dixie Highway, Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017

Sts. Peter and Paul School Serving Southern Campbell County

Over 150 years of tradition of Catholic education.

Mission:

Reverence for God - Respect for Self Respect for Others - Service to All

Come discover our hidden treasure Grades K-8 Student-teacher ratio 10:1 New computers in the computer lab SMART boards in all classrooms Senteo Interactive Response System

5876 Veterans Way Burlington, KY 859-689-4303 www.ihm-ky.org/school.htm

More than 70% of our graduates are on the honor roll in high school

Now enrolling for the 2010-2011 school year.

6829 Four Mile Rd., Camp Springs, KY 41059

Please call to set up an individual tour.

7303 Dixie Highway, Florence, KY 41042

Crusading to secure your child’s future!

St. Joseph School Camp Springs

IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY SCHOOL

Wrapped In Faith

3825 Dixie Hwy. Elsmere, KY 41018

Rooted in Catholic Values Committed to Academic Excellence Dedicated to Serving Others

IHM

A5

859-635-5652

email: stjosephcampsprings@insightbb.com web: www.stjosephcampspringsschool.catholicweb.com

Graduates include 10 Governor’s Scholars within the last 10 years. 3 STARS Rated Pre K thru Grade 8

859-635-4382

Saint Philip School

MARY, QUEEN OF HEAVEN SCHOOL

Accepting New Students

OPEN HOUSE

• Preschool - 8th Grade

Monday, March 8, 2010

• Ask for a tour • “Eighth Grade’s on Us!”

Program starts at 6:30 PM

A Gift for a Lifetime… St. Philip School (859) 371-8100 www.mqhschool.com 1130 Donaldson Rd., Erlanger, KY 41018

A 2009 National Blue Ribbon School

l o o h c S s e n g S aint A

Open Registration Grades K-8 2010-2011 Smartboards in every classroom

1322 Sleepy Hollow Rd. Ft. Wright, KY 41011 school.saintagnes.com 859-261-0543

Call for more information (859) 441—3423

stphilipky.org + 1402 Mary Ingles Hwy. + Melbourne, KY 41059

St. Joseph School

St. Pius X

2474 Lorraine Ct. Crescent Springs, Ky. 41017 (859) 578-2472 cstover@sjscrescent.org

Now Accepting Registration for 2010-2011

Please call for a personal tour.

Grades K–8

New Student Registration: Thursday, February 4 6:30-8:00 p.m.

(Full-Day and Half-Day Kindergarten Available)

859.341.4900 www.stpiusx.com

Full-time Kindergarten Available

www.sjscrescent.com

National Blue Ribbon School

got faith?

A Nationally Recognized Blue Ribbon School of Excellence

Open Registration PreK-8th Grade

Please contact the school for more informatino or to schedule a tour.

Registration Call 572-2680 for information or for your own Personal Tour St. Catherine of Siena School 23 Rossford Avenue Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075 For more information, go to www.stcatherineofsiena.org

St. Joseph Academy 48 Needmore St., Walton, KY 41094

859-485-6444

email: principalsja@insigthbb.com www.saintjosephacademy.net

St. Cecilia Elementary School We love and serve God through excellence in Catholic Education!

Private tours available now. Call the school office.

www.stcrusaders.org 5313 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051

For almost 140 years, St. Mary School has welcomed students to an exciting educational program full of opportunities for academic and spiritual growth. It is our goal to prepare our students for success beyond St. Mary School by providing the latest tools for learning with the guidance of a qualified, experienced teaching staff committed to academic excellence.

Saint Thomas School

428 South Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, KY 41075 mail to: sbres@sttschool.org

NOW ENROLLING for the 2010-2011 school year. Call for a personal tour.

2007-08, 2008-09 Service Learning School of Contribution Fostering Faith, Inspiring Excellence, Cultivating Leaders Grades PS-8, Full and Part-time Kindergarten


SCHOOLS A6

Campbell County Recorder

February 4, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

|

NEWS

|

ACTIVITIES

|

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

HONORS

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

Inspiring science curiosity role of fair

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

About 70 Campbell County Middle School students are preparing to prove science is a hands-on word with the third annual school-wide science fair Feb. 10. The science experiments will be on display during an open house at the school, 8000 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 10. Students have to use the scientific method, show their research, and give a presentation about their projects, said Doni Beaupre, a sixth-grade science teacher and organizer of the science fair. In the classroom, there’s not always time to perform experiments about each lesson, and that’s a big part of the fun of science, so the science fair is a good outlet, Beaupre said. Plus, participants receive extra credit. “Kids always, they’re just naturally curious,” she said. “They want to test things out.” Some of the most common entries include testing the effects of soda on teeth, and several students are doing variations about how different chemical solutions affect plant growth, Beaupre said. One of the more interesting and original entries this year is a student who designed a working miniature trebuchet, a medieval siege weapon that uses a counter-

weight system to hurl objects through the air, she said. The trebuchet project is an experiment about how mass affects the projectile being hurled, Beaupre said. The students’ projects will be judged the morning of Feb. 10 by a panel from the community with backgrounds in science including a mechanical engineer, school district staff, and a representative from Northern Kentucky University, she said. The top five students, who compete across grade levels of 68, will advance to the regional science fair at NKU Feb. 27. An entrant from last year’s science fair, Getechen Walch, placed in the regional competition at NKU and went on to compete at the state science fair at the University of Kentucky, Beaupre said. Although not all students participate in creating a science fair project, the other students have to write a persuasive letter for their teachers explaining their scientific reasoning for why they think one project is better than another, Beaupre said. The fair is one way to get students excited about science and trying something that’s hands-on, which is what most students like best about the subject, she said. “We promote it as this is your opportunity to try to be a scientist,” Beaupre said.

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Thomas Schnitzler, left, 11, of Alexandria, raises his hand in sixth grade science class to answer a question about the sun's relevance to why the equatorial regions of the world are hotter than other areas during Campbell County Middle School science teacher Doni Beaupre's lecture Feb. 1. Second from left is Andrew Temke, 12, and third from left is Jake Barton, 11, both of Alexandria.

Johnson Elementary School holds Penny War to benefit Haiti

Project Grad back for 2010

By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

By Chris Mayhew

After seeing the devastation due to the earthquake in Haiti on the news, students at Johnson Elementary School came together to help. In response to the need in Haiti, fifth-grader Jamie Drury proposed that the school hold a Penny War. “This was such a great opportunity because the need in Haiti is so great and the idea to help came from a student,” said Principal Jon Stratton. “The students were really excited about the chance to help, several classrooms talked about the great need in Haiti, and we had a real sense of excitement all week.” The Penny War, which was held the week of Jan. 18, raised about $3,000 in pennies, other change and dollars. “The students response has been tremendous and the children

cmayhew@nky.com

PROVIDED

Johnson Elementary School second-grader Thad Long, who just returned from Haiti, shares some pictures of places he visited in Port-auPrince during the school’s Penny War to benefit people in Haiti.

PROVIDED

Johnson Elementary school students (from left) Beckett Wiswell, Mason Stull and Jamie Drury carry pennies and other change donated by students during the school’s Penny War to benefit people in Haiti. recognize that the real winner is not the grade with the most money, but hopefully the Haitian

children,” said Josh Feldmann, second-grade teacher. “They have all been very concerned for them

and very excited about how the money might be used to help them.” Students in the second grade learned more about Haiti during the Penny War from student Thad Long, who just returned from a trip to Haiti. Long shared pictures of some places he visited in Port-au-Prince with students.

Spaghetti dinner helps foundation fund scholarships, supplies By Amanda Joering Alley ajoering@nky.com

For 11 years, the Southgate Educational Foundation has been improving the educational opportunities for children throughout the city. Since forming in 1999 after the state issued mandates about technology in schools, but provided no additional funding, the foundation has been helping fund various things that don’t fit in the budget at Southgate Independent School. “The Southgate Educational Foundation is a very important part of our school community that provides resources to our school that goes beyond what our school district can provide,” said Superintendent Jim Palm. “This valuable work is part of what makes our school a unique place for learning.” With no office or any other

AMANDA JOERING ALLEY/STAFF

Allison Neace, a seventh-grader at Southgate Independent School, stands by a sign featuring a slogan she wrote to promote the Southgate Educational Foundation’s annual spaghetti dinner. The foundation sponsored a slogan contest for all seventh- and eighth-graders and Neace was chosen as the winner. expenses to maintain, everything the foundation makes goes to the students, said foundation President Dwain Bowling. “We do anything we can to help the school,” Bowling said. “This year with all the new students at the school, we purchased

13 new computers for the computer lab.” Along with funding new technology, supplies and programs, the foundation also provides scholarships for students at Southgate Independent and St. Therese.

“We try to help anytime we see a need a student in the city has, it doesn’t matter what school they go to,” Bowling said. To raise the money needed to help the schools, the foundation holds various fundraisers throughout the year, including an annual spaghetti dinner, which is from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5 at the Southgate Community Center. The dinner, catered by Pompilio’s, is the foundation biggest fundraiser. Bowling said this year, to give students a chance to show off their creativity and promote the dinner and the foundation, a contest was held for seventh- and eighth-graders to see who could come up with the best slogan to be featured on a sign about the event. Seventh-grader Allison Neace won the contest.

The supervised after prom party for Campbell County High School students has been dropped in favor of the after graduation party. Both functions are geared toward giving students a safe after party alternative and businesses, community groups and parent volunteers participate with donations of time and products used as prizes during the event. “We have discussed this a lot and really feel it is wrong to ‘hit up’ local businesses for support of two so similar events,” said Renee Boots, the school’s principal. “That’s about the extent of the reason for not doing two (events).” The school’s Youth Service Advisory Council, which oversees the functions, decided in the fall of 2009 to change from Project Prom to Project Grad. Parents had previously expressed their desire at a School Based Decision Making Council meeting in the fall to have an after-graduation event rather than an after-prom event. The school has switched back and forth on supporting either a project graduation or project prom in recent years. Boots said given the option and unlimited money she probably still would not hold both events because they’re pretty much the same – just for two different occasions. Project Grad is special because parents get so involved in making a success because it’s the last big school-related thing they can do for their child, Boots said. The school couldn’t do it without those dedicated parents, she said. “The value of either event in my opinion is that we know students are safe and aren't put in the position of making unwise choices,” Boots said. “Parents know where their child is and what they are doing.”


Schools

CCF Recorder

February 4, 2010

A7

SCHOOL NOTES NCC scholarships

Newport Central Catholic announced the following eighth-grade students obtained the top 10 scores on the High School Placement Test (HSPT): • Mitchell Pangallo, St. Joseph, four-year partial scholarship • Whitney Fields, St.

Catherine, four-year partial scholarship • Abby Schmitt, St. Thomas, two-year partial scholarship • Jonathan Murrin, St. Catherine, two-year partial scholarship • Joanna Goldstein, St. Therese, two-year partial scholarship

• Frances Tracy, St. Catherine, two-year partial scholarship • Nick Bogart, St. Therese • Alyssa Blanchet, St. Therese • Evan Brannon, St. Catherine • Josie Barnett, Holy Trinity

Registration for kindergarten, first grade

Registration for the Fort Thomas Independent Schools’ kindergarten and first grade is from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 18 for residents of the school district. Children born on or before

Sept. 30, 2005 are eligible for kindergarten. Any child entering first grade must be six years of age on or before Sept. 30, 2010. The child’s birth certificate, social security number and two proofs of residency are required. For more information call

the elementary school principal or the assistant superintendent for students services at 815-2011. Children who are currently enrolled in kindergarten at a Fort Thomas school do not need to register.

list for the 2009 fall semester. Local students making the list include Kathryn Steffen of Alexandria, Katherine Sipple of Fort Thomas, Jill Flottman of Cold Spring, Lauren Schwierjohann of Newport, Maria Haas of Wilder and Amanda Salzer of Newport. The dean’s list recognizes students who receive a grade point average of 3.5 or above

on a 4.0 scale. For information about the school, visit www.bellarmine.edu.

COLLEGE CORNER New degree programs

Daymar College announced that it is increasing educational options for students in Kentucky and the region by offering new Bachelor of Science degree programs at Daymar College locations throughout the state. Offering certificate, diploma and associate degree programs in a variety of disciplines, the institution will transition to a higher credential level with the addition of bachelor degree programs in Business Management, Business Administration, Healthcare Administration, and Criminal Justice Administration. Daymar College campuses in Owensboro, Paducah, Bellevue, Louisville, Scottsville and Albany will immediately begin accepting

applications for admission to the higher degree programs. (Program availability varies by campus).

ODK inducts student

Carey Jessica Lanham, a 2006 graduate of Newport High School, was inducted into the Omicron Delta Kappa National Leadership Honor Society of Georgetown College Dec. 6 in Georgetown, Ky. Students with superior scholarship, leadership and exemplary character are recognized. The Society recognizes achievement in scholarship; athletics; campus or community service, social, religious activities, and campus government; journalism, speech and the mass media; and the creative and performing arts.

Emphasis is placed on the development of the whole person, both as a member of the college community and as a contribution to a better society. ODK was the first college honor society of a national scope to give recognition and honor meritorious leadership and service in extracurricular activities and to encourage development of general campus citizenship.

Dean’s List

Alan deCourcy, D.Mn., chief academic officer and dean of the faculty at the College of Mount St. Joseph, has announced the Dean’s List for the 2009 fall semester. To achieve the Dean’s List, a student must earn a minimum 3.50 grade point average on a 4.00 scale while

enrolled with a minimum of 6 credit hours. There are 642 students who achieved Dean’s List. Students making the Dean’s List from Campbell County are: • Alexandria Patterson of Alexandria • Connie Schultz of Alexandria • Heather Maria Couch of Newport • Benjamin Parr of Bellevue • Matthew Gerard Grosser of Fort Thomas • Jennifer Sellers of Fort Thomas • Lorel Studer of Fort Thomas • Julie Van Curen of Fort Thomas

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SPORTS

A8

CCF Recorder

BRIEFLY

This week in basketball

• Ryle High School boys beat Highlands High School 49-34, Jan. 22. Highlands’ top-scorer was Zach Lother with nine points, including one three-pointer. • Bishop Brossart High School boys beat Bracken County 49-42, Jan. 22. Brossart’s top-scorer was Zach Fardo with 27 points, including six three-pointers. • Scott High School girls beat Bishop Brossart 46-32, Jan. 22. Brossart’s top-scorer was Becca Kidney with 12 points, including two threepointers. • Highlands girls beat Ryle High School 54-47, Jan. 22. Highlands’ top-scorer was Bekah Towles with 21 points. • Bellevue High School girls beat Silver Grove High School 60-39, Jan. 22. Bellevue’s top-scorer was Catherine Kessen with 19 points, including one three-pointer. • Campbell County High School girls beat Harrison County 63-55, Jan. 22. Campbell’s top-scorer was Kelsey Miller with 16 points, including two three-pointers. • Highlands boys beat Boone County 62-59, Jan. 23. Highlands’ top-scorer was Jack Stewart with 15 points. • Bishop Brossart boys beat Nicholas County 58-33, Jan. 23. Brossart’s top-scorer was Jacob Rieger with 17 points, including one threepointer. • Silver Grove High School girls beat Eminence 38-31, Jan. 23. Silver Grove’s topscorer was Payton Govan with 18 points, including four three-pointers. • Highlands girls beat Newport High School 79-20, Jan. 23. Highlands’ top-scorer was Jesse Daley with 14 points. Newport’s top-scorer was Margaret Faison with three 3-pointers. • Villa Madonna Academy boys beat Silver Grove High School 61-43, Jan. 25. Silver Grove’s top-scorer was Travis Baumann with 11 points. • Bellevue High School girls beat Dayton High School 58-52, Jan. 26. Bellevue’s topscorer was Catherine Kessen with 25 points, including two three-pointers. Dayton’s topscorer was C.C. Centers with 14 points, including two three-pointers. • Villa Madonna Academy girls beat Silver Grove High School 55-32, Jan. 26. Silver Grove’s top-scorer was Payton Govan with 14 points, including two three-pointers. • Beechwood girls beat Newport High School 59-16, Jan. 26. Newport’s top-scorers were Margaret Faison and Maddy Wiedeman with four points each. • St. Henry High School girls beat Newport High School 62-19, Jan. 27. Newport’s top-scorer was Margaret Faison with 16 points, including one three-pointer. • Villa Madonna girls beat Dayton High School 70-37, Jan. 27. Dayton’s top-scorer was C.C. Centers with 12 points, including one threepointer.

This week in swimming

• Highlands High School boys finished fifth in the NKAC Swim and Dive Championships with a score of 137.5. Campbell County High School finished eighth with a score of 44.

Follow Northern Kentucky sports on Twitter twitter.com/crkysports

February 4, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@nky.com | 513-248-7573

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

N K Y. c o m

RECORDER

State title memorable finish for NewCath By James Weber jweber@nky.com

A week of fast starts turned into a memorable finish for the Newport Central Catholic girls’ basketball team. The Thoroughbreds thrashed Louisville Holy Cross, 56-40, in the championship game of the All “A” Classic state tournament Jan. 31 at Eastern Kentucky University in Richmond. NewCath, in the state tourney for the fourth straight year, won the title for the first time in school history. It was also the first girls’ title for any Ninth Region team (Bishop Brossart won in 1999 out of Region 10). Head coach Ron Dawn also led the NCC boys’ team to the All “A” state title in 2000. “It feels amazing, especially for the second time we’ve been to the final (2007),” senior forward Mariah Tabor said. “Our freshman year, we didn’t quite make it, but it feels awesome to win it this time.” This championship game started like the previous two games in the tournament as NCC rattled HC with its fullcourt pressure defense. NCC led 14-2 near the end of the first quarter. Junior guard Kiley Bartels scored the first four points on layups after sprinting past HC in transition. Sandfoss had two layups after picking the pocket of a Cougar player in the lane. Senior Mariah Tabor had two short baskets off set plays, and junior guard Brittany Fryer had one. “That was huge,” Dawn said. “I thought it was going

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport Central Catholic players celebrate at the end of the All "A" state final Jan. 31. to be a struggle the whole way. We got some easy shots off of our defense and we played well from that point on.” In the second quarter, junior guard Hannah Thiem, who had missed her first five three-point attempts, found her range. She made her first trey to give NCC a 22-6 lead, then hit another trey at the halftime buzzer to stake the Thoroughbreds to a 29-15 lead. “Coach Dawn just kept telling me to keep shooting; don’t worry about it,” Thiem said. “Keep your eye on the rim and they’ll eventually go in.” NewCath started the third quarter with a 12-4 run in the first two and a half minutes, fittingly by four different players, and

the Cougars never got closer than 14 points. Thiem led with 14 points including four treys. Tabor had 13, Fryer 12 and Bartels 10. Sandfoss, the tourney MVP, had seven points, eight assists and three steals. “It’s awesome, being a senior and being down here four years. You can’t ask for anything better,” Sandfoss said. “The memories we made. Last year we got caught in the ice storm and had no power in the hotel. This year we get to remember winning it.” Said Fryer: “We’ve all been around for so long. I’ve come down here every year, and every year we get more experience and we know how to handle it.”

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

NewCath junior Hannah Thiem shoots against Green County Jan. 29 during NCC’s quarterfinal win in the All “A” Classic state tournament.

NewCath junior Christine Ciafardini prepares to shoot a free throw against Green County Jan. 29 during NCC’s quarterfinal win in the All “A” Classic state tournament.

Thoroughbreds win with balance By James Weber jweber@nky.com

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

NewCath junior guard Brittany Fryer battles in the paint against Green County Jan. 29 during NCC’s quarterfinal win in the All “A” Classic state tournament.

District standings

Updated information on local district hoops races: 35th boys: Holmes 3-0, CovCath 1-1, Beechwood 0-2, Holy Cross 0-1. Feb. 2, Holy Cross at Beechwood, Feb. 5, CovCath at Holy Cross. 35th girls: Notre Dame 2-0, Holmes 2-1, Holy Cross 1-1, Beechwood 0-3. Feb. 4, Holy Cross at Notre Dame. 36th boys (unseeded, random draw tourney): Newport 2-1, Dayton 2-1, Highlands 1-1, NewCath 1-1 Bellevue 0-2. 36th girls (unseeded, random draw tourney): NewCath 2-0, Dayton 3-2, Bellevue 2-1, Highlands 1-1, Newport 0-4. Feb. 9, NewCath at Newport. 37th boys: Brossart 4-0, Scott 3-1, Campbell 2-2, Silver Grove 03, Calvary 0-3. Feb. 12, Silver Grove at Calvary. 37th girls: Brossart 3-1, Scott 2-1, Campbell County 3-1, Calvary 1-3, Silver Grove 0-3. Feb. 12, Calvary at Silver Grove. NKAC D-III boys: Dayton 8-0, Beechwood 7-1, VMA 6-2. Feb. 9, VMA at Beechwood; Feb. 11, Dayton at VMA; Feb. 19, Beechwood at Dayton. NKAC D-III girls: VMA 7-0, Beechwood 6-1, Dayton and Bellevue 4-3. Feb. 8, Beechwood at VMA. NKAC D-II boys: Brossart 3-0, NewCath 2-1, Newport 2-1, Highlands 2-2. NKAC D-II girls: NewCath 3-0, Highlands 3-1. NKAC D-I boys: Boone Co. 6-0. NKAC D-I girls: Boone 5-0, Ryle 5-0, Simon Kenton 4-2, Campbell County 2-2.

As NewCath now focuses on its goal of playing in the postseason state tournament, the experience from this state tourney should help. “It’s a big difference,” said NCC head coach Ron Dawn. “It’s the whole experience of knowing how to deal with this whole situation. They get back to the hotel, they’re where they’re supposed to be. They’re in their rooms. We don’t have to worry about what they’re going to do.” The team, with three seniors and six juniors, showed its offensive balance in the tournament. Senior forward Mariah Tabor was the team’s leading scorer in the tourney, averaging 13 points and 6.5 rebounds. Junior Hannah Thiem averaged 11.8 points per game, and junior Kiley Bartels 10.3. Senior guard Courtney Sandfoss had 9.3 points, 6.5 assists and 5.3 steals in the tourney. Brittany Fryer averages 8.3 points and 5.3 steals, including eight steals against Green County. “It shows that we can do it and play like a team,” Sandfoss said. “All of us contributed. You can’t stop one of us, you have to stop all five plus our bench. It’s just from practicing against

each other and that pays off.” The Thoroughbreds forced 27 turnovers per game in the four games of the All “A” Tournament. The team played full-court pressure for four games in five days and never missed a beat. “Our practices every day are like this, so we don’t get tired that much. We’re used to it,” Fryer said. “It’s been a lot of work.” Fryer enjoys playing defense. “I just run towards the ball and try to do whatever I can to get the ball,” she said. “Coach Dawn always preaches deflecting passes. Just try to get the ball.” Senior Trisha Taylor barely played in the tourney after injuring an ankle last week. “It was frustrating, but I’ll just keep working and hopefully get back in there soon,” she said. “It’s really awesome to be a part of it and be on the team every day.” NewCath students called for her to enter the final late in the game, and Taylor got on the floor in the final minute.

Next year

The All “A” state tournament will stay in Richmond at least through the 2013 tournament. Northern Kentuckian Stan Steidel, the

JAMES WEBER/STAFF

Newport Central Catholic junior Kiley Bartels scores the opening basket of the All “A” state final Jan. 31. head of the tournament, announced Sunday, Jan. 31, that the city of Richmond agreed to a new three-year contract. There was concern that Richmond, which has hosted the last 19 tourneys, would not bid to keep the tournament because of financial problems in the city. But both sides were able to work out an agreement. Corbin, Pikeville and Frankfort also put in bids for the state tourney.


Sports & recreation

CCF Recorder

February 4, 2010

A9

Camels fall to Pandas

Taylor Griffen of Campbell County tries to get past Chandler Clark of Notre Dame during the Camels’ 57-34 loss Jan. 28 in Park Hills in an NKAC Division I game.

PROVIDED

The Brossart boys’ basketball team with its All “A” 10th Region championship trophy Jan. 23 in Paris.

MATT BECK/ CONTRIBUTOR

Mustangs bow in first round

The Bishop Brossart boys’ basketball team lost in the first round of the All “A” Classic state tournament Jan. 28 in Richmond. Brossart fell to Hazard 63-60. Senior Jacob Rieger led Brossart with 27 points. Jordan Armstrong had 11 points and Justin Saunders, 10.

Laptops from

TIM WEBB/CONTRIBUTOR

Brossart’s Jacob Rieger draws a foul during Brossart’s opening-round loss to Hazard Jan. 28.

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The Newport boys’ basketball team lost in the first round of the All “A” Classic state tournament Jan. 28 in Richmond. Newport fell to DeSales 60-57. Casey McDaniel led Newport with 22 points. Travis Jones had 11 and DaMarkco Foster, 10.

Newport’s DaMarkco Foster drives the baseline against DeSales’ Derek Thornsberry, during the opening round of the All “A” Classic Jan. 28.

Team: Dixie 205, Scott 191, Highlands 169, Beechwood 149, Covington Latin 122, Covington Catholic 111, Ryle 93, Campbell County 81, Boone County 79, Conner 69, St. Henry 67, Simon Kenton 18, Villa Madonna 9. 200 medley relay: Dixie 1:49.40, Scott 1:49.83, Beechwood 1:52.25. 200 free: Cole Garriott (Dixie) 1:52.43, Conner Downard (Highlands), 1:52.48, Stephen McMurtry (Covington Latin) 2:01.15. 200 IM: Tyler Groneck (Scott) 2:03.07, Spencer Franzoi (Dixie) 2:06.20, Hide Seki (Ryle) 2:19.34. 50 free: John Eubanks (Beechwood) 22.82, Ethan Reynolds (Scott) 23.31, Phillip Englert (Highlands) 23.35. Diving: Logan Stevens (Scott) 280.30, Bailey Harrison (Dixie) 266.85, Justin Youtsey (Beechwood) 255.35. 100 butterfly: Norman Klein (Dixie) 54.38, John Eubanks (Beechwood) 55.08, Phillip Englert (Highlands) 56.56. 100 free: Ethan Reynolds (Scott) 52.75, Evan Dulaney (Dixie) 56.16, Zak Koeninger (Campbell) 57.64. 500 free: Cole Garriott (Dixie) 4:57.92, Tom Bailie (Ryle) 5:34.65, Mayson Hurtt (Highlands) 5:47.96. 200 free relay: Cov. Latin 1:40.62, Highlands 1:42.09, Scott 1:42.13. 100 back: Conner Downard (Highlands) 58.02, Brian Baxter (CovCath) 59.83, Christopher Schoettker (Dixie) 1:08.03. 100 breaststroke: Tyler Groneck (Scott) 1:02.77, Spencer Franzoi (Dixie) 1:04.94, David O’Hare (Beechwood) 1:11.66. 400 free relay: Dixie 3:35.44, Scott 3:41.13, Beechwood 3:42.52.

Girls

Team: Notre Dame 226, Ryle 154, Highlands 149, Campbell County 134, Dixie 125, Beechwood 106, St. Henry 103, Scott 97, Boone County 82, Conner 49, Simon Kenton 43, Covington Latin 42, Holmes 12, Villa Madonna 5. 200 medley relay: NDA 1:57.14, Beechwood 2:00.54, Highlands 2:05.28. 200 free: Caitlyn Forman (NDA)

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55.42, Sarah West (Campbell) 1:00.38, Katie Mauntel (St. Henry) 1:04.63. 500 free: Melissa Thurman (Beechwood) 5:22.71, Hiromi Holt (NDA) 5:30.05, Katie Eichinger (Ryle) 5:34.77. 200 free relay: NDA 1:47.27, STH 1:52.88, Ryle 1:54.23. 100 backstroke: Krissie Brandenburg (Beechwood) 59.47, Tully Bradford (NDA) 1:08.43, Ashley Schenck (St. Henry) 1:09.99. 100 breaststroke: Ellen Williamson (NDA) 1:09.72, Melissa Thurman (Beechwood) 1:10.97, Samantha Kalany (Boone) 1:20.33. 400 free relay: NDA 3:50.83, Ryle 4:08.90, Dixie 4:24.18.

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The Region 4 swimming and diving competition will take place Feb. 3-6 at Scott High School. In swimming, Region 4 comprises all of Northern Kentucky plus several counties to the south and east. Under state rules, a swimmer can participate in a maximum of four events, including no more than two individual races. Boys’ preliminary heats take place 5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 3. Girls’ preliminaries are at 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 4. The diving competition will take place in its entirety Friday, Feb. 5, starting at 4:30 p.m. with the girls’ meet. The swimming finals commence 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 6. There will be 24 spots in the state meet for each event. The top two finishers in each event at the regional meet will qualify, plus the next 14 fastest times/diving scores from among the five regions. The state meet will be Feb. 12-13 at the University of Louisville. Local swimmers warmed up for the regionals with the Gold Medal Meet Jan. 27 at Scott. In the meet format, a team could only enter one swimmer or relay per event. Dixie Heights won the boys’ meet and Notre Dame the girls contest.

Boys

1:59.83, Gracie Lynne (Highlands) 2:10.42, Alyssa Farris (Conner) 2:19.31. 200 IM; Mary Bank (Ryle) 2:13.10, Natalie Lawson (NDA) 2:25.54, Rebecca Freihofer (St. Henry) 2:27.65. 50 free: Tully Bradford (NDA) 26.48, Stephanie Sherman (Conner) 26.84, Natalie Schultz (Highlands) 26.92. Diving: Carly Hill (Highlands) 234.45, Kelsea Trickel (Ryle) 179.40, Bridget Fallis (Scott) 174.55. 100 butterfly: Ellen Williamson (NDA) 58.18, Krissie Brandenburg (Beechwood) 58.78, Mary Bank (Ryle) 1:00.98. 100 free: Mackenzie Margroum (NDA)

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A10

Campbell County Recorder

February 4, 2010

Dying in Kentucky without a will Clients often ask about what happens to their property and their minor children in Kentucky if they die without having a will. In this article I will briefly discuss how property passes under Kentucky law if someone dies without a will and who would raise the children and handle their funds if a guardian is not appointed in the will. Under Kentucky law, if a person dies without a will, a surviving spouse is first of all entitled to onehalf of all real property and onehalf of all personal property owned by the decedent after payment of all bills and expenses. The remaining one-half that does not pass to a surviving spouse would pass first of all to surviving children and grandchildren, if none, then to surviving parents, if none, then to surviving brothers and sisters and their children and finally if there are none of the above, then the remaining one-half of all land and personal property would pass to the surviving spouse. If a person dies without a will and there are no surviving children, grandchildren, parents, brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, or spouse, then the property would pass to grandparents, then aunts, uncles and cousins, and then on down the line to more distant relatives. Property would only go to the State of Kentucky if no relatives whatsoever can be found. A somewhat related issue is whether one spouse can completely cut out the other spouse from a will and leave everything to the children or others. This might very well be attempted in a second marriage where someone might want to leave all their property to their children by their first marriage rather than their second spouse. Under Kentucky law, a surviving spouse has the right to renounce the provisions of the will of the deceased spouse and take a one-third share of any real estate

CH@TROOM Last week’s question

For which team will you root in the Super Bowl? Why?

“Indianapolis, because I am from Indiana and they are my favorite team.” K.P. “The Saints. I always root for the underdog.” J.H. “I will be rooting for the Colts because I like the image Peyton Manning portrays.” A.H. “The Colts are my team of choice to win the Super Bowl. I enjoy Peyton Manning’s style and leadership. I also like this franchise and the way they conduct themselves. I mostly hope the game is close and interesting.” G.G. “I will root for Indianapolis

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N K Y. c o m

Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053

James A. Daley Community Recorder guest columnist

owned by the deceased spouse and a one-half share of all personal property owned by the deceased spouse. It should be noted that the above discussion and provisions apply only to property owned individually by the deceased person and not to jointly owned property that is held in survivorship. Most couples have all of their real estate, bank accounts, etc., jointly in both names with the right of survivorship. All such property would pass directly to the surviving spouse regardless of whether or not there was a will. Also, the provisions of a Last Will and Testament or the above noted rules about how property passes without a will would not apply to any situation where there is a designated beneficiary of the property such as with life insurance proceeds or retirement benefits. Although the discussions above have dealt just with the passing of property without a will, a much more important reason for having a will is to designate who will raise minor children and who will handle the property of the minor children. A court will generally appoint the guardian to raise the children and the guardian or trustee to handle their property as has been requested in the Last Will and Testament. If no one has been designated in a will, then the court would appoint whoever would apply to the court to be appointed as guardian and/or trustee for the minor children. That person may or may not be someone you would have liked or approved of. I hope this information is interesting and helpful. If you have any topics you would like to have covered in this column, please mail to me at 331 York Street, Newport, Kentucky 41071 or fax to me at 491-5932 or e-mail our office at jadcca@fuse.net. James A. Daley is the Campbell County Attorney.

Next question: What is the best thing the president and Congress can do to reduce unemployment? Send your response to kynews@communitypress.com with “chatroom” in the subject line. because I like Peyton Manning’s commercials and oh yeah, he throws the football like it was meant to be thrown!” K.K. “Go, Saints, for lots of reasons. The main one? We’ve owned four St. Bernards.” M.S. “Early in the game I thought New Orleans defensive players were purposely taking penalties for roughing the passer to intentionally injure Bret Favre (coaching decision?). Even injured, Favre had them beat. Peyton Manning will have a field day. I’ll root for Indy, but really against New Orleans.” W.H.

COUNTY RECORDER

RECORDER

Congress should go back to drawing board on health care The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce applauds the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives for debating an issue Kentucky businesses and the families they employ continue to struggle with – the rapidly rising cost of health insurance premiums. U.S. businesses voluntarily pay more than $500 billion to provide health insurance to more than 170 million Americans every year. That cost has escalated for more than a decade, increasing at a rate that is significantly higher than the rate of inflation. The chamber has long advocated for reforms that would have a meaningful impact upon reducing costs. Unfortunately, the competing bills passed in the House and the Senate fail to take any meaningful steps to get cost under control and will likely add to the rate of medical cost for virtually all Americans who have health insurance today. If either version of the bill becomes law, this burden will impact employers and employees at a time when businesses and working families can least afford it. There are numerous strategies that have widespread business support and which would have an immediate and significant impact in reducing medical cost. Some of the most notable strategies the chamber supports include enacting meaningful tort reform, wellness and prevention initiatives, administrative simplification, cost incentives encouraging further use of health information technology and further access to consumerdriven health plans and tools. These and numerous other market-based strategies would maintain our current free-market system while creating efficiencies, slowing the rate of premium increase for those with insurance today, and reducing the number of

Gary Beatrice Community Recorder guest columnist

uninsureds. Perhaps most alarming are the unintended consequences of the bills, consequences that are not unusual when government overextends itself into the private sector. One of the most noteworthy unintended consequences is that either bill would serve to significantly raise premiums for those who have been most in need of health care reform: small employers and their families. Actuaries from WellPoint analyzed the impact of changes in pricing methodology and the taxes and charges mandated by reform. They determined that small businesses in Kentucky would pay, on average, 22 percent more for the same coverage with those employees who were particularly young and healthy paying as much as twice what they pay today. Kentuckians who purchase health insurance in the individual market can expect to see an average increase of 122 percent with the younger and the healthier seeing their premiums triple. And this study does not factor in medical trends or changes in health care consumption patterns due to modified features of medical plans, which will exacerbate the premium increases even further. The current health care reform proposal also significantly affects Medicaid spending in Kentucky. A recent study by the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce shows that while 77 percent of Medicaid funding comes from the federal government, the remainder comes from the general fund. Kentucky’s expenditures from the general fund have increased 33 percent since 2000 while the state’s increase in appropriations to Medicaid has increased 67 percent

About guest columns

We welcome guest columns on all sides of an issue; however, potential columnists should reserve space in advance with Editor Michelle Shaw by calling 578-1053. Include with your column your name, address, daytime telephone number, and a two-to-three line biography outlining your expertise related to this topic. Either include a color headshot of yourself, or make arrangements when you call to have your photo taken here. We reserve the right to edit for length, accuracy and clarity. Columns may be no more than 500 words. Deadline: Noon Friday for next Thursday’s issue. E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. over the same amount of time. The current reform proposal calls for an unfunded expansion of programs like Medicaid that already are burdening states and adding to their massive budgets. Ultimately, this unfunded expansion will add further cost to all Kentuckians. While the goals of our federal health care reform debate are laudable, the massive and virtually unprecedented governmental intrusion into the employer-based benefit system and health insurance industry is directly counter to the basic tenants of free enterprise on which this nation was founded and fails to achieve its purpose. Our nation needs to create an environment that is conducive for businesses to retain and hire employees and this version of health reform will only exacerbate America’s economic problems. Gary Beatrice is president of Business Benefits and Chair of the Board of the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce.

Swine flu response commendable In times of crisis, a community’s true colors shine. In the case of Northern Kentucky during the swine flu vaccination effort this fall, those colors were golden. The task of providing the swine flu vaccine was – and still is – enormous, and beyond the scope of any that we’ve faced before. But, through the combined efforts of the Health Department staff and board, community volunteers, medical providers, partner agencies and the public, we’ve been able to get more than 100,000 doses of vaccine in Northern Kentucky, with additional vaccine still available. This effort would not have been possible without the time, dedication and willingness of people to deliver a necessary community service. The Health Department staff has been tremendous in their efforts, working weekends, evenings and holidays to meet the needs of our community. Opening a flu clinic is no small task, and it’s one that our staff and volunteers have now perfected, doing it 32 times. To successfully operate a clinic, we needed materials, such as bandages, syringes, pens, staplers, tables, chairs – and let’s not forget the stickers for the children. But, a successful clinic is more than just having the pieces in place – it’s the people. Each staff

member and volunteer was given a role, and they all performed them admirably. Besides the nurses who actually administered the shot or nasal Steven spray, we had Katkowsky, staff and volunM.D. teers who greeted, filled out paperCommunity work, screened Recorder for allergies, guest restocked supcolumnist plies, and – one that was vital – made sure the lines of people flowed from station-to-station. We could not have done it alone, though. Our community partners – the emergency management agencies, first responders, school systems, Northern Kentucky University, TANK and local businesses – have been supportive and given their resources to ensure success for the community. In addition, we’ve been fortunate for the services of our Medical Reserve Corps, who volunteered their time and expertise to help staff the flu clinics. Seventyfour volunteers worked one or more flu clinics, supplementing the health department staff. I also appreciate the support from our medical providers. Their efforts have led to the vaccination

A publication of Your Community Recorder newspaper serving all of Campbell County

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

Campbell County Editor . . . . . .Michelle Shaw smhaw@nky.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-1053

of almost 70,000 people. Local providers worked diligently to administer the vaccine to those in need and to offer education and information. The Northern Kentucky District Board of Health was supportive of our work, with some members even taking an active role by volunteering at a vaccination clinic. Finally, I want to thank those who received the vaccine for being patient waiting in lines, for making efforts to rearrange schedules to attend a clinic, and for taking the time to protect yourself and your family from this dangerous and unpredictable virus. While it is important to reflect on the success of our flu vaccination efforts thus far, we must realize that the threat of the disease is not over. Less than one-third of our population has received the vaccine to date. If you haven’t received it yet, consider getting the vaccine. Supplies are readily available from the health department and from local medical providers. To those who played a role in our response to the swine flu pandemic, I thank you. Everyone performed in an efficient and hardworking manner during the emergency response. I am honored to have been a part of this incredible effort. Dr. Steven R. Katkowsky is district director of health of the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

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A WORLD OF DIFFERENT VOICES

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 283-7285 | 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 | 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 | e-mail kynews@NKY.com | Web site: www.NKY.com


Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

T h u r s d a y, F e b r u a r y

RECORDER

4, 2010

PEOPLE

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IDEAS

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RECIPES

MY FAVORITE TEACHER

CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Elley Claybern, left, 10, with her fifth-grade teacher Peggy Herald.

Teacher’s caring inspires student group of students known as Service Learning Ambassadors including Claybern in multiple charitable collections year-round. Herald said caring has always been important to her, and she wants the students to learn that lesson too. “We need to, it’s a global community,” she said. “They need to know that it’s going to take the world to help the world,” Herald said. Claybern’s mother, Jennifer, said Elley is in her second year as a service ambassador and loves it. “I would like to nominate both Elley and Mrs. Herald for caring for their community, because without a teacher like Mrs. Herald, my daughter would not have the chance to show how much she cares,” said Jennifer Claybern in an e-mail. Chris Mayhew/Staff

THINGS TO DO Film festival

The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center will host Cincinnati World Cinema’s Lunafest Film Festival Feb. 9-10 at 7:30 p.m. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. each night. The festival will feature 10 short films that were chosen from 800 submissions. Tickets are $10 at the door and $8 in advance. Part of the proceeds will benefit the Breast Cancer Fund. The Carnegie is located at 1028 Scott Blvd. in Covington. For more information, call 781-8151 or visit www.cincyworldcinema.org.

friendly event including Tastefully Simple, Premier Designs Jewelry, Sonoma Crafts, Avon and the Kim Anderson Collection. The event benefits the Pet Castle Animal Rescue. Spa 4 Paws is located off Mall Road at 8075 Connector Drive in Florence. For more information, call 525-PAWS.

My furry valentine

Laugh on the Levee

Have your dog pose for their Valentine’s Day photos during the “Paws 4 Luv Bazaar” from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 7 at Spa 4 Paws in Florence. A professional photographer from Abby Lane Photos will be at the event. There will be other vendors at this pet-

The Funny Bone at Newport on the Levee will feature comedians John Witherspoon and Alex Reymundo this week. Witherspoon will perform Feb. 5-6 and Reymundo will perform Feb. 11-14. For tickets and information, call 957-2000 or visit www. funnyboneonthelevee.com.

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LIFE

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Audrey Archer, an employee of the Kentucky Haus Artisan Center in Newport is the resident tea aficionado, and drinks hot tea daily.

Relaxing with a cup of hot tea By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Whether serving hot tea for a cozy respite for one or something more formal, indulging in the warm beverage is a break from the day. Whether as an alternative to coffee, or as a break from the day, tea time can be anytime. Throughout January, the Kentucky Haus Artisan Center in Newport offered tastings of Perryville, Ky. Elmwood Inn’ loose-leaf teas with a side of scones and other treats. Peggie Brunyate, shop manager, said the store carries Elmwood Inn tea, teapots and handmade cloth tea cozies and a range of books from what kind of food pairs with each type of tea and tea etiquette to books about Celtic teas and children’s books about tea. “People are really starting to drink teas,” Bunyate said. Amy Ast of Columbus, and formerly of Fort Thomas, visited the store Jan. 30 and tasted the Kentucky Blend, a black tea from Elmwood Inn. “I like chai tea and peppermint tea the most,” she said. Hot tea is usually something for the evenings four or five times a week, and it’s a good way to relax, she said. She doesn’t drink loose-leaf tea, but uses tea bags instead.

BUSINESS

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CHRIS MAYHEW/STAFF

Teapots with built-in tea infusers are kept warm by candlelight from below during a Jan. 30 tea tasting at the Kentucky Haus Artisan Center in Newport.

Upcoming events In February, the Kentucky Haus Artisan Center, 411 East 10th St., Newport, will have Valentine’s theme for lovers of chocolate and foods made with bourbon tastings each weekend. There will also be a special “Angel Card Reading,” a not-soserious spiritual card reading event, at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 27, said Bev Holiday, the shop’s owner. Audrey Archer of Covington, a part-time worker at the Kentucky Haus, is the resident tea aficionado. “The purists always have loose tea,” Archer said. For loose tea, an infuser is needed, and it’s a balance of how much water is put in to determine how strong or light the tea is, she said. Black teas are typically more full-bodied, while

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green and chai teas are typically lighter, Archer said. “I like the Earl Gray because it has a little licorice taste to it,” she said. Tea time has traditionally been observed at about 4 p.m. in Britain, and it’s served with sweets and savories like finger sandwiches, Archer said. But Archer said there is no requirement to be formal

when drinking tea. Archer said she drinks tea all day. She’s been drinking tea her entire life, in part because she’s allergic to coffee. Donald W. Drewry of Highland Heights stopped into the store Jan. 30 and tasted a blueberry tea made by Elmwood Inn. Drewry said he drinks loose tea all the time, a tradition he’s observed since growing up. Drewry said he typically drinks Earl Gray, flavored and herbal teas year-round. “It’s kind of soothing, and it doesn’t’ make me hyper like coffee,” he said. Drewry said he also drinks coffee regularly, and tea is a good alternative.

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Grant’s Lick Elementary School teacher Peggy Herald’s lessons about caring inspired Elley Claybern, 10, to give up six weeks of her allowance to buy water for Haiti earthquake relief. Claybern, a fifth-grader, said with the about $15 to $20 a week in allowance money and help from her grandparents, she was able to buy an entire skid of water bottles for about $120 to send to Haiti as part of the school “Water Warriors” program organized by Herald. Claybern said she typically uses her allowance for clothing or video games, and she wanted to help children in Haiti. “I’m very proud of Elley, and she has done an admirable thing, and she is a role model Cardinal,” said Herald in a reference to the school’s red bird mascot. Herald leads a volunteer


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CCF Recorder

February 4, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD F R I D A Y, F E B . 5

ART & CRAFT CLASSES The Great American Aran Afghan Knit Along, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Knit On, 735 Monmouth St. Squares feature variety of stitches from basic cables to more challenging designs. For advanced beginner to advanced knitters. Family friendly. $210 for 21 sessions in advance; $12 per session, plus materials. Registration required. 291-5648. Newport.

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

SPECIAL EVENTS

Home and Remodeling Showcase, 4 p.m.9 p.m. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd. Theme: Think Globally, Act Locally. Everything you need to build, remodel and update your home. From kitchens, bathrooms, sunrooms and custom remodeling to windows, siding, roofing and doors. Includes seminars on how to be more energy conscious at work and at home, locally grown food products, sustainable resources and more. $10, free ages 12 and under. 250-5854; www.homeproductexpo.com. Covington.

SPORTS

Winter/Spring Meet, 5:30 p.m. $1 draft beer, hot dogs, games and prizes. Doghouse performs. Turfway Park, 7500 Turfway Road, Free, except March 27. Through March 28. 371-0200; www.turfway.com. Florence.

A New Year of Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd. Works by Jommi Chung, Marc Leone, Christopher John Troutman, Scott Donaldson, Cedric Michael Cox and Matt Tullis. 957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

ART EXHIBITS Interior Views, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sandra Small Gallery, Free. 291-2345; www.sandrasmallgallery.com. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

MUSEUMS

Days Of The New, 7:30 p.m. Mad Hatter, 620 Scott Blvd. With Callloused. $12, $10 advance. 291-2233. Covington.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Midnight Rain, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 12200 Madison Pike, 356-1440. Independence.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St. Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

John Witherspoon, 8 p.m. $22. Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, Ages 21 and up. 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

A Bad Year for Tomatoes, 8 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Campbell County High School, 909 Camel Crossing, Auditorium. Comedy about famous television actress who tries to “get away from it all” in small New England town. $7. Reservations recommended. Presented by Campbell County High School Drama. Through Feb. 7. 635-4161, ext. 1146; www.showtix4u.com. Alexandria.

S A T U R D A Y, F E B . 6

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Exhibit explores world of archaeology through photography, dig-site information and hands-on activities including actual staged indoor dig for all ages. Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

MUSIC - CONCERTS

RJD2, 9:30 p.m. With Kenan Bell and Happy Chichester. Doors open at 8:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. $20, $17 advance. 431-2201. Newport.

MUSIC - COUNTRY

Midnight Rain, 10 p.m. Peecox II, 356-1440. Independence. Matt Woods, 9:30 p.m. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. Juney’s Lounge. With The Rubber Knife Gang. Ages 21 and up. Free. 4312201. Newport.

MUSIC - JAZZ

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m. Dee Felice Cafe, 261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Shadowbox After Dark, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, Newport on the Levee, Comedy sketches and music by BillWho? Dedicated to love, relationships and all the fun between the sheets. $30; $20 students, seniors and active military. Reservations required. Through March 13. 581-7625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport. Exhibit This! - The Museum Comedies, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St. Seven comedic plays and six monologues based on works at Metropolitan Museum of Art. $12, $10 seniors and students. Presented by Wyoming Players. Through Feb. 6. 513-588-4910. Newport.

RECREATION

Family Fun Night, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Includes Valentine’s Day craft. Town and Country Sports and Health Club, 1018 Town Drive, Family-organized games, optional crafts, Aeroball, rock climbing, Wii Sports, sports wall and swimming. Family friendly. $5 per family. Reservations required. 442-5800; www.towncountrysports.com. Wilder.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com. Exhibit This! - The Museum Comedies, 8 p.m. Monmouth Theatre, $12, $10 seniors and students. 513-588-4910. Newport.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Polar Bear Plunge, 11 a.m. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Riverwalk Plaza. Registration begins 9 a.m. Post Plunge Bash follows at Jefferson Hall. Benefits Special Olympics of Kentucky and Ohio. Free for spectators; $50 minimum for plungers. Registration required. 800-633-7403; www.soky.org. Newport. Home and Remodeling Showcase, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, $10, free ages 12 and under. 2505854; www.homeproductexpo.com. Covington.

SPORTS

Winter/Spring Meet, 1:10 p.m. $50,000 Likely Exchange Stakes. Turfway Park, Free, except March 27. 371-0200; www.turfway.com. Florence. S U N D A Y, F E B . 7

MUSEUMS

History Unearthed: Archaeology Speaks, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission: $7, $6 ages 60 and up, $4 ages 3-17, free for members and ages 2 and under. 491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

A Bad Year for Tomatoes, 2 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Campbell County High School, $7. Reservations recommended. 635-4161, ext. 1146; www.showtix4u.com. Alexandria.

SHOPPING

Paws 4 Luv Bazaar, 2 p.m.-5 p.m. Spa 4 Paws Dog Grooming Salon, 8075 Connector Drive, Vendors display gift ideas. Benefits Pet Castle Animal Rescue. Free. Vendors must reserve table, e-mail hozeska4@yahoo.com. 803-8428; www.nkychristiananimalrescue.com. Florence.

SPECIAL EVENTS Mendoza

MUSIC - WORLD

Javier Mendoza, 8 p.m. Leapin Lizard Gallery, 726 Main St. With singer-songwriter Jason Wilber. Includes complimentary drink. $15. 689-1560; www.javiermendoza.com. Covington.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

John Witherspoon, 7:30 p.m. $25. Funny Bone Comedy Club, 957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

ON STAGE - STUDENT THEATER

Home and Remodeling Showcase, noon-5 p.m. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, $10, free ages 12 and under. 250-5854; www.homeproductexpo.com. Covington.

SPORTS

Winter/Spring Meet, 1:10 p.m. Turfway Park, Free, except March 27. 371-0200; www.turfway.com. Florence. M O N D A Y, F E B . 8

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

A New Year of Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

A Bad Year for Tomatoes, 8 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Campbell County High School, $7. Reservations recommended. 635-4161, ext. 1146; www.showtix4u.com. Alexandria.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

ON STAGE - THEATER

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Shadowbox After Dark, 7:30 p.m. Shadowbox Cabaret, $30; $20 students, seniors and active military. Reservations required. 5817625; www.shadowboxcabaret.com. Newport.

Open Mic, 9 p.m. With Mike Kuntz. Southgate House, 24 E. Third St. 431-2201. Newport.

Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

Cincinnati World Cinema presents LunaFest Film Festival, 10 award-winning short films about women, made by women, from around the world, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 9-10, at the Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for socializing and a cash bar, hosted by Women Writing for (a) Change and including a book signing by founder Mary Pierce Brosmer of “A Guide for Creative Transformation.” Post-film discussion by Sara Mahle Drabik of Ft. Thomas, filmmaker and educator at Northern Kentucky University and Kristen Erwin, executive director of the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Film Commission. Tickets $10, $8 advance, students, ETA and WVXU Perks members. Part of the proceeds benefit the Breast Cancer Fund. For advance tickets, visit www.cincyworldcinema.org. Call 781-8151. Pictured is a still from the American film, “The Kinda Sutra,” by director Jessica Yu. Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Stories, songs and activities. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs and activities. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Tot Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Short stories, games, dancing and baby signing. Ages 18 months-2 1/2 years. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring.

ON STAGE - COMEDY

Fireplace Comedy, 8 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Bean Haus, 640 Main St. Open-mic night for area comedians. Free. 431-2326; www.beanhaus.com. Covington. T U E S D A Y, F E B . 9

ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

A New Year of Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

COMMUNITY DANCE

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ART CENTERS & ART MUSEUMS

A New Year of Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

FASHION SHOWS

Veils & Cocktails Bridal Event, 6:30 p.m. The Madison Event Center, 700 Madison Ave. Hors d’oeuvres, martini ice bar, bridal fashion show and two floors of the area’s local wedding retailers. $10. 291-3300. Covington.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

Line Dancing, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co. Through Dec. 28. 727-0904. Fort Wright.

Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Shimmers, 426-0490. Fort Wright. Karaoke, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Willie’s Sports Cafe Covington, 401 Crescent Ave. With $1 Budweiser longnecks and half-price select appetizers from 10 p.m.-midnight. Free. 5811500. Covington.

KARAOKE AND OPEN MIC

LITERARY - CRAFTS

Karaoke, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Shimmers, 1939 Dixie Highway, 426-0490. Fort Wright.

Play Art, 4 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 11 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, Free. Registration required. 572-5033. Fort Thomas. Toddler Story Time, 9:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 10 a.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 781-6166. Cold Spring. Lap Time, 9:30 a.m. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Quiet rhymes, bounces, lullabies and books with your baby. Ages birth to walkers. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5033. Fort Thomas.

MUSIC - BLUES

Ricky Nye, 7:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Chez Nora, 530 Main St. Free. 491-8027. Covington. Original Wed Blues Jam, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave. Hosted by Dick and the Roadmasters award winning blues band. Burgers & Blues Dinner starts 6 p.m. 261-1029; www.mahoganyslive.com. Latonia.

LITERARY - BOOK CLUBS

Book Club, 11 a.m. “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Teen and adult. New members welcome. Free. 781-6166. Cold Spring.

LITERARY - STORY TIMES

PROVIDED

“Cats” returns to Cincinnati for three performances at the Aronoff Center Friday and Saturday, Feb. 5-6 as a special presentation of Broadway Across America. With music by Andrew Lloyd Webber, “Cats” won seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical. Performances are at 8 p.m. and at 2 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $22.50-$57.50. Visit www.BroadwayAcrossAmerica.com/Cincinnati or call 800-982-2787. The musical is family friendly.

Toddler Story Time, 10 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 2-3. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Preschool Story Time, 1:30 p.m. Cold Spring Branch Library, 3920 Alexandria Pike, Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 7816166. Cold Spring. Preschool Story Time, 11 a.m. Fort ThomasCarrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave. Stories, songs, finger plays and craft. Ages 4-5. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 5725033. Fort Thomas. Pajama Story Time, 7 p.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Ages 3 and up. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport. Baby Time, 9:30 a.m. Newport Branch Library, 901 E. Sixth St. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Birth to age 2. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 572-5035. Newport.

PROVIDED

Parents can find the perfect summer camp for their kids at the Summer Adventure Camp Fair, held 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 7, at the Cincinnati Museum Center. There will be day camps, residential camps, arts and education programs and more from local and national representatives, as well as enrichment services and products and on-stage performances. The event is free. The school with the most students in attendance (sign-up sheets available) will when a pizza party. Visit cincinnatifamilymagazine.com or nkyfamily.com.


Life

February 4, 2010

Big events highlight best and worst of sports Are sports over-emphasized in our culture? Many a person today would offer a resounding “yes!” Extravagant salaries, greed, capricious owners, intended concussions or other injuries, arrogant athletes who see themselves as gods – so many factors suggest a “yes.” Professional sports seems too much about money, selfinterest, and celebrityhood for the participants – not local community representation, loyalty, inspiration of youth and love of the game. The good aspects of sports now usually seem to happen at the high school and college level. However, these observations are not intended as a blanket condemnation of sports. Athletics has great positive potential. A knife can be used for good or bad; by a thief to rob or by a surgeon to heal. Similarly, sports can accomplish

much good, or bad. The deciding factor is always us. On the negative side: sport zealots can foster undue competition and doanything-to-win attitude. “When I played pro football, I never set out to hurt anyone deliberately – unless it was, you know, important, like a league game or something,” said Dick Butkus. Joking or not, such an unhealthy attitude in order to win, cheating, drugs to enhance performance, etc., does no favor for sports, participants or fans. The thrill of winning is uplifting and celebrated. Winning at any cost is actually a personal defeat. In a much bigger picture of life, we often learn more from dealing with our honest defeats. Misplaced social attitudes can lead some athletes to believe their physical prowess makes them superior to fellow humans with tal-

ents in other areas of life such as art, music or other intellectual endeavors. Sports, for some, is almost a religion. Several sociologists have pointed out the powerful religious components in many public sports spectacles: special robes, music, and devotees costumes; adherence to prescribed rituals and chants; the vestal virgins of old cheering game participants and fans (fanatics); myopic coaches of young athletes setting practice sessions on Sunday mornings making adolescent athletes necessarily choose between practice sessions (more important) and church worship (less important); adoration bestowed on players convincing them and of their semidivine status, etc. On the positive side: great benefits come when sports are engaged in ethically and healthfully. The late Pope John Paul II

was an athlete in his youth. In later reflections on the topic he spoke of the benefits of sports: they contribute to the integral development of the human person; can be a training ground for life itself, demanding self-discipline, loyalty, courage, coping with failure and adversity, fostering humility, justice, learning to work with others and facing one’s fears and anxieties, etc. Late sportswriter Haywood Hale Broun believed that sports didn’t build character as much as they “revealed it” in a person. For us fans and our society, sports can serve as enter-

tainment, relaxation, help form community attitudes and involvement, and take our minds off the heavy routine of work. Psychologically, sports can serve healthfully as the ritualized expression and catharsis of aggression. This writer has participated in various sports throughout life and have found them a wonderful benefit of life in this world. Our present task to honor sports and pass them on to our young is to keep them healthy for body and soul, not a detriment. John Carmody writes: “Just as we can thank God for

CCF Recorder

B3

the light of our eyes and the air we breath … so we can thank God for the exercise that helps Father Lou us see the Guntzelman w o r l d m o r e Perspectives sharply and breath the air more deeply. The river that runs by me in the middle of my work-out is better focused than the river of thoughts I contemplate on a turnstool over multiple drinks.” Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@community press.com or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Paying with credit card allows for easier refunds

Howard Ain Hey Howard!

T h e contract t h e y signed g i v e s them three days in which to cancel, so they did both by email and

by fax. “We were told we’d get our refund in 15 working days, business days. But it didn’t happen,” Graff said. He repeatedly contacted the company by phone and e-mail. “Every day it was another excuse,” he said. “ ‘You’ll be getting it next week; you’ll be getting it next week.’ ” In an e-mail to the Graffs, the company wrote, “Thank you for your patience. Please rest assured your refund will be sent next week, no later.” But that e-mail was dated Dec. 30. Graff said he doesn’t know whether the company will ever return his money adding, “I doubt it, but at least I’d like to have it exposed.” The key thing to remem-

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ber is you don’t have to worry about the company returning your money. Just pay with a credit card and you can dispute the charge with your credit card company and get the money back that way. Under federal law, you can dispute a charge up to 60 days after getting your credit card statement. The Graffs have now filed a dispute, both over the phone and in writing, so they can get the money back from their credit card company since the vacation club failed to do so. Ohio law says a company must return your money within 10 business days after receiving your cancellation notice. The Graffs have now filed a complaint with the state attorney general’s office. Bottom line, always pay with a credit card – not a debit card or check – because that’s the only way you can dispute such a payment. Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

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What should you do if you sign up for something, cancel within three days as permitted, but still don’t get your money back? Unless you know your rights you may fall victim to those who keep your money even though they are not entitled to do so. Cleves resident Gary Graff and his wife, Diane, said this is what has happened to them. Back in November they answered an ad for a vacation club and went to a local hotel to hear the sales pitch. Gary said they already belong to two such clubs. “We went there and right away we told them of the ones we have, and I said it sounds alike. Things went on a little bit more and, of course, they keep trying to sell you,” he said. The Graffs signed up and paid nearly $3,000 for the membership with their credit card. “When we got home we started looking back at our programs we’ve used,” said Gary Graff. “We found out really they’ve got just about everything this has got, so why do we really want this?”

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*Annual percentage yield (APY) is accurate as of date of publication. 1.49% rate (1.50% APY) referenced in any of the following tiers is guaranteed for at least 90 days from the date of account opening then may change at any time as the Huntington Premier Plus Money Market Account (HPPMMA) is a variable rate account. Different rates apply to different balance tiers. Rates and corresponding APYs listed in the tiers that do not earn 1.49% rate (1.50% APY) are also variable and subject to change without notice even prior to the first 90 days. Initial minimum opening deposit required is $20,000.00 and must be new money to Huntington. The interest rate for balances $0.01-$19,999.99 is 0.00% (0.00% APY); the interest rate for the following balance tiers, $20,000.00 to $49,999.99, $50,000.00 to $99,999.99, and $100,000.00 to $2,000,000.99 is currently 1.49% rate (1.50% APY) and will apply for at least 90 days.This is our current standard rate for HPPMMA opened November 23, 2009 or later. Balances $2,000,001.00 to $999,999,999.99 do not qualify for the 1.49% rate (1.50% APY); current standard rate for that balance tier is 0.80% (0.80% APY) and subject to change at any time. After the first 90 (ninety) days, the rates in all tiers are not guaranteed and subject to change at any time. When your balance falls into a particular rate tier, your entire balance will earn the applicable rate in effect for that tier, i.e., if your balance reaches $2,000,001.00 or more, your entire balance will earn that lower rate. Balances below $20,000.00 are subject to a $20.00 per month maintenance fee. Interest is compounded and paid monthly. Limit one account per household. CHECKING ACCOUNT REQUIREMENT & CONDITIONS: Customer must also have, or open, a consumer checking account with a $1,500.00 balance which must have a common owner/signer in the same name(s) as the HPPMMA. Depending on your type of checking account, it may or may not be interest-bearing which will impact the overall return of your total funds on deposit. If checking account is not maintained, the HPPMMA will be converted to our Huntington Premier Money Market Account which has lower rates in all respective rate tiers and does not receive the 1.49% rate (1.50% APY) on any balance tier. APPLICABLE TO BOTH HPPMMA AND CHECKING ACCOUNTS: Fees may reduce earnings on the account. An Early Account Closing fee will apply to accounts closed within 180 days of opening. We reserve the right to limit acceptance of deposits greater than $100,000.00. Not valid with any other offer. FDIC insured up to applicable limits. Member FDIC. A®, Huntington® and A bank invested in people.® are federally registered service marks of Huntington Bancshares Incorporated. ©2010 Huntington Bancshares Incorporated. 0000380941


B4

CCF Recorder

Life

February 4, 2010

Super dishes to serve at a Super Bowl party The Colts or the Saints – who’s your favorite for the Super Bowl? I’m for the Colts, since Indy is closer than New Orleans. How about that for a scientific, educated opinion? My editor Lisa said she’s rooting for the Saints since Milford High School graduate Zach Strief is on the team. Truth be told, I’m not a huge football fan but I sure do like the party that accompanies Super Bowl Sunday. We always have a big crowd of friends and family. (And no, we don’t have a big flat screen TV). Everyone brings appetizers, husband Frank makes his Caesar salad to go along with take-out pizza, and I make homemade doughnuts. Here’s some easy and tasty appetizers either to make at home or to tote.

Big Boy pizza

I first tasted this when friend Bert Villing brought it to our Super Bowl party. It was gone in a matter of minutes.

Boboli thin crust pizza shell Frisch’s tartar sauce Dill pickle slices 1 pound ground beef, cooked and drained Shredded iceberg lettuce Shredded cheddar cheese Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Use about half the jar of tartar sauce and spread on crust. Layer ingredients in order given. Bake about 12 minutes.

Big Mac variation

My editor Lisa’s colleague, Sarah, doesn’t like tartar sauce. So the two of them came up with this – use Thousand Island dressing instead of tartar sauce for a “Big Mac” pizza.

Buddy Boy variation

Boboli thin crust pizza shell Frisch’s tartar sauce Shaved ham Sliced tomatoes Thin sliced dill pickles Mozzarella cheese Preheat oven to 375

dish and sprinkle onions, tomatoes jalapeños.

degrees (one reader bakes it at 450 degrees and just bakes it for less time). Spread about half a jar of tartar sauce over shell. Layer ingredients in order given. Bake about 12 minutes or so until cheese is melted.

with and

Stuffed mushrooms Monterey

24 mushroom caps, medium size 1 lb. sausage 8 oz. cream cheese 1 ⁄4 cup Monterey Jack cheese, shredded or bit more to taste Crushed red pepper flakes to taste – start with 1⁄4 teaspoon and go from there (opt.) Sprinkling of Parmesan cheese (about 1⁄4 cup or so)

Real Texas chile con queso

Awesome with multi-colored tortilla chips. 1 cup grated extra sharp cheddar 1 ⁄2 cup Velveeta, cut into pieces 1 ⁄2 cup whipping cream 2 tablespoons chopped yellow onion 2 tablespoons diced tomato 1 jalapeño, stemmed, seeded and diced Tortilla chips

Remove stems, pat dry. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cook sausage, drain and add cream cheese, Monterey Jack and pepper flakes. Mix. Place 1 heaping teaspoon into each mushroom cap. Put on sprayed cookie sheet, sprinkle with Parmesan, and bake 20 minutes. Let cool five minutes and serve.

Put cheddar and Velveeta into a nonstick pot or double boiler over low heat and heat until cheese mixture is nearly melted. Add cream and whisk constantly until hot and smooth. Pour into serving

Wheat-free gingerbread muffins

I’m embarrassed to say how long this has been in my files. (I just found it recently). Mary Pollock sent this in for Pat Landrum. Mary said, “Although these do not taste very good hot, you’ll be amazed at how wonderful the flavor is after an hour or so, so cool at least one hour before serving. These are also low-sodium.” 3

⁄4 cups brown rice flour or potato starch 1 ⁄2 teaspoon each: cinnamon, ground ginger 1 ⁄8 teaspoon ground cloves Yolks of 2 large eggs 2 tablespoons light molasses, not Blackstrap as that is too strong 1 ⁄2 teaspoon grated orange peel 2 tablespoons fresh orange juice Whites of 4 large eggs 2 tablespoons sugar 1 ⁄4 cup fresh lemon juice mixed with 2 tablespoons granulated sugar. Preheat oven to 400

degrees. Grease muffin Rita cups. M i x Heikenfeld rice flour Rita’s kitchen and spices in large bowl. Put yolks, molasses, orange peel and orange juice in small bowl; whisk with fork to mix. Add to dry ingredients and stir gently until well blended. Batter will be stiff and difficult to mix. Beat whites until soft peaks form. Beat in sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time until whites are thick and glossy. Stir about 1⁄4 of whites into rice flour batter to lighten it, then fold in remainder. Scoop into muffin tins and bake 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden brown and springy to the touch. Cool on rack 10 minutes. Brush tops with lemon juice mixture. Let cool at least one hour before serving. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. E-mail columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

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Community

February 4, 2010

CCF Recorder

B5

Home show set for Feb. 5-7 The Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky’s 37th annual Home & Remodeling Showcase takes place Feb. 5-7 at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center. The showcase will feature everything needed to build, remodel and update a home all in one place. Visitors will find money and energy saving ways to improve their home through the many displays and daily seminars with leading experts. New features include a

Ad Altare Dei Religious Award

Four members of Boy Scout Troop 86, sponsored by St. Joseph, Cold Spring recently received the Ad Altare Dei Religious Award. They studied the sacraments and performed community service based on applying the sacraments to their daily lives. Fr. Reinersman presented the emblems to them and recognized their hard work and dedication. Shown from left are: Jonathan Ehlman, Alex Weiglein, Tom Burns, and Andrew Callahan of Boy Scout Troop 86.

Green Street, a Designer Challenge with local celebrities and more than 120 different exhibits from kitchens, outdoor living, remodelers, windows and décor. The showcase will run 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 6 and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 7. Discount tickets are available at all Kroger stores or at the door for $10; children 12 and under are free. Parking is free at the Kenton County Garage with paid admission.

PROVIDED

‘Fans don’t let fans drive drunk’ driver before the party begins and leave your car keys at home. • Avoid drinking too much alcohol too fast. Pace yourself – eat enough food, take breaks and alternate with nonalcoholic drinks. • If you don’t have a designated driver, ask a sober friend for a ride home; call a cab, friend or family member to come and get

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you; or just stay where you are and sleep it off. • Use your community’s Sober Rides program. • Never let a friend get behind the wheel if you think they are impaired. Remember, Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk. • Always buckle up – it’s still your best defense against other impaired drivers.

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“Kickback” for Kicking Back In Madison Indiana

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Super Bowl party: • Remember, you can be held liable and prosecuted if someone you served ends up in an impaired-driving crash. • Make sure all of your guests designate their sober drivers in advance, or help arrange ride-sharing with other sober drivers. • Serve lots of food and include lots of nonalcoholic beverages at the party. • Stop serving alcohol at the end of the third quarter of the game and begin serving coffee and dessert. • Keep the numbers for local cab companies handy and take the keys away from anyone who is thinking of driving while impaired. If you are attending a Super Bowl party or watching at a bar or restaurant: • Designate your sober

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The Kentucky Office of Highway Safety announced that it is teaming with the National Football League, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and other highway safety and law enforcement agencies to remind everyone to designate a sober driver if they plan to be partying with alcohol on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 7. “We want everyone who will be celebrating to remember that Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk,” said KOHS Division of Highway Safety Programs Director Boyd Sigler. Nearly a third of all motor-vehicle fatalities in 2008 occurred in crashes attributed to alcohol impairment – meaning a driver or motorcycle rider had a blood-alcohol concentration of 0.08 or higher, according to NHTSA research. But that rate jumped to 49 percent – nearly half – in the period of Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 to 5:59 a.m. on Feb. 4. If you are hosting a

*Disclaimer: Limited to the first 200 who apply. Limit one per household. Must stay one night during each visit. Certificates good only at participating merchants.

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B6

CCF Recorder

Community

February 4, 2010

Leadership class renovates Holly Hill The Leadership Northern Kentucky Class of 2010 has chosen to renovate Holly Hill Children's Services Supervised Visitation Center as its class project. The renovations will provide a more family-friendly, inviting and safe environment for those who are served by this program. “Strong families are needed to build strong communities and Holly Hill's Supervised Visitation Center strives to build strong families,” says Chris McDaniel, chair of class project. “This is the only supervised visitation program in Northern Kentucky that serves children of all ages and allows

them to reconnect with their families.” Holly Hill Children's Home, which was founded in 1884, supervised 990 visitations and served 318 people in 2009, which was a 113 percent increase in the total number of people served compared to 2008. The class has been working on fundraising for the project for a few months and has already secured enough money and materials to complete the first phase of the project. Phase one includes making the current supervised visitation room more friendly and safe for those who use it as well as creating an additional

supervised visitation room. Both rooms will include games, books, puzzles and other activities to help the families interact with one another. Phase II includes renovation of the office space, including new carpet, tile in the kitchen (often used by families) and foyer and painting. “Our goal is to make the entire center a more inviting place for the families who use it,” says McDaniel. Monetary and material donations are still needed to make this entire project possible. Please contact Gina Holt at gina.holt@kentonlibrary.org or visit www.hol-

lyhill-ky.org for more information. Donations can be made payable to Holly Hill Children's Services, care of Kerri Richardson, VonLehman & Co., Inc., 250 Grandview Dr., Suite 300, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017. Leadership Northern Kentucky Class of 2010 is made up of 42 individuals who either live or work in Northern Kentucky and will be the 31st class to graduate from the program sponsored by the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. All of the members are in key positions in business, government, education and nonprofit organizations.

Readers on vacation

PROVIDED

Leo and Judy Schwarber of Melbourne cruised Tahiti and the Society Islands of the French Polynesia for 10 days in January.

Covington Church plans service and HIV testing Feb. 7

FA THE

The National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness event is part of an on-going effort by the Lane Chapel C.M.E. staff and congregation to address the issue of HIV/AIDS. Kentucky Health Department will offer free, anonymous HIV rapid tests at 12:30 p.m. The church is located at 125 Lynn St., in Covington.

Services and testing are open to the public and all are welcome and encouraged to attend. The National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness event

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is part of an on-going effort by the Lane Chapel C.M.E. staff and congregation to address the issue of HIV/AIDS. Members of the church collaborated with the Health Department to certify people to become HIV counselors. These volunteer counselors offer HIV rapid testing from noon to 2 p.m. on the

second Saturday of every month at the church. “This is something we are dedicated to face, address and change in our community,” said Collier. “The theme this year, ‘HIV/AIDS prevention - A choice and a lifestyle,’ is so accurate. HIV infection can be treated if diagnosed early and infection can be avoid-

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ed with education and better choices.” According to the Kentucky Department for Public Health, in 2008 blacks represented 38 percent of new AIDS diagnoses and 38 percent of new HIV diagnoses, but make up made up 7.6 percent of the Kentucky population. “With the number of HIV and AIDS diagnoses so high in relation to the population, it is important to provide opportunities and outreach in the black community and education regarding the risks of HIV/AIDS,” said Steven R. Katkowsky, M.D., District Director of Health. “We appreciate the efforts of the Rev. Collier and his congregation to partner with the Health Department for outreach.” For more information about National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, please visit www.blackaidsday.org. For more information on local HIV testing, counseling and case management services, contact the Health Department at 341-4264 or visit www.nkyhealth.org/ hivtesting.

PVT. Matt Rogers, 20, of Independence, recently graduated from United States Marine Corps boot camp at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island on 12/18/2009. PVT.Rogers, a graduate of Highlands High School and former Ft. Thomas resident, successfully completed 13 weeks of intensive basic training at MCRD Parris Island as one of 65 recruits in Training Platoon 2093. Following ten days home on leave he will report to Camp Lejuene, NC for Marine Corps Combat Training then continue on to Military Occupation Specialty school. PVT Rogers is the son of Jon Rogers and Sharon Carusone from Independence, KY. NKY.com/community

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Lane Chapel C.M.E. Church in Covington will continue its efforts to provide education, testing and awareness about HIV/AIDS by observing National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day on Sunday, Feb. 7. The Rev. Anthony Collier will dedicate his 11 a.m. Sunday service to the issue of HIV, and the Northern


Community

KSO to party like it’s 1963

CCF Recorder

B7

BRIEFLY

Mardi Gras party

Creative Hands Artisan Studio at 605 Fairfield Ave. in Bellevue announced their fourth annual Mardi Gras Party for a Cause benefiting the recent earthquake victims in Haiti. Featured artist Ives Nawman will display his wild, vivid and funky paintings. Also at the even will be intuitive tarot card reader Mystic Mary and live musical entertainment, refreshments and fire pit. The party is being held along with Bellevue’s First Friday Walk, Friday Feb. 5 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Cocktails will be served at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. with dancing from 8 p.m. until midnight. Music provided by Mike Young DJ Service. Cost is $50 a couple. Limited Reservations available, and RSVPs can be made by calling Sandy at 859-6355991.

Sensory Friendly Films

AMC Entertainment (AMC) and the Autism Society have teamed up to bring families affected by autism and other disabilities a special opportunity to enjoy their favorite films in a safe and accepting

environment on a monthly basis. Sensory Friendly Films premiered across the country in August 2008, and will continue this month with a showing of “The Tooth Fairy” at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 6, at AMC Newport on the Levee 20, One Levee Way Suite 4100, in Newport. Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disability that affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased on the day of the event.

Firemen’s Ball

PROVIDED

The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra’s annual gala is Feb. 20. Silent auction committee members are, from left, Nancy Kidd, Rick Sammons, Wendy Kirkwood and Cindy LaBoiteaux.

The Alexandria and Community Volunteer Fire Department will be having a semiformal Valentine’s Dance/Firemen’s Ball Saturday, Feb. 13.

NKY.com/community

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St, James luxury resort at Montego Bay, Jamaica. The KSO will award its first-ever “Crystal Baton” to Mary Middleton who volunteers with many nonprofit organizations. Since its inception in 1994, Middleton has been an integral part of the KSO’s success. 0000380918

For the KSO’s 16th annual gala Feb. 20, the orchestra will take you back to the decade of the 1960s, and is inviting everyone to the Northern Kentucky Convention Center Ballroom for “Dance to the Music.” In creating a festive event the KSO will thematically return to the 1960s – when a cup of coffee cost 10 cents, television offered only three or four channels and all music blared from black vinyl. To receive an invitation, contact the KSO at 4316216 or info@kyso.org. Cost to attend the gala is $125 per person which includes wine, dinner, dessert and dancing. A ticket at $175 per person includes additional recognition in the printed program and preferential seating. Reservations will be taken through Friday, Feb. 12. The KSO’s annual gala silent auction is traditional the area’s largest. Raffle tickets are on sale prior and the night of the event for a five-night, allinclusive stay at the Secrets

February 4, 2010

Looking beyond cars and trucks…

Meet Tetsuo “Ted” Agata - President & COO of Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing -North America & Volunteer “As a company, we take great pride in producing a high quality product. But, there is also so much joy to be gained when you can improve the quality of life in your community. By participating in programs like the March for Babies, the Cincinnati Mayor’s Corporate Challenge, Prepare Affair, and National Public Lands Day, my colleagues and I, along with our families, have experienced the reward of volunteerism. Regardless of the position you hold within a company, these experiences remind us that it’s important to look beyond making cars and trucks.” Visit us at toyotageorgetown.com

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ON

RECORD

CCF Recorder

THE

February 4, 2010

| DEATHS | Editor Michelle Shaw | smhaw@nky.com | 578-1053 BIRTHS

|

REAL

ESTATE

Arrest

Gina Guidugli, 26, 51 Tower Hill Road, DUI, no insurance at 200 block of Memorial Parkway, Jan. 10. Tony Neil Morris, 37, 316 Lafayette Ave., alcohol intoxication, disorderly conduct at 209 Division St., Jan. 12. Jason Debroler, 36, 1402 Dayton Ave., disorderly conduct at 24 Fairfield Ave., Jan. 16. Aaron Debroler, 32, 1106 McKinney Ave., disorderly conduct at 24 Fairfield Ave., Jan. 16. James Allen Turner, 32, 914 Central Ave., alcohol intoxication at Colfax Avenue, Jan. 17. Ricky Caldwell, 33, 600 West Overton St., theft by unlawful taking at Donnermeyer Drive, Jan. 18. Joe Raleigh, 56, 339 Berry Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public

place, resisting arrest at 339 Berry Ave., Jan. 19. Jack Smith Jr., 29, 410 Fairfield Ave. Apt. 1, warrant at 350 O'Fallon Ave., Jan. 19. Matthew Haddix, 21, 758 East 10th St., theft by unlawful taking, possession of marijuana, warrant at 10 Donnermeyer Drive, Jan. 20. Matthew Caudill, 22, 229 Van Voast Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place at 300 block of Prospect, Jan. 22. Matthew Robinson, 22, 918 Washington Ave. No. 1, alcohol intoxication, warrant at 300 block of Prospect, Jan. 22. Shannon Kelly, 51, 330 Center St. No. 1, fourth degree assault at 330 Center St. no. 1, Jan. 23. Robert Clark III, 24, 126 Fairfield Ave. Apt. 2, warrant at Retreat Street, Jan. 23.

Matt Heuser, 19, 368 Foote Ave., alcohol intoxication, second degree fleeing at 327 Division St., Jan. 24. Ashley Cooper, 20, 303 East Fourth St., theft by unlawful taking at 10 Donnermeyer Drive, Jan. 24. John Wayne Handy, 44, Homeless, alcohol intoxication at 225 Fairfield Ave., Jan. 25. James Phillips, 27, Homeless, warrant at 53 Donnermeyer Drive, Jan. 26. Anthony Morgan, 33, 424 Berry Ave., warrant at 424 Berry Ave., Jan. 27.

CAMPBELL COUNTY Arrest

Dawn M. Brockman, 30, 2815 Madison Ave., warrant at Davjo Drive, Jan. 11. Jimmy L. Hamilton, 28, 524 Fisher

N K Y. c o m ws@

unit

PROJECT: LICKING RIVER PUMP STATION IMPROVEMENTS SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Taylor Mill Treatment Plant 608 Grand Avenue Latonia, KY 41015 Date: February 25, 2010 2:00 p.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Replacement of two sluice gates (underwater construction), one manual trash screen, handrails, and gratings; installation of submersible dewatering pump; repaint all existing painted steel and structural steel; repaint inside pump room; roofing work; HVAC work; and replacement of motor control centers at the Licking River Pump Station. A pre-bid conference will be held on Tuesday February 16, 2010, at 9:30 a.m. (local time) at the Taylor Mill Treatment Plant (608 Grand Avenue, Latonia, KY 41015). Attendance at the pre-bid conference is recommended, but not mandatory. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 700 Alexandria Pike, Fort Thomas, Kentucky 41075; GRW Engineers, Inc., 11909 Shelbyville Road, Suite 100, Louisville, Kentucky 40243; and GRW Engineers, Inc., 801 Corporate Drive, Lexington, Kentucky 40503. Copies of the Bidding Documents have also been provided to the following Plan Holders: McGraw-Hill Construction Dodge, 7265 Kenwood Road, Suite 200, Cincinnati, OH 45236, Telephone 513-345-8200 or 1-800328-4542, ext. 3616 Jennifer Johnson, ext. 3630 Truman, Fax 513-345-8253. AGC/McGraw-Hill Construction Dodge Plan Room, 950 Contract Street, Suite 100, Lexington, KY 40505-3664, Telephone 859425-6630, Fax 859-294-5188. AGC/McGraw-Hill Construction Dodge, 1811 Cargo Court, Louisville, KY 40299, Telephone 502- 671-1296, Fax 502-671-1298. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from GRW Engineers, Inc., 11909 Shelbyville Road, Suite 100, Louisville, Kentucky 40243, Telephone 502-489-8484. Sets are $75.00 each and are non-refundable. Any questions regarding specifications and drawings can be directed to Jason Hindenach, GRW Louisville Office at 502-489-8484. Bids will be received on a lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a Bid Bond in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond as security for the faithful performance and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project falls under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. If the Contract is to be awarded, Owner will give the Successful Bidder a Notice of Award within the number of days set forth in the Bid Form for acceptance of the Bid. On request 72 hours in advance, Owner will provide each Bidder access to the site to conduct such investigations and tests as each Bidder deems necessary for submission of a Bid. Arrangements for site visits shall be made by calling Dave Enzweiler at 859-547-3265.

AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY STATING ITS INTENTION TO ANNEX TO THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY, A CITY OF THE SECOND CLASS, AN UNINCORPO RATED AREA OF 12.2933 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, LYING ADJACENT AND CONTIGUOUS TO THE EXISTING CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY. WHEREAS, pursuant to KRS 81A.420 the Board of Commissioners of the City of Newport, Kentucky hereby state the City of Newport’s intention to annex the real estate described in Exhibit "A", which is attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference; and, WHEREAS, the Board of Commissioners of the City of Newport, Kentucky hereby declare that it is desirable to annex the herein described unincorporated territory; and, WHEREAS, the Board of Commissioners of the City of Newport, Kentucky, finds, pursuant to KRS 81A.410, that the herein described unincorporated territory is subject to annexation as it is adjacent and contiguous to the City of Newport’s boundaries at the time the annexation proceeding began; and, by reason of commercial, industrial, institutional, or governmental use of land, is urban in character and no part of the area to be annexed is included within the boundary of another incorporated city. NOW, THEREFORE BE IT ORDAINED BY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE CITY OF NEWPORT, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That the Board of Commissioners of the City of Newport, Campbell County, Kentucky, an incorporated city of the second class, hereby states its intention to annex to the City boundary the unincorporated territory described in Exhibit "A", which is attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. SECTION II The Board of Commissioners of the City of Newport declare that it is desirable to annex said unincorporated territory into the City of Newport, Kentucky and has found pursuant to KRS 81A.410 that said unincorporated territory is adjacent to and contiguous to the City’s boundaries at the time this annexation proceeding is being conducted and by reason of commercial, industrial, institutional and governmental use of land the area is urban in character. Furthermore, the Board of Commissioners find that no part of the area to be annexed is within the boundaries of any other incorporated city.

Bari Joslyn, V.P., Water Quality Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1001536104

Fourth degree assault

Report of man punched, kicked and knocked to ground in parking lot by another man at 6302 Licking Pike, Jan. 17. Report of female juvenile assaulted by another female juvenile at 909 Camel Crossing, Jan. 13. Report of male juvenile punched another male juvenile at 909 Camel Crossing, Jan. 13. Report of fight between two men at 712 Milton Road, Jan. 16.

Theft by unlawful taking

Incidents/reports Animal complaint Attempted burglary

Reported at 8774 Constable Drive, Jan. 11.

Barking dog

Report tailgate taken off truck parked in Park and Ride at U.S. 27 Park and Ride, Jan. 11.

Civil dispute

Report of aluminum ladder and utility trailer taken from barn at 11155 Shaw Hess Road, Jan. 11.

Report of sliding glass door found wedged open at 1174 Racetrack, Jan. 14.

Report of barking dog inside condominium at 10565 Michael Drive, Jan. 16.

Reported at 10332 Persimmon Grove Road, Jan. 14.

Dogs not to run at large

Report of dogs entered yard and

Margaret Bartholomew

Margaret Bartholomew, 79, Dayton, died Friday, Jan. 29, 2010, at Highland Springs of Fort Thomas Health Care & Rehabilitation Center. She worked at Baptist Convalescent Center. Her husband, Robert H. Bartholomew, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Steve Bartholomew of Sarasota, Fla., and Robert Bartholomew of Bellevue; daughter, Jo Ann Jones of Dayton; brother, Robert Freeman of Florida; sister, Shirley Ross of Oneida, Tenn.; 10 grandchildren; and eight greatgrandchildren. Burial was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Online condolences to www.catchen.com.

Charles E. Berte

Charles E. Berte, 83, Highland Heights, died Monday, Jan. 25, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He worked for 37 years with the manufacturing division of Gibson Greeting Cards in Cincinnati, was a World War II Navy veteran, member of the Highland Heights Volunteer Fire Department and St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring. His grandson, Christopher Saner, died previously. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Shirley Hickman Berte; daughter, Kimberly Berte of Alexandria; sons, Keith Berte of Taylor Mill and Kevin Berte of Amelia, Ohio; sister, Helen Wheeler of Columbus, Ga.; four grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Joseph Church Capital Campaign Fund, 4011

Theft of identity of another without consent Theft of parts from vehicle Third degree burglary

Third degree criminal mischief

Report of tire tracks left in yard at 4888 Winters Lane, Jan. 17.

About police reports

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

FORT THOMAS Arrest

Dorita Roberts, 65, 10 Taylor Ave., DUI at Taylor and Ohio Avenues, Jan. 23. Joseph Sullivan, 18, 2792 Madison Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place, third degree criminal trespassing at 2 Overlook, Jan. 24. Perry Saller, 30, 1820 Aspen Pines Drive, DUI at 85 North Grand Ave., Jan. 23. John Sousa, 45, 2191 North Fort Thomas Ave., DUI at Memorial Parkway at Wilson, Jan. 24. Clarence Herald Jr., 44, 435 W. Eighth St., possession of marijuana at North Fort Thomas Ave., Jan. 25. Terry Miller, 41, 832 Brighton, possession of marijuana at North Fort Thomas Ave., Jan. 25.

Incidents/reports Theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 940 Highland Ave. no. 2110, Jan. 25. Reported at 100 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 25.

Theft of identity, theft of credit/debit card, theft by unlawful taking

Reported at 122 Wessex Place, Jan. 22.

DEATHS Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076. Online condolences to www.dmefuneral.com.

Virginia ‘Sue’ Blevins

Virginia “Sue” Blevins, 52, of Dayton died Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2010, at her home. Survivors include her son, Richard Campbell; daughter, April Massingale of Burlington; stepdaughters, Carrie Blevins and Jennifer Prejean; brothers, David, Mark and Michael Crowley; and sister, Donna Rowe. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp Erschell Funeral Home, Bellevue, handled arrangements. Online condolences to www.dmefuneral.com.

Larry Buchanan

Larry John Joseph Buchanan, 43, Dayton, died Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2010, in Fort Mitchell. He was a Navy veteran. Survivors include his daughter, Amanda Buchanan of North Carolina; son, Adam Buchanan of North Carolina; mother, Betty Smith Buchanan of Dayton; sisters, Brenda Schulte of Spotsylvania, Pa., and Pennie Clutter of Bellevue. No public services. Burial will in Camp Nelson National Cemetery, Nicholasville. Dobbling, Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home, Bellevue, is handling arrangements. Online condolences to www.dmefuneral.com.

Effie Cash

Effie Cleo Cash, 75, Alexandria, died Jan. 25, 2010, at University Hospital, Corryville. She was a homemaker and a member of the Alexandria Church of God.

Survivors include her husband, Carl Cash; sons, Mike Sizemore of Beavercreek, Ohio and Kenneth Cash of Alexandria; sisters, Cora Garwood of Michigan and Eunice Baker of Buckhorn; five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was in Alexandria Cemetery.

Mildred Clark

Mildred “Millie” Clark, 85, Cold Spring, died Monday, Jan. 25, at her daughter’s home in Cold Spring. She was a homemaker and member of First Baptist Church of Cold Spring. Her husband, Jim Clark, and great-grandson, Michael Matthew Massella, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Carolyn Glahn of Cold Spring, Cynthia Moll of Western Hills, Ohio, and Jennifer Taylor of Hebron; son, Garry Clark of Union; 11 grandchildren, eight stepgrandchildren, 19 greatgrandchildren, 15 stepgreat-grandchildren; and eight stepgreat-greatgrandchildren. Burial will be in First Baptist Church of Cold Spring Cemetery. Alexandria Funeral Home handled arrangements. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Meredith Paul Fossett

Meredith Paul Fossett, 87, Erlanger, died Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He worked for Railway Express in Cincinnati, was a World War II Army veteran and member of St. Mark

Deaths continued B9

SECTION III That pursuant to KRS 81A.425 notice shall be sent by first-class mail to each property owner listed on the records of the Campbell County Property Valuation Administrator as of January 1, 2010 no later than fourteen (14) days prior to the meeting at which this Ordinance proposing annexation shall receive its second reading, and a copy of this proposed Ordinance. SECTION IV That this Ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested to by the City Clerk, recorded, published and effective upon publication. PASSED: PASSED:

Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 90 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance.

were aggressive to dog at 5605 Cutters Trace, Jan. 17.

Report of cash taken from wallet at 9859 Man O War, Jan. 15. Report of coat, DVDs, compact discs and cash taken at 7217 Tippenhauer, Jan. 16. Report of cash taken from residence at 712 Milton, Jan. 17.

Report of goats in fenced-in enclosure attacked by two dogs at 11730 Pond Creek Road, Jan. 17.

COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE NO. 0-2010-001 Section 00020 INVITATION TO BID

Road, warrant at Ky. 9 and Gloria Terrell, Jan. 11. Kevin E. Price, 19, 1107 Rockyview Drive, warrant at 1107 Rockyview Drive, Jan. 14. Carl J. Starrett, 29, 6935 Gloria Drive, improper display of registration plates, possession of drug paraphernalia, trafficking in marijuana less than eight ounces - first offense, operating on suspended or revoked operators license, failure of owner to maintain required insurance at Mary Ingles Highway and Four Mile Road, Jan. 13. Sharon K. Fields, 55, 56 Ronda Lane, operating on suspended license at U.S. 27 and Lickert Pike, Jan. 15. Christan T. Hughes, 27, 110 Ridgeland Drive, warrant at Ky. 9 and California Crossroads, Jan. 19.

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County E-mail: k

POLICE REPORTS

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POLICE

First reading 12-7-09 Second reading 1-25-10

_______________________ MAYOR JERRY PELUSO ATTEST: _____________________________ Q. Evone Bradley, CKMC CITY CLERK PUBLISHED: In Full in the Campbell County Recorder the 4TH day of February 2010.

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Deaths

February 4, 2010

DEATHS From B8 United Church of Christ in Latonia. His wife, Mary Lou Schmidt Fossett, died in 2007. Survivors include his daughter, Mary Aubrey of Erlanger; sons, Paul Fossett of Latonia, Jay Fossett of Fort Thomas and Glen Fossett of Covington; seven grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Burial with honor guard service was in Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017. Online condolences to www.connleybrothersfuneralhome.com.

Dolores ‘Dee’ Hartman

Dolores “Dee” Hartman, 78, Butler, died Monday, Jan. 25, 2010. at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was an Avon salesperson for more than 35 years and a member of Eastern Campbell Firehouse Ladies Auxiliary. Her husband, William F. Hartman, and daughters, Emma Justice and Margie Holcumb, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Alice Mullen of Butler; brothers, Frank McClanahan of Taylor Mill and Edger McClanahan of Newport; sister, Barbara Belew of Covington; five grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Serenity Funeral Care, Covington, handled arrangements. Memorials: Holly Hill Children’s Home, 9559 Summer Hill Road, California, KY 41007. Online condolences to www.serenityfuneralcare.com.

Audney Hensley

Audney Marie Brock Hensley, 89, Taylor Mill, died Jan. 23, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker and member of Community Family Church. Her husband, the Rev. Harley Hensley Sr., died in 1997; son, Robert Hensley, died in 1995 and sons, John and Harley Hensley Jr., died in 2002. Survivors include her daughters, Judy Ireland of Florence, Barbara Ballard and Irene Schwaller, both of Independence; sons, Dennis Hensley of Taylor Mill and Jesse Hensley of Williamstown; sisters, Mildred Cox

of Tulsa, Okla. and Ruby Hodge of Covington; brother, Lee Brock of Newport; 25 grandchildren; 48 great-grandchildren and 20 greatgreat grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens, Taylor Mill. Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Home, Independence, handled the arrangements. Memorials: Community Family Church, 11875 Taylor Mill Road, Independence, KY 41051.

Charles ‘Eddie’ Holaday

Charles “Eddie” Holaday, 73, Melbourne, died Sunday, Jan. 24, 2010, at Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood. He was a butcher for Meijer Meats in Cincinnati. Survivors include his daughters, Barbara Norman of Melbourne, Linda Gray of Illinois, Charleen Rutherford, Regina and Christine Holaday, all of Cincinnati; 12 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Burial was in Baltimore Pike Cemetery, Cincinnati. Memorials: Hospice of St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Margaret Keller

Margaret Beck Keller, 96, of Cincinnati, formerly of Fort Thomas, died Sunday, Jan. 24, 2010, at Oak Hills Pavilion, Cincinnati. She was head cafeteria manager for the Oak Hills School District and member of Shiloh United Methodist Church, Cincinnati. Her husband, Eckhart Richard Keller, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Martha Couch of Burlington; son, Edward Keller of Cincinnati; three grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Dobbling Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, handled arrangements. Memorials: Shiloh United Methodist Church, 5261 Foley Road, Cincinnati, OH 45238. Online condolences to www.dmefuneral.com.

Sister Mary A. Komar

Sister Mary A. Komar, 94, Fort Thomas, died Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010, at Good Shepherd Pelletier Hall in Fort Thomas.

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She was a member of the congregation of the Good Shepherd, Pelletier Hall, Fort Thomas. She is survived by her sister, Anita Goss. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Mayme Elizabeth Long

Mayme Elizabeth Tillet Long, 94, of Lebanon, Ohio, formerly of Pendleton County, died Sunday, Jan. 24, 2010, at Otterbein Retirement Home, Lebanon. She was a homemaker and member of Stanford Christian Church. Her first husband, John Estes; second husband, Charles Long; sons, John Leslie Estes and William Long; and daughter, June Elizabeth Barnes, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Charles Long Jr. of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., David Long of Amelia, Ohio, and Larry Long of Newport; daughters, Doris Peck of Hawaii Gardens, Calif., Helen Richter of Fort Thomas, Betty Betuel of Lynchburg, Ohio, Barbara Rodarmel of Falmouth, Patricia Long of Dayton, Ky., and Bonnie Westall of Lebanon, Ohio; brother, Ray Tillet of Stanford; 115 grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Burial was in Mt. Zion Cemetery, Augusta.

Hazel V. Messmer

Hazel V. Messmer, 85, Newport, a homemaker, died Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. Her husband, William George Messmer, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Carol Michael of Newport; son, William Messmer; brother, Earl Cox of Berry; sisters, Alma Johnson of Waco, Texas and Viola Jarboe of Bellevue. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: Wood Hudson Cancer Research Center, 931 Isabella St., Newport, KY 41071; or Hospice of the Bluegrasss, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042. Online condolences to www.dmefuneral.com.

Herbert Morgan Sr.

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

Carl H. Morris, 62, Newport, died Friday, Jan. 29, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass, Fort Thomas. He was a railroad car inspector with CSX for 41 years. He is survived by his wife, Carol Morris of Newport; son, Carl D. Morris of Covington; daughter, Christy Herald of Cold Spring; two brothers, John Morris of Toledo and Burl Morris of Edgewood; two sisters, Wanda Blackwell of Fort Thomas and Melody Herron of Cincinnati; and three grandchildren. Memorials: Madison Miracle Center, 809 Madison Ave., Covington, KY 41011.

Edward Oeltman

Edward Oeltman, 87, of Berea, formerly of Bellevue, died Sunday, Jan. 24, 2010, at Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Lexington. He was a World War II Army veteran. His nieces and nephews survive. No public services. Burial will be in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Muehlenkamp-Erschell Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, is handling arrangements. Online condolences can be given at www.dmefuneral.com.

Julia Lynn Plunkett

Julia Lynn Plunkett, M.D., 30, of Poughkeepsie, N.Y., formerly of Fort Thomas, died Monday, Jan. 25, 2010, at her home. She was board certified in emergency medicine and was to begin a new position in Nashville, Tenn., in May. Survivors include her parents, Jim Plunkett, M.D. and Joan Linhardt Plunkett, M.D.; brothers, Tom Plunkett of Port Townsend, Wash., and Andy Plunkett of Fort Thomas; sister, Mary Plunkett of Fort Thomas and

About obituaries

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-242-4000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the "Obituaries" link at NKY.com. grandmother, Margaret Lindhardt of Cincinnati. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. MuehlenkampErschell Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, handled arrangements. Memorials: Campbell County Animal Shelter, 1989 Poplar Ridge Road, Melbourne, KY 41059; or St. Thomas Education Fund, 428 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075. Online condolences to www.dmefuneral.com.

Patricia Pulsfort

Patricia J. Dobbling Pulsfort, 77, Fort Thomas, died Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was an administrative secretary for the Kroger Co. of Cincinnati and a member of St. Thomas Church of Fort Thomas. Survivors include her son, David Pulsfort of Edgewood; daughters, Karen Kirk of West Palm Beach, Fla., Susan Whitaker of Independence and Sandra Piller of Fort Thomas; brother, William F. Dobbling of Southgate; and nine grandchildren. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate. Memorials: The charity of donor’s choice. Online condolences to www.dmefuneral.com.

Ann Ramonaitis

Ann Ramonaitis, 94, Newport, died Jan. 26, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Hospice, Fort Thomas. She and her husband immigrated to the United States from Lithuania in 1949. She was a housekeeper for Lakeside Place. Her husband, Joseph, preceded her in death. Survivors include daughters Bernadette Henry of Newport and Violet Lichtenstein of Fort Thomas; her sister, Ele Viltrakis of Newport; four grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephens Cemetery, Fort Thomas.

Eric Vance Randoll

Eric Vance Randoll, 60, Bellevue,

died Monday, Jan. 25, 2010, at his home. He was a maintenance worker for Arnold S. Levine. Survivors include his sons, Ricky Randoll of Bellevue, Eric Randoll of Dayton, Steven, Matt, and Brian Knowels, all of Cincinnati and Jamie Knowels of Iowa; daughters, Michelle Randoll of Newport, Samantha Randoll of Dayton, Tiffany and Amber Goins, both of Bellevue; mother, Jane Randoll of Kansas City, Mo.; brothers, Rusty Randoll of Missouri and Greg Randoll of Tennessee; seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Burial was in Peach Grove Cemetery.

Charles S. Reckley

Charles S. Reckley, 73, Fort Thomas, died Jan. 29, 2010, at St. Elizabeth Medical Center, Fort Thomas. He was a member of Divine Mercy Parish in Bellevue; a tax preparer for AARP in Newport and Covington; the marketing director for Northern Kentucky Heritage Magazine; a SCORE counselor for small businesses; a Eucharistic minister at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Fort Thomas; and from 1981-1996 was senior vice president of international operations for Bradford National Life Insurance Company in Lexington, Lamar Life Insurance Company in Jackson, Miss., and Life Partners Group in Denver. From 1999 to the present he was president of Stanton International Consulting. He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Anita NeCamp Reckley; five sons, Douglas Reckley, Brian Reckley, Chris Reckley and Jim Reckley, all of Fort Thomas, and Paul Reckley of West Chester; one sister, Mary Grace Cappabianco of Dunedin, Fla., 11 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. Memorials: Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 600 E. Main St., Louisville, KY, 40202.

Deaths continued B10

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Clearwater/Indian Rocks Beach GULF BEACH’S BEST VALUE! Beach front condo with 2 BR, 2 BA, pool. May rates. • 513-770-4243 www.bodincondo.com

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B9

Travel & Resort Directory

THE ROOSTER’S NEST Charming log cabin B&B located in Adams Co. 3 queen rms w/pvt baths offer sophistication and old fashioned hospitality. Featured in 2009 Best of Midwest Living 877-386-3302 www.roostersnest.net

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Herbert Morgan Sr., 80, Alexan-

dria, died Monday, Jan. 25, 2010, at Hospice of the Bluegrass Care Center, Fort Thomas. He was an electrician of the former Sullivan Electric Co. His granddaughter, Lindsey Morgan, died in 2006. Survivors include his daughter, Sharon Wagner of Alexandria; sons, Herbert Morgan Jr. of Highland Heights and Charles Morgan of Alexandria; and five grandchildren. Alexandria Funeral Home handled arrangements.

CCF Recorder

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

The Rooster’s Nest is a unique B&B located in Winchester, OH in Adams County, off St. Rt. 32 about an hour east of Cincinnati. The B&B consists of a log building constructed of logs dating back to 1788, yet is complete with modern amenities. There are 3 rooms available, each with a queen bed and private bath. The Rooster’s Nest is a perfect place to relax and enjoy a break from busy routines. Walk on the 25 acres of woodlands, fish in the 1.25 acre stocked pond, curl up with a book or sit outside by the campfire. Breakfast is served in the spacious gathering room overlooking the pond while birds and squirrels entertain at the feeders. Innkeepers Sally & Dave White promise to tantalize your taste buds with scrumptious dishes like Rooster Egg Bake, Rhode Island Red Stuffed French Toast, Chanticleer Bananas & Ice Cream or Banty Fruit Parfait along with freshly baked breads, juice and coffee. The Inn’s convenient location allows guests to experience all that Adams County has to offer. There are many Amish shops with baked goods, furniture and cheese. If you

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are hunting for unique items for yourself or someone special, you can check out the antique shops and art gallery. For outdoorsy adventures within a short drive you will find Adams Lake Nature Walk, Chaparral Prairie, Edge of Appalachia, Lynx Prairie, Buzzards’ Roost and Serpent Mound. An oasis of sophistication, The Rooster’s Nest offers a memorable winter retreat, a romantic get-away or a mid-week respite. It is a perfect location for smaller business meetings or weddings and receptions or for a Mom’s scrapbooking weekend. Gift Certificates are available. The Rooster’s Nest B&B Winchester, Ohio 877-386-3302 www.roostersnest.net

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Hilton Head Island Vacation Resort. Choose 1 or 2 bdrm condos. Oceanfront, ocean view or nr ocean. Great locations & rates. Golf pkgs, too. www.hhi-vr.com. 877-807-3828

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1,2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

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Call for free brochure 866-780-8334 www.northmyrtlebeachtravel.com

HILTON HEAD • Mariott Five û Resort. PGA Heritage Golf Week. Ocean front, 2BR, 2BA, sleeps 8. Tennis & golf package. Discounted rate. Local owner. 513-324-8164 N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1,2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617 GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618


B10

CCF Recorder

Deaths

February 4, 2010

INVITATION TO BID PROJECT: Pump Motor Replacement

From B9

SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT:

Nathan Richter

Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 700 Alexandria Pike Ft. Thomas, Kentucky 41075 UNTIL:

Date: February 19, 2010 Time: 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed purchase and work is generally described as follows: The District is accepting bids for the purchase and Installation of a 1250 hp Pump Motor at the Ohio River Pump Station #1 All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 700 Alexandria Pike Ft. Thomas, Kentucky 41075 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated, by contacting Joan Verax at 859441-0482. Bids will be received on a Lump Sum price basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 90 days after the day of bid opening. Ron Lovan, President/CEO Northern Kentucky Water District 1001536089

INVITATION TO BID February 4, 2010

LEGAL NOTICE-NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION KEY STORAGE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2010 4:30 PM The following persons are hereby notified that their goods stored at Key Storage under self storage rental agreements will be sold at Public Auction, terms—Absolute/ No Reserve, on Tuesday, February 9, 2010 at 4:30 PM at Key Storage, located at 206 Vine Street, Wilder, Kentucky 41076. SUSAN C GRAVETT, CHRISTINA L HUSSEIN, TERESA L JOHNSON, TARA L GONZALEZ, BRANDON J SANDERS, MICAH E LEE, PROFESSIONAL JONATHAN GROUP, SERVICES DANIELS, BILLIE D TILLEY, STEVEN W FIELDS, SCOTT MORROW, VICTORIA A. MCCLURE, DARINA SAUER, BRYAN R MARTIN, DAVID A CRAIG, ROBERT F DUVE JR, SCOTT W ROBERTS, ROBERT LARSON, KIM A KRUER, GREGORY P ROUTZON, BRADLEY E CUPPLES, NKY DAIRY DISTRIBUTING, RALPH L HOBBS, CONSTRUCTION DREAMS, BERNARD MEIGGS, JOSHUA GALLENSTEIN, BRIAN J OCHS, ROGER S STEFFEN, MARY PATTERSON, MONEK CARR, JAMES E MAR-GRAFF, ASHLEY M SCOTT, MATTHEW E BUSCHLE, JONATHAN K CAUDILL, RIKKI ACKERSON, STEPHEN WOLFE, PAULINE HOLLAND, SABRINA M CROWE, SABRINA M CROWE, PAULINE HOLLAND, VICKI SUCHANEK, DENISE E. JACKSON, VENCENT LEE VAUGHN, CHRISTINE N PETERSON BRIAN W HENDERSON, ANDREA J SEARP, ANGELA S FARMER, DONALD W DREWRY, JAMES W BROWN, CHRISTOPHER W FORNASH, WILLIAM COLE ,HALL N JACKSON, ROGER S STEFFEN BRENDA MCGAHEE, MICHELLE E ARNZEN, JESSICA N FOSSETT, WILLIAM M WOOD, ROBERT F DUVE JR, RICHARD L CLARK, DEBORAH WHITE, JANET MC KENZIE, JERRY MC KENZIE, JAMES KAMP, PEGGY TRUTSCHEL MELSON, AMBERLYN D GLOSS, RICHARD A WEBSTER, GERARD J MOHAMMED, MEISSA J GUIDUGLI, ROBERT STURGIL JR, DEBORAH HILL, TIM WILCH, ANTOINETTE BADER, HARRY BADER, CASEY L WEBER, KEVIN M REED, ANDREW KING, ROBERT E MORSCHER. 1001535966

PROJECT: Project Material Bid - Copper SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: February 11, 2010 Time: 9:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed purchase is generally described as follows: to supply the Northern Kentucky Water District with 30,000 feet of ¾inch type K soft copper (100’ coils) and 1,000 feet of 1-inch type K soft copper (100’ coils), as described in the Specifications and other Documents prepared by the Northern Kentucky Water District. Freight shall be included in the bid price. All deliveries are to be made to the Northern Kentucky Water District at 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated above by contacting Ed Prather at (859) 426-2701. There is no charge for these documents. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Bids may be submitted for any one item, multiple items, or all of the items listed in the Bid Form. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Also if, in Owner’s opinion, a particular product and/or supplier offer distinct advantages over other Bidders, the Owner may award to a Bidder that is not the lowest. Distinct advantages may include shipping time, standardization or ultimate economy. Owner reserves the right to have separate awards for individual bid items from different Bidders. Owner further reserves the right to reject all bids, to waive any informalities and to negotiate for the modification of any bid, or to accept a bid which is deemed the most desirable and advantageous from the standpoint of customer value and service and concept of operations, even though such bid may not, on its face, appear to be the lowest price. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 15 days after the day of bid opening. Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering Northern Kentucky Water District 1001535749

INVITATION TO BID PROJECT: Durable Outdoor Uniform Apparel Date: February 4, 2010 SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018-0640 or 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky41018-0640 UNTIL:

Date: February 23, 2010 Time: 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed purchase is generally described as follows: The sale and delivery to various designated locations in Kenton and Campbell Counties, Kentucky of selected durable outdoor apparel, all as specified in the periodic orders of the District placed during the period from April 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011, with up to two one-year extensions of the period at the sole discretion of the Owner. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Melissa Bielo at (859) 426-2722. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Bidder shall submit samples of the following apparel items: pullover hooded sweatshirt, jean, arctic bib overall, thermal lined hooded jacket, waterproof jacket, and waterproof pants. Bidder shall also submit sample catalogs of all uniform apparel available. Sample items and catalogs must be submitted with the Bid Form prior to the date and time indicated above. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Ron Lovan, President/CEO Northern Kentucky Water District 1001535890

PUBLIC NOTICE GUARANTEED ENERGY SAVINGS CONTRACT Pursuant to KRS 45A.352(6), this is to provide public notice that Campbell County Fiscal Court will meet in regular session on Wednesday, February 17 at 5:30 PM at 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, KY 41071 at which time it proposes to award a guaranteed energy contract. savings The parties to the proposed contract are Campbell County Fiscal Court and Inc.. Ameresco, The purpose of the contract is to enAmeresco, gage Inc. to perform a project consisting of certain energy conservation services and installations at County facilities. 1001535799 ADVERTISEMENT FOR REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS CAMPBELL COUNTY COURT HOUSE COMMISSION (OWNER) will receive proposals through CMW ARCHITECTS, INC. (Architect) for a Commissioning Agent for the CAMPBELL COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER located at 330 YORK STREET, NEWPORT, KY 41072. Details for the Request for Proposal may be obtained from: Chris Greene CMW ARCHITECTS, INC. 400 East Vine Street, Suite 400 Lexington, KY 40507 PHONE: ( 8 5 9 ) 254-6623 FAX: (859) 259-1877 EMAIL: cgreene@cmwaec.co m Questions should be directed in writing to Chris Greene as noted above. A set of drawings and specifications for the project may be reviewed at the office of the Owner, 330 YORK STREET, First Floor, NEWPORT, KY 41072, or, a copy may be obtained afa providing ter refundable $50.00 deposit payable to Owner. The deposit will be returned only if a proposal is submitted and the documents are returned in good condition within 7 days after the proposals are opened. Otherwise, no refund will be due. The proposals shall be due on February 18th, 2010 at 2:00 PM, and will be opened at the CAMPBELL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 330 YORK STREET, NEWPORT, KY 41072. Proposals received after the deadline will not be opened. No Bidder may withdraw a proposal for a period of sixty (60) days after the date set for the opening of bids. Proposals shall be subject to acceptance by the Campbell County Project Development Board (CCPDB) and the Administrative Office of the Courts, and Bidder should be prepared to provide a brief presentation of their proposal to the CCPDB on February 24, 2010, beginning at 5:30 p.m., if requested to do so. Owner reserves the right to reject any and all proposals and to waive all informalities and/or technicalities where the best interest of the Owner can be served. CAMPBELL COUNTY COURT HOUSE COMMISSION AND CMW ARCHITECTS, INC.1001536149

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Campbell County & Municipal Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at the Alexandria Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, KY an Tuesday, February 16, 2010 at 7:00 PM, for the purpose of reviewing and hearing testimony on the following;C A S E NUMBER: BA-01-10 Lafarge Plant Variance APPLICANT: WBMC, LLC - Mark Shafer LOCATION: An approximate one hundred seventy-five (175) acre area located on the north side of Mary Ingles Highway, between Industrial Road and St. Anne Drive, approximately three quarters (3/4) of a mile west of St. Anne Drive, City of Silver Grove. REQUEST: The applicant is asking for a waiver to increase the fence height within the 1-4 Zone from the maximum 6 feet to 12 feet. Persons interested in this case are invited to be present, Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, Ky. Monday-Friday during normal business hours /S/Peter Klear, AICP, Director of Planning & Zoning Date: January 28, 2010. Published: February 4, 2010, Campbell County Recorder. 1536057

LEGAL NOTICE The Newport Board of Adjustments will hold a public hearing on Thursday, February 18, 2010 at 4:30 p.m. in the Newport Municipal Complex, 998 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky. The hearing will be held for interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the following agenda items: BA-10-07 914 and 920 Hamlet Street, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting front yard variances for new construction Requested by: Newport Housing Authority BA-10-08 Monmouth 1717 Street, Newport, Kentucky The applicant is requesting a change non-conforming of use to another nonconforming use Requested by: Lance Mockbee/Lance Appliance Repair Inquiries regarding this public hearing should be addressed to: J. Gregory Tulley AICP Planning and Development Director City of Newport 998 Monmouth Street Newport, Kentucky 41071 859-292-3637 959555/1001534850 If you’re looking for buyers, you’re in the right neighborhood. Call Community Classified

513.242.4000

INVITATION TO BID PROJECT: Lightweight Uniform Apparel Date: February 4, 2010 SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018-0640 or

2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018-0640

UNTIL:

Date: February 23, 2010 Time: 10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed purchase is generally described as follows: The sale and delivery to various designated locations in Kenton and Campbell Counties, Kentucky of selected lightweight uniform apparel, all as specified in the periodic orders of the Owner placed during the period from April 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011, with up to two one-year extensions of the period at the sole discretion of the Owner. All Bids must be in accordance with the Bidding Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office at the address indicated herein by contacting Melissa Bielo at (859) 426-2722. Bids will be received on a unit price basis as described in the Bidding Documents. Bidder shall submit samples of the following apparel items: pullover hooded sweatshirt, T-shirt, work pant, white polo shirt, and denim shirt. Bidder shall also submit sample catalogs of all uniform apparel available. Sample items and catalogs must be submitted with the Bid Form prior to the date and time indicated above. Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the selected Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening. Ron Lovan, President/CEO Northern Kentucky Water District 1001535919

Nathan E. Richter, 66, Dayton, died Jan. 25, 2010, at his home. He was a truck driver with Riverbend Transportation in Cincinnati and member of East Dayton Baptist Church. Survivors include his wife, Darlene Stewart-Richter; son, Thomas Richter of Bellevue; step-son, Todd Stewart of Burlington; brothers, Howard Richter of Highland Heights and Rowland Richter of Fort Thomas; five grandchildren; two stepgrandchildren and one greatgrandchild. Dobbling, Muehlankamp & Erschell Funeral Home, Bellevue, handled the arrangements.

Sr. Josephine Schneider

Sr. Josephine Theresa Schneider, Congregation of the Good Shepherd, 97, Fort Thomas, died Jan. 23, 2010. She was a member of Good Shepherd Pelletier Hall, Fort Thomas. Burial was in St. Stephen Cemetery, Fort Thomas. A.C. Dobbling Funeral Home, Fort Thomas, handled the arrangements.

Matilda ‘Tildy’ Turner

Matilda “Tildy” Turner, 82, Fort Thomas, died Jan. 26, 2010, at Southview Hospital in Centerville, Ohio. She retired as a school teacher from A.D. Owens Elementary School in Newport, was a member of the Highland Avenue Baptist Tabernacle

Church in Fort Thomas and a member of the Kentucky Retired Teachers Association. Her husband, Clay Turner, preceded her in death. She is survived by her daughter, Nadine Govan of Washington Township, Ohio; one brother, James W. Herald of Butler; and two grandchildren. Burial was at Buck Herald Cemetery in Talbert, Ky.

Margaret Whitehead

Margaret J. Whitehead, 60, Brookville, died Jan. 24, 2010, at University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington. She was a member of Germantown Eastern Star Chapter, Brooksville Christian Church and Prime Time at church. Survivors include her sister, Barbara Whitehead of Fort Thomas and brother, Chuck Whitehead of Maysville. Burial was in Bracken Memorial Cemetery.

James Winkel

James Winkel, 86, Newport, died Jan. 29, 2010, at Eastgatespring Health Care Center. He was a pastry chef for the Queen City Club. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Judith Zeh. He is survived by his wife, Pat Winkel of Newport; three grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Memorials: Hospice of Cincinnati, 4310 Cooper Road, Blue Ash, Ohio 45242; Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 3949 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 45223.

LEGAL NOTICE The following is a list of committees of the Cold Spring City Council who will meet regularly for the year 2010. Public Works – 4th Monday of each month at 6:30 pm Personnel – 2nd Monday of each month at 6:30 pm Finance – 2nd Monday of each month at 6:30 pm Public Safety– 4th Monday of every other month at 6:30 pm The meetings will be held at the Cold Spring City Building which is located at 5694 E. Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 5867

ADVERTISEMENT FOR REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS CAMPBELL COUNTY COURT HOUSE COMMISSION (OWNER) will receive proposals through CMW ARCHITECTS, INC. (Architect) for a Commissioning Agent for the CAMPBELL COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER located at 330 YORK STREET, NEWPORT, KY 41072. Details for the Request for Proposal may be obtained from: Chris Greene CMW ARCHITECTS, INC. 400 East Vine Street, Suite 400 Lexington, KY 40507 PHONE: (859) 254-6623 FAX: (859) 259-1877 E-MAIL: cgreene@cmwaec.com Questions should be directed in writing to Chris Greene as noted above. A set of drawings and specifications for the project may be reviewed at the office of the Owner, 330 YORK STREET, First Floor, NEWPORT, KY 41072, or, a copy may be obtained after providing a $50.00 refundable deposit payable to Owner. The deposit will be returned only if a proposal is submitted and the documents are returned in good condition within 7 days after the proposals are opened. Otherwise, no refund will be due The proposals shall be due on February 18th, 2010 at 2:00 PM, and will be opened at the CAMPBELL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 330 YORK STREET, NEWPORT, KY 41071. Proposals received after the deadline will not be opened. No Bidder may withdraw a proposal for a period of sixty (60) days after the date set for the opening of bids. Proposals shall be subject to acceptance by the Campbell County Project Development Board (CCPDB) and the Administrative Office of the Courts, and Bidder should be prepared to provide a brief presentation of their proposal to the CCPDB on February 24, 2010, beginning at 5:30 p.m., if requested to do so. Owner reserves the right to reject any and all proposals and to waive all informalities and/or technicalities where the best interest of the Owner can be served. CAMPBELL COUNTY COURT HOUSE COMMISSION AND CMW ARCHITECTS, INC. 962785/1001536365

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL Legal Notice The City of Alexandria, Kentucky (herein the City) is requesting proposals for a three (3) year contract for the provision of banking services. The proposals are for the selection of a bank depository beginning on July 1, 2010, and shall terminate on June 30, 2013. The City reserves the right to cancel the depository agreement with sixty (60) days written notice. Copies of the Specification Documents and Request for Proposal may be obtained or examined in the Office of the City Clerk, 8236 W. Main St., Alexandria, KY 41001 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, starting Feb. 5th, 2010 through Feb. 19th, 2010. Sealed proposals will be received by the City, in the Office of the City Clerk located at 8236 W. Main St., Alexandria, KY, 41001, until 12:00 p.m. (NOON), on Wed., March 10, 2010 and then publicly opened. Pursuant to specifications on file in the Office of the City Clerk , proposals are to be submitted in a sealed envelope labeled: " B A N K IN G SERVICE PROPOSAL" The City reserves the right to reject any or all proposals and to waive any informalities or irregularities in the proposals received. All questions dealing with this proposal should be reduced to writing and faxed to Karen Barto, City Clerk at (859) 6354127 or emailed to kbarto@alexandria ky.org. 1001535942

Cleaning out your basement or attic? The quickest way to get rid of your unwanted items is to sell them quickly in the Community Classified.

Call 513.242.4000


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