__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Cibare

London’s Food and Drinks Magazine Issue Twenty Two, Autumn 2020

www.cibare.co.uk @cibaremagazine


Contents RECIPE

REVIEW

Chilli Margarita 14 Spicy Chicken Strips 16 Tepache 20 Spicy Prawn & Chickpea Stew 22 Spiced Tomato Chutney 28 Fiery Ferments 30 Chilli Tofu 34 Spicy Glazed Salmon 36 Spicy Cauliflower Florets 38 Jamaican Tiger’s Eye 40 Thai Pork Balls 42

FEATURES Green Chilli, Labneh 24 & Dukkah Bites Squid Ink Tacos 44 Five Dinners 68

Meletius 8 Laboratorio Pizza 48

GARDENING The Big Tidy Up

58

BOOK REVIEW Ghana Kitchen 4 Chilli to Vanilla 74

CRAFTS Halloween Fun 72

HEALTH AND NUTRITION How To Safely Spice Up Your Dog’s Life

76

BOOZE Happy on the Inside Sustainable Wine

2

52 62

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


This issue is sending out all of the love to the lockdown heroes all over the world who have been doing their bit for mental health and of course keeping their hospitality world alive!! Zoe Adjonyoh and the Ghana Kitchen (after which she has named her book) transformed her restaurant into a community kitchen to feed people in her area of London as well as hospital workers that needed it. Theo Michaels has been working relentlessly cooking with our kids, producing new books full of delicious recipes and new ways to help us make good food our way with his Five Dinners ideas. The Burnt Chef Project has been working throughout ensuring that chefs are mentally stable and giving support throughout this difficult time where it seems like there is no hope - but the project has been a beacon of light through this uncertain year. We are here to support you all, with recipes full of hot comforting food and a few cocktails too, as well as introducing you to amazing people. Will we go through another lockdown? Who knows, but Cibare is here to spread the love as always, as best as we possibly can. x

Cibare

Editor’s Note


BOOK REVIEW

Ghana Kitchen By Zoe Adjonyoh By Despina Mina

I’m fortunate enough to live in a diverse pocket of north London, where little shops selling unfamiliar looking fruit and veg dot the high street. After reading through the list of 4

ingredients, some more familiar than others, it immediately makes me want to grab a shopping bag and go on an expedition down Tottenham High Road! Zoe’s diary entries are interspersed throughout, sharing personal insights into her Ghanaian family who seem just as fascinated by her as she is by them…three breakfasts a day anyone? Her description of the bustling streets, markets and ‘Chop Bars’- little canteens and roadside eateries selling home cooked fresh food - evoke the sounds and smells that make my stomach grumble for food. So, back to trying to pick a menu. My first thought was to make Nkatsenkwan, a traditional peanut butter and lamb stew, as Zoe mentions it early on in the book as being the recipe she learnt to make at an early age. Clearly a crowd pleaser, it’s become a signature dish served at her pop-up restaurant Ghana Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS: Despina Mina

It took me ages to choose a recipe for this issue of CIBARE, as Zoe Adjonyoh’s debut cook book Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen doesn’t make it easy. The truth is, with most cook books I get I read the intro, skip through the ingredients section and flick through the recipes until something jumps out at me. It’s not often a cook book comes along that draws me in from page 1. Maybe I connected to her stories because of my Greek heritage: like Zoe’s, there was always a rich smell of garlic and fresh herbs emanating from our kitchen. At a young age curiosity made me want to stick around and learn how to roll the meat balls, stuff vine leaves and make tzatziki - at home, our cultural diets came first and our British diets second.


Chicken isn’t something I’m often drawn to in a restaurant and I very rarely cook it at home these days: maybe it’s because unbeknownst to my parents, I spent all my pocket money on chicken burgers as a kid. I’m only ever tempted to order it off a menu or cook it myself if the meat is of high welfare quality and has been cooked with consideration and heaps of flavour. So, when I saw the photo of Jollof Fried Chicken and wanted to reach in and steal a piece, I immediately knew this was the one. I also really enjoy frying food. I know people have a fear of hot oil for good reason, but I love the chemistry of it, watching the hot spitting oil baptise a piece of meat or veg for it to emerge golden and crunchy on the outside and delicious on the inside. In order to achieve this, I marinated the chicken overnight in a combination of homemade dried jollof spice mix and buttermilk, then coated each strip of chicken with an aromatic nutmeg /cornflour mix. The result is scrumptious and exactly the reason why I wait for a good chicken dish to come along. The meat is tender and delicately spiced, wrapped in a hot crispy coating - irresistible. I decided that I wanted to serve the chicken with rice and as I was heading down the jollof flavoured rabbit hole, it made sense to make jollof rice. I’ve eaten jollof a small handful of times, always been cooked with meat and I’ve marvelled at the layers of flavour you discover with every mouthful. This felt 6

like a good opportunity to find out firsthand how it’s done and, on this occasion, I opted for the vegetarian version - a jollof spiced rice with every grain absorbed in Chale sauce - a rich, spicy tomato sauce that also works super well with meat and fish. This is fiery on its own but together with the chicken and the slaw, it balances out really well and I found myself going back for more of that heat. Now, about that aforementioned slaw - this one has a scotch bonnet hit. It’s packed with fruit (apples, lemon juice) and veg (carrots, cabbage) and a touch of mayo. There are so many clever and creative chefs and food writers out there coming up with new versions of the simple slaw, that I urge everyone to ditch the pre-made shop bought stuff and make your own. I’m always on the lookout for a new and updated version and this one doesn’t disappoint. It’s crunchy, zingy and fruity with a chilli kick - I confess, I wimped out and only added half a scotch Bonnet to save my remaining taste buds. I did toy with making the Coconut & Cassava Cake for dessert but some might say cakes are made for sharing, so I think I’ll save that for when lock down is over and my friends can come over. Then I can make the endless snacks I’ve bookmarked, finally tuck into the peanut butter stew and polish off the cake. Did I mention the suggested soundtrack? I defy anyone not to at least tap their toe to the beat!

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS: Despina Mina

Kitchen, after which the book has been named. But then summer happened and a hot bowl of comforting stew didn’t feel that fitting, so I bookmarked that page and continued my search.


REVIEW

MELETIUS By Emma Jordan

Set up by two friends, the Meletius crew have been testing, tasting and fine tuning their coffee over the last 3 months. They opened the doors of their café and roastery in the heart of Islington in early September of 2020. All their coffee is fair-trade and roasted in house to their own specifications. If you’re in the area, pop in for breakfasts and bistro-style lunches and evening openings with specific foodie themes. These coffees are produced for particular purposes, and I was advised about the best format for each product. To keep this review in line with other reviews, I have tried them as both short and long coffee. While it’s not unusual for coffee to be marketed for specific purposes, the single origin coffees really do work better in one format over the other. All in all, these are three really nice, easygoing coffees that you can enjoy at any time of the day. 8

Spread the love: Mixed blend This coffee is intended to be an espresso blend, but I found it rather nice as a long drink as well. The aroma of the beans is initially acidic, but not with sharp and soft elements. It’s crisp, like bitter cooking apple, but with a stone fruit softness – maybe a hint of fresh cherry. From the cafetière, the aroma is much softer and more rounded – like Irish Cream, but not quite as rich and still with a sharpness to it. There’s a refreshing lightness at the first sip with a nice “coffee” flavour with the Irish Cream coming through and even a bit of a sweet coconutty softness. It leaves a glossy mouth feel for sometime afterwards with a gravelly aftertaste that includes just a hint of that bitter apple. The aroma of the espresso is mellow and creamy. The first sip yields a strong, dark chocolate bitterness and similar dark chocolate mouth feel – glossy, but Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


with a slight pithiness to it for just a second. Aerating brings out that sweet chocolate-coconut flavour, with a flash of sharpness. Colombian Again, the aroma of the beans is quite sharp but with softer, wholesome, toasty notes. It’s developed to be drunk as an espresso and unsurprisingly this is the format in which it works best. In the cup, it doesn’t have a strong aroma, but it’s gently creamy with a hint of citrus. The first taste is rich and creamy with a hint of bitterness, but tempered by the mellow undertones which give it a slight hazelnuttiness. Behind all this – with a bit of aeration – there’s a juicy texture and fruitiness. It ends with a glossy mouth feel. It’s not a challenging espresso – smooth and flavoursome with just enough bitterness to reassure you that it’s espresso, but not enough to make you screw your face up. For my taste, it doesn’t work well as a long coffee (which it wasn’t designed to) but if you like a very light coffee, it might suit you. It has a very light aroma with a creamy body. Drinking it is light, sweet and watery, which makes it quite refreshing, and it has a slight hint of burnt caramel and milk chocolate. It has a slight acidity which lifts the flavour. It leaves you with a glossy mouth feel. Ethiopian This is intended to be a pour-over and accordingly worked better in the cafetière. Its aroma is surprising for Ethiopian coffee in that it’s not particularly farmy or citrusy.

that typical zinginess in the cup. Instead there’s an abundant fruitiness. The first taste is peachy – very peachy and this intensifies as the flavour develops. It’s quite unusual and very pleasant. There’s a lemon-ish citrus note on the tip of the tongue which unfolds into a refreshing and light burst of flavour. Aerating gives a hint of sweetness along the lines of light caramel, which reappears in the aftertaste and leaves a mostly glossy mouth feel but with a touch of pithiness on the tongue. As an espresso it is soft and creamy, with a note of rain-on-hot-tarmac. The first taste is impressively zingy – not quite lemon, but it’s an assertive bitterness. Aerating gives a softer, nuttier taste. It’s not a strong espresso, and not intended to be drunk as one, but regardless, it’s not bad. If you haven’t tried Meletius coffee and need to try before you buy, then head on down to their coffee shop in Angel for brunch. If you are lucky you will see them roasting and sit inhaling the incredible smell whilst you have your coffee however you like it, and a really good meal too. Check out their socials for the love to begin. Meletius Coffee 30 Duncan Street Angel Islington London N1 8NW @meletiuscoffee

As a long drink, neither does it display 10

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


RECIPE

CHILLI MARGARITA By Dhruv Baker

The beauty of this cocktail is that you can make it in a cocktail shaker for one or you can make a jug or pitcher of them for a group of six and have a bit of a get together: just stick to the ratios - the “part” can be a shot glass or a pint glass! INGREDIENTS To make the Chilli Sugar Syrup, you will need: 250ml water 250g caster sugar  1 large red chilli split lengthways and deseeded

kettle. Stir in the sugar till it’s dissolved, allow to cool a bit then add the chilli. Start by rubbing the rim of your glass with a wedge of lime. Press the rim of the glass into the saucer of salt so that the rim is liberally coated with salt. Set the glass or glasses aside.

2 parts good Tequila  1 part Cointreau or Triple Sec 1 part freshly squeezed lime juice 1/2 part chilli sugar syrup  Table salt in a saucer  Lime wedges  Ice 

If you’re making the cocktail in a shaker, fill it with ice, add the measures of Tequila, Cointreau or Triple Sec, lime juice and the chilli syrup.  Shake well. If you’re using a pitcher or jug, pop in a liberal quantity of ice, add all the ingredients and stir well. Pour carefully into the glass or glasses taking care not to knock the salt off the rim. You can also add ice to each glass and serve it on the rocks or add the ice and other ingredients to a powerful blender and whizz till you have the infamous frozen version.

METHOD Make the syrup ahead of time and keep in the fridge for up to a week. To do this, heat the water in a pan or from a boiled

For the record I always go straight up but drink it before it warms up! Sit back and enjoy but be careful – these Margheritas kick like a mule!


RECIPE

SPICY CHICKEN STRIPS WITH HOT SAUCE By Jack’s Meat Shack

There’s nothing quite like the lure of fried chicken, but why take-away when you can so effectively fake-away!? INGREDIENTS For the Chicken 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts 480 ml buttermilk 2 tbsp hot sauce 2 eggs beaten 100 g plain flour 100 g cornflour 3 tsp salt 1 tsp black pepper Rapeseed oil for frying For the Hot Sauce 2 tbsp Jack’s Meat Dust 2 tsp mustard powder 3 tbsp brown sugar 1 tbsp cayenne pepper 50 ml rapeseed oil leftover from frying 16

METHOD 1. Slice the chicken breasts into thin strips, yielding approximately 4 to 5 strips per breast. 2. Mix the buttermilk, eggs and hot sauce in a mixing bowl. 3. Add the flour, cornflour, salt and pepper to another mixing bowl. 4. Combine all of the dry spices for the sauce in a heatproof container and set aside ready for the hot sauce later. Time for the fun part - set up your dredging station. 5. Have ready the chicken, the bowl of buttermilk and bowl of flour mix to hand and in reach. Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


6. Individually pick up the chicken strips dipping each one into the flour, coating completely, dip into the buttermilk mix, coating completely, then back into the flour mix coating completely.  7. Repeat this process for all of the chicken strips placing each one onto a wire rack once completely coated. Allow the chicken to rest for about 5 minutes to allow the coating to stick. 8. Whilst the chicken is resting, heat about 2 inches of oil in a heavy bottomed cast iron pan or a Dutch oven until the oil is bubbling at approximately 180°C. 9. Gently place chicken strips, one by one, into the hot oil and let them fry for 2 to 3 minutes per side, cooking in two batches so the pot doesn’t get overcrowded. Keep an eye on the oil and adjust the heat accordingly. 10. Remove the chicken when golden brown on each side and the internal temperature reaches 75°C. 11. Place on to plate lined with a paper towel to drain off excess oil. 12. Cook the second batch of chicken strips before moving on to the next step. 13. To make the hot sauce, spoon the hot frying oil into the spices, whisking after each spoonful to combine to the consistency of a thin paste - not too watery. You will not need all of the oil. Remember you are handling hot oil and adhere to safety first measures! 14. Brush your sauce onto the chicken strips coating evenly. Serve with buns, with slaw or with freshly cooked chips.


RECIPE

TEPACHE By Anthony Raffo

Tepache is a fermented pineapple drink that originated from pre-Columbian Mexico. To the Aztecs, the word tepiātl means “drink made from corn”. Originally, corn (maize) was the base of tepache, but the contemporary recipe for tepache uses pineapple served traditionally in hand made clay cups. 

the ingredients for a minute or so. 

INGREDIENTS Large pineapple x1  Ginger x200g  Birds eye chilli x1  Brown sugar x100g  Cinnamon stick x1

6. Leave the jar open but covered with a cloth over-night. 

METHOD 1. Cut the pineapple and ginger into large chunks (leaving the skin on). 2. Place the pineapple and ginger into a Kilner jar with the sugar, chilli, cinnamon.  3. With a rolling pin carefully smash up 20

4. Fill the Kilner jar half-way with water, close the lid and shake till the brown sugar has dissolved.  5. Then top up the Kilner jar with water leaving an inch gap. 

7. Close and leave for 6 days popping the lid once a day.  8. Strain the juice from the ingredients into a glass bottle and refrigerate. 9. Add to corona beer or dark rum, ice and a wedge of lime and enjoy. I also like to use the ingredients twice – to do this just add more sugar and go again. Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


FEATURE

SMOKY PRAWN AND CHICKPEA STEW By Theo Michaels

A splash of olive oil, for shallow frying ½ large white onion, diced 2 garlic cloves, chopped 1 fresh red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped A pinch of chilli / hot red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon pimentòn dulce 1 tablespoon tomato purée / paste ¼ teaspoon brown sugar 400g / 14-oz can chickpeas, drained and rinsed 350 ml passata (Italian sieved / strained

tomatoes) 12 raw large king prawns / jumbo shrimp, shelled but with heads on Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to season TO SERVE 60 ml / 1/4 cup Greek yoghurt 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice A small handful of flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped Extra virgin olive oil, to drizzle Crusty bread (optional) Serves 2 1. Add a splash of olive oil to a large, deep frying pan and set over a medium heat. Add the onion and fry / sauté for a few minutes until soft and golden. Add the garlic, fresh chilli and chilli / hot red pepper flakes and cook for a further minute. 2. Stir in the cumin, pimentòn dulce,

PICTURE CREDITS: Theo Michaels

From Theo Michaels’ latest book ‘Rustica’ comes this spicy, Spanish-style stew that is deliciously warming and comforting. Seasoned with Spanish pimentòn the rich tomato sauce envelopes the juicy king prawns / jumbo shrimp and chickpeas. In winter, store-cupboard staples like pulses / legumes are used alongside fresh seafood and this surf ‘n’ turf dish would be typical of dishes cooked on the Southern coast. Serve with plenty of crusty bread for dunking.


tomato purĂŠe / paste and sugar, quickly followed by the chickpeas. Stir in the chickpeas and then pour in the passata along with a splash of cold water and season with salt and pepper. Simmer, partially covered, over a low heat for 15 minutes. 3. Put the prawns / shrimp into the pan, pushing them down slightly into the liquid. Cook for about 4 minutes before

turning them over to continue cooking for another 2 minutes or so, until pink and cooked through. 4. Spoon the stew into dishes. Whisk together the yoghurt and lemon juice with 1 tablespoon of cold water and swirl a little over each serving. Add a sprinkle of chopped flat-leaf parsley and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and serve with crusty bread, if you fancy.


FEATURE

GREEN CHILLI, LABNEH AND DUKKAH BITES I am a huge fan of canapés. I think the simplest food can taste so much nicer presented as a canapé. It’s a little extravagant ritual my family has on a Friday night. Teasing out leftovers in the fridge to see who can get the most creative. 

For the Green Chilli Chutney  2 to 3 thin green chillies  1 small bunch of fresh coriander  1 quarter of a preserved lemon  6 tbsp yoghurt  1 quarter tsp salt 6 tbsp desiccated coconut 

These Green Chilli, Labneh and Dukkah Bites are made from three small ingredients that we almost always have the fridge. The green chilli gives you a quick hit of heat on the tip of your tongue and the spices in this version of dukkah release a warming gentle heat. Both are cooled by the creamy labneh. 

For the Dukkah  100g sesame seeds  2 tbsp sunflower seeds  5 tbsp coriander seeds 2 tbsp cumin seeds  1 tbsp fennel seeds  1 to 2 tsp sea salt 

INGREDIENTS For the Labneh  1kg yoghurt 

24

METHOD 1. First make the labneh. Line a sieve with a muslin cloth and place this over a deep bowl. Pour the yoghurt into the centre of the sieve and leave to drain off the excess water for about 10 minutes. Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS: Urvashi Roe

By Urvashi Roe


Scoop up the sides of the muslin cloth so you have a ball of yoghurt in the middle. Push the sides of the muslin to squeeze out any more water and then hang this up with a bowl underneath for a minimum of 4 hours. I usually hang it on my kitchen tap overnight and let the excess water drip off into the sink. Once the water is drained off you will be left with a thick creamy substance. It will keep in the fridge for about a week.  2. For the green chilli chutney place all the ingredients except the desiccated coconut into a food processor and blitz until the coriander is finely chopped all the way through. Pour this mixture into a bowl and stir in the desiccated coconut. Pop the bowl into the fridge so the desiccated coconut can swell slightly leaving you with a thick paste consistency. If it is too runny you can add more coconut. 

used up. Next roll each ball in the green chilli chutney until it is evenly coated. When you are ready to serve, roll the balls in the dukkah. If you do this part in advance the dukkah will go soggy so I usually wait until my guests have arrived and do this last part quickly to keep the crunch.  The extra green chilli chutney will keep in the fridge for about a week and you can use it as a dip or sauce for grilled meat or fish. It’s also excellent stirred into mashed potato! The extra dukkah will keep well for about 6 weeks in an air tight container. It’s lovely thrown over fried eggs or as a dip with bread and olive oil.  

PICTURE CREDITS: Urvashi Roe

3. To make the dukkah, first toast the sesame seeds on a low heat until evenly browned. Stir occasionally to prevent any from burning. Remove these into a bowl. Next toast the sunflower seeds in the same way and place into a pestle and mortar. Finally toast the coriander, cumin and fennel seeds until they too are lightly browned. You will have a wonderful aroma at this point as the spices release their flavours. Place them into the pestle and mortar and crush lightly so you have a coarse mixture. Add the sea salt and toasted sesame seeds and mix well.  4. When your labneh is ready, scoop out a heaped teaspoon full and roll it into a ball. I find having very lightly oiled hands helps. Repeat until all your labneh is 26

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


RECIPE

SPICED TOMATO CHUTNEY By Gillian Balcombe

With autumnal weather upon us, a warming chutney is a delight with our sausages, cheeses, cold cuts – in fact so many savoury dishes benefit from the addition of a good dollop of a zingy chutney. And with all those tomato gluts I keep reading about, this is the perfect recipe. Here’s what you need: INGREDIENTS 500g red onion, diced 1kg ripe tomatoes, chopped 5 garlic cloves, finely sliced 2 red birds’ eye chillies, deseeded and finely chopped 7 to 8cm piece of root ginger, peeled and fairly finely chopped 250g dark Muscovado sugar 150ml red wine or cider vinegar 5 cardamom pods 1 tsp each of smoked paprika and cumin

28

METHOD Couldn’t be easier – chuck everything into a large, heavy bottomed casserole or saucepan and bring to a gentle simmer, stirring frequently. Simmer for one and a half to two hours, stirring every so often to make sure it’s not sticking. When everything has softened nicely, raise the heat and bring the mixture to a gentle boil. Let it cook away like this until the chutney has become darker and jammier in consistency. It should also look a bit shiny. Pop it into sterilised jars and let it cool, then pop the lids on. It will keep for about 5 to 6 weeks… actually it won’t, you’ll have eaten it all by then! If you can bring yourself to keep some jars, this will make a lovely, foodie stocking filler for Christmas, for slathering on all that leftover cheese, ham and turkey! Enjoy…

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


RECIPE

Fiery Ferments By Emma Walton-Moore

There are lots of great reasons to introduce fermented foods into your diet: they are fantastic for gut health and their flavour always packs a punch! The latter is especially true if you decide to add chilli peppers to your stash of fermented veggies. Below you’ll find two recipes for fiery ferments: Fermented Jalapeños and Fermented Salsa. They are perfect for adding to your next Mexican feast! Fermented Jalapeños (Will fill one 500ml jar) INGREDIENTS 1 tbsp sea salt 500 millilitres water 2 cloves garlic 250 grams jalapeños (or enough to fill the jar)

30

METHOD 1. Dissolve the salt in the water and place to one side. 2. Slice the jalapeños and add them to a clean jar leaving a gap of 1 to 2 inches between them and the top of the jar.  3. Fill the jar with the salt water ensuring the jalapenos are covered but still leaving an inch of headroom from the top of the jar. 4. The jalapeños have begun fermenting when you see little bubbles begin to form and they’ll be ready to eat once more little bubbles begin to appear (this will take on average 5 to 7 days). Once the jalapeños have fermented, they can be enjoyed immediately or stored in the fridge. 

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


Small-Batch

Pre-Mixed Cocktails lockdown-liquor.com | @lockdownliquorco


ICECREAM SANDWICHES HANDMADE IN EAST LONDON

www.happyendingsldn.com

@HappyEndingsLDN


RECIPE

Chilli Tofu & Noodles By Emma Sousa

This is a fantastic vegan dish that’s perfect for sharing… just proportionally increase the quantities, and cook it in a big wok, then let everyone help themselves. I love tofu… the secret is to make sure that your tofu is either dry or well pressed and then marinate it with lots of lovely seasonings - it takes on flavour really well. The panko breadcrumbs are the best for a crispy coating – and if you have never used them before you are going to be hooked, I promise. Enjoy! For the Panko Breaded Tofu (serves two) 450 grams of firm tofu 1 tablespoon of maple syrup 1 tablespoon of Thai chilli sauce 1 tablespoon of dark soy sauce 1 tablespoon of olive oil 1 heaped teaspoon of chilli flakes 1 heaped teaspoon of garlic powder A generous helping of black pepper METHOD Put all the ingredients except the tofu into a bowl and stir well. Cut the tofu into 2.5 cm chunks, pop the cubes into

the marinade and leave for an hour or better still overnight in the fridge. When you are ready to cook (best done at the last minute so it’s really fresh), fill a bowl with your panko breadcrumbs, make sure each cube is coated completely and fry in a splash of oil (light olive or rapeseed), turning once they have browned and cooking on all sides. Fry them over a low to medium heat so that they don’t burn. For the Noodles & Broth 1. Cook one bag of dried rice noodles as per instructions on the pack. Set aside. 2. Gently fry 2 cloves of minced garlic, a small sliced onions and some peeled and finely sliced fresh ginger (about 1 cm) in a wok. 3. Add your favourite vegetables - I like to make carrots and courgettes into ribbons using a potato peeler and I also include lightly steamed broccoli, cauliflower: in fact, any veg you have in the fridge will be fine. Lightly toss all


the veg in the wok and add a generous glug of soy sauce to flavour. Your veggies should be crunchy. 4. Make up a pint of broth with vegetable stock and some more soy sauce (about 3 tablespoons) and pour it over the veg, add the noodles and sprinkle some

fresh chopped coriander on top. At the last minute add the tofu to the top (it’s supposed to sit on top so the breadcrumbs stay crispy) and sprinkle with some sesame seeds. Serve and enjoy!


RECIPE

Spicy Glazed Salmon By Dani Gavriel

INGREDIENTS For each salmon fillet you will need:

sure the salmon doesn’t catch on the heat.

1 tbsp of runny honey  1 tbsp of crushed ginger 1 tbsp of crushed garlic 2 tbsp of soy sauce 1 or 2 deseeded and finely sliced hot red chillies The freshly squeezed juice of 1 lime

4. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and chopped coriander and serve with stir fried greens.

METHOD 1. Marinate the salmon fillet or fillets in the marinade mixture and refrigerate for two hours, reserving some of the marinade for brushing. 2. When you’re ready to grill the fish, remove it from fridge and brush with the remainder of the marinade along with a drizzle of melted coconut oil. 3. Grill on a medium heat for 15 to 20 minutes, depending on the size of your fillet or fillets, turning once and making 36

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


RECIPE

Spicy Glazed Cauliflower Florets By Dani Gavriel

INGREDIENTS 1 cauliflower 1 tablespoon melted coconut oil 1 teaspoon sugar salt & pepper 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper pinch of ground turmeric pinch of ground cinnamon METHOD Break the cauliflower up into florets, combine the remaining ingredients, coat the cauliflower florets and bake on a parchment lined baking tray at 180°C for 25 to 30 minutes. Serve with a natural yogurt or sour cream dip.

38

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


RECIPE

Kids’ Corner JAMAICAN TIGER’S EYE By Samina Iqbal

I’m pretty sure it was our holiday to Jamaica (on a budget, and what seems like hundreds of years ago!), that my kids discovered a fabulous mocktail. It could be that the bartender just made it up to entertain them, but it was so good, that it became the favourite drink of the holiday. We then tried to re-create it when we got home, and it turned into THE drink for all their birthday parties in the early teen years. Since those lovely times, I have had it in my Cookery Classes for Kids, and it has always been a huge success. Try it, and you’ll see why. INGREDIENTS 1 lemon 1 orange 1 tbsp sugar Bitter lemon drink Orange juice Lime cordial Grenadine

METHOD 1. Tip the sugar into a saucer and spread it out 2. Squeeze the lemon and pour the juice into another saucer 3. Cut the orange into slices with a slit up to the middle of the slice. Set aside. 4. Use tall glasses for this drink 5. Turn one glass upside down, and dip the rim lightly in the lemon juice and then the sugar. Set aside. (Kids LOVE doing this) 6. Carefully, pour a small amount of grenadine at the bottom of each glass (about half an inch) 7. Next pour in an inch of lime cordial. 8. Pour in the orange juice taking care not to dislodge the sugared rim. About 3 inches. 9. Finally pour in the bitter lemon to nearly the top of the glass. 10. Gently thread a slice of orange onto the rim of the glass using the slit you made earlier. Cheers!


RECIPE

THAI PORK BALLS WITH COCONUT RICE INGREDIENTS Pork Balls: 500g minced pork 1 tablespoon of red Thai curry paste 5 fresh lime leaves 1 egg 1 teaspoon of sugar 180g fine green beans Coconut Rice: 2 cups of Thai jasmine rice 2 cups of good quality coconut milk 1-3/4 cups of water 1 teaspoon of sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt METHOD 1. Cut the fine green beans and lime leaves into thin slices. 2. Mix the egg and red Thai curry paste with the minced pork. 3. Add sliced fine green beans, lime leaves and sugar to the mixture then combine everything together well. Leave it to one 42

side for 5 to 10 minutes. 4. While you’re waiting prepare the rice: add all the ingredients together into a large heavy bottomed saucepan and stir the mixture well to combine. Cover the pot and cook the rice on a medium heat for 15 to 20 minutes then turn the heat off and leave it covered for another 5 minutes. 5. While the rice is cooking put a good amount of vegetable oil into a frying pan on a medium heat. Form the pork mixture into small balls then flatten and fry them on both sides until they’re cooked to a golden-brown colour. 6. Dish up the hot coconut rice onto a serving platter and place the cooked pork balls on top of the rice: garnish the plate with slices of cucumber and coriander and enjoy. You can also eat this with Thai sweet chilli dipping sauce which will draw out the flavours even more! Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS: Ying Bower

By Ying Bower


FEATURE

SQUID INK TACOS WITH BEER BATTERED HADDOCK, HOT ‘GREEN SAUCE’, SALSA AND YOGHURT By David J Rickett

I’ve loved this recipe since I developed it and served it to Grace Dent on Masterchef 2020. I hope you enjoy it just as much. INGREDIENTS Makes 6 tacos For the Taco Dough: 150 ml water 4g squid ink 90ml olive oil 1 teaspoon baking powder 300g plain flour plus extra for dusting 1 teaspoon salt For the Green Sauce: 44

2 large, ripe avocados 2 kiwi fruits (peeled) 10 drops Tabasco sauce 1 green chilli 1 small bunch of coriander 2 limes (juice and zest) 2 cloves of garlic For the Yoghurt: 250ml plain yoghurt 1 lime (juice only) For the Salsa: 1 punnet cherry tomatoes 1 small bunch coriander 1 small red onion 1 lime (juice only) Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


Sea salt For the Haddock: 500g haddock fillets 150g plain flour 100g cornflour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 bottle Mexican beer (Corona or Sol) Salt and pepper

4. Once coated, deep fry at 180°C until golden. For the Salsa: 1. Roughly chop the tomatoes, finely chop the coriander and finely dice the red onion.

For the Garnish: 1 red chicory

2. Mix together in a bowl and add lime juice and salt to taste.

METHOD For the Squid Ink Tacos: 1. Add the flour, salt and baking soda into a large bowl and mix.

For the Yoghurt: 1. Mix the lime juice with the yoghurt.

2. Whisk together the oil, water and squid ink then slowly add to the flour mixture. 3. Knead the dough, then leave to rest for 10 to 15 minutes. 4. Roll the dough to 3mm thick and cut around a saucer to shape the dough 5. Cook in a very hot pan on both sides until charred. For the Green Sauce: 1. Blend all the ingredients together until smooth then place into a squeezy bottle for serving. For the Battered Haddock: 1. Make a batter by mixing the flour, baking powder and beer together. Season to taste. 2. Cut the haddock into fish finger sized pieces and coat with flour. 3. Add the floured haddock to the batter. 46

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


REVIEW

LABORATORIO PIZZA By Eve Tudor

Having sent my spies out on the hunt for something new I found myself invited for dinner and cocktails at the beautiful Laboratorio Pizza restaurant. Let’s face it, being invited to an Italian restaurant is always a joy for this little Cibare (to feed by name, to eat by nature!). This restaurant is super new, as it opened two days before lockdown, and the pizza oven is in full swing, bringing out some fresh pizza delights for us all to get down and EAT!! And eat we did! I grabbed a friend and sat down for some Negronis and a girlie chat before the feast began. Who doesn’t love a cocktail hour or two perfectly timed after work? Tasty nibbles came with our drinks which, to be perfectly honest, were LUSH! I know, but sometimes you just need to use the word that’s running around your head… I could have eaten those hot, fried, puffy balls of cheesy spicy goodness dipped in 48

’Nduja sauce for hours. And to be fair…. I may have. Once we got down to the second set of cocktails it was time for pizza. The dough was fresh, soft and thin, a perfect match for the spicy sausage and chilli flakes on topping on one and artichoke and olives on the other. And yes, I did add some chilli oil, I couldn’t’ help myself and it was perfect! There is nothing like a little heat with your pizza! Once that was devoured it was of course time for another cocktail and more pizza. These were a little different. Pizza Fritta is a Neapolitan street food that is like a calzone but it’s deep-fried. One was a delightful yet more traditional tomato pizza with rocket sandwiched in between that worked perfectly! The peppery rocket was strong and hot next to the creamy cheese and the sweet Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


tomato sauce. Simple but every so elegant. Perfection. Now the other pizza was eye-poppingly good! Sandwiched between two thin sourdough layers was a slice of lettuce, a large piece of burrata and, slipped in for good measure, was a long end to end covering of anchovy. Now I know some of you don’t like anchovies and you are wrong, they are amazing. It is that simple. But honestly, that sharp salty oily fish sat happily on that creamy moist cheese and basked in the joy of the pizza bread. It was heaven. There are no more words, other than just eat it. Now usually with this kind of pizza, fresh and utterly quintessentially Italian, I would only be drinking wine. Probably red and definitely lots of it. This evening began with cocktails and I stuck with them and they worked really well too I’m glad to say. Of course, a Negroni is also Italian so it really should. But it definitely was the perfect mix. The décor is modern and really spacious in the Fitzrovian restaurant, with a high ceiling at the back with a skylight that was so lovely and bright at the beginning of the evening. The pizza oven being open for us all to watch the cooking entertainment was so lovely too. Who doesn’t want to watch their pizza being made? I loved it! All in all, the perfect evening out with friends or family in your little bubble. Or an intimate date with that perfect pizza? Absolutely! Laboratorio Pizza – Fitzrovia and Brick Lane www.laboratoriopizza.co.uk @laboratoriopizza


BOOZE

HAPPY ON THE INSIDE

In an ever-changing world, our social habits have become truncated. For many, this has meant they couldn’t wait to return to each new opening, but for others it has had the opposite effect. Here’s a snapshot of thoughts and experiences of lockdown laid bare from foodies, social butterflies, ever-optimists and experts in human psychology that illustrates how trends have already begun to adapt amidst 2020 anxieties. Many of us have changed this year. The year 2020 is sure to go down in history as one of great flux. But there are ways we can recalibrate; ways we can assert some of our liberties and gain back a bit of independence. Having a sense of freedom can often be seen as rather necessary for our mental health, so really, we need to think of things like that: socialising is good for us - however we now do it.

52

TREND: Comfort It makes sense that in an uncertain world we strive for comfort and “never is that more obvious than in the era of pandemia,” says Professor Charles Spence, head of the Crossmodal Research Laboratory at Oxford University, reminding us that “when the world seems like a safe place, and we are sure of our position in it, we tend to search out new flavours and exotic tastes: molecular mixology, modernist cuisine, bring it on. However, when the global situation is much more uncertain, as it is today, then many of us gravitate toward those food choices that are associated with comfort and security instead.” This is something that the on-premise industry has already begun to catch on to, with sales of baking ingredients such as flour and yeast skyrocketing and pubs and restaurants following suit and serving up classics to bolster a Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS: Jessica Mason

By Jessica Mason


sense of reassurance. But that’s not all that has changed - while our diets began adapting, so too did our habits. “Until March I was in the pub pretty much every day, then from 13th March to 22nd June, I didn’t leave the house once,” says Pete Brown, author of British food history book Pie Fidelity. “Since then, I’ve only been out when I have to,” he admits. As a very social person whose life and livelihood centre around food and drink, this is quite a dramatic change of events. Similarly, Margate-based furniture and textiles designer Zoe Murphy admits “I’ve almost completely stopped going out during the pandemic. Not only for my own health reasons (vulnerable parents who I am very close with have been my choice over socialising) but also it feels to me like I’m contributing to a greater movement of care at the moment by choosing to wind down and stay in so that the spread can slow and we can take stock of what’s best to do.” For Murphy, whose business ethos is hinged on her optimistic take on life, being social has adapted from going out with lots of people to reasserting the importance of personal wellbeing. “I do things like take more walks out in nature, light candles and make for sweet cosiness when I’m home. So cooking, and self-care and ceremony and ritual are really helpful for me to feel like I am in control of my own experience and that I can make it nice for myself,” she explains. Making things nice for ourselves often begins with food and drink. Beer writer, author and certified cicerone Melissa Cole highlights how like so many of us, it’s the gift of home cooking that, for 54

her, has been part therapeutic, part distraction and part blessing. “Cooking has always been my refuge,” reveals Cole, pointing out that lockdown even pushed her “to try new things as many days a week as possible and read more deeply about food and drink cultures in order to approach them with more respect.” As Cole reminds us, nothing can substitute a hug, but there are at least some avenues to feeling a similar level of comfort, one of which is a cocktail that conjures up those simpler times. Comfort Cocktail: Martin Miller’s WINTERFUL Gin Mulled Wine (to be served hot) Martin Miller’s Winterful Gin: 50ml Red Wine: 125ml Simple syrup or honey Juice of one lemon or orange per serving Licor 43: 50ml Garnish to taste: cinnamon stick & orange wedge

WINTERFUL will be available in Waitrose nationwide from 26 October 2020 (£27.99) and will also be available on Amazon. TREND: Nostalgia In addition to feeling like we need some comfort, another element to tap into is the security of looking backwards and not forwards. Because, well, back then - we now consider them ‘the good old days’. “Nostalgic flavours that remind us of a happy, earlier time have also seen a dramatic rise too,” says Spence, adding: Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


TREND: Digital There is also the trend for digital commensality - or rather, the inclination to share moments online at a distance, rather than in person. “I spend a lot more time online now, and as a result I’m buying more from online retailers, but also seeing a lot more small businesses that have an online presence that I don’t think I would have seen before,” says Murphy. Spence notes that “there is a big rise in digital commensality Zoom cocktails and the like. One of the intriguing challenges is to help people feel connected at a distance. Does it help if you are drinking the same thing, or if background music is the same? Thinking about how technology can connect us while so many of us are isolated seems like one of the more exciting challenges for experience-designers at the present time. That, and tailoring one’s tipples to the changing taste profiles of one’s guests,” he adds. 56

“Even when I plan online family zooms I’m suggesting we buy-in the same drinks and somehow make special every part of what we’re doing even if we can’t physically be together,” says Murphy,” explaining: “I’m much more likely to buy-in a bottle of wine or an extravagant dining accessory now, and if I visit my family I’ll always take a special treat and make a moment of the visit. I’ve also been posting lots of things to people, because, at a time when your presence can’t be your present, it helps to actually send a thing. Thank goodness for things,” she laughs, before sagely adding a little bit of truism to her message. The piece of advice that retailers, venue hosts and brand owners need to tap into. TREND: Meaningfulness “Time with people I care about has become so much more important,” says Murphy, revealing that any business that wants to understand how to garner her attention as a consumer needs to know that treating all people, including ourselves, well is so much more important than anything else - especially right now. It isn’t about expense anymore, but love, after all. As Murphy reminds us: “I don’t care about spending on the treats and accessories, or how much things cost, so long as I can make the time I get to spend with each person I care for extremely meaningful, memorable, and safe.”

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS: Jessica Mason

“How else to explain the explosive rise in sales of trifle soon after the present pandemia took hold? Research from Mintel earlier this year reported that when it comes to chocolate, 63% of us reach for the same brand as we did as a child.” As a result, there has, you may say, been a new era of reprioritisation. Or a renaissance for the things we find charming. “The first thing we did (after I came out of two weeks’ quarantine) was institute Date Night every Saturday. My wife and I take it in turns to cook a meal, preceded by a cocktail, and followed by a film,” says Brown, admitting that it’s the little things that keep you grounded. The things you remember you love and continue to include in your timeline of events.


NO SUGAR. NO CALORIES. NO BS. THAT’S REFRESHING.

A DONATION FROM EVERY CAN BENEFITS

UGLYDRINKS.COM @UGLYDRINKS


GARDENING

THE BIG TIDY UP! By Emma Sousa

So Autumn is here, the days are shorter and the weather can play tricks on us at this time of year…one day we have brilliant sunshine and can walk around in a short-sleeved shirt and the next day we have frosts and the central heating is put back on. But this a great time to get out into the garden or onto the allotment and get some of those much-needed jobs done. Now is the time to bring your tender plants into the greenhouse, an unheated conservatory, a windowsill even (if you haven’t already) - make sure all your plants are well spaced and ventilated otherwise you can be in danger of powdery mildew! It’s also a good time to start a big clean up in the garden or on the allotment. Cut back hardy perennials such as delphiniums, but leave the more tender ones such as penstemon until the Spring as the extra layers will offer a bit of protection overwinter. Now is also a 60

good time to divide any perennials that are getting big and scruffy, just dig them up and use two forks to split them in half, then replant them to increase your stock and keep them strong and healthy looking. People always think that things start to slow down in the garden at this time of year and whilst to a certain extent that is true, there is lots to be done before the hard winter hits if you want to get ahead of the game…..collect seed from your favourite flowers ready to sow next year, scoop all the leaves up and if you haven’t already created a leaf mulch pile now is the time (I actually go around and collect the bags of leaves the council leaves on the roadside before they are taken away) - this is a free resource and will improve your soil next year. I mix mine in with my compost so there is a balance of nutrients from the veggies, spent plants and the leaf mulch which lightens it all Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


up and is great for my heavy clay soil to break it all down. Spring bulbs can be planted out still while the soil is warm (narcissi, allium etc) but leave tulip bulbs until towards the end of November as the ground needs to be cold if they are to make it to the following year. You can also plant out new perennial plants and start preparing the ground for bare root plants next month. If you grow dahlias, dig up the tubers as soon as the first frosts have turned them black: dry them out for a few days before tucking into dry compost or I usually use wood shavings to store them over winter. They should be packed into cardboard boxes and kept somewhere dry and cool. They will need checking every now again for any rotting parts which should be removed immediately and then in the spring they can be brought out again to be potted up in March ready to plant out some time in May. Any tubers that can be divided I usually divide in the spring to increase my stock and keep those tubers under control! You can also start sowing sweet peas this month although I usually wait until January to sow mine otherwise, I tend to neglect them and they end up weak or dead!

compost. If you have a major weed problem it is well worth covering beds with cardboard (make sure you take off all the sticky tape) and then topping up with compost to keep the weeds under control. If, like me, you only have a few raised beds then it’s easy to keep on top of the weeds come spring so I wouldn’t necessarily put cardboard down. Over the next few weeks, you should also clean and put away your tools, check for any repairs that need doing around the plot, mend fences, mulch pathways and generally get everything looking shipshape before the madness starts again come the new year. And of course, as always keep composting! You will thank yourself next year when you have lots of free, nutrient rich compost to put on your veggie beds!

Veggie wise you can continue to sow salad leaves under cover (outside just put up a low caterpillar tunnel or cloche) and now is the time to plant out your onion and garlic plants. If you have a nice sheltered spot you can also sow broad beans this month. Plant out new soft fruit canes / trees. This month I start clearing out spent beds and topping up with home-made 62

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


WINE

HOW SUSTAINABLE IS YOUR WINE? By Katie Goodchild

When shopping for wine do you consider how sustainable your purchase is? I’m guilty of not doing so. Often my wine choices are swayed by producer, grape variety or the style I fancy drinking at that moment. I enjoy organic and biodynamic wine, but whether or not a wine is sustainable does not determine my shopping habits. But should it? As we continue to struggle through a pandemic, wild fires ravage expansive areas of land in California and Australia, and Sir David Attenborough joins Instagram to communicate with us in an urgent attempt to save the planet, a need to live more sustainably has never been so important. When we talk about the planet and the role agriculture plays in protecting or harming it, we seldom discuss wine. Yet the global wine industry is a huge part of agriculture. There are many practices 64

throughout the winemaking process that can help us to create a more sustainable planet, including working organically and biodynamically. The term sustainability can be hard to define when it comes to the wine industry, but to the producers I have spoken to sustainability in wine is ensuring a reduction in water resources, the improved use of natural fertilisers and other organic products, and being energy efficient. Practices that can be followed from the planting of vines to the finished product ending on a shop floor. Sustainability should not stop there, however. What happens to a wine once it lands in the hands of Londonbased retailer Borough Wines is of huge importance. Since 2002 the company has been on a mission: with a focus on sustainability, accessibility and approachability, Borough Wines took a new approach to delivering wine. Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


They have recently expanded their Zero Waste range from one to three ways in which shoppers and restaurateurs can buy wine, beginning with the hugely successful Refill Kegs, the only reusable kegs in the UK. Designed for restaurants, bars and retailers, each keg holds 25 litres of wine, the equivalent of 33.3 bottles and thus there is a saving of 16kg of glass from being produced and disposed of. Borough Wines’ second initiative is the Return Bottle Scheme. Launched to improve the process of buying and dispensing wine in every way, it is again suitable for everyday shoppers and restaurateurs. Managing Director Muriel Chatel explains, “We know that the wine bottle is a very familiar and much-loved way of serving and buying wine, yet this traditional model is not the most sustainable.” If we refill our glass bottles, we can reduce our carbon footprint by a staggering 96%. Also launched in September was Borough Wines’ Vinotap™, an alternative to Bag In Box yet even more sustainable. The little brother of Refill Kegs, Vinotap™ is a 10 litre zero-waste format suitable for bars, restaurants and retailers. To be a customer of Borough Wines you do not have to dine out to sample their wines at bars or restaurants. Retailers across the UK have installed Borough Wines Corners allowing you to refill your recyclable glass bottle with wine. By shopping Borough Wines Zero-Waste range less glass is produced and recycled, reducing the world’s carbon emissions. The initiative is also a brilliant way to save money when buying wine, for you 66

will only pay for the wine and not the glass in which it is packaged. The Zero-Waste range is comprised of 25 artisan wines from independent winemakers, all of whom were chosen for their sustainable approached to winemaking. There’s a brilliant selection of grape varieties, from the well-known (Sauvignon Blanc) to the obscure (Xarello), covering France, Italy, Spain and Portugal. The focus is on still wine, but included is a Frizzante (semisparkling Prosecco) and Sangria. Most of which are organic, biodynamic and/ or vegan. All wines are shipped in bulk to Borough Wines directly from the vineyards to minimise environmental impact, and are then bottled by Borough Wines in London. Restaurants and bars using the Return Bottle Scheme have their bottles delivered in recycled plastic crates, which also reduces the use of cardboard. Whilst shoppers are encouraged to bring their empty bottles back to the shop when in need of a refill. The bottles are then reused, reducing the amount of glass needing to be recycled. Geometric glass bottles adorned with Borough Wines’ logo are used for refills and are part of the journey of sustainability. But the reusable bottles for the Return Bottle Scheme are somewhat more chic. Dark glass bottles feature a chalk strike which “is a nod to our commitment to respect the earth by creating products that are closing the loop and reducing waste”. The labels have been designed to reflect the different categories within the range and are produced from bagasse (the byCibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


product of the extraction of juice from sugar cane), which is fully biodegradable. For something that sounds so simple and beneficial to our struggling planet, it begs the question why more wine merchants aren’t selling wine this way and why we as consumers aren’t looking for more sustainable ways to buy wine. Bag In Box is often deemed cheap and inferior but do a little research and you’ll discover some fantastic wines packaged this way. The same can be said for wine in can. As with Borough Wines’ refills, the wines are high quality and exciting. Gone are the days when only cheap wines were sold in other packaging formats. Having tried a selection of Zero-Waste artisan wines I was pleasantly surprised to discover I absolutely loved the organic Pinot Grigio by La Chiusa Grande. So often Pinot Grigio can be unexciting but this one from Italy’s Abruzzo was wonderfully fruity, with notes of candied apple, pear and lime. A Portuguese Vinho Verde is the wine to whisk you straight back into summer. Flavours of citrus fruits and white flowers, complete with the classic spritz of Vinho Verde.

France features heavily at Borough Wines so it’s only right that a number of French wines should be included within the 25 artisan offerings. One of the two I tasted was a biodynamic Côtes du Rhône. Blackberry, cassis and bramble fruits dominate on the nose and palate. The alcohol is warming and the tannins are soft, it is exactly the wine you want to drink throughout the winter months. The second, a white wine, was a Piquepoul from the Languedoc. Rounder than the other two white wines, with stone fruit and floral characters. I thoroughly enjoyed all of the wines I tasted from Borough Wines. The fact that these wines are all shipped in large bulk containers, packaged in kegs and poured into bottle or glass on sale made no difference to the taste or quality of the wines. And it is this that I believe is important as we move forward in our choices of shopping sustainably for wine. Tradition is great, the glass bottle is what we know and what we trust, but changing our habits to better our way of living is surely only ever a good thing. Borough Wines aren’t asking you to forgo the glass bottle, they are asking you to be more mindful and reuse that glass bottle.

As we head into winter, I find myself reaching more for a glass of red. Choose the organic Tempranillo from producer Casa Berger in Spain. It’s bold and juicy with notes of cherry, cassis, and blueberry. The perfect pairing for steak. An organic and vegan Montepulciano from Italy is complex and structured. With notes of Marasca cherry, redcurrant, cedar and vanilla, it feels more grown up than the Tempranillo but no more or less delicious. 68

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


FEATURE

FIVE DINNERS By Theo Michaels

Stuck in a rut and cooking the same thing every week? Fed up deciding what to cook? Spending too much on food shopping? We know the feeling… Each week Theo and his chefs create five easy family recipes that come with a complete shopping list so you have everything you need to buy for the week in one place. Theo’s weekly meal plans are published online at FiveDinners.com and each week includes a delicious combination of meals featuring Meat-free Mondays, Fish Fridays and a mix during the rest of the week for a well-balanced diet. Members simply log in to their FiveDinners account to download the recipes, change serving sizes, leave days out if they’re not eating at home and get the automated shopping list.  70

Theo said “The feedback from the service has been incredible, families are loving not having to think what to cook each week and the single shopping list has made life much easier for everyone. Our members are saving money on their food shopping, only having to shop once and reducing their food waste. And in addition to that core service we have a whole bunch of other cool and helpful features for members to access.” Members can create their own meals plans with our recipes, change serving sizes so whether you’re feeding two people or ten the shopping list automatically updates and we even have a text-a-chef service so you can text us in real time if you need any help in the kitchen! Cibare readers can get the first month half price for only £2.50 by quoting CIBARE at checkout! Head to FiveDinners.com to try us out for free today!

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS:Theo Michaels

FiveDinners.com is the new weekly meal planning service, created by celebrity chef Theo Michaels.


CANDIED SMOKED SALMON Premium Scottish Salmon, dry cured, brined with pure Canadian maple syrup, air dried and smoked over old whisky barrel oak.

  @can_Dfood  canDfoodco


CRAFTS

The Kids’ Table A ‘RECIPE’ TO KEEP THE KIDS ENTERTAINED AT HOME By Sarah Frow

The Kids’ Table has teamed up with Koru Kids to get families out and about on Halloween to go on a hunt to spot spooky decorations and pumpkins in their neighbourhood. Follow their Instagram @TheKidsTableUK or this link www. thekidstable.co.uk for more info on how to join in. 74

HANGING BATS INGREDIENTS A piece of black A4 card White paper / white address label Eye stickers / wiggly eyes One pipe cleaner Glue stick / glue dots Sellotape Scissors A pencil String to hang your bat on METHOD 1. Cut the A4 black card in half lengthways 2. Roll one half into a tube and secure with Sellotape 3. Use the other half to draw and cut out a bat wing shape, making sure the shape is wide enough so that the wings protrude out on either side of the tube. Draw and cut out two small triangles for the bat’s ears Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS:The Kids’ Table

Trick or treating might be cancelled this year but that doesn’t mean we can’t still have some Halloween fun with the kids. Follow the crafty recipe below from The Kids’ Table – London’s pop-up kids’ corner service - to make hanging bats to display in your window and add a bit of spook to your house. Or, if you’re reading this after Halloween – why not make hanging elves instead? Follow the steps below for the body and legs and then simply add a cheeky elf face and hat.


4. Glue the bat wing shape onto the centre of the tube so that the wings stick out either side and stick the two triangular ears onto the inside front at the top of the tube 5. Stick on the eye stickers or glue on the wiggly eyes and cut small triangles from the white paper or the address label to make the bat’s fangs 6. Cut the pipe cleaner in half and Sellotape the two pieces of pipe cleaner

inside the front bottom of the tube to make two legs sticking out from the bottom of the tube 7. Bend the ends of the pipe cleaners away from the body of the bat to create hooks to hang the bat onto string 8. Secure a piece of string across your window and hang your bat. You could make a whole colony of bats with different faces and in different colours – go wild with your spooky window display!


BOOK REVIEW

CHILLI TO VANILLA By MARIE ABADIE

This book is a beautifully photographed celebration of spices – it takes an inspiring look at many different ways in which they can be used.

Duck Breast with Orange and Cardamom, West Indian Beef Stir Fry and Roast Pork with Indonesian Pepper would make wonderful dinners for special occasions.

‘Cocktails and Nibbles’ opens the book with a gorgeous Champagne Cocktail with orange and pepper, and a proper Bloody Mary accompanied by Five Berry Crackers.

The book is dotted with large photos and pages of different spices, pickling blends and spiced seasonings, including spicy oils and preserved lemons. Yes, these things are easily bought these days, but it’s hugely satisfying turning your hand to something like this – so simple but so rewarding.

Starters include Mango and Prawn Salad with Spicy Ginger Vinaigrette and Oyster Mushrooms with Curry Vinaigrette. There’s also an in-depth look at the different peppercorns and the best blends to make with them. Rare Tuna Steak with Mustard and Fennel Seed, Shellfish Steamed with a Lemongrass Infused Thai Broth and Peppered Scallops are all beautifully simple but luxurious recipes from the Fish chapter. From the Meat section, Rack of Lamb with Harissa and Almond Couscous, 76

Desserts and Sweets include Roasted Pineapple Marinated in Indonesian Pepper, Cloves, Honey and Vanilla, Chocolate Ginger Cake, Chocolate Creams with Caramel and Chilli Sauce and my Favourite – Strawberries with Mint and Crushed Black Pepper (sounds odd but please try it!). This book has been on my bookshelf for over 15 years: from warm and comforting to zingy and spicy, it’s a glorious journey through a whole spectrum of spices. Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS: Marie Abadie

By Rebecca Stratton


www.cibare.co.uk

Cibare Magazine

77


PETS

HOW TO SAFELY SPICE UP YOUR DOG’S LIFE! By Roz Lishak

No better reason to highlight the issues of feeding spicier ingredients that we may enjoy but your dog’s digestion simply won’t thank you for. So, the question is “Which are the most dangerous spicy ingredients and which, if any, can your dog tolerate?”. A variety of foods can be toxic for dogs and could cause stomach problems but there are some, that with education 78

and information, can have positive properties, which makes you, the canine “cook” and menu creator, even more responsible when it comes to meal times and obviously those much loved snacks!  While some of the items on this list of well-known spice ingredients that are dangerous for dogs may be familiar, others may surprise you. Here, in my opinion, are my five best known spice ingredients that are toxic to dogs, with explanations as to why they’re not good for your pooches. ONION, CHIVES AND LEEKS  All can easily upset a dog’s stomach and cause diarrhoea and vomiting. The onion family contains sulfoxides and disulphides, which, in the canine world, may damage red blood cells. Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS: shutterstock_ Monika Chodak

It’s no news to any dog owner - it’s so hard not to share your last morsel when they’ve taken up their most impressive “begging” position, salivating by your lap, shamelessly giving you those puppy dog eyes - it can be too much to bear... their nose twitching as they sense the aromatic food, and before you know it, you’ve given in.


SALT Although humans use salt in nearly everything, this just doesn’t translate well to our dogs’ diet. Salt causes increased thirst and urination, which then leads to dehydration. It can also cause vomiting, when ingested in larger quantities. COCOA POWDER While not technically a spice, cocoa powder is used extensively in baking, and some pet parents may not realise it can be dangerous. Cocoa powder can encourage kidney trouble and heart problems, so cocoa and chocolate ingredients are definitely to be avoided!! NUTMEG Possibly a surprising spice toxic to dogs, nutmeg can cause severe stomach upset and agitation in the nervous system. There are many spices and ingredients out there that are dog friendly and safe. Here are five well-known ingredients and the benefits they can bring! BASIL  Basil is a fragrant herb, rich in antioxidants. It can help diminish the painful effects of arthritis, pep up the mood, and provide a natural remedy for stress and anxiety. 80

CINNAMON  Cinnamon contains antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and can help to counteract the effects of diabetes. Cinnamon can also help improve bad breath. GINGER  Ginger is another ingredient with anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. It can provide a boost to the digestive system and soothe nausea, as well as improve circulation. Do note that fresh ginger is quite strong, so you might use dried or ground ginger. PARSLEY  Parsley contains healthy antioxidants, fibre, vitamins, and minerals. It helps improve organ function, flush toxins from the body, and improve bad breath. And it can be easily grown too! TURMERIC A champion among ingredients and spices, turmeric provides a boost to the metabolism and helps to support weight loss, providing benefits for cardiovascular, joint, and brain health. Turmeric can also provide some relief from arthritis thanks to its antiinflammatory properties. In all things “doggy diet”, consider those ingredients: remember that “sharing is caring” but most importantly, know your ingredients to ensure that your canine Spice Girl or Boy gets the benefits and steers clear of the rest. My best advice? If in doubt, just leave it out!

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk

PICTURE CREDITS: shutterstock_ Monika Chodak

GARLIC I’ve  separated Garlic from the Allium group specifically, as there are differing opinions about garlic, with many studies proving that owners find it helpful to ward off fleas on their dogs. But proceed with great caution and absolutely discuss this idea with your vet before you try it.


www.cibare.co.uk

Cibare Magazine

81


Team Links Despina Mina - @forkedldn Emma Walton-Moore - @supperinthesuburbs Jon Moore - @beerinthesuburbs Dhruv Baker -@dhruvbaker1 Sam Wilkin - @cellarmansam Charlotte Benbow - @charlotte.benbow Katie Goodchild - @heritagewinesuk Emma Sousa - @theurbanflowerfarmer Ying Bower - @yingenough Dani Gavriel - @dani_gavriel Roz Lishak - @yourpupparazzi Rebecca Stratton -@cakerebecca Gillian Balcombe - @gillianbalcombe Jo Farren - @jo.farren Samina Iqbal - @samina.i Sarah Frow - @thekidstableuk Suzanne Purton - @suzanne4fitness Eve Tudor - @editoroffood Theo Michaels - @theocooks

Jack and Hayley Rowbottom - @jacksmeatshack Anthony Raffo - @anthonyraffo Jessica Mason - @drinksmaven Urvashi Roe - @urvashiroe

82

Cibare Magazine

www.cibare.co.uk


Support us in de-stigmatising mental health today

wwww.theburntchefproject.com


SPECIALITY COFFEE ROASTED IN-HOUSE EVOLVING KITCHEN OFFERING A PLAYFUL FUSION COMBINING FOOD & COFFEE UNIQUE PASTRIES BAKED DAILY BY OUR EXPERT BAKERS SMALL PLATES ACCOMPANIED BY COCKTAILS & NATURAL WINE

30 DUNCAN STREET ANGEL, ISLINGTON, LONDON N1 8BW INFO@MELETIUS.COM WWW.MELETIUS.COM WWW.INSTAGRAM.COM/MELETIUSCOFFEE

Profile for Cibare

Cibare 22  

With our Heat and Cocktails issue we are getting you ready for that perfect snuggle at home this autumn.

Cibare 22  

With our Heat and Cocktails issue we are getting you ready for that perfect snuggle at home this autumn.

Profile for cibare