Issuu on Google+

   

 

2008  Green Veneer or Green Revolution?     

 

 

 

 

 

‐ greening the local authority ICT estate    

Published by:  LGITU magazine and www.UKAuthorITy.com  with support from SAS UK, Sun Microsystems,  CIMA and Socitm.    © Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


2    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Index    1.  2.  3.  3.1  3.2  3.3  3.4  3.5  3.6  4.  4.1  4.2  5.  5.1  5.2  5.3  5.4  6.  6.1  6.2  6.3  6.4  6.5  6.6  6.7  6.8  6.9  6.10  6.11a  6.11b  6.12  6.13  6.14  6.15  6.16  6.17  6.18  6.19  6.20  7.  Appendix I      Appendix II  Appendix III 

  Introduction  Executive Summary, Helen Olsen, Editor, LGITU  Commentary  ‐ Dave Waltho, Head of Government Affairs, SAS UK  ‐ Jim Craig, Public Policy and Corporate Social Responsibility  Manager, Sun Microsystems Ltd  ‐ Helenne Doody, Sustainability Specialist, Chartered Institute of  Management Accountants (CIMA)  ‐ Richard Steel, Society of IT Management (SOCITM) President, CIO  London Borough of Newham  ‐ Jos Creese, Head of IT, Hampshire County Council  ‐ Glyn Evans, Assistant to the Chief Executive on Transformation,  Birmingham City Council  The Survey  ‐ Methodology  ‐ Response  Quick Survey  ‐ Do you feel adequately informed about Green issues?   ‐ Are Green issues important to your council?  ‐ Is your council committed to Going Green?  ‐ Does technology  have a part to play in Going Green?   Main Survey  ‐ Green issues and the council’s wider organisational strategy  ‐ Key drivers for pursuing Green initiatives  ‐ Green issues in relation to other policy agendas  ‐ Do authorities have Green targets?  ‐ Do authorities understand the Green impacts of current operations?  ‐ How is the measurement of sustainability tracked?   ‐ What is in the Green business case?  ‐ Who leads on Green issues?  ‐ Is technology an enabler for sustainability?  ‐ What technology specific Green initiatives are under way?  ‐ Do Green/sustainability issues influence technology procurement?  ‐ What proportion of decision scoring do Green issues play?   ‐ Is evidence of Green accountability required from suppliers?  ‐ Is best value procurement based on whole life costing?  ‐ What does whole life costing include?  ‐ How far is the finance team involved in these decisions?  ‐ Do councils report on sustainability performance?  ‐ Key enablers of success for Green initiatives  ‐ Key barriers to success for Green initiatives  ‐ Will councils’ ICT estate be ‘carbon neutral’ within four years?  ‐ How important is Green ICT to local government?  Greening Council ICT –  Examples in the News  Response  ‐ Council Types  ‐ Job Titles  The Questionnaires  Project Partners 

Page  3  4  8  8  10  11  13  14  15  16  16  16  18  18  19  19  19  20  20  20  21  22  22  23  24  24  25  25  27  27  28  28  28  29  29  30  30  31  31  34  37  37  39  42  49 

© Informed Publications Ltd, 2008  All rights reserved. This survey was researched and written as a snapshot of Local Government’s attitudes towards the  identification and authentication of citizens within the context of transformation of local service delivery early in the  financial year 08/09. Whilst every care is taken, the publishers and project partners accept no liability whatsoever for the  content or accuracy of this research and the opinions expressed in this report. 

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


3    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  1. Introduction  Will local government be able to match central government’s ‘carbon neutral ICT within   four years’ goal?   This key question, asked in LGITU editorial back in July 2008, instigated the research programme,  ‘Green Veneer or Green Revolution’.   When Cabinet Office minister, Tom Watson, announced the government’s aim to make energy  consumption of its ICT estate carbon neutral within four years – and carbon neutral throughout its  entire lifetime, including manufacture and disposal by 2020 – the British government became the   first in the world to tackle the carbon footprint of its own computer systems.   Computers produce as much carbon globally as the airline industry. And, yes, technology does  admittedly use a massive amount of carbon energy. Yet there is universal acknowledgement of  technology’s potential for cutting the carbon footprint of an organisation’s operations – any  organisation.   According to Richard Steel, CIO at Newham, current Socitm president and member of LGITU’s   Local t‐Gov editorial board, “The real potential of ICT is to save ten times the carbon it creates. We   should be considering the ICT potential to model new solutions and alternatives to profligate   energy consumption.”   Newham practices what it preaches. The council has a commitment to ‘supporting environmental  stewardship through its use of ICT’ as one of its ten ICT strategic principles. Says Steel, “Local  government has a duty of care for its communities, so environmental stewardship must be at the   heart of its agenda, although this may often seem politically unattractive.   “It follows that we should be helping our communities to minimise environmental damage –   tele‐assistance and telehealth can minimise the drain on travelling and other resource consumption;  connected homes can benefit from energy management systems and so on.”  As a transformational tool, there is no doubting that technology will enable mobile, flexible,   joined up, innovative, smart, efficient – and green – ways of working. It can deliver the green  aspirations of many.   Following Watson’s announcement, the government published a document containing ’18 key   steps’ that departments can take to become green. Some were simple in the extreme – such as  removing screen savers and automatically switching off PCs outside working hours – but if   followed across the public sector these simple measures could have a massive impact on   carbon emissions and budgets.   The difficulty, of course, will be any perceived trade‐offs in the desire to implement leading   edge, transformation technology solutions delivering enhanced customer services, and meeting   green aspirations.   Reducing the carbon footprint of service provision will indeed involve a radical rethink on behalf   of both suppliers and the public sector on how ‘green technology’ is factored into the business   case, enforced throughout the procurement process, and measured at the end of the day.   Supported by SAS UK, Sun Microsystems, the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA)  and the Society of Information Technology Management (SOCITM), the research team set out to   investigate whether local government can ‘green’ its ICT estate within the next four years; how   it can ensure that ‘green’ is factored into the business case and procurement process; and, most  importantly, how it will measure, monitor, and thus prove, its success in meeting this global   challenge.   With 98% of Local Area Agreements containing commitments for tackling climate change and its  impacts, is local government, as with many issues before, ahead of the charge on the green revolution?   Or is the ever increasing talk and hype over green merely a veneer to continue the status quo?  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


4    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  2. Executive Summary  Green veneer paves way for green revolution  Helen Olsen, editor LGITU  Almost six hundred local government officers – across the spectrum of  councils and responsibilities – opened a survey form during this research  project, reflecting the universal appeal of, and interest in, green issues.  

 

What initially surprised researchers, however, was that only a third of  these forms were completed.   A quick follow up exercise confirmed suspicions: whilst 84.5% of the 162  officers responding to this second exercise thought that technology had a part to  play in ‘going green’ for their council, the majority felt unable to complete the  survey because either it was not their personal area of work, the questions were too  complex, or they felt unable to answer on behalf of their council.   There is obviously great interest in greening the council ICT estate, but there  appears at present to be more talk than firm, well communicated, plans of action.   Overall, 359 officers from 219 local authorities participated in the research  programme, representing 47% of the UK’s 468 local authorities.   In‐depth questionnaires were completed by 197. 

“We recognise  that ICT has a  vital contribution  to make both in  terms of reduction  of energy  consumption and  as an enabler to  other initiatives.”    “It should be  married to cost  efficiency ‐ we are  wasting our own  money, we need  to be finding a  way to use IT  more efficiently.”   

Technology has a key role  The vast majority of ‘quick survey’ respondents (162) thought that technology had  a part to play in ‘going green’ (84.5%) – even more than felt that their council was  committed to going green (74.7%); or that their council saw green issues as  important (81.5%); or felt informed about green issues in the first place (60.5%).   Of those completing the in‐depth questionnaires (197) just 4.1% felt that green  issues were of limited or no importance to their council. The majority felt that  green issues were of central importance (49.2%) or of some importance (46.7%) to  their council’s wider organisational strategy.   The majority (87%) of in‐depth survey respondents again see technology as a key  enabler of sustainability, council‐wide. Despite this, however, the head of IT or CIO  appears to have little role in leading on green issues outside of the IT department.   Disappointingly, just four percent of respondents were confident that their  council’s ICT estate would be carbon neutral within four years. Just over a third  thought it ‘possible’, and 1.5% ‘probable’. But 12% were definite that their council  would not meet this goal.  High levels of interest in all things Green  In general, interest in green issues seemed to be higher in the larger councils than in  the smaller ones. Nearly nine in ten of the London boroughs and the metropolitan  councils responded to the survey, with almost three quarters of the counties  showing interest. The lowest response rates came from among the English districts  (36.1%), Scottish unitaries (34.4%), Welsh unitaries (13.6%), with Northern Ireland  showing least regional interest (3.8%).  

“It becomes even  more important  that Chief Officers  and politicians  have bought into  a sustainable  strategy for the  delivery of  sustainable  solutions. The  total lack of  strategy in many  public  organisations  means that  solutions that  meet green  targets are NOT  being enabled in  the most efficient  way. This requires  governance over  business  transformation  AND strategic IT.” 

In many cases, more than one officer from many of these larger councils submitted  surveys. For example, eight responses came in from Birmingham City Council from  officers with a wide variety of responsibilities and levels of seniority, suggesting  that the importance of green issues permeates all levels of that organisation.  The main drivers for pursuing green initiatives appeared to be local: a desire to play  a part in conserving the local environment, champion local environmental  responsibility and ensure local sustainability.  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


5    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  The link to cost savings and efficiencies from ‘going green’ has not been lost on many,  however. Six in ten said that this was a major or key driver to their green  programmes.   Green in the policy agenda  More respondents felt that the green agenda complemented the regeneration/place  shaping policy agenda (63%) than felt it complemented any other – but only slightly  more than felt it complemented the transformation agenda (61%).  Over half (55%) felt that green issues were complementary to the Gershon efficiency  drive.   However, one in ten (8%) felt that the green agenda conflicted with efficiency efforts.  Over a quarter (27%) also felt that green issues and Varney customer service  aspirations bore no relation to each other ‐ and three percent that they were in  conflict with each other.   Pulling together the threads of policy agendas to ensure that the organisation as a  whole is acting in a coherent fashion on all fronts is no easy matter. Green, however,  appears to be a policy that relates easily in the minds of many to other major policy  issues, and could well be a cross cutting, or underpinning, theme pulling other  agendas into the fuller picture.   Who leads the green charge?  There is little consistency as to who leads on green initiatives within councils at either  the strategic or the operational level, except for when it comes to technology:  responsibility for this lies firmly at the door of the head of IT or CIO.   Setting the corporate vision fell to the chief executive in a third of councils and the  lead member in another third. In one third, however, there appeared to be no senior  officer steering direction which, in light of later identification of senior level buy‐in  being an essential factor for success, suggests that many councils will struggle to  implement a coordinated green response.   One striking factor was the lack of lead by heads of finance either operationally or  strategically in green issues.   Time to track  Encouragingly, almost seven in ten (68%) councils currently had green targets  embedded within overall corporate targets. A further two in ten (21%) planned to  embed targets in this way.   Less encouragingly, however, when it came to embedding green targets within  specific IT department targets, just three in ten (30%) of councils currently did this.  Just over a third (34%) not only had no IT department targets, but had no plans to do  this. The remainder��36% had plans to instigate green targets within IT.  

“Budget  pressures mean  that 'Green IT' is  not really a  priority in  procurement.  We are  implementing  things under the  'Green' banner,  eg Power Down,  but the real  reason for doing  this is to save  costs.”    “There are far  more pressing  issues to tackle  and we have  neither the will,  funds or  resources to deal  with additional  requirements,  especially when  they are so ill  defined.     ”All of these  (policy items)  are led by the  City's  Sustainable  Community  Strategy where  'green' issues  underpin much  of the action.”   

 

And even less encouragingly, the majority of respondents did not feel that their  councils had a clear understanding of the impact of current operations and working  practices.   Half of respondents claimed that their councils were tracking and measuring  sustainability within the wider strategic performance process and within existing  performance indicators. Yet just a third were using carbon footprint calculations, and  only six percent currently used a green house gas protocol accounting tool.   By dint of the lack of activity, a number seemed to feel that tracking of specific green  targets was not necessary.    

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


6    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Green technology initiatives  Whilst the role that ICT can play in enabling greener working practices is universally  acknowledged, initiatives seem to focus on reducing the carbon footprint of the ICT  function (virtualisation, thin client computing, power down, technology refresh etc).   Videoconferencing and mobile working stand out as greener working practices enabled  by technology being actively deployed by councils – but telehealth had been explored  by few.   Green purchasing  Ensuring that green factors are embedded into the procurement process will be key to  delivering sustainable ICT according to recent Gartner reports. Encouragingly, over  four in ten (42%) of councils currently specify green/sustainability issues within the  tender process.   However, only 17% of councils currently use whole life costing when assessing best  value procurement options. The majority, 62%, used a combination of quality and cost,  with a further 15% making decisions based on ‘lowest cost’ alone.   At present there is little involvement of finance teams in the tracking of performance  measures and indicators. However, this can be expected to change as procurement and  tender processes increasingly specify green criteria.   There is a recognition that ICT environmental impact continues well after the hardware  comes to the end of its life, with 74% stating that sustainable IT disposal initiatives are  currently underway.   Increasingly, it would seem, technology suppliers will need to demonstrate green  credentials for both themselves and their products – 67% either currently, or will soon,  specify green/sustainability issues in the tender process. A further 53% state that they  either currently, or will soon, request evidence of green accountability from suppliers.   It is obvious that green credentials are beginning to have a substantial impact on the  tender process. And it can be expected that green will increasingly become a standard  criterion within technology procurement within the next four years.   However, it remains to be seen whether green considerations will override cost  considerations – especially in the wake of the credit crunch and banking failures  prevailing in the last quarter of 2008.  

“Lots of hype and  misinformation  which tends to  cloud real issues  and benefits.  There is an  inability to look at  the overall  impact, especially  with external  influences – a  tendency to jump  on latest  bandwagon. See  the LCD monitor  situation for an  example.”    There are benefits  in some aspects  such as power  saving, but much  of the 'green  agenda' is over  hyped, lacks  credibility, and is  promoted by  those with a  vested interest.  Anything that is  done is either a  knee‐jerk reaction  or a box ticking  exercise.” 

Factors for success  Embedding green initiatives within the corporate strategy was seen as the most  important enabler for success in delivering a ‘green council’, with 68% scoring it as very  or vitally important.   Having senior green champions within the organisation and both engaging with and  involving employees were also cited as key to ensuring the success of green initiatives.   Quantifiable targets with clear performance reporting to officers and the community  was also seen as important by a majority of respondents.   Interestingly, ICT was currently seen as the least important of these factors by the  majority of respondents, with under half (46%) suggesting that they were very or vitally  important to success. This despite the majority acknowledging technology’s  importance to the green agenda in previous questions.  

  “You can't  quantify the  importance as it is  paramount.” 

  “Members need to  prioritise green  issues and the rest  will follow.” 

 

Green barriers  Overwhelmingly, insufficient resource/budget was seen as the biggest barrier to the  success of a council’s successful implementation of its green initiatives – seven in ten  said that it was a main or major barrier. Just 1.5% said that this was not a barrier at all. 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


7    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Respondents felt that green initiatives were not yet given enough priority or  importance within the majority of councils – and this, according to many, was a  main blocker to successful implementation. Existing corporate culture, lack of clear  targets and corporate requirements for a quick ROI were also listed as key barriers to  success.   A third felt that their council’s current inability to monitor or measure progress was a  major block – which is understandable. After all, if you can’t prove progress and  success, how can you build the case for implementing such initiatives?  This lack of reporting ability appears in direct contradiction to the majority opinion  that getting senior level and end user buy in to such initiatives was vital as a  precursor to success. To engage effectively you need both evidence and a  communication channel.   Councils, of course, are not green field sites. There is a massive existing investment  in technology, fuelled in large part by the local e‐government programme which  ended in 2005 and aimed to e‐enable local services. This existing, legacy technology  infrastructure was cited as a main or major barrier to successful implementation of  green initiatives by four in ten respondents (41%).   Green future  According to Gartner, immediate green IT issues centre on power, cooling and flow  space problems in data centres and office environments. The analyst suggests eight  areas of focus within the next two years: modern data centre facilities' design  concepts; advanced cooling technologies; use of modelling and monitoring  software; virtualisation technologies; processor design and server efficiency; energy  management for the office environment; integrated energy management for the  software environment; combined heat and power.   During the next two to five years, Gartner believes that many green technologies  will mature and become important in the development of greener IT organisations.  However, the analyst stresses the importance of planning and assessing the  appropriateness and cost of using these new products. It suggests that organisations  focus on green IT procurement; green asset life‐cycle programmes; environmental  labelling of servers and other devices; videoconferencing; changing people's  behaviours; green accounting in IT; green legislation in data centres; corporate  social responsibility (CSR) and IT programs.   Gartner identifies seven further areas to focus on long term: carbon offsetting and  carbon trading, data centre heat recycling, alternative energy sources, software  efficiency, green building design, green legislation, green chargeback. And it warns  organisations to beware of ‘greenwash’ – industry hype that causes confusion!  The results of our research suggest that local government is already making inroads  with the immediate green IT issues – indeed the government’s 18 step plan to  greener IT aligns nicely with these goals.   However, local government has made less progress with Gartner’s areas of medium  and long term focus. Indeed, the sector will have its work cut out in the next few  years if it is to green the ICT estate – either to match the government’s own target,  or whether because it sees the benefit to the organisation and local communities of  doing so. 

“It is not  understood by  decision makers  (our Head of ICT  does, but can't  seem to get  adequate support  as ICT itself is not  valued).”    “There are far  more pressing  issues to tackle  and we have  neither the will,  funds or resources  to deal with  additional  requirements,  especially when  they are so ill  defined.”    “North Tyneside  Council’s early  engagement with  Keysource has  resulted in the  implementation  of a free cooling  system solution  representing  potential savings  of £55,000 per  annum. An  equivalent saving  of 300 tonnes of  CO2 based on  National Grid  emissions.”    

 

The situation today would appear to be neither green veneer nor green revolution ‐  but there is an unstoppable green tide washing over local government that will  revolutionise the way it underpins operations and service delivery.      

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


8    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  3. Commentary  3.1  When flying through heavy turbulence into a green fog you need good  instrumentation  Dave Waltho, Head of Government Affairs, SAS UK  The roots of the current financial crisis lie in the inability of some major, multinational organisations to  make evidence based risk:benefit decisions, and to therefore align resources and incentives with  sustainable strategic goals.  Indeed, it is not uncommon in our dealings with private sector organisations for SAS Business  Intelligence and Analytics solutions to uncover that c20% of an organisation’s customers are destroying  c400% of their profit. However, because more than half of executives agree that they do not fully  understand what drives their profit, many have been making decisions – such as investing scarce  resources in and incentivising staff on high response rates from marketing campaigns to those same or  similar customers ‐ that are in fact accelerating the death of the company.   Reminding myself of this helps me to assess these research results in Green IT through a half full rather  than half empty lens. If global organisations are even now managing such fundamental and long  standing KPIs as profit by using gut feel and/or bad data, then it is no surprise that many Local  Authorities admit that they are currently struggling to integrate, measure and prioritise the impacts of  new, and harder to pin down, KPIs such as green.   Our global research shows that the majority of larger organisations across all sectors have also  identified environmental issues as a key strategic issue – if only because of the increasing demand from  all of their external stakeholders. But few have successfully embedded this in their strategies, corporate  and business unit performance management frameworks and ‘business‐as‐usual’ operations. Fewer still  really understand how to benchmark, measure and track progress and prioritise what they should do  next.   Certainly it has to be highly encouraging to find that, not only do almost all councils acknowledge that  green issues are vital to their wider organisational strategy, but also that nearly 70% see it as their role  to act as a champion and provide a lead locally in environmental responsibility and awareness.  Furthermore, it makes absolute sense that many have started by putting a green veneer on existing  cost saving initiatives. Best practice suggests that a phased approach, starting with the more obvious  lower hanging fruit, is a great way of getting quick wins and generating internal momentum and buy in.   Nevertheless other parts of the research indicate that the commitment to green among many councils  is built on fragile foundations. The fact that, in the short time since the research was completed and the  financial crisis has worsened, some councils have already reported that green has become an  ‘unaffordable luxury’ supports this more pessimistic perspective. For some councils at least, it seems  that green was not even momentarily this seasons ‘new black’ but merely an even faster passing fad  among accessories!  To some extent this apparent fickleness is surprising because 91% of councils identify that embedding  green into corporate strategy is the biggest enabler ‐ and 60% claim to have done this. A similar  majority say that green is regarded, and indeed communicated, as complementary to other key goals  such as ‘Place shaping’, Transformation and Gershon.   Nevertheless, other responses point to the shaky foundations and more of a ‘zero sum’ mentality ‐ not  least the 93% who say that insufficient budget and resources are the key barrier to greening the  organisation. Perhaps of most concern is that over 50% say they are tracking green performance, but a  higher proportion then admit that they do not understand the green impacts of either their current  working practices or their future plans and few are using one of the established carbon accounting  protocols.   This suggests that many are essentially ‘flying blind’ – unclear on both where they took off from and  where they are headed; with no information on fuel levels, and no instrumentation or radar to steer  them through the turbulence. 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


9    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  To make matters worse, few seem to have their qualified pilots on board! The limited involvement of  both Heads of Finance and Heads of IT in the greening of councils technology estate surprised all who  have been involved in commissioning and reviewing this survey. The research underlines that the latter  do have a clear responsibility for leading the greening of the IT department but that they are largely  missing the opportunity to make a bigger impact by evangelising how IT can help green the rest of the  organisation. In contrast, it seems that Heads of Finance are almost entirely failing to engage ‐ not even  being involved in the measuring, monitoring, analysis and performance of green initiatives.   Until the strong relationship between carbon emissions and pounds ‐ and the importance of accounting  for both ‐ is understood, then ‘green’ initiatives will always be the first to be jettisoned when councils hit  turbulence and fuel runs low and choices between alternative routes through the storm will have to be  made on gut feel.   With the long range forecast indicating that the regulatory and moral pressures on councils to not only  do more with less but achieve and be transparent about their green credentials will only grow, the  prospects for a crash landing for many would seem to be high.   From our experience of deploying integrated ‘instrumentation and radar’ in the private sector, SAS  knows that the right information can make organisations both more fuel efficient and better at piloting  a successful course through financial storms. Our ‘IT Intelligence’ solutions not only enable the  ‘greening of IT’ but also generate many £ms in quick win savings – at the same time as reducing  contingency risk. Indeed, we are so confident of these capabilities that we often enter risk:reward  arrangements.    However, identifying and reaching the bulk of the fruit that is above the easy pickings line requires a  more holistic approach. Investing a small proportion of the ‘Green IT’ savings in solutions such as SAS  ‘Sustainability Performance Management’ ‐ which includes carbon footprint modelling, ‘what if’  scenario analysis and simple and consistent reporting ‐ enables a balanced view across economic, social  and environmental issues and shows where you can be both ‘green’ and ‘lean’ going forward.   Evidence based decisions between alternative routes can then generate much larger financial and  carbon savings both across the organisation as a whole (IT generally represents 2% of emissions) and  also within its value chain.  The alternative is to fly by the seat of your pants. But, as the ‘profit blind’ private sector executives  found, taking that approach in turbulent economic weather can result in lost bearings and decision  making that may not only hasten the organisation’s demise but also, in the case of green issues, that of  the rest of the planet.    

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


10    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  3.2 Think global, act local to impact sustainability  Jim Craig, Public Policy and Corporate Social Responsibility Manager, Sun Microsystems Ltd  I'd like to thank all the participants who took the time to respond. Overall we were encouraged by the  responses to the ‘Green Revolution’ survey. The importance of local initiatives combining to create a  wider benefit cannot be underestimated.  It is positive to see that over 90% of councils who responded feel that green issues are central or of  some importance to the wider organisational strategy. The importance of thinking globally and acting  locally is something that a combination of local authorities and global organisations can achieve.  Green issues are seen as aiding the transformation agenda and in order for us to mitigate the impact of  climate change we can increase our focus on transformation.  The Eco‐nomic and Eco‐logical aspects are well balanced in the survey demonstrating both commercial  and environmental awareness. More benefits can be achieved with cross functional teams.  IT provides a service used by all the authorities and is both part of the carbon emission problem and  reassuringly is also seen as part of the carbon reduction solution.  The Global eSustainability Initiative (GeSI) in its Smart2020 report recommends technology for mobile  and flexible working and video‐conferencing; this view was also echoed by the authorities questioned.  At Sun we encourage flexible working. This saves time, money and GHG emissions avoided or reduced  by eliminating employee commutes. In 2008 a US study revealed that employees saved on average 107  hours in travel time, 151 gallons of fuel and avoided 52000 metric tons of carbon dioxide!  Technology can provide dramatic reductions in electrical consumption and associated carbon  emissions. Sun's thin client desktop model uses approximately 5% of the electricity consumed by a  traditional PC, providing significant environmental and cost benefits.   Expansion of green/sustainable procurement policies will encourage technology vendors to take this  aspect of their business even more seriously. Standards for measurement and comparison within the  industry will help authorities to compare ‘apples with apples’.  Measuring whole life costs would help to identify products that were more ‘sustainable’, especially  combined with green accountability of suppliers. A greater weighting towards sustainable technology is  favoured. Measuring and accounting of emissions will become standard practice. You can't manage  what you can't (or don't) measure. With figures of €30 per tonne of carbon being muted currently,  involving the finance team in this process will be a key enabler to success.  An on‐going partnership is important between vendors and authorities to create ‘exemplars’ of  successful implementations while simultaneously understanding and removing barriers to adoption;  this will help in the overall implementation and promotion of sustainable ICT.   The key to 'Green IT' is that it should not (and does not) cost more. Many efforts are underway to  reduce the environmental impacts of ICT within authorities, including server virtualisation and PC  replacements with thin clients. These help reduce power, space, heat and cooling costs. More positive  use of ICT to help the broader organisation reduce emissions is also considered, such as video  conferencing and remote working.   Overall the signs are encouraging. Understanding the benefits of sustainable technologies, sharing  lessons learned and looking at the eco‐nomic as well as eco‐logical benefits provides a balanced view to  organisations for long term sustainability.   

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


11    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  3.3 Traditional financial tools and strategy will underpin green ambitions  Helenne Doody, Sustainability Specialist, Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA)  CIMA supported this survey because we are interested to learn whether sustainability is becoming  integrated within local government. Thousands of our members work within the public sector and it is  important for us to get a better understanding of how the green agenda is affecting their role and the  organisations they work for.   Local authorities have a vital role to play in taking the lead on ‘going green’ and are uniquely placed for  encouraging local action for reducing carbon emissions and responding to climate change. The survey  results have been positive in this respect. It is clear from both the ‘quick survey’ and the ‘main survey’  that green issues are of importance to local government, and the majority of respondents felt that their  council is committed to going green.   However, in digging a little deeper, the survey results generally reflect what we are seeing in the private  sector. Although environmental issues are becoming increasingly important, and there is a lot of talk  about ‘going green’, this talk is often not translated into action. Few organisations, in either the public  or the private sector, have really integrated sustainability into strategy, and fewer still are involving the  finance team.  One reason for this may be a lack of real understanding as to what ‘going green’ actually means, both  for the local authorities and for individuals. The main survey highlighted that the majority of  respondents feel that their local authority does not have a clear understanding of the green impacts of  its current or future operations. Without a clear understanding of impacts it is difficult to identify  appropriate actions. In terms of individuals, the quick survey showed that less than two thirds feel  adequately informed about green issues.   A contributing factor may be that there is little consistency as to who leads on green issues, both at a  strategic or operational level. In a significant number of cases there appears to be no senior officer  responsible for steering direction of green issues at all. It is important that all organisations have a clear  vision in relation to green issues and related objectives should be incorporated into the council’s overall  strategy. Equally important is communication of strategy and objectives throughout the organisation,  and regular updates on progress towards meeting the objectives. Although 62% of councils report  regularly on sustainability performance internally to staff, 38% do not. Yet the key enabler rated with  the highest overall importance was ‘engaging and involving employees’.  Almost two thirds claimed to have green targets embedded within business strategy and in overall  corporate targets, but only about half felt that their councils were tracking and measuring sustainability  within the wider strategic performance process. A further 15% planned to do so.   Strategy should be the starting point. Measurements and targets will play an important role, but  metrics will have little value unless they are in demand to support strategy and long term decision  making. Likewise, unless sustainability reporting is demonstrating measured progress towards  implementing a sustainability strategy, it is largely just a backward‐looking compliance or public  relations exercise.   Survey respondents agree that strategy is a key enabler to going green, with 88% believing that is  important that green initiatives are embedded in corporate strategy. Organisations should be more  forward looking and think about how to adapt their strategy to make sustainability part of day‐to‐day  operations. Finance professionals have a key role to play in this process, providing vital business  intelligence to support strategy and influence long‐term decision making.  When making capital investments, including those relating to ICT processes and technologies, it is  important to consider the long‐term implications – both financial and environmental – and balance  these with short‐term costs. Finance teams should be involved in such capital investment appraisal  exercises, applying tools such as whole‐life costing and looking at the entire value chain.   The main survey showed that only 17% of local authorities are currently using whole‐life costing  processes when assessing best value procurement options. The majority use a combination of quality  and cost, but 15% are still making decisions based on ‘lowest cost’ alone, with no consideration being  given to environmental impacts.  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


12    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  In the Cabinet Office’s document on ‘Greening Government’s ICT’ Finance Directors have been tasked  with assuring that the environmental consequences of procurements are fully evaluated.   Yet in the small percentage of cases where whole‐life costing is being applied, there is limited  involvement of the finance team. Making investment decisions based on long‐term impacts may be a  challenge for finance directors, who are often faced with short‐term budget pressures, particularly in  the current economic climate. It is important to encourage a change in mind set, from the top  downwards, so that decisions made are based on the best long‐term financial return and the lowest  environmental impact, even when this may mean a greater up‐front investment.   Culture and insufficient budget and resources were seen by survey respondents as the top two key  barriers to successful implementation of green initiatives. It is important that a more long‐term view is  taken when making procurement decisions and up‐front investments will need to be made. However,  many ‘quick wins’ have also been identified ‐ actions that do not cost any money but that save money.  Implementing quick wins are an ideal start in the journey to going green. They will help to build  momentum and motivation, as well as contribute towards reducing costs and the council’s carbon  footprint. Seeking cost savings and efficiencies were seen as another key driver of green initiatives.  Although the finance team do have involvement in procurement decisions, they surprisingly have very  little involvement in activities such as tracking performance measures, preparing carbon footprint  calculations, carbon accounting/budgeting and sustainability reporting. CIMA would like to see this  situation change over time, with organisations making better use of the skill sets of finance  professionals. Traditional financial tools and techniques can be applied to these new and challenging  issues.     

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


13    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  3.4 Green IT, pragmatism & strategy  Richard Steel, Society of IT Management (SOCITM) President, CIO London Borough of Newham  The Green Bandwagon is rolling, but how can we steer beyond the hype and adopt a pragmatic  approach that’s embedded in our ICT strategy? And how can we avoid preaching to the converted and  influence those who are only paying lip‐service?  I was recently a Panellist at an ‘Answer Time for Green IT’ conference organised by the Environmental  IT Leadership Team, which was interesting and informative, but I realised that the audience was  already converted to the cause. The indifferent majority have yet to be engaged. Part of the answer, I  suppose, is that the converted must be missionaries for the cause, but I feel there’s a still greater need  to cut through the hype and articulate a realistic Green Agenda.  Experts agree that the most environmental damage occurs during the manufacture, delivery and  disposal of ICT equipment, so that hints at priority areas in which to focus our efforts on sustainable  procurement and end‐of‐life strategies, and implies the need to sweat the asset.   Understandably though, the Bandwagon has initially focussed on the more obvious power  consumption and the mantra now is to switch unused equipment off. This sounds like a no‐brainer, but  is it? Old IT lags, like me, remember the days when we dreaded disruption to our Data Centre power  supplies because there were always failures when equipment that had to be turned‐off was switched  back on again.   My own conversion to green consciousness started last year when I decided to switch‐off the three year  old family PC at night. So, guess what, the hard disc failed. The reality still is that the longevity of  computer equipment, especially where motors are involved, is heavily affected by switching on and off  and associated affects such as heat variation and power spikes.   So how do we achieve the right balance when it comes to sweating the asset and power management?  The clue, I think, is in the words ‘power management’. Modern systems software is designed to strike a  reasonable balance between minimising power consumption and maximising equipment longevity. ICT  products, services and applications have massive potential to reduce climate change in other industrial  and domestic sectors through a reduction in their carbon emissions, but we should also ensure that we  maximise the potential for ICT tools to mitigate its own carbon footprint.  An allied consideration is that, in the UK, accepted wisdom says that we should turn equipment off at  night; ‘standby is not good enough’. But when I was at a conference in Sweden earlier this year an EU  Researcher on the subject presented figures that showed that the difference between power  consumption in computers switched‐off, and in a sleep state, were negligible. (www.ecocomputer.org).  A less debatable focus for the avoidance of power wastage is in the millions of transformers we use for  the chargers and low voltage power supplies used by our ‘phones and computer peripherals. More often  than not, these are left humming away when the equipment they serve is turned‐off, or fully charged!  On the principle that every little helps, we can help to save energy by avoiding the use of bright colours  in our applications design (if using LCD screens – there’s no difference with CRTs) – see the alternative  to Google… www.blackle.com   So, we need to be clearer about what really makes a difference. But the other key consideration is  strategy.   How does the Green Agenda fit alongside other imperatives, such as digital convergence and the  resulting new security infrastructure requirements, Local Government Reorganisation, Data Centre  virtualisation, greater partnership working driven by Local & Multi‐Area Agreements, Comprehensive  Area Assessment, New Ways of Working and accelerating channel migration?   Actually, most of these will considerably help reduce Local Government’s carbon footprint in the longer  term, but we must, at all costs, avoid knee‐jerk reaction to single‐issue agenda items, like ‘Green IT’,  driven by misinformation and hype.   An holistic approach to strategy development is vital. We have to plan for the long‐term and the reality,  therefore, is that the full potential for sustainable, ICT facilitated reduction in Local Government’s  carbon footprint will only be achievable in the medium to long term.  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


14    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  In the meantime, there are some ‘no‐brainers’ that will deliver benefits in the short‐term. Effective print  management, almost certainly based on networked multi‐function devices, with accounting controls to  encourage efficient use of resources, is certainly one of them.   

3.5  Green veneer or green revolution?  Jos Creese, Head of IT, Hampshire County Council (Local Government Delivery Board, CIO Council and  SOCITM Vice President)  The trouble is, ‘Green IT’ has a sort of fashionable ring about it. At one end of the spectrum it’s seen as  being sustainable and organic, but with little practical business value – a sort of ‘green froth’. At the  other end it is seen to be just about reducing energy consumption and marketing more environmentally  sensitive manufacturing methods.  In reality, Green IT must be about much more. Technology is a major contributor to greenhouse gases  and at a time of soaring demand for energy it really does offer the potential to help save the planet ‐ if it  is used and designed responsibly.    Part of the problem is that no one seems to really know exactly what to do. Clearly switching off things  when they are not in use makes practical sense. But beyond this things get a little more complicated.  Take for example bio‐fuels – good or bad for the planet? The jury is out. The same goes for disposable  versus traditional nappies. You would think these were the easy things to prove! Home working is more  difficult, yet we are told it’s a good thing and most companies are pushing for more flexible working to  save money and to reduce carbon footprint. I’d be the first to admit that flying to Brussels twice a week  is probably not good for the planet. But for many businesses the most energy and carbon efficient  approach is to squeeze as many people as possible in to a well‐designed office block, even if they have  to commute there, rather than all of us working in our own homes, with our own PCs, printers, lighting,  heating etc. … not that I can prove it of course.   The trouble is that business has been quick to spot the savings from home working and of course the  ability to claim carbon savings on the company ‘green’ balance sheet.  And then there are PCs. Not many people know that it is estimated that 80% of the ‘carbon cost’ of the  life of a PC lies in its manufacture, not in its use or even its disposal. Yet we seem fixated on power  ratings. The same goes for mobile phones – do we really need a new one every 12 months? Do they  really all need different chargers and cables? The manufacturers thinks so, and few of us seem to resist  those ‘free’ upgrades.  Of course, the big debate in IT is about data centres and the enormous power they consume and the  energy they waste in heat. Whilst there is a great deal of good practice in consolidation, power  management and heat reuse, there is still a risk that companies will choose to simply outsource their  data centre carbon footprint to the far east and claim the benefit.  In all this, therefore, there must be a role for government and we are all braced for new regulations.  Given the failure of market forces to control the banking sector there seems little hope in my view that  market forces alone will bring about change in response to global climate issues until it’s too late.   So I am in favour of regulation to encourage ‘green’ behaviours and corporate social responsibility. But I  am also a bit worried that regulation may be based on some of the misconceptions I’ve described, or at  least some inadequate information about what really works.  Whilst recessionary pressures will inevitably pop the bubbles of any ‘green froth’, it will also stimulate  considerable interest in technology to support more efficient ways of working, energy efficiency and  more rigorous practices in acquisition, management and disposal of technologies. It might even  encourage a wider and more sensible debate about how technology can contribute to more sustainable  business practices and working behaviours. At least, that is my hope.     

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


15    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  3.6  Green in the here and now can make a difference long term  Glyn Evans, Assistant to the Chief Executive on Transformation, Birmingham City Council   (Local Government Delivery Board, CIO Council)  I grew up in the shadow of The Bomb. Though for most people it had no tangible impact on daily lives,  it was a constant companion; something over which you had no control but which could destroy not  just you but everything you held dear in an instant.  It seems sometimes that global warming is the new Bomb. Most people don’t feel that they can  contribute much to saving the planet (an interesting conceit in itself as, whatever happens, we’re not  going to destroy Earth). And to a large extent they are right; whilst it might have an important symbolic  role, turning off unneeded lights will have a marginal impact on carbon emissions.  I think we have the focus wrong. When it comes to ‘Green IT’, there are three main changes I would like  to see.  First, let’s make the incentives clearer. National targets that set challenging commitments for 2050 will  not necessarily result in the required actions being taken today. The more cynical might argue that’s  precisely the point.   In Birmingham, we have set a target that we will reduce the city’s carbon emissions by 60% by 2026.  Better, but it will still be hard to motivate people to strive for something that far in the future. In local  government we’re used to the annual planning cycle, so let’s use it; build annual targets built into our  business plans that are set at the required level.   A 4.5% annual carbon reduction will pretty well achieve Birmingham’s target, and sounds more  realistic. And by working on an annual basis we can build the targets into performance management  systems that will incentivise their delivery. Clearly, in such an environment carbon emission reductions  will not all come from Green IT, but it will make an important contribution.  Second, we should emphasise the ‘no brainer’ aspects of ‘Green IT’. Almost all local government  managers are faced with challenging efficiency targets. It doesn’t require significant intellectual ability  to realise that reducing energy consumption will result in lower energy bills.   The problem for many is that the charge made to a cost centre for energy often bears little relationship  to the energy consumed by that service, with bills often being aggregated and recharged within overall  building costs. We need to make the linkage much closer – by using smart metering, for example – and  managers can then see a direct link between energy savings and budget savings. They will soon be  knocking at the IT manager’s door for tools to drive down the cost of running their PCs.  Third, and perhaps more controversially, I’d like to see a move away from the focus on ‘Green IT’.   Not only does it paint IT (at least implicitly) as somehow vaguely disreputable when it comes to  environmental credentials, but it only looks at one aspect of the issue.   What should concern us more is the total carbon footprint of particular public service. By focusing our  attention on the IT we risk missing other, potentially greater, green opportunities. One example would  be channel shift; if we move our customers to electronic self service from home rather than visiting the  one‐stop shop, there is a reduction in carbon emissions.   And it’s cheaper for us too, so there are efficiency savings as well as environmental benefits.  In practice, green issues are rarely central within a local authority. The problem is that our priority is the  here and now and not future generations. The answer is to recognise this. By making ‘Green’ a here and  now issue, we may actually make a difference in the long term.     

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


16    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  4. The Surveys  Following the Cabinet Office’s announcement in July of its aim to make the government ICT estate  ‘carbon neutral’ within four years, and a recent flood of reports suggesting how local government ‘can  go green’, the research programme, ‘Green Veneer or Green Revolution’, aimed to provide a snapshot  of how local authorities were, today, approaching the issue of ‘greening IT’.    Unlike other research programmes and reports, this survey was specifically designed to gain  quantitative results of action on the ground and best practice as it developed in the sector. To this end,  the programme was undertaken and the results published in a short period of time. Questionnaires  were issued and collated in August and September with the analysis undertaken in October and the  final report produced in November 2008.   4.1 Methodology  LGITU and UKauthorITy.com’s publisher, IPL, maintains a database of subscribers to its stable of  publications in the local government and local area agreement (LAA) organisation space. This currently  comprises over 22,000 local government and other LAA organisation officers. This was used to identify  and personally invite relevant local government officers and IT practitioners in all the UK’s 368 local  authorities to participate in the research programme and outline their views and experiences on the  issues. The aim was to garner a wide spread of views from technology through to finance and  procurement and other council departments.   Invitations to participate in the web‐based survey were sent by personalised email, containing a link  through to a personalised survey form, thus enabling the results to be analysed, if necessary, by council  type, region, area of service and job function through use of key codes rather than the collection of new  data. This also enabled the results to be anonymised whilst retaining comprehensive information about  council type, geographical region and job function for analysis purposes.  4.2 Response  The survey forms were opened by 598 local government officers.   Only 197 of these forms, however, were fully completed. Officers that had not completed the forms  were contacted with a ‘quick question’ survey to ascertain why they had shown initial interest but  decided not to complete the survey. Of these, 162 responded.   The results from the exercise are therefore split into two parts:   ‐ ‐

Quick questions – 162 respondents  Main in‐depth survey – 197 respondents 

Overall, 359 officers from 219 local authorities participated in the research programme, representing a  47% response rate from the UK’s 468 local authorities.   In general, the larger  authorities showed most  interest in the issue. Nearly  nine in ten of the London  boroughs (87.9%) and the  metropolitan councils (88.9%)  responded to the survey, with  almost three quarters of the  counties (73.5%) showing  interest. The lowest response  rates came from among the  English districts (36.1%),  Scottish unitaries (34.4%),  Welsh unitaries (13.6%), with  Northern Ireland showing least  regional interest (3.8%).  

 

% of Council Type Responding 87.9% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

73.5%

88.9%

66.7% 36.1%

34.4% 3.8%

13.6%

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


17    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  A number of councils showed a high level of interest in the issue. For example, eight officers from  Birmingham responded; six from both Derby City and Hampshire; five each from Bedfordshire,  Kensington& Chelsea and Leicestershire;  London  Scottish  Boroughs,  and four from Calderdale, Fife, Kent,  Unitaries,  English  15.3% Lewisham and Trafford. A further 25  4.5% Counties,  councils submitted three responses and   15% 46 submitted two.   In terms of subdividing overall response,  almost a third of the replies to the survey  came from English district councils – despite  the low response rate from this type of  council (36.1%) this still represented 86  unique councils.  

Northern  Ireland, 0.3% English  Unitaries,  14.2%

Welsh  Unitaries,  1.1% Metropolitan  Councils, 17%

English  Districts,  32.6%

From a regional pint of view, most interest in issues related to the greening of councils’ ICT estate came  from officers in councils in the south east (17%) and London (15.3%). The north west (11.1%), the west  midlands (10%), south west (9.5%), east midlands (8.9%) and Yorkshire & Humberside (7.5%) showed  keen interest, but the lower interest rates in Scotland (4.5%), Wales (1.1%) and Northern Ireland (0.3%)  stood out: Yorkshire & Humberside,  7.5% West Midlands, 10%

East, 10% East Midlands, 8.9%

Wales, 1.1%

North East, 4.7%

South West, 9.5% London, 15.3% South East, 17%

Northern Ireland , 0.3% Scotland, 4.5%

  

 

 

 

North West, 11.1%

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Sample size: 359 

A wide range of officers from these councils participated in the research, with responsibilities ranging  from chief executive and head of IT to finance, procurement and departmental user:  19.8%

Senior IT/Business/Project Managers Environmental Customer Services Performance & Policy Heads of IT Finance Procurement Economic Develoment & Regeneration Public Relations / Communications Heads of Transformation / Business Change IT/Business/Project Officers Social Care   Web Managers Social Care IT Chief Executives Customer Services IT Environmental IT Economic Development IT

17.0% 11.4% 9.7% 7.2% 6.4% 6.1% 3.6% 2.8% 2.8% 2.8% 2.5% 2.2% 1.7% 1.7% 1.1% 0.6% 0.6% 0%

2%

4%

6%

8% 10% 12% 14% 16% 18% 20%  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


18    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  5. Quick Survey  Four hundred and one officers opened the main survey form   but did not complete it.   Of these, 162 subsequently returned a ‘quick questions’ survey  looking at why they did not complete the main survey.   The majority felt that it was either not their personal area of  work; that the questions were too complex; or that they were  unable to answer on behalf of the council.   Said one: “As we are a small Borough there is no single officer that  deals with 'green' issues and would therefore be able to respond on  the Borough's behalf.” 

Reason 

%. 

Not area of work 

27 

Too complex 

23 

Unable to answer for council 

23 

No time 

Not an influencer therefore no point 

Council does not have this info 

Unable to answer some questions 

Other 

10  TOTAL 

100% 

The researchers felt that, overall, the picture was of an issue that held great interest for officers, but  was one in which real/positive actions were not always far enough advanced and solid  information/plans were not to hand.   Said one respondent: “Maybe this is something we will be able to respond to in the future.”  Other comments received at this point included:   “I suspect that plans are not always far enough advanced to answer such questions, however I  expect all councils will be working towards more greener working.”  “The reason I didn't fill in the questionnaire is that I have just been given the task of delivering the  Sustainability Strategy for the Council and developing this into a programme. I am currently  getting to grips with identifying the project portfolio from projects already running and those that  need to be put in place and then prioritising these into short, medium and long term delivery  against our corporate objectives and available resources. Because it is such early days I did not  feel that I could give you accurate answers. I can confirm that one of the Council's top priorities is  a clean, green and sustainable environment and that this has been developed further within the  priorities of the administration.”  “We have attempted to answer the questions but despite consultation with business areas we  don’t actually have that level of data available at the moment “  “I will add that although we are committed to ‘going green’ there is a lot of work going on at the  moment but it is still in its infancy in technology terms so that the business can truly benefit from  the technology aspects of 'going green'.”  “The council have initiated some green initiatives but I feel it is more to tick a box rather than  properly investing in it.”  “Sorry, started the questionnaire but not in the position to complete, too IT focused!”  “We are very interested in this area and have an IT rep looking at Greening up all the IT services,  so were pleased to get latest newsletter with information in, which he has too. Have a new  network of Environment Champions doing a Big Switch off campaign in Oct which will include IT  equipment.”  This 162 went on to answer four key questions for researchers.   5.1. Do you feel adequately informed about Green issues?  Don't  Know,  16%

No,  23.5%

Yes,  60.5%

 

The majority, (60.5%) felt that they were adequately informed  about green issues.   However, this leaves a substantial minority (39.5%) that do not  feel that they have enough information on green issues in  general. 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


19    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  5.2. Are Green issues important to your council?  No,  3.1%

Over eight in ten (81.5%) stated that green issues were  important to their council.  

Don't  Know,  15.4%

Just 3.1% said that green was not of interest. A further 15.4%  did not know. In light of the almost universal inclusion of green  targets within Local Area Agreement (LAA) plans this suggests  councils need to do more to spread the importance of green  concerns internally.  

Yes,  81.5%

5.3. Do you feel your council is committed, in action, to Going Green?  No, 8%

Almost three quarters (74.7%) felt that their council was  committed, in action, to ‘going green’.  

Don't  Know,  17.3%

Again, as the majority of LAAs contain targets against   National Indicator 186 on reducing per capita emissions of   CO2 in their areas (of between four and 15% of the 2005  baseline), the surprise here is that over a quarter either didn’t  know, or did not feel, that their council was committed to  going green.  

Yes,  74.7%

5.4. Do you think that technology has a part to play in Going Green?  No,  2.5%

A resounding 84.5% thought that technology had a part to  play in ‘going green’ for their council.  

Don't  Know,  13%

The researchers were pleasantly surprised that this was the  ‘biggest’ yes in this group of questions. More respondents  thought that technology had a part to play in going green  than felt that their council was committed to green issues, or  that their council truly saw green issues as important, or felt  themselves to be informed about green issues in the first  place.  

Yes,  84.6%

     

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


20    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  6. Main Survey  1. How important are Green issues to your council's wider organisational strategy?  No. of users who responded to this question: 195 (98.98%) 

49.2%

46.7%

Green issues are seen as important throughout the  organisation in the vast majority of UK local authorities.   Almost half (49.2%) of respondents felt that green issues  were of central importance to their council’s wider  organisational strategy. A further 46.7% said that green  issues were of some importance.  

4.1%

Limited or No  Some  Importance Importance 

Just 4.1% of respondents said that green issues were of  limited or no importance to the wider organisational  strategy.  

Central  Importance 

  2. What are the key drivers for pursuing Green initiatives within your authority?  No. of users who responded to this question: 188 (95.43%)  

A desire to play a part in conserving the local environment was a major or key driver for almost three  quarters of respondents (73%).   Seventy two percent also indicated that the desire to ensure local sustainability, and 67% the desire to  champion/lead local environmental responsibility, were major or key drivers.   The desire to play a part in the global climate control challenge, however, was seen as a key driver by  fewer: just over half (54%). Still less important was a desire to trailblaze green innovation in the  community – just 40% felt that this was a major or key driver. 

4% Desire to play part in conserving local environment  2%

21%

Seeking cost savings/efficiencies

4% 7%

Desire to ensure local sustainability 

4%5%

Desire to champion/lead local environmental responsibility 

4%6%

Central government mandate/targets 

3%7%

Desire to play part in global climate control challenge  Desire to trailblaze green innovation in the community  Pursuing goal of  ‘carbon neutral’ ICT within four years

36% 27%

29%

19% 23%

27%

17%

9.5%

Employee pressure ‘to go green’

10%

32% 30%

27%

29.5%

25%

34%

21%

Community pressure ‘to go green’ 

33%

35%

33%

26% 20.5% 29%

Not a Driver Minor Driver A Driver Major Driver Key Driver

33%

39%

5% 13.5% 8%

37%

24% 32.5% 49% 43%

17% 16% 4.5% 18%

3%

15% 3%

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%100% Pursuing the goal of ‘carbon neutral’ ICT within four years was least likely to be a driver for green  initiatives in local authorities today – just under half (47%) said that it was either not a driver or was only  a minor driver to such initiatives.   However, the need to seek cost savings and efficiencies through green initiatives was a major or key  driver for over six in ten (62%). Central government mandate/targets also had a role to play as a driver  for pursuing green initiatives.  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


21    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Employee and community pressure to ‘go green’ was seen as ‘a driver’ by 43% and 49% respectively,  but was seen as neither a ‘key driver’ nor ‘not a driver’ by few. This view is reinforced with the results of  later questions pertaining to internal and external reporting of green progress – both of which are rare.   A number of other drivers for embarking on green initiatives were mentioned by respondents at this  point: councillor champion, energy team's recommendations, linking development to carbon  neutrality, local manifesto pledge, own green travel plan, partnership working, political commitment to  EMAS (Eco‐Management and Audit Scheme), public health, recycling only items that will make a profit  (only now thinking of recycling cardboard and plastic), and reducing the council’s carbon footprint.  One respondent said that their council had a major role promoting sustainability in procurement and  ICT through Peer Support Funding and other partnership work.  Another said that the key issue was to link strategies ‐ accommodation, IT, flexible working,  procurement, efficiency, community, Aalborg Commitments etc.  One, perhaps more jaded, respondent said: “To get another tick in another box”.    3. How are green issues regarded in your authority in relation to the following policy agendas?  No. of users who responded to this question: 185 (93.91%)  

Over half (55%) of the survey respondents felt that  green issues were seen as complementary to the  Gershon efficiency drive.    Almost a quarter did not know whether it was  complementary, 13% said that green issues had no  relation to the efficiency agenda and almost one in  ten (8%) felt that the green agenda conflicted with  efficiency efforts.   Just over six in ten (61%) felt that green issues were  complementary to the current transformation  agenda. Just 3% felt that ‘going green’ could conflict  with the current drive to transform both council  operations and service delivery.  

Gershon efficiency drive  Don't Know 24% Conflicts  With No Relation 8% 13%

Transformation agenda  Conflicts  With 3%

Don't Know 22% No Relation 14%

Over a third, however, felt that green issues either  had no relation to the transformation agenda (14%)  or just did not know if it was relevant (22%).  Interestingly, just one quarter (25%) felt that green  issues complemented Varney’s customer service  aspirations.   Over a quarter (27%) felt that green and Varney bore  no relation to each other, and three percent that they  were in conflict with each other. However, almost half  (45%) did not know whether the two agendas were  complementary.   More respondents felt that the green agenda  complemented the regeneration/place shaping  policy agenda (63%) than felt it complemented any  other – but only slightly more than felt it  complemented the transformation agenda (61%).  Almost a quarter (24%) did not know if the two  issues were complementary, just four percent felt  that green issues conflicted with regeneration/ 

 

Comple‐ mentary  55%

Comple‐ mentary  61%

Varney customer focus 

Don't Know 45%

Comple‐ mentary  25% No Relation 27%

3%,  Conflicts  With

Regeneration/Place Shaping  Don't Know 24% Conflicts With 4% No Relation 9%

Comple‐ mentary  63%

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


22    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  place shaping, and nine percent that it bore no  relation to it.  

Social inclusion 

Just over four in ten (42%) felt that green issues  were complementary to the social inclusion  agenda. However, almost three in ten (28%) felt  that they bore no relation to this particular agenda,  with four percent feeling that green conflicted with  it and over a quarter (26%) saying that they did not  know how the two agendas sat in relation to each  other.  

Conflicts With 4%

Don't Know 26%

Comple‐ mentary  42%

No Relation 28%

Said one respondent: ”All of the above are led by the City's Sustainable Community Strategy where 'green'  issues underpin much of the action. We still need to consider the other listed issues in more detail.”    4. Does your authority currently have green targets?  No. of users who responded to this question: 179 (90.86%) 

Encouragingly, almost seven in ten (68%) said that their councils currently had green targets embedded  within overall corporate targets. A further two in ten (21%) planned to embed targets in this way.   The figures for those documenting green targets in the corporate sustainability strategy (64% current,  25% planned) and embedding them in the overall business strategy (60% current, 25% planned) were  also encouraging signs of the importance being afforded to green issues by councils today.   However, when it came down to individual departmental targets level, just over a third had no such  green targets, and had no plans to set them. Only approximately one third (36%) currently had  departmental level targets, with a further third (33%) planning to instigate them.   Even less encouragingly, when it came to embedding green targets within specific IT department  targets, just three in ten (30%) of councils currently did this. Just over a third (34%) not only had no IT  department targets, but had no plans to do this. The remainder 36% had plans to instigate green  targets within IT.   

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Yes

Documented in  corporate  sustainability  strategy  64%

Embedded  within overall  business  strategy  60%

Embedded  within overall  corporate  targets  68%

Embedded  within specific IT  department  targets  30%

Embedded  within individual  departmental  targets 36%

No

11%

15%

11%

34%

30%

Planned

25%

25%

21%

36%

34%

 

 

5. Does your authority have a clear understanding of the green impacts of its operations?  No. of users who responded to this question: 179 (90.86%) 

The majority of respondents did not feel that their authority had a clear understanding of the green  impacts of its current operations and working practices. Just 41.5% could say with confidence that they  did; however, a further 24 % planned to have the ability to track this soon.  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


23    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Just over a third had a clear understanding of the green impacts of their e‐government developments  (34%) with again just over a third having a clear understanding of the potential impacts of their future  plans for working practices/service delivery initiatives (36.5%) or future plans for e‐services (34%).  However, interestingly, almost a further third (32.5%) had plans to work out the potential green impact  of future plans relating to working practices/service delivery.   Nearly four in ten (39%) felt that their council had a clear understanding of the green impact of their  current ICT operations, and just over a third (34%) that they could assess the green impact of future  plans. A further 20% and 24% respectively had plans to enable this type of assessment.  

45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Its current  Future plans for  Its e‐ Future plans for  Its current  Future plans for  operations and  working  government  e‐services  technology  its technology  working  practices /  develop‐ments  (ICT) operations  (ICT) operations  practices  service delivery  (service  initiatives  delivery)  41.5% 36.5% 34% 34% 39% 34%

Yes No

16%

15%

20%

20%

18%

18%

Planned 

24%

32.50%

21%

21%

20%

24%

18.5%

16%

25%

25%

23%

24%

Don't Know

6. How is the measurement of sustainability tracked?   No. of users who responded to this question: 180 (91.37%) 

Half (51%) of respondents claimed that their councils were tracking and measuring sustainability within  the council’s wider strategic performance process; a further 15% said that their council planned to track  green issues within the wider performance process.   Nearly six in ten (57%) said that this was tracked within existing council performance indicators, with  16% saying that there were plans to track in this way.   60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Yes

 

The council’s  wider strategic  performance  management  process 

Council  performance  indicators

Separate  sustainability/ green  measures 

Carbon  Footprint  calculations 

51%

57%

52%

34%

Carbon  accounting  global  reporting  initiative  framework  6%

Green house  gas protocol  accounting  tool 

Local Area  Agreement 

6%

36.5%

No

9%

8%

8%

14%

24%

27%

13%

Planned

15%

16%

18%

23%

19%

12%

13%

Don't Know

25%

19%

22%

29%

51%

55%

37.50%

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


24    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Over a third (36.5%) stated that green issues were tracked within their Local Area Agreement; 13% said  plans were in place to do so.   Just over a third of responding councils used carbon footprint calculations, with a further third having  plans to do so. Just six percent currently used a green house gas protocol accounting tool; however 12  percent indicated that they had plans to do so.     7. Which of the following elements are required to be considered within a business case for green  initiatives?  No. of users who responded to this question: 152 (77.16%)  

Just five percent of respondents said that a business case was not required for green initiatives within  their council.   Over eight in ten said that business cases for green initiatives required an economic case (81%) and an  environmental case (83%), with 54% also needing a social case to be presented.  

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Economic case 

Environmental case

Social case 

Yes

81%

83%

54%

No business case  required  5%

No

3%

2%

15%

53%

Don't Know

16%

15%

31%

42%

8. Who leads within your authority on green issues at the following levels?  No. of users who responded to this question: 144 (73.10%) 

There appears to be little consistency over who leads within a local authority on green issues at either a  strategic or operational level – except for when it comes to technology. Overwhelmingly, the head of IT  or CIO was responsible for leading on green technology issues.  70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Vision  30%

Strategy  28%

Lead Member

39%

15%

Head of IT/CIO

1%

4%

Chief Exec

 

Operations  7%

Technology  4.5%

Perf'ce  12%

Measuring  6.5%

Monitoring  7%

Analysis 6%

6%

1%

8%

5%

4%

1%

6.5%

60%

4%

3%

4%

4%

Head of Finance

1%

1%

3%

1%

4%

4%

2%

2%

Sustainability Officer

10%

23%

30%

11%

29%

35.5%

38%

42%

Specific Green Team

12%

17%

27.5%

12.5%

21%

28%

28%

30%

Other

7%

12%

20%

10%

22%

18%

17%

15%

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


25    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  When it came to Vision, the chief executive led in three out of ten councils, with the lead member  taking on that role in almost four in ten (39%).   For strategy there was no clear lead – chief execs (28%) were almost as likely as a sustainability officer  (23%) to be setting the pace.   Unsurprisingly, operationally, the responsibility was more likely to lie with sustainability officers (30%)  or a specific green team (27.5%). A similar pattern was seen when it came to performance, measuring,  monitoring and analysis, with increasingly less involvement from senior officers or members. Other  officers suggested as leading in these various areas were:  •

in vision and strategy: heads of services/directors (5), strategic management board/chief  officers (4), head of environment services (4), head of policy (2), assistant director ‐ sustainable  communities , head of performance and strategic development 

in operations/performance/measuring/monitoring/analysis: the performance team (3), AONB  officer, lead officers in departments, local environment programme manager, performance  manager, policy and performance dept, policy officer, service leads environment/recycling,  service managers, technical services 

Encouragingly, one respondent said, “It is included as part of internal audit function, teams set up within  each department to meet specified targets as designated by chief executive/elected members.”  Explained another: “The sustainability officer leads but is supported by member and director level  champions and the senior management team.”  However, worryingly, a number of respondents made negative, or world‐weary, comments on this  issue:   “Probably no one, it's not visible if it is done.”  “There is no vision for anything, including 'green' issues.”  “There doesn't currently appear to be a lead on green initiatives within my organisation.”  “No vision. No performance lead.”    9. How important is technology seen in terms of being a key enabler of sustainability throughout  your council?  No. of users who responded to this question: 150 (76.14%)  

Almost nine in ten (87%) see technology as either of  some or great importance as a key enabler of  sustainability council wide. 

Of little  importance  12%

Just one percent believe that technology has no  importance in this respect, with just over one in ten  (12%) believing that technology has little importance  when it comes to enabling sustainability throughout  the council.  

Of some  importance  49%

Of no  importance  1%

Of great  importance  38%

  10. What type of technology specific green initiatives are underway and/or planned for the next   12 months?  No. of users who responded to this question: 153 (77.66%)  

Technology’s ability to enable greener working practices through mobile and flexible working has been  recognised by most councils in recent years. The green benefits from such styles of working are  undeniable and almost three quarters (74.5%) of respondents stated that their council currently had  initiatives underway in this area, with a further 19% planning them.   Other technologies that have obvious green benefits include video‐conferencing and telehealth;  however councils have made less progress in implementing initiatives with these technologies – 33.5%  and 9% respectively, with a further 26% and 10% (respectively) planning to explore initiatives.  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


26    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?   

90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Mobile & flexible  working  74.5%

Videocon‐ ferencing  33.5%

Telehealth 

Virtualisation 

9%

38%

Thin client  computing  42.5%

Planned

19%

26%

10%

21%

19.5%

Don't Know

6.5%

40.5%

81%

41%

38%

Underway

In terms of reducing the carbon footprint of technology itself, the purchase of energy efficient desktops  was common practice in almost six in ten (57%) councils, with a further 16% planning to implement  such initiatives. However, almost three in ten (27%) were not aware of any such council initiative.   Technology refresh initiatives were underway in almost half of councils (47%), with a further 21%  planning to put this into practice shortly.   Thin client computing was implemented in 42.5% of councils with a further 19.5% planning to move to  this model. Virtualisation was also of high interest: almost four in ten (38%) already had such initiatives,  a further 21% were planning to implement the technology.   Powerdown initiatives were implemented by almost four in ten (38%) of councils, with a further 28%  planning to instigate this.   Meanwhile, there is significant recognition that ICT’s environmental impact continues long after the  hardware reaches the end of its useful life: 74% currently have sustainable IT disposal initiatives  underway.   Use of a green scorecard was limited to under one council in ten (9.3%), with little interest in exploring  this (19.3%).   

80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Power down 

Technology  refresh 

Underway

38%

47%

Purchasing of  energy efficient  desktops  57%

Sustainable IT  disposal 

Green scorecard 

74%

9.3%

Planned

28%

21%

16%

9%

19.3%

Don't Know

34%

32%

27%

17%

71.4%

Other comments made relating to this question indicated that some councils were also implementing  energy efficient street lighting, instant communication, culture change programmes, power  management; a Green IT policy; and print reduction initiatives (including replacement of printer fleet  with MFDs).  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


27    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  11a. To what extent do green/sustainability issues influence technology procurement?  No. of users who responded to this question: 140 (71.07%) 

Over four in ten (42%) of councils currently specify green/sustainability issues within the tender  process.  A further 25% state that such factors will be specified within the next 12 months, with 11.5% stating  that they expect this to be so within the next four years.   Just 13.5% felt that green or sustainability issues had no place within the tender process.   Other comments made at this point included:  “As we use an outsourced IT supplier there is not necessarily a formal tender process for  technology.”  “A factor to consider but not a strong one as most hardware suppliers claim 'green' credentials.”  “We are awaiting publication of Sustainable Procurement Strategy.”  “Complete green equipment refresh underway within an existing thin client environment.”  “It is a general part of all procurement decisions.”   

42%

Currently specified within tender process Will be specified within tender process within next 12  months 

25% 11.5%

Will be specified within tender process within 4 years 

13.5%

Have no place within tender process 

8%

Other 

0%

20%

40%

60%  

11b. If currently specified in your procurement process, what proportion of the decision scoring do  green factors typically play?  No. of users who responded to this question: 66 (33.50%) 

Of those that currently specified green factors in the procurement process the majority (64%) allocated  ten percent or under of the decision scoring process to ‘green’ issues.  Just less than two in ten (18%) said that green factors played a part in 11‐15% of the process. A further  one in ten (12%) said that this accounted for up to 20% of the decision scoring, and six percent said that  over 20% of the decision scoring was related to green factors.  

6%

More than 20%

12%

16%‐20%

18%

11%‐15%

32%

6%‐10%

20%

1%‐5%

12%

Zero

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


28    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  12. Does your authority require evidence of green accountability from its suppliers?  No. of users who responded to this question: 136 (69.04%) 

Almost a third of respondents (32%) currently expect suppliers to provide evidence of green  accountability during the purchasing process. A further 21% stated that they will do so within the next  12 months, with a further four percent expecting this to be a prerequisite within four years.   Just over four in ten (43%) did not currently look at this aspect of supplier activity and had no  expectations of doing so within the next four years.   32%

Yes No, not currently Will do within 12 months Will do within 4 years

43% 21% 4% 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

13. Does your authority tend to make best value procurement based on whole life costing, lowest  cost purchasing or another basis?  No. of users who responded to this question: 134 (68.02%)   Only 17% of responding councils currently use whole life costing when assessing best value  procurement options. The majority, 62%, used a combination of quality and cost, with a further 15%  making decisions based on ‘lowest cost’ alone.   Other criteria suggested for this question included: a quality/price matrix that varies from purchase to  purchase; five year period assessment; all of the above; and whole life costing plus quality.  17%

Whole life costing  A combination of quality and cost  lowest cost  Other 

62% 15% 6% 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

14. If whole life costing, does this include:  No. of users who responded to this question: 56 (28.43%)  

If whole life costing being practiced, respondents were most likely to consider elements relating to  power consumption (64%), WEEE compliant disposal costs (63.5%), recyclability (62%) and  environmental responsibility (57%).  

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Recyclability  factors 

Power  consumption 

Increasing  energy costs 

Yes

Disposal costs  (WEEE  compliant) 63.50%

62%

64%

No

3.50%

6%

6%

33%

32%

30%

Don't Know

 

Estimated  emissions 

Environmental  responsibility 

Carbon costs of  acquisition 

48%

43%

57%

41.50%

15%

16%

8%

14.50%

37%

41%

35%

44%

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


29    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Less than half would consider increasing energy costs (48%), estimated emissions (43%) or carbon costs  of acquisition (41.5%).     15. Is the finance team involved in the following activities?  No. of users who responded to this question: 145 (73.60%) 

In the majority of councils, the finance team is not actively involved in carbon footprint calculation  (6%), carbon accounting/budgeting (11%) or sustainability reporting (9%).   The finance team is also likely to have limited involvement in whole life costing exercises (31%) and  tracking performance measures/KPIs (29%).   However, the finance team is likely to be included in preparing the business case (45.5%) and other  procurement decisions (62%).  

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Whole life  costing 

Yes

31%

Other  Preparing the  Carbon  procurement  business case  accounting /  decisions  budgeting  62%

45.50%

Carbon  footprint  calculations 

11%

6%

Tracking  Sustainability  performance  reporting  measures /  KPIs  29% 9%

No

21%

13%

24.50%

37%

44%

31%

47%

Don't Know

34%

21%

26%

46%

44%

36%

40%

Not Applicable

14%

4%

4%

6%

6%

4%

4%

16. Does your organisation report regularly on its sustainability performance?  No. of users who responded to this question: 125 (63.45%) 

Reporting of the organisation’s sustainability performance both internally and externally was poor.  Despite its apparent importance, only six in ten (62%) of councils currently reported sustainability  performance regularly to top level management.  Two in ten councils (21%) did not report performance to top level management at all; nearly four in ten  (38%) did not report performance internally to staff; and one third did not report achievements to their  citizens.   50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Quarterly

Six Monthly

Annually

Doesn't  report

Centrally to top level management 

34%

11.5%

16.5%

21%

Plans to start  within 12  months 17%

Internally to staff 

18%

11%

17%

38%

16%

Externally to citizens 

7%

3%

41%

33%

16%

Less than one in ten (7%) reported progress to citizens quarterly and only three percent every six  months. Just four in ten (41%) of councils currently reported achievements to citizens annually.  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 

 


30    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Internally, currently less than half (46%) of councils report on sustainability performance and progress  internally to staff.   This lack of reporting appears in direct contradiction to subsequent responses relating to the  importance of senior level and end user buy in to such initiatives as a precursor to success.     17. What are the key enablers of success for your green initiatives?  No. of users who responded to this question: 135 (68.53%)  

Embedding green initiatives within the corporate strategy was seen as the most important enabler for  success in delivering a ‘green council’, with 68% scoring it as very or vitally important.   Having a senior champion was seen as essential by 64.4%, engaging and involving employees by 65%  and then dedicating resources to the issue (59%) and communicating how the initiative fits within the  overall council strategy (55%) were also key factors for ensuring success of the initiative.   Having quantifiable targets and performance reporting (54%), engaging and involving the community  (53%) and communicating and celebrating success (54%) were also seen as important by just over half  of respondents.   Information and communication technology was currently seen as the least important of these factors  by the majority of respondents, with under half (46%) suggesting that they were very or vitally  important.   1 ‐Not Important Embedded within corporate strategy  Senior champion(s)  Engaging and involving employees 

6.8%6.8% 22% 4% 7%

42%

26%

20%

6% 6%

3 ‐ Important

35.6%

28.8%

4

29%

36%

24%

2

5 ‐ Vital Importance Dedicating resources to the issue  Quantifiable targets and performance reporting 

5% 11%

25%

4% 6%

36%

Engaging and involving the community  Communication of fit within overall strategy and  programme Information & communication technology

30%

5% 11%

Communicating and celebrating successes 

28%

8% 11%

31%

8% 6%

33%

21%

33%

21%

36%

17%

38%

17%

20%

40%

16%

30%

33%

5% 16%

0%

26%

33%

60%

80%

100%  

  18. What are the key barriers to successful implementation of your green initiatives?  No. of users who responded to this question: 136 (69.04%) 

Overwhelmingly, insufficient resource/budget was seen as the biggest barrier to the success of a  council’s successful implementation of its green initiatives – 69.5% said that it was a main or major  barrier, with a further 19% stating it was ‘a barrier’. Just 1.5% said that this was not a barrier.   Insufficient priority/importance given to green initiatives was seen as a main or major barrier to success  by 45%, existing corporate culture by 42%, and a lack of clear targets by 33.5%. The requirement for  quick ROI/short term initiatives was cited by 36.5% and a current inability to monitor or measure  progress was highlighted by 35.5%.  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


31    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  The existing, legacy technology infrastructure was cited as a main or major barrier by four in ten  respondents (41%).   Other barriers to success were listed as the economic realities of remote communities, political  resistance and a lack of buy in from senior management.   Not a Barrier Insufficient resource/budget  Insufficient priority/importance 

1.5%10% 19% 15%

11%

41%

28.5%

3 ‐ A Barrier

22%

23%

29%

2

4 Lack of clear targets  Culture  Legacy technology infrastructure 

41%

6% 11% 6%

29.5%

21.5%

15.5%

31%

22%

Requirement for in year ROI/short term initiatives 

13.5%

20%

30%

Inability to monitor/measure progress 

12.5%

22%

30%

15.5%

18% 27%

15%

26%

15%

5 ‐ Major Barrier

14.5%

22% 23%

12.5%

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%100%  

  19. Will your council be able to match Central Government's 'carbon neutral ICT within four years'  goal?  No. of users who responded to this question: 137 (69.54%)  

Just four percent of respondents felt that their council  would definitely be able to match central government’s  ‘carbon neutral within four years’ goal.  

No  12%

Less than two in ten (17.5%) thought that their council  would ‘probably’ make this target. A further third (34.5%)  felt that their council would ‘possibly’ reach the goal. But  almost a further third just didn’t know.  

Yes  4%

Other  1% Possibly 34.5%

Probably  17.5% Don’t  Know  31%

More than one in ten (12%) were quite certain that their  council would not make their IT estate carbon neutral within  four years.   The ‘other’ option was taken by one percent, who explained that with approaching reorganisation for  their authority it was difficult to predict whether carbon neutral IT would be a reality within that  timescale.     20. Do you have any other comments that you would like to make on the importance of   green ICT to local government?  Comments made by respondents fell into a number of broad categories (each with example quotes): 

Green is efficient:  “It should be married to cost efficiency ‐ we are wasting our own money, we need to be  finding a way to use it more efficiently.”  “We are looking at rationalising the number of servers that we have at present as well as  investing in thin client although comment has been made about increased heating bills if  we remove PCs from offices!” 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


32    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  “Budget pressures mean that 'Green IT' is not really a priority in procurement. We are  implementing things under the 'Green' banner, eg Power Down, but the real reason for  doing this is to save costs.” 

There are more pressing priorities than green:  “There are far more pressing issues to tackle and we have neither the will, funds or  resources to deal with additional requirements, especially when they are so ill defined.  

Unitary reorganisation will affect green issues:  “We are becoming a Unitary authority with five DCs & BCs joining the county council.  How green issues will figure once the Unitary is working is unknown, but I would assume  it will be one of the many considerations.” 

Green is over hyped:  There are benefits in some aspects such as power saving, but much of the 'green agenda'  is over hyped, lacks credibility, and is promoted by those with a vested interest. Anything  that is done is either a knee‐jerk reaction or a box ticking exercise.”  “Lots of hype and misinformation which tends to cloud real issues and benefits. There is  an inability to look at the overall impact, especially with external influences – a tendency  to jump on latest bandwagon. See the LCD monitor situation for an example.” 

Green is not understood:  “It is not understood by decision makers (our Head of ICT does, but can't seem to get  adequate support as ICT itself is not valued).”  

Green hasn’t reached IT:  “Whilst we have significant 'green' policies & practices at a corporate level, the impact of  the IT infrastructure has not been significantly considered yet!” 

Green actions are restricted by suppliers:  “Whatever we try to do within the Authority is restricted by the developments being  made by our suppliers.” 

Technology is not always green:  “This statement is almost an oxymoron, it is very easy to be non‐green with technology.” 

Green burden:   “The measurement of 'greenness' is yet another unwelcome additional layer of cost and  complexity, when virtually everything that drives efficiency will already feed into a  reduction in carbon footprint. Direct measurement and targets for anything will always  lead to an immediate distortion of how the business is run. It becomes even more  important that Chief Officers and politicians have bought into a sustainable strategy for  the delivery of sustainable solutions. The total lack of strategy in many public  organisations means that solutions that meet green targets are NOT being enabled in  the most efficient way. This requires governance over business transformation AND  strategic IT.” 

Green needs sponsorship:  “Members need to prioritise green issues and the rest will follow.”  “Seems to be left to individuals or department, not an overall strategy that all follow  willingly ‐ ie try to get people to switch off PCs at night!” 

 

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


33    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?   

ICT has vital green contribution:  “We recognise that ICT has a vital contribution to make both in terms of reduction of  energy consumption and as an enabler to other initiatives.”   “Green ICT is one aspect (ie efficient datacentres, PCs, power downs etc) but ICT has a  wider role to play in reducing travel, making buildings more energy efficient etc as an  innovation driver.”   “Can't quantify the importance as it's paramount.” 

Going green works:  “North Tyneside Council’s early engagement with Keysource has resulted in the  implementation of a free cooling system solution representing potential savings of  £55,000 per annum. An equivalent saving of 300 tonnes of CO2 based on National Grid  emissions.”  

 

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


34    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  7. Councils Greening ICT in the News  (From LGITU magazine, January to September 2008) 

  Councils take up green challenge  The government is praising local authorities for having ‘risen to the challenge of climate change’ as it  publishes statistics for the 2006 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions at local authority and government  office region level.  The majority of Local Area Agreements (LAAs) now contain targets against National Indicator 186 on  reducing per capita emissions of CO2 in their areas, of between four and 15 percent of the 2005  baseline.   "Climate change is a global issue, but the only way to fight it effectively is if people make positive  choices and work together to make a difference in their local community. Local authorities are not only  ideally placed to enable this positive work but also, through their own hard work and dedication, are  able to set a good example through their own actions,” said climate change minister, Phil Woolas.   www.defra.gov.uk    Leeds leads green charge  Leeds' ICT team has instigated new environmental criteria, based on the EPEAT Gold standard, into its  ICT procurement process – all new laptops, for example, must contain a number of recyclable elements.  It currently has a refresh target of 100 PCs and monitors each week with zero waste thanks to partner  Computacenter’s environmentally friendly disposal service   Last year the ICT team also used a variety of initiatives to reduce energy consumption in their  department by 10% and have saved 172,000kWh. A review of its servers found that 138 were suitable  for virtualisation: the team has now reduced down to ten servers. This has not only improved business  processes but will also save 767 tonnes of carbon emissions over the next three years   In a cultural change washing through the council Leeds plans to boost its ‘green’ credentials even  further over the next year through initiatives such as print management. On the basis that ‘every little  counts’, the council’s ICT service delivery manager has gone as far as selling his car and chooses to cycle  his 16‐mile daily commute.     Hillingdon cuts IT carbon footprint  Hillingdon has cut its hardware footprint by 97 percent, and carbon emissions by 20 percent, in just 18  months with help from Compellent and VMware.  Faced with 100 percent year‐on‐year data growth ‐ driven by expanding employee email boxes, use of  digital images and need to retain ever more documentation – it has replaced its disparate array of  servers and storage hardware with a greener virtual environment. It has reduced 94 production servers  to just three, and the number of server rooms from three to two. The subsequent power reduction from  34kW to 1.1kW is saving £20,000 annually.  “We were looking for a new storage solution that could automatically manage data and drive down the  cost per TB of stored data over the life of the SAN. It had to provide us with affordable system resilience  and also contribute to a greener IT infrastructure,” explained Roger Bearpark, assistant head of ICT at  the council.   Meanwhile, Hillingdon’s enhanced ICT Service Desk operation, implemented with help from the Service  Desk Institute, has enabled a significant increase in the take up of staff homeworking agreements,  saving 55,000 travel kilometres in the past year alone.   The council has also delivered £6m of capital through sales of now redundant council buildings – with  an additional £0.45m saved in annual revenue and £1.1m in cost avoidance through the closure of non‐ central office space by the end of 2008.    

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


35    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Keeping cool in North Tyneside  North Tyneside Council has significantly reduced energy usage and found efficiency savings of up to 20  percent through implementation of a new server room from Keysource.   The resilient and innovative energy efficient 36 rack ‘free cooling’ solution, using in‐row chilled water  cooling technology for both low and high density contained zones, has already achieved a more  efficient Power Usage Effectiveness measurement of 1.6, representing a potential saving of £55,000 per  annum and equivalent to 300 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions.    Staffordshire turns off PCs to save money  An in‐house development by Staffordshire County Council’s ICT department has saved the council over  £40k a year by automatically enforcing PC shutdown at the end of the working day.  Says developer, Peter Kear, “It’s a really simple concept of taking readily available utilities and writing a  program around them.”   Kear is using PSShutdown (free for corporate use) to shut down computers that his solution has first  identified as on but not in use. A summary report also tracks how many computers were left switched  on when the programme is run, council‐wide at 8pm every night. The next step is to send an automated  email to all users that have left their computers switched on – reminding them to switch off before they  leave next time.  ict@staffordshire.gov.uk     Brent donates PCs to Africa  Schools and hospitals in Africa are benefiting from over 500 PCs, laptops and monitors donated by the  London Borough of Brent via Computer Aid International.   By placing the specialist charity at the heart of its IT disposal strategy, the council is both enhancing its  Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programme and ensuring that unwanted equipment is disposed  of in accordance with the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) regulations. Computer Aid  also guarantees 100 percent data removal from any hard disk, which meets all recognised international  data destruction standards.  Duncan McLeod, director of finance at Brent, says, “Donating is a simple process but one that can make  a huge difference in developing countries. Using Computer Aid’s asset tracking service we can see the  positive effect that our old equipment is having in poverty‐reduction projects and actively  communicate this to staff.”   www.computeraid.org     Birmingham recycles IT into community   Service Birmingham has launched a scheme to recycle up to 20,000 council computers as and when  they are updated.  The council’s computers will be disposed of in an environmentally friendly and secure manner. Where  possible they will be recycled and refurbished for use in the local community for a nominal charge  payable to the charities.  “This new recycling initiative demonstrates the commitment by Service Birmingham to reduce the  environmental impact of technology. We’re also delighted to be working with these local organisations  that have such a positive impact on our community”, said Helen O’Dea, chief executive of Service  Birmingham.    The way they work: Hertfordshire County Council is implementing a cross‐county conferencing and  collaboration solution from a&o which will use telephone and video conferencing and secure instant  messaging to improve communication and productivity between 20,000 staff. The move forms part of  the council’s ‘The Way We Work’ project, which aims to consolidate over 50 existing council offices to  just three whilst creating a more flexible working environment.   

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


36    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Green print: Hartlepool Council will save more than £100,000 each year thanks to its new Northgate  Information Solutions ‘Managed Print Solution’ ‐ which optimises the number of print and copy devices  needed, thus allowing the council to manage its corporate print function centrally while returning both  cost and efficiency saving.    Bournemouth winning with green: Bournemouth Borough Council is on track to represent the UK in  the European Business Awards for the Environment. The council is among the major winners in the  Green Apple Environment Awards – one of the few accredited feeder schemes into the international  campaign. Said councillor Stephen MacLoughlin, Bournemouth leader, “As a council we are constantly  striving to improve our recycling record and the partnership with M&S means we can provide enhanced  services and send a strong environmental message to all those who live, work and visit Bournemouth.    Green monitoring: Merton Council is pioneering an innovative new scheme, in partnership with experts  and students from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), Massachusetts, to measure how much  renewable energy is produced across the borough. The monitoring system was unveiled at a national  environment conference at Merton civic centre where delegates had the chance to see a demonstration  of the web‐based green energy database.    Orkney Islands Council has teamed up with the Orkney Renewable Energy Forum to raise  awareness of the environmental impact of computer equipment. Councillor Ian Johnstone, chair of  the information services subcommittee, said: “Computer technology can have positive effects on  emissions if well‐managed. It can facilitate flexible working, eliminate the need for some business  travel and can help some business processes be more efficient. However it is clear that we should do  what we can to reduce emissions due to computers; doing so will help the environment, and may also  reduce the costs of owning equipment.”       

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


37    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Appendix I  1. Councils Responding to Survey  English Counties                           

Bedfordshire County Council (5)  Cambridgeshire County Council (2)  Derbyshire County Council (2)    Durham County Council    Essex County Council (2)    Hampshire County Council (6)    Kent County Council (4)    Leicestershire County Council (5)  North Yorkshire County Council  Nottinghamshire County Council  Somerset County Council (2)    Surrey County Council (3)     Worcestershire County Council (3)  

                       

Buckinghamshire County Council  Cheshire County Council (3)  Dorset County Council  East Sussex County Council  Gloucestershire County Council  Hertfordshire County Council  Lancashire County Council  Lincolnshire County Council  Northumberland County Council (2)  Oxfordshire County Council  Staffordshire County Council (3)  Warwickshire County Council 

English Districts                                                                                       

 

Babergh District Council      Basingstoke & Deane Borough Council    Bromsgrove District Council (2)      Canterbury City Council (2)      Carlisle City Council        Cheltenham Borough Council (2)    Chesterfield Borough Council      Chichester District Council      Crawley Borough Council      Dacorum Borough Council      Durham City Council        East Hampshire District Council      East Lindsey District Council (2)      Eden District Council (3)      Fenland District Council      Gedling Borough Council      Guildford Borough Council (2)      Harlow Council (2)        Hertsmere Borough Council      Kennet District Council      King's Lynn & West Norfolk Borough Cncl (2)  Mid Suffolk District Council      Newcastle‐under‐Lyme Borough Council    North Kesteven District Council      Oxford City Council        Preston City Council        Reigate & Banstead Borough Council    Rossendale Borough Council      Rushcliffe Borough Council      Selby District Council        Shrewsbury & Atcham Borough Council    South Bucks District Council        South Northamptonshire Council (2)   South Shropshire District Council    Stevenage Borough Council (2)      Suffolk Coastal District Council (2)    Taunton Deane Borough Council    Tendring District Council      Tonbridge & Malling Borough Council (2)    Wansbeck District Council      Wealden District Council      Winchester City Council      Wyre Borough Council 

Basildon District Council  Broadland District Council  Burnley Borough Council  Caradon District Council  Carrick District Council  Cherwell District Council  Chester‐le‐Street District Council  Corby Borough Council  Crewe & Nantwich Borough Council  Daventry District Council (2)  East Devon District Council (2)  East Hertfordshire Council (2)  Eastleigh Borough Council  Exeter City Council  Forest of Dean District Council  Gosport Borough Council  Hambleton District Council  Hart District Council  Ipswich Borough Council  Kettering Borough Council  Macclesfield Borough Council  New Forest District Council (3)  North Hertfordshire District Council (3)  Norwich City Council  Pendle Borough Council  Purbeck District Council (2)  Ribble Valley Borough Council  Runnymede Borough Council  Ryedale District Council (2)   Shepway District Council  South Bedfordshire District Council  South Cambridgeshire District Council  South Oxfordshire District Council  South Staffordshire Council (2)   Stroud District Council  Surrey Heath Borough Council  Teignbridge District Council (3)  Test Valley Borough Council (2)  Vale of White Horse District Council (3)  Warwick District Council (3)     West Oxfordshire District Council (2)   Wycombe District Council (2)  

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


38    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  English Unitaries                                 

Bournemouth Borough Council (2)  Brighton & Hove City Council    Darlington Borough Council    East Riding of Yorkshire Council (2)   Herefordshire Council (2)     Isles of Scilly Council      Leicester City Council (3)     Medway Council      Milton Keynes Council    Nottingham City Council (2)     Poole Borough Council (3)     Reading Borough Council    Stoke on Trent City Council    Telford & Wrekin Council (2)     Warrington Borough Council    Wokingham Borough Council   

                               

Bracknell Forest Borough Council  Bristol City Council  Derby City Council (6)   Halton Borough Council  Hull City Council   Isle of Wight Council (2)  Luton Borough Council  Middlesbrough Council  North Somerset Council  Plymouth City Council (2)   Portsmouth City Council  South Gloucestershire Council  Swindon Borough Council  Torbay Council (2)   West Berkshire Council (2)   York (City of) Council (2)  

London Boroughs                               

Barking & Dagenham London Borough (3)   Bexley London Borough      Bromley London Borough      City of London Corporation (2)      Ealing London Borough      Greenwich London Borough      Hammersmith & Fulham London Borough (3)   Havering London Borough      Hounslow London Borough      Kensington & Chelsea Royal Borough (5)    Lambeth London Borough      Merton London Borough      Redbridge London Borough (2)      Tower Hamlets London Borough (2)     Wandsworth London Borough (3)    

Barnet London Borough (3)   Brent London Borough  Camden London Borough  Croydon London Borough (2)   Enfield London Borough  Hackney London Borough  Haringey London Borough (2)   Hillingdon London Borough  Islington London Borough (2)   Kingston Upon Thames RBC  Lewisham London Borough (4)   Newham London Borough (2)   Sutton London Borough (3)   Waltham Forest London Borough (3)  

Metropolitan District Councils                               

Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council     Bolton Council (2)        Bury Metropolitan Borough Council    Coventry City Council       Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council (5)   Kirklees Council (3)         Liverpool City Council       North Tyneside Council (3)       Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council  Sefton Council        South Tyneside Council (2)       Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council   Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council        Wakefield City Council  Wirral Council       

Birmingham City Council (8)   Bradford City Council (3)     Calderdale Council (4)   Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council (2)  Gateshead Council (3)   Leeds City Council  Manchester City Council (3)   Rochdale MBC (3)   Salford City Council  Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council  St Helens Council  Sunderland City Council  Trafford Council (4)   Wigan Council  Sheffield City Council   

Scottish Unitaries             

 

 

Dumfries & Galloway Council (2)   East Dunbartonshire Council    Edinburgh (City of) Council    Moray Council      Scottish Borders Council    Stirling Council   

         

Dundee City Council  East Lothian Council  Fife Council (4)   Renfrewshire Council  West Lothian Council (2)  

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


39    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Welsh Unitaries     

Conwy County Borough Council  Flintshire County Council (2)  

 

Denbighshire County Council 

Northern Ireland   

Newry and Mourne District Council 

  2. Officers Responding to Survey  (In alphabetical order, de‐duped, ie no indication of quantity)                                                                                                       

 

Account Manager        Acting Group Manager Procurement    Acting Head of Property Services    Analyst/Programmer        Applications Development Manager    Assistant Chief Executive (Policy & Scrutiny)  Assistant Director ‐ Development Strategy  Assistant Director Central Finance    Assistant Director Social Services    Assistant Head of Service      Asst Director ‐ Corporate Information Services  Audit & Exchequer Manager      Benefits Manager        Broadband Project Manager       Interim Head of Technology Solutions     Business & IT Development Analyst    Business Change Manager      Business Protection Manager      Business System Consultant          Category Manager    Chief Executive        Chief Internal Auditor       Cinderford Regeneration Manager    Communications & Information Officer    Community Projects Officer      Complaints & Compliance Manager    Corporate Administration Manager    Corporate Procurement Manager    Corporate Research & Consultation Office  Council Alliances Officer      CRM Development and Support Officer    Customer Service Manager      Customer Services Manager ‐ Contact Centre  Customer Services Project Consultant    Customer Services Supervisor      Desktop Support Officer – Corporate    Director of Community Services    Director of District Development    Director of Libraries        Director of Services to the Community    Divisional Manager Home Authority    e‐Communications Officer      Economic Development Officer     E‐Government Officer      E‐Government Officer; Strategy & Partnerships  E‐Services Programme Manager ‐ Social Care  Environment Team Leader      E‐Services Manager        Executive Director        Executive Head of Information Technology  Finance Officer       

Accounting Assistant  Acting Head of Performance & Democracy  Administration Manager  Application & Information Manager  Assistant Area Manager of Libraries  Assistant Customer Services Manager  Assistant Director ‐ Golden Gates Housing  Assistant Director of Strategy & Performance  Assistant Dir Strategic Planning & Partnership  Assistant to the Chief Executive on Business          Transformation  Audit Manager  Benefits Manager   Interim Corporate Services Mgr (Financial)  Building Control Manager  Business Analyst  Business Partner  Business Support Manager  Category & Review Manager  Change and Performance Officer  Chief Information Officer  Children & Community Services Manager  City Informed Project Manager  Communications Officer  Community Web Manager  Contracts Officer  Corporate Manager  Corporate Projects Officer  Corporate Sustainability Officer  Council Transformation Programme  Customer Excellence  Customer Services Development Manager  Customer Services Officer  Customer Services Section Manager  Deputy Town Clerk  Development Librarian  Director of Customer Services  Director of Environment  Director of Public Affairs & Communications  Divisional Director ‐ Urban Regeneration  E‐Care Project Manager  Economic Development Manager  Economic Policy Officer  E‐Government Strategy Manager  Electrical / Mechanical Engineer  Engineering Services Manager  Environmental Health Coordinator  eStandards Assistant  Executive Head of Customer Services  Finance Manager ‐ Legal Services  Financial Systems Officer 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


40    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?                                                                                                                               

 

GIS Project Manager        Group Manager ‐ Business Development  Group Manager ‐ Business Transformation  Head of Adult Social Care  Head of Audit        Head of Business Improvement  Head of Children's Social Care      Head of Communications  Head of Corporate Planning & Performance  Head of Corporate Procurement  Head of Customer Services & Communications  Head of Development Services  Head of Division for Young People    Head of Economic Development  Head of Economic Regeneration & Property  Head of Economic Strategy  Head of e‐Government & ICT      Head of Environmental Protection  Head of Finance        Head of Housing & Council Tax Benefits  Head of ICT         Head of IM/IT & Improvement  Head of Investment & Regeneration    Head of IT  Head of IT Service Delivery      Head of IT Services  Head of IT Strategy        Head of Learning  Head of Libraries        Head of Planning & Transport  Head of Planning Services      Head of Policy & Performance  Head of Research & Intelligence  Head of Procurement       Head of Revenues & Benefits      Head of School Improvement  Head of Scrutiny & Performance    Health & Safety Officer  Head of Strategic Procurement & Risk Management  Housing Benefits Appeals & Complaints Officer  Housing Systems Coordinator  HR Project Officer        ICT / Strategic Client Coordinator  ICT Assets Manager        ICT Business Analyst  ICT Client Account Manager      ICT Development Manager  ICT Manager        ICT Production Services Manager  ICT Programme Manager      ICT Project Manager  ICT Project Team Leader      ICT Service Provision Manager   ICT Strategy & Monitoring Manager    ICT Strategy Officer  IM & IT Manager, Community Services    Information & Communications Assistant  Information Assistant       Information Manager  Information Manager & ICT Manager    Information Officer  Information Support Team Leader    Information Systems Consultant  Information Systems Officer      Interim Chief Finance Officer  Interim Head of IT         Interim Director for Finance, Information  Interim Service Development Manager        Systems & Property  Internal Auditor        Internet Editor  IS Support Officer        IT Business Integration Manager  IT Client & Strategy Manager      IT Department  IT Manager          IT Officer  IT Procurement Consultant      IT Project Manager (E‐Government)  IT Services Manager        Joint Head of ICT  LA 21 Officer, Planning & Env’tal Strategy  Land and Property Systems Manager      Leisure Service Manager  Lead Scrutiny Officer    Librarian          Library Information Services  LLPG Custodian        LLPG/ Principal Planning Officer  Local Strategic Partnership      Local Taxation Manager  Management Information & ICT Systems Mgr  Manager ‐ Benefits Accounts & IT  Manager (Support Services)      Manager Web Development Team  Manager of Audit and Risk Management Services  Marketing Coordinator  Media Relations Manager      Monitoring Team Leader  Network & Telecommunications Manager  Network Services Manager  Operations Librarian        Operations Manager Economic Investment  Operations Support Manager – Education  Organisational Development Consultant (IT)  Paris Implementation Project Manager    Parking Section  Performance & Customer Services Manager  Performance & Improvement Service Officer    Performance & Partnership Manager  Performance & Measures Unit    Performance & Projects Manager    Performance Management Officer  Performance Monitoring Officer    Planning Assistant (Forward Planning)  Planning Enforcement Officer      Planning Officer  Planning Policy Manager      Planning Technician  Policy & Performance Manager     Policy Advisor  Policy Analyst        Policy Manager  Policy Officer        Policy Support Officer 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


41    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?                                                                                                     

 

 

Press & PR Officer        Principal Environmental Health Officer    Principal Housing Benefit officer    Principal ICT Officer for Planning Control    Principal IT Projects Officer      Principal Operations Consultant      Principal Planner (Policy Information)  Principal Strategic Information Manager    Principal Trading Standards Officer    Process Lead – ICT        Procurement Assistant      Procurement Manager      Project Management Officer      Project Officer        Property Systems Programme Manager    Quality Systems Officer      Research Officer        Revenues Manager        SAP Procurement Specialist      Senior Accountant        Senior Corporate Performance Officer    Senior Economic Development Officer    Senior IT Projects Officer      Senior Policy Analyst        Senior Project & Business Analyst    Senior Systems Analyst      Senior Trading Standards Officer     Service Delivery Analyst      Service Development Manager      Service Lead ‐ Leisure & Green Spaces    Service Lead ‐ Shared Services & Procurement  Service Manager, ICT        Services Operator CRMO       Software Development Manager    Strategic Procurement Manager    Supplies Officer        Support Unit Manager      Sustainability Officer        Sustainable Development Officer    Systems & Searches Team Leader    Systems Development Officer      Systems Support Manager      Team Leader        Team Leader Better Government/Democracy  Technical Design Authority      Technology & Transformation      Vitality Index Secondee      Web & Intranet Development Manager    Web Operations Manager      Workwise Project Manager 

Preventative Technology Development Officer  Principal Financial Support Officer  Principal ICT Consultant  Principal IT Consultant  Principal Officer for Sustainability  Principal Performance Officer  Principal Service Development Manager  Principal Technical Specialist  Private Sector Housing Co‐ordinator  Procurement & Risk manager  Procurement Implementation Manager  Procurement Officer  Project Manager  Project Officer ‐ IT Department  Quality & Performance Manager  Research & Information Officer  Resource Pool Manager  Revenues Team Manager  Section Manager Transport & Development  Senior Administration Officer  Senior Development Officer  Senior ICT Portfolio Manager  Senior Planning Technician  Senior Procurement Officer  Senior Systems & Performance Officer  Senior Technical Support Officer  Service Account Manager  Service Delivery Manager  Service Director ‐ Strategic Procurement         & E‐Services  Service Manager ‐ Business Support  Service Manager; Contract Management          Source & Supply  Strategic Accountant  Strategy Development Manager  Support Services/Finance Manager  Sustainability Manager  Sustainability Team Leader  Systems & Projects Manager  Systems Administrator  Systems Software Engineer  Systems Support Officer  Team Leader  Team Leader, Trading Standards  Technical Officer (Housing & Environment)  Transport/Stores Manager  Waste Management Officer  Web Developer  Web Project Manager 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


42    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Appendix I ‐ Questionnaires  1. Quick Questionnaire  Dear *******,  On analysing the results from our survey on greening local government technology I noticed that you initially opened a survey  form but did not complete it. A number of your local government colleagues did the same and I am very interested to explore  whether this was because the questionnaire was too complex or whether it was because, although interest in the topic may be  high, practical plans are not always far enough advanced to answer such questions.   To that end, would you mind just quickly replying to my email with a 'Y' or 'N' in the box below as relevant?  Yes/No 

   1. Do you feel adequately informed about Green issues? 

  

2. Are Green issues important to your council? 

  

3. Do you feel your council is committed, in action, to Going Green? 

  

4. Do you think that technology has a part to play in Going Green? 

    If you have any other comments on either the survey or the topic I would also be very keen to hear them! By way of thanks I will  add your name to a quick prize draw for a further £50 Amazon book voucher.  Looking forward to hearing from you.   Kind regards,   Helen Olsen  Managing Editor  Local Government IT in Use (LGITU) magazine 

  2. Main Survey Questionnaire 

 

 

     

 

 

Welcome to our survey!   1. How important are Green issues to your council's wider organisational strategy? 

Of central importance to the council  Of some importance to the council   

Of limited importance to the council  Of no importance to the council   

 

2. What are the key drivers for pursuing Green initiatives within your authority?  (On a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = Not a factor, 3 = A driver and 5 = Key driver)    

  

1    

2    

3    

4    

5    

  Central government mandate/targets 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Desire to play part in global climate control challenge 

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


43    Green Veneer or Green Revolution? 

 

  Desire to ensure local sustainability 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Desire to play part in conserving local environment 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Desire to champion/lead local environmental responsibility 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Desire to trailblaze green innovation in the community 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Seeking cost savings/efficiencies 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Employee pressure ‘to go green’ 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Community pressure ‘to go green’ 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Pursuing goal of ICT becoming ‘carbon neutral’ within four years   

  

  

  

  

  

  Other 

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

Please give details for 'other'   

 

 

3. How are green issues regarded in your authority in relation to the following policy agendas? 

 

  

   Complementary to   

  Gershon efficiency drive 

  

  Transformation agenda 

  

  Varney customer focus 

  

  Regeneration/Place Shaping     Social inclusion 

  

  Other (please specify below)    

 

           

No relation   

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

Conflicts with   

  

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Don't know   

 

  

 

 

                 

Please give details for 'other'   

 

 

4. Does your authority currently have Green targets?  NB ‐ 'Planned' = plans to within 12 months    

  

Yes    

No    

  Documented in its corporate sustainability strategy   

  

  

  Embedded within its overall business strategy 

  

  

  

  Embedded within its overall corporate targets 

  

  

  

  Embedded within specific IT department targets 

  

  

  

  Embedded within individual departmental targets    

  

  

Planned      

 

 

     

 

              

5. Does your authority have a clear understanding of the green impacts of:  NB ‐ 'Planned' = plans to within 12 months    

  

Yes    

No    

  Its current operations and working practices (service delivery)  

  

  

Planned  

Don’t know  

 

 

 

  

 

  

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


44    Green Veneer or Green Revolution? 

 

  Future plans for working practices/service delivery initiatives    

  

  

  Its e‐government developments 

  

  

  

  Future plans for e‐services 

  

  

  

  Its current technology (ICT) operations 

  

  

  

  Future plans for its technology (ICT) operations 

  

  

  

  

Yes    

No    

  The council’s wider strategic performance management process  

  

  

  Council performance indicators 

  

  

  

  Separate sustainability/green measures 

  

  

  

  Carbon Footprint calculations 

  

  

  

  Carbon accounting global reporting initiative framework 

  

  

  

  Green house gas protocol accounting tool 

  

  

  

  Local Area Agreement 

  

  

  

  Other 

  

  

  

         

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

              

6. Is the measurement of sustainability tracked within:  NB ‐ 'Planned' = plans to within 12 months    

 

 

Planned                   

 

Don’t know  

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

                       

Please give details for 'other'   

 

 

 

 

7. Which of the following elements are required to be considered within a business case for green initiatives? 

 

 

  

  

Yes    

No    

  Economic case 

  

  

  

  Environmental case 

  

  

  

  Social case 

  

  

  

  No business case required   

  

  

Don't Know          

 

           

8. Who leads within your authority on green issues at the following levels? 

  

  

  Vision 

  

  Strategy 

  

  Operations    

 

  Technology       Performance      Measuring       Monitoring    

 

Chief     executive               

                    

Lead     member               

                    

Head of     IT (CIO)               

                    

Head of     finance               

                    

Sustainability     officer               

                    

Specific  Green     team 

Other  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

             

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


45    Green Veneer or Green Revolution? 

  Analysis   

  

 

 

  

  

 

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

  

Please give details for 'other' 

 

   

9. How important is technology seen in terms of being a key enabler of sustainability throughout your council? 

Of great importance  Of some importance  

Of little importance  Of no importance   

 

10. What type of technology specific green initiatives are underway and/or planned for the next twelve months?    

   Underway  

  Mobile & flexible working 

  

  Videoconferencing 

  

  Telehealth 

  

  Virtualisation 

  

  Thin client computing 

  

  Power down 

  

  Technology refresh 

  

 

  Purchasing of energy efficient desktops   

 

  Sustainable IT disposal 

  

  Green scorecard 

  

  Other (please specify below) 

  

 

                     

Planned  

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

                                

Don't Know                         

                                

Please give details for 'other' 

 

 

 

11a. To what extent do green/sustainability issues influence technology procurement? 

Currently specified within tender process  Will be specified within tender process within next 12 months  Will be specified within tender process within 4 years 

 

Have no place within tender process  Other   

 

 

11b. If currently specified in your procurement process, what proportion of the decision scoring do green factors  typically play? 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


46    Green Veneer or Green Revolution? 

 

 

      Zero   

1%‐5%   

6%‐10%   

11%‐15%  

16%‐20%   

More than 20%   

 

  .    

  

 

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

12. Does your authority require evidence of green accountability from its suppliers? 

Yes  No, not currently   

Will do within 12 months Will do within 4 years   

 

13. Does your authority tend to make best value procurement based on whole life costing, lowest cost  purchasing or another basis?  (NB. Whole life includes financial and carbon costs of acquisition, operation, maintenance and disposal.) 

Whole life costing  A combination of quality and cost  

lowest cost  Other   

 

 

14. If whole life costing, does this include:    

 

 

  

Yes    

No    

  Disposal costs (WEEE compliant)?   

  

  

  Recyclability factors 

  

  

  

  Power consumption 

  

  

  

  Increasing energy costs 

  

  

  

  Estimated emissions 

  

  

  

  Environmental responsibility 

  

  

  

  Carbon costs of acquisition 

  

  

  

  Other 

  

  

  

Don't know                  

 

                       

Please give details for 'other'   

 

 

15. Is the finance team involved in the following activities? 

 

 

  

  

Yes    

No    

  Whole life costing 

  

  

  

  Other procurement decisions 

  

  

  

  Preparing the business case 

  

  

  

  Carbon accounting/budgeting 

  

  

  

Don't know          

           

Not applicable          

           

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


47    Green Veneer or Green Revolution? 

  Carbon footprint calculations 

 

  

  

  

  Tracking performance measures/KPIs   

  

  

  Sustainability reporting 

  

  

  

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

16. Does your organisation report regularly on its sustainability performance?    

   Quarterly  

  Centrally to top level  management 

  

  Internally to staff 

  

  Externally to citizens 

  

 

 

 

     

Six     monthly 

  

 

  

 

  

 

Doesn't     report 

Annually  

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

  

 

  

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Plans to start within 12     months 

  

 

17. What are the key enablers of success for your green initiatives?  (On a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = not important, 3 = important and 5 = vital importance) 

 

 

  

  

1    

2    

3    

4    

5    

  Embedded within corporate strategy 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Senior champion(s) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Communication of fit within overall strategy and programme   

  

  

  

  

  

  Engaging and involving employees 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Engaging and involving the community 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Dedicating resources to the issue 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Communicating and celebrating successes 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Quantifiable targets and performance reporting 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Information & communication technology 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Other (please specify below) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

Please give details for 'other'   

 

 

18. What are the key barriers to successful implementation of your green initiatives?  (On a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = not a barrier, 3 = a barrier and 5 = major barrier)    

  

1    

2    

3    

4    

5    

  Insufficient resource/budget 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Insufficient priority/importance 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Lack of clear targets 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Inability to monitor/measure progress 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Requirement for in year ROI/short term initiatives  

  

  

  

  

  

  Legacy technology infrastructure 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  Culture 

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


48    Green Veneer or Green Revolution? 

  Other (please specify below)   

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

Please give details for 'other'   

 

 

19. Will your council be able to match Central Government's 'carbon neutral ICT within four years' goal?  Yes  Probably  Possibly   

No  Don’t Know  Other 

 

 

 

 

20. Do you have any other comments that you would like to make on the importance of green ICT to local  government?   

 

 

21. Survey report and findings  The final report will be published in pdf format. An event will be held to discuss the findings and share best practice at  CIMA in central London on 6 November 2008. 

 

 

 

  

  

Yes    

No    

Maybe  

  Would you like to receive the report on this survey’s findings? 

  

  

  

    

  Would you like to attend an event to discuss the findings of this survey?   

  

  

    

 

  

 

   

 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


49    Green Veneer or Green Revolution?  Appendix III – Project Partners    1. Informed Publications Ltd  Informed Publications Ltd (IPL) publishes LGITU (Local Government IT in Use) magazine,  the only magazine to focus solely on the use of IT within UK Local Government and the  Transformation of Local Service Delivery. Read by 22,000 senior officers in the UK’s 468  local authorities, LGITU provides an independent forum for the development of the  transformational local government vision and the application of technology to the  efficiency agenda.  IPL also publishes the www.UKauthorITy.com online news service, the Town Hall  subscription‐only newsletter and the ComCord database. Managing editor, Helen Olsen, was also  editor of www.localtgov.org.uk (formerly www.localegovnp.org.uk) and its associated newsletter and  writes for the Guardian’s ePublic on a freelance basis. Editor, Tim Hampson, has over 18 years’  experience in writing about and analysing the local government/IT marketplace.   info@infopub.co.uk     2. SAS UK  SAS is the leader in business analytics software and services, and the largest  independent vendor in the business intelligence market. SAS® solutions are used by  over 2,000 public sector bodies worldwide to ‘do more with less by working smarter’ in  all areas of their operations including strategy and policy formulation, compliance and reporting, safety  and security, fraud and risk, efficiency and effectiveness, customer intelligence and social inclusion and  overall performance management. In addition, SAS solutions for IT intelligence and sustainability  management are helping customers to reduce both financial and carbon costs of their IT systems and  also to manage and improve the sustainability performance of the wider organisation. Since 1976 SAS  has been giving customers around the world THE POWER TO KNOW®.  www.sas.com/uk     3. Sun Microsystems Sun Microsystems develops the technologies that power the global marketplace.  Guided by a singular vision – “The Network is the Computer” – Sun drives network  participation through shared innovation, community development and open source  leadership. Sun can be found in more than 100 countries and on the Web at http://sun.com     4. CIMA  CIMA, the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants, is the only  international accountancy body with a key focus on business. It is s world leading  professional institute that offers an internationally recognised qualification in  management accounting with a full focus on business, in both the private and public sectors. With  164,000 members and students in 161 countries, CIMA is committed to upholding the highest ethical  and professional standards of its members and students.  CIMA is a member body of International Federation of Accountants (IFAC).    5. Socitm  The Society of Information Technology Management is the professional  association for ICT managers working in and for the public sector. Members are  drawn primarily from local authorities but also from the police and fire services, housing authorities and  other locally delivered public services. With nearly 2000 members from around 500 different  organisations including 98% of all UK local authorities, Socitm provides a widely respected forum for  the promotion, use and development of ICT best practice. It is also playing a leading role in the  implementation of the UK’s transformation strategy and runs the Local Government CIO Council. 

 

© Informed Publications Ltd, November 2008 


Green Veneer or Green Revolution?