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ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

CHARLESTON CHAPTER

NEWSLETTER From the president...

SPRING 2010

Dear ASSC Chapter Members, On April 10, the ASSC Graduate Student Grant-In-Aid Committee awarded two grant awards at the ASSC Annual Conference, located in Columbia, SC. These awards went to Brooke Brilliant and James Nyman, who are both seeking their Master’s degrees at USC in the Anthropology Department. Brooke was awarded $600 and James was awarded $800. The Charleston Area Chapter almost always gave money in the past to students conducting research in the local area, and this year was no different. Both James and Brooke are conducting essential ceramic studies on problematic artifact classifications and important collections here in the Charleston area, on Charleston area sites, and for that, we contributed $200 dollars as a donation to their research. In turn, we hope that both of them will satisfy one of the stipulations of their award—to present on their findings publicly—by presenting at one of our local chapter meetings in the future. We wish both Brooke and James all the best in their endeavors, and are glad that they are furthering our understanding of the past in Charleston. Sincerely, Andrew Agha Post and Courier and Channel 4 News covered the new archaeological finds at Charles Towne Landing. State Park archaeologist David Jones will be discussing the finds from this site at a public lecture on May 29th (more info on page 2). You can read the Post and Courier article here:

NEWS

http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2010/may/19/rare-discovery/

South Carolina African American Heritage Commission presented chapter members Andrew Agha and Nicole Isenbarger with individual

Preserving Our Places In History awards at a recent luncheon. Read more about it on their website: http://www.state.sc.us/scdah/afamer/pophawards10.htm

LAST CALL: If you have any images you would like to submit to the Charleston Chapter Archaeology Photo Contest, Contest the deadline is May31st. For more info, visit the ASSC Charleston Chapter website.


SPRING 2010

Page 2

Founders Hall Archaeology Lecture Series “Miller Site Excavations” David Jones, South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism. Where: Founders Hall, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site. When: May 29, 2010, Saturday at 6:00 PM

Subcommittee Meeting on SC House Bill H.4129 Where: Gressette Building, Room 308, Columbia, SC When: May 25, 2010, Tuesday at 10:00 am. House Bill H4129 will be discussed at a public hearing on Tuesday. The bill proposes penalties against those who enter lands with clear “No Trespass” signage without permission to disturb or collect archaeological remains. If passed, the bill will be an amendment to existing property rights. The bill is supported by the State Archaeologist Jonathan Leader as well as professional archaeologists, historic preservationists, tribal representatives, and property owners throughout the state. Opposing arguments have been raised by metal detecting and relic hunting forums online. Please voice your concerns about the bill and call the subcommittee members: Paul Campbell (R) (803) 212-6016 John (Jake) Knotts (R) (803) 212-6350 Floyd Nicholson (D) (803) 212-6040 Or email Paula Benson, SC Senate at PaulaBenson@scsenate.gov The subcommittee especially invites opinions from SC residents, so be sure to mention that in your letter or phone call. You can read the full text of the bill on the SC Senate website: http://www.scstatehouse.gov/sess118_2009-2010/bills/4129.htm

UPCOMING EVENTS

Archaeologist David Jones will be presenting the finds from the Miller Site at Charles Towne Landing, including the tabby floor of a 17th century structure. The lecture will be followed by an exhibit and a wine reception.


SPRING 2010

ARTIFACTTAG

by Nicole Isenbarger

White salt glazed stoneware (1740-1775) White salt glazed stoneware, a completely white bodied stoneware with a clear salt glaze, was the most common mid-eighteenth century tableware. The recovery of white salt glazed stonewares in archaeological contexts is commonly a marker for mid-eighteenth century occupation. The development of white salt glazed stoneware marks an important turning point in the ceramic industry as its introduction led to a drastic decline in the popularity of delftwares (Noel Hume 1969:114-115).

Barley Pattern.

Potters developed an early version in the 1720s, known as slip dipped white salt glazed stoneware which has an off-white slip on a gray body (Noel Hume 1969:114-115; Williams 2003:128). Common vessel forms include drinking vessels such as mugs, cups, and jugs, with a brown oxide slip applied to the rims to help reinforce the glaze against chipping. By the 1740s, the potters perfected the ware into a completely white bodied ceramic and the use of block molds allowed them to create elaborately designed tablewares (Noel Hume 1969:114-115).  Floral pattern (top left), slip dipped (bottom left).

Common white salt glazed stoneware plate rim patterns consist of the “dot, diaper, basket” and “barley” motifs. In the 1750s, elaborate floral patterns also appear on plate rim designs (Noel Hume 1969:115). However, the floral patterns are not as commonly found in archaeological contexts from South Carolina. Another variation of the ware is Scratch Blue (1750-1775) where incised designs are filled in with cobalt (Noel Hume 1969:117). Dot, diaper, basket patterns (top), scratch blue (bottom).  References Cited: Noel Hume, Ivor 1969 A Guide to Artifacts of Colonial America. Vintage Books, New York. Williams, Peter 2003 The Talbot Hotel Pit Group. In Ceramics In America, ed. by Robert Hunter, pp. 111-137. Chipstone Foundation, Milwaukee.

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ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG If you have any ARTIFACTTAG questions or ARTIFACTTAG suggestions for ARTIFACTTAG artifacts you ARTIFACTTAG would like to ARTIFACTTAG have discussed in a future ARTIFACTTAG newsletter please ARTIFACTTAG contact Nicole ARTIFACTTAG Isenbarger, ARTIFACTTAG Laboratory ARTIFACTTAG Supervisor, ARTIFACTTAG Brockington and Associates, by ARTIFACTTAG email at ARTIFACTTAG nicoleisenbarger@ ARTIFACTTAG brockington.org. ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG ARTIFACTTAG


ASSC Charleston Newsletter- Spring 2010