Page 1

Building an oasis

Five seniors build a cabin to stay in during Spring break / Page 4 and 5

“It’s really just a place to relax and eat lunch before going out to hunt on the pasture.� Ryan Armes Senior

www.chspylon.com Salina High School Central

Vol. 87, Iss. 7 March 18, 2011

Waiting to come back home April calendar

Sophomore Katelyn Peacock remains positive while recovering from accident By Kaleigh Parker Co-Editor

Monday March 28 Spring sports pictures Friday 1 April Fools Day Saturday 2 7:00 Prom—Salina Country Club Thursday 14 7:00 Spring show Friday 15 7:00 Spring show Thursday 21 1:30 Academic achievement celebration—auditorium 6:00 Art department open house Friday 22 Earth Day Monday 25 7:00 Band Spring concert— auditorium Thursday 28 7:00 Awards program— auditorium

01

day until

spring break

15

days until

Prom Inside

Federico Uboldi warms up to life in the U.S. Page 2 Editorial: The pledge of allegiance /Page 7 Photo spread: spring sports / Pages 8

Her Facebook wall was swarmed with encouraging posts from friends and students as soon as they heard what happened. “That was how I found out other people knew,� she said. “I think I replied to people, but I don’t really remember. Thank you to anyone that sent me anything. Thanks for the help.� On February 9, sophomore

Peacock’s injuries include:

-broken part in left hand -torn spleen (critical, took days to stop bleeding) -bruised lungs -cracked or broken ribs

Katelyn Peacock left Salina to go on a ski trip in Leadville, Colorado. Two days later Peacock awoke to a hospital in a strange town, hurting from multiple injuries and tired from surgery. Somewhere between 9:30 and 10:00 a.m. on Feb. 10, Peacock and a group of family and friends had planned to go snowmobiling and afterward, tubing. However, “people got stuck somewhere so we had to wait, and the people told us to go tubing while we waited, so we

all went to go buy some tubes,â€? Peacock said. Along with her mom, Peacock and another family consisting of a mom, a dad, a younger son and a girl a couple years younger than Peacock went to the tubing spot. “There were two snow hills right by each other, one a bit bigger looking, and we all thought it’d be more fun. We went to the top and me and the girl were goLQJGRZQWKHKLOOČ´UVW

-broken clavicle -basil skull fracture -carotid artery torn with tear in lining (could have been life threatening) -broken bones in both ears (affected

hearing) -hole in both ear drums -broken bones in forehead and face -brain injury (bleeding on top, damaged on right side; bleeding quit and absorbed into brain)

See HEALING / Page 2 Courtesy photo

Sophomore Katelyn Peacock has a hopeful outlook for the future despite injuries from a severe accident during an early February Colorado trip.

Dual sports participation Decision allows involvement in two sports within same season By Grant Martens Co-Sports Editor

Thanks to a recent ruling by the school board, student athletes in USD 305 will be able to participate in two sports within season. However, it won’t be an easy process, the student athlete in question will have to jump WKURXJKDIHZKRRSVČ´UVW “There is a process that kids must go through. I will sit down with the parents and the kid and discuss why they want to do dual participation. Then they ZLOOKDYHWRČ´OORXWDIRUPDQG I’ll talk to both coaches,â€? Athletic Director Greg Maring said. “If one of them isn’t okay with it, it doesn’t happen.â€? The application, due April 15 for fall sports, is now available. In addition to getting parent and student signatures, students must answer questions weighLQJWKHEHQHČ´WVDQGGLÉš FXOWLHV of dual participation, the reason the student wishes to compete in PXOWLSOHVSRUWVDQGWKHFRQČľLFW ing competition dates. One student who has begun the application process is sophomore Kylee Campion. Campion is hoping to utilize dual participation in two sports next year: volleyball and Vets in the Fall along with cheerleading and Vets in the Winter. “I enjoy all of them and I’ve been doing all of them since I was little,â€? Campion said. “It’ll be hard [to balance school and sports], but I’ll just have to do my homework later.â€? Students must keep up with school work too, which could SURYHH[WUHPHO\GLÉš FXOWDF cording to Maring. “Of all the schools we’ve talked to, an average of one stu-

Photo illustration by Michelle Hanschu / The Pylon

Senior Laurel Michel could not participate in both Vets and tennis within the same season because there was no dual sports participation for the 2010-2011 school year. dent does it per year. That’s not one per season. Once per year, for all sports. It’s going to take VRPHȾH[LELOLW\,WȇVQRWDQHDV\ process, that’s for sure,� Maring said. The complications mostly surround practice schedules. A prospective athlete must declare a primary sport, and attend at least one practice per week for each sport. Practice times will not be adjusted, according to Maring, and, in order to be eligible for state or sub-state competition, the athlete must have participated in at least 50 percent of the games. Only students in grades 10 through 12

are eligible. “It’s going to have to be activities that have alternate practice times, and almost all our activi-

ties practice right after school. How this is going to work out, I don’t really know. It’s going to have to be the perfect scenario.�

        

           %"# !"! # !" ! ! !$!%





  

 

%"! !!! !#  ! !

  

 

  


Page 2

Student Life

Federico Uboldi warms up to U.S. By David Weiner Staff Reporter

“I’m going to cry when I see my family,â€? junior Italian foreign exchange student Federico Uboldi said. )RU8EROGLDWČ´UVWJHWWLQJ used to the United States was a IULJKWHQLQJH[SHULHQFHČ´OOHGZLWK confusion and worry. Uboldi was unaware of the family he was to live with, in this alien country, until the day he left Italy. “Usually, with the program I used to come here, they tell you who the family is a couple of

months in advance so that you can talk to them on the internet and learn about them, but I didn’t get the chance to do that,� Uboldi said. Surprised by the vast expanse of open land that is Kansas, Uboldi fell in love with the new scenery. Back in Italy Uboldi’s window faces the open ocean, something Kansas doesn’t have to offer. The American life has grown on Uboldi, and as the year proJUHVVHVKHȴQGVKLPVHOIEHFRPing more relaxed in this foreign country and adapting to the new

Stephen Lamer / The Pylon

Junior Federico Uboldi has enjoyed his time spent in Kansas. environment. Experiencing new things everyday, such as school

03.18.11 sports, different religions, Arby’s sandwiches, strict parental guidance, new English words and $PHULFDQJLUOV8EROGLČ´QGVD new adventure each day. “I have girls; not a lot like in Italy, but I have girls,â€? Uboldi said. Leaving his friends and girlfriend behind in Italy to experience the American life, Uboldi had to learn quickly the format of American relationships. For the Italian, back in his home country he would hangout with all kinds of girls while visiting Č´VWSXPSLQJ,WDOLDQ'LVFRȇVEXW LQ$PHULFDKHČ´QGVLWKDUGHUWR acquire a girlfriend. “One time I try to have two girls at the same time, then both found me out and both dumped me; it was not good,â€? Uboldi said. Not only has his view on rela-

tionships changed, the American lifestyle has burrowed its way into Uboldi’s dreams. “About one month after I FDPHKHUH,KDGP\Č´UVWGUHDP in English; it felt really weird,â€? Uboldi said. “In my dream, my Italian English teacher was mad at me for how bad my English speaking was.â€? His English is lathered with a thick Italian accent; his taste for American food has yet to be acquired and his ability to pick up a girls has been hampered by Western culture. Although having foreign roots, Uboldi has been welcomed with open arms LQWRWKHFRPPXQLW\'HVSLWH the fact that in only a few more months Uboldi will no longer be a Kansan, his ties to his new friends and host family will stay with him forever.

HEALING / Support helps Peacock cope during healing process Continued from page 1 But when we went, our tubes were spinning in circles fast going down. The other girl fell off her tube, and the hill had a groove type thing that drifted me off sideways instead of straight down and led me into a small storage-like building. My whole body hit,â€? Peacock explained. After the accident, Peacock ZDVNQRFNHGRXWDQGČľRZQWR the ICU at St. Anthony Central +RVSLWDOLQ'HQYHU&RORUDGR Nine days later, she was taken to Craig Hospital for rehabilitation, DQGKHUPHPRU\Č´QDOO\VWDUWHG to come back. “All I remember is right be-

fore it, blowing up the tube and getting out of the car,� Peacock said. “Then I only remember nine days after, and there’s a lot I forgot still.� (Peacock’s mom helped her re-tell the incident.) 3HDFRFNLVVWLOOLQ'HQYHULQ the brain rehabilitation section. “It’s kind of nothing like I’ve ever seen before,� she said. “I could’ve been deaf, really should have been actually; and not able to walk again, and dead. That all could have happened,� Peacock said. “Prayers helped a lot.� Peacock said her face is sensitive and she can’t open her mouth as wide as she could, VRFKHZLQJEHFDPHDGLɚFXOW

task, but “it’s getting better.â€? She will also have surgery on her ears, but she will not have any long-term affects from any of her injuries. “It’ll all be back to normal eventually,â€? she said. While these injuries sound painful and extremely serious, 3HDFRFNDVVXUHVVKHLVGRLQJČ´QH “I think it sounds a lot worse than I feel,â€? she said. “I didn’t even know my arm was broken until they told me. I have a little cast on, and I healed really fast. I’m doing really good now.â€? At the hospital, Peacock attends classes for physical therapy and speech during the day. “It’s kind of depressing being

here so long, but they keep me busy,â€? she said. “I feel normal a lot of the time, but my memory is kind of bad on some things; it’s hard.â€? Peacock will not be coming back to school for the rest of the year, but she will be back in school in August, ready to VWDUWKHUMXQLRU\HDU7RČ´QLVK her sophomore year, the school has sent her a lot of homework already, and she has a teacher at the hospital for extra teaching and tests. When she gets back home, she will be homeschooled for the rest of the year. As far as support goes, Peacock isn’t lacking any. Her mom stays with her at the hospital,

and her family is there a lot of the time. “Seth (Tramble) comes down like every weekend,� she said. “Seth’s been great.� $IWHUDGLɚFXOWPRQWKDZD\ from home, school and friends, Peacock is ready to come back. “Now I’m just waiting until they let me leave,� she said. When she does get back to Salina, Peacock said she doesn’t want to be treated differently from anyone because of what happened. “There’s a lot you see here, people way worse off than I could be,� she said. “People should take the little things in life and enjoy them.� “Hand Washing: A lost art�

Exclusively at:


03.18.11

Sports

Page 3

Spring sports receive little fan attention By Thatcher Keast Staff Reporter

The spring sports season is the shortest season of all high school sports and the state tournaments take place a week after school is no longer in session. Popularity for these sports is lacking because students and the community do not show interest in girls’ soccer, boys’ tennis, boys’ golf, baseball, softball and track. In turn, spring sports do not receive the same type of consistent fan support as other sports. “The fan base is spread out, our sport does not carry a general group of supporters like basketball or football,” head track coach Rick O’Neill said. Due to the fact that Central does not have a usable track, the track team must travel to Bethany College to host Central’s home meets. “When we get our new track hopefully more fans will be at our home meets” O’Neill said. Track is not the only sport that does not draw as many fans as consistently as other sports.

Athletes in the mix

Tim Stricker Track & Field

Courtney Olson Soccer Ben Shoup Golf Sara Smucker Swimming Luke Johnson Tennis

Honor Code violation Tom’s Two Minute Drill

“People watch what is on TV like football and basketball,” head golf coach Patrick Newell said. There are certain aspects to JROIWKDWPDNHVLWGLɚ FXOWIRU spectators to watch.

Tom Reed

Co- Sports Editor

By Tom Reed

Co-Sports Editor

“People watch what is on TV.” Patrick Newell Head Golf Coach

“Golf is not a spectator sport, fans at football games stay in one spot and it does not require them to move around and follow the action. With golf spectators have to pay attention and know what is going on,” Newell explained. “Golf is hard to follow.” Despite the fact fall and winter sports, such as football and basketball, receive more of the fan’s attention, it does not diminish the importance of the spring sports season. Several teams will vie for a berth in their state tournaments.

File Photo

Students cheer during a girls’ soccer match last season. The student section at girls’ soccer games pales in comparison to other sports.

On the Spot

This year’s national champion will be _________

________ should get a Justin Bieber haircut

Most overrated TV show?

“Jimmer”

“Vince Froome”

“The Bachelor”

“KU”

“Jake Bergeson”

“The Real World”

“Belmont”

“Kamen Kossow”

“Jersey Shore”

“Ohio State”

“Aaron Davis”

“Teen Mom”

“KU”

“Shay Wooten”

“Pretty Little Liars”

Junior power forward Brandon Davies of the BYU Cougars was recently suspended from the mens’ basketball team because Davies admitted to having premarital sex, which violates the BYU Honor Code. It’s clearly stated in the BYU Honor Code to “Live a chaste and virtuous life.” All BYU students agree to live by this standard while they are students. Society’s standards would seem to say that pre-marital sex is acceptable. As a Christian who practices abstinence, I am not here to condemn anyone who may have had premarital sex, but I want to make it very clear that premarital sex is something I do NOT condone. I am adamantly opposed to pre-marital sex being acceptable. It is very clearly stated in the Bible that Christians are commanded by God to wait to experience God’s gift of sex under wedlock. I believe that sex is one of God’s greatest gifts to mankind and that it is to be experienced only in the way intended by God Himself. There are several factors that separate Mormonism from Christianity, including Mormon’s use of the Book of Mormon and dozens of others. Even if you think waiting for marriage is old-school, outdated or too religious for you, consider the following: according to marriageromance.com, research indicates that couples who engage in pre-marital sex have a 50 percent higher divorce rate than those who wait. Domestic violence between these couples also increase and satisfaction in their marriage decreases. It’s encouraging to see Davies admit to his mistake and accept his punishment. BYU should take this into consideration and allow Davies to remain a student at BYU and have the opportunity to rejoin the mens’ basketball team next season, if not sooner.


Page 4

Feature

Page 5

Preparing for an overdue break

Whether staying in town or traveling to a far-away destination, students are finding ways to stay entertained during the week away

No break for spring sports

With little to do in Salina over spring break, five seniors are

Building anoasis By David Weiner Staff Reporter

Stephen Lamer / The Pylon

Senior Cade Sullivan whittles on a small log for a cabin he and several friends will live in for a few days during spring break.

Stay or go Top places in town to spend the break 1. Home 2. Mall 3. Friend’s House 4. Movie Theater 5. Park 6. Restaurants 7. Bowling Alley 8. YMCA 9. Walmart 10. Bed 292 students polled

Surrounded by a pack of wild coyotes, stranded in the wild with the nearest town so far off in the distance it is EDUHO\LQVLJKWČ´YHIULHQGV inhabit the open land sleeping under the stars and feeding off of the fruit of the earth and left-over IHOP breakfast. Spring break for some is a span of time where the thought of school is far removed from the brain and lazily wallowing about the house seems to be the best use RIWLPHEXWIRUČ´YHVHQLRUV their time away from school will be spent living on an uninhabited pasture of land in

Even though some fantasize of faraway destinations, they will have to find contentment in Salina

their own cabin creation. “The whole idea started because of Xbox,â€? senior Stephen Lamer said. “I was playing Xbox with my friends and talking on live chat when we all agreed we needed to get outside.â€? From the original intent to just get some fresh air and escape the addicting paralysis of their video games, seniors Stephen Lamer, Jacob Lemaster, Cade Sullivan, Ryan Armes and Trevor Cole found their way to Lemaster’s grandparent’s open cow SDVWXUH7KHČ´YHIULHQGV chopped down trees and stripped them of their limbs as they zip-tied their cabin together.

Photo courtesy of Stephen Lamer

Seniors Jacob Lemaster and Stephen Lamer begin to build their entirely hand-made cabin.

“The structure is really safe; I can hang from the supports without it breaking,� Lamer said.

“It’s really just a place to relax and eat lunch before going out to hunt on the pasture.� Ryan Armes Senior

With no budget for natural disasters, the guys can only hope that the elements take

Where would you like to go for spring break? “Rockford, Illinois�

pity on them as they brave the wilderness and attempt to survive spring break outside the comfort of their homes. For if a tornado was to strike, their only chance for survival is to go limp and hope they don’t hit the ground hard. “It’s really just a good place to relax and eat lunch before going out to hunt on the pasture,â€? senior Ryan Armes said. Working a total of nine hours every two weeks, the cabin is coming together now LQFOXGLQJDČ´UHSLWDWDOOJUDVV SDGGHGČľRRUZDWHUSURRIWDUS exterior, a metal cattle feeder URRIDQGDFRRNLQJČ´UHIRU preparing wild game. “After we use it, we’ll set

LWRQČ´UHRQWKHODVWGD\Č‹ Lemaster said. 7KLV\HDULVWKHČ´YHȇVODVW year of high school together, ending with the separation of the friends as some head off to college and others to the Army. “I’m starting basic training for the Army after high school, so there is really no point in keeping the cabin, plus if they were to go out to visit it without me they’d run the risk of getting shot at by my grandparents for trespassing,â€? Lemaster said.

“Miami, Florida� Imani Whitaker

Sophomore

“Orlando, Florida� Kyle McQuaige Junior

“Reno, Nevada� Darius Moore Senior

As students look forward to an entire week of no classes, some students will still have VFKRROGXWLHVWRIXOČ´OO:LWK the spring sports season starting in about three weeks, teams feel the need to squeeze in practices over spring break. “If we didn’t have practice, people would probably get lazy and be in worse shape than when they started practice,â€? senior track runner Cale Sharp said. Rather than spending spring break with friends and family on vacation, some students stay in town to attend

practice. “I think we need to because most of our big meets are right after spring break,â€? sophomore tennis player Justin Bengston said. Others choose to enjoy their spring break. “I think an exception can be made for athletes when they are on vacation, but if they are in town then they should go,â€? senior soccer player Courtney Wiggins said. The choice to travel and miss practice over spring break can sometimes be LQČľXHQFHGE\DQREOLJDWLRQWR be at practice. ČŠ,WKLQNWKHUHLVGHČ´QLWHO\ pressure to be at practice

because there are more chances to play the better players,� Bengston said. In order to keep attendance at spring break practices high, coaches try to adjust practice times to accommodate to the players’ schedules. “Our coaches try to make it work, and it’s always worked out for us,� Wiggins said. Student athletes understand the importance of having good practices over the break. “Spring break practice is the start of the season so it makes a difference,� Sharp said.

Hot or Cold

Students travel to Denver to hit the slopes and volunteer Copy Editor

Freshman

By Tom Reed

Co-Sports Editor

Spring breakers prepare wardrobes for destinations to different climates By Gabby Briggs

Anthony Darby

Stephen Lamer / The Pylon

Senior Luke Johnson works on his forehand shot at tennis practice.

Venturing outside of their homes and outside of the state, two students will travel to a next-door state. Spring break is a week off from school in which students usually indulge in too much sleep and other self-centered activities. Some choose to go out of state or go far away, but a IXQČ´OOHGVSULQJEUHDNJHWDZD\IRUWZR students is only one state away. This trip is not just for hitting the slopes, but also to volunteer in Denver, Colorado. While on their trip, when most would be concerned with just relaxing, sophomores Barkley Edison and Decker Gates will be serving. “The most rewarding part is seeing how important something is, that we take for granted everyday, like food, water and shelter,â€? Gates said. They will be staying at a local church for a night and volunteering. “When you serve, something like food, when you volunteer the looks on the people’s faces just make you happy,â€?

Edison said. The destination for spring break is Winter Park Resort in Winter Park, Colorado. While on their trip for spring break, Edison and Gates will also be hitting the slopes. “It’s the perfect opportunity to learn how to snowboard,â€? Gates said. According to Gates, Edison is going to show him the ropes on snowboarding. Gates is also hoping not to injure himself like he did last year, returning to school with a broken collar bone, while going off a ski jump. While at the resort, Edison and Gates will have the opportunity to go snowboarding, ice skating, tubing, hottubbing and shopping. These two students will be joined by about 40 more youth, also going on this same trip. “The second day (of snowboarding) is always the best because you have UHJDLQHG\RXUVNLOOV7KHČ´UVWGD\LV just relearning how to do everything,â€? Edison said. Edison hopes to be able to go through trails and on jumps the second day of the trip.

Hat

Alex Gershon Senior

Goggles Heavy coat

Shades V-neck

Shorts

Warm Socks Decker Gates Sophomore

Manflops


Page 4

Feature

Page 5

Preparing for an overdue break

Whether staying in town or traveling to a far-away destination, students are finding ways to stay entertained during the week away

No break for spring sports

With little to do in Salina over spring break, five seniors are

Building anoasis By David Weiner Staff Reporter

Stephen Lamer / The Pylon

Senior Cade Sullivan whittles on a small log for a cabin he and several friends will live in for a few days during spring break.

Stay or go Top places in town to spend the break 1. Home 2. Mall 3. Friend’s House 4. Movie Theater 5. Park 6. Restaurants 7. Bowling Alley 8. YMCA 9. Walmart 10. Bed 292 students polled

Surrounded by a pack of wild coyotes, stranded in the wild with the nearest town so far off in the distance it is EDUHO\LQVLJKWČ´YHIULHQGV inhabit the open land sleeping under the stars and feeding off of the fruit of the earth and left-over IHOP breakfast. Spring break for some is a span of time where the thought of school is far removed from the brain and lazily wallowing about the house seems to be the best use RIWLPHEXWIRUČ´YHVHQLRUV their time away from school will be spent living on an uninhabited pasture of land in

Even though some fantasize of faraway destinations, they will have to find contentment in Salina

their own cabin creation. “The whole idea started because of Xbox,â€? senior Stephen Lamer said. “I was playing Xbox with my friends and talking on live chat when we all agreed we needed to get outside.â€? From the original intent to just get some fresh air and escape the addicting paralysis of their video games, seniors Stephen Lamer, Jacob Lemaster, Cade Sullivan, Ryan Armes and Trevor Cole found their way to Lemaster’s grandparent’s open cow SDVWXUH7KHČ´YHIULHQGV chopped down trees and stripped them of their limbs as they zip-tied their cabin together.

Photo courtesy of Stephen Lamer

Seniors Jacob Lemaster and Stephen Lamer begin to build their entirely hand-made cabin.

“The structure is really safe; I can hang from the supports without it breaking,� Lamer said.

“It’s really just a place to relax and eat lunch before going out to hunt on the pasture.� Ryan Armes Senior

With no budget for natural disasters, the guys can only hope that the elements take

Where would you like to go for spring break? “Rockford, Illinois�

pity on them as they brave the wilderness and attempt to survive spring break outside the comfort of their homes. For if a tornado was to strike, their only chance for survival is to go limp and hope they don’t hit the ground hard. “It’s really just a good place to relax and eat lunch before going out to hunt on the pasture,â€? senior Ryan Armes said. Working a total of nine hours every two weeks, the cabin is coming together now LQFOXGLQJDČ´UHSLWDWDOOJUDVV SDGGHGČľRRUZDWHUSURRIWDUS exterior, a metal cattle feeder URRIDQGDFRRNLQJČ´UHIRU preparing wild game. “After we use it, we’ll set

LWRQČ´UHRQWKHODVWGD\Č‹ Lemaster said. 7KLV\HDULVWKHČ´YHȇVODVW year of high school together, ending with the separation of the friends as some head off to college and others to the Army. “I’m starting basic training for the Army after high school, so there is really no point in keeping the cabin, plus if they were to go out to visit it without me they’d run the risk of getting shot at by my grandparents for trespassing,â€? Lemaster said.

“Miami, Florida� Imani Whitaker

Sophomore

“Orlando, Florida� Kyle McQuaige Junior

“Reno, Nevada� Darius Moore Senior

As students look forward to an entire week of no classes, some students will still have VFKRROGXWLHVWRIXOČ´OO:LWK the spring sports season starting in about three weeks, teams feel the need to squeeze in practices over spring break. “If we didn’t have practice, people would probably get lazy and be in worse shape than when they started practice,â€? senior track runner Cale Sharp said. Rather than spending spring break with friends and family on vacation, some students stay in town to attend

practice. “I think we need to because most of our big meets are right after spring break,â€? sophomore tennis player Justin Bengston said. Others choose to enjoy their spring break. “I think an exception can be made for athletes when they are on vacation, but if they are in town then they should go,â€? senior soccer player Courtney Wiggins said. The choice to travel and miss practice over spring break can sometimes be LQČľXHQFHGE\DQREOLJDWLRQWR be at practice. ČŠ,WKLQNWKHUHLVGHČ´QLWHO\ pressure to be at practice

because there are more chances to play the better players,� Bengston said. In order to keep attendance at spring break practices high, coaches try to adjust practice times to accommodate to the players’ schedules. “Our coaches try to make it work, and it’s always worked out for us,� Wiggins said. Student athletes understand the importance of having good practices over the break. “Spring break practice is the start of the season so it makes a difference,� Sharp said.

Hot or Cold

Students travel to Denver to hit the slopes and volunteer Copy Editor

Freshman

By Tom Reed

Co-Sports Editor

Spring breakers prepare wardrobes for destinations to different climates By Gabby Briggs

Anthony Darby

Stephen Lamer / The Pylon

Senior Luke Johnson works on his forehand shot at tennis practice.

Venturing outside of their homes and outside of the state, two students will travel to a next-door state. Spring break is a week off from school in which students usually indulge in too much sleep and other self-centered activities. Some choose to go out of state or go far away, but a IXQČ´OOHGVSULQJEUHDNJHWDZD\IRUWZR students is only one state away. This trip is not just for hitting the slopes, but also to volunteer in Denver, Colorado. While on their trip, when most would be concerned with just relaxing, sophomores Barkley Edison and Decker Gates will be serving. “The most rewarding part is seeing how important something is, that we take for granted everyday, like food, water and shelter,â€? Gates said. They will be staying at a local church for a night and volunteering. “When you serve, something like food, when you volunteer the looks on the people’s faces just make you happy,â€?

Edison said. The destination for spring break is Winter Park Resort in Winter Park, Colorado. While on their trip for spring break, Edison and Gates will also be hitting the slopes. “It’s the perfect opportunity to learn how to snowboard,â€? Gates said. According to Gates, Edison is going to show him the ropes on snowboarding. Gates is also hoping not to injure himself like he did last year, returning to school with a broken collar bone, while going off a ski jump. While at the resort, Edison and Gates will have the opportunity to go snowboarding, ice skating, tubing, hottubbing and shopping. These two students will be joined by about 40 more youth, also going on this same trip. “The second day (of snowboarding) is always the best because you have UHJDLQHG\RXUVNLOOV7KHČ´UVWGD\LV just relearning how to do everything,â€? Edison said. Edison hopes to be able to go through trails and on jumps the second day of the trip.

Hat

Alex Gershon Senior

Goggles Heavy coat

Shades V-neck

Shorts

Warm Socks Decker Gates Sophomore

Manflops


Page 6

Entertainment

Reality Check, Ink.

03.18.11

Sham wows

Sham wows are positive and negative words or phrases that describe the month. These were chosen by the Pylon staff for March. If you have a sham or wow for the April issue go to and leave a comment to submit your suggestion.

Tyler Walker / The Pylon

23

29

22 20 19

21

18 17 16

6

12 13 11 10

48

47

3 1 2

46

15 14

42

41

43

38 37 39 40

32

36

45

8

9

7

4 5

for videos, pictures and more stories

24

28

30

31

33

34 35

44

Visit

25

26 27

Connect the dots

Miranda Higle / The Pylon

Shams

Wows

-Natural disasters -Ustream crashing -Bugs emerging -Spring cleaning -11 mpg -Sore backs -$3.40 per gallon -Practice AP tests -Seizures -Spring forward -Basketball lost -Indoor sports practice -Shattered phones

-March snow storms -March madness -American Idol -Spring break -Senior puppet day -Mac Miller mixtape -97 cent sale at Old Navy -Start of spring sports -St. Patrick’s Day -Crispy chicken nuggets -Daily Stang


03.18.11

Opinion

Page 7

Staff editorial: Use choice to say the pledge of allegiance wisely Is it necessary to say the pledge of allegiance every day? Student staff vote: 4—yes 12—no Tyler Walker / The Pylon

By David Weiner Staff Reporter

My morning routine consists of dragging myself out of bed after repeatedly hitting the snooze button on my alarm clock, trudging down the steep stairs to the kitchen, stumbling on every-other step and driving carefully to school due to my blurred vision from eye crust that always appears in the morning. Most days, I make it to school on time, and drop like a falling tree onto the hard plastic seats in the classroom. At this point in the morning, the last thing I want to do is bring my body to an erect position and talk, but at the same time every morning the tardy bell rings and in a military fashion most of the class rises for the Pledge of Allegiance.

           

          

#!#  #!     #  "#  # "##

  





 

I stand up and look around me and notice a few students are still glued to their chairs, often times with a baggy hood covering their face as they sleep.

 





 

It’s their choice on whether to pledge their allegiance to the United States every day, and I’m not going to be the one to make them stand up every morning.

People have asked me why we say the pledge every morning and my response is always the same; the American traditions are not forced upon its people because it is a country that advocates diversity and foreign cultures. Nobody puts a gun to your head, threatening to pull the trigger if you don’t show your allegiance every day and that is exactly why I choose to do it. In America we have the choice on whether we do something or not, unlike some countries in the world where the government controls every action of its citizens and strips people of their freedoms. We are Americans, united XQGHURQHȾDJOLYLQJLQRQHRI the most prosperous countries in the world that prides itself on its ability to physically protect its citizens and their rights, and I would like to live in no other place than this country. The least we could do is show our support for this country which keeps us safe and surrounds us with opportunities to better ourselves. I know people’s mornings are hectic and our eyelids are still heavy and the hard plastic seats that bring so much pain in the afternoon have somehow acquired the ability to comfort our upper-leg meat, but would it be so hard to stand up for approximately 60 seconds and put your hand on your heart? No, you don’t have to say the pledge of allegiance every morning, you get to say it.

If you had one day to live, what would you do? “Hug a penguin in Antarctica� Zach Martin Freshman

“Blow all my money� Hunter Crowder Sophomore

“Travel to Vegas� Landon Wiens Junior

“Watch season 1 of 24� Tyler Walker Senior

What’s your Letter to the editor: Give open lunch a chance favorite Stacie Burnett and Kaleigh Parker, Editors in Chief

By Kyra Hallack

editor@chspylon.com

Sophomore

Kaitlyn Neuschafer, Business Manager

What do you like to eat for lunch? Microwave hamburgers? I think not. I would rather get a Whopper from Burger King, but at Central it is a “crime� for students to leave school. I think we should be able to have open lunches, so the students are able to eat what they like. One concern of the administration is that the students will take this opportunity to go smoke and drink while out at lunch and the school would be responsible. Well, at the beginning of the year the school could have the students’ guardians sign a waiver saying that they are not responsible for any of the actions the students decide to make while they are out at lunch. Another administration concern is that the students will not want to come back to school or will be late. Well give

business@chspylon.com

Entertainment Miranda Higle, editor

Opinion Sammy Jordan, editor

Sports Tom Reed and Grant Martens, editors

Photography Stephen Lamer and Michelle Hanchu, editors

Features Kaleigh Parker, editor

chsPylon.com Logan Maltbie, webmaster

Videography Sierra Rowlison, editor

Cartoons Tyler Walker, cartoonist

entertainment@chspylon.com

sports@chspylon.com

feature@chspylon.com

opinion@chspylon.com

photos@chspylon.com

webmaster@chspylon.com

video@chspylon.com

carpentoonist@chspylon.com

Arts Gabby Briggs, editor

Student Life Thatcher Keast, editor

Copy editor Gabby Briggs

Graphic artist Miranda Higle

arts@chspylon.com

studentlife@chspylon.com

Staff reporters Dylan Grammer, David Weiner, Grayson Jones, Brooke Wakefield The Pylon gladly accepts contributions from guest writers on any subject. Please email your submissions to editor@chspylon.com. The Pylon is the official student newspaper of Salina High School Central. It is produced entirely by students of the newspaper production class daily on chsPylon.com and monthly in print.

J.D. Garber, Adviser jd.garber@usd305.com (785) 309-3578

WKHVWXGHQWVČ´YHVWULNHV)LUVW offence let ‘em slide ; Second offence gives them one hour detention; third two hour detention; the fourth time suspend their privilege for two weeks; WKHČ´IWKWLPHWDNHWKHSULYLOHJH away from them for the rest of the school year. The next concern is that the student will bring their food to class and disturb the other students. Make this a decision left to the teachers. If it doesn’t cause the teacher problems, then why waste time worrying about it? If you like microwave hamburgers, then go ahead and keep eating them, but I’d rather pass on that offer and get a Whopper at Burger King. Mr. Vaughn, just give us a chance to prove to you we can do this. Let us use our preparation, self-discipline, and integrity to develop the real world skills we will need for out-of-high-school life.

cartoon? “Bugs Bunny� Hailey Mayfeild Freshman

“Men and Black: The Series� Preston Gapter Sophomore

“Tom and Jerry� Aaron Giron Junior

The Pylon wants to hear your opinion! Email your letters, preferably limited to 500 words, to editor@chspylon.com. Submissions must contain a full name for inclusion, and we will contact you to confirm that you are the author of your letter. Letters may be edited for clarity.

“Courage the Cowardly Dog� Cody Norton Senior


Page 8

Photo Story

3.18.11 12

1

BRINGING BACK

WHAT IS

OURS

2

1. Junior Alexis Nevarez casts a look back during stretches at baseball practice. (photo by Shelby Dinkel) 2. The soccer team pushes themselves during a run. (photo by Stephen Lamer) 3. Sophomore Nathan Garlow returns the ball to his partner with a forehand. (photo by Stephen Lamer) 4. Sophomore Spencer Schrader pushes forward in his determination to hand off the baton to his relay teammate. (photo by Stephen Lamer) 5. Concentrating, senior Will Putzier lands a direct hit on a golf ball. (photo by Brooke Wakefield) 6. Freshman Ian Johnson leaps up and over a hurdle at track practice. (photo by Stephen Lamer) 7. Freshman Matt Rowe prepares to throw his baseball to his teammate. (photo by Shelby Dinkel) 8. Senior Courtney Wiggins pursues the ball. (photo by Stephen Lamer) 9. Senior Amanda Murry practices her event. (photo by Stephen Lamer) 10. Determined to hit his target, senior Bradley Ethridge swings his tennis racket. (photo by Stephen Lamer) 11. Junior Reggie Rhodeman throws a softball to her teammate. (photo by Tori Happel) 12. Senior Dana Kennedy takes a breath during a catch-up drill. (photo by Michelle Hanschu)

11

8

9

For some, the spring sports season is a chance to recover from years of heartbreak. For others, it’s a chance to recapture the title that barely eluded them last season.

4

6

3 5

7

10

March 2011  

March 2011 Publication of the Pylon at Salina High School Central

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you