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is you.

Do you envision a brighter, healthier future for you and your loved ones? You probably do. That’s why we’ve put the community’s well being at the top of our agenda, taking your health to a whole new level of importance. Exceptional Healthcare Close to Home. Visit us at hahv.org

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For More Info, Go To dutchessfair.com Rhinebeck, NY 2 ChronograM 8/13


ASIA-BARONG

LARGEST ASIANART ART STORE STORE ININAMERICA LARGEST ASIAN AMERICA

A Visit Is Like An Exotic Vacation, A Sophisticated Museum, And The Highlight Of Your Trip To The Berkshires All Rolled Into One.

AM NEW YORK singles out

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YANKEE MAGAZINE chose ASIABARONG as an “Editor’s Choice” in its Special Travel Issue. The Editor’s Choice recommendation singles out those establishments Yankee’s editors feel no visitor to New England should miss.

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST says, “After a visit to ASIABARONG’S huge gallery, you might just feel as if you’ve just browsed through nearly every region in the eastern world.” 199 Stockbridge Road, Route 7, Great Barrington, MA 01230 Call for hours: 413-528-5091 www.asiabarong.com 8/13 ChronograM 3


Freshlayde Handm in the

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OCTOBER 4 5 6 A Celebration of Fine Craft, Art, Music, Food & Fun! The Hudson Valley Arts Festival is a celebration of artistic expression in its many forms with a main focus on craft and visual art. In addition to America's top artists and craftspeople, the festival will present a line-up of exceptional musicians, live art projects, demonstrations, guided art tours, children's art activities, specialty food, wine, and more! BUONAIUTO

Dutchess County Fairgrounds 845-331-7900 Stacey Jarit – Director

www.artrider.com

PerforMIng arts at tHe cMf

IrIsH arts Week

Hudso

Zad

n rIver

ar t tr a

uM t t Muse ock Pr a

Il sIte

Home of the Hudson River Art Trail, Catskill Mountain Foundation Piano Performances, art galleries, museums, and world class performing art and dance centers, the Great Northern Catskills of Greene County boasts a rich cultural heritage that continues to inspire arts enthusiasts from near and far.

800-355-CATS • www.GreatNorthernCatskills.com/arts-culture

8/13 ChronograM 5


Chronogram arts.culture.spirit.

contents 8/13

news and politics

Community pages

24 while you were sleeping

58 the view from here: Rhinebeck, Red Hook, Tivoli

Urinal-sink units, out-of-control Phish concerts, and why buying a house might not be the right path to the American Dream—find out what you may have missed.

27 beinhart’s body politic: The Lure of Brutality

Larry Beinhart discusses Al Jazeera, an international network broadcasting in Arabic since 1996, which is now available in English.

home

85 Driving the Oblong: Route 22

A profile of craft-furniture maker Michael Puryear's self-renovated home.

37 Trickles are Better than Sprinkles

Michelle Sutton gives some advice on watering your plants.

43 Home and Garden events for August

A listing of fairs, classes, and tours for green thumbs and homebodies.

Money and Investing 45 The Living Return: Why Investing Local Is Invaluable Jennifer Gutman reports on the benefits of investing in your local economy, including strategic advice from "mother of localism" Judy Wicks.

Continuing Education 53 School's Out, Learning's In A roundup of adult learning opportunities in the Hudson Valley­—from pottery and gardening to music and martial arts.

46 Field notes: Protesting with Mom & Pop

Robert Burke Warren explores an alternative way of bonding with your kids that puts a spin on the idea of staying active.

48 Calculus of Calm: An Interview with Lawrence Carroll

The long-time educator discusses incorporating meditation in the classroom.

50 kids and family events A listing of family-friendly, local happenings.

Whole Living 96 Different Strokes

Not just for the elderly, strokes these days are getting younger, demanding more vigilance than ever—Wendy Kagan reports.

Community Resource Guide 12 Ellenville A directory of things to do and see in the Ulster County village. 91 tastings A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 95 Lodging A listing of places to stay in the Hudson Valley. 92 business directory A compendium of advertiser services. 100 whole living Opportunities to nurture mind, body, and soul.

Sheila Stumph with her children Keira Langely and Sasha Langely protesting outside the White House in Washington, DC, on May 17, 2013. kids and family

scott langley

46

A closer look at the 60-mile long stretch along the New York / Connecticut border.

Kids and Family

28 Live Small, Think Big: Settling DOwn in Shokan

Good eats and community camaraderie define these Dutchess County towns.

6 ChronograM 8/13


BARDSUMMERSCAPE 2013

O

Sergey Taneyev’s opera—U.S. stage premiere

the american symphony orchestra conducted by Leon Botstein, music director directed by Thaddeus Strassberger Bard SummerScape is internationally recognized for staging critically acclaimed opera productions, complete with magnificent sets and costumes and gorgeous music. With a huge, international cast, this year’s production of Russian composer Sergey Taneyev’s Oresteia tells a gripping tale of lust, murder, and revenge. A tantalizing story of moral gravity with ageless appeal, Aeschylus’ powerful drama about the cursed House of Atreus—from Agamemnon’s fateful return from Troy to the trial of his son Orestes—propels us from the monstrous to the divine. sosnoff theater

The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College July 26 and August 2 at 7 pm | July 28, 31, and August 4 at 3 pm tickets: $30, 60, 70, 90

845-758-7900 | fishercenter.bard.edu Detail The Furies, John Singer Sargeant, 1921. © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The Bard Music Festival presents two extraordinary weeks of concerts, panels, and other special events that will explore the musical world of Igor Stravinsky.

weekend one Friday, August 9

Becoming Stravinsky: From St. Petersburg to Paris program one

Saturday, August 10 program two program three

Sunday, August 11

program four program five

weekend two Friday, August 16

The 20th Century’s Most Celebrated Composer Works by Stravinsky

The Russian Context

Chamber works by Stravinsky, Glazunov, Rachmaninoff, and others

1913: Breakthrough to Fame and Notoriety

American Symphony Orchestra, Leon Botstein, conductor Orchestral works by Stravinsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, and others

Modernist Conversations

Chamber works by Stravinsky, Debussy, Schoenberg, and others

Sight and Sound: From Abstraction to Surrealism Works by Stravinsky, Satie, Poulenc, and others

Stravinsky Reinvented: From Paris to Los Angeles program six

Against Interpretation and Expression: The Aesthetics of Mechanization

Works by Stravinsky, Bartók, Varèse, and others

Saturday, August 17 program seven program eight

the bard music festival presents

Stravinsky and His World

august 9–11 and 16–18

Sunday, August 18

Stravinsky in Paris

Chamber works by Stravinsky, Roussel, Martinu°, and others

The Émigré in America

American Symphony Orchestra, Leon Bostein, conductor Orchestral works by Stravinsky, Schoenberg, and Eisler

program nine

Stravinsky, Spirituality, and the Choral Tradition

program ten

The Poetics of Music and After

Choral works by Stravinsky, Boulanger, Krenek, and others

Chamber works by Stravinsky, Copland, Carter, and others

program eleven The Classical Heritage

American Symphony Orchestra, Leon Botstein, conductor Orchestral works by Stravinsky

845-758-7900 | fishercenter.bard.edu Bard College Annandale-on-Hudson, New York

PHOTO: Igor Stravinsky, 1882-1971, Russian composer, photograph, 1949 Culver Pictures/The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY


arts.culture.spirit.

contents 8/13

arts & culture

Food & Drink

68 Gallery & museum GUIDe

86 Mead the New Boss: Honey in the Glass Mead­—the oldest alcoholic drink in human history—is making a comeback, and it's heading in the direction of other artisanal beverage industries in the region.

72 Portfolio: Marcellus Shale Documentary Project Photographers document the effect of natural gas drilling in Pennsylvania.

74 music: Rising Voices Peter Aaron profiles singer-songwriters Johanna Warren and Sasha Pearl. Nightlife Highlights include Larry Moses & The Latin Jazz Explosion; Hudson Jazz Workshop Concert with Sheila Jordan; Daniel Bachman, Pete Pidgeon and Arcoda, and Revocation. Reviews of Arrowhead by Arrowhead; Darn That Dream by Neil Alexander; and Shear Shazar by Shear Shazar.

78 books: Roots Cruise Nina Shengold profiles John Milward, whose new book rocks the blues.

80 book reviews Jana Martin reviews Elect H. Mouse State Judge by Nelly Reifler, and Anne Pyburn Craig reviews Save Yourself by Kelly Braffet.

82 Poetry Poems by Peter Coco, Deirdre Dowling, Hadley Holt Frydman, Ian Gillis, Dean Goldberg, A. J. Huffman, Yana Kane, Brian Loatman, Adam Markowitz, Ed Meek, Betty Renner, Matthew J. Spireng, Pamela Ugor, Mike Vahsen, Catherine Wald, and Lyla Yastion. Edited by Phillip X Levine.

128 parting shot Leonard Freed's photograph of a boa constrictor wrapped around a baby stroller.

6

58

Michael Rhodes at Tangent Theater's Carpenter Shop Theater in Tivoli. rhinebeck, red hook, tivoli

8 ChronograM 8/13

the forecast 106 daily Calendar Comprehensive listings of local events. (Daily updates at Chronogram.com.) PREVIEWS 105 "The Gun Show" exhibit is on view at Fovea in Beacon through October 6. 107 Power-pop icon Nick Lowe performs at Club Helsinki on August 21. 108 Arm-of-the-Sea Theater hosts its annual spectacle from August 23 to 25. 109 The Wassaic Project Summer Festival runs from August 2 to 4. 111 Evocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie screens at Upstate Films on August 4. 113 Kingston's San Severia hosts "Bon Appetit," a Julia Child opera, on August 24. 114 The Catskill Mountain Foundation hosts music festivals throughout August. 115 Cirque Éloize stages "Cirkopolis" at Proctor's in Schenectady through August. 119 The Felice Brothers host a music festival at Opus 40 on August 31. 121 Cornell Street Studios and the Art Riot host a DIY craft fair on August 10.

planet waves 122 Moving Mountains

Eric Francis Coppolino reports on a lawsuit that involved Mohonk Preserve claiming title to 75 acres of land that the court held belonged to its neighbors.

124 horoscopes

What are the stars telling us? Eric Francis Coppolino knows.

roy gumpel

Chronogram


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omegawomen’s leadershipcenter

LIVE ONLINE

Friday 9/20 Brené Brown Joan Halifax Roshi Elizabeth Lesser

Women & Power Retreat Find Your Own Strength

2013 register online at eOmega.org/owlc

September 20–22

BRENÉ BROWN | ELIZABETH LESSER | KATE CLINTON JOAN HALIFAX ROSHI | AI-JEN POO | SARAH PETER

EDITORIAL Editorial Director Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com creative Director David Perry dperry@chronogram.com assistant Editor Jennifer Gutman jgutman@chronogram.com Books editor Nina Shengold books@chronogram.com health & wellness editor Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com Poetry Editor Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com music Editor Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com food & drink Editor Peter Barrett food@chronogram.com EDITORIAL internS Caroline Budinich, Marie Solis, Schuyler Kempton proofreader Lee Anne Albritton contributors Larry Beinhart, Jay Blotcher, Stephen Blauweiss, John Burdick, Eric Francis Coppolino, Anne Pyburn Craig, Jason Cring, Larry Decker, Deborah DeGraffenreid, Melissa Esposito, Jennifer Farley, Roy Gumpel, Annie Internicola, Scott Langley, Jennifer May, Anne Cecille Meadows, Fionn Reilly, Sparrow, Michelle Sutton, Robert Burke Warren

HEIDI HARTMANN | CARLA GOLDSTEIN

PUBLISHING

CHUNG HYUN KYUNG | LESLIE SALMON JONES

FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky publisher Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com

OMEGA

visit eOmega.org/owlc or 800.944.1001 | Rhinebeck, New York

chairman David Dell Chronogram is a project of Luminary Publishing advertising sales advertising director Maryellen Case mcase@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Mario Torchio mtorchio@chronogram.com account executive Robert Pina rpina@chronogram.com account executive Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com account executive Jack Becker jbecker@chronogram.com ADMINISTRATIVE director of operations Amara Projansky aprojansky@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x105 business MANAGER Ruth Samuels rsamuels@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107 technology director Michael LaMuniere mlamuniere@chronogram.com marketing coordinator Samantha Henkin shenkin@chronogram.com marketing Intern Alicia Buczek PRODUCTION Production director Jaclyn Murray jmurray@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 pRoduction designer Kerry Tinger pRoduction Intern Jennifer Burgess Office 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 | (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION

Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Publishing 2013

SUBMISSIONS

calendar To submit listings, visit Chronogram.com/submitevent or e-mail events@chronogram.com. Deadline: August 15.

10 ChronograM 8/13


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Supermarket & Natural Food Store Delicious Home Cooked Foods •Deli Lunch Specials Extensive Organic Food Selection • Vitamins & Herbs

cragsmoor + ellenville + napanoch

Route 209, Napanoch, NY 12458 (845) 647-6990 Family owned and operated supermarket entering its 43rd year in business. Genuine Customer Service, High Quality Products including the Freshest Meats, Produce, Deli, and Bakery.

Good Prices & Great Values The Peters family & employees welcome you to a superior shopping experience. Weekly Flyer available on website: www.petersmarket.biz Hours: Monday - Saturday: 8am-8pm, Sunday: 8am-6pm

Ellenville/Wawarsing Chamber of Commerce Nestled in the beautiful Shawangunk Valley, the town of Wawarsing, with its six historic hamlets, and the village of Ellenville, serves as the gateway to the Scenic Byway. Enjoy hiking, biking, fishing, horseback riding, great restaurants and hometown hospitality. Breathtaking views from Sam’s Point, professional live theater at the renowned Shadowland Theatre and our famous Blueberry Festival make this a great family place to visit! 124 Canal St., P.O. Box 227, Ellenville, NY 845 647-4620 • www.ewcoc.com ewcoc@hvc.rr.com • www.shadowlandtheatre.org

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12 cragsmo0r + ellenville + napanoch ChronograM 8/13


JACOB’S PILLOW D A N C E FESTIVAL 2013

WENDY WHELAN

RESTLESS CREATURE August 14–18

413.243.0745

Wendy Whelan; photo Nisian Hughes

New York City Ballet star Wendy Whelan embarks on a new dance adventure with four of today’s most celebrated male dancer/choreographers. An exclusive world premiere, only at the Pillow!

jacobspillow.org

Life on film is as much a part of today’s world and business as it will ever be. Politics, family, advertising & art... have all come together on an infinitesimal chip. It is the language of the day... and the time to begin being a part of it... is now.

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8/13 ChronograM 13


BARDAVON PRESENTS

on the cover

Emmylou Harris

& RODNEY CROWELL AT HITS-ON-THE-HUDSON

Sunday September 8, 5pm - Saugerties NY Robert Johnson Margie Greve | Digital Art Work | 8” x 10” | 2012

Sunday October 13, 7pm - UPAC

MERLE Sunday November 3, 7pm - UPAC

Friday November 15, 8pm - UPAC BARDAVON • 35 Market St. • Poughkeepsie • Box Office 845.473.2072 UPAC • 601 Broadway • Kingston • Box Office 845.339.6088 HITS • 319 Main St. • Saugerties • 845.246.8833 • www.hitsshows.com Ticketmaster 800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com | www.bardavon.org

Bearsville-based husband-and-wife-duo Margie Greve and John Milward weren’t sure how to refer to the art that Greve did for Milward’s book Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ’n’ Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues) “Digital portraits? Illustrations? I don’t really know what to call them,” says Greve. In actuality, they are computer versions of Greve’s longtime artistic passion: woodcuts—a relief printing technique where images are carved into the surface of a block of wood. Though illustrations (what Greve and Milward ultimately called them in the book) is less of a mouthful than digitized woodcuts, the more precise description brings the portraits into a clearer light: These are not true-to-life, hand-detailed renderings of rock and blues icons. They are vivid caricatures meant to give a sense of the artist’s contribution to the music world. In fact, Greve admits that many people may not even recognize the portrait featured on this month’s cover of 1930s blues icon Robert Johnson out of the context of Milward’s book (which Nina Shengold profiles in this month’s Books section on page 78). “I don’t know if people will look at it and say, ‘Oh, that’s Robert Johnson,’” Greve says. “They know the pinstripe suit, cigarette in mouth, long fingers on fret board.” Greve purposefully portrayed the itinerant musician simply and straightforwardly—as a kind of Platonic ideal. “He’s the model for every other musician,” she says. “I didn’t want to show him playing the guitar because he’s the idea everyone has in their heads when they’re playing.” To account for the sketchy, rumor-laden details of Johnson’s life—including a myth that he sold his soul to the devil at a crossroads to achieve musical success—Greve incorporated a backdrop of bad luck charms: bottles of booze representing the poison that reportedly led to Johnson’s death, black cats, wishbones, hearts. “The heart—I think [that’s] what started the whole thing,” says Greve. “The love of the music, and of the woman he had a child with who died. He kind of went off after that.” Greve uses a variety of textures and fabrics to give each of the 20 portraits in Crossroads (which include such giants as Howlin’ Wolf, Eric Clapton, and Stevie Ray Vaughan) a different feel—a level of experimentation not possible when using wood as the medium. Working in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, Greve scanned fabrics that she liked and used them to fill the black spaces in her black-and-white drawings. “It’s what I’ve been doing forever [with woodcuts],” says Greve. “This is just a new way to do it.” Collaborating with Milward is another first for Greve—but not a last. “We have another idea that we’re working on,” says Greve. This collaboration, though, will see a reversal of their Crossroads dynamic. The new project, Greve notes, is more focused on the pictures. “I want him to write something for me,” she says. Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ‘n’ Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues) by John Milward, with illustrations by Margie Greve, was published by Northeastern University Press in June. Upne.com. —Jennifer Gutman chronogram.com

Watch a video interview with Margie Greve by Stephen Blauweiss.

14 ChronograM 8/13


chronogram.com contest: Your Favorite Chronogram Cover Chronogram’s 20th anniversary cover contest launched on May 1, giving readers the chance to browse the nearly 200 covers featuring work by local artists on Chronogram.com and vote for their favorite. After two and a half months of open polls, we have a winner: Catherine Sebastian’s Portrait of Levon Helm, featured on the May 2012 cover. The photograph, taken in 2010, captures the late local legend waving from the stage at Onteora High School during a fundraiser concert for the school’s auditorium renovation. Runners-up include Eugenia Ballard’s The Stromberg Alphabet from September 2008, and Randal Roberts’s Portrait of Homer Simpson from August 2009. Thanks to everyone who voted in honor of Chronogram’s 20th anniversary. We look forward to 20 more years of great covers by Hudson Valley artists. podcast: August Conversations We have some very special guests lined up this month for our weekly podcast, Chronogram Conversations. Hallie Scott, education director of the Wassaic Project, previews the upcoming arts festival from August 2 to 4; Patrick Wadden of Arm-of-theSea Theater discusses the ensemble’s largescale theater and puppet performances and their annual summer spectacle; Stephanie Monseu of Bindletsiff Family Cirkus discusses August shows planned for Bard’s Spiegeltent; members of local folk-rock band the Felice Brothers talk about their first music festival at Opus 40 on August 31; and Kerry Henderson of the Kingston Festival of the Arts discusses upcoming performances planned for Kingston’s new San Severia Speigeltent. A new episode of the Chronogram Conversations podcast is available every Thursday—find it on our website or subscribe via iTunes. Q&A: Christopher Sarmiento In conjunction with “The Gun Show” exhibit—featuring work by seven American photographers on the topic of guns—Fovea in Beacon and the Beacon Independent Film Festival present a screening of Christopher Sarmiento’s documentary A Son Down, After Sun Down on August 10 at 6pm. Sarmiento, a 23-year-old local filmmaker, will be part of a panel discussion to follow, which will also include Monte Frank from the Newtown Action Alliance and Andy Pelosi, president of the Campaign to Keep Guns Off Campus. Chronogram caught up with Sarmiento with some questions about his stirring film on gun violence in Poughkeepsie and Newburgh, which he made over the winter of 2012. Sarmiento discusses possible causes and solutions for gun violence as well as his motivation for making the documentary.

PLUS • Video interview with August cover artist Margie Greve by Stephen Blauweiss • Tracks from CDs by Arrowhead, Neil Alexander, and Shear Shaza • Slideshow of photographs of the Marcellus Shale Documentary Project at the Center for Photography at Woodstock • Trailer for Evocateur, the Morton Downey Jr. film screening at Upstate

A new book from a pioneer in the treatment field ... With 60 yrs to share... The story of a man... A mission ... an inspiration to find the gift in any trouble ...HOPE in today’s world ! Written by Jim Cusack, the founder of Glenacre Lodge and Veritas Villa, addiction treatment centers in upstate New York.

Films in Rhinebeck this month • Additional illustrations by cover artist Margie Greve from John Milward’s book Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ’n’ Roll (and Rock ’n’ Roll Saved the Blues) • A mead-based cocktail recipe from Peter Barrett • Videos about telestroke medicine by Andrew Revkin • Additional shots from this month’s Community Pages

Published by S and J Publishing PO Box 610, Kerhonkson New York, 12446 Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble 8/13 ChronograM 15


esteemed reader

Fill Your Summer with World-class Entertainment! VISIT WEBSITE FOR FULL CALENDAR OF EVENTS

PAVILION STAGE THURSDAY

SUNDAY

AUG 8

THURSDAY

AUG 11

AUG 15

SPECIAL GUESTS

ThE JAMES hUNTER SIx AND QUINN SULLIVAN

FRIDAY

WITh EASTON CORBIN AND JANA KRAMER SATURDAY

AUG 16

TUESDAY

AUG 17

AUG 20

GOAT RODEO SESSIONS:

YO-YO MA — STuART DuNcAN EDGAR MEYER — chRIS ThIlE WITh GuEST AOIfE O’DONOvAN

SPECIAL GUEST

LEVI LOWERY COMMUNITY

FRIDAY

SEPT 6

FESTIVALS AT BETHEL WOODS

EVENT GALLERY

AUG 24 ROSANNE CASh

SEPT 13 JOAN OSBORNE

OCT 9 COLIN hAY

SUNDAYS

WITH FRIENDS SEPT 29 GLENN DICTEROW FAREWELL CONCERT OCT 6 JEREMY DENK, PIANO DEC 8 “LINCOLN CENTER FAMILY” hOLIDAY CONCERT

OCT 11 VANILLA FUDGE

BRADSTAN CABARET SERIES AUG 31 MAUREEN MCGOVERN

“The Long And Winding Road”

NOV 2

in “Sibling Revelry.”

“Christmas, Christmas, Christmas”

On Assignment: Woodstock admission To museum

(2) hours prior to show time with valid concert ticket stub. *Subject to change based on show times.

©BETHEL WOODS COLLECTION

Photos by Rolling Stone photographer Baron Wolman

5

ThE CALLAWAY SISTERS

DEC 14 KAREN MASON

ThE MUSEUM

$

NOV 23 & 24 ARLO GUThRIE

a sPeCiaL eXHiBiTion

ThRU AUG 18, 2013

CURRENT HUES OF THE HUDSON: CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS WORKING IN THE HUDSON VALLEY

A SPECIAL EXHIBITION

AUGUST 10-23, 2013

Tickets at BethelWoodsCenter.org By Phone 1.800.745.3000 • Bethel Woods Box Office Ticketmaster.com • Info at 1.866.781.2922 Bethel Woods Center for the Arts is a not-for-profit cultural organization. All dates, acts, times and ticket prices subject to change without notice. All ticket prices increase $5 on the day of show.

16 ChronograM 8/13

Hope of consciousness is strength. Hope of feeling is cowardice. Hope of body is disease. —A proverb Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: Remember the presidential campaign of six years ago and its inspiring but deceptively simple slogan, “Hope”? Looking back to the images that word evoked—the changes I hoped for—I see the hope the politicians and their marketers evoked was false. I recall the words of a dead Englishman—”Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are usually bad men.” Since memorizing this statement for an exam in high school, I thought it sounded too categorical to be true. Nevertheless, I now see no reason to expect authorities and leaders will someday be better. I see in myself an impulse to want to believe in authority. I want leaders that will guide me to what is good and just, whose decisions are well founded and sound—leaders with my best interests in mind. I don’t think this is unnatural—it is not simply that I am addicted, like the liberated convicts of the Bastille, to my prison cell. Yet everywhere I turn, I find people in positions of power and authority who are self-interested tyrants with no greater satisfaction than lording it over their minuscule fiefdoms. It is blatant in contexts that have no scruples about self-interest, like the corporate business world and government—where ruthless ambition and backstabbing are de rigueur; but it is more startlingly to find it in altruistic people and organizations espousing high ideals. In these latter contexts, the petty, power-wielding is insidious, neatly cloaked in spiritual-sounding sentiments. I find myself caught on the horns of dilemma with two seemingly opposite impulses at work. One is the comfortable habit of believing and doing what I am told by those in charge (and even possessing a deeper wish to submit to something real). The other is finding no one in positions of authority that deserves any trust. There is the impulse to grasp one horn or the other—to look for a better authority: a leader, master, belief, or organization that has real stability and substance; or conversely, enter the dark, cozy, cynical cavern of unbelief in anything—a nihilism that is disdainful of the weakness of followers and believers in anything. Hanging out in the discomfort of contradiction, a cloud begins to form between the antlers of opposing truths. It has a rich, rusty red color. The cloud is a feeling, but also carries information. It may be what an anonymous 14th-century Neoplatonist called “The Cloud of Unknowing.” The message that it conveys is that there is real authority, and it is alive somewhere deep in my breast. It is not me in the usual sense of this or that self-interest, but a kind of seeing or knowing that is always there. It evokes the image of a compass ever pointing to what is so. It is never not working—only one thing and another prevents my noticing where the needle points. The authority of the compass is not a belief or hope in anything in particular—no thought, no idea, no philosophy, no person, no religion, no nation, no government. The authority of the compass is a living sensitivity, together with ruthless willingness to acknowledge if not truth, then at least facts. It is an inner authority not to lie. The only obstacle to hearing and heeding the knowledge of the inner compass is me—the animation of self-importance, and an assessment of the idea of who I am that is relative to externals. This takes myriad forms, but the most powerful is the perpetual jockeying of master and slave. In every, even fleeting, relationship, we automatically size up our counterpart, and quickly, almost instantaneously, become the superior or inferior party in the exchange. We become either master or slave, authority or subjugated. This is the root of the slavery that infects our culture like a strange disease of somnambulism. It is what makes us believe and do what we are told like sheep being led to shearing, and then the slaughter. Waking up to the situation—that we and everyone we know are slaves to selfimportance—is a shock. Staying in that discomfort requires resilience. But to really see it opens a door that invites and beckons passage to a different world. However fleeting the glimpse, we see it is a world in which hope does not need an object to be alive, and so cannot be dashed. In that world, hope is present in the presence of being. In that world, we are equals, and as such, we treat one another with respect. In that world, we know mutuality, because we value the same thing above self-importance—we value the living truth toward which the inner compass points. The doorway beckons. May you enter in Truth. May you exit in Truth, And be guided to the presence of Being. —Jason Stern


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chronogram seen

Clockwise from top left: Jessica Frey as Cordelia and Stephen Paul Johnson as King Lear in the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival's production of "King Lear" at Boscobel in Garrison. Photo: William Marsh. Dave Murphy of STS9 joins Cherub onstage at Camp Bisco on July 11. Photo: Calder Wilson. Mickey Solis, Peter Macklin, Michael Medeiros, Sonia Feigelson, and Danny Wolohan in Bard SummerScape's production of "The Master and Margarita" at the Fisher Center on July 12. Photo: Cory Weaver. Carol Morley and Nicole Quinn of Actors & Writers in "Emoteworthy Shorts" at Maverick Concerts on July 13. Photo: Barbara Smiley. A piece by Joel Yau at the Hudson Valley Chalk Festival in New Paltz on July 12. Photo: Alex Lipstein. Tracy Bonham at the Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary's July Jamboree on July 6. Photo: Derek Goodwin. Pete Seeger at the Mount Beacon Fire Tower during the grand opening

18 ChronograM 8/13

ceremony on June 22. Photo: David Rocco.


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chronogram block party An infographic by Jason Cring

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The Chronogram Block Party will take place on Wall Street between John and North Front Streets in Uptown Kingston on August 17 from 4 to 11pm. For more infomation, visit Chronogramblockparty.com.

8/13 ChronograM 21


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Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note On the Block

I

n the Queens neighborhood where I grew up, the game universally known across the city as ringolevio was called ringolario. Perhaps it was a translation problem when the game entered our enclave. In the Discovery Channel reenactment of my childhood that runs in my mind, I picture two tribes of children rubbing up against one another at the boundary of the enclaves in which we played. One of the older kids crosses Corporal Kennedy Boulevard and spends the afternoon immersed in the foreign customs of the other tribe, just a couple blocks away.They never play Kick the Can, but they love Spud.When they harass neighbors by depressing their doorbells and hightailing it to the nearest shrubbery to snigger at the annoyed homeowner, they don’t call it Ring and Run but Ding Dong Ditch It. When the alpha child returns, we gather around to hear tales of the exotic other. That was how ringolario was brought to us, like Moses bearing the Ten Commandments. Maybe it was an honest mistake, and he misheard what the game was called, or perhaps he willfully twisted it to put a personal stamp on it, knowing the rest of us wouldn’t know different. The migratory paths of urban games are anecdotal and mysterious. They pass from child to child like ghost stories. The game was simple: There were two teams, each with the same number of players—five or seven or nine, it didn’t matter.There were two jails.There were no time limits. One team would hide, the other would count to 60 and then proceed to hunt for the first group. The game was over when all the members of one team ended up in jail. This sometimes could take hours, and games would collapse due to maternal calls to dinner. For within the boundaries—usually a block or so—you were free to hide anywhere: up a tree, in the trunk of a car, underneath the shed in mean Widow Prendergast’s backyard. If you had a good hiding spot, you could remain sequestered for hours, entering a fugue state of summer somnolence. If you could hold out, you might emerge half a day later to find the rest of the kids had organized themselves into another activity entirely, assuming you had gone home. Then they would pester you to reveal your hiding place, simultaneously accusing you of cheating—of going “off the block” and playing endless games of Tempest at the arcade rather than uncomfortably wedged between Mr. Santoni’s pool and Old Man Gonzaki’s garage.The urge to take pride and reveal your choice hideout was equaled by the desire to save it for another game. Hardly anyone ever held out, or was allowed to keep mum before more coercive forms of interrogation than simple questioning were employed. In August, just as summer seemed to be stretching out further than we could

have imagined—four entire Wiffle ball World Series behind us, a dozen tennis balls lost in the sewer, at least two epic sunburns, and a dozen bee stings amongst our crew—the season of block parties began. Like ringolevio, block parties are an old custom in New York, dating back to the First World War, when neighbors would gather on roped-off streets to sing patriotic songs in honor of the troops overseas. For us kids in Queens, block parties meant staying up late playing Ghost in the Graveyard while the adults barbecued and caroused and caught up on the latest gossip or traded woes about real estate or homeownership. By nightfall, strings of lights would be hanging from streetlight to telephone pole, the street would be teeming with people, music would be playing out of a dozen parked cars, and the summer felt like it would never end. We’re hoping to capture some of the summertime magic on August 17 with our Block Party. (For more details on the event, see the infographic on page 21 designed by Jason Cring, or visit Chronogramblockparty.com.) It was David Perry, Chronogram’s creative director, who suggested hosting our 20th anniversary shindig in front of our office on Wall Street. When David said we should shut down the street and have an old-fashioned block party, it was one of those ideas that emerged indisputably righteous. Where else could we have thought to throw ourselves a bash but on Wall Street, this fine old street in historic Uptown Kingston? And while Wall Street is our block, for one day, it’ll be your block too. Extending that vision, we view the entire Hudson Valley as our block, a big community of brilliant and fascinating neighbors to encounter. We invite you to join us out in the street as we celebrate 20 years of chronicling this amazing life we are privileged to live in the Hudson Valley—with music, dancing, food and drink, and community. If we’re lucky, the night will feel like it might never end. Department of Corrections In our July issue, a photo caption in the Chronogram Seen section incorrectly identified a photograph of former Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh as former Allman Brothers guitarist Warren Haynes. Also in July, in the Community Notebook, in an article on two Native American campaigns happening this summer—the Two Row Wampum Treaty and the Unity Ride—we botched the dates on a couple events. The Two Row Renewal event at the Hudson River Maritime Museum will be held on August 1, not July 1; and the two campaigns will merge in NewYork City at the United Nations on August 9, not July 15.

Chronogram Sponsors As part of our ongoing commitment to nourish and support the creative, cultural, and economic life of the Hudson Valley, Chronogram helps promote organizations and events in our pages each month. Here’s some of what we’re sponsoring in August. Byrdcliffe Theater Bird-On-A-Cliff’s 18th summer season of the Woodstock Shakespeare Festival continues with Andre Gregory’s adaptation of “Alice in Wonderland,” directed by David Aston-Reese. Performance begin August 9 and continue through September 1, every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 5pm. $5 suggested donation. Birdonacliff.org Hudson River Rising Hudson Rising is a grassroots effort to celebrate the greening of New York, to engage the public with their communities, and help catalyze smart, sustainable growth in the region. Events will take place through September around the Hudson Valley. The Hudson River Tour will stop in Beacon on August 11. Hudsonrising.com

Kingston Farmers’ Market The Kingston Farmers’ Market is open every Saturday from 9am-2pm, rain or shine, through November on Wall Street in Kingston. The market offers a variety of local food vendors that provide fresh fruits and vegetables grown in the Hudson Valley. August 3 is Senior Day/Catskill Mountain Music Together at the market, which will feature music and crafts from noon to 1:30pm. Kingstonfarmersmarket.org Jacob’s Pillow Jacob’s Pillow, located in Becket, Massachusetts, hosts more than 50 dance companies from around the world and has received the National Medal of Arts. Their annual dance festival continues through August. Upcoming shows include O Vertigo Danse, Jessica Lang Dance, Never Stand Still, Wendy Whelan/Restless Creature, La Otra Orilla, Martha Graham Dance Company, and Abraham.in.Motion in “Pavement.” Jacobspillow.org

8/13 ChronograM 23


hibits discrimination based on gender identity, this law is more descriptive and explicit in its language, marking the first time a state has mandated such treatment by statute. Opponents of the bill felt that the legislation might be at odds with other students’ rights to privacy and comfort. However, supporters maintained the bill is necessary to protect transgender students from bullying in the school setting and is consistent with California’s passing of same-sex marriage. Still, opponents claimed there is a risk that some students might take advantage of the bill. Boys who aren’t thriving on their own gender’s sports team might look to join the girls’ team or young sex offenders could use the bill as an excuse to use the facilities of the opposite sex, said the opposition. In response, Senator Ricardo Lara noted other California school districts have had similar policies for years without such incidents. Lara continued to emphasize that it’s important not to confuse behavioral difficulties with the sensitive nature of gender identity issues. Source: CBS News

Latvian designer Kaspars Jursons is doing his part to help solve European water shortages through his latest invention: a compact urinal-sink unit that uses the water that drains from the sink to flush. The design, called Stand, costs $590 and is currently being manufactured on a small production scale. So far, buyers in Norway, Germany, Russia, Poland, and Jursons's home country have purchased them. A number of them are currently installed in a Latvian concert venue where Jurson reports they have already saved the establishment thousands of liters of water. The urinal's design, he said, also acts to encourage good hygiene due to its convenience. Next, he's working on a sink-toilet combo for women's restrooms. Source: National Public Radio The three-day stand of Phish concerts at SPAC in early July accounted for 55 arrests and one death. Forty-year-old Brent Wallace’s cause of death was cardiac stenosis, a thickening of an artery to the heart or heart attack. Wallace had small trances of marijuana in his system and his blood alcohol level was 0.05, below the legal level of intoxication. Saratoga Hospital reported treating 45 concert-goers, primarily due to drug or alcohol use. With each night topping 25,000 attendees, four assistant district attorneys were assigned to the weekend due to the heavy volume of complaints and arrests. Forty-one complaints were drug or alcohol related, 14 ambulance services, 17 calls for assistance, 15 vehicle and traffic complaints, five motor vehicle accidents, and 53 other emergency calls. Of all the arrests made, 30 were sent to jail and 25 posted bail at the station. Of the arrests made, 32 were felony charges. Some of the confiscated drugs found by law enforcements over the course of the weekend included MDMA (Ecstasy), mushrooms, pot, ketamine, bath salts, cocaine, heroin, nitrous oxide, and gummy-bear laced LSD. Source: Albany Times Union Two men could face up to 15 years in prison for plotting to design a radiation weapon. They were thwarted when the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force in Albany uncovered their plan, charging Saratoga County resident Glendon Scott Crawford and Columbia County resident Eric J. Feight with conspiring to sell the weapon to Jewish organizations or the Ku Klux Klan. Crawford, an employee at General Electric and a member of the Klan, said his target was the Muslim community and began seeking out local synagogues for support in April of last year. At one synagogue, he asked to speak with someone about the type of technology Israel used to kill its enemies in their sleep, later stating that he was developing a device to protect Jewish people. Crawford enlisted the help of Feight, a software expert, whose role it was to design and build the electronic triggering device which would allow the radiation to be released from almost half a mile away. He and Feight planned to test it at a hotel in the Albany area. Crawford was arrested at a vacant auto body shop in Rensselaer County where he worked on the device. The FBI suspects there are up to eight others who might have been assisting them in their plots. Source: Albany Times Union In a 21 to 9 vote, the California Senate passed a bill allowing transgender students in public K-12 schools to use the restrooms and join the school teams that they feel reflect their gender identities. Though California law already pro-

24 ChronograM 8/13 10/12

Last September, Leslie James Pickering found a handwritten card labeled confidential in his mail stating, “Show all mail to [supervisor] for copying prior to going out on the street.” Pickering was once a spokesman for a radical environmental group called the Earth Liberation Front, deemed an eco-terrorist organization by the FBI. Now he has a child and owns a small bookstore with his wife in Buffalo. Postal officers confirmed that they were in fact tracking his mail under the Mail Isolation Control and Tracking program, an initiative which allows postal workers to photocopy the outside of all letters and parcels. The program was created in 2001 after a series of anthrax attacks resulted in five deaths. Law enforcement officials can fill out a request and be approved by the Postal Service without ever appealing to a judge. Their requests are rarely denied. Mail covers are exclusively related to either criminal activity or national security, with requests for the former averaging 15 to 20,000 a year. They have been used effectively in a number of cases, including the recent investigation of ricin-laced letters mailed to President Obama and Mayor Michael Bloomberg. However, the ease of obtaining this information leaves room for abuse of the program: Maricopa County Supervisor Mary Rose Wilcox received almost $1 million in compensation when she claimed a sheriff’s request to track her mail was politically motivated. Source: New York Times Since its passage in 2010, the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) has been unpopular with businesses, many of which have looked for ways to dodge its insurance requirements. Restaurant chains and state universities alike have begun cutting the work of part-time employees below 30 hours in order to avoid having to provide their workers with the affordable health care when the mandate takes effect. Bowing to pressure from business, the Obama administration has delayed the implementation of a provision known as the Employer Mandate that will require businesses employing over 50 workers to pay health insurance to their employees until 2015. The announcement of this delay follows a series of compromises made by the administration, including refusing multiple healthcare options for small business employees and scrapping a plan to institute nonprofit insurers. Business leaders have responded enthusiastically to delay enforcement of the Employer Mandate, saying it gives them needed time to study the new law’s requirements. Meanwhile, America’s 48.5 million uninsured will go at least another year without coverage. Sources: Bloomberg News, “Today” Show A 2011 study called “The American Dream or the American Delusion,” conducted by Professor Grace Wong Bucchianeri of University of Pennsylvania, concluded that homeowners weren’t any happier than renters. Although purchasing property is viewed as a part of the American dream, researchers found after controlling for income, housing quality and health, the 600 female homeowners studied were not better off than renters by a variety of measures, both global and situational. Saving money for a home may actually cause a dip in happiness, for some. Experts in the scientific field that focuses on understanding emotional well-being say that individuals are happier when they spend money on experiences rather than material goods, such as expensive houses and cars. A psychology professor and the director of the Center for Customer Insight at Yale School of Management, Ravi Dhar, says as with any item, the impact of happiness diminishes with time. In a theory called hedonic adaptation, Dhar cited, “Things give us more joy when they are first acquired than over time, as we adapt to them.” Source: New York Times Compiled by Caroline Budinich, Schuyler Kempton, and Marie Solis


C H R O N O G R A M B L O C K P A R T Y. C O M C E L E B R AT I N G 2 0 Y E A R S

8/13 ChronograM 25


althcare Associates is pleased to welcome Marty Clark, MD, to our years. He is Board Certified by the AmericanOrthopedics Board of Orthopedic oup practice. Dr. Clark has been practicing and SportsSur M ber of the American Academy Orthopedic years. He is Board Certified byof the American Surgeons. Board of Orthopedic Sur Welcoming Marty Clark, MD ber of the American Academy of Laude, Orthopedic Surgeons. ceived his Bachelor of Arts, Cum in Biology from Harvard Univ

Orthopedic Surgeon & tor of Medicine from Collegefrom of Physicians and Medicine Specialist ceived hisSports Bachelor ofColumbia Arts, CumUniversity, Laude, in Biology Harvard Univ dtor hisofInternship and Orthopedic Surgery New York-Pre to Sharon Hospital Medicine fromResidency ColumbiainUniversity, College of at Physicians and | did his Sports Medicine Fellowship at the Stea lumbia University. He

d his Internship and Residency in Orthopedic Surgery at New York-Pre Enhancing of Sports Life Medicine Fellowship at the Stea ,lumbia in Colorado. University.Quality He did his One Patient at a Time. ,asina Colorado. professional squash player and a four-time US National Champio

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ronze Medal winner in the Pan and American Games. has provided ev as a professional squash player a four-time USHe National Champio ILPGA, I O S Pin I Tthe A L Pan rronze the PGA andwinner Texas Rangers and Colorado Rockies spring train Medal American Games. He has provided ev andand Women’s Ski Teams, as and well Colorado as NY Yankees stadium rMen’s the PGA LPGA, Texas Rangers Rockies spring cove train coverage the PSA Ski (professional squash association), including th Men’s andfor Women’s Teams, as well as NY Yankees stadium cove nscoverage at Grandfor Central Station, just to name a few. the PSA (professional squash association), including th ns atall Grand Central Station, justand to name a few. interest in Sports M joys aspects Orthopedics has a special Regional Healthcare Associatesof is pleased to welcome Marty Clark, MD, to our A RegionalCare Hospital Partners Facility

physician group practice. Dr. Clark has been practicing Orthopedics and Sports Medicine for over 13 years. He is Board Certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery and a member of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

Marty Clark, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon & Sports Medicine Specialist

res include: Arthroscopic Surgery theaShoulder, Knee and Hip, Rot joys all aspects of Orthopedics andofhas special interest in Sports M | truction, Joint Replacements Total Knee and Total Hip, Tend Clark received his Bachelor of Arts, Cum Laude, in Biologyincluding from Harvard University Specializing in resDr. include: Arthroscopic Surgery of the Shoulder, Knee and Hip, Rot and his Doctor of Medicine from Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons. Arthroscopic Surgery, Clark did his Internship and Residency Orthopedic Surgery at New York-Presbyterian Reconstruction, el Dr. Release, as Replacements well asin Major and Minor Fracture Care. TotalACLJoint truction, Joint including Total Hip, Tend Replacement, Hospital, Columbia University. He did his Sports Medicine Fellowship at the Steadman Hawkins Knee and Total Tendon Repair & Fracture Care Foundation, in Colorado. Release, as well as Major USand Fracture Care. Dr. Clark was a professional squashrelocated player and a four-timeto National Champion, well as aare looking forward to be delhis family have theMinor area asand Silver and Bronze Medal winner in the Pan American Games. He has provided event and team coverage for the PGA and LPGA, Texas Rangers and Colorado Rockies spring training, Denver Broncos, US Men’s and Women’s Ski Teams, as well as NY Yankees stadium coverage. In addition, he provided coverage for the PSA (professional squash association), including the Tournament of Champions at Grand Central Station, just to name a few.

fdthe Hospital community. now accepting appointm his Sharon family have relocated to the Dr. areaClark and isare looking forward to be Regional Orthopedics & Sports located in Sharon Ho fctice, the Sharon Hospital community. Dr. Medicine, Clark is now accepting appointm Dr. 50 Clark enjoys all aspects of Orthopedics and has a special interest in Sports Medicine. tes, Hospital Hill Road, Sharon, CT 06069. His procedures include: Arthroscopic Surgery of the Shoulder, and Hip, Rotator Cuff Repair, ctice, Regional Orthopedics & Knee Sports Medicine, located in Sharon Ho ACL Reconstruction, Joint Replacements including Total Knee and Total Hip, Tendon Repair, Carpal Tunnel Release, as well as Major and Minor Fracture Care.

tes, 50 Hospital Road, Sharon, CT 06069. nformation or Hill to schedule an appointment, Dr. Clark and his family have relocated to the area and are looking forward to becoming members of the Sharon Hospital community. Dr. Clark is now accepting appointments in his new practice, Regional Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, located in Sharon Hospital’s Surgical Suites, 50 Hospital Hill Road, Sharon, CT 06069.

860.364.4532. nformation or to schedule an appointment, For more information or to schedule an appointment, 860.364.4532. please call 860.364.4532. Regional Healthcare Associates, LLC | an affiliate of Sharon Hospital | sharonhospital.com

26 ChronograM 8/13


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on, as well as a ’m doing some work for a television news magazine, “Empire,” on Al Jazeera English. vent and Alteam Jazeera began in 1996 as an international network broadcasting in Araon, as well a TV news organization in the region. Most of its bic, the firstas truly independent funding comes from Qatar, a country on the Arabian peninsula that’s bigger than ning,and Denver Rhode Island, smaller than Connecticut, with the highest per capita income in the vent team world. In 2003, they launched Al Jazeera English, very BBC, but more adventurous. in the coming months, they will launch Al Jazeera America, though erage. InSometime addition, ning, Denver not because they’re under the illusion that it’s a third language. They’re growing while other news organizations are shrinking. They like depth and serious reporthe Tournament they are the only serious rival to Jon Stewart’s claim that “The Daily erage. ing.InIn short, addition,

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Show” has “the best F**king News Team on the Planet.” My first project was “Empire of Secrets” about the intelligence services. My second assignment is “Oslo +20,” the name of the Norwegian city referring to the agreement that was supposed to lead to more agreements that would bring peace in Palestine. The 20th anniversary of Oslo is nigh. Except for the pleasure of reading the letters to the editor in the Woodstock Times, this is a subject I have studiously avoided. The pro-Palestinian Leftist Jews go at it with the pro-Israel less-Left Jews. Here’s a sample selected by the truly random method of let’s-see-if-there’s-one-in-this-week’s-paper. It says, in reply to a previous writer, “It’s too late for him to use others as a front while he whines about ‘victims.’ He has long since crossed over to the dark side of vicious propaganda.…Goebbels.” I have an ethnic identity. I’m a Jew. My parents regarded the religion itself as backward Old World superstition. To me, Jewish was a synonym for New Yorker, progressive, intellectual, and sarcastic. By contrast, in Europe generally, where I have traveled as an adult, and in England, in particular, where we lived for three years, Jews tend to be in the closet. Not like, “the Cossacks are coming!” Just aware that they’re in lands where antiSemitism has old, deep roots, so it’s best not to ruin dinner by awakening indecorous thoughts.Yet, as we traveled, we would discover, sometimes decades later, that a disproportionate number of the people we became friends with were Jews. Some cultural imprint, ways of thinking, mannerisms, attitudes, had transcended geography and endured through entirely different sets of assimilations, to form the neural pathways to communication. About five years ago, I went to Iran. While I was there, I visited a synagogue. My emotional reaction to the irrational idea that these were “my people,” completely surrounded by “the others” for a thousand miles or more in any direction, revealed to me the depth of my own tribalism, how profound that is, and how irrelevant reason is to such feelings. What I am examining now is how “the peace process stalled.” How, in fact, “the process” became a substitute for any sort of actual peace or justice, a way to keep the status quo in place—the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories—while Israel gradually grabs more bits and pieces and solidifies its power. This in cooperation with the US, working more closely than American political parties are with each other. The impulse to have a Jewish state is completely understandable. Most countries are legal wraps around single tribes. Where there’s more than one tribe, there’s trouble. In virtually every country where the Jews were a significant minority, their hosts turned on them, murdering, raping, robbing, and driving

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them into exile. Survival depends on controlling the government, the military, and the police. The location turns out to have been problematic. What would have been less so? If the Germans had given them Bavaria? One actual suggestion was Uganda. America was willing to give them Brooklyn, but only as a loaner, and it’s in the process of being returned. In the Caucuses? Saskatchewan? Costa Rica? Everything belongs to somebody and somebody thinks they have the title to any given place. They chose the location of ancient Israel. If that confers legitimacy, prepare to grant it to the Iroquois if they seize Manhattan. It needs be said that Palestinian claims to primacy and priority also have flaws. History is one long coiled strand of sausage and it depends on where you slice it. All of that is mooted by the fact that Israel has been in place for 60 years. They’re dug in.They’re not going anywhere.They’ve done many admirable things. They’ve set up a democratic state. (An imperfect democratic state is still a democratic state, so to with imperfect theocracies, monarchies, dictatorships. Humans have yet to organize themselves in conformity to Platonic ideals.) They’ve achieved astonishing material progress, even more striking when compared to the countries that surround them. They are world leaders in the military and espionage arts. There is a problem. Let us let Israeli insiders, from as far on the inside as anyone can get, explain it. The Gatekeepers, one of the most astonishing documentaries I’ve ever seen, consists primarily of interviews with the last six directors of Shin Bet, the Israeli security service.When they discuss operations and tactics the pride and the pleasure they took in how good they were at fighting dirty wars, and they were the best in the world, is evident. Avraham Shalom Ben-Dor, in charge from 1981 to 1986, has the demeanor of an alert but kindly grandfather as he says, “I didn’t want any more live terrorists in court.” He resigned after a scandal about executing prisoners. “In the war against terror, forget about morality. Find morality in terrorists first.” And the Israelis forgot. They employed mass arrests, used torture, and assassinated people. Avi Dichter, head of Shin Bet, from 2000 to 2005, said, simply, “We’d kill whoever tried to kill us.” All six men came to realize there was something profoundly wrong. Ami Ayalon, who served in the Six Day War, the War of Attrition, the Yom Kippur War, the fighting in Lebanon, and was commander-in-chief of the Navy before he became head of Shin Bet, said, “We wanted security and got more terrorism.” Carmi Gillon, head of the service from 1995 to 1996, said, “We are making the lives of millions unbearable, into prolonged human suffering.” But it is Avraham Shalom, the oldest of them, who gets to the heart of the matter. That Israel has “become a brutal occupation force similar to the Germans in World War II.” He specifies that he’s not referring to the Holocaust, but to the occupations of places like Poland and Czechoslovakia. “We’ve become cruel to ourselves as well, but mainly to the occupied population, using the excuse of the War Against Terror.” This is not a matter of bad people doing evil. It seems to be in the nature of things, that you’re fighting a dirty war, the lure of brutality is irresistible. In order to occupy a country where you’re not wanted, the intelligence services become as ruthless as the KGB and the police become the Gestapo. The victims of war crimes become the perpetrators of war crimes. I knew that, but I didn’t want to have read it and record it, chapter and verse, about the tribe that is so much, and so mysteriously, part of my identity. 8/13 ChronograM 27


The House

Live Small, Think Big Settling Down in Shokan

By Jennifer Farley Photographs by Deborah DeGraffenreid

W

hen acclaimed craft-furniture maker Michael Puryear met marketing consultant Nicole Carroll at a conference in Savannah 10 years ago, she lived in Wisconsin and he lived in Manhattan. Puryear was a widower, and Carroll’s marriage was ending, so initially they conducted a long-distance flirtation. “I’ll always remember the first e-mail Michael sent me,” says Carroll, who recently established the American Tuition Project, a new way to raise money for college students that leverages the asyet-untapped power of crowdfunding. “He just wrote, ‘And my heart went boom boom boom.’” Putting their lives together residentially in the Mid-Hudson Valley was a gradual process. Carroll felt she needed to stay in Madison until her daughter, Mehla, now 24, finished high school; last year, Mehla graduated from Bard College. Also, although Carroll grew up out west, she’s long had strong ties to New York. “When Michael and I met, I traveled a great deal. I was in New York maybe nine times a year already, helping artists market themselves,” says Carroll. “I knew who Michael was before we met in person.” After three decades in Brooklyn and Manhattan, Puryear, a serious outdoorsman, was ready to move upstate; he already knew he liked the Shokan area. Also, his older brother Martin, a famous sculptor, lives in Accord. caption

28 home ChronograM 8/13


Opposite: The Puryear/Carroll home on Longyear Road in Shokan. Above: Michael Puryear in his workshop. Below: The living room, which features many pieces of furniture made by Puryear.

8/13 chronogram home 29


Carroll relaxing with Jack on the porch in a bathtub couch designed by her daughter, Mehla Goodrich.

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A Muddled Old House “My landlord wanted to buy me out of the loft in which I’d lived for 24 years, and it took about a year for us to come to terms,” explains Puryear, who began looking at places upstate with a realtor. “When we drove into the driveway of this place—I was with my brother—I felt that this could work,” he says. “There was something about the total package that just seemed right, and it had an outbuilding large enough to be my workshop.” Located on Longyear Road, a quiet, dead-end street paralleling Route 28, the 1870 farmhouse was the original homestead of the Longyear farm, which covered much of the Shokan area back in the day. “It was clearly a lovely little house originally, but over the years, with additions, it got muddled,” says Puryear. “Of course, that’s what happens to old houses, until someone like me comes along and straightens things out again.” The two-story house is small, about 1,200 square feet, with three bedrooms and two baths. It sits on two acres and has four separate outbuildings of various ages, with the wood-storage shed possibly being original. The previous owner collected antique farm equipment. The 24’ x 36’ structure Puryear has converted into a heated and insulated showcase of a workshop was added in the ’80s, although its rough-hewn pine board and batten siding matches the older buildings on the property. “Michael bought the house. But I did get to see it before he closed,” says Carroll. “He’s very particular about his home, so I knew it would be great. Also, he’s superhandy, so he could easily visualize how much he could do to open it up.” A Craftsman’s Renovation “When I bought the house, it was in close to move-in condition, but there were acoustic tiles on the ceiling, a strange hall to nowhere, and lots of small rooms,” says Puryear. “To create this open space downstairs, I took down supporting walls and put in beams. Note there aren’t any strange lumps in the ceiling.That’s because I inserted the beams into the joists. That’s not a beginner’s renovation.”

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Who says there’s not enough room to swing a cat in here? Jack and Carroll.

The craftsman also laid bluestone for the entrance floor, and wheat-colored bamboo plank flooring elsewhere. Carroll chose the dark jewel-toned paint for the walls. Upgrading the carpentry seen and unseen throughout, Puryear fashioned the decorative downstairs window sills from exotic Indonesian lace wood. “They look good, but it turns out I’m highly allergic to lace wood,” laughs Puryear, who sliced through 40 percent of his trachea in a freak shop accident four years ago. He made a full recovery. The house had an existing UV light water purification and filtration system, but it wasn’t operational; Puryear fixed it. Eventually, they added a compact Munchkin high-efficiency boiler and a fine Rais woodstove, made in Denmark. Spray-foam insulation in the basement and between the walls further enhanced the comfort and thermal efficiency of the farmhouse. All the appliances were replaced, as was the entire septic system. “That’s one advantage of living in the watershed. The city of New York reimbursed us for safely upgrading our septic; it’s a great deal, it didn’t cost us anything, and our neighbors on both sides did it too,” explains Carroll. Puryear made almost all of the furniture in their home. Clean-lined and substantial, it possesses a resonance that underscores the sanctuary vibe of the no-chaos-allowed residence. “To me, good design is all about how it is experienced,” he says. “There’s a lot of furniture available these days that’s attractive but poorly made. My pieces all have heirloom potential. I use traditional joinery techniques, because they last—that’s how you make a piece of wood furniture that stands the test of time.” Puryear’s aesthetic pays homage to both Shaker and Scandinavian design. He also combines curved elements with planar surfaces and contrasting wood colors and textures. He’s profoundly influenced by the Japanese concept of shibui, which translates as simple elegance, objects of which one never tires because of the artful balance of line with textural complexity. After eight years and three major phases, upgrading the farmhouse presently takes a backseat to both Puryear’s and Carroll’s careers. Puryear’s completing a dramatic and whimsical chess bench for a repeat client. Carroll, a graduate of New York University’s philanthropy and fundraising certification program, recently attended a conference examining ways in which computer games might be used to better serve humanity. But continuing to fix up the farmhouse is always a priority. “We’re in the process of gut renovating the upstairs bathroom,” says Puryear. “Then we’ll probably fix up the front porch, which might become Nicole’s new office, and rip off the vinyl siding ... but it all depends on how much work I have, and the cash flow, too, of course.” Puryear currently has a show of his furniture on display at Gallery Naga in Boston, although most of his sales come through direct referrals. “I make very fine furniture for a discerning client, and to make things the way I do takes a lot of time, plus the expensive materials. Even the very wealthy are being careful about spending money right now,” says Puryear, who anticipates sales will continue to pick up as people begin to invest with confidence in their surroundings again. “I don’t think things will really fall apart. We’re just in a time of extreme change. I have faith in humanity and in America,” says Puryear. “Nicole and I like to live small and think big.”

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The Garden

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Trickles Are Better than Sprinkles and Other Advice on Watering Your Plants By Michelle Sutton Photographs by Larry Decker

S

ometimes Hollywood depictions of gardeners are quite comical. In The Next Best Thing, an otherwise forgettable Madonna movie, ingrained in my memory is Rupert Everett, playing a gardener in arid California, waving a watering nozzle in the remote vicinity of some shrubs, barely misting them—in other words, watering the air. If I was hired as a consultant for horticultural accuracy in a movie (nice fantasy), I’d have our heroine depicted filling an irrigation bag, the kind that’s designed to hold 20 gallons of water and slowly release it over the root system of a newly planted tree. Now that would be sexy, and educational! The practice of watering plants seems like it should be pretty simple, but there are some simple techniques that make a big difference. From my own trials and errors, I have some thoughts to share along with those of my colleague Allyson Levy, who with her husband Scott Serrano owns Hortus Conclusus in Stone Ridge. They are garden designers, horticulturists, and educators who regularly open their extensive gardens to the public.

Newly planted stuff needs more localized water. You will frequently encounter the guideline that plants need one to two inches of water provided weekly by some combination of rainfall and hand watering. That is great for established plant material (trees and shrubs are not distinct from plants; they are types of plants). But let’s say, for example, you bought a shrub or tree in a black plastic container from a nursery or garden center. It is growing in a peat mix in the container; you remove the “root ball” and plant it in the earth. For the first season, until the plant’s roots start to explore the surrounding soil environment, the plant has to get all its water needs met from the existing little ball of roots. And it doesn’t help that peat moss can be hydrophobic, especially if the mix has thoroughly dried out. I have seen relatively rainmoist landscapes in which the one newly planted addition is stubbornly dry and wilting. For these newcomers, Allyson Levy suggests gently teasing apart the existing roots to encourage them to explore their new soil environment, making it easier for them to come in contact with water. 8/13 chronogram home 37


Left: A trickle of water for several hours or more works well for tree root systems. Right: Newly planted things need extra vigilant watering attention.

Saturation of the root ball is best achieved by deep soaking, as with irrigation bags as described above, which can be mail-ordered or found in garden centers. Levy says, “For a low-tech, inexpensive way to deliver water over an extended period of time, drill two holes (1/16- to 1/8-inch) on one side of a five-gallon bucket. Place the bucket near the tree trunk or shrub canes with the holes on the trunk side, so as to deliver water most efficiently as the bucket slowly dribbles water to the root system.” Alternatively, you can put an open-ended hose on the surface and let it trickle for a couple of hours (say, for a newly planted shrub) or half a day or more (say, for an established tree). Or you can relax into a hand-watering session with the good ol’ backtrack. Be they newer additions or not, when I water, I go to plant #1, then move on to plants #2 and #3, then double back to give #1 more water, and so on, paying multiple visits to each plant. This gives the water a chance to really infiltrate the root ball—not just run off into surrounding soil. Levy brings up another option: “If you’re too busy to stand around with a hose,” she says, “timers and drip irrigation are great tools for vegetable and perennial plantings. Many mail-order companies offer inexpensive starter kits. The beauty of drip irrigation is that it delivers water right to the plants. For those with big gardens, different watering zones can be established. There are even some more elaborate systems that are rain sensitive and will not go off if it has recently rained.” Established trees and shrubs need watering during extended dry times. I pay extra attention to newly planted trees and shrubs for the first three years (as that’s how long it takes most to successfully survive transplant 38 home ChronograM 8/13

shock and start to establish). Then they are pretty much on their own— unless it is a crazy dry summer, and either the plant is showing symptoms of water stress, like pale or wilting leaves, or I can simply see how dreadfully dry the soil is, or I just want to ensure the plant’s long-term health. Levy says, “Often when plants show signs of drought stress, large sections of the plant may already be dying.” And it’s not uncommon for the effects of this summer’s drought stress to show up next summer. For established shade trees and other woody plants that you value, consider the open-ended hose slow trickle for a day a week during drought times. Keeping plants mulched helps a lot. Another way to protect those established trees and shrubs—and all plant material—from water stress is to use mulches of various kinds. My vegetable garden gets mulched with straw; my landscape at home is mulched with on-site leaves and some pine bark nuggets (they are so nice and light to carry); my shade garden plants are effectively mulched by moss (I embrace it); even my container plants get a light mulch of pine bark on the surface of the potting mix. Besides moisture retention, providing mulched areas around trees keeps lawn mower and foot traffic off tree roots and protects tree trunks from mechanical damage from mowers and weed whackers. Water less frequently but more deeply. Thorough wetting of the soil done less often does more good for plant roots than frequent, shallow watering. More water actually percolates to roots, and it encourages roots to explore a greater volume of soil.


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Water is the best fertilizer. Years ago, I caught myself in a fallacy. Examining a burning bush hedge that was looking pale, I immediately jumped to “must need fertilizer.” But on reflection, I realized that water stress could produce the same paleness. I did a little experiment on my client’s hedge, whereby one half I fertilized and watered deeply, and the other half I watered deeply but did not fertilize. The latter greened up just as nicely. So much of the magical greening that people attribute to fertilizer is really courtesy of the attentive watering that accompanies it. Indeed, most fertilizers are salt based and can contribute to plant root desiccation. So try “fertilizing” with deep watering first. For home gardeners, sprinklers are only for turf (if that). Cornell University Turf Specialist Dr. Frank Rossi writes about watering lawns on the Cornell Gardening site: “Most lawns in NewYork rarely need watering, except possibly for a few weeks in summer. Foregoing watering during these weeks does not mean you can’t still maintain a healthy turf. It is normal for cool-season grasses to experience ‘summer dormancy’ in response to lack of moisture. Studies show that as little as 1/4 inch of water over a three-week period can be enough to keep the sod from drying. Under all but the most severe conditions, it is better to avoid lawn watering, especially if your watering system isn’t precise.Too much or too little supplemental water can weaken plants, making them more susceptible to pest problems and less likely to recover when cool, moist conditions return.” Resources Hortus Conclusus LLC Hortus.biz Cornell Gardening Gardening.cornell.edu

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Home & Garden Events JAMIE FINE

The reflecting pool overlooking the perennial gardens at the Vanderbilt Estate in Hyde Park.

“Art of the Garden” at Barrett Art Center

Woodstock-New Paltz Art and Crafts Fair

July 13-August 14, Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie Featuring work submitted by local artists year, this exhibit at Barrett Art Center is displaying two- and three-dimensional artwork in a garden theme. April Hubbard and Yve Cook are two of the artists featured, displaying two very different kinds of artwork. Hubbard’s piece is a gorgeous sepia photograph of a flower, while Cook’s painting looks like more like a flower’s tie-dyed negative. Created in this variety of styles and mediums, this exhibit is attempting to highlight the possibility of gardening in an urban setting. (845) 471-2550; Barrettartcenter.org

August 31-September 2, Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz This fair provides an opportunity to interact with and purchase wares from local artisans and craftspeople. Also held during Memorial Day weekend, the 32-year-old event has become a regional staple. The fair, which had over 230 juried vendors at its last running, features crafts and artwork of all stripes along with food and live music. (845) 246-3414; Quailhollow.com

This Heirloom Life with the Fabulous Beekman Boys August 17, Church of St. John in theWilderness, Copake Falls The small town of Copake Falls is set to be the scene of a talk by Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell, aka The Fabulous Beekman Boys of reality TV show fame. The couple’s show, which is carried on the Cooking Channel, documents their life in rural Sharon Springs, an hour west of Albany, where they raise animals and cook food, having moved there from New York City. In the talk, Kilmer-Purcell and Ridge will discuss heirloom gardening, rural life, and good food. (518) 966-2730; Beekmanboys.eventbrite.com

Vanderbilt Garden Tour August 18,Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Park, Hyde Park Once the personal refuge of railroad tycoon Frederick W. Vanderbilt and his family, the gardens of his estate have now long-since been open to the public. On August 18, volunteer interpreters will lead a guided tour of the garden, focusing on its original intent and the restoration efforts of the Vanderbilt Garden Association. The tour will specifically showcase the renovation of the garden’s “Cherry Walk” and the replanting of the rose garden terraces. (845) 229-6432; Vanderbiltgarden.org

Rondout Waterfront Walking Tour August 31, departing from Heritage AreaVisitors Center, Kingston Beginning as a Dutch fort in the 1600s, incorporated as a town in 1849, and merging with the town of Kingston to its north in 1872, the Rondout district has had a long and complex history. The Friends of Historic Kingston walking tour attempts to familiarize you with the characters of the past who built the cast-iron buildings, towering churches, and waterfront docks that make up the district as it stands today. (845) 339-0720; Fohk.org

Beacon Flea Market Sundays through October 27, Beacon Despite being in only its third year, the Beacon Flea Market has already become an important venue for locals to bargain over goods. Begun as a collaboration between two Beacon residents who wanted to rid their homes of clutter, the flea market still has a distinctly community-based feel. Beacon vendors hawk their wares at a discount, and while artwork and collectables are also sold, many of the products are similar to what might be found at a yard sale. In the past week, everything from original comic book art to goods benefiting Safe Haven animal shelter were to be found at the market. (845) 202-0094; Beaconflea.blogspot.com 8/13 chronogram home 43


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Money & Investing

The Living Return

Why Investing Local Is Invaluable By Jennifer Gutman

I

n 1999, when Judy Wicks, the oft-cited “mother of localism,” took all of the money through the local food industry. Following Paul Newman’s axiom, “In life we need she inherited out of the stock market and invested it in her local community, to be a little like the farmer who puts back into the soil what he takes out,” the slow friends experienced with money management thought she was crazy. Though money movement works to rebuild the economy in pursuit of solutions to questions she first tried using socially responsible investing vehicles that screened out ethically like, “What would the world be like if we invested 50 percent of our assets within problematic industries—weapons, big oil, animal testing—she soon realized that that 50 miles of where we live?” “What if there were a new generation of companies that wasn’t enough. “I didn’t want to invest in the stock market at all,” says Wicks. “No gave away 50 percent of their profits?” “What if there was 50 percent more organic publicly traded company fit the bill. By law, [corporations] have to make decisions in matter in our soil 50 years from now?” The Slow Money organization has invested the best interest of their stockholders instead of other stakeholders.” Though Wicks more than $30 million in 220 small food enterprises around the US since 2010. Slow was advised against taking all of her money out of the stock market—since she’d get Money offers different opportunities to get involved, ranging from joining a local a smaller return—she ultimately outperformed the market (after it crashed in 2002) chapter or investment club to making a small donation using their soon-to-be-released with a locked-in 5 percent return rate. Though considered crowdfunding platform, Gatheround. "We build self-reliant low in 1999, a 5 percent return is now on the high-end At this year’s BALLE conference, Jenny Kassan, CEO systems by investing in for local investments (a common return these days is less of California-based Cutting Edge Capital, presented on than 2 percent). The unpredictable fluctuations of the local communities. Then we investment crowdfunding, or the ability for local businesses to stock market is one of the reasons why Wicks recommends acquire investors through in-state public offerings. (BALLE, investing locally. “When you’re investing in the stock get the living return of the or Business Alliance for Local Living Economies, is a network community’s wealth." market, there’s always a chance you’ll lose money.” And of around 30,000 local independent businesses in the US with the instability of the global financial system, Wicks and Canada that Judy Wicks cofounded.) Crowdfunding is —JUDY WICKS adds, it’s a good chance. a derivation of crowdsourcing, where individuals can reach But the world of investing does not always have to revolve around dollar signs, and financial goals through small contributions from many parties (think Kickstarter). financial security isn’t the only reason why Wicks has made it her life’s work to nurture Another new group investing prospect that was discussed at the 2013 BALLE and support local buying (a venture that she details in her book that was published last conference is online pooling. Francisco Cervera explained the origins and potential March, Good Morning, Beautiful Business:The Unexpected Journey of an Activist Entrepreneur of the online eMoneyPool, which he founded with his brother Luis. Investment pools and Local Economy Pioneer). “When we shop at local stores and invest in local banks and are similar to crowdfunding, as they both require a collective effort. Pooling involves a financial institutions, we’re keeping capital circulating within our own community,” network of individuals who put money into a common fund to create a lump sum that goes Wicks says. “When we shop at chain stores or bank with large banks or invest in the to a different member every month, which can help finance projects or developments. stock market, we’re taking capital out of our communities—capital that’s needed to Like other burgeoning economic models on the web—such as Wholeshare, an online grow our local economy.” Investing in local businesses, Wicks notes, results in a living local food group-purchasing platform—the Internet makes eMoneyPool an accessible, return—the benefits of living in a healthier and more sustainable community. “We efficient, and easy-to-use tool. Yet another innovative investing model presented at this build those self-reliant systems by investing in local communities. Then we get the year’s BALLE conference is Credibles (a portmanteau of “credit” and “edible”), a model living return of the community’s wealth—local food system, local energy system, at the nexus of the slow food and slow money movements.The way it works is, local food locally produced clothing. You eliminate imports by going to companies that support businesses use lump sums that are paid by customers in advance to fund development, local businesses and families—buy supplies locally, hire local lawyers, insurance and then the customers can cash in on their credit overtime, when they want to buy food companies. It’s the multiplier effect—when you buy locally, money for the most part from the restaurant or food retailer. stays in the community.” And, Wicks notes, it all begins with responsible investing In addition to new online-based local investing vehicles, there are also homegrown, decisions. “You need to invest locally in order to capitalize the new businesses that are hyperlocal networks specific to every community, such as the Hudson Valley’s brandneeded to build local self-reliance,” she says. new Berkshire-Columbia Investment Network.The network, which consists of five core Okay—so local investing is important. Really important, it turns out, if there’s any group members who held their first official meeting on July 10 in Great Barrington, is chance for a large-scale reconstruction of the struggling economic landscape. But how based on the model of Local Investment Opportunity Networks, which connects local do you go about it? What are the ways that we can best contribute to the local economy investors with local businesses that need loans. “Local businesses present to a group and still feel confident that our money is safe? of investors,” says Christopher Schaefer, one of the organizing group members of the When Wicks was first establishing her groundbreaking Philadelphia restaurant, the Berkshire-Columbia Investment Network. “And then individual investors decide and White Dog Café—known as one of the pioneers of the local food movement—she work out the terms of investment—number of years, interest rate, if it’ll be a loan or an turned to more traditional local financial vehicles, like local banks, credit unions, and equity investment.” Before businesses can present at a meeting, Schaefer explains, they the Reinvestment Fund in Philadelphia. Local reinvestment funds work to revitalize are asked to go through a small-business development center in Pittsfield or Albany. low-income communities by focusing on socially and environmentally responsible “That way we at least know that the businesspeople have put in due diligence and have development, like affordable housing, schools, local farms, small-scale food developed a plan and have financial projections,” says Schafer. “I think that the main enterprises, sustainable energy, manufacturing, and locally owned retailers. There are concern that people have that are interested in putting money to work locally as a way also several national institutions that invest in locally owned businesses, such as RSF of building up a sustainable economy is the safety question.” By making sure these small Social Finance and Calvert Community Capital. businesses have a secure plan, there’s less risk for investors who attend the BerkshireAccess to local funding and investment vehicles varies depending on the Columbia Investment Network meetings, and sessions can be more productive. community, though, and not all small towns have established reinvestment funds or Many of the new models for local investing create an image for themselves as a kind credit unions. The number of innovative alternatives that have developed in recent of foil to the manic world of Wall Street—where money is fast, constant, out of control, years is a testament to the growing demand for and interest in a more resilient, locally and largely abstract. Opportunities to invest locally are also opportunities for people oriented economic model. to reclaim the idea of value. Value is not a concept based only in money. Truly valuable One such development is the slow money movement—an outgrowth of the slow things in life—health, well-being, community—are often priceless. Which means the food movement. The main avenue of contributing to the community in this model is values that fuel locally oriented models of investing are, in fact, invaluable. 8/13 ChronograM money & investing 45


Kids & Family

Society’s Child

Protesting with Mom & Pop

By Robert Burke Warren Photos by Scott Langley

H

ow did your parents meet?” “Throwing their blood on the pillars of the Pentagon to protest US funding of the Colombian military.” That’s an exchange three-year-old Kira and six-year-old Sasha, of Ghent, will have with their friends someday. Their parents, Sheila and Scott Langley, first laid eyes on each other at a 2002 protest, and were arrested together. Scott later proposed in a note sent through the bars of the Alexandria, Virginia, jail. The Langleys eventually welcomed Sasha and Kira, but rather than slack off protesting, they’ve kept pressure on the government, albeit in less dramatic form. Like many couples, parenthood amplified their desire to stand up and speak out, but unlike most, they decided to make it a family affair; these days, they align with the Catholic Worker Movement, opposing the Guantánamo Bay detention center and the death penalty, and they always bring the kids to demonstrations. For the Langleys and other area families, activism is an integral part of teaching kids about their connection to the rest of the world, an opportunity to enable offspring to see beyond their bubble and feel engaged. Fortunately—or unfortunately—opportunities abound to join protests in the Hudson Valley and the Capital Region, and regardless of detractors who question whether it’s “a place for a child,” families are packing up, raising fists, and making a ruckus. “As soon as you become a parent,” Sheila Langley says, “all you want to do

46 kids & family ChronograM 8/13

is protect your child, at any cost. But at the same time, you open up to this universal connection to all parents.You want to withdraw, but at the same time you feel you have so much more of an awesome responsibility. When we stand outside the White House, protesting Guantánamo, we tell the girls, ‘Obama can see us. He sees that we don’t agree with this policy, we want to go on record, so the men in Guantánamo, and their families, can know someone cares.” Boiceville’s Christina Himberger, a devoted member of Catskill Mountainkeeper, which advocates for sustainable development and natural resource protection, feels similarly. “I work against fracking for my kids,” she says. “But I also do it for everybody else’s kids, [Dick] Cheney’s grandchildren. It’s important for everybody.” She recently took 13-year-old daughter Grace and 14-year-old son Milo (and some friends) to an antifracking rally in Albany, a first-time experience for the family. “Over 2,500 people [including Natalie Merchant and Debra Winger] showed,” she says, “so my kids thought, ‘Okay, Mom’s not crazy, she’s not the only one who thinks about this.’ Plus, it gave them a much broader perspective on the issue. And I thought they were at a level of maturity where they could get important things out of it, and not just see it through me. When it comes to the environment, climate change, water rights, food security, corporate responsibility—these are areas they’re going to be dealing with in their lifetimes.”


Opposite: Sasha Langely and friends handing out pamphlets outside the Department of Justice on January 11, 2013. Above: Children delivering messages of peace to the Afghanistan Embassy in Washington, DC, on December 29, 2008.

New Paltz singer-songwriter Tim Hunter had curtailed protesting since becoming a father of four, but a recent anti-Monsanto march at New Paltz’s Peace Park seemed the perfect opportunity to introduce his kids Wynne, eight, Theo, six, Moses, five, and Beatrice, four, to dissent. “We’re pretty serious about Monsanto,” he says. “We’re vegetarians, and we grow our own vegetables. At the Peace Park I got a chance to play my song about Monsanto’s corn seed, a growth-modified organism they won’t test on human beings. It’s called ‘Bad Seed’: ‘He was a bad, bad seed / Corrupting the other weeds / And he was born of greed / Everyone agreed he was a bad bad seed.’ It was the first time my kids saw me play in public.” “It was a peaceful protest,” he says. “No angry chants. The kids loved it, and sang along with everybody. It’s a good way for them to know it’s disturbing to me that merely for profit we’d be toying with the machinery of creation, with as-yet-untold consequences. It’s a ridiculous bargain.” Does he think his kids understand the gist of his concern? “Your specific protest doesn’t matter,” he asserts. “All you want is for your kids to see you taking positive action. And they need to see you enjoying it, having a good time.” Enjoying the process of activism is important to all of these parents because, frankly, Monsanto’s GMOs continue infiltrating the food supply, the fracking threat persists (in the Hudson Valley and elsewhere), Guantánamo remains open, and executions continue. Scott Langley knows he’s signed up for a long road with his family, with potentially no payoff in his lifetime. But, like the Himbergers and the Hunters, he takes the long view. “Last night,” he says, “there was a stay of execution for a mentally disabled man on death row in Georgia.We celebrated. It was an opportunity to say to the kids, ‘This is an example of something that worked, a small victory.’ That’s the ‘bigger picture’ approach. My main hope is, our daughters develop a sense of compassion for the world and all the different people in it, no matter where those people live, the color of their skin, or what they’ve done.” “We’re not just working for the world we want,” says Sheila, “we are actively creating the world we want. We want our kids to feel capable of making change, but we also raise them to yearn for change.” “They have to see it’s a process,”Tim says. “It’s a journey, not a destination; a process, not an outcome. We’re in such a pabulum moment in human culture; reality TV, instant gratification, people don’t want to think long term because they’re afraid for their future. They just want something instantly gratifying. We have no TV in the house, and I take the kids to community-supportedagriculture farms, where people are doing good things, building a good world around themselves.” Christina Himberger realizes she’s just at the beginning, too. “Fracking is still not my kids’ issue,” she says, “but part of my goal is to let them know I expect them to educate themselves on issues, to look at both sides, as I did when I went alone to hearings in Albany; I heard environmentalists, energy company lobbyists, chamber of commerce members, realtors, all testifying to the environmental committee. It wasn’t subjective. I’ve tried to convey that they need to figure out where they stand as human beings. And if sowing these seeds makes them think beyond themselves, that’s good.”

S atu rday

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new Paltz FAll 2013 Classes offered in the visual arts, theatre and music for K-12. Classes start on September 21 and run for 8 weeks. Registration opens June 3. Scholarships are available. For course descriptions and registration information, go to: www.newpaltz.edu/sal 845.257.3850 SaturdayArtsLab@newpaltz.edu S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y O F N E W Y O R K

8/13 ChronograM kids & Family 47


Kids & Family

Calculus of Calm An Interview with Lawrence Carroll by Anne Pyburn Craig

A

s a young teacher in New South Wales in the 1980s, Lawrence Carroll threw his extracurricular energies into helping people master the Tasman Sea, co-founding the Australian School Surfing Association, teaching lifesaving along with mathematics. That was before he went through the hell of losing a first love and thence to India, Bali, and Europe. Twenty years of study brought him to long sessions of stillness, to hundred-mile runs, and then to the Berkshires, where he found his path bringing him back again to teaching high school math. Coming back into the third-millennium classroom in 2006 was a shock, like returning to one’s once-bucolic hometown and finding it choked and bustling. Pressure on teachers and kids had increased exponentially. Everybody was plugged in, wired for sound, and pulled in a million directions at once: top-down initiatives like No Child Left Behind, adversarial policies like zero tolerance, and warp-speed social lives buzzing in their brains. Not the ideal setting for sharing the joys of higher mathematics. Bringing meditation to school, Carroll found that many kids dove into the silence like happy otters and the whole room changed. Since 2009, he’s been teaching other teachers at the Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and Averill Park, New York, school districts, life coaching teachers and teens, and refining his Silence to Greatness and Sink and Think programs. In 2011 he was nominated for a Distinctive Educator of the Berkshires award. “It began as a desperate and selfish need to help myself deal with my students’ lack of respect and motivation,” he writes in the abstract of “The Phenomenology of Silence,” the presentation he’ll be making to an Oxford Round Table. “Was my vision to make a valuable contribution to the lives of teenagers a pipe dream?” Turned out he just needed to entice them into surfing another ocean. Now, Carroll is convinced that widespread introduction of meditation techniques can have as transformative an effect on education as technology, and it looks like the man may have caught quite a wave. What was it like coming back to the classroom after two decades away? When I first returned to education in 2006, I naively thought that what I had learned in my two decades of world travel and spiritual search would be readily transferable to the kids. I assumed they’d be polite, tolerant, interested, and diligent. I was shocked at how these standards and values were missing. I spent the first two years  of teaching  reflecting and experimenting with pedagogical strategies.The classroom became my laboratory.When I introduced stress management through silence and reflection, everything changed. Stress started to dissolve, creating a happier and more productive classroom. The responses I was getting from teachers, parents, and students proved that I was on the right track.  The effects were so significant that I’m now devoting myself entirely to consulting, trying to go to the heart of the problem. Safety and stress mitigation in the classroom is the foundation for successful learning; the more teachers, parents, and students I can reach the better.  48 kids & family ChronograM 8/13

The first in your series of workshops for educators is about creating safe classrooms by lessening stress. What are some of the stress factors for students and teachers, in Australia and in the US? How did it get this bad? Stress is part of any group where competitiveness, survival, and hierarchy exist, and many aren’t conscious of how predominant stress is and the toll it takes on our health, effectiveness, and happiness. In this day and age, stress comes from a wide range of sources: poor diet, lack of sleep, overstimulation from cell phones and computers, relationships, pressures to do well at school/work, lack of downtime, financial worry, and more. These pressures are in both countries, although kids and teachers in Australia identify with an easygoing image. Teachers and students here in the United States are under enormous stress. Primary indicators reveal that the educational system in the United States is failing in its mission. Academic performance in the US has fallen from second place in the world in the 1950s to 17th place in 2012. The attrition rate of new teachers within the first five years is nearly 50 percent and growing, resulting in an acute shortage of experienced educators. I believe this is in great part attributable to stress.  The introduction of standardized rubrics and nationwide initiatives like No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top hasn’t touched root causes. They often exacerbate the problems they seek to remedy. Many people—administrators, teachers, parents, students—feel disempowered to meaningfully reform their individual and collective lives. Meanwhile, one of the current evaluation standards by which a teacher’s performance is measured here in the US is to create an environment of safety where students are willing to take academic risks. This is a true art form. And unless  a teacher can manage his or her own stress, it’s unlikely that teacher will enable students to feel safe in their presence. How do you get a room full of adolescents to invest themselves fully in meditating? At the beginning of the year, my priority is for them to think, “This guy’s different; I want to know more.” For any teacher, the first four days with the students are critical. If you rush into the curriculum, they’ll tune out on day one and it takes a lot to get them back. So I ask students if they’d like to come into my class and simply do nothing. Rarely does anyone object! Then I qualify what “nothing” means and what it does for their brains, their thinking, their experience of stress, and more. After that, they are very curious.  There’s a negative stigma around daydreaming or “spacing out.” But, unless a student can turn inward, the teacher cannot educe their natural curiosity, intelligence, and creative capacities. “Educe” means to bring out from within, and it is actually the root of the word “educate.” Real learning happens when we reflect inwardly and use metacognition. Students see that effort can replace ability. This inward-to-outward process goes against the conventional understanding of teaching, but it works. We might have become more willing to ask, “Okay, how do we reach students and build a relationship where they buy into the learning process?


What’s in it for them?” than teachers were in earlier eras. But the teacher is still assumed to have all the knowledge, and that’s usually unchallenged. It’s a powerful authoritarian position. And if there’s any attention deficit, no matter how well you teach, they can’t readily absorb the information you do have. When you allow a person’s innate intelligence to unfold and assess what you’re offering, the interaction becomes very satisfying to the teacher and infinitely more interesting to the students. Even if a student is confused, he or she has control over the fear. This gives them the sense of ease and space to learn. And when you create that intentional space, kids who are slow to answer and need more time feel safe to take the time needed to respond.When the class holds still for just 30 to 40 seconds, academic risk taking improves. Confidence builds in each student because he or she realizes, “It’s in there, it just takes me time to get it out!”  Real thinking is a slow-time process, not an assembly line. And higher-order thinking and learning are impossible if students and teachers don’t feel safe. When survival mode kicks in, the blood flows from the brain into the larger muscles. I tell the kids that when they’re constantly plugged in, agitated, and worked up—some of them sleep with their cell phones on—they’re soaking their organs in adrenalin. The process itself is a powerful ally. It develops the awareness of one’s own thinking process, enables students to identify what they are thinking, the fears and challenges blocking them, and how to move forward.Teens love that feeling. Some say it’s as refreshing as waking up in the morning. So I begin every class with a meditation. I guide the meditations for about one month, and we discuss their experiences. Soon, 90 to 100 percent of the class looks forward to that experience as the best part of their lesson—for some, it’s the best part of their day. The fact that they look forward to it means something. They like that it’s happening. I have interviewed my students over the past three years and recorded what happens for them.What they say is often beautiful and nuanced. Such as? “When I come in to the classroom, I can relax; I know kids aren’t going to be nasty.” And, “I can’t remember anyone swearing in this class.”There’s a natural morality that arises when kids are given space to be alone, quiet, unpressured.When they know they won’t be interfered with, something magic happens. They know managing stress is real and not just intellectual. It changes their attitude and behavior. I’ve had kids come up to me and say meditation stopped them getting into a fight. They relax, breath deep, regroup, and make an unexpected choice— walk away! Teens are told, “No,” “Don’t, “You shouldn’t...” somewhere around 400 to 500 times a day. When they’re not being admonished and limited, it’s a serious breath of fresh air. Meditation is kind of like zero in the number system, completely neutral. It creates a natural updraft toward positivity. Negativity and aggression are rendered impotent. When did you realize you were onto something that could be replicated by other teachers and implemented on a broader scale?  Over the past four years, I’ve introduced hundreds of both new and experienced teachers to my work in workshops and presentations. It began with teachers wanting to implement my techniques in their classes. I was delighted to be able to observe them teach, offer them guided meditation audios and instructions, demonstrate my approach in their own classes, and coach them one on one. I’m thrilled by their response and willingness to try the techniques in their schools. People are ready to experiment with meditation and other stress-relieving techniques, even though they may have little experience. I’ve become confident that the way I’m introducing it to people is effective. I also make myself available to support teachers who need more coaching for themselves or their classes. In 2009, I also became a Professional Certified Life Coach.

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Has there been any resistance from people who felt you were pushing religion? Many meditation processes are attached to philosophies that have their roots in religion. At first I wondered if what I was teaching would threaten some people’s religious sentiments, so I was braced for that kind of push-back, but it never came. The reason you meditate is very personal. It’s also universal— everyone can do it. Silence and stillness are natural, and in mastering the basic technique, you gain a wonderful self-management tool that can be applied in every aspect of your life. 8/13 ChronograM kids & Family 49


NURTURE

Bring your newborn, toddler, or preschooler to one of our fun-filled classes. Explore musical play, child-friendly instruments, songbooks, and CDs that you use at home. And find out how nurturing our research-based music and movement program can be.

AUGUST KIDS & FAMILY LISTINGS Young People’s Concert Kick off your shoes and dance around, family style. The Young People’s Concert, a long-time summer tradition in Maverick’s barnstyle concert hall, hosts Woodstock legend singer-songwriter Marc Black to entertain children and adults. Black, who won the American Library Association Award for Best Children’s Album, performs on August 3. Black plays celebratory songs about diversity

HIS INNER MUSICIAN

and changing the world with peace. Come sit cross-legged or dance around with friends and family for the last performance of

.

Maverick’s children’s concerts series. Woodstock. (845) 679-8217;

Find a class near you in the Hudson Valley:

WWW.MUSICTOGETHER.COM/HUDSONVALLEY

Summer Fun!

Outdoor Toys •| Science Kits • Butterfly Nets • Pool Toys

Maverickconcerts.org.

A Perfect Time to Clown Around Bard’s resident family circus and touring company presents three consecutive weekends of clowning around, from August 3 to 18. On August 3 and 4, Bindlestiff presents “Kinder Spiegel,” which will showcase sword swallowers, tightrope walkers, and jugglers. On August 10 and 11, Concrete Temple Theatre stars acclaimed Italian dancer Carlo Adinolfi in “Geppetto.” This theatrical comedy tells the tale of a poor Italian immigrant puppeteer who travels with his closest companions, two well-worn puppets. On August 17 and 18, European acrobatic theater group the Piccolini Trio performs “Circus in a Trunk.” The Spiegeltent is an authentic Belgian mirror tent that hosts music and cabaret all summer long.

THE PARENT TEACHER STORE

Annandale-on-Hudson. (845) 758-7900; Fishercenter.bard.edu.

63 North Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-1442 - www.parentteacherstore.com

Education Supplies for the Home & Classroom

Dive into Wonderland On August 8, Saugerties’s Fiberflame Studio invites children of all ages to grab their pixie dust for an afternoon of hands-on creativity. In this whimsical workshop, children create bird-size houses out of natural stone and twigs for fairies of their imagination. Folk storyteller Jill Olesker will tell interactive legends about fairies from all different cultural backgrounds. A tea party featuring fairy cupcakes, sparkly pink punch, and herbal iced tea will follow. The take-home creations

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are perfect to hang up in windows or the garden to bring protection and joy. Fiberflame Studio is an interactive walk-in studio with over 40 projects to choose from, such as paint-your-own-pottery, beading, and collaging. (845) 679-6132; Fiberflamestudio.com.

A Summer Classic: Bergers and Franks Sometimes there is magic in socks or awkward silences. On August 10, the Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck hosts magicians Derrin Berger and Frank Monaco. Eating magic for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, Berger and Manaco have been local magicians for a combination of 60 years. Combining humor and illusions, past performances have included marshmallows, socks, live animals, and audience participation. Part of the center’s family summer series, this will be the first time these magicians partake in a trick together

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on stage. (845) 876-1163; Centerforperformingarts.org.

Blue Ribbon County Fairs What’s a summer without cotton candy, bumper cars, and cupcakes? Throughout August, the county fairs of Ulster, Dutchess, and Columbia ensure that those sticky childhood memories stay intact. From July 30 to August 4, the Ulster County Fairgrounds hosts a farm animal petting zoo and an amusement park. Columbia’s fair offers a week full of entertainment ending with the 2013 Cupcake War. From August 20 to 25, the Dutchess County

www.codhill.com

Fair hosts rainforest rescue with Bixby’s, an interactive educational performance incorporating live tropical animals. (845) 255-1380;

Available at independent bookstores throughout the Hudson Valley

50 kids & family ChronograM 8/13

Ulstercountyfair.com. (518) 392-2121; Columbiafair.com. (845) 8764000; Dutchessfair.com.


ce Begins…

rship with Mount Saint Mary College. h Eighth Grade. tio.

Mountain LaureL Waldorf School

Christ-Centered Education. s and campus security.

l

Where Excellence Begins...

Come to our Open House Sunday, January 27 12pm-4pm Tuesday, January 29 9am-2pm

Can’t make our open house? Call 845-569-3494 for a private tour. • Unique learning partnership with Mount Saint Mary College.

• Pre Kindergarten through Eighth Grade. • Low teacher/Student Ratio.

here Excellence • Excellent Academics.Begins…

inspired learning

nique learning • 130partnership years dedicated towith Mount Saint Mary College. Christ-Centered re Kindergarten through Education. Eighth Grade. • Use of college amenities and ow Teacher/Student Ratio. campus security. xcellent Academics. 30 years dedicated to Christ-Centered Education. se of college amenities and campus security.

Call 845-569-3494 for a tour.

shop Dunn Dunn Memorial School emorialBishop School

On the Campus of he Campus of Mount Saint Mary College nt Saint Mary College idney Avenue burgh, NY 1255050 Gidney Avenue

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Newburgh, NY 12550 www.bdms.org

Come to our Open House Parent/child, nursery, Sunday, January 27 12pm-4pm Kindergarten through eighth grade Tuesday, January 29 9am-2pm Can’t make our open house? Call WWW.mountainlaurel.org 845-569-3494 for a privateneW tour. Paltz, nY 16 South cheStnut, 845 255 0033

8/13 ChronograM kids & Family 51


Mount Saint Mary College Newburgh, New York

Keelboat Sailing Certificate • September 13 Reiki 1 Certification • September 16 Intro to Metalsmithing - Ages 15 - Adult • September 18

Ukulele for Beginners • September 19 AutoCAD • September 23 Web Development • September 24 Real Estate Sales • September 24 Spanish Through Art – Level 1 • September 24 Owning & Operating a B & B • September 26 Italian Immersion Weekend • September 28 Writing Workshop Inspired by Nature • September 28 Home Staging • October 2 Personal Trainer • October 2 Celtic Civilizations • October 2 Etsy Series • October 3 Pen, Ink and Watercolor • October 10 Start Your Own Business • October 15 Pinterest, An Intro • October 21 Bring Your Best Recipe to Market • October 24 Ongoing: CASAC Fast Track BPI Certification

Now oNliNe! RN to BS in Nursing Advance your career potential with a degree from a leader in nurse education! Learn from experienced faculty in a flexible online format designed for working nurses

For more information:

www.msmc.edu/RNtoBS • 845-569-3750

The Natural Gourmet Cookery School For more than 20 years people around the world have turned to Natural Gourmet’s avocational public classes to learn the basics of

Continuing & Professional Education

healthy cooking. They come to the Chef’s Training Program to prepare for careers in the burgeoning Natural foods Industry.

For more details call 845-339-2025 or visit www.sunyulster.edu/ce

Celebrating the Past. Shaping the Future.

kellymillercooks Private Parties & Custom Cooking Instruction Hudson Valley New York City Phone: 203-858-5042 kellymillercooks@gmail.com www.kellymillercooks.com Kelly Anne Miller

Chef/Instructor Graduate, French Culinary Institute, NYC

Teaching You to Cook with the Bounty of our Hudson Valley!

Fall Workshop Series at the

Center for Metal Arts With the growing awareness of the effect that food has on health and well-being, there is a great demand for culinary professionals who can prepare food that is not only beautiful and delicious, but health-supportive as well. Our comprehensive Chef’s Training Program, the only one of its kind in the world, offers preparation for careers in health spas and restaurants, bakeries, private cooking, catering, teaching, consulting, food writing and a variety of entrepreneurial pursuits. Please browse our website to see how much we can offer you!

www.NaTuralGourmeTSChool.Com TelePhoNe: 212-645-5170 FaX: 212-989-1493 48 weST 21ST STreeT, New York, NY 10010 emaIl:INFo@NaTuralGourmeTSChool.Com 52 education ChronograM 8/13

Blacksmithing, repousse, foldforming, beginner & master classes in the metal arts

Register online at www.centerformetalarts.com More info: Facebook.com/CenterForMetalArts Open Saturdays 10-2 for Studio Tours at the 1890’s Icehouse, 44 Jayne Street, Florida, NY. (845) 651-7550


continuing education Carl Parris

An adult class at Hudson Valley Pottery & Moring Studio in Rhinebeck.

School’s Out, Learning’s In By Marie Solis

T

here are many things we’d rather not recall from our time in school. The cafeteria, study hall, changing for gym—some of these memories are best left inside crowded hallways and fluorescent-lit classrooms. However, one thing we often forget too easily is our capacity to learn. Not memorize, recite, or regurgitate, but learn in its most organic sense. Unfortunately, there are cases in which this kind of education never happens in high school or even college. We often become entangled in academia and can no longer remember what it’s like to have a true thirst for new ideas and skills. Though it may be buried under years of standardized tests and the stresses of adulthood, it’s still there and it’s never too late to quench it. Maybe you’ve realized you want to try singing outside your shower. Maybe you miss your ceramics class from sophomore year. Maybe you’d like to start gardening but don’t know where to begin. Across the Hudson Valley there are passionate people just waiting to be your new teacher. Learning to sing, make pottery, or grow an organic garden, they say, isn’t just good for your mind, but also your body and soul. So go out to do that thing you’ve always wanted to do. Let the learning begin. Glazed Over Sometimes there’s nothing more satisfying than getting your hands dirty—and then having a beautiful work of art to show for it. At Hudson Valley Pottery & Moring Studio in Rhinebeck, you’ll reap the rewards of clay-covered hands after just a few visits. The studio offers one-week and six-week sessions where you’ll learn throwing on the wheel, trimming, hand building, and decorating techniques. With 14 vibrant glazes to choose from and all of your tools included, all that’s left is firing up the kiln. In addition to instructional classes, students can practice their newfound skills during open studio hours. Taking advantage of these extra opportunities is key to honing your skills at the wheel, says owner Ann Moring. “You’re really working on your hand-eye coordination: Pottery is a physical thing, it’s three-dimensional,” she says. However, the very thing she says some students find challenging is what she finds calming about making pottery. “It’s very relaxing and satisfying to make something out of a wet piece of clay and then turn it into something functional. It’s rewarding

to make a cup or bowl you can use to drink your coffee or eat ice cream out of,” Moring adds. If you’re just looking to get your feet wet, or rather your hands, new adult students are eligible to sign up for a trial class. (845) 876-3190; Hudsonvalleypottery.com. Planting the Seed To learn about organic gardening, seed starting, and more, you’ll have to travel no farther than your own backyard. Jay Levine from Hudson Valley Backyard Co. can come to you, fully equipped to teach everything you need to know to start growing your own fruits and vegetables. The benefits of tending your own garden, Levine says, even surpasses the reward of fresh produce at your fingertips—though he admits the greens you grow will always taste better than the store-bought ones. “Organic gardening itself is a way to get you into the world and in your yard: It counteracts the fact we spend so much time in offices and not outside,” he says. Levine also teaches introductory classes to Thai, Vietnamese, Indian, and Chinese cuisine, though one of the most useful cooking classes he offers might just be Vegetables Kids Will Eat. “I take two approaches to the issue of getting kids to eat their vegetables: recipes where the children know they’re eating vegetables and recipes to hide the vegetables, such as squash pancakes. I surreptitiously fed it to my in-laws and then told them afterwards it had vegetables in it—they never knew,” laughs Levine. He continues, “If you can get your kids to want to eat vegetables then you’ll build a whole lifestyle around healthy eating.” So round up friends and family and schedule a lesson at your convenience. All supplies and ingredients are included in the cost and, as an added bonus, Levine lowers the price per person as groups get larger. (845) 876-7903; Hudsonvalleybackyardfarm.com. Rock the Boat Maybe you weren’t an angsty teenager dying to be in a garage band, but face it—there’s still a part of you that wishes you knew how to play the electric guitar. Ben Senterfit understands. At Creative Music Space in Red Hook, Senterfit can give you the music edge you always craved. “A lot of times as people get 8/13 ChronograM education 53


CREATE ART IN THE DIGITAL AGE

at Westchester Community College Center for the Digital Arts

• 3-credit Digital Arts • Non-credit Adult Arts Offerings • Non-credit Quickstart to software training • Day/evening general education • English as a Second Language • New Digital Filmmaking Program Located in the downtown arts district of the city of Peekskill, this Center offers five professional post-production studios dedicated to graphic design, digital imaging and illustration, digital filmmaking, animation and interactive design. Integrate technology into your portfolio and join a community of artists working in the digital age.

OPEN HOUSE DATES: August 8, 19 & 27 at 5:30-7:30 pm 914-606-7301 • www.sunywcc.edu/peekskill peekskill@sunywcc.edu Westchester Community College

Center for the Digital Arts Artist Lise Prown

www.sunywcc.edu/Peekskill

Woodstock day school

WATERSHED LEARNING CENTER

nursery through grade 12

the

BIRCH

WATERSHED LEARNING CENTER

SCHOOL

Call for a tour or a conversation. 845-246-3744 ext. 103

(

We still have some spaces available!

(

Early Childhood: Nursery School – Grade 1 Lower School: Grades 2 – 6 Upper School: Grades 7 – 12

woodstockdayschool.org 1430 Glasco Turnpike 1/4 mile East of Rte. 212 • Saugerties, NY 12477

• Progressive Education • Beautiful Campus • Dynamic, engaged faculty • Small class size • Cross-class buddies • Integrated learning • Media Arts • TV Station • Weather Station • Sports • Chinese & Latin • Suzuki music programs • Music Ensembles • Chorus • African Drumming & Dance • Graphic Arts • Community Service • College classes at Bard • Excellent College placement

education for life Woodstock Day School is accredited by the New York Association of Independent Schools (NYSAIS).

54 education ChronograM 8/13

the

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9 Vance Road, Rock Tavern, NY • www.TheBirchSchool.org • (845) 361-2267


The Silent Treatment With the fast-paced nature of everyday life, it can be difficult to find your inner peace. The monastics at Zen Mountain Monastery in Mount Tremper have the answer. Every month they offer an Introduction to Zen Training Retreat, a prerequisite for many of the monastery’s other retreats and programs. This month’s session is already full, but you can catch the next one on September 6 through 8. During this time, visitors adopt the monastic lifestyle: waking up at 4am every morning, meditating, chanting, silent work practice, and more. Ryushin Sensei, abbot of the monastery, says all of these things are important in beginning to understand Buddhist practices. “Buddhism is based on the willingness for each person to look deeply into their own experience. Mediation is central to that, but all of our practices give people an opportunity to see how

Situated on a 400-acre Biodynamic farm in New York’s Hudson Valley, Hawthorne Valley’s integrative Waldorf curriculum helps young men and women grow academically, artistically, and socially into the creative individuals needed in today’s complex world.

Day and Boarding Programs • Accepting Applications 518-672-7092 x 111 info@hawthornevalleyschool.org

Joy

© Christophe Testi

Trust

Community

WALDORF SCHOOL | www.hawthornevalleyschool.org 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | 518-672-7092 x 111

Nurture

In Full Swing Yes, dance trends have changed since the last time you were in school, but some styles are timeless—and swing dancing is certainly one of them.Though at Got2Lindy, which offers classes across the Hudson Valley, it’s about more than just dance. “The thing that is really different about our classes is that you don’t need a partner to attend, so it becomes a very social thing and it’s fun for everyone to learn together,” says Director Linda Freeman. Beginners can start out with Swing Foundations, a four-week session held on Monday evenings in Kingston or on Wednesday evenings in Highland. Swing dance parties take place the first Saturday every month, an event where dancers can come learn the basics at 7:30pm and then try out their new skills at a DJ dance party from 8 to 10:30pm. In addition to making new friends and learning new moves, Freeman says swing dancing has invaluable health benefits. “It’s great for your brain. And emotionally, it makes you feel good—you can’t swing dance without smiling. People come right from work from high stress jobs who are tired, but in the first few minutes they’re laughing, they’re moving, they’re having a great time,” she says. If you’re looking to try different kinds of partner dance, Hudson Valley West Community Dances teaches the Texas Two-Step on August 23 in addition to their swing dance class later the same evening, both at the Poughkeepsie Tennis Club. (845) 236-3939; Got2Lindy.com. Hudsonvalleydance.org.

Nurturing living connections... early childhood through grade 12

Parent & Child Classes Expectant Parents

Confidence

older, they have stories they grew up with—like a teacher who told them they had a bad voice or parents who wouldn’t give them lessons—and they carry that throughout their lives,” he says. Part of Senterfit’s mission is to help adults overcome these self-doubts. What once started out as a class called Singing for People Who Can’t Sing evolved into Creative Music Space’s current contemporary choir which now works on complex harmonies.You can join them in September, and Senterfit promises you too can sing. “It’s a transformative process for them to go back to their childhood and get them to realize they can do all of these things people told them they couldn’t do. It’s empowering. Music is good for your body, good for your soul,” he says.Year round Senterfit and his colleagues teach people guitar, saxophone, bass, drums, and more in private lessons. On the horizon is also a jamming ensemble and a comedy improv class. (845) 444-0607; Creativemusicspace.com. If you’re in the lower Mid-Hudson Valley, stop by Beacon Music Factory’s new location on Hanna Lane. Though their summer sessions are well underway—High on Rebellion (Women Who Rock) and Rock Camp ‘77 both of which will have a final performance on September 7 at the city’s waterfront park—there’s one more chance for you to get in on the action this season. Director Stephen Clair is hosting a one-week intensive this month from August 26 through 30. Starting August 5, you can check out fall classes which start in the second and third weeks of September. In addition to rock camps, there are group adult classes for ukelele, guitar, jazz ensemble, and more. Still not convinced you could ever be musically inclined? “I tell people all the time, all you need is the inclination. If you’ve got an inkling of a rock and roll heart, you’ll get somewhere good in these camps. And you’re likely to become hooked,” says Clair. (845) 202-3555; Beaconmusicfactory.com. Though both locations offer programs for kids, you can also bring your rising rock stars to the Paul Green Rock Academy in Woodstock. The fall season begins in mid October, and students can choose guitar, bass, drums, or keyboard as their primary instrument in addition to taking optional voice lessons on the side. In just a few months your whole family can be jamming together. Rockacademy.com.

Baby

Toddler

Pre-School

Now enrolling for September 2013!

307 Hungry Hollow Road Chestnut Ridge, NY 10977 845.356.2514 x326

www.gmws.org

8/13 ChronograM education 55


A remarkable, diverse community where the whole student thrives A College Preparatory School for boys grades 7-12 (day students) grades 9-12 & PG (boarding students) (845) 855-4825 • www.trinitypawling.org For more information or to arrange a tour, contact The Office of Admission (845) 855-4825 • www.trinitypawling.org

Come visit us! OPEN HOUSE Sat., Oct. 26 at 9 a.m.

260 Jay Street • Katonah, NY 10536 • 914.232.3161 admissions@harveyschool.org • www.harveyschool.org Harvey is a coeducational college preparatory school enrolling students in grades 6–12 for day and in grades 9–12 for five-day boarding.

SOUTH KENT SCHOOL

OPEN

HOUSE Monday, October 14th • 9am-1pm Visit campus, meet students and faculty, learn about our innovative academic programs and join us for lunch. Grades 9-12 & PG | Boarding & Day To RSVP or for more info contact admissions@southkentschool.org or (860) 927-3539 x201 40 Bulls Bridge Road, South Kent, CT 06785

www.southkentschool.org

56 education ChronograM 8/13

A

COMMITMENT

TO

CHARACTER


it is they use their mind and how they create the reality they experience—how they create harm or good in the world and take responsibility for that,” he says. If you’re looking for a milder introduction to Zen practices, the monastery also hosts a weekly Sunday morning program from 9am to 1pm. The itinerary includes a chanting and bowing service, beginning instruction of zazen, formal discourse about the history of Buddhism, and an afternoon lunch. (845) 688-2415; Zmm.mro.org. To Bee or Not To Bee Though bees might be your least favorite part of summertime, there’s good reason to keep them around and help them thrive. Hudson Valley Bee Supply in Kingston can not only give you the means to do so, but can guide you through the entire process of becoming an expert beekeeper—a necessity if you hope to enjoy these insects’ golden rewards. The bee season starts in January, which is when you can start contacting Megan Denver and her colleagues at the bee supply to set you up with some new striped friends. As spring approaches, you can take classes like Queen Rearing, Starting Right with Bees, and Beekeeping Spring Essentials. which will help ensure you’ll be up to your ears in honey by July. In the meantime, try a wax processing class where you can learn how to make your own candles, soap, and more using honey and beeswax. “You know where your ingredients are coming from, you can customize your creations to your own needs and fragrances, and if you have any allergies you could easily accommodate them,” says Denver. (845) 336-6233; Hudsonvalleybeesupply.com. Soften the Blow When considering the prospect of a 2,000-degree furnace, a long blow pipe, and the piece of molten glass at the end of it, it might seem as though glassblowing is an art best left to the professionals. However, everyone was once a beginner. Gilmor Glass in Millerton could be your place to start, offering intimate two-hour classes for two to three people at a time. Owner John Gilmor says these workshops usually take place the third week of every month and students can leave with their own handmade glass goods like a tumbler, paperweight, or small vase. “It’s unusual, it’s not something you’re going to get anywhere else and it gives you a greater understanding of how glass is made—it’s very challenging,” says Gilmor. Though it’s certainly an intricate art form, John Gilvey of Hudson Beach Glass in Beacon insists that it’s something even a child can tackle. At their Christmas ornament making class in the fall, Gilvey and his colleagues work with kids as young as five or six as well as adults. “I don’t know who gets more out of it, the parent or the child. When the parent sees their six-year-old standing in front of a hot furnace, it’s thrilling and terrifying,” he said.You can book an Intro to Glassblowing class at your own convenience and work one-on-one with an instructor. On August 17 and 18 you can also try out a beadmaking class—for six hours each day students work closely with a small torch to craft elaborate beads. By the middle of the first day Gilvey guarantees you’ll get the hang of it, and by the end of the second day you’ll leave with a handful of art. (518) 789-8000; Gilmorglass.com. (845) 440-0068; Hudsonbeachglass.com. Kicking Back You might not be looking to earn a black belt or take anyone down to the mat anytime soon, but a boost in self-esteem and self-control never hurt anyone. At Doug Cook’s Chosun Taekwondo Academy in Warwick, taekwondo is only a combat sport if you want it to be. “We teach the martial art of taekwondo rather than the sport. We focus on meditation, self defense drills, forms— a solo practice very similar to tai chi that allows the practitioner to move through different motions of self-defense by themselves,” he says. By offering a curriculum that focuses on these essential principles, Cook says his academy is more adult-friendly than most. “Most martial arts schools really cater to kids more than anything else. Adults tend to be reluctant because they think it’s something for children and don’t realize there’s an avenue for them,” explains Cook. For adults looking to give it a try, Cook offers a $29 no-commitment special, which lets students take unlimited classes for a month. Throughout August, stop in for classes like Hatha yoga, sunrise instruction for all belts, and even sessions in Warwick Town Park on August 11 and 25. (845) 986-2288; Chosuntkd.com.

Creative Writing Workshop Using Amherst Writers & Artists Method

 Weekly Workshops 

3 hour workshop meetings/10 week sessions Thursday Evenings and Sunday Afternoons

 Write Saturdays  All day writing workshops

Consultations and individual conferences

Wallkill Valley Writers, New Paltz. Kate Hymes, Leader

(845) 750-2370 www.wallkillvalleywriters.com | khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com

Kingston Catholic School

Raising the Standards! Values Based Achievement Oriented All Faiths Welcome

Schedule a Visit!! 845-331-9318 Serving Students Pre K through 8th www.kingstoncatholicschool.com

REACH OUR READERS New for 2013: your Chronogram ad buy combines print + digital advertising! Find out more at info.chronogram.com.

Chronogram.com it’s new | it’s now

scan to download 2013 media kit

8/13 ChronograM education 57


Community Pages

the view from here Rhinebeck, Red Hook, Tivoli

By Melissa Esposito Photographs by Roy Gumpel

T

here is no shortage of eateries in the Hudson Valley, so for a tiny, historic village to be known as a foodie destination, it’s got to pack an impressive array of dining options into a small area. Rhinebeck proudly fits the bill. Sure, the village is well known for a variety of things—namely, its boutiques, historic attractions, and horse culture—but this isn’t a case of “Jack of all trades, master of none.” Rhinebeck’s culinary culture is an experience that leads you by your senses; once evening settles in, the air is filled with savory scents complemented by a soundtrack of clinking glasses and fork-to-plate squeaks. If you weren’t hungry by five o’clock, you’re salivating by seven. Whatever your mood, options abound: Choose by ethnicity—French, Thai, Italian; by proximity to activities—Foster’s Coach House Tavern is a budget-friendly eatery/pub located next to indie cinema Upstate Films; or by in-house entertainment—a hot spot for live music is the Liberty Public House. You can also decide based upon your ideal dining atmosphere; there’s a sophisticated tavern in a historic inn (Tavern at Beekman Arms); a romantic French/Mediterranean restaurant (Arielle); a family- and wallet-friendly retro diner (Eveready Diner); or a renovated church where the crowd is chic and the fresh, New American food is divine (Terrapin). What you won’t find: bland chain eateries or vast, overcompensating dining rooms with questionable menu options (such as “Riverfront Restaurant Who Shall Not Be Named”). Shop owners have taken notice of this culinary craze and have added inventory that appeals to local and visiting foodies. Holly Raal, owner of Bumble and Hive—a boutique on East Market Street that offers honey-based soaps and candles, plus gift items, collectibles, and more—set up a Honey Bar in her shop. “When I opened in 2011, we offered just a few honey-based items. The customer response was so great that I started offering more culinary honeys and honey health products that I get from local apiaries and beekeepers,” she says. At the honey bar, customers can sample 30 types of honey, each of which has a different flavor and health benefit. “The honey bar is great for people who want to have an interactive experience,” she says. “We have some staff members who are CIA grads and can thoroughly explain the culinary aspects of the honey samples. Plus, we’re passionate about supporting products that are ethical and local, and Honey Bar visitors can learn more about the importance of bees, ethical products, and more.”

58 rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli ChronograM 8/13

ABOVE from top: Brianna Cashen looks west from the top of the Ferncliff forest firetower in Rhinebeck; Tivoli Deputy mayor/painter Joel Griffith looking toward the catskills on the bank of the hudson river. opposite clockwise from top: murrays in tivoli; (l-r) Lucian diamond, Jonny diamond, Dr. Ruby K, Mike gonnella, and Ellie Gunther-Mohr at Tivoli bread and baking; parker and max goldin at Oblong books in rhinebeck; a vintage vw beetle in the center of rhinebeck; The Cow Gals performing at the Rhinebeck Farmers’ market.


8/13 ChronograM rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli 59


COOKING!

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We can’t We can’t

LABOR DAY WEEKEND | 17 HUDSON VALLEY ARTISTS | OPEN STUDIOS

LABORDAY DAYWEEKEND WEEKEND||17 17 HUDSON HUDSON VALLEY LABOR VALLEY ARTISTS ARTISTS||OPEN OPENSTUDIOS STUDIOS

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PRESENTING SPONSOR

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AUG 31-SEP 1, 2013 Visit the studios to 11-5pm see art through the eyes of the artists. Art Studio Views is celebrating the 6th annual Visit the studios to see art through the eyes of Open Studio Tour in Tivoli, Red Hook, Rhinebeck, Hyde Visit the studios to see artisthrough of the artists. Art Studio Views celebratingthe theeyes 6th annual Park and Staatsburg. The works of 17 talented artists inOpen Studio Tour in Tivoli, Red Hook, Rhinebeck, Hyde the artists. Art Studio Views is celebrating the 6th annual clude a variety of mediums—oil, watercolor, sculpture, Park Studio and Staatsburg. The works of 17 talented artists inOpen Tour in Tivoli, Red Hook, Rhinebeck, Hyde ink, photography, ceramics, glass, printmaking and mixed clude a variety of mediums—oil, watercolor, sculpture, Park and Staatsburg. The works of 17 talented artists inmedia. Enjoy a weekend in the country. ink, photography, ceramics, glass, printmaking and mixed clude a variety of mediums—oil, watercolor, sculpture, media. Enjoy a weekend in the country. ink, photography, ceramics, and mixed Randy Bloom Maureenglass, Gatesprintmaking Judy Malstrom media. Enjoy a weekend in the country. Melissa Braggins Carl Grieco Tatiana Rhinevault Randy Bloom

60

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Judy Malstrom

it when youit leave. when you leave.

Ted Braggins Betsy Jacaruso Jeff Romano Melissa Braggins Carl Grieco Tatiana Rhinevault Randy Bloom Maureen Gates Judy Malstrom for you at: Richard Chianella Jenn Ted Braggins BetsyJordan Jacaruso Pierce Smith Jeff Romano Melissa Braggins Carl Grieco Tatiana Rhinevault Richard Chianella John Jenn Lavin Jordan Pierce Smith Doris Cultraro Todd Young Ted Braggins Betsy Jacaruso Jeff Romano DorisGabel Cultraro John LavinLivesey Todd Young Tarryl Christine mac’s agway in red hook mac’s agway in red hook new paltz agway new paltz agway Richard Chianella Jenn Jordan Pierce Smith Tarryl Gabel Christine Livesey 845.876.1559 | 68 firehouse lane 845.876.1559 red hook|, 68 ny firehouse 12571 lane red hook, ny 12571 845.255.0050 | 145 rte 32 n,845.255.0050 new paltz, ny|12561 145 rte 32 n, new paltz, ny 12561 Doris Cultraro John Lavin Todd Young Tarryl Gabel Christine Livesey For more information: www.artstudioviews.com www.macsfarmandgardenworld.com For more information: www.artstudioviews.com or Facebook facebook.com/artstudioviews macsfarmgardenworld@yahoo.com or Facebook facebook.com/artstudioviews For more information: www.artstudioviews.com or Facebook facebook.com/artstudioviews rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli ChronograM 8/13


dance students at a dress rehearsal at kaatsbaan in tivoli; foster’s coach house and tavern in rhinebeck.

Around the corner at Montgomery Row—a small strip of shops and restaurants— you’ll find Oblong Books, a locally owned bookstore with a larger-than-average offering of cookbooks and food writing. As the demand increased for culinary literature, the shop quickly sought to meet expectations. “We’ve certainly increased our culinary section,” says manager Suzanna Hermans, who co-owns the shop with her father, Dick, who opened the store’s original location in Millerton in 1975. “We have a lot of Culinary Institute students that this appeals to, and now that Rhinebeck has become a foodie destination, cookbooks are a big section for us. Customers are very interested in our variety; we have a wide selection, including gluten-free, vegan, and all the specialties people are into these days.” Oblong’s author events are just as popular as its carefully chosen selection and the store hosts about 80 events per year for all ages. The recently started Hudson Valley Young Adult Society, for example, meets once a month and sees anywhere from 50 to 200 attendees. “We’re very fortunate to have a very literary community here in Rhinebeck—meaning, one that values literature and what we offer as far as bringing authors to the area,” she says. “Our goal is getting people to fall in love with books and to discover their next favorite author. The store is very curated; every book is chosen by hand. We read a lot, know our inventory, and can recommend a book for everyone.” Keep an eye out for their extensive local interest section, featuring Hudson Valley authors, regional history, and a few self-published titles not available in larger bookstores. Easygoing Hardscrabble While Rhinebeck is better known for its happenings than nearby Red Hook, there is still much to do in the small town once known as Hardscrabble. Along its outskirts you’ll find Taste Budd’s Chocolate & Coffee Café, a funky little coffee shop and eatery with delicious coffees (including fair trade and organic blends), scrumptious sweets, and a mixed crowd ranging from artsy teens to—well, artsy adults. If the town seems quiet on Thursdays it’s because almost everyone is at the café’s open mic night—possibly one of the most supportive, encouraging environments for an open mic in the Mid-Hudson region; there’s just a great community vibe. 8/13 ChronograM rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli 61


haldora

25+ DEALERS IN OUR NEW LOCATION

ANNEX

ANTIQUES

TRUNK SHOW OUTERWEAR COATS by designers ITALA TESTINO KUSHI

Antique, Vintage & Collectible Items RED HOOK BUSINESS PARK

7578 N BROADWAY (RTE 9) • 845-758-2843 OPEN DAILY

11am-5pm

SATURDAYS

10am-5pm

AMPLE PARKING & HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

Ferncliff Forest

community pages: rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli

4 days only: sept 5, 6, 7 & 8 28 E. mARKET STREET, RHINEbECK, NEW yORK 845.876.6250

RHINEBECK ARTIST’S SHOP

Rhinebeck’s number one free attraction offering an amazing view of the Hudson Valley from our Observation Tower. Enjoy hiking, picnics, camping or just walk your dog in our wonderful 200 acre Forest Preserve.

Affordable Art Supplies, Expert Picture Framing, Stationery, Gifts

Open all year 68 Mount Rutsen Rd. Rhinebeck, NY 845-876-3196 for additional information

TWO GREAT LOCATIONS 56 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY 845.876.4922 188 Main Street, New Paltz, NY 845.255.5533

www.RhinebeckArt.com

Ate li er Renée fine framing

Iyengar Yoga is perfect for beginners and all levels. A safe supportive exercise that builds strength, flexibility and peace of mind so you can move better and feel better.

The Chocolate Factory 54 Elizabeth Street • Red Hook, New York Tuesday through Saturday 10 ~ 6 or by appointment Renée Burgevin, owner, CPF e-mail ~ renee@atelierreneefineframing.com

845. 758 .1004

62 rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli ChronograM 8/13


easy chic

6406 Montgomery St. Rhinebeck NY 845.516.4150

handbags • clothing • dresses • jeans • jewelry accessories • outerwear • eileen Fisher attilio giusti leombruni Francesco Buitoni with patrons at Mercato-Osteria Enoteca in Red Hook;

Visit our Stuyvesant Plaza, Albany location!

Freeman Wison bartends at Bread and Bottle in Red Hook.

This communal attitude seems to be a Red Hook trait. Like many Hudson Valley towns, there can sometimes be a “rural folk vs. city visitor” mentality, as well as a distinct line between conservative and liberal environmentalists, but each seems to share a common goal—maintaining Red Hook as a safe and charming town. Bonnie Scheweppe—who opened Living Eden with business partner Bobbi Jo Forte in May— learned this firsthand. The shop offers recycled, upcycled, locally made, fair trade, and USA-made items plus organic and gluten-free foods. “We thought we’d have a niche market, but we actually cater to a very mixed crowd,” Scheweppe says. “The very, very conservative bunch want made-in-America products, and the very, very liberal love the cruelty-free, vegan items. And since our items range in prices, we can appeal to anyone. We refer to it as Conscious Capitalism. We want people to understand why buying locally made or fair trade is important. We didn’t just open a shop for the sake of opening a shop—we knew if we did this for the right reasons everything would work out, and so far it’s been great.” For a taste of the nightlife and local happenings, stop by Bread and Bottle for a glass of wine or craft beer and locally sourced charcuterie (live music takes place during weekends), or head to Mercato Osteria & Enoteca for fine Italian dining with its seasonally changing menu and hard-to-find wines. Enjoy a lively, daylong community celebration during Hardscrabble Day, a family-friendly event featuring fun activities, food vendors, music, and more (September 21), but before that, take part in the Sixth Annual Art Studio View Tour, during which various private art studios will open their doors to the public for a peek into their creative processes. This event takes place the Saturday and Sunday of Labor Day Weekend at various venues throughout Red Hook, Rhinebeck, Hyde Park, and Tivoli (ArtStudioViews.com). After exploring the studios, any Tivoli-bound fiber artist or knitter will want to check out Fabulous Yarn, which has a huge selection of luxury yarns produced by top brands. (With the fiber-art resurgence in the Valley, we know there are bound to be a few of you.) The shop also features local yarns from Buckwheat Bridge and Alpatrax. Hometown Pride An emphasis on buying local and supporting the area’s farms and purveyors rings throughout Tivoli. A dish from the all-day brunch menu at Murray’s, for instance, features seasonally changing ingredients sourced from Valley growers. Chef Rei Peraza of Panzur, a Spanish gastropub and wine bar, cooks with the same local/seasonal 8/13 ChronograM rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli 63

community pages: rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli

Arche shoes And much more


ENVIRONMENTAL IMMERSION 2013 | 2014 Course Offerings COURSES Week 1: Jan. 14-17, 2014; Week 2: Jan. 20-23, 2014

Held at Bard College; weeks 1 and 2 may be taken separately

Climate Finance: Theory and Practice

m u r r ay ’ s

Held at Bard College; weeks 1 and 2 are taken together

Slow Water for Sustainable Development Held in Oaxaca, Mexico; week 1 and 2 are taken together; preregistration and valid passport required

community pages: rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli

ANNANDALE, NEW YORK

BARD CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION SEPT 15

contact us today to reserve your spot: www.bard.edu/cep, cep@bard.edu, 845.758.7071

AUCTION Truly a Must-Have, One-of-a-Kind I can see for miles (actually 30 miles) with unlimited sunsets. Electric is supplied by solar panels, monthly bill is less than a cable bill. This magnificent deck home with 3000+ sq ft features a wall of windows overlooking the Catskill Mountains. It’s positioning on a hill makes it rightfully called the Tree House. We have cathedral ceilings, tiled floor, and basement unfinished to take your creative plans. Did I tell you the basement also has a wall of windows?! The master bedroom has a full bath with hot tub and magnificent views of the yard with it’s flowering fruit trees and gardens. This house is definitely a must-see with it’s 2 Million Dollar views. This is a priceless find in today’s market.

Fresh to Market ~ $935,000

GeorGe Auctioneers

(845) 758-9114 N. Broadway (Rte. 9, next to IGA) Red Hook, NY • 845-758-9114

www.GeorgeColeAuctions.com

“We sell the earth and everything on it.” 64 rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli ChronograM 8/13

local, seasonal, delicious weekly menus la colombe coffee outdoor patio dining open 7 days

Land Trusts: A Primer and the Role of Climate Change

Cole

brunch ! w w w. m u r r ay s t i v o l i . c o m


“Best Sushi”~Chronogram & Hudson Valley Magazine

Japanese Restaurant o saka su sh i. ne t

TIVOLI 74 Broadway (845) 757-5055 RHINEBECK 22 Garden St (845) 876-7338

Rated “Excellent”~Zagat for 18yrs • “4.5 Stars”~Poughkeepsie Journal

Wills

eldeR laW

esTaTe PRobaTe

EstatE Planning EldEr law

Real esTaTe

37 West Market • Rhinebeck 845.876.3300 www.haggertylawoffices.com

Law Offices Of

Brad Luse at Antiques Annex in Red Hook

Michel P. haggerty USCO:

philosophy, but serves small plates with Old World flavor. Larger meals, such as paella dishes or pig feasts that can each serve up to 10 people, are available with advanced The Company of Us notice. The wine bar offers more than 100 bottles, largely from Spain, and has received EldEr law EsTaTE ProbaTE A Retrospectacle acclaim from local and national publications. For savory Southwestern flavor, try Santa wills rEal EsTaTE Fe, a Tivoli cornerstone whose vibrant décor is as authentic as its Enchiladas Tipicas. August 10th – Sept 21st incomE Tax living TrusTs Local goodies, fruits, and veggies—including the ability to pick your own apples Opening Saturday, and pumpkins—are available at Mead Farms through October. Anyone planning to h oAugust u s E c a10th, l l s 5-8 b y pm aPPointmEnt visit Tivoli during the fall should also mark November 7 to 10 on their calendars for 37 west Market • Rhinebeck NEWvember, a festival of new plays, presented by the town’sTangentTheatre Company, 845.876.3300 that takes place at the Carpenter Shop Theater (NewvemberFestival.com).

+ Space

E

plusspace.org 845.758.5252 Saturdays 12-5 pm or call

CO

O

L

+Space Gallery Plusspace.org Always There Alwaystherehomecare.org Annex Antiques (845) 758-2843 Art Studio Views Artstudioviews.com Atelier Renee Fine Framing Atelierreneefineframing.com Bard Center for Environmental Policy Bard.edu/cep Clear Yoga Clearyogarhinebeck.com Ferncliff Forest Ferncliffforest.org George Cole Auctions Georgecoleauctions.com Haldora Haldora.com Law Offices of Michel P. Haggerty Haggertylawoffices.com Mac’s Agway Agway.com Murray’s Tivoli Murraystivoli.com Northern Dutchess Botanical Gardens Ndbgonline.com Osaka Osakasushi.net Pet Country (845) 876-9000 Red Hook Emporium Redhookemporium.com Rhinebeck Antique Emporium Rhinebeckantiqueemporium.com Rhinebeck Artist’s Shop Rhinebeckart.com Rhinebeck Department Store Rhinebeckdepartmentstore.com Rusty’s Rustysfarmfresheatery.com

R•

YL

RESOURCES

An Art Gallery at The Chocolate Factory in Red Hook, NY

CUT •

ST

Hair Color • Cut • Style Men, Women & Children Colorists & Master Barbers on staff 7 West Market St, Rhinebeck

845.876.8900

Visit us online @ iconic-hairsalon.com Find us on &

8/13 ChronograM rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli 65

community pages: rhinebeck + red hook + tivoli

living TRusTs


The Olana Partnership Presents

Olanafest 2013

Fine Crafts Fair August 17 & 18, 2013 10am to 5pm RAIN or SHINE

A celebration of food, art and farming featuring art-inspired hors d’oeuvres, craft beers, local wines and a silent auction

Saturday, september 21 5:30-8pm

Olana’s Historic Farm Complex OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE 5720 ROUTE 9G, HUDSON NY

High quality handmades by 85 regional artists For collectors of fine craft and discerning buyers Food, gourmet goodies, non-stop live music FREE parking at MTA lot

Step off the TRAIN and into the FAIR ! for 50% off admission Hudson Line to Garrison Stop $5 TRAIN riders & Seniors 62 with ID $10 Adults Kids under 18 FREE with parent 23 Garrison’s Landing

galleries & museums

To purchase tickets call (518) 828-1872 www.olana.org

garrisonartcenter.org

Anonymous

THE

Contemporary Tibetan Art

DORSKY SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART

Dedron, Mona Lisa, 2012, Mineral pigment on canvas, 39 1/4 x 31 inches

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

WWW.N EWPALTZ.E DU / M USE U M

66 galleries & museums ChronograM 8/13

Garrison, NY 10524

845.424.3960


arts &

culture

Gerd Stern in Mount Tamalpais, CA, 1962 with a model wearing a series of sweatshirts Stern designed based on highway signs. From the exhibit “USCO: The Company of Us,� showing at + Space Gallery in Red Hook from August 10 to September 21.

8/13 ChronograM Arts & culture 67


galleries & museums

Censorship Drops, 3.5” tall Visine bottles by Molly Rausch, from the traveling exhibit from KMoCA, “bauMoCA—The World’s Smallest Museum of Controversial Art,” featuring works by Molly Rausch, Norm Magnusson, and David Goldin. August 10 through September 8 at bau Gallery in Beacon.

+ SPACE GALLERY

BETHEL WOODS CENTER FOR THE ARTS

54 ELIZABETH STREET, SUITE 4, RED HOOK 758-5252. “USCO: The Company of Us—A Retrospectacle.” August 10-September 21. Opening reception August 3, 3pm-6pm.

200 HURD ROAD, BETHEL 454-3388. “Current Hues of the Hudson.” August 10-23.

510 WARREN ST GALLERY

BETSY JACARUSO STUDIO & GALLERY

43 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK 516-4435. “Essence of the Valley.” Through August 31.

510 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-0510. “Linda Clayton: Being in the Mystery.” Recent oil paintings. August 2-25. Opening reception August 3, 3pm-6pm.

AI EARTHLING GALLERY 69 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679 -2650. “Aurora.” Through August 31.

ALBERT SHAHINAIN FINE ART GALLERY 22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK 876-7578. “Yale Epstein: Re-Imagings, Re-Contextualized Photographs.” Through August 11.

ANN STREET GALLERY 104 ANN STREET, NEWBURGH 784-1146. “Light as Medium.” Through August 17.

ARTS SOCIETY OF KINGSTON (ASK) 97 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 338-0331. “Figuratively Speaking: A Members’ Exhibition.” August 3-31. Opening reception August 3, 5pm-8pm.

ARTS UPSTAIRS 60 MAIN STREET, PHOENICIA 688-2142. “Group Show and Solo Room Exhibits.” Through August 11.

ASHOKAN CENTER 477 BEAVERKILL ROAD, OLIVEBRIDGE 657-8333. “Catskill Waterscapes.” Through August 20.

ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER 24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS (518) 945-2136. “ICE Exhibit.” Featuring the works of 13 Hudson Valley artists. Through August 10.

BARD COLLEGE CCS/HESSEL MUSEUM of ART route 9G, ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON 758-7598. “Helen Marten: No Borders in a Wok That Can’t Be Crossed.” Through September 22. “Haim Steinbach: Once Again the World is Flat.” Through December 20.

BARRETT ART CENTER 55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550. “Art of the Garden.” An exhibition of 2D and 3D artwork. Through August 14.

BEACON 3D 164 MAIN STREET, BEACON Beaconarts.org. “Sculpture Installation.” Ed Benavente, Tadashi Hashimoto, and Insun Kim. Through October 15.

BEACON ARTIST UNION 506 MAIN STREET, BEACON 222-0177. “Layers and Lines.” Plus Charles McGill solo exhibition in the Beacon Room. Through August 3.

68 galleries & museums ChronograM 8/13

BOSCOBEL

1601 ROUTE 9D (BEAR MOUNTAIN HIGHWAY), GARRISON Boscobel.org. “Robert W. Weir and the Poetry of Art.” August 11-November 30.

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY

318 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1915. “Across the Board.” New works on paper by Kenneth Polinskie. Through August 11.

CLARK ART INSTITUTE

225 SOUTH STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA (413) 458-2303. “George Inness.” Through September 8.

COLUMBIA COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS 209 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 671-6213. “Threads: Fiber Art.” August 10-September 21. Opening reception August 10, 5pm-7pm.

CR10 CONTEMPORARY ARTS PROJECT SPACE

283 COUNTY ROUTE 10, LINLITHGO (518) 697-7644. “Heavy Equipment.” Site installations curated by Francine Hunter Mcgivern. Through September 15.

D&H CANAL MUSEUM

23 MOHONK ROAD, HIGH FALLS 687-9311. “The Art of Manville B. Wakefield.” Through October 20.

DAVIS ORTON GALLERY

114 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 697-0266. “Passage.” Janet Sternburg, photography. August 2-September 1. Opening reception August 3, 6pm-8pm.

DOG HOUSE GALLERY

429 PHILLIPS ROAD, SAUGERTIES 246-0402. “Pastorale.” Duo exhibition by E. S. DeSanna and Claudia Engel. August 3-September 1. Opening reception August 3, 4pm-7pm.

Masters on Main

MAIN STREET, CATSKILL Greenearts.org. “Eastern Standard: Indirect lines to the Hudson River School.” Through September 20.

DREAM IN PLASTIC

177 MAIN STREET, BEACON Dreaminplastic.com. “Windows On Main Street 2013.” August 10-September 14. Opening reception August 10, 6pm.

DUCK POND GALLERY

128 CANAL STreet, TOWN OF ESOPUS LIBRARY, PORT EWEN 338-5580. “Hudson Valley Scapes.” Photography exhibit. August 3-30. Opening reception August 03, 5pm-8pm.


THE FALCON 1348 ROUTE 9W, MARLBORO 236-7970. “The Paintings of Commander Cody.” August 4-September 30.

FOVEA EXHIBITIONS 143 MAIN STreet, BEACON 765-2199. “The Gun Show.” Through October 6.

FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER at Vassar College 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5632. “Pictures of Nothing: Abstract Art from the Permanent Collection.” Through September 8.

FRIENDS OF HISTORIC KINGSTON 63 MAIN STREET, KINGSTON 339-0720. “Greetings From Kingston: A Story in Postcards.” Through October 26.

GALERIE BMG 12 TANNERY BROOK ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-0027. “Floriography: The Language of Flowers.” Through August 5.

GALLERY 291 291 MAIN STREET, KINGSTON 340-8625. “Works by Chloé Valentine.” August 3-September 30. Opening reception August 3, 5pm-7pm.

GALLERY AT THE FORMER SPRUCE STORE INTERSECTION AT ROUTE 213 AND MOHONK ROAD, HIGH FALLS 548-2420. “Three Muses.” August 3-4 and August 10-11.

GRAY OWL GALLERY 10 MAIN STREET, NEW PALTZ 518-2237. “Art...On Vacation.” Through September 6.

GREENE COUNTY COUNCIL ON THE ARTS GALLERY 398 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-3400. “The Grace Project.” August 10-November 2. Opening reception August 10, 5pm-7pm.

THE HARRISON GALLERY 39 SPRING STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MA (413) 458-1700. “Works by Hideaki Miyamura.” August 3-30.

View of the South Fields, all works by Mark di Suvero. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson

STORM KING ART CENTER

HUDSON OPERA HOUSE 327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-4181. “Art Meets Art: Perspectives On and Beyond Olana.” Through August 11.

HUDSON VALLEY LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTER, INC. 300 WALL STREET, KINGSTON 331-5300. “Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals 1933-1945.” Through August 14.

IMOGEN HOLLOWAY GALLERY

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY 362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907. “Bruce Gagnier: Made for Bronze.” Through August 11. “Jenny Snider: New Work.” August 15-September 8. Opening reception August 17, 6pm-8pm.

www.stormking.org

KAPLAN HALL SUNY ORANGE, NEWBURGH 431-9386. “Aesthetic Aspirations.” Through September 6.

KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY MUSEUM 94 BROADWAY, NEWBURGH 569-4997. “Mark Twain.” Examples of writing in the master’s hand. Through September 1.

KLEINERT/JAMES ARTS CENTER 34 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2079. “Give and Take.” Works by Catherine Murphy. Through August 11.

LIFEBRIDGE SANCTUARY 333 MOUNTAIN RD, ROSENDALE 658-3439. “Light Beneath the Sea.” David Hall. August 3-October 13. Opening reception, August 3, 1pm.

M GALLERY 350 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-2189. “Illustrations by Patrick Milbourn.” Through August 30.

DOWNTOWN BEACON MAIN STREET, BEACON Beaconwindows.org. “Windows On Main Street.” August 10-September 14.

MARK GRUBER GALLERY 17 NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241. “Summerscapes.” A group show. Through September 7.

NEUMANN FINE ART 65 COLD WATER STreet, HILLSDALE (413) 246-5776. “The Power of Place.” Featuring artists Ken Young and Jeffrey L. Neumann. Through September 2.

NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM 9 ROUTE 183, STOCKBRIDGE, MA (413) 298-4100. “Jarvis Rockwell: Maya, Illusion, and Us.” Through October 20.

OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE 5720 ROUTE 9G, HUDSON (518) 828-0135. “Maine Sublime: Frederic Edwin Church’s Landscapes.” Through October 31.

OLD CHATHAM COUNTRY STORE AND CAFÉ 639 ALBANY TURNPIKE ROAD, OLD CHATHAM (518) 794-6227. “Landscapes by Alden Heck.” August 1-28. Opening reception, August 4, 3pm-5pm.

ONE MILE GALLERY 475 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON 338-2035. “Strange Landscapes.” Featuring the work of 20 different artists. August 3-31. Opening reception August 3, 6pm-8pm.

THE OPEN STUDIO 402 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-9531. “Follow the Thread.” Through September 20.

8/13 ChronograM galleries & museums 69

galleries & museums

81 PARTITION STreet, SAUGERTIES (347) 387-3212. “Leaf in a Landscape.” Through August 11. “Wood.” August 17-September 29.


The home address for Art in Woodstock

Auction @ WAAM

galleries & museums

ORANGE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER ROUTE 94, NEW WINDSOR (866) 676-2837. “Black Dirt.” Through September 13.

ORPHIC GALLERY 53525 STATE HIGHWAY 30, ROXBURY (607) 326-6045. “Potophonics.” Through August 25.

PALMER GALLERY

To benefit the Woodstock Artists Association & Museum

Labor Day Weekend Sunday, September 1 1:00pm sharp

VASSAR COLLEGE, POUGHKEEPSIE Palmergallery.vassar.edu. “The Flip Side.” Through September 4.

PS 209 3670 MAIN STreet, STONE RIDGE Pspace209@gmail.com. “Corrugate.” Works by Ruth Hardinger, Susan Walsh and Peter Zeibel. Through August 11.

RED HOOK CAN NORTH BROADWAY, RED HOOK 758-6575. “Mythic.” Through August 31.

ROOS ARTS 449 MAIN STREET, ROSENDALE (718) 755-4726. “Our Backyard.” A group show featuring works that consider the environment. Through August 17.

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART 1 HAWK DRIVE, NEW PALTZ Newpaltz.edu/museum. “Screen Play: Hudson Valley Artists 2013.” Through November 10.

SAUnDERS FARM 853 OLD ALBANY POST ROAD. “Collaborative Concepts: The Farm Show 2013.” August 31-October 26. Opening reception August 31, 2pm-6pm.

STARR LIBRARY Neil Ives, 1892-1946, Sheffield Paper Mill, Saugerties, New York, circa 1935

19th- & 20th-Century and Contemporary American, European & Worldwide Art. Featuring Historic Art of the Hudson Valley Region. For additional information contact: The Woodstock Artists Association & Museum 845-679-2940 ext.300, auction@woodstockart.org or The James Cox Gallery at Woodstock 845-679-7608, info@jamescoxgallery.com

6417 MONTGOMERY STREET, RHINEBECK 876-4030. “The Cannon Roar all Night: Profiles of Local Civil War Soldiers.” Through October 31.

THE CHATHAM BOOKSTORE 27 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3005. “Works by Karen Hummel, Tina Fahey, and Scott Thomas Balfe.” August 1-September 3.

THE RE INSTITUTE 1395 BOSTON CORNERS ROAD, MILLERTON (518) 567-5359. “Immaterial.” Through September 14. Opening reception August 17, 4pm-8pm.

THEO GANZ STUDIO

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION & MUSEUM 28 Tinker Street • Woodstock, NY • www.woodstockart.org

149 MAIN STREET, BEACON (917) 318-2239. “Judy Sigunick: Sculptures.” August 10-September 8. Opening reception August 10, 6pm-8pm.

THOMAS COLE NATURAL HISTORIC SITE 218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-7465. “Albert Bierstadt in New York & New England.” Paintings. Through November 3.

THOMPSON GIROUX GALLERY 57 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3336. “Drawn Away: An Exhibition of Abstract Art.” Through August 11.

TIVOLI ARTISTS CO-OP 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI 758-4342. “Alan Reich: Art and Craft.” Through August 25.

UNFRAMED ARTIST GALLERY 173 HUGUENOT STREET, NEW PALTZ 255-5482. “Wild Things.” Through August 11.

UPTOWN GALLERY 296 WALL STREET, KINGSTON 514-7989. “You’re Burning Me Up Baby.” Installation by British-American artist Adrian Frost. August 16-24.

VASSAR COLLEGE Thompson Memorial Library 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5760. “Franc Palaia: Artist’s Books, 1975-2013.” Through August 16.

WALLKILL RIVER SCHOOL AND ART GALLERY 232 WARD STREET, MONTGOMERY 457-ARTS. “Works by Lisa O’Gorman and Nancy Reed-Jones.” August 1-30. Opening reception August 3, 5pm-7pm.

WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS 84 LIBERTY STREET, NEWBURGH 562-1195. “Unpacked and Rediscovered.” Through December 31.

The Wassaic Project

September 21 & 22 Saturday & Sunday 2 PM - 7 PM Featured Artists

Daniela Cooney George Centamore Joan Kehlenbeck

Route 84 West Exit 2 - Turn Right onto Mountain Road. On Mountain Road take Right onto Mullock Road. As you cross Greeville Turnpike - THE BARN is on your right, Corner of Mullock Road and Decker Drive. 70 galleries & museums ChronograM 8/13

37 Furnace Bank Road, Wassaic (347) 815-0783. “Homeward Found.” Through September 2.

WIRED GALLERY 1415 ROUTE 213, HIGH FALLS (682) 564-5613. “Group Show #6—Cars, Tools, Doors...and an iPad.” Works by 9 artists. Through September 29.

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM 28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2940. “July Group Show.” Through August 18.

WOODSTOCK BYRDCLIFFE GUILD 34 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2079. “Gimmer Shleter.” Outdoor sculpture exhibit. Through September 29.

WOODSTOCK FRAMING GALLERY 31 MILL HILL ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-6003. “Anne Crowley: The Urban and Country Landscape.” Through September 15.

WOODSTOCK GOLF CLUB 114 MILL HILL ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-2914. “The Woodstock Golf Club Collection: Featuring Anton Otto Fischer.” August 24-September 20.


a fresh look at contemporary fine art.

Art... On Vacation July 10 - September 6

Early Fog, The Sea by Colin Barclay. (Oil)

Water Street Market, New Paltz – Open Daily 11a to 6p –Call for Appointment 845-518-2237 – All Credit Cards Welcome

A Sculptural Celebration of the Village’s Bicentennial 1813-2013

Public Outdoor Commemorative Sculpture Walking Tour 25 outdoor sculptures celebrating the Village of Ossining

May 5 - October 26, 2013 Village Hall, 16 Croton Avenue, Ossining, NY

galleries & museums

www.villageofossining.org

8/13 ChronograM galleries & museums 71


Portfolio Marcellus Shale Documentary Project

In her essay accompanying the photographs in the Marcellus Shale Documentary Project, Michelle Nijhuis tells the remarkable story of how natural gas drilling got its start. In 1821, William Hart, a gunsmith in Fredonia, New York, tried to capture the flammable vapors that rose from certain spots in the woods around Lake Erie. Hart, aided by neighbors, dug a 27-foot hole by pick and shovel, banging away at the dirt and rocks while the pit filled with gas. A single spark would have blown the entire dig to smithereens, but Hart and his associates emerged unscathed. When the hole was completed, Hart covered it with sheet metal, built a mile-long pipeline made of hollowed-out logs, and brought gas-powered light to Fredonia, impressing the visiting Marquis de Lafayette on his visit four years later. Anti-fracking advocates would say not much has changed in 200 years. Hart’s dangerous experiment in resource extraction is now being carried out throughout Pennsylvania by large gas companies rather than rogue wildcatters. Almost 9,000 wells have been drilled in the state since the gas boom began, and photographers Noah Addis, Nina Berman, Brian Cohen, Scott Goldsmith, Lynn Johnson, and Martha Rial spent 10 months in 2011 documenting the effect of natural gas drilling on the people and landscape of Pennsylvania. An exhibit of images from the Marcellus Shale Documentary Project will be on view at the Center for Photography at Woodstock through August 18. Cpw.org; The-msdp.us. —Brian K. Mahoney

72 PORTFOLIO ChronograM 8/13


Clockwise from top: A gas-drilling rig in Hopewell Township area of Washington County. Nearby residents complained of extreme noise, seismic activity, and dust from truck traffic along with polluted air and water. June 21, 2010. Photo by Scott Goldsmith. A flare from a natural gas well in Franklin Forks lights up the night sky behind a farmhouse that had leased its land to natural gas companies in 2011. December 20, 2011. Photo by Nina Berman. Carrie Hahn, an activist, talks to an Amish farmer about the hazards of allowing a gas-drilling operation on his land in Wilmington. October 21, 2011. Photo by Lynn Johnson. Opposite, clockwise from top: Fred Mcintyre at the window of his home in Connoquenessing Township. On a sunny spring day, Fred, his wife Janet, and the photographer had been sitting outside when the wind turned and came in from the direction of a well pad where some activity had been taking place; all three felt a burning sensation in their throats and around their eyes, and were forced to move indoors. May 17, 2012. Photo by Brian Cohen. A view of the Sunoco Marcus Hook Refinery in Marcus Hook. The refinery, which has since been idled, is under construction as a potential site for a liquefied natural-gas terminal to process and export gas from the Marcellus Shale. September 11, 2011. Photo by Noah Addis. A view of a natural gas pipeline under construction in Franklin Township. May 1, 2012. Photo by Noah Addis.

8/13 ChronograM portfolio 73


Music

Rising Voices Johanna Warren and Sasha Pearl By Peter Aaron Photograph by Fionn Reilly

Johanna Warren and Sasha Pearl on the riverfront in Hudson

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I

t sounds like a Downstate-driven cliché but it’s undeniably true.The Hudson Valley is, let’s just come right out and say it, the mealy-mouthed mecca for an awful lot of cloying, sappy, and overly earnest graduates from the James Taylor School of Musical Macramé.Thus, the CD review inbox here sometimes looks more like an oven for the aural brown bread served up by these wellmeaning but uninspiring types, and as a music editor you learn to approach the releases whose accompanying bios say “acoustic-based singer-songwriter” with trepidation. Every once in a while, though, you do actually come across an artist working in said medium who’s intriguing. Unique. Even great. And Johanna Warren and Sasha Pearl, both still in their 20s, are two such finds. In terms of style, as singer-songwriters the two couldn’t be more different. Warren is soaring, metaphorical, melodic; Pearl is rustic, plainspoken, captivatingly endearing. But, besides their shared underground/outsider stance, the two women are united by their common links to Hudson’s lively music scene; until very recently, both lived in the area. “The general lifestyle [of Hudson] is really conducive to having a creative life,” says Warren, who’s lately been staying between tours with her father in Westchester County. “There’s a really good community of artists and a social support network in town, and the surrounding natural beauty is very inspiring. Also, the rent is pretty affordable, so I didn’t have to work that much and had more free time to concentrate on my music— not like when I lived in Brooklyn.” Pearl’s reasons for gravitating toward the Columbia County capital are perhaps more directly related to her art. “I was psyched when I started playing in Hudson, because I discovered there were a lot of people in town that liked my music,” she says. “Before that, it was just me playing to whoever else happened to be in the bar. And my mom.” (Pearl’s mother is a musician herself, an accordionist in Balkan folk ensemble Caprice Rouge.) The daughter of an academic, Warren, 24, was born in Decatur, Georgia, and also lived in Massachusetts before coming to the area to double major in Spanish and visual arts at Bard College from 2007 to 2011. “Moving around definitely shaped the way I think about myself and my relationship to the rest of the world,” the waifish singer and guitarist maintains. “I’m glad I got to see different places, and I learned early on about self-reinvention. When you move to a new place and don’t know anybody, you can be who you want to be, lie about who you were. You learn you don’t have to stay any particular way, your choices are endless.” Indeed, even as a young performer Warren has already made a few identity changes, going from being the vocalist and bassist in high school cover bands to leading Sticklips (“a name I came up with when I was 16 for my MySpace page”), a Bard-born collective that released one CD, 2012’s Zemi (Independent). She took piano and flute lessons before picking up the guitar in her early teens, and names the Beatles as her earliest inspiration. “That’s how I learned about vocal harmony, chord structure, [compositional] changes,” she explains. “I internalized the Beatles’ music and I could reference it to understand any other music. But I didn’t really start writing complete songs until the summer after high school graduation. Before that, I would tell people I wrote songs but it was really more like song fragments.” Other, arguably more apparent, influences—Elliot Smith, Joni Mitchell, Joanna Newsome, Modest Mouse—came later. Around the time of the recording of Zemi, the full-band incarnation of Sticklips managed only a few local and campus gigs before it became to clear the singer—and her audiences—that she really didn’t need a band. (For a time she continued to use the moniker for her solo guise, but has since been retired it.) And, admittedly, when witnessing one of Warren’s powerful and starkly transcendent performances it’s hard to fathom why she ever felt the need to buttress herself with other players. All part of a rising artist’s quest, obviously. But that isn’t to say that the handful of musicians on Zemi don’t do the songs justice— the disc’s eight tracks are delivered with a sublime sympatico that’s gripping nevertheless, and perhaps it’s the gorgeously lulling “Lyrebird,” with its sparse drums and soft electronic drones, that gives the closest snapshot of Warren’s solo craft. “Johanna is one of a rare breed of gifted people where you could tell how great of a singer she is just by hearing the sound of her speaking voice,” says producer Kenny Siegal, who recently recorded Warren’s version of Harry Nilsson’s “Without Her” for The Town: A Tribute to Nilsson,Volume 1 (Royal Potato Family Records), which is set for release in November. “Her music is awesome, very psychedelic and melodic. I think she’s an amazing artist, over all.” The songstress spent a month in Brooklyn earlier this year, where she met musicians who play in Iron & Wine, the vehicle of acclaimed singer-songwriter Sam Beam. After catching Beam’s ear, Warren, who also received a National

Endowment for the Arts grant to translate the complete works of Salvadoran author Claudia Herndandez Gonzalez, was asked by the band leader to perform as a back-up vocalist on tour dates. “[The tour] was amazing,” recounts Warren, who appeared with Iron & Wine on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” and is reconnecting with the band for more touring in the coming months. “Just to be out drinking some place after one of the shows and be standing next to this guy whose music I listened to when I was 14 years old was incredible.” Pearl, 27, is an unmined Hudson Valley jewel. A Tivoli townie throughout her childhood years, she likewise claims the Beatles as musical founding fathers. “I wanted to be Ringo and I wanted to marry George Harrison,” she jokes, also expressing a passion for the early country sounds that are most audible in her songs. “I love how when you listen to Hank Williams every song has the same three chords but it doesn’t matter, because his lyrics are just these incredibly beautiful poems.” Pearl moved to New York following her junior year in high school, and, on a plane that recalls Woody Guthrie, has since worked a dizzying variety of jobs—everything from bar tender to film projectionist, pizza maker, and, currently, farm worker at Sol Flower Farm in Millerton. A musical journeywoman as well, she also tried her hand at a variety of instruments before settling on ukulele as her main axe, playing percussion in her elementary school band, studying drums with the patriarch of a neighbor family, and “[trying] guitar lessons, but the teacher gave up because I didn’t practice.” At 20 she acquired a chord organ and formed a duo with her guitarist roommate called Enchanted Castle, and it was that outfit that performed “Ernie and Sylvia,” the first song she composed. “It’s about my grandparents,” says Pearl. “I wrote it when my grandmother died and my grandfather had moved into a retirement home. He said he kissed her good-bye when she died and it was like kissing a piece of ice.” Sad? Sure. But also sweet as hell. And sadness, anyway, makes sweetly reliable fuel for many a songwriter. Evidence of such painfully wrought creative riches abounds on Friendship Street (Independent), Pearl’s debut. One of the disc’s many devastatingly brilliant tracks that jumps out is “Bruiser.” In it, against a carny-esque waltz the singer’s bittersweet drawl spins a darkly humorous yarn about the pitfalls of barroom romance: “My vision was double / But what do I see / A handsome Adonis was looking at me / He sat down beside me and opened his mouth / I was bored to tears by what came out / In his arms was the dullest place I’ve ever been / I wished for an oven to put my head in.” “It would be cool to figure out how to write a happy song, but I mostly only want to write songs when I’m sad,” Pearl explains. “I’m in a good relationship now and I have a happy heart, so I haven’t written many songs lately.” For most of the past two years Pearl’s been less active as a solo artist and more busy singing and playing tenor banjo and tenor guitar with folk-roots unit Pocatello, a group that this year put out a self-titled seven-inch EP produced by Tommy Stinson and released on the Replacements / Guns ’N Roses bassist’s Done to Death label. Pocatello also includes another Hudson-area singer-songwriter of note, guitarist Liv Carrow, who met Pearl after months of buildup by mutual friends. “We both had all these people telling us we needed to meet and play together, saying, ‘You guys are so much alike!’” says Carrow. “So of course we were both, like, ‘I don’t wanna meet this person.’ [Laughs.] But when we finally met we ended up totally hitting it off and playing music in my kitchen all night. One of the things that’s great about playing with Sasha is that she knows so many weird, old songs. I’m more into English folk music, but she can play all these American ragtimey, country, and sailing songs that I’d never heard. What she says about mainly writing songs when she’s sad is true. I think songwriting for her is more about expressing emotion than it is about the songcraft itself.” What does Warren want people to get from her songs? “Mostly, I just hope they listen,” she says. “In this day and age, people’s attention spans are really dwindling and I’m worried that not enough people really listen to music now. Just sit down, close their eyes, and listen.” “I’m comfortable just being a storyteller,” says Pearl. “Being a songwriter for me isn’t a conscious choice, I never even planned to make an album. But I hope when people hear my songs they find they can cry in their beer to them. And then have the beer come out their nose from laughing along.” Johanna Warren will perform with Andrea Tomasi at the Spotty Dog Books & Ale in Hudson on August 10. Facebook.com/pages/Johanna.Warren. Friendship Street by Sasha Pearl is out now. Sashapearl.com. chronogram.com Listen to “Bruiser” by Sasha Pearl and “Lyrebird” by Johanna Warren.

8/13 ChronograM music 75


nightlife highlights Handpicked by music editor Peter Aaron for your listening pleasure.

Larry Moses & the Latin Jazz Explosion August 1 and 2. Like many jazzmen, area saxophonist Rob Scheps, who was quoted in last month’s feature on drummer Marvin “Bugalu” Smith, also performs in myriad other bands. One of them is Larry Moses & the Latin Jazz Explosion, which is led by trumpeter Moses and also includes saxophonist Mike Migliori, pianist James Ratner, bassist Al Ramos, timbalero Thomas Lopez, and conguero Pito Castillo. True to its name, the organization delivers torrid Latin jazz that puts dancers in a frenzy. The band has a pair of free gigs in Beacon this month: August 1 at Long Dock Park (6pm) and August 2 at Southern Dutchess Bowl (9pm). (845) 831-3220; Robscheps.8m.net.

Hudson Jazz Workshop Concert with Sheila Jordan August 11. More hot jazz happens farther north with the Hudson Opera House’s seventh annual Hudson Jazz Workshop Concert. The afternoon public performance finds workshop participants joined by pianist Armen Donelian and saxophonist Marc Mommaas and none other than National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master vocalist Sheila Jordan. Praised by leading jazz scribe Scott Yanow as “one of the most consistently creative of all jazz singers,” Jordan was originally inspired by seeing Charlie Parker in the late 1940s and rose to prominence while working with Herbie Nicholls and George Russell in the early 1960s. A songwriter as well, the 84-year-old singer shines in both the bebop and free jazz idioms. 3:30pm. (Preconcert talk at 3pm.) $10. Hudson. (518) 822-1438; Hudsonoperahouse.org.

Daniel Bachman August 22. Raised in Fredericksburg, Virginia, Daniel Bachman has been playing what he calls “psychedelic Appalachia” since he was a teenager, putting out small-run tapes, CDs, and LPs that float with droning banjo and acoustic guitar. Touring off and on since he was 17, Bachman has shared stages with such searching players as his fellow Fredericksburg native, the late Jack Rose. Still in his early 20s, Bachman, who here visits the cozy Dream Away Lodge, is now signed to weird folk haven Tompkins Square Records, which recently released his stunning Seven Pines. (Sean Rowe sings August 17; Heather Maloney holds court August 25.) 8:30pm. Donation requested. Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 623-8725; Thedreamawaylodge.com.

Pete Pidgeon and Arcoda

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August 24. It was a sad end to an amazing era when Black Swan manager and music booker Michael Nickerson left his post at the beloved Tivoli tavern. But, as they say, on to better things. Now ensconced at the similarly inviting Liberty Public House, Nickerson’s has been bringing his sage programming to the new and nearby venue, setting up nights like this one by Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Pete Pidgeon and his band, Arcoda. Pidgeon, a sometime collaborator of Levon Helm, Gorillaz’s Gabe Wallace, and Sting’s Fareed Haque, is currently touring in support of Growing Pains, a three-song EP recorded in Nashville. (The Big Takeover skanks it up August 2.) 10pm. $5. Rhinebeck. (845) 876-1760; Libertyrhinebeck.com.

Revocation August 27. In the mood for some metal? Boston’s Revocation has been hailed as one of the thrash scene’s hottest new bands, described as crossing “the excellent dynamics of Pestilence with the visceral intensity of Sepultura and the technical prowess of Carcass combined with shredding extensive leads and solos” by reigning online death / black metal, er, bible Masterful Magazine. The band’s second offering, Chaos of Forms, newly out on the Relapse label, screams with such heartwarmingly named ditties as “Cradle Robber,” “Dissolution Ritual,” “No Funeral,” and “Cretin.” Rounding out this supremely heavy bill at BSP Lounge are My Bitter End, Towers, Clover, and Submit to Suffering. You have been warned. (Kevin Devine croons August 3; Gary Lucas wails August 9.) 6pm. $12, $15. Kingston. (845) 481-4158; Bsplounge.com.

Your work deserves attention. Which means you need a great bio for your press kit or website. One that’s tight. Clean. Professionally written. Something memorable. Something a booking agent, a record-label person, a promoter, or a gallery owner won’t just use to wipe up the coffee spill on their desk before throwing away. When you’re ready, I’m here.

PETER AARON Music editor, Chronogram. Award-winning music columnist, 2005-2006, Daily Freeman. Contributor, Village Voice, Boston Herald, All Music Guide, All About Jazz.com, Jazz Improv and Roll magazines. Musician. Consultations also available. Reasonable rates.

See samples at www.peteraaron.org. E-mail info@peteraaron.org for rates. I also offer general copy editing and proofreading services, including editing of academic and term papers.

76 music ChronograM 8/13

Daniel Bachman plays Dream Away Lodge in Becket, MA on August 22.


cd reviews Arrowhead Arrowhead (2013, Pitchfork Wreckerds) 

Arrowhead sounds like Pitchfork Militia guitarist Peter Head’s long-considered response to “state” music—music of which the primary purpose is to produce heightened mental states. Most religious and ritualistic music could be called state music, as well as the tuba-heavy music of the actual State, the State at war. But the idea of music as neuro-technology is most powerfully associated with New Age, and that is the terrain that Head and Michael Patrick explore with Arrowhead. To understand the modification that Arrowhead wishes to perform upon the New Age, look no further than the title of track one: “Darkness Is Good.” In most respects, this is meditative, instrumental New Age music, made of earth and ether in equal measure, woven in gradually shifting patterns, rich in omen and aboriginal evocations. Arrowhead simply permits more darkness, more disturbance, and more hints of menace on the periphery of these engrossing, desert-themed pattern studies. Menace is easy to convey via the ominous synth pad, but Arrowhead is quite above that. The band upsets in ways more subtle and acute, via skittering synth junk and other sonic irritants: insect-husk percussion, distant, broadcast-grade voices, and the spidery pawing of kalimbas. It’s a potent timbral mix, especially in its balance of dry and wet, of standard rock instrumentation, electronics, and “world” instruments, including Head’s many one-of-a-kind home builds. The best compositions here—like “Darkness Is Good” and the stunning, motile minimalism of “Big Deep”—do, in fact, change the state. Peterheadhimself.com. —John Burdick

Neil Alexander Darn That Dream (2013, P-Dog Records)

Ever-active Hudson Valley keyboardist Neil Alexander seemingly does it all—playing jazz fusion synth and electric piano in NAIL, the Mahavishnu Project, and Mr. Gone; out-there acid rock with Pink Floyd tribute band The Machine; and, at Beacon’s Howland Cultural Center on August 10, a centennial-celebrating performance of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring. But it wasn’t until the recording of Darn That Dream that Alexander at last realized his own dream, of making a solo acoustic piano album. And, just a few seconds into the opening version of the Jimmy Van Heusen / Eddie DeLange title standard, it becomes crystal clear that the wait has been more than worthwhile. In fact, one could say that that track, “Darn That Dream (Version 1),” makes a fine encapsulation of the approach Alexander displays throughout this disc: that of twinkling touches recalling his classical training and the freewheeling, impressionistic flights of his predominant postbop influences of Keith Jarrett, Chick Corea, and Bill Evans, as well as the shimmering, stride-into-bop runs of the great Art Tatum. But despite the album’s many moody interludes, the hammering hands of Alexander’s hard-fusion background aren’t brushed aside completely; see the thundering “Stop for a Moment (and Listen),” which is full of frantic passages and brings to mind Cecil Taylor dive-bombing Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Flight of the Bumblebee.” Pristinely captured over two dates at the Falcon in Marlboro, Darn That Dream is a delight for admirers of exemplary jazz piano. Nailmusic.com. —Peter Aaron

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Shear Shazar Shear Shazar (2013, Cussy in a Case Records)

Woodstock’s Jules Shear and Pal Shazar are both acclaimed artists; the Bangles and Cyndi Lauper scored hits with his tunes, she’s a successful novelist/songwriter/painter. Married for umpteen years, they’ve each released numerous solo albums, on which neither has shied away from “romantic turmoil” material. On Shear Shazar, for the first time, they cowrite and duet on all songs, offering a look at the steadfast love that’s weathered that turmoil. To tell the story, they’ve combined Shazar’s penetrating lyrics and unorthodox chord-play with Shear’s classic melodicism and elegant turns of phrase, resulting in pleasant friction here, sparks there, even some touching dissonance. Producer Julie Last (she worked on Double Fantasy—of course) conjures a spare, Americanachamber pop atmosphere, dialing in just enough of Ross Rice’s delicate piano, Anthony “Fooch” Fucilli’s keening fiddle, and Kyle Esposito’s nimble acoustic to accentuate the hooky tunes. The focus, however, is on the two burnished voices, each harmony integral to the melody. “Beauty to My Bones,” with its minor-key shadows, acknowledges sins overcome in a lover’s forgiving embrace. On the sprightly “See That Star,” Shear defiantly states his disregard for “anyone’s approval” except Shazar’s, noting the past is “a million miles away,” then entwines with Shazar on the chorus, joyfully singing, “No one understands.” “Silent Movie” and “Passion Flowers” find Shear and Shazar casting inevitable downtimes as part of a greater whole, gracefully allowing pain into a house built on a sturdy foundation. It’s a house you’ll leave inspired, wanting to return again. Shear-shazar.com. —Robert Burke Warren chronogram.com Listen to tracks by the artists reviewed in this issue.

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Books

ROOTS CRUISE

JOHN MILWARD’S CROSSROADS ROCKS THE BLUES By Nina Shengold Photograph by Jennifer May

John Milward in front of an illustration of Keith Richards by Margie Greve

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W

oodstock’s Golden Notebook has hosted many author events, but the launch for John Milward’s Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock’n’Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues) may be the first to provoke a call to the cops. The launch party at the Colony Café was a multigenre affair. Milward read excerpts and sang pertinent songs, his gritty vocals accompanied by solo guitar on roots tunes and by his long-running band Comfy Chair on electric blues and rock numbers.The stage was flanked by his wife Margie Greve’s illustrations for the book­—striking black-and-white portraits of such blues and rock icons as Robert Johnson, Howlin’ Wolf, Eric Clapton, and Stevie Ray Vaughan. As Comfy Chair wailed on “Black MagicWoman” (a Santana hit via Fleetwood Mac’s Peter Green via Otis Rush), an intoxicated audience member “doing the Woodstock hippie dance” lost her balance, knocking over an easel with portraits of Taj Mahal and—wait for it—Peter Green. “She was okay, the paintings were okay,” Milward says, laughing. “And you know that little room off the balcony at the Colony? During the rock set, there was a couple up there ‘engaging in lewd behavior.’ The club owner went up and said, ‘You’re going to have to leave.’ And the guy says, ‘Can’t we have a few more minutes?’” That’s when she brandished her phone to dial the Woodstock Police. The cops never came—the club owner’s threat did the trick—but Milward gleefully echoes a friend’s response: “Wow, man, this is a great literary reading if they’re doing it in the balcony!” Milward and Greve share a classic white cottage in the Bearsville Flats with two mellow cats, Tipitina and Big Red. The walls display Greve’s woodcuts and prints and hundreds of neatly shelved CDs and records. “Leftover swag from my rock critic days,” explains Milward, an affable man with a soul patch; he’s a little abashed by the framed gold Ted Nugent album in a back hallway, explaining that he profiled the singer for the Chicago Reader in the mid-’70s, “before he became such an absolute asshole.” Sitting near his cherished 1930 National Triolian resonator guitar, Milward notes that he’s usually the one with the interview pad. Crossroads grew out of a feature he wrote for influential roots-music magazine No Depression on “The Sons of Gary Davis.” The legendary blind preacher and guitar virtuoso gave lessons in his Bronx apartment to many younger players, including David Bromberg, Ry Cooder, Stefan Grossman, and Woody Mann. “I have no children,” Davis once remarked, “but I’ve got many sons.” Milward met Mann at West Virginia blues camp. “Woody had these old tapes of his lessons with Davis,” he recalls. “He was playing this little ragtimey thing— he was a very accomplished player for 15—and in the background you can hear Gary Davis clanging on his guitar. That’s folklore at its base. It’s like an oral history.” Milward also played guitar as a teen growing up in the Westchester suburbs; his first was a Daphne blue ’65 Fender Mustang. “I wasn’t in high school bands,” he says. “I brought the guitar to college, where it sat in the closet. Basically, I ignored it for 20 years.” He started playing again in midlife, while working as a freelance rock journalist. “I’d been a music freak all the way through,” he explains.After studying journalism and hosting a radio show at Northwestern, he veered between a “crazy job working for an encyclopedia” and freelancing for Chicago papers. The Chicago Daily News soon put him on staff. “The first week, you’re supposed to get acquainted, learn where everything is? My second day there, Elvis Presley died. It was a baptism by fire,” Milward recalls. “I didn’t leave the building for 24 hours. Every newsroom in the country was doing the exact same thing, all trying to avoid the lede ‘The King Is Dead.’” After the Daily News folded, Milward wrote for Rolling Stone, the New York Times, USA Today, and the Philadelphia Inquirer, moving to New York in the late ’70s. Shortly after meeting Greve, he “threw things asunder” by renting a summer place from composer George Tsontakis. By summer’s end, he’d relocated to Bearsville. “We’ve been a commuting couple ever since,” he reports. He’s based mostly upstate, while an art director job keeps her in Manhattan during the week. Along with the musician portraits for Crossroads, Greve contributed an “author photo” illustration, which, Milward quips, “added some hair and subtracted some years.” (He’s repaying the favor by being her “editorial sherpa” on a musicbased art project.) They were thrilled when advance copies arrived in the mail. “It’s like seeing your byline for the first time, but it’s a book,” beams Milward, whose first book,

The Beach Boys Silver Anniversary, came out in 1985. “For all the toil, we’re both pretty proud of it.” He worked on Crossroads nonstop for two-and-a-half years. “The first year, I read everything,” he says, and it’s barely an exaggeration; the bibliography cites nearly 200 titles. “And, of course, there are all these conflicting accounts. Did Muddy Waters make Buddy Guy a baloney sandwich, or a salami sandwich?” He also interviewed artists such as Bonnie Raitt, Geoff Muldaur, and Jorma Kaukonen. “I realized I was not going to get quality time with Clapton and Keith Richards,” he says drily. (He did interview Richards for a 1986 feature on Dirty Work; they shared a bottle of Makers’ Mark.) For such marquee names, he relied on painstaking research and well-chosen quotes, such as Richards recalling how Brian Jones named the band while placing a phone ad, “The Best of Muddy Waters album was on the floor—and track one was ‘Rolling Stone.’ So the band’s name was picked for us by Muddy Waters.” The Stones went on to adapt blues classics by Robert Johnson (“You Got to Move”), Muddy Waters (“Satisfaction”), and more. Blues-based rock, along with an earlier wave of folk-era rediscoveries, like Mississippi John Hurt playing the Newport Folk Festival, injected new life into faded careers. Crossroads recounts moving stories of elderly players—some of whom had to relearn their old tunes—becoming “strangers in a strange land: Southern black men in a northern white world. Songs that they once played to rowdy neighbors in a juke joint or at a fish fry were now performed for attentive college kids.” “B. B. King once said, ‘Playing the blues is like being black twice,’” Milward says. “Young blacks didn’t want to know from the blues. A) it was their parents’ music; b) they didn’t want to go back to Alabama. They were listening to Ray Charles, the Coasters, the Drifters. So was B.B. King grateful to find a white rock’n’roll audience? You bet. He had a whole second career, especially after ‘The Thrill Is Gone.’” Crossroads’s title refers to the site where Robert Johnson reputedly sold his soul to the devil in trade for musical genius. But it also alludes to the crosspollination of musical styles. “Folk music purists, blues purists, and rock’n’roll purists don’t meet very often,” Milward notes. “As I got older, I related more to the rootsier players. I knew of these players—Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Mississippi John Hurt—but didn’t really start listening to them till I was in my forties, when the music on the radio wasn’t the music I loved anymore. It was my midrock crisis.” That “midrock crisis” also launched a band named for Monty Python’s Spanish Inquisition skit (“Not ... the Comfy Chair!”). Principals include Milward on vocals and rhythm guitar, with Josh Roy Brown, Steve Mueller, Larry Packer, Eric Parker, Baker Rorick, and the late Steve Burgh; according to a recent flyer, they play “music at the crossroads of blues, rock, country, and soul.” That’s a busy intersection, and many names weave throughout the book. Milward cites legendary music collector Harry Smith, whose Anthology of American Folk Music was the gateway drug for a generation of blues fans, demonstrating string tricks to a young Patti Smith at the Chelsea Hotel and producing the Fugs’ first album. “And then you have Ed Sanders of the Fugs visiting Joplin two days before she died and noticing the bangles she wore to cover her heroin tracks.” Sanders, like many of Milward’s interviewees, lives inWoodstock. Crossroads’s local connections cover the waterfront, from the exploits of local impresario Albert Grossman to Muddy Waters receiving a key to the town while recording The MuddyWatersWoodstock Album, produced by the late Levon Helm. Indeed, the web of interconnections is so dense that one waggish GoodReads reviewer called it “Six Degrees of Robert Johnson.” But the real joy of Crossroads is well-tuned prose that illuminates the music along with its history. Here’s Milward on Hendrix: “‘Voodoo Chile’ is a 15-minute musical meditation in the key of E, a virtual Gone with the Wind of the blues that opened deep in the Delta with Hendrix repeatedly hammering on a single string before casting our long, reverberating lead lines. Hendrix references ‘Catfish Blues’ in the introduction, but by the time the band enters, it’s as if the blues had already moved from Mississippi to Chicago, with Hendrix’s lyrics suggesting Muddy’s “Hoochie Coochie Man.’” For added pleasure, Milward suggests, “You canYouTube your way through it. The book starts with a blues collector who was willing to travel from Brooklyn to Washington to listen to a rare 78—not to buy it, just to listen—and now, boom, it’s all right there on YouTube.” Pull up a comfy chair. 8/13 ChronograM books 79


SHORT TAKES Literary locavores will savor this summer picnic of tasty paperback fiction. SEVEN LOCKS Christine Wade Atria Books, 2013, $15

Wade’s you-are-there account of farm life in the Hudson Valley during the early stirrings of the Revolutionary War is compelling reading, with a brave, unconventional Dutch woman at its heart. When her husband mysteriously disappears, she’s left with the work of two, amid swirling rumors. Winner of a James Jones Fellowship Prize, Seven Locks makes local history sing, offering a fresh new twist on a venerable Catskill legend. Appearing at Maple Grove, Poughkeepsie, 8/25 at 3pm.

THE CASTILIAN SUITE Graham Blackburn Blackburn Books, 2012, $14.99

Subtitled Ambition & Love in Eight Movements, Blackburn’s musically structured novel follows its peripatetic hero, composer Roger Coulter, from a youthful trip to Franco’s Spain through 1960s London, Bob Dylan-era New York, and Aix-en-Provence to 1980s Hollywood, where he finds success of a sort scoring B movies. Bearsville author Blackburn has a keen sense of character and place, and his prose is as rich and flavorful as a well-tempered rioja.

SCOUT’S HONOR Charley Rosen, foreword by Phil Jackson Codhill Press, 2013, $14.95

Fast-paced and irreverent, this new novel by Ulster County’s—and possibly the planet’s—preeminent basketball writer follows pro scout Rob Lassner’s effort to reconcile his love of the game with his contempt for its business underbelly. Scouring high school and college gyms for the next rising star, he’s a curmudgeonly man of honor in an NBA run by corporate bean counters. From the locker room to the peak of Meads Mountain, Rosen slam-dunks it.

THE OLD LION Marlene Newman Troy Book Makers, 2013, $18

The author of Myron’s Magic Cow returns with a heartfelt, wise, and miraculous novel set during WWII. Andy, whose widowed father is serving overseas, escapes from his bullying uncle by hiding in the lion cage of a traveling circus. Spunky New Yorker Evie writes about fireside chats, ration stamps, and scrap drives in her beloved diary. She spends an unforgettable summer at her family’s upstate farm, which is hosting a certain circus with a very old lion—and an intriguing new boy.

THE HYPOTHETICAL GIRL Elizabeth Cohen Other Press, 2013, $14.95

In this suite of 15 stories about the vicissitudes of Internet dating, girl meets boy again and again, and he’s never quite as expected. In lesser hands, the setup might become repetitive, but Adirondack writer Cohen is sure-handed and inventive; there are cross-cultural adoptions, aging dogs, and midget yoginis in the mix, and her 21st-century romantics— desperate, fraudulent, lusty, or lost—never fail to surprise. Appearing 8/24 at 4pm, Golden Notebook.

THEA GALLAS ALWAYS GETS HER MAN Kristen Panzer Panzer Press, 2012, $14.95

Amateur sleuths have a wide variety of day jobs, but Thea Gallas may be fiction’s first detective / lactation consultant-in-training. A creepy neighbor’s gone missing in Boston’s Jamaica Plain; the local cops buy his wife’s cover story, but the irrepressible Thea does not. Her inquisitive zeal—and her libido—undiminished by pregnancy, she turns over all the right rocks. Millerton author Panzer’s cockeyed blend of nursing lore, mom’s intuition, and deep-dish neighborhood weirdness is a winner.

80 books ChronograM 8/13

Elect H. Mouse State Judge Nelly Reifler Faber & Faber, 2013, $11

N

elly Reifler’s Elect H. Mouse State Judge  is a smart, deep-hearted page turner of a novelette. Forget any doubts about reading a book with a mouse at its center. Reifler, who lives in Malden-on-Hudson and teaches at Sarah Lawrence, has skillfully packed big elements—childhood, suspense, sex, longing, violence, religion, love— in one small, swift-moving, adorable package. If that last descriptive tidbit seems just a bit mouselike, it may not be unintentional: Reifler easily works on many levels at once, mini to meta. Within this dollhouse-scaled world dwell very human extremes. Running his successful campaign on a platform of progressive idealism, local politico H. Mouse is privately flawed, a man haunted by past acts. On election night, his two daughters are kidnapped from the Mouse residence, a small and tidy house in a small, tidy neighborhood. Taking a page from the universal playbook on political damage control, Mouse eschews the police for the more discreet services of a couple who work as private eyes. The couple lives with the woman’s younger sister in a fancy, two-story house complete with elevator, palm trees, pool, and inflatable chairs.  That the Mouses are actually mice; that the kidnappers, a family of backwoods-dwelling religious fanatics, are Sunshine dolls (a ’70s line of hippy-ish, calico-clad dolls); that the private eyes are Barbie and Ken, and the sister is Skipper—is not entirely beside the point. Those little details that make them recognizable as mice, or dolls—furry, round stomachs, bendable legs— underscore their emotional lives. The Sunshine family have “hinged arms that clicked back and forth”—a primitive rigidity that also underlies their unwavering, scary fanaticism. H. Mouse sits on his porch in a “real wood rocking chair” and is usually hungry—he often seems to find tangible reality too novel to take action, and he has a hungry, yearning soul. The most enjoyable characters may be Barbie, Ken, and Skipper. Barbie, apropos to her many real incarnations, can wear many hats (all of them cute). She’s an unapologetic narcissist with fabulous accessories. She and Ken are drawn to each other like pink magnets. “Poolside, they humped, slamming against each other, grinding, wedging their legs into each other’s crotches. Skipper watched in her plaid jumper, bored,” Reifler writes. I remember, at seven, using Barbie and Ken to act out my bizarre misconceptions of how sex worked, and one can almost see a seven-year-old puppeteering them together here. Reifler also nails the dim self-awareness of poor Skipper, condemned to preteenhood: “She couldn’t decide if she was missing something, or if she was the one that was missing.” The book’s narrative structure suggests childhood as well: Every chapter is loyal to a singular point of view, so each character can only move forward in time, and plot, so much at once. Such is the way I remember playing: Set up the dolls, enact something, be interrupted, leave them just as we put them, come back and pick up where we left off. Apparently, Reifler based the book on stories she made up in her own childhood, involving a family of mice, the Sunshine family of dolls, and Barbie and Ken.  What began as a private project turned into a book. I’m glad it did, and you will be too. Part Beatrix Potter, part Kafka, it’s a total delight. Appearing 8/17 at 5pm, Golden Notebook. —Jana Martin


Experience What will you experience at Mirabai?

Save Yourself Kelly Braffet Crown, 2013, $25

R

atchetsburg, Pennsylvania, is a familiar place: its convenience marts, its midrange seafood place, its gritty neighborhoods where older houses press too closely against one another, its suburbs. Its headlines, too, could be from almost anywhere in the US: Christian Worship Group Objects to Birth Control Lesson in High School Biology Class. Man Convicted in Vehicular Homicide Sentenced to 15 Years. Behind those stock postmodern miseries are humans in worlds of anguish, and Kelly Braffet brings two families into crystalline focus in Save Yourself. The Elsheres are fundamentalists who’ve cornered the local market on purity rings and run a worship group in their basement. The widower Cusimano, a blue-collar alcoholic who steeped his misery in cheap beer, is now imprisoned for a horrible hit-and-run. The Elshere daughters and the Cusimano sons are already paying heavily for their parents’ choices as the novel opens. Twentysomething Patrick Cusimano toils joylessly on the night shift at the convenience store, slogging through a sucking swamp of shame and alienation. Teenaged Layla Elshere, who started a ruckus that ended the career of a popular high school bio teacher for discussing condoms, has dyed her hair (what remained of it after the popular kids set it on fire) black, rejected her parents’ beliefs in every possible way, and become a core member of the school’s alienated Goth set. As the tale builds, we experience life in Ratchetsburg from the perspectives of Patrick—who already had enough worries without being stalked by underage Goth seductress Layla—and of Verna, Layla’s younger sister, who’s caught between trying to remain a good Christian daughter and the relentless sex-shaming bullying of the In Crowd. Then there’s Caro, the seafood-place waitress who’s playing house with Mike, the elder Cusimano brother, while growing steadily more attracted to the deeper, subtler Patrick. New Paltz resident Braffet is a sensual, concrete writer. We feel and smell the scenes she sets, from the pristine misery of the Elshere dinner table to the shabby Cusimano living room with its ever-ready cooler of beer. Under the fluorescent lights of Zoney’s GoMart, on the high school loading dock where the alienated teens go to smoke and reaffirm their infinite superiority, in the blur of the corner bar, we are right there with her characters as they struggle with their loads of pain like swimmers wearing ankle weights. Glimmers of hope surface and resubmerge as a growing sense of doom builds in their hearts and ours. As Verna increasingly follows her sister away from an empty Christianity into an even emptier nihilism, as Patrick falls into joyless sex with Layla, as Caro begins to realize that her hope of stability and coziness with Mike Cusimano will never be realized, the reader wants to yell “Watch out!” Yet the characters are so beset by deftly drawn reality that even as they stumble through bad choices, it’s hard to see exactly what they’d do instead. When the catastrophe comes, it is both inevitable and weirdly random— like bad news, like real life. Mundane threads have been woven deftly into breathtaking all-natural horror. Braffet leaves us wiser, anguished, praying to whatever powers we favor that the tiny, tentative green shoot of hope will flourish in the scorched earth. One certainty: Psychological thriller fans will be ravenously awaiting her next book. Appearing at 8/17 at 7pm, Oblong Books, Rhinebeck; 9/28 at 7pm, Inquiring Minds, New Paltz. —Anne Pyburn Craig

Mirabai of Woodstock

Nourishment for Mind & Spirit ®

Since 1987, always a new experience.

23 Mill Hill Rd Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 Open Daily 11 to 7

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What if everything you know is wrong? Does poetic justice exist? Do we have the right to end our own lives? Should drugs be legal? Can prostitution be beneficial? Rational Polemics is a provocative, controversial, outrageous book that dares to challenge the ideas and values that most of the world has been spoon-fed from infancy onward– a welcome breath of fresh air from a writer who might be one of the most original thinkers of our time.

Rational Polemics by Richard Devens. Available at: OutskirtsPress.com, Amazon.com, bn.com

8/13 ChronograM books 81


POETRY

Edited by Phillip X Levine. Deadline for our September issue is August 5. Send up to three poems or three pages (whichever comes first). Full submission guidelines: www.chronogram.com/submissions.

Rainbow Masterpiece

Dysfictional Writing

Rainbow Tango Don’t say mango

(I’m between genres.) —p

I miss this kiss in August —Hadley Holt Frydman (5 years)

Silence Silence is so accurate —Mark Rothko Silence is so inaccurate. It is the sense of absence when someone is gone. It is the ellipsis at the end of the story… It is not the comma, but the period. It is the break at the end of the end-stopped line. It fills the spaces between the fingers and toes. It is the hesitation before you choose: the interior sigh whenever you lose. The empty room after the door closes; It is the blank page, the white space. It is what remains unsaid. —Ed Meek

Recycling

The Breakfast Banana

Ironically, We try to flee The dead we seem to fear.

She wanted to write, “The Perfect Banana” But that seemed to give the banana an alter ego. Staring at it hanging from the hook With the rest of the bunch she thought, “Why wait for it to ripen?” In its pale fading limey green and Lightly yellowed skin it appeared to be waiting. If she let it hang the hues would pop-up leopard spots Especially in this late July heat And who wants to eat a banana that can run faster than you can. Between brown and green lies yellow. It’s a subtle yellow, not altogether bright or golden, But rather soft and sweet. She thought again, “To wait for something to ripen Is to pass on the taste of surprise And what fun is that?”

We box them up And bury them So they won’t reappear. Now science shows That nothing’s lost, Not even when we die. Life’s energy, So human once, Becomes our air supply. We breathe our dead And die in stead; Thus life goes on forever,

The Dance

So when they say We all must pray, It’s to our own endeavor.

He smiled and she, longing To be sipped, passed His white picket fence, Leapt to the place of the beat

And so it seems Our god is we Whose science mind can peek

Ebony and ivory played sweetly Swaying gently with the melody until, The sound ground to a hum and whistle And a chill changed her pulse Tango, Tap, or Rhumba Nothing could stay the Fates. The music ended with a clash And the last strains faded out the open door. —Deirdre Dowling

Night Sounds The new neighbor has put in a pond and now a din of spring peepers fills the night. He’s fresh from the city and may be disturbed by the sound. But I’m thinking maybe I, too, need a pond. —Matthew J. Spireng

82 poetry ChronograM 8/13

Into this complex Trick of ours, A system so unique.

—Pamela Ugor

A Very Short Novel It wasn’t actually an agreement, you see, it couldn’t have been. Not after the living hell they’d just gone through. —Dean Goldberg

—Betty Renner

Poughkeepsie Is A Color You Do Not Understand I looked at something and it made everything seem like I was standing with you in a field. We were in the middle of it, the field. You were caring about everything, everything until the sky was filled with your care for empty places you can only forget, like your care for Poughkeepsie. And the space near the field was what no one could see. And there was a window made of nonroad into a place where there are no cars, no cars only your memories of forgetting Poughkeepsie, memories meant for nothing your memories of the fields meant for doing nothing, the fields meant for doing nothing near Poughkeepsie. And we were doing nothing together wearing shirts made of things you can’t remember and feelings. But we were above the field and without road, without road, without it with the color you don’t understand that makes Poughkeepsie never be with you, the color that makes Poughkeepsie a pure truth within us through care used and gone and great fields of disappearance that hold us upon its emptiness always. —Brian Loatman


Song to the Cicadas The cicadas are singing to the sun. The cicadas are singing to the sun. After 17 years indoors, underground, The cicadas are singing to the sun! -Lyla Yastion

The Brood of Lucky ’13 The next time the cicadas come I’ll be 46, with: a mortgage or a hovel full of empties; a woman brave enough to try it or disproportionate arms; kids, or more abortions (more abortions, more abortions); another list of the right people I met at the wrong time.

Coatcheck

The Sow Under The Oak Tree

I used to wish upon a hammock star for your possession

Beneath an oak a sow pigged out on acorns, Then napped under the shady canopy, At last, refreshed, she set her snout to digging, Baring the roots that fed the ancient tree.

now dandruff almost sparkles on my black T-shirt …looks pretty similar to that sky and makes me wonder if I was just wondering what it would be like to Have something free of rebuke to play with— to transfer your knock-out smile and teenage curiosity to compulsion to easy access met by my ability to fool you into thinking that I loved you… if wicked dandruff can teach bad Breath can forgive

Burrow back down your holes, bugs and take your pressures with you.

—Peter Coco

I won’t miss your humming thrumming, buzzing through my fumblings. When the wind and rain knock your vile remnants from the tree bark my pity will be elsewhere:

Pick-Up Sticks

Seventeen more blinks.

single sharpened stick from stack, structure reinvents itself weight (relentlessly) shifts.

—Mike Vahsen

With Static gathering in step, forward escape. Attempt thwarted by miniature lightning. Flash against brass, grasp immediately retracted. Shaken off, reformed into hover. Hesitant ly held, a moment before completed release. -A.J. Huffman

Each time you -delicately -excise

“Stop! Stop!” called out a raven from the branches. “The oak tree’s roots are damaged when you dig.” “What do I care if this useless stump does wither? Acorns are all I’m after,” said the pig. The oak tree’s voice then joined the conversation. “Ingrate!” said to the swine the mighty tree, “If you could lift your snout up from your grubbing, You’d see that all the acorns come from me.” ------An ignoramus mocking education, Scoffing at science, is blind just like that sow, Failing to see that on the tree of knowledge Ripened the comforts he’s enjoying now. —Ivan Andreyevich Krylov, translated by Yana Kane

The Coward [to D. N.] “It’s a marathon, baby” you often said then sprinted off, shut down, and disappeared at the first sign of exertion, when four miles had gone so beautifully, but you stumbled at the first hill. When I went looking for you you were nowhere to be found nor would you utter a word; hiding behind a friend, you had run off the course entirely. What a lonely stretch that was, as I, pushed beyond all limits, without strength or hope, staggered on without you. —Adam Markowitz

One Sleepless Night After Another

You can posit balance, fulcrum, center of gravity but still, your next move could upend the universe.

i get drunk on wine and mumble metaphors and acid waves, white roses and a mausoleum for juvenile cliché. see? i’m already doing it, stuttering through a long winded meandering anticlimatic unintelligible stumbling mumbling bumbling idiot diatribe rant of unbelievably undeniable inexplicable stupidity. where else can i go with this? nowhere? shit, i’m already there.

—Catherine Wald

—Ian Gillis 8/13 ChronograM poetry 83


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Community Pages

Driving the Oblong Route 22 By Anne Pyburn Craig Photograph by Anne Cecille Meadows

the j. H. ketcham hose co. in dover plains

T

he Oblong is a special place. Two miles wide and sixty long, this stretch of territory along the New York/Connecticut border was being disputed by New York and Connecticut back when they were just colonies. But as European settlements took hold, the Oblong benefited from being settled largely by peace-loving Quakers. Today, the region is still a largely gentle place: rolling, pretty farmlands and forests interrupted occasionally by towns that have grown more in personality than they have in size. Take a ride down the highway through the Berkshire foothills—as close as you can get to southern New England without leaving New York—and let the peaceable essence of the Oblong fill your soul. Bring your camera or your sketchbook or your journal—the gentle, rolling Oblong may stir your soul. You can start in Dover Plains and drive the merged Rt. 22/Rt 55 down through Wingdale, a hamlet once dominated by a state psychiatric center that closed in the 1990s and is rumored to be haunted. More happily, in Wingdale, you can find the quiet beauty of the Slocum-Mostachetti Preserve. The preserve is located about a mile west of Rt. 22 on Pleasant Ridge Road, and the ridge lives up to its name; here you’ll find good walks, abundant wildlife watching, and an entrée to one of eastern New York’s lesser known blessings, the Great Swamp. The Great Swamp is 6,000 acres of precious wetlands, and is looked after by two nonprofits, the Oblong Land Conservancy and the Friends of the Great Swamp. Slocum-Mostachetti is an upland suitable for hiking; other preserves are better viewed from a kayak or canoe. As you’re traveling down Route 22, pause a moment and appreciate this ancient miracle that provides the Harlem Valley

with drinking water and a riotous variety of wildlife with a place to call home. Heading south on Route 22, you’ll enter the pleasant Dutchess County town of Pawling. Pawling, like Wingdale, is a station stop on Metro-North’s Harlem Valley line—a singular spot as the rail line intersects with the Appalachian Trail here. Take a ramble in the Pawling Nature Preserve, near the Pawling/Wingdale line off Quaker lake Road, and you may find yourself meeting folks who’ve been rambling all the way from Maine or Georgia. The village of Pawling is a great place to stop for lunch, or pick up a picnic to take along.You’ll find plenty of choices, from sit-down dining to pizza by the slice; you can rent a bike for your exploration. You’ll also find a rich history and a proud one. Pawling is where the Quakers established their home base around 1720, and abolished slavery in 1767, nearly a century before the Feds got around to it. They also opted out of the Revolutionary War, but the war came to town without a welcome mat: wounded soldiers were healed or buried on the aptly named Purgatory Hill, and George Washington spent two months here, headquartered at the preserved John Kane House. Also preserved is the Oblong Meeting House, emblematic of the simple worship tradition of the Quakers and commandeered for a time by the Revolutionary officers as a hospital. Proceed south on Route 22 and you’ll find yourself crossing the Putnam County line into Patterson, another historic corner of the Great Swamp/Oblong region.Take a self-guided walking tour of historic churches in the hamlet, or ponder the adventures of Sybil Ludington, a teenage girl sometimes called the “female Paul Revere,” although her ride was actually longer than his, sneaking past Tories on a rainy night with the news that Danbury was in flames. 8/13 ChronograM route 22 85


Food & Drink

The bottling machine at Helderberg Meadworks. Bottom: The current batch features platinumcolored wax; each year gets a different color to differentiate them.

Mead The New Boss Honey in the Glass by Peter Barrett

86 food & drink ChronograM 8/13

I

t seems worthwhile, on the heels of the beekeeping piece last month, to hip you all to the leading edge of a new mead industry that could well take its place alongside hard cider and microdistilling as another excellent artisanal expression of our region’s natural bounty. Honey is a powerfully antimicrobial substance; its high sugar concentration and the hydrogen peroxide it contains in small amounts makes it an impossible medium for bacteria or yeast to earn a living on. Dilute it with water, however, by about four to one, and fermentation will occur. The result is mead, the oldest alcoholic drink in human history. Mead dates back to the dawn of civilization, before agriculture: Traces of honey and rice have been found in 10,000-year-old Chinese fermentation vessels. (Some historians have posited that our urge to ferment grains gave rise to agriculture in the first place; we all descend from brewers and drunkards). Peter Voelker started making mead as a hobby about 15 years ago, after his homemade beer failed to excite him: “I couldn’t make anything as good as the craft beers I was buying.” He turned to mead, and spent the ensuing period experimenting and modifying his recipe until he arrived at the current version. Now the situation is reversed: “I have never tasted better than the mead I am making.” Last year, he turned pro, founded Helderberg Meadworks, and began selling his Heritage mead from his home in Duanesburg, a few miles outside of Schenectady. Voelker self-funded the modest equipment cost, and with virtually no overhead he broke even the first year. In France, unorthodox small-scale winemakers are known as “garagistes.” Voelker embodies this descriptor quite literally; his bonded, licensed facility consists of a long, narrow room he walled off from his garage when he took the plunge and got all the federal, state, and local permits required to make mead commercially. Coils of plastic tubing hang along one wall, and several hulking white plastic fermentation tanks huddle at the end of the room. On a table sit bottles from both vintages (he is prohibited from putting a vintage on the label, but he changes the wax color each year to tell them apart).


Meadmaker Peter Voelker checks the progress of fermentation in this year’s mead.

Trained as a nuclear and civil engineer, and still holding down a day job in the latter capacity, Voelker hopes someday that his side project will become his sole occupation. It’s not unlikely; his first two vintages are sold out and he’s waiting impatiently for the current batch, quietly frothing in two 200-gallon tanks, to finish fermenting so he can bottle it. Selling everything is a good problem to have, he admits, but “telling stores that I have nothing left to sell them sucks.” In response to the enthusiastic demand, his anticipated production curve for next year next year has steepened, from 400 cases to 800. Two new 300-gallon fermenters sit empty alongside their busy brethren in anticipation. His wife Kirsten helps out on the business side, but it’s essentially a one-man operation. Voelker, though imposingly tall, still looks every bit a mild-mannered, middle-aged engineer. His calm demeanor belies a deep connection to one of mead’s most storied traditions, however. He is a direct descendant of King Harald Fairhair of Norway. His label, featuring a stylized Viking clutching a sword, also includes the Stavanger Swords, a monument commemorating the battle of Hafrsfjord in 872, when Harald united Norway into one country. Voelker is also a fan of obscure Scandinavian metal, in addition to mead, which argues persuasively for genealogy as destiny, or at least a powerful influence. Because of its high alcohol content, Voelker is unable to put the word “mead” on the label; instead, the cumbersome phrase “other than standard wine” cites its legal designation. “Heritage” refers to his ancestry and his determination to carry on the ancient tradition of fermenting honey. After many trials,Voelker has settled upon a particular wine yeast (D47) for achieving the best result. Notable mostly for its understated nature, its main contribution besides alcohol seems largely to be the absence of any strong yeast flavor, which is a welcome distinction; too many meads taste too strongly of yeast. The major factor in his mead’s complexity is his use of American oak barrel staves during fermentation. The oak adds tannins, classic notes of va-

nilla, butter, and caramel—all flavors that mesh handsomely with honey—and helps it evolve and improve over time. Voelker talks about 10-year-old bottles that have developed a nutty, sherry-like oxidized quality. The high alcohol and acidity also contribute to its ageworthiness; port, sherry, and other fortified wines usually fall in the 18-20 percent alcohol range, so his mead flirts with the lower end of that category. “Vikings would have used oak barrels,” he explains, and he is investigating the possibility of having some oak drinking vessels made, possibly for sale alongside each bottle.Though his own identity and branding is Norse-centric, Voelker is an avowed fan of honey wines from around the world, especially Ethiopian tej, and he credits the autheniticity of his product to the excellent local source material; people thousands of years ago would, of course, only have used local honey. Voelker also uses his well water as is, without running it through the softener he installed for the house, which contributes to its sense of place as well as providing nutrients: “The yeast loves the calcium and other minerals.” He buys from Ole McDonald’s Honey Farm in nearby Carlisle, and notes that each year’s crop tastes different; the expression of terroir is not limited to grapes. Because honey is a seasonal product (though it stores well) and fermentation takes place in the warm summer months, Voelker has arranged to have a few barrels of this year’s honey crop held for him until he is ready to use it, after the current batch of mead is bottled and the fermentation tanks are empty. “It’s the best raw honey I have ever tasted.” Asked if he keeps any hives, he replies: “I’m allergic to bees.” The recipe he began with, over 700 years old, called for boiling the honey and water before fermentation, but he feels strongly that boiling changes the flavor and defeats the purpose of using raw honey. The most recent batch, sealed with silver wax, is quite sweet, with a strong honey profile akin to liquid baklava, suggesting an affinity for cheeses and 8/13 ChronograM food & drink 87


FARMERS MARKET July 6, 2013 – September 28, 2013 Every Saturday from 10am - 2pm Front parking lot of the mall.

VISIT NEWBURGH MALL ON FACEBOOK OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.NEWBURGHMALL.COM 1401 ROUTE 300, NEWBURGH, NY 12550 845-564-1400

A local family-owned farm hand-raising high quality beef, pork and poultry

MIRON

Come visit the farm or find us at the Millbrook or White Plains Farmers’ Markets.

25 Years Experience in planning all wine and liquor needs for your

Millbrook, NY www.archriverfarm.com 845.988.6468

special occasion.

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Local Organic Grass-Fed Beef • Lamb • Goat • Veal • Pork • Chicken • Wild Salmon

N H ~ N A ~ N P Custom Cut • Home Cooking Delicatessen Nitrate-Free Bacon • Pork Roasts • Beef Roasts Bone-in or Boneless Ham: smoked or fresh Local Organic Beef • Exotic Meats (Venison, Buffalo, Ostrich) • Wild Fish 88 food & drink ChronograM 8/13

(845) 440-8676

A tasting room offering beer pairings with small plates celebrAting locAl seAsonAl products retAiling craft beer, cheese, house-mAde charcuterie, And locAl speciAlty food products personalized service for beer And food pAirings


caption

A five-gallon carboy with a test batch of mead.

fruit-based desserts. It would also match well with spicy Asian food, subbing for an off-dry Riesling or gewürztraminer. It also suggests limitless cocktail possibilities—a subject that clearly requires much painstaking future research by your tireless correspondent—both as a base or to swap in for a liqueur or cordial. For those who might find it a bit too sweet or strong, Voelker suggests diluting it with a little seltzer or soda.The new batch, still gently fermenting, is much drier. As a result, the tannins from the oak and the natural acidity of the honey are more apparent, and complex nuances—some beery, some winey— become apparent. This less-sweet style is more versatile and food friendly, and should appeal to fans of other fermented beverages. Heritage is available in about 40 stores throughout the region, from New Paltz to Plattsburgh; a list can be found on the Helderberg website. A bottle will run you between $18 and $24, depending on the retailer.Though required to post business hours on the door, Voelker emphasizes that he is not open to the public for tours or tastings, though New York residents can order directly from the meadery and have it shipped (when the next batch is ready for sale, that is). His plans include a cider/mead hybrid using local cider and a barrelaged version that will sit in oak for a year or two before bottling. He wants to make a carbonated version, too, possibly in six packs. Only a small handful of meadmaking operations currently exist in New York, yet this will likely change. It’s easier to make than beer, since there’s no brewing or heating involved, so if you use raw honey, it’s a raw product. Mead can be flavored a million different ways, using herbs, fruit, flowers (saffron is an ancient and revered additive), or whatever else inspires, and it lends itself to a wide variety of drinking styles. Mead represents an excellent way to add significant value to an already valuable agricultural product, thus ensuring continued prosperity for bees and beekeepers alike: two populations that need our support. There’s something poetically fitting about rediscovering the oldest drink in the world as a means toward 21st-century sustainability. What’s very, very, very old is new again.  chronogram.com

wine, beer, tapas intimate, welcoming outdoor lounge, front patio, spectacular sunsets wed-mon 12pm-12am tues 4pm-12am www.jardwinepub.com water street market, new paltz

view a recipe for a mead-based cocktail from Peter Barrett.

8/13 ChronograM food & drink 89


McGillicuddy’s Restaurant & Tap House

A fine place to raise your spirits

Extensive Menu

Voted best Buffalo Wings in the Hudson Valley

Stadium Plaza, Rt 9d, WaPPingeRS FallS (845)838-3446

Family Friendly

All kids meals served in a boat and come with a toy from the McGillicuddy’s Treasure Chest

neWbuRgh toWn Plaza, Rt 300 neWbuRgh (845)564-3446

Happy Hour

tastings directory

CoRnWall Plaza, QuakeR ave. CoRnWall (845)534-3446

Every day! 3pm - 7pm and 3pm - 9pm on Fridays

84 Main St, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-9289 www.cuddysny.com

Cake Balls, hand-made for your special occasion. A work of art in each bite.

We are celebrating our

Goshen Gourmet

Café • Sweets • Bar Serving New Paltz for 23 years… 194 Main St, New Paltz

845-255-2633 www.LaBellaPizzaBistro.com

M-F: 6-4 • Sat: 6-3 • Sun: 7-2

845.294.2800

www.goshengourmetcafe.com

ANNIVERSARY and our new location at:

134 West Main Street in Goshen, NY

Specializing in CATERING: • Corporate events • Baby and Bridal Showers • Holiday platters

Waterfront Patio Dining Culinary Chefs • Raw Bar Close to Train & Walkway Over Hudson Public Boat Docking • Happy Hour Casual, Sophisticated Menus On Premise Catering • Group Tours Local Hudson Valley Foods Live Music & Entertainment

Water Street

(845) 232 -5783 1 Main Street Poughkeepsie, NY PoughkeepsieIceHouse.com

Hudson River

est. 1788

Restaurant & Tavern Riverside Weddings & Events Main Street

• Local

Fare • Seafood • Pasta

Dried Aged Prime Steaks

20 Grist Mill Lane, Gardiner, NY | TUTHILLHOUSE.com | 845.255.4151 us on Facebook for daily specials and updates!

90 tastings directory ChronograM 8/13


tastings directory

The Merchant Wine and Spirits

Bakeries The Alternative Baker 407 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-3355 www.lemoncakes.com 100% all butter scratch, full-service, small-batch, made-by-hand bakery. Best known for our breakfast egg sandwiches, scones, sticky buns, Belgian hot chocolate, lunch sandwiches (Goat Cheese Special is still winning awards), and all- vegan soups. Plus varied treats: vegan, wheat, gluten, dairy or sugarfree. Wedding cakes too. Lemon cakes shipped nationwide and for local corporate gift giving. Closed Tues/Wed but open 7 am for the best egg sandwiches ever! Served all day!

Cafes Bistro-to-Go

Outdated: An Antique Café 314 Wall St., Kingston, NY (845) 331-0030 outdatedcafe@gmail.com

Delis Jack’s Meats & Deli 79 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2244

Restaurants Gaby’s Cafe 150 Canal Street, Ellenville, NY (845) 210-1040 www.gabyscafe.com

Gilded Otter 3 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-1700 A warm and inviting dining room and pub overlooking beautiful sunsets over the Wallkill River and Shawangunk Cliffs. Mouthwatering dinners prepared by Executive Chef Larry Chu, and handcrafted beers brewed by GABF Gold Medal Winning Brewmaster Darren Currier. Chef driven and brewed locally!

Global Palate Restaurant

1433 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-3446

McGillicuddy’s 84 Main Street, New Paltz, NY www.cuddysny.com

Murray’s Tivoli 76 Broadway, Tivoli, NY (845) 757-6003 www.murraystivoli.com

Osaka 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7338 or (845) 876-7278 www.osakasushi.net Foodies, consider yourselves warned and informed! Osaka Restaurant is Rhinebeck’s direct link to Japan’s finest cuisines! Enjoy the freshest sushi and delicious traditional Japanese small plates cooked with love by this family-owned and operated treasure for over 18 years. For more information and menus, go to osakasushi.net.

Rusty’s Farm Fresh 5 Old Farm Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-8000 www.rustysfarmfresheatery.com

730 Ulster Avenue Kingston, NY (845) 331-1923

Terrapin Catering & Events 6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 889-8831 www.terrapincatering.com hugh@terrapincatering.com Local. Organic. Authentic. At a Terrapin event, you can expect the same high quality, award-winning cuisine and service that you know and love at Terrapin Restaurant. Terrapin’s professional event staff specializes in creating unique events to highlight your individuality, and will assist in every aspect of planning your Hudson Valley event.

Have a smart phone? Check out our menu!

EAT HEALTHY & ENJOY EVERY MOUTHFUL.

Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro 6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3330 www.terrapinrestaurant.com custsvc@terrapinrestaurant.com Voted “Best of the Hudson Valley” by Chronogram Magazine. From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle. Out of elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh, and dynamic: dishes to delight both body and soul. Serving lunch and dinner seven days a week. Local. Organic. Authentic.

CHINA JAPAN KOREA INDONESIA Open 7 days  Reservations Accepted Lunch and Dinner

The Garrison 2015 Route 9, Garrison, NY (845) 424-3604 www.thegarrison.com

1746 Route 9W, Esopus, NY (845) 384-6590 www.globalpalaterestaurant.com

The Hop at Beacon

Ice House

The Would Restaurant

1 Main St, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 232-5783 www.poughkeepsieicehouse.com

Extensive selection of Summer Rosés from Around the World

tastings directory

948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 www.bluemountainbistro.com Gourmet take-out store and bakery serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. Featuring local and imported organic products, sophisticated four-star food by Chefs Richard Erickson and Jonathan Sheridan, delicious homemade desserts, and special order cakes. Off-premise full-service catering and event planning for parties of all sizes.

Leo’s Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria

458 Main Street, Beacon, NY www.thehopbeacon.com 120 North Road, Highland, NY (845) 691-9883 www.thewould.com

Jar’d Wine Pub

Tuthill House

Water Street Market, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-8466 www.jardwinepub.com

20 Grist Mill Lane, Gardiner, NY (845) 255-4151 www.tuthillhouse.com

LaBella Pizza Bistro

Yobo Restaurant

194 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2633 www.labellapizzabistro.com

Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-3848 www.yoborestaurant.com

Wednesdays & Thursdays 3 Course prix fixe $25

8/13 ChronograM tastings directory 91


business directory Accommodations Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa 220 North Road, Milton, NY (877) 7-INN-SPA; (845) 795-1310 www.buttermilkfallsinn.com

Clove Cottages 200 Rock Hill Road, High Falls, NY (845) 687-4170 www.clovecottages.com

Diamond Mills 25 South Partition Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 247-0700 www.DiamondMillsHotel.com info@DiamondMillsHotel.com

The 1850 House Inn & Tavern 435 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-7800 or (855) 658-1805 www.the1850house.com 1850house@gmail.com

Alternative Energy Hudson Solar

business directory

(845) 876-3767 www.hvce.com

www.artstudioviews.com

ArtsWave Ellenville, NY www.artswave.org info@artswave.org

Dorsky Museum SUNY New Paltz 1 Hawk Dr, New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3844 www.newpaltz.edu/museum sdma@newpaltz.edu

Exposures Gallery 1357 Kings Highway, Sugar Loaf, NY (845) 469-9382 www.exposures.com

Open Wednesday to Sunday, 11am to 5pm. Internationally recognized photographer Nick Zungoli has been capturing iconic images of the Hudson Valley and world travel since 1979. Current special exhibit “Tuscana.” Fine art for residential and commercial spaces offering interior design services and installation. Commissions, stock, and photo workshops.

Garrison Art Center

Lighthouse Solar (845) 417-3485 www.lighthousesolar.com

Antiques Annex Antiques Center 7578 N Broadway, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-2843

Freight House Antiques Canal Street, Ellenville, NY (845) 798-5456

George Cole Auctioneers North Broadway (Route 9, next to IGA), Red Hook, NY (845) 758-9114 www.georgecolauctions.com

Hyde Park Antiques Center 4192 Albany Post Road (845) 229-8200 www.hydeparkantiques.net

Outdated 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0030 outdatedcafe@gmail.com

Rhinebeck Antique Emporium 5229 Albany Post Rd, Staatsburg, NY (845) 876-8168 www.rhinebeckantiqueemporium.com

The Red Hook Emporium 7392 South Broadway, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-0202 www.redhookemporium.com

Architecture

23 Garrison’s Landing, Garrison, NY (845) 424-3960 www.garrisonartcenter.org

Traffic and Criminally Related Matters Karen A. Friedman, Esq., President of the Association of Motor Vehicle Trial Attorneys, 30 East 33rd Street, 4th Fl, New York, NY (212) 213-2145, fax (212) 779-3289 www.newyorktrafficlawyers.com Representing companies and motorists throughout New York State. Speeding, Reckless Driving, DWI, Trucking Summons, and Misdemeanors, Aggravated Unlicensed Matters, Appeals, Article 78 Cases 27 Years of Trial Experience

Audio & Video

Water Street Market, New Paltz, NY www.grayowlgallery.com

Mark Gruber Gallery New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 www.markgrubergallery.com

Omi International Arts Center 1405 County Route 22, Ghent, NY www.artomi.org

Storm King Art Center (845) 534-3115 www.stormkingartcenter.org

The Barn Art at Elm Lake 2 Decker Drive, Middletown, NY (845) 697-4291 www.thebarn-art.com

Thomas Cole National Historic Site www.hudsonriverschool.org

Woodstock Artists Association and Museum 28 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY www.woodstockart.org

Art Supplies Catskill Art & Office Supply Kingston, NY: (845) 331-7780 Poughkeepsie, NY: (845) 452-1250 Woodstock, NY: (845) 679-2251

Rhinebeck Artist’s Shop

(845) 255-4480 www.RichardMillerArchitect.com

Rhinebeck & New Paltz, NY www.rhinebeckart.com

Artisans

Cabinet Designers 747 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2200 www.cabinetdesigners.com

Glenn’s Wood Sheds (845) 255-4704

Granite Factory 27 Renwick Street, (845) 562-9204 www.granitefactory.com

Herrington’s Hillsdale, NY: (518) 325-3131 Hudson, NY: (518) 828-9431 www.herringtons.com

Markertek Video Supply

John A Alvarez and Sons

www.markertek.com

3572 US 9, Hudson, NY (518) 851-9917 www.alvarezmodulars.com

Auto Sales & Services Fleet Service Center 185 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4812

Banks Mid Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union (800) 451-8373 www.mhvfcu.com

Beverages

Gray Owl Gallery

Richard Miller, AIA

Art Galleries & Centers

Attorneys

Art Studio Views

Binnewater/Leisure Time Spring Water 25 South Pine St, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0237 www.binnewater.com

Esotec (845) 246-2411 www.esotecltd.com; www.thirstcomesfirst. com; www.drinkesotec.com sales@esotecltd.com

Choose Esotec to be your wholesale beverage provider. For 25 years we’ve carried a complete line of natural, organic, and unusual juices, spritzers, waters, sodas, iced teas, and coconut water. If you are a store owner, call for details or a catalog of our full line. We’re back in Saugerties now!

Bicycle Sales, Rentals & Service pv Bicycle Shop 1557 Main Street, Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 635-3161 www.pvbikeshop.com

Book Publishers

L Browe Asphalt Services (518) 479-1400 www.broweasphalt.com

Marbletown Hardware True Value 3606 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-2098 www.marbletownhardware.com

MarkJames & Co. 199 Rt. 299, Suite 103, Highland, NY (845) 834-3047 www.markjamesandco.com info@markjames.co

N & S Supply www.nssupply.com info@nssupply.com

Will III House Design 199 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0869 www.willbuilders.com office@willbuilders.com

Cinemas Rosendale Theater Collective Rosendale, NY www.rosendaletheatre.org

Upstate Films 6415 Montgomery Street, Route 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-2515, 132 Tinker Street, Woodstock (845) 679-6608 (845) 876-2515 www.upstatefilms.org

Clothing & Accessories

Monkfish Publishing

de Marchin

22 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4861 www.monkfishpublishing.com

620 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-2657

Bookstores Mirabai of Woodstock 23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 www.mirabai.com

Building Services & Supplies

Ellipse 329 Wall Street, Kingston, NY www.ellipseny.com

Evoke Style 6406 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 516-4150 www.evokestyle.com

+ Space Gallery

Neumann Media LLC

Associated Lightning Rod Co.

Rhinebeck Department Store

The Chocolate Factory, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-5252 www.plusspace.org

65 Col Water St, Hillsdale, NY (413) 246-5776 www.neumannfineart.com

(518) 789-4603; (845) 373-8309; (860) 364-1498 www.alrci.com

1 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-5500 www.rhinebeckstore.com

92 business directory ChronograM 8/13


Cooking Classes Kelly Miller Cooks Hudson Valley, NY (203) 858-5042 www.kellymillercooks.com

Craft Galleries Crafts People 262 Spillway Road, West Hurley, NY (845) 331-3859 www.craftspeople.us

Representing over 500 artisans, Crafts People boasts four buildings brimming with fine crafts; the largest selection in the Hudson Valley. All media represented, including: sterling silver and 14K gold jewelry, blown glass, pottery, turned wood, kaleidoscopes, wind chimes, leather, clothing, stained glass, etc.

Custom Home Designer Atlantic Custom Homes 2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY (888) 558-2636 www.LindalNY.com and www.hudsonvalleycedarhomes.com info@LindalNY.com

Farm Markets & Natural Food Stores Adam’s Fairacre Farms

Route 209, Napanoch, NY (845) 647-6990 www.petersmarket.biz

Sunflower Natural Foods Market 75 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5361 www.sunflowernatural.com info@sunflowernatural.com

The Green Space 73B Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 417-7178 www.ShopTheGreenSpace.com

Financial Advisors Joanne E. Secky

Third Eye Associates, Ltd. 38 Spring Lake Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 752-2216 www.thirdeyeassociates.com

Gardening & Garden Supplies Mac’s Agway 68 Firehouse Lane, Red Hook (845) 876-1559, 145 Route 32 North, New Paltz, (845) 255-0050

389 Salisbury Turnpike, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2953 www.NDBGonline.com

Graphic Design Annie Internicola, Illustrator www.aydeeyai.com

Hair Salons

1600 Main Street, Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 635-1626 www.marionsalonspa.com

327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7500 www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org Mon-Sat 7:30 to 7:00, Sundays 9 to 5

A full-line natural foods store set on a 400-acre biodynamic farm in central Columbia County with on-farm organic Bakery and Creamery. Farm-fresh foods include cheeses, yogurts, raw milk, breads, pastries, sauerkraut, and more. Two miles east of the Taconic Parkway at the Harlemville/Philmont exit. Farm tours can also be arranged by calling the Farm Learning Center: 518-672-7500 x 231.

Kingston Farmers’ Market Kingston, NY www.kingstonfarmersmarket.org

Mother Earth’s Store House 1955 South Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 296-1069, 249 Main Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-9614, 300 Kings Mall Court, Route 9W, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5541 www.motherearthstorehouse.com

Founded in 1978, Mother Earth is committed to providing you with the best possible customer service as well as a grand selection of high quality organic and natural products. Visit one of our convenient locations and find out for yourself!

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124 Main Street, New Paltz, NY

Marion Salon

Hawthorne Valley Farm Store

Let us help you achieve success Call us at (212) 246-5087 E-mail: info@dragonsearch.net www.dragonsearchmarketing.com

Brigette Lewis and Erin Scoville

7433, Gardiner, NY (845) 895-7433 www.brookside-farm.com 1401 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-1400 www.newburghmall.com

The DragonSearch Online Marketing Manual Starting from scratch? Learn to manage your online reputation, build a loyal customer base and measure your marketing efforts to drive long term success.

Northern Dutchess Botanical Gardens

Brookside Farm

Farmers Market at Newburgh Mall

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(845) 255-8680 joanne.secky@lpl.com

Arch River Farm Millbrook, NY (845) 988-6468 www.archriverfarm.com

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DIGITAL MARKETING Search Engine Optimization / Pay-per-Click Management / Social Media

Home Furnishings & Decor Asia Barong Route 7/199 Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, MA (413) 528-5091 www.asiabarong.com

Lounge High Falls, NY (845) 687-9463 www.loungefurniture.com

Atwood Furniture (845) 657-8003 Find us on Facebook: Atwood Furniture atwoodfurniture@earthlink.net    

Farm Tables, Heirloom Quality. Hand crafted to any size from 150 to 200 year old barn wood, usually Pine or Chestnut. Also hand made Windsor chairs, Cupboards, Sideboards, Benches, Stone topped Coffee and End Tables, and Bookcases, all custom-made to fit your needs. Call or email Ken Anderson.

Home Improvement Certapro Painters (845) 987-7561 www.certapro.com

CUTTING EDGE, STRATEGIC DIGITAL MARKETING SOLUTIONS FOR BUSINESSES AND AGENCIES

Gentech LTD 3017 US Route 9W, New Windsor, NY (845) 568-0500 www.gentechltd.com

William Wallace Construction (845) 750-7335 www.williamwallaceconstruction.com

www.dragonsearchmarketing.com (212) 246-5087 info@dragonsearch.net

8/13 ChronograM business directory 93

business directory

1240 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 569-0303, 1560 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-6300, 765 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-4330 www.adamsfarms.com

Peters Market


Interior Design Mercer INTERIOR Warwick, NY (347) 853-4868 www.mercerinterior.com

New York Designer Fabric Outlet 3143 Route 9, Valatie, NY (518) 758-1555 www.nydfo.myshopify.com

Internet Services DragonSearch (845) 383-0890 www.dragonsearchmarketing.com dragon@dragonsearch.net

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts Dreaming Goddess 44 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 www.DreamingGoddess.com

Haldora 28 E Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY www.haldora.com

Hummingbird Jewelers 23 A. East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4585 www.hummingbirdjewelers.com hummingbirdjewelers@hotmail.com

Landscaping Augustine Landscaping & Nursery

business directory

9W & Van Kleecks Lane, Kingston, NY (845) 338-4936 www.augustinenursery.com

Coral Acres, Keith Buesing, Topiary, Landscape Design, Rock Art (845) 255-6634

The Crafted Garden (917) 701-2478 www.thecraftedgarden.com

Webster Landscape Sheffield, MA (413) 229-8124 www.websterlandscapes.com

Lawyers & Mediators Law Offices of Michel Haggerty 37 West Market, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3300 www.haggertylawoffices.com

Schneider, Pfahl & Rahme, LLP

Bardavon Opera House 35 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2072 www.bardavon.org

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Bethel, NY (800) 745-3000 www.bethelwoodscenter.org

Byrdcliffe Theatre Co. Inc. 45 Comeau Dr, Woodstock, NY (845) 247-4007 www.birdonacliff.org

Falcon Music & Art Productions 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY (845) 236 7970 www.liveatthefalcon.com

Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival (413) 243-0745 www.jacobspillow.org

Kaatsbaan International Dance Center www.facebook.com/kaatsbaan www.kaatsbaan.org

SPAC Saratoga Performing Arts Center 108 Avenue of the Pines, Saratoga Springs, NY (518) 584-9330 www.spac.org

Tannery Pond Concerts New Lebanon, NY (888) 820-1696 www.tannerypondconcerts.org

The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio 339 Central Ave, Albany, NY (518) 465-5233 www.thelinda.org The Linda provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personnel with world-renowned artists, academy award winning directors, headliner comedians and local, regional, and national artists on the verge of national recognition. An intimate, affordable venue, serving beer and wine, The Linda is a night out you won’t forget.

The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College Annandale-on-Hudson, NY (845) 758-7900 www.fishercenter.bard.edu

Pet Services & Supplies Earth Angels Veterinary Hospital

(212) 629-7744 www.schneiderpfahl.com

8 Nancy Court, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 227-7297 www.earthangelsvet.com

Wellspring

Pet Country

(845) 534-7668 www.mediated-divorce.com

6830 Rt. 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-9000

Libraries

Photography

Cragsmoor Library

Fionn Reilly Photography

355 Cragsmoor Rd, Cragsmoor, NY (845) 647-4611 www.cragsmoorfreelibrary.org

Saugerties, NY (845) 802-6109 www.fionnreilly.com

Musical Instruments Imperial Guitar & Soundworks 99 Route 17K, Newburgh, NY (845) 567-0111 www.imperialguitar.com

Organizations Re>Think Local www.facebook.com/ReThinkLocal

Performing Arts Arm of the Sea Theatre East Bridge Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-7873 www.ArmoftheSea.Org

94 business directory ChronograM 8/13

Ulster County Photography Club 128 Canal Street, Port Ewen, NY (845) 338-5580 www.esopuslibrary.org

A visit to Red Hook must include stopping at this unique workshop! Combining a beautiful selection of moulding styles and mats with conservation quality materials, expert design advice and skilled workmanship, Renee Burgevin, owner and CPF since 1991, has 25 years’ experience in the framing industry. Special services include shadow-box and oversize framing as well as fabric-wrapped and French matting. Also offering mirrors.

Pools & Spas Aqua Jet 1606 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-8080 www.aquajetpools.com

Ne Jame Pools, Ltd. (845) 677-7665 www.nejamepools.com

Real Estate Paula Redmond Real Estate Inc. (845) 677-0505; (845) 876-6676 paularedmond.com

Smitchger Realty (845) 534-7874 www.smitchgerrealty.com

South Kent School 40 Bulls Bridge Road, South Kent, CT (860) 927-3539 www.southkentschool.org

St. Joseph’s School 235 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-4390 www.saintjosephschookingston

SUNY New Paltz (845) 257-7869 www.newpaltz.edu

SUNY New Paltz School of Fine and Performing Arts New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3860 www.newpaltz.edu/artnews

SUNY Ulster 491 Cottekill Rd, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 339-2025 www.sunyulster.edu/CampUlster Campulster@sunyulster.edu

The Birch School 9 Vance Road, Rock Tavern, NY (845) 361-2267 www.thebirchschool.org

Wild Earth Wilderness School

Willow Realty 120 Main St, Gardiner, NY (845) 255-7666 www.willowrealestate.com

Schools Bishop Dunn Memorial School (845) 569-3496 www.bdms.org

New Paltz / High Falls area, (845) 256-9830 www.wildearth.org info@wildearth.org

Woodstock Day School 1430 Glasco Turnpike, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-3744 www.woodstockdayschool.org

Tourism

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5343 www.caryinstitute.org

Green Meadow Waldorf School 307 Hungry Hollow Road, Chestnut Ridge, NY www.gmws.org

Harvey School 260 Jay Street, Katonah, NY (914) 232-3161 www.harveyschool.org admissions@harveyschool.org

Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7092 www.hawthornevalleyschool.org

Located in central Columbia County, NY and situated on a 400-acre working farm, Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School supports the development of each child and provides students with the academic, social, and practical skills needed to live in today’s complex world. Also offering parent-child playgroups and high school boarding.

Hudson Hills Academy 1145 Little Britain Rd Ste 100 New Windsor, NY (845) 787-0324 www.hudsonhills,org asmasiddiqui@hudsonhills.org

Kingston Catholic School

Ellenville Wawarsing Chamber of Commerce 124 Canal Street, Ellenville, NY (845) 647-4620 www.ewcoc.com

Ferncliff Forest Mt. Rutsen Road, Rhinebeck, NY www.facebook.com/Ferncliff-Forest

Green County Tourism (800) 355-CATS www.GreatNorthernCatskills.com

Town Tinker Tube Rental Bridge Street, Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-5553 www.towntinker.com

Weddings Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2079 www.byrdcliffe.org events@woodstockguild.org

Wine & Liquor The Merchant Wine and Liquor 730 Ulster Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 331-1923

Miron Wine and Spirits 15 Boices Lane, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5155 www.mironwineanspirits.com

The Ulster County Photography club meets the second Wednesday each month at 6:30pm. Meet at the Town of Esopus Library, 128 Canal Street, Port Ewen. All interested are welcome.

159 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 331-9318 www.kingstoncatholicschool.com

Mount Saint Mary College

Peter Aaron

Picture Framing

330 Powell Avenue, Newburgh, NY (845) 569-3225 www.msmc.edu

www.peteraaron.org info@peteraaron.org

Mountain Laurel Waldorf School

New Paltz, NY (845) 750-2370 www.wallkillvalleywriters.com khymes@wallkillvalleywriters.com

Atelier Renee Fine Framing The Chocolate Factory, 54 Elizabeth Street, Suite 3, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-1004 www.atelierreneefineframing.com renee@atelierreneefineframing.com

16 South Chestnut, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0033 www.mountainlaurel.org

Writing Services

Wallkill Valley Writers


Your Password:

Welcome

Everyone is welcome to enjoy The Garrison’s restaurants, golf course, events, and inn – no secret handshake or membership dues required! Of course, you may want to keep it all — the views, the service, the experience — to yourself.

Clove Cottages 200 Rock Hill Road High Falls, NY 845-687-4170 www.clovecottages.com

Seven peaceful, private cottages. Hiking trails nearby. Homemade granola, organic coffee and Sunday homemade scone delivery. Simply furnished. Kitchen, bathroom, A/C and heat in each; fireplace and jetted bath in some. WiFi and llamas onsite. Pet and eco-friendly.

LIKE US on facebook and receive a voucher for a free drink on us.

dine. stay.golf. discover

8/13 ChronograM lodging 95

lodging

845-424-3604 • thegarrison.com


whole living guide

DIFFERENT STROKES Not just for the elderly, strokes these days are getting younger, demanding more vigilance than ever.

by wendy kagan

illustration by annie internicola

L

ast fall, Aaron Parker was doing carpentry on a job site when suddenly his right arm stopped working. It was a strange sensation, like a drill that had lost power, yet the tool that was failing him was his own body. Before he knew it, he hit the ground. Lying in a ditch with a concrete wall, he wanted to call out to his coworkers for help but he couldn’t speak. The thoughts were there, yet the circuitry between mind and mouth had shorted out. “If I’d had time to be scared, I would have been,” says Parker (not his real name). “I remember thinking, ‘You’re not going to die here—get up.’” He managed to slide himself up the wall and after about five minutes he started to get his voice back, but it was different. It came out like a bear’s growl, roughly forming the words. Still, a coworker heard him and rushed over to help. A ride to the emergency room at Kingston Hospital ensued where tests confirmed that he’d had a stroke due to trauma to his left carotid artery. Parker was only 47. Ten days earlier, he recalled, he’d visited a chiropractor who had given him a forceful neck adjustment. Not long after this experience, he’d noticed that his left eye was droopy and tearing—a sign, he learned later, that a stroke was coming. A sign so subtle that he had missed it altogether. A Younger Disease The nation’s third leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability, stroke is not just a disease of the elderly—in fact, it is becoming less so every year. Statistics show that the mean age of stroke incidence is declining and is 69 (down from 71 in the mid-1990s). Stroke occurrence in people under 55 is on the rise at 19 percent. Partly, credit is due to increased stroke awareness, faster response time, and improved diagnosis, with better technology and sharper imaging. Some individuals can connect their stroke back to uncommon origins like an underlying blood clotting disorder, sleep apnea, oral contraceptive use in women, or, in the case of Parker, a particular trauma to the neck (even craning your neck to paint the ceiling or tipping your head back for a salon shampoo can cause injury).Yet in a great number of cases, our unhealthy lifestyle is to blame. Earlier onset of diseases like diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol may have a lot to do with the fact that nearly one-fourth of strokes occur in people under 65 these days. High blood pressure is the single most important risk factor for stroke, while the risk of ischemic stroke (or stroke due to arterial blockage) for smokers is double that of nonsmokers. “I think we’re seeing hypertension at a younger age,” says Ramandeep Sahni, MD, assistant director of the stroke program at Westchester Medical Center. “Young patients always feel like they’re healthy, and blood pressure is a silent killer.” Recreational tobacco, alcohol, and drug use are also culprits in stroke for younger people, who perhaps feel more invulnerable than they should to health threats like stroke and heart disease. Unexpected “brain attacks” do happen, often when people are feeling fine—though younger patients tend to have 96 whole living ChronograM 8/13

milder strokes with less incidence of disability or death. Says Sahni, “Elderly patients do have the most severe strokes. The younger ones can have more subtle symptoms, and we actually do see them on their first stroke these days. Part of this has to do with the stroke centers implemented in the 1990s. Acute care for stroke has changed and now many patients are immediately brought to hospitals that are designated stroke centers instead of to the nearest ER.” Time Is Brain Parker was lucky—two of his coworkers were volunteer firefighters and they knew that with stroke, as neurologists say, “Time is brain.” The faster a medical team can treat a stroke, the more cerebral tissue they can save. With a police escort, one coworker drove Parker to the hospital, where doctors diagnosed a carotid dissection—the inner lining of the artery in his neck had peeled away, creating clots that blocked blood flow to the brain. A few hours later, he was transferred to Albany Medical Center, a designated stroke facility, where physicians threaded a stent into the ailing artery via an incision in his groin. “It was a very unnerving operation,” says Parker. “I was awake and could feel the stent being placed right under my ear. I could hear it there.” Following an intensive care unit stay of a few days, he was sent home with three or four blood thinners, including one to inject in his stomach twice a day.Yet six days later, he had another stroke—a bleeder. The stent had occluded. Back to the hospital he went, this time for three-and-a-half weeks. After some debate about bypass surgery, nonintervention was the decided route and he went home to recover. Fortunately, he suffered no permanent disability from the ordeal.Yet poststroke, he’s not quite the same person. “I’m a little more jumpy, not as easygoing as I was,” says Parker. “I can’t focus as well as I used to. Everything is more intense.” The decision about how to treat a stroke can vary depending on the type of stroke and the presentation of symptoms. Nine out of ten strokes are ischemic, while only one in ten are hemorrhagic, caused by a blood vessel that leaks or bursts. With ischemic strokes, a lifesaving drug called tPA (tissue plasminogen activator), introduced in the 1990s, can dissolve a clot that’s leading to thrombosis and restore blood flow.Yet the drug must be administered within a small window of time, only three to four hours. Since stroke symptoms are often unmistakable—such as a sudden loss of movement, sudden trouble speaking, sudden paralysis or numbness on one side on the body, or sudden trouble seeing with one eye—many patients do make it to the hospital in time for this gold-standard treatment.Yet the signs are not always as pronounced, especially in younger patients. “People have to know that stroke symptoms can be subtle and are not always severe,” says David Ober, MD, of Rockland Neurological Associates in West Nyack. “Most strokes don’t cause any pain. If someone just has numbness or tingling they might pooh-pooh it, but this isn’t a good idea, especially if they have risk factors like high blood pressure or high cholesterol.”


8/13 ChronograM whole living 97


Kristen Spada, LCSW Licensed Clinical Social Worker

243 Main Street, Suite 230, New Paltz, NY phone: (845) 214-8477 fax: (845) 419-2378 email: kaspada@gmail.com

Individual ~ Marital ~ Substance Abuse ~ Depression Codependency ~ Self-esteem ~ Relationships In a respectful, compassionate environment we will work towards understanding and healing the source of your pain so that you may experience greater happiness, enhanced self-worth, and improved relationships.

Left: Barbara Monaco, LSCW-R, BCN, Executive Director Center: Dan Meyer, PhD, BCB-N. Clinical Director Right: Alyssa Montgomery, BA,BCN, Associate

Neurofeedback is a non-invasive intervention to help retrain the brain related to ADHD, Learning Challenges, PDD/Autism, Migraines and other headaches, OCD, Anxiety, Panic and TBI.

Call about our Summer aDHD ! boot Camp

12 Davis Avenue, Vassar Professional Building, Poughkeepsie, NY 845.473.4939 www.HVCNF.com IBM Employee SCCAP Reimbursement Available Neurofeedback now recognized as a best practice by the American Academy of Pediatrics

New Office Announcement! Lorraine Hughes, RH (AHG) Registered Herbalist Herbal Medicine & Nutrition Reflexology, Reiki & Qi Gong

Effective August 1st, 2013 Will open her new office location at: 1129 Main Street, Fishkill, NY (2nd Floor)

John M. Carroll H ,T ,S C EALER

EACHER

PIRITUAL

OUNSELOR

“ Miracles still do happen.” —Richard Brown, MD Author Stop Depression Now “ John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.” —Gerald Epstein, MD Author Healing Visualizations See John’s website for upcoming classes.

Believe. Begin. Become...

www.EmpoweredByNature.net lorrainehughes54@gmail.com (845) 416-4598

Medication-free treatment for ADD / ADHD

Empowered by Nature

johnmcarrollhealer.com or call 845-338-8420

Overeating and Food Addiction Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy While sometimes endlessly alluring, overeating doesn’t actually satisfy any of our true and deepest hungers. These deep hungers are messages from the soul. We need to listen deeply to hear those messages. Learn how to deeply listen to your soul by being deeply listened to and discover how to gently and effectively unravel the pattern of overeating and food addiction. The Accord Center has been successfully helping people to dissolve the pattern of overeating and food addiction since 1986. 845 626 3191 • www.theaccordcenter.com Both in-person and phone sessions are available.

©2013

MINDFULNESS-BASED STRESS REDUCTION You can’t stop the waves, but, you can learn how to surf! Stephanie Speer, M.A.

Medical Intuitive Kir Noel (Est 1993)

www.medicalintuitivekirnoel.com

for appointments call 845-249-8417 As seen in the Daily Freeman and Spa Finder

98 whole living ChronograM 8/13

ENROLL NOW FOR 8 SESSION PROGRAM

September 17 to November 5 Tuesday Evenings, 6:30-8:30pm Stone Ridge Healing Arts, Stone Ridge, NY Individual Instruction and Professional Consultations also available www.stephaniespeer.com 845.332.9936 stephaniespeer@earthlink.net


Lucky Stroke When Andrew Revkin suspected that his subtle symptoms indicated a stroke, he didn’t waste any time. It was Fourth of July weekend in 2011 when Revkin, an environmental reporter for the New York Times and a resident of Garrison, was experiencing vision problems in his left eye after a tough run in the woods with his teenage son. “When I got home, initially I was still in slo-mo mode,” says Revkin, then 55. “But I had a lucky moment of deciding ‘maybe this is a stroke’ and taking five or six baby aspirin [a good idea for ischemic stroke, but not for hemorrhagic].” He headed to Hudson Valley Hospital, which, though a designated stroke center, didn’t have a stroke neurologist on site that holiday weekend. The ER doctor almost sent him home but Revkin, trusting his instinct that something wasn’t right, requested an ultrasound of his carotid arteries. That’s when a technician discovered that he had no pulse in his left carotid artery. How could his brain be working without this crucial vessel? The answer lies in an anatomical wonder called the Circle of Willis—an arrangement of arteries in the brain that creates collateral circulation so if one artery is compromised, the others can compensate. Like Parker, Revkin had a carotid dissection; the stroke hadn’t struck yet, but it was coming. Transferred to Westchester Medical Center, he was put on intravenous heparin to prevent blood clots, though perhaps too late. He suffered a mild stroke that night and spent a week recuperating in the hospital, then went on to make a full recovery. Says Revkin, “It was like peeking through the door of a very dark place, and getting to shut the door very quickly.” Wondering why had he suffered a stroke so young, the reporter in Revkin kicked into gear: He spent his week in the hospital researching and blogging. He learned that carotid dissection is a relatively rare form of stroke, but for youngish, healthy people without common risk factors, it’s often a suspect. He also learned about some of the most cutting-edge technology available for stroke: telemedicine. Similar to Skype, telemedicine is virtual care from an expert physician who doesn’t need to be in your emergency room to be helpful. At least three American companies have developed technology for telemedicine administered through various devices, from robots to iPads. Unfortunately, says Revkin, “this country doesn’t have policies that are friendly to telemedicine. It’s particularly important in stroke, because most of the diagnosis is done visually. So if it’s Fourth of July weekend in the Hudson Valley and there’s no stroke neurologist at the hospital, you can still have someone there.” What good is this money- and time-saving technology if it’s not widely available to help patients? “My main concern is that as much can be done as possible to change policies that get in the way of rapid diagnosis and treatment.” Before Stroke Strikes We’ve come a long way with stroke care, but there’s more work to be done. For now, one key to combating stroke is vigilant awareness—and, like Revkin, listening to your body and acting swiftly. “Often a patient is well aware when the symptoms start but then waits and thinks they’ll get better, or goes back to bed, or doesn’t listen to their wife,” says Sahni. “Even if it does get better it could be a TIA [transient ischemic attack], and if you have a TIA your highest risk of stroke is in the next 48 hours.” There is also the empowerment of knowing that, according to the American Stroke Association, about 80 percent of strokes are preventable. “We often have patients who know they’ve had high blood pressure for years and didn’t do anything about it, and now they have a devastating bleed in their head,” says Sahni. “Or they’ve been a smoker their whole life, but they’re going to stop smoking now that they’ve had this stroke and they’re paralyzed on one side.” Note to self: Don’t skip the annual physical. “Even if you feel healthy, you should always make sure your blood pressure is okay, your blood sugar is okay. You can’t control the fact that you’re going to get older, but there are other things you can control.You can commit yourself to having a healthy lifestyle.” RESOURCES Ramandeep Sahni, MD (914) 345-1313 David Ober, MD (845) 353-4344 Andrew Revkin Twitter @revkin and @dotearth chronogram.com

UPCOMING RETREATS Living Unto Death: Dying Into Life Mark Epstein & Robert Thurman August 16 - 18, 2013 Medicine Buddha Healing Retreat Lama Palden & Robert Thurman August 19 - 26, 2013 The Art of Happiness Howard Cutler September 20 – 22, 2013 The Joy of the Yogini: Women’s Retreat Colleen Saidman Yee September 27 – 29, 2013 In the Garden of the Medicine Buddha David Crow, Jai Dev Singh, & Robert Thurman October 3 – 6, 2013 Buddha & the Martial Arts: Combating the Enemy Within Justin Braun & Robert Thurman October 11 – 13, 2013 To register or for more information, visit us at www.menlamountain.org or call 845-688-6897

INDOOR ROWING CLASS WEDNESDAYS AND FRIDAYS 10:00 - 10:45AM LOCATION: YMCA SPECIALIZED TRAINING ROOM

ONLY $10 FOR NON-MEMBERS

(INCLUDES FULL USE OF FACILITY FOR THE DAY)

FULL BODY STRENGTH & CARDIO WORKOUT!

ALL LEVELS WELCOME! EVENING CLASSES COMING IN SEPTEMBER! For more information, call the YMCA at (845) 338-3810 or visit us at www.ymcaulster.org 507 Broadway, Kingston, NY

DEALS save 50% to 90% with your favorite local merchants. see all our featured deals at chronogramdeals.com.

Watch videos about telestroke medicine by Andrew Revkin.

8/13 ChronograM whole living 99


Judy Swallow

whole living guide Acupuncture

MA, LCAT, TEP

PSYCHOTHERAPIST • CONSULTANT

Rubenfeld Synergy® Psychodrama Training

371A Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 546-5358 www.creeksideacupuncture.com

~

25 Harrington St, New Paltz, NY 12561 (845) 255-7502

Acupuncture by M.D.

Hoon J. Park, MD, P.C. Board Cer tified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Auto and Job Injuries • Arthritis • Strokes • Neck/Back and Joint Pain • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

• Acupuncture • Physical Therapy • Joint Injections • EMG & NCS Test • Comprehensive Exercise Facility

298-6060

1772 South Road Wappingers Falls, NY 12590 ½ mile south of Galleria Mall

most insurance accepted including medicare, no fault, and worker’s compensation

I NPATIENT T REATMENT

AND

Creekside Acupuncture and Natural Medicine, Stephanie Ellis, L.A.C.

WELLNESS CENTER

Private treatment rooms, attentive one-onone care, affordable rates, many insurances, sliding scale. Stephanie Ellis graduated magna cum laude from Columbia University in pre-medical studies. She completed her acupuncture and Chinese medicine degree in 2001 as valedictorian of her class and started her acupuncture practice in Rosendale that same year. Ms. Ellis uses a combination of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Classical Chinese Medicine, Japanese-style acupuncture, and trigger-point acupuncture. Creekside Acupuncture is located in a building constructed of non-toxic, eco-friendly materials.

Hoon J. Park, MD, PC 1772 South Road, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-6060

Transpersonal Acupuncture (845) 340-8625 www.transpersonalacupuncture.com

Aromatherapy Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 www.apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net See also Massage Therapy

Body and Skincare Dermasave Labs, Inc. 3 Charles St. Ste 4, Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 635-4087 www.hudsonvalleyskincare.com

Counseling

Helping the alcoholic and addict find the gift of sobriety for over 4 decades and 4 generations. MEN’S PROGRAM

WOMEN’S PROGRAM

(845) 626-3555

Kerhonkson, New York

FAMILY PROGRAM

www.villaveritas.org

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING

e-mail: info@villaveritas.org

Licensed by NYS Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse

CARF Accredited

Kristen Spada, LCSW 243 Main St, Suite 230, New Paltz, NY (845) 419-2378 kaspada@gmail.com

The Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy (845) 646-3191 www.theaccordcenter.com

Make

Splitting Up?

the

eMpowered, reSponSible ChoiCe...

Dentistry & Orthodontics Center for Advanced Dentistry 494 Route 299, Highland, NY (845) 691-5600 www.thecenterforadvanceddentristry.com

Herbal Medicine & Nutrition

Mediation Design Your Own Future Nurture Your Children Preserve Your Assets

Rodney Wells, CFP 845-534-7668 www.mediated-divorce.com

100 whole living directory ChronograM 8/13

Empowered By Nature (845) 416-4598 www.EmpoweredByNature.net lorrainehughes54@gmail.com Lorraine Hughes, Registered Herbalist (AHG) and ARCB Certified Reflexologist offers wellness consultations that therapeutically integrate Asian and Western Herbal Medicine and Nutrition with their holistic philosophies to health. This approach is grounded in

Traditional Chinese Medicine with focus placed on an individual’s specific constitutional profile and imbalances. Please visit the website for more information and upcoming events.

Holistic Health Cassandra Currie, MS, RYT‚ Holistic Health Counselor 41 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 532-7796 www.holisticcassandra.com

Hudson Valley Center for Neurofeedback 12 Davis Avenue, Vassar Professional Building, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-4939 www.HVCNF.com

John M. Carroll 715 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 338-8420 www.johnmcarrollhealer.com John is a spiritual counselor, healer, and teacher. He uses guided imagery, morphology, and healing energy to help facilitate life changes. He has successfully helped his clients to heal themselves from a broad spectrum of conditions, spanning terminal cancer to depression. The center also offers hypnosis, and Raindrop Technique.

Kary Broffman, RN, CH (845) 876-6753 Karyb@mindspring.com 15 plus years of helping people find their balance. As a holistic nurse consultant, she weaves her own healing journey and education in psychology, nursing, hypnosis, and integrative nutrition to help you take control of your life and to find True North. She also assists pregnant couples with hypnosis and birthing.

Kir Noel Medical Intuitive (845) 249-8417 www.medicalintuitivekirnoel.com

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Stone Ridge Healing Arts, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 332-9936 www.stephaniespeer.com

Movement 4 Life Beacon, NY (845) 386-8343 www.movement4life.net

Nancy Plumer, Energy Healing and Mystery School Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-2252 www.womenwithwisdom.com nplumer@hvi.net Energy Healing and Mystery School with One Light Healing Touch in Stone Ridge begins October 2013. The School is based in Shamanic, Esoteric, and Holistic teachings across the ancient wisdom traditions. Learn to increase your intuition; release old programming - hurt, grief, sadness, pain; become empowered, grounded, and heart-centered; access Source energy and increase spiritual awareness, joy, and peace in your life. Also, private OLHT energy healing sessions are available.

Omega Institute for Holistic Studies (800) 944-1001 www.eomega.org


At Kripalu, we invite you to breathe—to intentionally pause the ongoing demands of life, bring your attention inward, and rediscover your authentic nature. Conscious engagement with the breath connects you with the intelligence and power of the life force within and around you. Whenever you are faced with a challenge—on the yoga mat, in a relationship, at work, or with your health—you can draw on a deep sense of ease, purpose, and mastery to create positive change. We call it the yoga of life. To learn more: 800.741.7353 or kripalu.org Stay connected: kripalu.org/blog/thrive

Relieve Chronic Pain Rolf Bodywork Stand taller. Feel better.

A group designed especially for teenage girls focusing on issues of adolescence: relationships, school, dealing with parents, coping with teen stress, and more. Group sessions include expressive art activities - it’s not all talk!

whole living directory

www.HudsonValleyGoodStuff.com

Tuesday Evenings New Paltz, New York Facilitator: Amy Frisch, LCSW For more information call: 845-706-0229 or visit: www.itsagirlthinginfo.com

Jared Power • Beacon, NY

(530) 386-8343 • movement4life.net

iNtEgR atE YOuR LiFE

Transformational Energy Work

Holistic Nurse HealtH coNsultaNt

Private practice in Rhinebeck & Kingston, NY, and mid-town Manhattan. Phone sessions also available.

i t ’ s

a

B a L a N c i N g

a c t

Manage stress • apprehensions • Pain • improve sleep Release Weight • set goals • change Habits Pre/Post surgery • Fertility • Hypno Birthing immune system Enhancement • Nutritional counseling Past Life Regression • intuitive counseling Motivational & spiritual guidance

Breathe • Be Mindful • Let go • Flow

H Y P N O s i s - c Oac H i N g Kary Broffman, R.N., c.H. 845-876-6753 • karybroffman.com

Priscilla Bright, Ma

Profound individual energy-healing work with the former School Dean of the world-renowned Barbara Brennan School of Healing and presenter at Omega Institute and NYC Open Center. • Reconnect with your intuitive inner awareness • Open blocked energies • Increase relaxation - decrease stress • Learn skills for energy self-care • Life-transitions - career issues - relationships www.priscillabright.com • priscilla@priscillabright.com • 845-417-8261 FREE INITIaL PHONE CONSuLTaTION

8/13 ChronograM whole living directory 101


whole living directory

Sponsored by

on the HUDSON TwithAROT Rachel Pollack

Internationally Renowned Certified Tarot Grand Master & Award Winning Novelist

• Tarot Readings — Individual, or Parties • Tarot Classes and Workshops • Individual Tarot Mentoring

Susan DeStefano Medical. Swedish. Deep Tissue. Hot Stone. Shiatsu. Craniosacral. Lymph Drainage. Reflexology.

• Mentoring and Editing in Creative Writing

Specializing in relief of back neck & shoulders Advanced trainings in working on people with cancer

Telephone:845-876-5797 rachel@rachelpollack.com www.rachelpollack.com

845.255.6482

Zweig Therapy Julie Zweig, MA, LMHC

The Sedona Method‰ Accord Center for Counseling & Psychotherapy Discover how to effortlessly turn fear, loss, grief, stress, trauma, addiction, spiritual crisis, and any other life challenge into courage, joy, peace, love, creativity, abundance, self mastery, life mastery and flow.

Imago Relationship Therapy New Paltz, New York • (845) 255-3566 • (845) 594-3366

www.ZweigTherapy.com • julieezweig@gmail.com

102 whole living directory ChronograM 8/13

The Sedona Method is an elegantly simple yet remarkably profound and effective way to effortlessly dissolve any obstacle to having the life that we all desire. For the only certified and authorized Sedona Method coaching in the Hudson Valley call The Accord Center, 845 626 3191. Phone sessions are available. Find more information and testimonials at www.theaccordcenter.com

©2013


Psychics

Priscilla Bright, MA Rhinebeck & Kingston, NY (845) 417-8261 www.priscillabright.com

Psychic Life Readings

Stone Ridge Healing Arts

(845) 481-4159

3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-7589 www.stoneridgehealingarts.com

www.lifereadings.net

Hospitals

709 Ulster Ave, Kingston, NY

Psychic Readings by Rose 40 Mill Hill, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-6801

Health Alliance

Psychically Speaking

396 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 334-4248 www.hahv.org

(845) 626-4895 or (212) 714-8125

Health Quest 45 Reade Place, Poughkeepsie, NY, (845) 283-6088 www.health-quest.org

www.psychicallyspeaking.com gail@psychicallyspeaking.com

Psychotherapy Amy Frisch

Sharon Hospital

5 College Ave, New Paltz, NY

50 Hospital Hill Road, Sharon, CT (860) 364-4000 www.sharonhospital.com

www.itsagirlthinginfo.com

Hypnosis Susan Spiegel Solovay Hudson Valley and Great Barrington (917) 881-0072 www.HypnoCoachNY.com healingwithhypno@fairpoint.net

Massage Therapy

(845) 706-0229 amyfrischLCSW@yahoo.com

Judy Swallow, MA, LCAT, TEP 25 Harrington Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-7502 www.hvpi.net

Retreat Centers Garrison Institute (845) 424-4800

21 South Chestnut Street, Suite 108, New Paltz, NY (845) 594-7807 www.botanicamassage.com amymosbacher@gmail.com

www.garrisoninstitute.org

Amy Mosbacher, LMT and her associates offer a peaceful environment that allows for healing treatments such as Therapeutic, Deep Tissue, Oncology, and Pregnancy Massage. They use Warm Stones and Crystals, Aromatherapy, and Herbal Compresses. Whether you need healing of acute or chronic physical injury, or are looking to relieve anxiety and stress, massage is a great way to help achieve well-being in many different areas of life.

garrison@garrisoninstitute.com Retreats supporting positive personal and social change in a renovated monastery overlooking the Hudson River. Featuring CARE for teachers: 6th Annual Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education Summer Retreat, August 9-14, and Tsoknyi Rinpoche: Wisdom in Aging, September 20-26.

whole living directory

Route 9D, Garrison, NY

Botanica Massage and Wellness

Menla Mountain Retreat & Conference Center Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-6897 ext. 0

Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 www.apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net Luxurious massage therapy with medicinal grade essential oils; Raindrop Technique, Emotional Release, Facials, and Stones. Animal care, health consultations, spa consultant, classes, and keynotes. Offering full line of Young Living Essential Oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s, and non-toxic cleaning products.

www.menla.org menla@menla.org

Recharge Retreats 960 Rt 6 #210, Mahopac, NY (845) 225-5192 www.recharge-retreats.com liz@recharge-retreats.com

Tarot-on-the-Hudson‚ Rachel Pollack Rhinebeck, NY

Mid-Hudson Rebirthing Center

(845) 876-5797

(845) 255-6482

www.rachelpollack.com

Osteopathy

rachel@rachelpollack.com

Yoga

Stone Ridge Healing Arts Joseph Tieri, DO, & Ari Rosen, DO 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge; 138 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 687-7589 www.stoneridgehealingarts.com

Clear Yoga: Iyengar Yoga in Rhinebeck

Drs. Tieri and Rosen are NY State Licensed Osteopathic Physicians specializing in Osteopathic Manipulation and Cranial Osteopathy. Please visit our website for articles, links, books, and much more information. Treatment of newborns, children, and adults. By appointment.

www.clearyogarhinebeck.com

6423 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6129

Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health Stockbridge, MA (800) 741-7353 www.kripalu.org

8/13 ChronograM whole living directory 103


THE LINDA WAMC’S PERFORMING ARTS STUDIO

339 CENTRAL AVENUE ALBANY

A FOOD FOR THOUGHT FILM AUG 3 / 7pm

AUG 15 /67

PM -RECEP PM- FILM

DAVID WAX MUSEUM

STEVE KATZ

SEP 6 / 8pm

SEP 7 / 8pm ASBURY SHORTS

GOLDSPOT

GUGGENHEIM GROTTO

SEP 12 / 8pm

SEP 13 / 8pm

NEW YORK SHORT FILM CONCERT

SEP 19 /67

PM -RECEP PM- FILM

SEP 21 / 8pm

the American Roots Music series is made possible by the support of the New York State Council on The Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature

TICKETS ONLINE AT

THELINDA.ORG OR CALL 518.465.5233 x4

D r um B oogie Festival ® 201 3 Comes t o Woodst ock The Woodstock Chimes Fund presents

A FREE WORLD-CLASS MUSIC FESTIVAL with DANCE and VOICE Saturday, September 7, 2013 • 10AM - 8PM Andy Lee Field - Woodstock, NY (rain date Sept. 8)

RAGTIME OPENING CEREMONY K I D S J A PA N E S E TA I K O MIDDLE EASTERN AFRICAN R U D I M E N TA L CONTEMPORARY B E L LY D A N C E N AT I V E A M E R I C A N J A Z Z S T E E L P A N R O C K

10:00 am N E X U S at the Artists Cemetery

11:00 am J A C K D E J O H N E T T E at Andy Lee Field with special guests

11:30 am 12 noon 12:45 pm 1:30 pm 2:15 pm 2:45 pm 3:45 pm 4:30 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm 6:45 pm

POOK & ENERGY DANCE C OB U SIMON SHAHEEN M A N D A R A FIFE & DRUM BAND NEXUS BEATBOX GUITAR IN UNITY JACK DEJOHNETTE NYU STEEL MIDNIGHT RAMBLE BAND from the Levon Helm Studios

Program subject to change without notice

Free / family-oriented Diverse styles of music, dance and voice from around the world

Peter S. Reed Foundation

Incredible line-up of world-class talent Fabulous food vendors on site Come for the entire day

NYS Parks and Recreation

Woodstock Chimes® The World’s Favorite Windchime™

*Rain or Shine. If the weather is dangerously bad, however, we’ll postpone it until the next day - September 8th. Check our website. Bring your family, a chair / blanket & relax for the day.

www.drumboogiefestival.com 104 forecast ChronograM 8/13

Ulster Magazine (4.2“ x 5.825”).indd 1

7/23/13 1:07 PM


the forecast

event PREVIEWS & listings for AUGUST 2013

A photograph by Erin Trieb from the exhibition "The Gun Show" at Fovea in Beacon. Don Svetanics, 47, flew in from St. Louis to go with his brother, Jim, 45, to the NRA show held at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, Texas on Friday, May 3, 2013.

Packing Heat The annual Oklahoma Full Auto Shoot and Trade Show is a family affair—kids practice handling .22 caliber rifles, and babies pose for photos next to AK-47s. “The people who attend it view it as wholesome recreation,” says Pete Muller, who photographed the show in 2012. “They don’t view it as aggressive or malicious. They view it as a fun, very controlled fair that revolves around very serious heavy machine guns.” The national conversation about guns has become increasingly complicated in recent years: from the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin in February 2012—for which the killer was found not guilty last month on the basis of Florida’s stand-your-ground law—to the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, last December. Despite such tragedies, there are many people in the US who stand by the Constitution’s Second Amendment. After all, the right to bear arms is written into the DNA of our country. And guns don’t kill people, people kill people, right? The polarized debate on gun culture in the US is, of course, much more nuanced and complex than its extremes account for. “Guns seem to provide their owners with a certain sense of security and power,” says Neil Harris, associate photo editor at Time magazine and curator of “The Gun Show” exhibit, which features photo-essays on domestic gun culture by seven American photographers. “But ironically, it’s the possession and use of firearms that engenders so much fear, causes so much trauma, and actually erodes people’s sense of security.” The conversation surrounding guns in the US is fraught with such paradoxes, and Fovea’s exhibit contributes to the debate in powerful, dynamic, and provocative ways. Muller’s Oklahoma Full Auto Show project explores inconsistencies and divergent viewpoints on the gun issue. “I really wanted to meet these people that had these kinds of love affairs with heavy machine guns,” says Muller. “Their views are bound up with

the polarized view about gun control on a national level. I wanted to get a more human perspective from their standpoint.” The photo of Story Rush, a kindergarten teacher beaming as a fireball explodes out of her M1919 Browning .30 caliber machine gun, reveals different attitudes about guns, depending on who is looking at it. “I sent it to [Rush], and she was thrilled. To people at something like OFAS, they see someone having a great time,” Muller says, adding that the photograph frightens others. While the featured photo-essays explore the topic of domestic gun culture from different angles—Barbara Davidson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning photo-essay on the effects of gun violence in Los Angeles; Erin Trieb’s coverage of the 2013 annual meeting of the National Rifle Association in Houston; Drew Ludwig’s experimental photographs of shooting target posters placed in schools—there’s something central to the exhibit that touches on the issue more broadly. “It all seems to come from one instinct or urge that really is a fundamental part of American culture, for better or worse,” says Harris, referring to the violent frontier ethos on which the country was founded. Muller adds that guns offer an avenue into the psychology of a group of people. “Through guns, you get at so many existential questions in a population—safety, fear, community, alienation.” Men with guns made America. “I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery,” Thomas Jefferson said. “The Gun Show” asks us to consider our country’s complex relationship with guns, and how, in the pursuit of such abstractions as freedom and peace, they continue to shape our national identity. “The Gun Show” will be on view at Fovea in Beacon through October 6. (845) 202-3443; Foveaexhibitions.org. —Jennifer Gutman

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THURSDAY 1 Clubs & Organizations Hooks & Needles, Yarns & Threads 10am-2pm. First Thursday of every month. Drop-in for an informal social gathering. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Writing Circle 1:30pm. Bring paper and a pen. Pat Richards will facilitate. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Dance MOMIX Botanica 8pm. $30. Instrument Petting Zoo sponsored by The Alfred Z. Solomons Children’s Workshops on the Lawn. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Film The Tapping Solution 7-9pm. The film explores the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), an alternative healing method know as “tapping”. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. 687-0880.

Theater Boeing Boeing 8pm. $35/$30/$2 students and seniors. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream 6pm. $15/$5 children and students. Bring your own seating and blanket for this 90-minute performance of Shakespeare’s beloved comedy performed outside. The Mount, Lenox, MA. Shakespeare.org. The Sparkley Clean Funeral Singers $20-$60. This world premiere musical comedy from country singer-songwriter Lori Fischer is perfect for a heart-felt, laughter-filled summer. Capital Repertory Theatre, Albany. (518) 346-6204.

Workshops & Classes Community Drawing: Ink Wash From Life 6pm. First Thursday of every month. $25/$15 selfguided. Come enjoy an evening of large-scale still life drawing from observation, with teaching artist, Susie Tarnowicz. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Fiddle and Cello Retreat Through August 4. With Abby Newton. Shokan, Shokan. Abbynewton.com/retreat.html.

Kids & Family

Landscape Painting with John MacDonald: Oils or Acrylics 10am-4pm. $260/$240 members. Through Aug. 2. This two-day intensive painting workshop will focus on using the essentials of painting– composition, value, color and edges– to create strong landscapes and find the artist’s authentic voice. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Disney’s Winnie The Pooh Kids 6:30pm. $12. Pesented by The Acting Out Playhouse. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335.

Teen Tech Tutors 5-7:30pm. First Thursday of every month. Computer help by appointment Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Food & Wine Barbecue & Music 6pm. $30/$15 for children/12 and under, children 2 and younger are free. Terrace Grill at The Garrison, Garrison. 424-3604.

Art Adventures: Mix it Up! 10am-2pm. $60/$50 members. Fun-filled art workshop devoted to the art of collage. Each class explores collage through a different theme and material– get ready to mix and match, combine the unexpected, and creatively reconstruct images. Ages 6-12. The Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah. (914) 232-9555.

FRIDAY 2 Clubs & Organizations HV:CREATE 8:30am. First Friday of every month. A no-agenda informal meet-up space for creatives to meet, connect, and inspire each other. MaMa, Stone Ridge. 679-9441.

Teen Hip Hop Poetry Workshop 3:30pm. Write and record your own Hip Hop creations. The workshop will be 3 sessions long where teens will learn how to write to beats and discover the processes of recording and creating an album from start to finish, even an intro to making cover art and picking a cool title. Field Library, Peekskill. (914) 737-0010.

Satr Nations Sacred Circle 7pm. First Friday of every month. $5. A positive, not for skeptics, discussion group for experiencers of the paranormal. Open to all dreamers, contactees, abductees, ET Ambassadors and those interested in acknowledging the extraterrestrial presence on earth. Center for Symbolic Studies, New Paltz. 658-8083.

Literary & Books

Dance

Book Club: Into the Beautiful North 3pm. By Luis Alberto Urrea. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

Music Dave Mason 6:30pm. Jazz. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. The Latin Jazz Explosion 5:30-7:30pm. Long Dock Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Live Jazz 8pm. Julia Gottlieb Qt, vocals and Don Mikkelsen, trombone. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. Imharhan and Mamadou Kelly 8:30pm. $20. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Mighty Spectrum Band 6:30-8:30pm. Sugar Loaf Crossing, Sugar Loaf. 469-2713. Moses Patrou 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Mountain Heart 8pm. $30-$45. Known throughout the music industry for continually redefining the boundaries of acoustic music. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (860) 542-5531. Sammy Figueroa & His Latin Jazz Explosion 8pm. $26. Get ready to dance for this world-renowned percussionist & his group. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. 254-5600. Simi Stone 8pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Singing Songbirds Community Chorus Summer Concert 7pm. The Singing Songbirds brings together seniors, “shower singers”, people with disabilities, and anyone who loves to sing into a glorious musical whole. Wonderful songs from 17th-20th century. The Fountains at Millbrook, Millbrook. 677-5871.

Outdoors & Recreation Pitch in for Parks 5:30-7:30pm. Help us maintain and build new trails at some of our most popular parks. Shaupeneak Ridge, Esopus. Scenichudson.org.

Sports The 13th Annual Millbrook Horse Trials Check website for specific events and times. Coole Park Farm, Millbrook. Millbrookhorsetrials.com.

chronogram.com Visit Chronogram.com/events for additional calendar listings and staff recommendations.

106 forecast ChronograM 8/13

Choreography on the Edge 8pm. $12. An eclectic mix of new dance pieces by local and non-local choreographers stretching their boundaries. Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild, Woodstock. 453-8673. Monica Bill Barnes and Company: Luster and Suddenly Summer Somewhere 8pm. $30/$25 members/$15 students. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Fairs & Festivals Phoenicia Festival of the Voice 5-6pm. 3-day festival of concerts, lectures, and workshops. Phoenicia. 688-1344. The Wassaic Project Summer Festival Through August 4. Multi-disciplinary celebration of art, music, film, dance, and community featuring over 100 artists, 25 bands, film screenings, dance performances, and more. The Wassaic Project, Wassaic. (347) 815-0783.

Film Between Traditions: Stravinsky’s Legacy and Russian Émigré Cinema 9pm. $12. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-onHudson. Bard.edu. Kingston Film Festival Through August 11. Through screenings and associated events, the festival aims to present a wide spectrum of filmmaking. See website for specific events and times. Backstage Studio Productions (BSP), Kingston. Kingstonfilmfestival.org. Land and Hope Palestine Trilogy 7pm. Films of Palestine Series. Special guests for the night: Taha Awadallah from Bethlehem, Palestine, and Rami Efal from Kfar-Saba, Israel. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Kingston. 331-2884.

Pizza and a Movie Night 6pm. Featuring the movie Rio. Phillies Bridge Farm Project, New Paltz. 256-9108.

Literary & Books 17th Sharon Summer Book Signing 6-8pm. Featuring more than 30 noteworthy authors, editors, and illustrators. Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041. John Montgomery Presents The Answer Model: A New Path to Healing 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Music Synesthesia 6pm. $7. Hudson Valley musicians Justin Wixson, Luke Adams, and Gryphon Rue are collaborating with the award-winning Ekaterina Smirnova, an internationally showing artist. Special guests include Ian Holden, Tyler Beatrice, Odetta and more. Live music and reactionary art. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. (315) 263-3341. The Bar Spies 4pm. Classic rock. Mahoney’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, Poughkeepsie. 471-7026. Bret Mosley 8pm. Roots music. Dave’s Coffee and Wine House, Saugerties. 246-8424. Dayna Kurtz & Trio 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Eliza Gilkyson 8pm. $20/$15. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Hunter Foundation Annual Fundraising Event 7:30pm. Platinum $295/gold $175/silver $95. Larry Campbell, Teresa Williams and friends Justin Guip, Brian Mitchell, Catherine Popper, Jim Weider performing. Platinum VIP tickets include special seating, artist meet & greet, John Warner Art Poster signed & numbered, gourmet hors d’oeuvres and full bar. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 589-5050. Just US-Dan Fiore 6pm. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. Larry Moses & The Latin Jazz Explosion 9pm. Southern Dutchess Bowl, Beacon. 831-3220. Lick The Toad 9:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Little Feat’s Paul Barrere and Fred Tackett 8pm. $39-$59. This intimate kind of “back porch” pickin’ and grinnin’ show is something very special and one you don’t want to miss. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (860) 542-5531. Live Jazz 8pm. Rob & Peter Putnam, Rob Kelly, & Jeff Stevens. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. Met Opera Summer Series: Rossini’s Barber of Seville 7pm. $12.50/$7.50 students. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448. Moon Hooch 8pm. $5. Jazz. The Wassaic Project, Wassaic. (347) 815-0783. The Pedrito Martinez Quartet 8pm. $26. An absolutely electric Cuban percussionist, Pedrito has been described as “a force of nature with hands of thunder and a voice like lightning”. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. 254-5600. Roots Music Concert with 17 Strings and David & Jacob Bernz 7:30pm. $10/$5 students/children free. Local father & son duo 17 Strings are David & Jacob Bernz whose acoustic and folk roots span both of their lifetimes. Brook Farm, New Paltz. 255-1052. Salsa Night with Anaïsa 7:30pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Saugerties Sunset Concert Series 6pm. Featuring Dorraine Scofield, Paul Luke, and Kimberly. Tina Chorvas Water Front Park, Saugerties. 246-5306. Sergey Taneyev: Oresteia 7pm. $30/$60/$70/$90. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. The Wailers 8pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

Food & Wine

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits

Field To Fork Gourmet Supper Club 7pm. $65. Six-course gourmet menu features Rogowski Farm’s freshly harvested produce, paired with local artisanal specialties. Enjoy a toast and live music. W. Rogowski Farm, Pine Island. 544-5379.

Saugerties First Friday 6-10pm. Grab a fresh fruit cocktail, mingle with artists and musicians, then dance the mad Tango in a hat you made yourself at the millinery bar! We’ve got Maitais and a limbo contest, sangria, late night mussels and fluffernutter sandwiches. Downtown Saugerties, Saugerties. (347) 387-3212.

Kids & Family Disney’s Winnie The Pooh Kids 6:30pm. $12. Presented by The Acting Out Playhouse. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. Cirque de Summer Book Character Carnival 6:30pm. Red Hook Library summer reading program finale featuring carnival games and crafts. Red Hook Firehouse, Red Hook. 758-3241. Exploring Nature with The Columbia Land Conservancy 11am. The Columbia Land Conservancy’s educator, Jenny Brinker, will lead the children on an exploration of the wonders of the natural world resident in PS21’s beautiful apple orchard. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Sports The 13th Annual Millbrook Horse Trials Check website for specific events and times. Coole Park Farm, Millbrook. Millbrookhorsetrials.com.

Theater All’s Well That Ends Well 8pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Boeing Boeing 8pm. $35/$30/$2 students and seniors. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.

Fiddler on the Roof 8pm. $20/$15 seniors and students. Directed and choreographed by Rose Cremonese-Norton. Mount Pleasant Community Theater, Thornwood. (914) 949-8382. Life of Pi 7pm. $18. Performed by Young Actors Summer Workshop, ages 9-16. Cocoon Theater, Rhinebeck. 876-6470. Shiva Arms 8pm. $18/$15 members. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. The Sparkley Clean Funeral Singers $20-$60. This world premiere musical comedy from country singer-songwriter Lori Fischer is perfect for a heart-felt, laughter-filled summer. Capital Repertory Theatre, Albany. (518) 346-6204. Stories of Highland 8pm. $5. Community Playback Theatre will perform Stories of Highland. Playback Theatre uses improvisation to bring personal stories of audience members to life. Boughton Place, Highland. 691-4118. The Winter’s Tale 5pm. Bird-on-a-Cliff Theater. Comeau Property, Woodstock. Birdonacliff.org.

Workshops & Classes Hold on to Your Kids Three-day course on parenting in the 21st century. Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001. Annual Lewton-Brain Conference: Now Fold This Through August 5. Featuring instructor Charles LewtonBrain. Center for Metal Arts, Florida. 651-7550. Prehistoric Myths and Contemporary Culture: Hunter/Gatherers and Farmers Through August 4. Presented by Dr. David Miller. Spillian Retreat Center, Fleischmanns. (800) 811-3351.

SATURDAY 3 Dance Buudou, BADOO, BADOLO 8pm. $20. Choreographed and performed by Souleymane Badolo. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Choreography on the Edge 8pm. $12. An eclectic mix of new dance pieces by local and non-local choreographers stretching their boundaries. Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild, Woodstock. 453-8673. Monica Bill Barnes and Company: Luster and Suddenly Summer Somewhere 8pm. $30/$25 members/$15 students. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Swing Dance 7:30-10:30pm. $10. Basic lesson at 7:30 with instructors Linda and Chester Freeman. First Saturday of every month, 8pm. $10. Workshop at 7:30pm with Linda and Chester Freeman MAC Fitness, Kingston. 853-7377.

Fairs & Festivals Phoenicia Festival of the Voice 10am-11pm. 3-day festival of concerts, lectures, and workshops. Phoenicia. 688-1344. The Two Row Wampum Festival 11am-9pm. Native American music, food, crafts, art installations, children’s activities, storytelling, ceremonies, demonstrations. Beacon Waterfront, Beacon. Beacontworow.org. The Wassaic Project Summer Festival Through August 4. Multi-disciplinary celebration of art, music, film, dance, and community featuring over 100 artists, 25 bands, film screenings, dance performances, and more. The Wassaic Project, Wassaic. (347) 815-0783.

Film Between Traditions: Stravinsky’s Legacy and Russian Émigré Cinema 7pm. $12. Ottaway Film Center, Annandale-onHudson. Bard.edu. Film Screening: Hannah Arendt 7:30pm. $8/$6 members. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448. More than Honey 5:45pm. $12.50/$10 members/$7.50 students. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8448.

Food & Wine Pickling Class and Sanctuary Tour 11am. $50. In this class you’ll make pickles using both the quick pickle method and hot water bath canning process. Participants will be able to sample their quick pickles and everyone gets to take home a jar of pickles made in class. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447. Putnam County Wine & Food Fest 11am. Wine Garden $25/per day. Showcasing New York’s most renowned wine producers, beer garden, food, arts and crafts, flea market, fresh produce and local artists. Grounds of Patterson Flea Market, Patterson. (800) 557-4185 ext. 3.

Kids & Family Disney’s Winnie The Pooh Kids 2 & 6:30pm. $12. Pesented by The Acting Out Playhouse. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335.


music NICK LOWE

Pure Pop for Pow! People To those who see Nick Lowe as one of the leading lights of the sleek, hippie-rejecting new wave revolution of the late 1970s but don’t know his background, it may be a surprise that one of the quintessential British power popper’s greatest early inspirations was the act that defined the freewheeling, dirt-farming sound of the Woodstock era: The Band. “When [1969’s] Music from Big Pink came out, it was just so completely different from everything else at the time,” says Lowe, who will headline Club Helsinki in Hudson on August 21. “When The Band played Wembley Stadium in 1974, they rehearsed at the farm we were all living on. We were just in awe. They left some empty bottles of Grand Marnier behind—which we saved on a shelf, as a shrine.” The “we” Lowe is talking about is the band Brinsley Schwarz. A country-and-R&B-tinged group, Brinsley Schwarz was named for its lead guitarist (a future member, along with keyboardist Bob Andrews, of Graham Parker and the Rumour) and featured Lowe on bass and lead vocals and Ian Gomm (1979’s “Hold On”) on guitar and vocals. The outfit cut the original version of “(What’s So Funny ’Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding,” later a hit for Elvis Costello, and helped foment the early ’70s pub rock movement, a back-tothe-roots rock ’n’ roll scene that paved the way for British punk. And when punk began blowing up, Lowe was one of its prime movers. His pounding 1976 single “So It Goes” b/w “Heart of the City” was the first release by the seminal Stiff Records, and as a producer he worked on discs by such early label signings as the Damned, Costello, and Wreckless Eric, as well as those by non-Stiff acts like the Pretenders. Lowe’s solo debut, 1978’s Jesus of Cool (retitled Pure Pop for Now People for the timid American market), was followed by 1979’s Labor of Lust, which harbors his biggest hit, the bittersweetly rollicking “Cruel to Be Kind.” Concurrent with the making of those classic albums, he and singer-guitarist Dave Edmunds co-led the quartet Rockpile, whose sole studio set, 1980’s Seconds of Pleasure, sold strongly thanks to the infectious single “Teacher, Teacher.” Since making his name with this winning trifecta, Lowe has continued to craft superb records that are increasingly colored by his love of classic pop and country; recent standouts include 1994’s The Impossible Bird, 2001’s The Convincer, and 2011’s The Old Magic. One might say the latter’s title squarely nails Lowe’s longheld methodology: that of his timeless, if-it-ain’t-broke-don’t-fix-it approach. But does Lowe ever yearn to try something more experimental? “Funny, I was just talking to Elvis Costello about that when we played Hyde Park last week,” says Lowe. “I suppose I should sometime. But I guess I’ve always just tried to write songs that sound good with either a full band or just an acoustic guitar. Songs that will stand up, no matter what.” Mission accomplished, Mr. Lowe. Nick Lowe will perform at Club Helsinki in Hudson on August 21. Kim Richey opens. Doors are at 8pm. Tickets are $45. (518) 828-4800; Helsinkihudson.com. —Peter Aaron

dan burn-forti

Nick Lowe performs at Club Helsinki in Hudson on August 21.

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The Bindlestiff Family Cirkus 11am. $15/$10. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Magic Lantern Puppet Theatre 11am. An adaptation of the beloved children’s story of a spider who was busy spinning her web and never lost focus no matter the distractions. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181. Open Mike Night 7pm. First Saturday of every month. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Sand Casting Crafts 2pm. Learn how to use sand to make cool sculptures and works of art. Starr Library, Rhinebeck. 876-4030. Small Box Theater 10am-12pm. With Puppeteer Chantal Van Wierts. Ages 8-11 Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Literary & Books Bart Plantenga: Yodel in Hi-Fi 3pm. The presentation will feature a short reading and PowerPoint lecture that focuses on the yodel as a global phenomenon with video and audio examples, plus some live local yodeling. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000. En Plein Air Writing Workshop 10am-noon. $10/$5 parking. For those interested in reflection, memoir writing/poetry and learning new ways to beat writer’s block-this is for you. Local writer/ poet Kathe Izzo will lead a series of creative writing exercises ‘enpleinair’ (out of doors) in the summer landscape of Olana to encourage a direct relationship with nature as inspiration for process and automatic writing. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109.

Perry Beekman and Friends: The Songs of Rodgers and Hart 6:30pm. $40 reserved seating/$25 general seating. This will be the third of Perry’s highly acclaimed “Great American Songbook” concerts at the Maverick. Featuring Perry Beekman on vocals and guitar, Peter Tomlinson on piano, and Lou Pappas on bass, the trio plays a thoughtful balance of highly arranged and improvised music. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Phil Paladino 8pm. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. Pianist Xuerong Zhao 4:30pm. $15/$10 members. Playing Prokofiev’s youthful “Sarcasms for Piano,” Beethoven’s exuberant “Waldstein” Sonata and Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition.” New Marlborough Village Association Meeting House, New Marlborough, MA. (413) 229-2785. Premik Russell Tubbs & Friends 7:30-10:30pm. $10. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Roy Zimmerman Concert 8pm. $20. Join us for a fun concert of progressive political songs about peace and justice by singersongwriter Roy Zimmerman. Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Catskills, Kingston. 518-5947.

Third Annual Janine Pommy Vega Poetry Festival 7:30pm. $15/$8 WAAM members. Poet Pamela Twining will read the works of the late Janine Pommy Vega. Also, reading from their own work will be poets Charlie Plymell, Andy Clausen, George Wallace & Elizabeth Gordon. Musicians Marc Black and Cosmic Legends’ Sylvie Degiez & Wayne Lopes will perform. Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, Woodstock. 443-0621.

Music

Alpenglow + Hand Habits 8pm. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Amernet String Quartet 6:30pm. $35/$30/children free. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. Beth Orton 9pm. $25/$35/$45. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Beth Rose Band 8pm. Jazz. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. Bret Mosley 8pm. Roots music. Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001. Chick Corea and The Vigil with Christian McBride 9pm. $120/$85. Music master Chick Corea reinvents himself. With all new music and an all new band. Plus, fresh arrangements of Corea Classics. From sublime acoustic to brilliant electric. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (860) 542-5531. Ed Palermo’s Big Band Plays Zappa & Throws a Beach Party! 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Ellis Paul 8pm. $25/$20. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Isn’t It Romantic: Manhattan in the Mountains 8pm. In advance: $23/$18 seniors/$7 students. At door: $27/$21 seniors/$7 students. Featuring Tatiana Goncharova, Joanne Polk, pianists, Grigory Kalinovsky, violinist. Verbal program notes presented by Dr. Jeffrey Langford. Doctorow Center for the Arts, Hunter. (518) 263-2066. Paquito D’Rivera and Dizzy Gillespie’s Big Band 8pm. $26-$66. This red-hot finale featuring Paquito & a 16-piece ensemble culminates the Hot Latin Nights Jazz Series with a wall of Latin sound heard all the way to Havana. Light food and pre-show entertainment starts at 6:15. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. 254-5600. Passero World Music Ensemble 4pm. Morning Glory, Woodstock. 679-3208. Performance of Collaborative Works by Music Omi Residents 5pm. A unique experience of global music. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747.

chronogram.com Visit Chronogram.com/events for additional calendar listings and staff recommendations.

108 forecast ChronograM 8/13

Karmic Immersion 11:30am-6pm. $110/$95 in advance. An all-day workshop w/ White Eagle channel James Philip. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

Sports The 13th Annual Millbrook Horse Trials Check website for specific events and times. Coole Park Farm, Millbrook. Millbrookhorsetrials.com.

Theater Babes in Toyland 11am. $5. Operetta Babes in Toyland performed by the young people of the Youth Opera Experience Workshop. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Boeing Boeing 8pm. $35/$30/$2 students and seniors. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. Fiddler on the Roof 8pm. $20/$15 seniors and students. Directed and choreographed by Rose Cremonese-Norton. Mount Pleasant Community Theater, Thornwood. (914) 949-8382. King Lear 8pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Arm-of-the-Sea Theater Filled with the larger-than-life magical realism of a Tim Burton film or Gabriel García Márquez novel, performances by the Hudson Valley-based traveling mask and puppet theater troupe have been amazing audiences for 20 years. Their large-scale hybrid performances of visual arts and music create an atmosphere of strangeness and wonder that the whole family can enjoy. On August 23 through 25, Arm-of-the-Sea Theater presents its annual outdoor performance spectacle, “The Esopus Creek Puppet Suite,” at Saugerties’s Tina Chorvas Waterfront Park. This year’s production, “A Bend in the Crick of Time—True Tall Tales from Olde Saugerties,” focuses on the town’s heritage, featuring historical Saugerties characters, like farming families, Civil War draft dodgers, paper mill workers, steamboat captains, and wandering poets. (845) 246-7873; ArmoftheSea.org

Stories by Artists Paul Russell and Evi Seidman 3pm. The Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center in conjunction with the Old Dutch Church is pleased to host local writers Paul Russell and Evi Seidman. Join us as they speak about their work, telling personal stories of loss and survival. Old Dutch Church, Kingston. 331-5300.

The Fred Savages 9:30pm. $10/$5 with dinner. 80’s rock. Tunes from Peter Gabriel, Ozzie Ozborne, Billy Idol, The Police, The Cars, U2, The Stray Cats and more. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Spirituality

Sarah Lee Guthrie and Johnny Irion 6pm. The Wassaic Project, Wassaic. (347) 815-0783. Steve Black 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277.

Life of Pi 1 & 7pm. $18. Performed by Young Actors Summer Workshop, ages 9-16. Cocoon Theater, Rhinebeck. 876-6470.

Todd Rundgren 8pm. $62. Rock. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream 12:30pm. $15/$5 children and students. Bring your own seating and blanket for this 90-minute performance of Shakespeare’s beloved comedy performed outside. The Mount, Lenox, MA. Shakespeare.org.

Tony Merando 8:30pm. Pop, soft rock. Piano Wine Bar, Fishkill. 896-8466.

Shiva Arms 8pm. $18/$15 members. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Trio Candela Latin food 6pm-7:30pm. 3-piece Latin American and Caribbean band 7:45pm-9:30pm. Knox Trail Inn, Otis, MA. (413) 269-4400.

The Sparkley Clean Funeral Singers $20-$60. This world premiere musical comedy from country singer-songwriter Lori Fischer is perfect for a heart-felt, laughter-filled summer. Capital Repertory Theatre, Albany. (518) 346-6204.

Young People’s Concert 11am. Marc Black, vocals and guitar. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits First Saturday Reception 5-8pm. First Saturday of every month. ASK’s openings are elegant affairs with wine, hors d’oeuvres and art enthusiasts. These monthly events are part of Kingston’s First Saturday art events. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331. Maria Cole’s 200th Birthday Party 1pm. Celebrate with refreshments, a special birthday toast, and croquet. Tours and views of the Bierstadt exhibition will commence as normal during the day. Thomas Cole National Historic Site, Catskill. (518) 943-7465. Mid-Summer Party 5:30-7:30pm. $100/$90. Tour the newly restored Clermont Cottage and explore the Cow Barn, food, drink, music live and silent auction. Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. (518) 537-4240. Open House for Prospective Students and Their Families 10am. Tour our beautiful campus and learn about our programs. Ask questions about the admissions process. Storm King School, Cornwall-On-Hudson. 534-9860 ext. 210.

Outdoors & Recreation Volunteer Restoration Day 10am-2pm. Learn to identify local flora and proper techniques for removing invasive plants that wreak havoc on the valley’s fragile ecosystem. Then put your newfound knowledge to use. Long Dock Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org.

The Winter’s Tale 5pm. Bird-on-a-Cliff Theater. Comeau Property, Woodstock. Birdonacliff.org.

Workshops & Classes Hands-on Pickling Class and Sanctuary Tour 11am-2:30pm. $50. Guest chef: Julie Barone. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447. One Soul, One Love, One Heart Workshop 10am-1pm. $33. This workshop with Ramananda John Welshons will explore the dynamics of successful relationships. You will gain tools and insights that will help you to heal the relationships in your life and you will gain new and revolutionary perspectives that will help to make relationship with others the most fertile ground for your own inner growth and happiness. Newton Plaza, Latham. (518) 466-4035.

SUNDAY 4 Comedy Rita Rudner 7pm. $25-$66. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

Dance Spiegeltent Dane: Tango 6:30pm. $20. Ilene Marder of Woodstock Tango with the JP Jofre Hard Tango Trio and DJ La Rubia del Norte. Lesson at 5:30pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

Fairs & Festivals La Guelaguetza 2013 2pm. 5th annual Poughkeepsie festival of Oaxacan culture, music, dance, and food. The local festival replicates the world-famous cultural celebration that

takes place annually in Oaxaca, Mexico. Organized by the area’s Oaxacan community and other community cultural organizations. Waryas Park, Poughkeepsie. Facebook.com/pokguelaguetza. Phoenicia Festival of the Voice 10am-6pm. 3-day festival of concerts, lectures, and workshops. Phoenicia, Phoenicia. 688-1344. The Wassaic Project Summer Festival Through August 4. Multi-disciplinary celebration of art, music, film, dance, and community featuring over 100 artists, 25 bands, film screenings, dance performances, and more. The Wassaic Project, Wassaic. (347) 815-0783.

Kids & Family Disney’s Winnie The Pooh Kids 2 & 6:30pm. $12. Pesented by The Acting Out Playhouse. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. The Bindlestiff Family Cirkus 11am. $15/$10. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Children and Families: Exploration 360 1pm. Explore space over, under, in front of, behind, and between sculptures in this hands-on workshop. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115. Crafting a Shrine with Melanie Hall 2-5:30pm. $55. Mark a moment, show your devotion, express who you are, dabble in assemblage. Start with a locally-handmade wood shadowbox. Experiment with applying surface textures, painting with acrylic paints and metallic inks. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. Saugerties Old Timers Day 7am-7pm. Bed race and old timers day. Partition Street, Saugerties. (646) 707-4126.

Literary & Books David Appelbaum: Letters and Found Poems of Edisa and Chloe 2pm. Conceived first as a correspondence between two woman, Letters and Found Poems expresses the mystery of their intimacy in their quotidian existence in rural New York. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000. Dr. Joanne Gavin Presents Live Your Dreams, Change the World: The Psychology of Personal Fulfillment for Women 4pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300. Showcase of Writers from the Woodstock Mayapple Writers’ Retreat 3pm. Featuring Patricia McMillen, Maril Nowak and Helen Ruggieri. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Music Amernet String Quartet 3pm. $35/$30/children free. Music Mountain, Falls Village, CT. (860) 824-7126. Buckwheat Zydeco 7:30pm. $55/$40. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Farm Music Round Robin and Potluck 4pm. First Sunday of every month. Farm music round robin and potluck. You’re welcome to bring a song to share, an instrument (or two!), your voice, or just your good cheer. Potluck at 6:30pm. Music until 9pm Brook Farm, New Paltz. 255-1052. JB’s Soul Jazz Jeremy Baum 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Leipzig String Quartet 4pm. Beethoven: String Quartet in A Major, Op. 18, No. 5, Witold Lutosławski: String Quartet (1964), in honor of the composer’s centenary, César Franck: String Quartet in D Major. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Ray Blue Pro-Am Ensemble 4pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. REBEL Baroque Ensemble 3pm. $25/$15 students. Cooperstown Summer Music Festival. Otesaga Resort Hotel, Cooperstown. (800) 838-3006. Sergey Taneyev: Oresteia 3pm. $30/$60/$70/$90. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Work-Party/Potlucks 2pm. Help salvage building materials and build a new stage and performance area. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Spirituality Congregation Shir Chadash Ice Cream Social 2pm. Meet local families who share a desire for community and spiritual connection. Freedom Park Pavilion, LaGrangeville. 227-3327.

Sports The 13th Annual Millbrook Horse Trials Check website for specific events and times. Coole Park Farm, Millbrook. Millbrookhorsetrials.com.

Theater Boeing Boeing 2pm. $35/$30/$2 students and seniors. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511.


Art wassaic project summer festival

scott indermaur / wassaic project From the Wassaic Project 2013 summer exhibition “Homeward Found” preview party held on June 15. In the foreground, Tora Lopez's Two Cheers For The Bundle Of Sticks Metaphor. In the background, the ivy wrapped around the wooden structure is Giada Crispiels's Climbing Ivy, Wassaic. The Wassaic Project Summer Festival runs from August 2 to August 4.

Plum-Colored Drawstring Pants Wearers Need Not Attend Rarely is a free event a hot ticket, but the Wassaic Project Summer Festival is one. Run by a troika of young artists, the event is a four-ring circus—music, film, dance, and visual arts—held inside and outside a former grain elevator in northeastern Duchess County. Their sixth season is the first weekend of August. These curators are addicted to novelty; only about five visual artists (out of 80) repeat from last year—and none of the bands. Because the festival is within walking distance from the Wassaic train station, it’s highly accessible to nondrivers; both Brooklynites and neighbors arrive on foot. This may be the best art festival in the USA for pedestrians. Highlights this year include the folk duo Sarah Lee Guthrie and Johnny Irion premiering their new Jeff Tweedy-produced album, Wassaic Way. (Sarah Lee is Woody Guthrie’s granddaughter.) The actor Martin Starr, best known as Bill Haverchuck in “Freaks and Geeks,” will present a film at the festival. Dancers from the Earl Mosley Institute for the Arts, based in New Milford, Connecticut, will also perform. Artists from previous seasons have gone on to greater success. The film Sleepwalk with Me, directed by Mike Birbiglia and screened at Wassaic last summer, has had a highly successful commercial run. “We like to say, ‘You saw it here first!’” remarks Eve Biddle, one of the founders of the festival. The rest of the year, the Wassaic Project functions as an artists colony. Roughly half of the visual artists in the current show were residents at Wassaic during the past year. Participating artists are encouraged to attend the festival, where they wear name tags on lanyards. Painters and photographers are accustomed to anonymity, but the Wassaic Project encourages conversation between the “creatives” and the crowd. One purpose of this festival is to demystify art and make it accessible to folks who don’t commonly enter the Museum of Modern Art (which now costs $25). Increasingly, the

art world is a specialized subculture, with its own language (“Olafur Eliasson interrogates intertextuality”) and fashion trends (plum-colored drawstring pants). Wassaic bucks that trend. “It’s great to see a 10-year-old who lives across the street standing next to a super-high-powered Chelsea gallery owner looking at the same piece of work, and being engaged in the same way,” says Biddle. All the art onsite is for sale, with prices as low as $50. By giving a free festival, then dangling cheap art before the visitors, the project encourages “impulse collecting.” The art show, which is titled “Homeward Found,” features an international roster of emerging artists. The design of the seven-story structure, dictated by industrial necessity, today strikes us as mazelike Surrealism. The curators carefully employ the building as a commentary on the art. Certain themes emerge in “Homeward Found”: temporary dwellings, secrets encoded as riddles, a gentle eroticism. There are a number of examples of “found abstraction,” in which the artist stumbles upon the nonfigurative. For example, the photograph “At Night” by Rachel Barrett suggests that a woman’s back, dotted by freckles and moles, resembles a Jackson Pollock painting—or the night sky. Jonathan Schipper’s “To Dust” is two gray figurative sculptures hung upside down and rubbed against each other by a mechanical motor. Gradually, their features become eroded, like driftwood. Perhaps the most memorable piece is a drawing in ballpoint pen by Shannon Finnegan spelling out the words “WANT LESS.” Visitors must preregister for camping. “Homeward Found” is also on view weekends throughout the summer, until September 2. The Wassaic Project Summer Festival runs from August 2 to 4. (347) 815-0783; Wassaicproject.org. —Sparrow

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Fiddler on the Roof 2pm. $20/$15 seniors and students. Directed and choreographed by Rose Cremonese-Norton. Mount Pleasant Community Theater, Thornwood. (914) 949-8382. Life of Pi 1 & 7pm. $18. Performed by Young Actors Summer Workshop, ages 9-16. Cocoon Theater, Rhinebeck. 876-6470. The Sparkley Clean Funeral Singers $20-$60. This world premiere musical comedy from country singer-songwriter Lori Fischer is perfect for a heart-felt, laughter-filled summer. Capital Repertory Theatre, Albany. (518) 346-6204. The Winter’s Tale 5pm. Bird-on-a-Cliff Theater. Comeau Property, Woodstock. Birdonacliff.org.

Workshops & Classes Drop In and Draw 10am-noon. $15/$75 for six sessions. Drop-in and draw the model with guidance from instructor Yura Adams. Save by pre-purchasing all six sessions for $75. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. A Transformative Gong Adjustment with Don Conreaux 2pm. Please see website for details. As a closing, in a special sound evening ceremony, Don Conreaux will perform The Magnum Opus Gong Concert, last presented in Integral Yoga Center Winter Solstice 2012. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

MONDAY 5 Business & Networking Dutchess Peace 5:30-7pm. First Monday of every month. All those interested in peace, social justice, and the revolution of the 99% are invited Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 876-7906.

Film Make ‘Em Laugh Film Festival: Sleeper 8:30pm. In this classic futuristic comedy Keystone Cops meet Flash Gordon in the wild imagination of Woody Allen. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Food & Wine The Hudson Valley Bounty "Taste of" Dinner 5-8pm. $75/$50 HVB members/$25 children. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. Hudsonvalleybounty.com.

Kids & Family Mask & Puppet Building with Arm-of-the-Sea Theater 9am-noon. Ages 9+. Create large theatrical characters for the upcoming Esopus Creek Puppet Suite. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132. On Stage and Backstage with the Berkshire Theatre Group 9am. Through Aug. 9. BTG Plays! helps campers enhance their acting skills and gain self-confidence through improvisational skits, theater games, movement exercises, and storytelling. Make props, design costumes, and experiment with lighting to create a set for the Friday finale performance for friends and family. Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 443-7171 ext. 40.

Lectures & Talks The Voice is All: Rethinking Kerouac 4pm. $22/$20 members. In her biography of Beat poet Jack Kerouac, Johnson sheds new light on his journey from boyhood to cultural icon. Drawing from their love affair, as well as Kerouac’s letters and diaries, Johnson peels away the layers of the legend to reveal the real man beneath. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (413) 551-5100.

Music Lea Delaria 8:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

TUESDAY 6 Film Free Movie Tuesdays/ Make ‘Em Laugh Film Festival: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes 8:30pm. Howard Hawks directs Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell in this musical comedy based on Anita Loos’s novels about Two Little Girls from Little Rock. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Food & Wine Black Dirt Feast 6pm. $100. Some of the most distinguished chefs in the Warwick Valley will join forces with the Pine Island Chamber of Commerce for Black Dirt Feast 2013. This anticipated celebration of local farmers and restaurateurs pairs a sumptuous al fresco meal with fine wines on the great lawn of Scheuermann Farms & Greenhouses. Scheuermann Farms & Greenhouse, Warwick. 258-4221.

Kids & Family History Camp 10am-3pm. $75. Through August 8. Special activities for kids ages 8-12. Activities include hearthside cooking, churning butter, making wampum and cornhusk dolls, 18thc.games and more. Senate House and Museum, Kingston. Kids Summer Yoga Camp 10am-2pm. Through August 8. Ages 4-12. Held at Bowdoin Park. Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223. Make It! Mini Camp 10am. $55/$275 six-week series. Play, experiment, and make art! This drop off mini-camp is all about getting our hands dirty as we create one-of-a-kind masterpieces. Ages 5+. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. (945) 679-6132. Shark Week 4:30pm. Eat sharky food, make sharky things, learn sharky facts. Age: teens. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Swingin’ Jazz for Kids 3:30pm. $15/$5 children. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

Lectures & Talks Artist Art Murphy 6pm. Local artist Art Murphy will be at the library to discuss his photography and his interest in using local archaeology and historical settings as subjects. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Kayak Trip Planning 6-7:30pm. Where are the best places to launch a kayak, camp and haul out along the Hudson? Experienced kayakers will provide all the answers, sharing their knowledge of gear and the area to make your paddling adventure a success. Long Dock Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org.

Music Tango Night 8:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Theater King Lear 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream 6pm. $15/$5 children and students. Bring your own seating and blanket for this 90-minute performance of Shakespeare’s beloved comedy performed outside. The Mount, Lenox, MA. Shakespeare.org.

Workshops & Classes Costume History Camp 11am. $155. This is a four-day, drop-off program for high school students. Students will make four 18th century ladies’ projects while learning the basics of costuming and needlework of the period. Includes day cap, mitts, pockets, and a petticoat Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. (518) 537-4240.

WEDNESDAY 7

country gardens. Book signing to follow. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Music All-Ages Open Mike 7pm. For all-age musicians, all levels. This is the perfect opportunity for the first time public performers as well as seasoned musicians The Castle Fun Center, Chester. 469-2116. Ben Rounds Band 6pm. T.R. Gallo West Strand Park, Kingston. 334-3914. Duo Parnas with Vincent Adragna 8pm. Darrow School, New Lebanon. (888) 820-1696. The Fixx 8pm. $59/$39. Together, The Fixx has an incredibly strong voice, strong legacy and strong future. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Ladies Night: Burgers & Bordeaux 7pm. Drink specials plus live music with the talented singer/songwriter Drew Bordeaux. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Old Songs Acoustic Open Mike First Wednesday of every month, 7:30pm. $3. Walk in and sign up to play (fifteen minutes). Local performer Kate Blain will host Old Songs, Inc., Voorheesville. 518765-2815. The Philadelphia Orchestra—Opening Night 8pm. $24-$80. Stéphane Denève, Conductor Gil Shaham, Violinist -Sibelius: Lemminkäinen’s Return -Sibelius: Violin Concerto -Dvoák: Symphony No. 8 Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Sick Puppies 7pm. Rock. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Tom DePetris Quartet Call for times. Jazz, blues, and original music Dave’s Coffee and Wine House, Saugerties. 246-8424.

Nightlife The Match Game 8pm. Hosted by Trixie Starr. Two Boots, Red Hook. 758-0010. Terraoke! Karoake Night 10pm. Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro, Rhinebeck. 876-3330.

Theater All’s Well That Ends Well 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Berkshire Playwrights Lab Presents a Staged Reading of New Play 7:30pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040. Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 7pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204. Staged Reading of The Handyman 7:30pm. Berkshire Playwrights Lab. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

THURSDAY 8

Fairy Houses and Stories of Wonder 3:30pm. $35. Build your own fairy house using nature's treasures and enter into small worlds of wonder, with local storyteller, Jill Olesker. Ages 7+. Fiberflame Studio, Saugerties. 679-6132.

Music Bill Malchow and the Go-Cup All Stars 5:30-7:30pm. Long Dock Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Brother Joscephus and the Love Revolution 8pm. $35/$20. Dip heavily into a musical gumbo rich with old school soul, roots, classic rock stylings, New Orleans rhythms, and feel-good secular gospel music. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Bucky Pizzarelli and Ed Laub Duo 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Chris Walsh 7pm. Singer/songwriter. Keegan Ales, Kingston. 331-2739. George Thorogood & The Destroyers 7:30pm. With Buddy Guy and The James Hunter Six Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. John Winton 7pm. Soft rock. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. The Last Chance Band 8pm. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. The Philadelphia Orchestra: The 150th Anniversary of the Race Course Concert 8pm. $24-$80. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Reddan Brothers Band 6:30-8:30pm. Sugar Loaf Crossing, Sugar Loaf. 469-2713. Ted Nugent 8pm. $31.50-$35. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 471-1966. Woman Fest: Celebrating Women Open Mike Competitions 7-9pm. HG Fairfield Arts Center, Brewster. 363-1559.

Spirituality Journey to the Your Life’s Purpose with Sacred Sound 7-9pm. $20/$15. Sound-driven journeywork with Lev Natan. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

Theater All’s Well That Ends Well 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 7pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204. Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream 6pm. $15/$5 children and students. Bring your own seating and blanket for this 90-minute performance of Shakespeare’s beloved comedy performed outside. The Mount, Lenox, MA. Shakespeare.org.

FRIDAY 9

Business & Networking Hudson Valley Garden Association Monthly Meeting Second Thursday of every month, 7pm. Shawangunk Town Hall, Wallkill. 418-3640.

Clubs & Organizations Kingston-Rhinebeck Toastmasters Club Second Thursday of every month, 7-9pm. Practice public speaking skills. Ulster County Office Building, Kingston. 338-5184. SPL Evening Book Club 7pm. Rabbit Run by John Updike. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Fairs & Festivals

Art Galleries & Exhibits 11th Annual Saugerties Artists Studio Tour 5pm-7pm. Opening reception. 36 artists, working in a variety of media and styles, will open their doors to the public. Partition and Main Street, Saugerties. Saugertiesarttour.com. John Fischer Photography Show 4-10pm. Through August 11. Presented by Wired Galley. John Fischer, born and raised in Ulster County, has traveled extensively in the United States, but all roads seem to lead back to the Hudson Valley. A portion of each sale goes directly to support the Rosendale Food Pantry. Canaltown Alley, Rosendale. 658-8563.

The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival 5pm. Mostly free, some, small fee, see hudsonvalleyjazzfest.org. Four date event feature local and name musicians to be held throughout the Hudson Valley. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival, Warwick. (917)903-4380.

Dance

Film

Fairs & Festivals The 18th Annual Litchfield Jazz Festival Music on two stages, fine art, and handmade crafts, fantastic food, wine and beer, artist talks and clinics, student performances and our new Kids Zone all with views and sunsets. Check website for specific events and times. Goshen Fairground, Goshen, CT. Litchfieldjazzfest.com. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival 5pm. Four date event feature local and name musicians to be held throughout the Hudson Valley. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival, Warwick. (917) 903-4380.

'80s Dance Party 8pm. Dance all night as DJ Princess Zoe spins the best of 80’s pop, soul, new wave, dark wave, and new romanticism. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Singalong Jamboree Concert 7pm. Institute for Music and Health’s Second Singalong Jamboree Concert given by and for people with Developmental Disabilities. Led by members of IMH’s. The Fountains at Millbrook, Millbrook. 677-5871.

Make ‘Em Laugh Film Festival: Mr. Bean: The Movie 8:30pm. Mr. Bean (Rowan Atkinson) is a well-meaning but hopelessly clumsy and destructive guard at the Royal National Gallery in London. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Make ‘Em Laugh Film Festival: The Jerk 8:30pm. Steve Martin made his film-starring debut in this wacky comedy hit. He is Navin Johnson, adopted son of a poor black sharecropper family, whose crazy inventions lead him from rags to riches and right back to rags. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Workshops & Classes

Health & Wellness

The Art of Pastel Painting 10am-1pm. $180/$160. 4-weekly sessions. With Marlene Wiedenbaum, PSA. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550.

Food & Wine

Hope After Neonatal Death through Sharing First Wednesday of every month, 6:30pm. Open to all who have suffered the loss of a child, before, during, or after birth Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. Handssupportgroup.blogspot.com.

Open Mike 7pm. Every other Thursday. Hosted by Jack Higgins of Die-Hardz. Palaia Vineyards, Highland Mills. 928-5384.

Kids & Family

HQMP Beach Day 10am-6pm. Join us for health information, free goodies, and fun in the sun with Health Quest. Our staff will be on-hand to answer your questions and provide the latest information on services. SplashDown Beach, Fishkill. 897-9600.

Woodstock Nights 6pm. Woodstock’s own version of a night market. Businesses will offer special nighttime deals, restaurants will create small bites or special menu items, artists will be recruited to create pop-up art shows, and musicians are invited to perform. Woodstock Nights, Woodstock. 594-6518.

Kids & Family

Film

Art Adventures: Mix it Up! 10am-2pm. $60/$50 members. Fun-filled art workshop devoted to the art of collage. Each class explores collage through a different theme and material– get ready to mix and match, combine the unexpected, and creatively reconstruct images. Ages 6–12. The Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah. (914) 232-9555.

Birders- The Central Park Effect 7pm. Discover the diversity of birds found in Manhattan’s celebrated patch of green, and the equally colorful New Yorkers who schedule their lives around the rhythms of their migration. A Q&A with director Jeffery Kimball will follow the 60 minute documentary. Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook. 677-5343.

Learn to Meditate with Raja Yoga Meditation 6pm. First Monday of every month. Enhance or begin a meditation practice. Brahma Kumaris Raja Yoga is an ancient spiritual discipline that is used for relaxing, refreshing and clearing the mind and heart to experience peace and positivity in the life. Peace Village Learning & Retreat Center, Haines Falls, Hunter Mountain. (528) 589-5000. Sparks Inspiration Monthly Class 6:30pm. First Monday of every month. $25. Learn to do what sparks your interest by transforming life challenges into opportunities! Join a supportive community where you can be yourself in order to learn and be happier Maria Blon, Middletown. 313-2853.

110 forecast ChronograM 8/13

Film

Family Fun Night: Talent Show 6:30pm. Perform for your family and friends. All ages. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Swingin’ Jazz for Kids 3:30pm. $15/$5 children. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

Literary & Books Private Edens: Beautiful Country Gardens 4pm. $30/$25 members. Join garden designer Jack Staub on a visual garden tour through 21 superb private

Health & Wellness


film evocateur: the morton downey jr. movie

© magnolia pictures

Morton Downey Jr. and Rev. Al Sharpton in Evocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie, screening at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on August 4.

Zip It! Bill O’Reilly is conciliatory, Sean Hannity is thoughtful, and Glenn Beck is downright To the uninitiated, Mancompared Man is a bit a tough The Philadelphia group’sJr. odd, rational—that is, when to of 1980s talk sell. show host Morton Downey The alliterative name is easy to mishear, like something you should understand but still don’t chain-smoking right-winger with the suitcase-sized mouth went from New York City talk quite. albums—just as bizarrely titled, with Man inofa his Bluepopulist Turbanstance with showTheir personality to national working-class heronames on thelike strength a and Facebullying and Sixonscreen Demon Bag—feature music wholly removed from any of the dominant antics. sonicThe threads in contemporary American indie. It’s a soundand assembled alien wild ride lasted only two years. Drunk on power, believingofhis ownparts hype, imported from far and wide—lusty sea shanties, primal chants, dark and passionate Downey eventually imploded in public. But, argue the Hudson Valley directors of the Mediterranean jigs, Evocateur: bits of doo-wop. There’s a lot ofJr.yelping, swearing, and the waltzing, new documentary The Morton Downey Movie, Downey paved way for and much more xylophone than electric guitar. the brash theatrics of today’s breed of conservative TV pundits. Indeed, Man screening Man is one Americanfeaturing indie’s most distinctive live A one-time of of Evocateur, co-director (andacts, Red and Hooktheir resident) show—coming to Kingston’s BSP Lounge on Friday, May 24—is among its most Seth Kramer, will take place at Upstate Films Rhinebeck on August 4. intense and exhilarating. don’t careFilms, if we look crazy, or if we look foolish, company or if we Kramer is one-third “We of Ironbound the Garrison-based production sweat too much,” insists lead man Ryan Kattner. “We’re just trying to get down in the that spent several years on the film. He admits being a teen fan of “The Morton Downey dirt, to connect.” Assuming the nom-de-guerre Honus Honus, Kattner cuts a stage Jr. Show,” as were co-directors Daniel A. Miller, and Jeremy Newberger. As adults, and presence of Freddy Mercury-as-carnival barker, a flamboyant, mugging front man who award-winning documentarians, the trio realized the perfect-for-film, sensationalistic sings likeof hisDowney’s guts are on andas pounds at his keyboard with a child’s animal glee. quality life.fireBut unapologetic liberal progressives, they saw the “Iphenomenon learned a lot about keyboards from playing with drummers,” says Kattner. “I started as a cautionary tale. out on a Rhodes, is asays, very that physical thing. canthe really dig hilarious in.” Man to Man’s The team felt,which Kramer it would beI“on onejust hand, bring sound reflects this hunger for visceral connection, and while their music is too eclectic him back to the big screen and see him, once again, terrorize people. On the other tohand, safely the pigeon-hole, the live material largely culled fromtothe caterwauling something junkyard film seemed to have theispotential, for us, communicate skronk—part Tom Waits circa Bone Machine, part Captain Beefheart circa Trout Mask perhaps more important: Because there are people today who are still practicing Replica—that is their go-to mode. his act on television.” Physicality is ManofMan’s calling card, and in their in their frenetic live and Over the course research, Kramer his sound, colleagues discovered thatshows, Downey was infar Kattner’s lyrical preoccupations. Man Man is one of the few American indie groups more complicated than his crass, braying persona might suggest. “It was just one who seemafter richly, un-ironically sexualized. “Sex isthe dirty, and ugly, and it’s wonderful,” surprise the next,” Kramer says. Downey, son of it’s a famous Hollywood crooner,

was originally a liberal Democrat, a friend and booster of the Kennedys, and even a poet. says Kattner. with “(Man Man)and tries to express all that, no holds “Knuckle Down”, In interviews friends contemporaries—among them, barred.” Gloria Allred, Bill Boggs, Pat the opener on 2011’s Life Fantastic, nakedly recounts a relationship vexed by Buchanan, and Alan Dershowitz—a portrait emerges of a man who reinvented sexual himself dependence: “Whatfor the hell than can Ifrom do when youconviction, whisper ‘punish me’?/ me like a tiger more for a hunger fame political churning upSnap his studio audience trap, harvest all my honey”. There’s also a playfulness to Man Man’s unfettered raunch, into what Mayor Ed Koch called “a lynch mob.” as on 2008’s fittingly Rabbitcame, Habits, where Kattner admonishes a promiscuous Downey’s biggesttitled crusade uncharacteristically, with the case of Tawana leach named Butter Beans for the “lipstick across [his] dipstick”, only to laterhate playcrime. the Brawley, the Wappingers Falls teen who claimed to be the victim of a fearsome villain himself, tempting an unhappily married woman: “You wonder where the true love Downey dissected the issue several times on his show, resulting in an on-stage battle and went / cause the breeder your bed your Al bread / I’m top dog, hot dog.” visceral television. Along in the way, hedon’t madebutter Reverend Sharpton a household name. The dark and dirty stuff aside, Man Man’s true strength is in tempering pain andof The most unsettling scene—among many—in Evocateur is when members sadness with merriment and play. “(We try) totheir handle subjectthe matter without being Downey’s original production team discuss rolesdark in fanning flames of theitBrawley all doom and gloom,” says Kattner. “It’s important to maintain levity…and to celebrate.” case (ultimately proven a hoax). With unsettling candor and a measure of shame, they Man is for a testament to this mood of redemptive, talk Man’s about live theirshow quest through-the-roof ratings, at any cost.cathartic celebration. On stage the band members all smile incessantly, donning paintsays andofquasi-ritualistic “It was still a keystone experience in all of their lives,”war Kramer the producers, headgear, bopping along to the collective rattle. Kattner’s lyrics are brilliant, but for the “and they had a lot of baggage associated with it.” (One of the former producers was in-person Man Man experience, truly meaning boils down to truly feeling: “You go see Jim Langan, now editor of the Hyde Park weekly newspaper Hudson Valley News.) a show, you’re probably not going understand that the singer’s saying. The and Ironbound Films directors sawtoEvocateur as anything “a psychological thriller about the But if they mean it, that translates regardless. If you believe in what you’re doing, it rise and fall of this man,” Kramer says. Jarring animation segments by British artist should register some emotion.” Murray John depict the internal demons of Downey. Daughter Kelly offers a clear-eyed The recently work on itsman as-yet-unnamed fifth studioinalbum, set tofor bea look at group her father, whofinished went from family to egomaniac, trading her mother released via ANTIlater this year, with an extensive tour to follow. showgirl. Downey’s widow refused to participate, Kramer says, when she realized this Mannot Man appear atcanonization BSP Loungebut in “a Kingston 8:30pm. Advance would bewill a cinematic fair lookon at May who 24 he at was, warts and all.” tickets, sold through the BSP website, are $8. Tickets at the door are $12. (845) 481-A Evocateur screens on Sunday, August 4, at 3pm at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck. 4158; Bsplounge.com. discussion with co-director Seth Kramer follows the film. (845) 876-2515; Upstatefilms.org. —Tom —Jay Whalen Blotcher 8/13 ChronograM forecast 111


Make ‘Em Laugh Film Festival: Kind Hearts and Coronets 8:30pm. Free. UK, 1949, 106 min. In this darkly funny Ealing comedy Dennis Price plays Louis D’Ascoyne whose mother was rejected by her noble family for marrying an Italian tenor for love. Louis decides to avenge his mother by murdering the relatives ahead of him in line for the dukedom, all of whom are played with incredible virtuosity by the brilliant Alec Guinness. They range from a youthful D’Ascoyne to a slew of uncles and one Aunt Agatha. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Paragraph 175 7pm. Between 1933 and 1945, over 100,000 men were arrested under Paragraph 175 of the German Penal Code; less than 4,000 survived. Join us at the Old Dutch Church for this critically-acclaimed documentary, as survivors tell their stories for the first time. Old Dutch Church, Kingston. 331-5300.

Health & Wellness Essential Waves: A Moving Meditation Second Friday of every month, 7:30-9pm. $15/$10 students and seniors. 5rythms-Bob. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 255-8212.

Kids & Family Story Time 10:30am. Ages 1-3. Age appropriate stories and songs. Just bring a lap to sit on! Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Vanaver Caravan SummerDance On Tour 1pm. $10/$5 youth 18 years and under. From Flamenco to percussive/rhythm tap and clog dancing to Bulgarian and contemporary dance/theatre the Vanaver Caravan’s SummerDance on Tour will take you around the world and back again. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Lectures & Talks Birds of Prey 11am. Lecture and demonstration with Tom Ricardi, Wildlife Rehabilitator. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Literary & Books Jim Weider’s Blue Chicken 7pm. Opening: RoseAnn Fino. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. John Montgomery presents The Answer Model: A New Path to Healing 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Music The 20th Century’s Most Celebrated Composer 8pm. $25-$60. Pre-concert talk at 7:30pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Artimus Pyle Band 8pm. $50/$35. Tribute to vintage Lynyrd Skynyrd with special guests Citizens Band Radio. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. The Artimus Pyle Band with Special Guests Citizens Band Radio 8pm. $35, $50. Lynyrd Skynyrd’s drummer Artimus Pyle and his new band performing the vintage Skynyrd hits. This is the real deal! Come hear the band, the interesting untold stories and meet Artimus in person after the show. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Ben Rounds Band 7pm. Country. Catamount Banquet Center, Mount Tremper. 688-2444. Bill Charlap Trio 8pm. $26. Jazz pianist Bill Charlap takes the stage for the first of two nights of piano mastery on Belleayre Mountain. Group features bassist Peter Washington and drummer Kenny Washington along with Mr. Charlap. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. 254-5600. Breakaway Featuring Robin Baker 9:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. The Cagneys 9pm. Dave Mason opening at 5:30pm. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. Catskill Jazz Factory Artists-in-Residence 7:30pm. $7-$28. Featuring Jelly and George: a tribute to Jelly Roll Morton & George Gershwin. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-4246. Fat City 9pm. Blues. Shea O’Brien’s, New Paltz. 255-1438. Happy Jawbone Family Band 8pm. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Harpeth Rising 8pm. $20/$15. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Jeff & Bob’s Second Friday Jam 8pm. Lifelong friends and musicians, Jeff Entin and Bob Blum, host a rocking good time every second Friday of the month. With special guests. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. John Hiatt & the Combo 8pm. $67. Singer/songwriter guitarist. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

chronogram.com Visit Chronogram.com/events for additional calendar listings and staff recommendations.

112 forecast ChronograM 8/13

Melissa Frabotta CD Release Party 9:30pm. Acoustic. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

The Piecemakers of Cairo Quilt Guild Quilt Festival 10am-4pm. $2. Cairo Public Library, Cairo. (518) 622-2270.

Myles Mancuso Band 7:30pm. Blues. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Film

One World Trio in Concert at the Howland Cultural Center. 8pm. $15 at door, $10 for seniors and students. Come and share in the experience of improvised music that defies categorization. A great chance to hear this group of world class musicians in a unique performance space. One World Trio is Gary Kelly on Basses, T. Xiques on Drums and Percussion and Sam Morrison (Miles Davis, Gil Evans, Santana) on Saxes and Flute. Howland Cultural Center, Beacon. 831-4988. Peter Primamore Quartet 8pm. Jazz. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. The Philadelphia Orchestra: A Bernstein Extravaganza with NYCB 8pm. $24-$80. Instrument Petting Zoo sponsored by The Alfred Z. Solomons Foundation, children’s workshop on the lawn presented by Albany Medical Center. Stéphane Denève, Conductor. Jamie Bernstein, host NYCB dancers Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Reality Check 9:30pm. Classic rock. The Quiet Man Pub, Peekskill. Thequietmanpublichouse.com. Steve Katz 9pm. $25/$20. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. The Sweet Clementines 8pm. San Severia, Kingston. (917) 450-4295. Woman Fest: Celebrating Women Open Mike Competitions 7-9pm. HG Fairfield Arts Center, Brewster. 363-1559.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Wallkill River School Golf Outing 12-5pm. $95. Lunch, golf outing, plein air paint out and live auction. Winding Hills Golf Course, Montgomery. WallkillRiverSchool.com.

A Son Down, After Sun Down 6pm. The documentary explores gun violence in Newburgh and Poughkeepsie, New York, and will be followed by a discussion with the director, joined by Monte Frank from the Newtown Action Alliance and Andy Pelosi, President of the Campaign to Keep Guns Off Campus. Fovea Exhibitions, Beacon. 765-2199. Alice’s Restaurant 7pm. $8/$6 members/$5 children. The iconic song “Alice’s Restaurant” by Arlo Guthrie was turned into the popular 1969 film of them same name. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Make ‘Em Laugh Film Festival: A Shot In the Dark 8:30pm. The second of the Peter Sellers hilarious Pink Panther movies directed by Blake Edwards, often cited as the greatest of the series. When M. Ballon’s (George Sanders) driver is found shot dead, Inspector Clouseau is the first official on the scene. All evidence suggests that the maid, (Elke Sommer) is the murderer, but because Clouseau is attracted to her, he is sure she is innocent. He has her released from jail, but things do not work out the way the he hoped and people keep being murdered. With a score by Henry Mancini. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Health & Wellness Meet the Doulas 10:30am. Hosted by the Doulas of the Hudson Valley. Expectant parents who come to this info session will be able to meet with local doulas, ask questions, and find out how a doula can benefit them during pregnancy, labor, and beyond. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. 473-5952.

Kids & Family Honk! Jr. 1pm. $15. HONK! JR. is a contemporary retelling of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Ugly Duckling presented by The Acting Out Playhouse. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335.

Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 8pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204.

The Bindlestiff Family Cirkus 11am. $15/$10. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Fiddler on the Roof 8pm. $20/$15 seniors and students. Directed and choreographed by Rose Cremonese-Norton. Mount Pleasant Community Theater, Thornwood. (914) 9498382.

Farm and Gardens 3:30pm. Hawthorne Valley Farm brings a taste of the farm to Starr with “How Groundhog’s Garden Grew.” Kids plant an herb garden to take home. Starr Library, Rhinebeck. 876-4030.

King Lear 8pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Hudson-Athens Lighthouse Journey 11am. Led by environmental educator Fran Martino for ages three and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Theater

SATURDAY 10 Art Galleries & Exhibits 11th Annual Saugerties Artists Studio Tour 10am-6pm. Thirty-six artists, working in a variety of media and styles, will open their doors to the public. Partition and Main Street, Saugerties. Saugertiesarttour.com. John Fischer Photography Show 10am-10pm. Through August 11. Presented by Wired Galley. John Fischer, born and raised in Ulster County, has traveled extensively in the United States, but all roads seem to lead back to the Hudson Valley. A portion of each sale goes directly to support the Rosendale Food Pantry. Canaltown Alley, Rosendale. 658-8563. Meet the Artists 1:30-5pm. $50. Visit the studios of Joan Snyder and Jenny Nelson. Includes light refreshments. Byrdcliffe Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Dance Ajkun Ballet Theatre 7:30-9:15pm. Performing La Bayadère. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Southern Dance Party 8pm. $15/$5 children. Cajun, square & contra dancing to live music. Workshop at 7:30pm. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Fairs & Festivals 10th Annual West Stockbridge Zucchini Festival 10am-9:30pm. Activities for kids and adults: a pet parade, rides and races, zucchini recipe contest, zucchini decorating/weigh-off contests, live music and entertainment, games, food booths, arts and crafts booths, and more. West Stockbridge Cultural Council, West Stockbridge. Weststockbridgetown.com. The 18th Annual Litchfield Jazz Festival Music on two stages, fine art and handmade crafts, fantastic food, wine and beer, artist talks and clinics, student performances, and our new Kids Zone all with views and sunsets. Check website for specific events and times. Goshen Fairground, Goshen, CT. Litchfieldjazzfest.com. 3rd Annual DIY Craft Fair 11am-5pm. Over 30 local craft vendors participating. Beautiful crafts, fun DIY activities, fitness demos including butt & gut bootcamp and Zumba, live music with Mr. O, and more. Cornell Street Studio, Kingston. 331-0191. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival 12pm. Four date event feature local and name musicians to be held throughout the Hudson Valley. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival, Warwick. (917) 903-4380.

Lectures & Talks Who Was Stravinsky? 10am-noon. Panel discussion. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003.

Literary & Books Kingston’s Second Saturday Spoken Word 7pm. $5/$2.50 open mike. Featured poets: Judith Kerman and Bobbi Katz. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Kingston. 331-2884. Marion Winik: Highs in the Low Fifties: How I Stumbled Through the Joys of Single Living 5pm. Winik chronicles of being single in middle age will leave readers shocked, awed, and laughing out loud. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000. Signing and Discussion with Kevin Egan 4pm. Author of Midnight. Merritt Bookstore, Millbrook. 758-2665.

Music 1913: Breakthrough to Fame and Notoriety 8pm. $30-$75. American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director. Preconcert talk at 7pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Adult Party Games from the Leisure Planet 8pm. $20. Performed and arranged by Varispeed. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Andrea Tomasi + Johanna Warren + Half Waif 8pm. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Another Road 7:30pm. $5. Acoustic. The Annex at North East-Millerton Library, Millerton. (518) 610-1331. The Art of Fugue 4:30pm. $25/$20. J.S. Bach’s great contrapuntal cycle performed live. New Marlborough Village Association Meeting House, New Marlborough, MA. Ben Rounds Band 12pm. Country. Hunter Mountain Resort, Hunter. (518) 263-4223. The Blues Dudes 7pm. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. Catskill Jazz Factory: Aaron Diehl Ensemble 7:30pm. $10. With guest artist, singer Cecile McLorin Salvant and pianist Marcus Roberts Doctorow Center for the Arts, Hunter. (518) 263-2066. Catskill Jazz Factory Artists-in-Residence 7:30pm. $10. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. 518-263-2063.

Chuck Prophet 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Clifton Anderson Quartet 7:30pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. The Crossroads Band 9pm. Classic rock. Southern Dutchess Bowl, Beacon. 831-3220. The Cupcakes 8pm. Acoustic. San Severia, Kingston. (917) 450-4295. Dave Liebman: 2013 Hudson Valley Jazz Festival 7pm. $30/425 in advance. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. Eric Erickson 8:30pm. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Fat City 10pm. Blues. Mahoney’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, Poughkeepsie. 471-7026. Jazz at the Grille 5:30pm. $12/$10 members. Featuring local jazz musicians, and food and wine from the Vineyard Grille while sitting among the vines on the beautiful 130 acre estate. Children are allowed. Millbrook Vineyards, Millbrook. 677-8383 ext. 21. Jazz at the Maverick 6:30pm. Fred Hersch, piano and Nico Gori, clarinet. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Kenny Barron’s All-Star Quintet 8pm. $26-$66. Jazz pianists Kenny Barron will mark his 70th birthday celebration with accompaniment by a “who’s who” of some of the most accomplished players on today’s jazz scene, including Lionel Loueke, Marcus Strickland, Lee Pierson, and Linda Oh. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. 254-5600. Live Jazz 8pm. George Schuller Trio, drums; Helen Sung, piano. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. Lost Radio Rounders 7pm. Historic music duo performs music from the 1800’s. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775. Marji Zintz 7pm. Acoustic Joma Cafe, West Shokan. 251-1114. Outdoor Concert with The Big Band Sound 6pm. $23/$18 members/$20 in advance/$15 in advance members/students half price. The Big Band Sound is a 20 piece jazz orchestra that recreates the swinging sounds of the big band era. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. The Philadelphia Orchestra: Yo-Yo Ma 8pm. Stéphane Denève, Conductor Yo-Yo Ma, Cellist Elgar: Cello Concerto Debussy: La mer. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Rock Camp Session Three Final Performance 12pm. Final concerts for New York School of Music’s award-winning Rock Camp USA. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 778-7594. Roswell Rudd Quartet 8pm. $20/$18 members. Byrdcliffe Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, Woodstock. 679-2079. The Russian Context 1:30pm. $35. Pre-concert talk at 1pm. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. Travis Schifko 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Vance Gilbert 8pm. $20/$15. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. The Wiyos 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Woodstock Concerts on the Green 1-5pm. Village Green, Woodstock. Woodstockchamber.com.

Nightlife Live at the Fillmore: Celebrating the Music of the Allman Brothers 8pm. $25, $40. Live at the Fillmore is the definitive tribute to the original Allman Brothers Band which featured Duane Allman, Dickey Betts, and Berry Oakley. It takes its name from what many consider the greatest live album ever made by one of the greatest live bands of all time, At Fillmore East, recorded at Bill Graham’s legendary NY rock venue Fillmore East. Rolling Stone magazine listed At Fillmore East as number 49 of the 500 greatest albums of all time and Duane Allman #2 on its 100 Greatest Guitarists Of All Time. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits 100 Years of Spring: A Celebration of Community, Food and Stravinsky 8pm. $20/$15 students and seniors. An evening of acoustic music and a perspective on the current flourish of food farming initiatives in the area. Pianist Neil Alexander will perform. Interspersed within the program, a look at fresh harvested local food, a prize drawing, special guests including violinist Rachel Evans, and more as Neil Alexander invites the community farm and education organization Common Ground Farm to join. Howland Cultural Center, Beacon. 831-4988. First Annual Muddy Puddles “Mess Fest” 11am-4pm. A fundraising event for childhood cancer in honor of SuperTy Campbell. Camp Kiwi, Carmel. Muddypuddlesproject.org.


Hudson-Athens Lighthouse Tours Second Saturday of every month. $25/$10 children and members/$5 members’ children. Take a ferry from the Henry Hudson or Athens Riverfront Park to Emily Brunner’s former home: the 139-year-old lighthouse where she and her family lived until 1949. She’ll guide you through the structure where you can see lighthouse relics, like old family photos and the tower’s original fog bell. Henry Hudson Riverfront Park, Hudson. Hudsonathenslighthouse.org. Ice Cream Social and Concert 6-8pm. $15-$23. Under the stars with The Big Band Sound. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Work-Party/Potlucks 2pm. Help salvage building materials and build a new stage and performance area. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Outdoors & Recreation Four Seasons Hike 3: Summer 10am-2pm. Mount Beacon Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. A Revolutionary Camp at Night at the Historic Huts 7-9pm. Experience by candlelight, military drills, musket firings and other period activities done at the encampment. New Windsor Cantonment, New Windsor. 561-1765 ext. 22.

Kids & Family Honk! Jr. 3pm. $15. A contemporary retelling of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Ugly Duckling presented by The Acting Out Playhouse. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. The Bindlestiff Family Cirkus 11am. $15/$10. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Children & Families: Art and Nature Hike 1pm. Explore the meadows, woods, and sculptures with Hudson Highlands Nature Museum and Storm King educators. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

Literary & Books Claude Samton: FiftyFiveFables 2pm. Reading many of the fables along with other members of his Improv Company. The fables deal with relationships, health, aging, and politics among other things. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000.

Modernist Conversations 1:30pm. $35. Pre-concert talk at 1pm. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. Music and Movement: Stravinsky and Dance 10am-noon. Panel discussion. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. Sight and Sound: From Abstraction to Surrealism 5:30pm. $25-$60. Pre-concert talk at 5pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Trio Solisti: Kindered Souls 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. White Nights 2pm. $25/$20 seniors/students $7/more at the door. Showcases work by the three pillars of Russian classical music—Sergei Rachmaninoff, Sergei Prokofiev and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky—performed by Yehuda Hanani and renowned pianist Vassily Primakov. Doctorow Center for the Arts, Hunter. (518) 263-2000. World Beat Tango Party 4-9pm. San Severia, Kingston. (917) 450-4295.

"Bon Appetit": The Julia Child Opera On August 24, Lee Hoiby’s one-woman comic opera “Bon Appetit” appears at Kingston’s new San Severia restaurant tent as part of the citywide 11-day celebration of art and culture. From cornstarch to egg whites, Ann Harvey directs soprano Lisa Jablow as Julia Child in the live baking of a real chocolate cake, with music performed by pianist Diane Huling. Following the opera, there will be a chocolate cake bake-off by local restaurants, judged by Lisa Jablow and Mayor Shayne Gallo, as well as a humorous performance by cabaret singer-songwriter Jennie Litt about being the long-lost sister of food critic Nigella Lawson. San Severia is a historic Belgian waffle tent in Midtown Kingston. Other performances at the venue this summer includes world music, classical song recitals, dance parties, and kid shows. (917) 697-6916; Kingstonfestival.org

Theater All That Jazz Performance 11am. $5. Summer Stages Jazz Workshop Performance. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 2 and 8pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204. Fiddler on the Roof 8pm. $20/$15 seniors and students. Directed and choreographed by Rose Cremonese-Norton. Mount Pleasant Community Theater, Thornwood. (914) 949-8382. Hudson Valley Shakespeare’s All’s Well That Ends Well 12pm. Performance followed by a green expo featuring local businesses and services will provide information, demos, and samples on “greener living”, complete with refreshments and entertainment for the whole family. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream 12:30pm. $15/$5 children and students. Bring your own seating and blanket for this 90-minute performance of Shakespeare’s beloved comedy performed outside. The Mount, Lenox, MA. Shakespeare.org.

Workshops & Classes

Music

Theater

Elements of the Novel: A Writing Seminar 9am-4pm. $100. With Eileen Charbonneau. Merritt Bookstore, Millbrook. 758-2665.

7th Annual Hudson Jazz Workshop Concert 3:30pm. $10/$8 students and members. Featuring pianist Armen Donelian, saxophonist Marc Mommaas, with Special Guest NEA Jazz Master Vocalist Sheila Jordan and participants of the Hudson Jazz Workshop. Pre-concert talk at 3pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181.

All’s Well That Ends Well 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Enlightened Consciousness through Mental Imagery 2-4pm. $20/$15. A workshop with author Dr. Gerald Epstein M.D. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 6792100. The Nude in Landscape 10am-4pm. $290/$150 one day only. With John Varriano. Two-day workshop. The Art Students League of New York Vytlacil Campus, Sparkill. 359-1263.

SUNDAY 11 Art Galleries & Exhibits 11th Annual Saugerties Artists Studio Tour 10am-6pm. 36 artists, working in a variety of media and styles, will open their doors to the public. Partition and Main Street, Saugerties. Saugertiesarttour.com. John Fischer Photography Show 10am-6pm. Through August 11. Presented by Wired Galley. John Fischer, born and raised in Ulster County, has traveled extensively in the United States, but all roads seem to lead back to the Hudson Valley. A portion of each sale goes directly to support the Rosendale Food Pantry. Canaltown Alley, Rosendale. 658-8563.

Dance Romeo and Juliet 2pm. $10/$6 children. See the Bolshoi ballet in an HD Cinema experience. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. Spiegeltent Dane: Swing 6:30-9pm. $20. Linda and Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance with Eight to the Bar. Lesson at 5:30pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

Fairs & Festivals The 18th Annual Litchfield Jazz Festival Music on two stages, fine art and handmade crafts, fantastic food, wine and beer, artist talks and clinics, student performances and our new Kids Zone all with views and sunsets. Check website for specific events and times. Goshen Fairground, Goshen, CT. Litchfieldjazzfest.com. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival 12pm. Four date event feature local and name musicians to be held throughout the Hudson Valley. The Hudson Valley Jazz Festival, Warwick. (917) 903-4380.

Ben Rounds Band 12pm. Country. Hunter Mountain Resort, Hunter. (518) 263-4223. Blake Shelton 7pm. $75.75/$35.50. With Easton Corbin and Jana Kramer Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388. Blake Shelton with Easton Corbin, Jana Kramer 7:30pm. $35.50 lawn/$118 lawn 4-pack/$75.75 reserved. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Catskill High Peaks Music Festival: White Nights 2pm. In advance $23/$18 seniors/$7 students/ At the door $27/$21 seniors/$7 students. Celebrating “White Nights” of the Nordic and Russian traditions, two charismatic international performers join forces to present a program of Russian masters. Doctorow Center for the Arts, Hunter. Catskillmtn.org. The Compact 11am-2pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Eric Johnson & Mike Stern: Eclectic Guitars 7:30pm. $65/$45. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Hilary Kole 7:30pm. Cooperstown Summer Music Festival. Otesaga Resort Hotel, Cooperstown. (800) 838-3006. Jazz at the Opera House 3pm. $10/$8 seniors and HOH members/students free. 7th Annual Hudson Jazz Workshop Concert featuring pianist Armen Donelian, saxophonist Marc Mommaas, with special guest NEA Jazz Master Vocalist Sheila Jordan and participants of the Hudson Jazz Workshop. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-4181. John Abercombie, Adam Nussbaum, Steve Swallow and Ohad Talmor 7pm. $25/$20 in advance. Part of the Hudson Valley Jazz Festival. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. Justin Hayward 8pm. $70. Front man from The Moody Blues. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Keith Newman & Robert Leitner 2pm. Acoustic. Robibero Family Vineyards, New Paltz. 255-9463.

Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 2pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204.

Workshops & Classes Drop In and Draw 10am-noon. $15/$75 for six sessions. Drop in and draw the model with guidance from instructor Yura Adams. Save by pre-purchasing all six sessions for $75. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

MONDAY 12 Film Make ‘Em Laugh Film Festival: Mon Oncle 8:30pm. Free. France,1958, 117 min. M. Hulot (Jacques Tati) is the dreamy, impractical, and adored uncle of young Gérard (nine years old), who lives with his materialistic parents in a new suburb of Paris. Slapstick prevails when Jacques Tati’s eccentric hero is let loose in his brother-in-law’s home. Mon Oncle won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, a Special Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, and the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Foreign Language Film. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Kids & Family On Stage with the Berkshire Theatre Group 2 9am-4pm. Through August 16. Build dramatic skills and gain self-confidence through improvisational skits, theater games, movement exercises, and dramatic storytelling Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 443-7171 ext. 40.

Lectures & Talks Battle of Saratoga 6pm. Free!. A discussion of the engagements of the Battle of Saratoga as well as the concurrent battles of Fort Clinton and Fort Montgomery in the Hudson Highlands near West Point. Additionally, the American and British strategies for winning the war, battlefield tactics of the late 18th century, contest for control of the Hudson River, and the burning of Kingston will be discussed. The presentation will be provided by Collin Carr. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. The Richest Woman in America: Hetty Green in the Gilded Age 4pm. $22/$20 members. Renowned author Janet Wallach explores the life of Hetty Green, America’s first female tycoon. Green, considered an eccentric by her friends and “The Witch of Wall Street” by her enemies, bucked conventional wisdom and amassed a fortune equal to more than two billion dollars today. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (413) 551-5100.

Shakespeare’s Kitchen 6:30pm. Talk by food historian Francine Segan. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

Literary & Books Writer’s Group for Youth Literature Second Monday of every month, 6:30pm. Ever thought about writing for children and young adults? Bring you work to our writer’s group. We will give one another constructive criticism. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Music Checkpoint KBK 8:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Studio II Open Mike for Music and Vocals 6:30pm. Acoustic. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Theater King Lear 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Workshops & Classes Living a Life You Love: A Visioning Workshop 7-9pm. $20/$15. A workshop with life coach Terri Hall. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

TUESDAY 13 Film Free Movie Tuesdays: This is Spinal Tap 8:30pm. Free. USA, 1984, 82 min. Rated R. Rob Reiner’s directorial debut has developed into a cult phenomenon. The film that invented the “rockumentary” has now outlasted most of the bands it mocked. Following the ill-fated American comeback tour of an aging heavy-metal group, this film has joined the ranks of the greatest comedies ever made. With Michael McKean, Harry Shearer, and Christopher Guest as David St. Hubbins, Derek Smalls, and Nigel Tufnel. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Kids & Family Bindlestiff Family Cirkus Family Show 3:30pm. $15/$5 children. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Teen Card Gaming Group 3:30pm. Yu-Gi-Oh!, Pokémon, Magic: The Gathering, and more! Snacks served. Open to middle and high school age. Field Library, Peekskill. (914) 737-0010.

Lectures & Talks PechaKucha Pittsfield Night #7 7pm. $5. Be entertained by a cool, innovative, surprising, and fast-moving evening of creative PowerPoint presentations on a wide variety of topics. Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 443-7171.

Music Bindlestiff Family Cirkus 8:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. David Bromberg 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Rhinebeck Legion Band 7pm. Starr Library, Rhinebeck. 876-4030.

Theater Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream 6pm. $15/$5 children and students. Bring your own seating and blanket for this 90-minute performance of Shakespeare’s beloved comedy performed outside. The Mount, Lenox, MA. Shakespeare.org.

Workshops & Classes Landscape Painting Workshop for Teens and Adults 9:30am. $100/$180 two people. Through August 15. Join artist Jamie Williams Grossman as she instructs participants during a landscape painting workshop in Frederic Church’s artist designed landscape and air conditioned studio. Students will be addressing issues such as composition, values, color mixing, and perspective. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109.

WEDNESDAY 14 Kids & Family Bindlestiff Family Cirkus Family Show 3:30pm. $15/$5 children. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Finale: Ventriloquist Steve Charney and his Dummy Harry! 7pm. Celebrate a reading-filled summer with ventriloquist Steve Charney and his Dummy, Harry! Sponsored by the Saugerties Teachers Association. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Literary & Books The Glaring Omissions Themed Reading Series 7pm. Presents three Hudson Valley authors reading from their recent work. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

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Music All-Ages Open Mike 7pm. For all-age musicians, all levels. This is the perfect opportunity for the first time public performers as well as seasoned musicians The Castle Fun Center, Chester. 469-2116. Caramoor@KMA: Live Music in the Sculpture Garden at Katonah Museum of Art 6:30pm. $20/$15 members. Featuring The Winds of New York. The Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah. (914) 232-9555. Chris Eldridge and Julian Lage 8pm. $30, $45. Guitar duo founded in the roots of acoustic music, exploring the worlds of improvisation and composition. With Lage’s background in modern jazz and new music, and Eldridge’s deep relationship with bluegrass as well as his being a member of the widely acclaimed band, Punch Brothers, this duo lives at the nexus of improvisation, spontaneous composition, and virtuosic refinement, all performed on their pre-war Martin guitars. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Classical Kids Concert 2pm. Presented by the Catskill Mountain Foundation. Windham Public Library, Windham. (518) 263-2063. David M. Lutken: “Woody Sez” 8pm. $50/$40. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Ladies Night: Burgers & Bordeaux 7pm. Drink specials plus live music with the talented singer/songwriter Drew Bordeaux. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Open Mike Night 7pm. Join Jeff Entin at the Open Mic Night. Registration is at 6:30 and music starts at 7:00. Come on down to hear some great music. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699.

Debbie Davies Blues Band 7pm. With special guest Bruce Katz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Donovan Frankenreiter 8pm. $37/$28. Guitarist, singer/songwriter. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. E’Lissa Jones Band 6:30-8:30pm. Folk, rock, pop. Sugar Loaf Crossing, Sugar Loaf. 469-2713. The Philadelphia Orchestra - The Night of the Drums 8pm. $24-$80. Date Night Bramwell Tovey, Conductor Colin Currie, Percussionist Tovey: Urban Runaway Higdon: Percussion Concerto Beethoven: No. 7 Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Teri Roiger & John Menegon 6pm. Jazz. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. Tin Pan 5:30-7:30pm. American music from the early part of the 20th-century Jazz, blues and American popular song. Long Dock Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. What Cheer? Brigade 8:30pm. $20. Street Brass Revelry. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Theater Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 7pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204.

Youth Theater Celebration 11am. Free. Young actors from Chatham will present a mini-festival of plays they have created themselves from scratch during their theater workshops at Chatham Kids Club and the Chatham Recreation Department’s summer camp. Come celebrate the imagination and skill of the young people in our community! PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Literary & Books Chilean Poet Dafna Rosenblum 7pm. Presenting works from Because What Came Before...Is Gone. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Music The Aesthetics of Mechanization 8pm. $25-$60. Stravinsky concert. Pre-concert talk at 7:30pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Back to the Garden, Woodstock Tribute 9:30pm. $15/$7 with dinner. Performs in the style of those artists: Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Joe Cocker, Sly & The Family Stone, The Who, Jefferson Airplane, Janis Joplin, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Jimi Hendrix, Santana, Richie Havens, and many more. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. The Bar Spies 4pm. Classic rock. Mahoney’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, Poughkeepsie. 471-7026.

Theater All’s Well That Ends Well 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 7pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204. The Wharton Salon Presents Two By Wharton 5:30pm. $35. Two lighthearted, one-act short stories by Edith Wharton: “The Quicksand” and “The Looking Glass.” By popular demand, tea and cookies will be served. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (800) 838-3006.

Workshops & Classes Botanical Illustration: Drawing Fruits & Flowers with Colored Pencil 10am-4pm. $290/$260 members. Through August 16. Learn ways to create textured backgrounds and colors smooth as glass or rough as sandpaper with colored pencil. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

THURSDAY 15 Clubs & Organizations Hooks & Needles, Yarns & Threads Third Thursday of every month, 10am-2pm. Drop in for an informal social gathering Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771.

Comedy Cheech & Chong: Live in Concert 7:30pm. $18.50-$79.50. “Up In Smoke Tour” with special guests WAR, Tower of Power. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

Kids & Family End of the Summer Party for Teens 4pm. Pizza, music, fun. Pick out of the prize box this summer and you’re invited to come to the party. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Literary & Books Author Series: Peter Wheelwright 6pm. Local author, architect, and professor Peter Wheelwright will be at the library to discuss his book, As It Is on Earth. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Music Acoustic Guitar & Vocals with Dave Reed 8pm. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. David M. Lutken: “Woody Sez” 8pm. $50/$40. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

114 forecast ChronograM 8/13

The Philadelphia Orchestra: Sarah Chang 8pm. $24-$80. Instrument Petting Zoo sponsored by The Alfred Z. Solomons Foundation. Children’s workshop on the lawn presented by Albany Medical Center. Gianandrea Noseda, Conductor. Sarah Chang, violinist Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Ribfest Country Kickoff Concert 7pm. Featuring great country artists Phil Vassar, Chris Janson and Samantha Landrum. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. Hudsonvalleyribfest.org. Rich Rosenthal: CD Release Party for Falling Up 8pm. Hudson Valley-based guitarist Rich Rosenthal celebrates the release of his powerful first recording date as a leader, the CD release Falling Up, at Chill Wine Bar in Beacon. For this CD release event, Rosenthal will be joined by Chris Kelsey on saxophones, Craig Nixon on bass (who is also featured on Falling Up) and Dean Sharp on drums. Chill Wine Bar, Beacon. 765-0885.

Soulful Swingin’ Rhythm & Blues 8pm. $17-$25. Featuring Professor Louie & The Crowmatix, Big Joe Fitz & Vito Petroccitto. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Professor Louie & The Crowmatix, Big Joe Fitz & Vito Petroccitto 8pm. $25/$21 members/$21 in advance/$17 in advance members. Soulful swingin’ rhythm & blues. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Tom DePetris Quartet Call for times. Jazz, blues, and original music. Dave’s Coffee and Wine House, Saugerties. 246-8424. Learn to Fish 10:30am-12:30pm. Department of Environmental Conservation staff will supply everything you need to catch a whopper. Also learn about the ancient art of gyotaku—fish prints—with Scenic Hudson educators. Long Dock Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org.

The Outpatients 7:30pm. Blues, funk, punk, acoustic. Wildfire Grill, Montgomery. 457-3770.

Shawn Mullins 8pm. $25-$40. Expertly crafted folk rock, instrumental rock, and adult alternative music. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (860) 542-5531.

Yehuda Hanani with one of his students.

The Philadelphia Orchestra: Elton John’s Pops Night 8pm. $24-$80. Steven Reineke, Conductor. Selections including “Philadelphia Freedom”, “Your Song”, “Yellow Brick Road”, “Rocket Man”, and “Tiny Dancer.” Also including hits by The Eagles, Paul McCartney, and Lynyrd Skynyrd Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Outdoors & Recreation

Michael Jackson Birthday Party Tribute: Forever King 10pm. $5. Hosted and created by local DJ Ali Gruber, this annual event celebrates the artist through the ages, from his years as the youngest member of the Jackson 5 up through his many musical successes as a solo artist. Market Market Café, Rosendale. 658-3164.

Catskill Mountain Foundation Music Festivals The Catskill Mountain Foundation brings international music to Hunter and Tannersville. On August 8, the Catskill Jazz Factory hosts “The History of Jazz” at the Doctorow Center for the Arts, highlighting the evolution of jazz from 1890 to the present with a musical demonstration by jazz pianists Marcus Roberts and Aaron Diehl. The Catskill High Peaks Music Festival features compositions in honor of the season of the sun remaining visible on the horizon for 24 hours, with “White Nights” on August 11 and “Season of the Midnight Sun” on August 18. The performances, held at the Orpheum Performing Arts Center, feature music by noted Russian and Nordic composers Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky, and Grieg. Music will be performed by classical musicians, including baritone Mischa Bouvier, pianist Vassily Primakov, and Israeli cellist Yehuda Hanani. (518) 263-2000; Catskillmtn.org. King Lear 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Chain Gang 9pm. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277.

The Wharton Salon Presents Two By Wharton 5:30pm. $35. Two lighthearted, one-act short stories by Edith Wharton: “The Quicksand” and “The Looking Glass.” By popular demand, tea and cookies will be served. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (800) 838-3006.

Chimi Lama + Paul McMahon 8pm. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006.

Workshops & Classes Library Knitters Third Thursday of every month, 7-8pm. Sit and knit in the beautiful Gardiner Library. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

FRIDAY 16 Dance PearsonWidrig Dancetheater: Ordinary Festivals and Other Works 8pm. $30/$25 members/$18 students. Sara Pearson and Patrik Widrig, artistic directors of PearsonWidrig Dancetheater, have gained an international following for work that transforms the familiar into the mysterious, the subversive, and the intimate. Creating and presenting American dance theater at its funniest and most compelling, they have toured extensively throughout the US, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and New Zealand. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Kids & Family Kingston Night Market 6pm. Third Friday of every month. Parisian-style antique market, food and drink, artist meet and greet, historic tours, garden tour, photo booth, free tastings, music, art shows, WDST giveaways and more. Rondout Waterfront, Kingston. 338-8473. Story Time 10:30am. Ages 1-3. Age-appropriate stories and songs. Just bring a lap to sit on! Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Summer Share 6pm. Screening of works by participants in the Children’s Media Project Summer programs. MidHudson Heritage Center, Poughkeepsie. 485-8506.

Concert of Trios and Quartets 7:30pm. Performances by talented up-and-coming musicians participating in the festival’s residency for young artists, proving audiences with an opportunity to catch a glimpse of some of the classical music worlds future. Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. (518) 263-2063. David M. Lutken: “Woody Sez” 8pm. $50/$40. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Gabriel Butterfield 7pm. With Michael Davis. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Gangstagrass 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. The Goat Rodeo Sessions 8pm. $35-$125. Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer, Chris Thile with guest vocalist Aoife O’Donovan. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Gustafer Yellowgold’s Rock Melon Tour 2:30am. $10/$9 seniors/$8 children and members. Equal parts pop rock concert and animated storybook, Gustafer Yellowgold concerts are a truly different multimedia experience that entrances children and adults alike. Upstate Films, Woodstock. 697-6608. The Harvest Band 5:30-11pm. Pasta dinner with a night of great music from all genres including contemporary hits, dance favorites, classic rock, motown, oldies, ballroom, and country. The Italian Center, Poughkeepsie. 454-1492. Jeff Allen Quartet 7:30-10:30pm. $10. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Jukebox Junkies 9:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277.

Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes 8pm. $57.50. Rock. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Wanda Houston Band 8pm. Jazz. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244.

Spirituality Ancient Wisdom Rising 2013 Through August 18. A weekend of teachings, stories, and ceremony to enliven your connection with nature spirit. Sobonfu Some from Dagara, West Africa Eliot Cowan from Huichol, Sierra Madres Oren Lyons from Onondaga Turtle Clan Tom Porter from Mohawk Bear Clan Eda Zavala from Wari, Peru Special Guest Lama Tenzin Rinpoche Blue Deer Center, Margaretville. Ancientwisdomrising.org.

Theater Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 8pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204. Sound and Sense: Music and Literature in Russia Throught the Late 19th Century 1pm. $10/$7 students. The Catskill Mountain Foundation presents scholar-in-residence Timothy Sergay. His topics will include the liturgical and folk roots of both Russian literature and Russian music, the Revolutionary and Silver Age periods of artistic experimentation, and the development of soviet-era official, “underground,” and emigre musical and literacy cultures. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-2063.

SATURDAY 17 Art Galleries & Exhibits Dream Stream: Mother-Daughter Art Exhibit and Auction 4-8pm. Works by the late Kim Schneider and her daughter Kim. Proceeds benefit a trust fund for Kim. North East Community Center, Millerton. 373-7742.

Dance PearsonWidrig Dancetheater: Ordinary Festivals and Other Works 8pm. $30/$25 members/$18 students. Sara Pearson and Patrik Widrig, artistic directors of PearsonWidrig Dancetheater, have gained an international following for work that transforms the familiar into the mysterious, the subversive, and the intimate. Creating and presenting American dance theater at its funniest and most compelling, they have toured extensively throughout the US, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and New Zealand. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Fairs & Festivals Fine Crafts Fair 10am-5pm. Through August 18. $10/$5 seniors. High quality handmades by 85 regional artists. For collectors of fine craft and discerning buyers with food, gourmet goodies, and non-stop live music. Garrison Art Center, Garrison. 424-3960.


theater cirque Éloize

valÉrie remise

Cirque Éloize brings "Cirkopolis" to Proctor's Theater in Schenectady this month.

Cirque du Schenectady A woman in a violet dress makes her way across the stage, but never touches it. Five men hold her above their heads as she dips into hyperextended splits or jumps into complex Tobefore the uninitiated, Man is a a tough sell. The Philadelphia group’s odd, lifts soaring into theMan arms ofbit theofnext performer. Finally, they hoist her high into alliterative name is easy to mishear, like something you should understand but still don’t the air by one foot and she raises her leg a full 180 degrees—a human skyscraper. This quite. bizarrely names likeshow, Man in a Blue Turban with is justTheir one albums—just awe-inspiringas scene from titled, Cirquewith Éloize’s new “Cirkopolis.” a Face and Six Demon Bag—feature music wholly removed from any of the dominant The Montreal-based troupe recently signed a five-year commitment with Proctor’s sonic threads in contemporary American indie. It’s a sound assembled of alien parts Theatre, making the historic venue their seasonal home. “[They] exhibit the highest imported from far and wide—lusty sea shanties, primal chants, dark and passionate quality of craft and professionalism [and] we are so proud to be hosting them here,” says Mediterranean jigs,the bits of doo-wop. There’s a lot of yelping, swearing, and waltzing, Richard Lovrich, theater’s marketing director. “For me, Montreal and Schenectady and much more xylophone than electric guitar. are appropriately connected: Montreal is a place of realized, fabulous dreams, and Indeed, ManisMan is one American indie’s dreams.” most distinctive and their live Schenectady a place of of newly re-imagined Part of acts, the town’s revivalist show—coming to Kingston’s BSP Lounge on Friday, May 24—is among its most spirit has to do with Proctor’s 2007 renovation that made the theater into a booming intense and exhilarating. Broadway-style house. “We don’t care if we look crazy, or if we look foolish, or if we sweatThough too much,” insists man Ryan Kattner. “We’re just maintains trying to get down the Proctor’s haslead hosted circus groups before, Lovrich whats setsinCirque dirt, to connect.” Assuming the nom-de-guerre Honus Honus, Kattner cuts a stage Éloize apart is its commitment to storytelling as well as acrobatics. “Cirkopolis” is inspired presence ofabout Freddy Mercury-as-carnival a flamboyant, man who by movies totalitarian societies—a barker, heavy topic for a cirquemugging troupe tofront tackle. However, sings like his guts are on fire and pounds at his keyboard with a child’s animal glee. the theme is ultimately an upbeat one. Opening with a dismal city scene, the 12 performers “Istart learned a lot about keyboards playing drummers,” says Kattner. “I started out playing characters goingfrom through their with dreary daily routine. As they drudge through out on a Rhodes, which is a very physical thing. I can really just dig in.” Man Man’s their bureaucratic work, each character gradually breaks out of the monotony with stunts sound reflects this hunger for visceral connection, andTheir whilepersonalities their music is too eclectic involving contortion, juggling, and aerial gymnastics. emerge and the toshow safelyunfolds pigeon-hole, live material is largely culled from the caterwauling junkyard into thethe colorful spectacle characteristic of Cirque du Soleil. skronk—part Tom Waits circa Bone Machine, part Captain Beefheart circa Trout Among the acts is Angelica Bongiovonni’s performance with the Cyr wheel: Mask a large Replica—that is their go-to mode. Éloize’s cofounder, Daniel Cyr. As it spins on its axis, metal hoop invented by Cirque Physicality is is able Man to Man’s callingdozens card, inof their sound, tricks in theirand frenetic live shows, and Bongiovonni maneuver acrobatic forms, swinging solely inby Kattner’s lyrical preoccupations. Man Man is one of the few American indie groups her arms or extending her legs into the frame of the wheel. With her hair down in curls who richly, un-ironically sexualized. is dirty, it’s ugly, and it’s andseem her red dress billowing around her, “Sex it’s clear thatand for Bongiovonni thiswonderful,” is a moment

of freedom. “I’m not acting at all, whereas in other parts of the show I’m putting on a character and always smiling,” she explains. It is the honesty of these performances says “(Man Man)the tries to express all that, no holds barred.” “Knucklecostumes Down”, that Kattner. she thinks makes show believable. Rather than the over-the-top the opener on 2011’s Life Fantastic, nakedly recounts a relationship vexed by sexual and dramatics typical of other circuses, “Cirkopolis” relies on realism. “Our story takes dependence: “What the hell can I do when you whisper ‘punish me’?/ Snap me like tiger place in a city atmosphere, we’re wearing normal clothes—it’s more realistic thana being trap, harvest all mylike honey”. There’s also a playfulness to Man raunch, on stage looking superheroes, which is what I think lets Man’s peopleunfettered relate to us more,” as on 2008’s fittingly titled Rabbit Habits, where Kattner admonishes a promiscuous says Bongiovonni. leach named Butter Beans for theof“lipstick across and [his]adults, dipstick”, onlyÉloize to later play the With an audience comprised both children Cirque makes sure villain himself, tempting an unhappily married woman: “You wonder where the true love these emotional connections are accessible to all age groups. To that end, Bongiovonni went / cause theacrobatic breeder inelements your bednor don’t butterand yourdance breadcould / I’m top dog, hot dog.” insists neither theater function alone. She The dark and dirty stuff aside, Man Man’s true strength is in tempering pain and says, “Just doing circus tricks you won’t be able to get across emotions. You need the sadness merriment and play. try)totolink handle subject matter without it being theatricswith to portray emotion, the“(We dance the dark moves and the story together, and all doom says Kattner. “It’s important to maintain levity…and to celebrate.” the tricksand for gloom,” the wow-factor.” ManCirque Man’s live show is a testament toof this redemptive, celebration. Éloize will help students allmood ages of learn some of cathartic these amazing feats On in a stage the band members all smile incessantly, donning war paint and quasi-ritualistic summer camp they’re hosting throughout the month. The aim for the week-long sessions headgear, along to the collective rattle. Kattner’s lyrics are but theas for teens isbopping to educate them about the artistry and the physicality of brilliant, the stunts asfor well in-person Man Man experience, truly meaning boils down to truly feeling: “You go see teaching them the tricks themselves. For adults the goal is the same, but since the session aisshow, andone you’re probably not going to understand anything thefun. singer’s saying. only for day, the program will be less educational andthat more Nonetheless, But if they mean it, that translates regardless. If you believe in what you’re doing, whether guests are watching these acts or doing them, ultimately the troupe’s hopeitis should register some the same. Says Touremotion.” Director Valerie D’Amours simply, “We want everyone to fall in The group recently love with the circus.” finished work on its as-yet-unnamed fifth studio album, set to be released via ANTIlater year, with an extensive to follow. from August 7 to 24 “Cirkopolis” will be this hitting Proctor’s Theater intour Schenectady Man Man will appear at BSP Lounge in Kingston on 24 at 8:30pm. with ticket prices starting at $20. Cirque Éloize’s summerMay programs run fromAdvance August 5 tickets, sold through the BSP website, are $8. Tickets at the door are $12. 481through 9 for 12 to 14 year-olds, August 12 to 16 for 15 to 18 year-olds, and(845) the single4158; Bsplounge.com. day sessions for adults go from August 12 to 23. (518) 346-6204; Proctors.org. —Tom Whalen —Marie Solis 8/13 ChronograM forecast 115


Put New Paltz on your Calendar

free

publicprograms

BIRDERS THE CENTRAL PARK EFFECT Friday, August 9 at 7 p.m. Discover the diversity of birds found in Manhattan’s celebrated patch of green, and the equally colorful New Yorkers who schedule their lives around the rhythms of their migration. A Q&A with director Jeffery Kimball will follow the 60 minute documentary. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY WITH LISA DELLWO Sunday, September 8 at 9 a.m. Photographer Lisa Dellwo will offer outdoor photography tips as she leads a walk on the Cary Institute’s grounds. Learn about topics like composition, working with natural light, and capturing moving water. Register online at http://fallfoliagewalkat eventbrite.com.

www.newpaltz.edu/fpa

845.257.3860

PIANOSUMMER AT NEW PALTZ www.newpaltz.edu/piano Tickets are on sale Box Office: 845.257.3880

SYMPHONY GALA WITH THE HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC Vladimir Feltsman, conducting Friday, July 26 Mozart, Overture to “Impresario“ Piano Concerto performed by the 2013 winner of The Jacob Flier Piano Competition Brahms Symphony #1

FESTIVAL CONCERTS 8:00 p.m.• McKenna Theatre PIANOSUMMER FACULTY GALA Saturday, July 6 Schubert, Brahms, Chopin, Scarlatti, Shostakovich, Ravel and Scriabin JONATHAN BISS RECITAL Saturday, July 13 An all Beethoven program. Mr. Biss is internationally recognized for his artistry, musical intelligence and deeply felt interpretations.

INSTITUTE EVENTS Concerts, recitals, piano competitions, master classes, lectures – all open to the public. Visit www.newpaltz.edu/ piano for complete schedule

ALEXANDER KORSANTIA RECITAL Saturday, July 20 Mr. Korsantia, praised for the clarity of his technique, richly varied tone and dynamic phrasing, will perform Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition,” Beethoven’s Fifteen Variations and Fugue in E flat major, Op 35 and Sonata in E flat Major, Op 7.

Learn more at www.caryinstitute.org 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Rte. 44)|Millbrook, NY 12545|845 677-5343

Maverick Concerts 2013

Music in the Woods Since 1916 Sat., Aug. 3, 6:30 pm • Perry Beekman, Jazz guitar Sun., Aug. 4, 4 pm • Leipzig String Quartet Sat., Aug. 10, 6:30 pm • Fred Hersch, Jazz piano Anat Cohen, clarinet Sun., Aug. 11, 4pm • Trio Solisti Sat., Aug. 17, 6:30 pm • Steve Gorn & Friends ArtisticDirector: Director: Christian Christian Steiner Artistic Steiner

Sun., Aug. 18, 4 pm • Borromeo String Quartet Sat., Aug. 24, 6:30 pm • Zuill Bailey, cello Robert Koenig, piano – String Quartet Sun., Aug. 25, 4 pm • Enso

May 25

6pm

Matt Haimovitz cello Christopher O’Riley piano

June 8

8pm

Sebastian Bäverstam cello Yannick Rafalimanana piano

June 22

8pm

Soovin Kim, Jessica Lee violins Ed Arron cello Maurycy Banaszek viola Christian Steiner piano

July 27

8pm

Miró String Quartet

Sat., Sept. 7, 6:30 pm • Dan Tepfer, Jazz piano

August 17 8pm

Vassily Primakov & Natalia Lavrova duo piano

Sept. 7

8pm

duo parnas with Vincent Adragna, piano

Sun., Sept. 8, 4 pm • American String Quartet Free Young People’s Concert • Sat., Aug. 3, 11am • Marc Black

Sept. 21

6pm

Brentano String Quartet

Performances at Darrow School in New Lebanon, NY www.tannerypondconcerts.org or 888-820-1696

116 forecast ChronograM 8/13

Sat., Aug. 31, 8:30 pm • Marc Black, vocals & guitar Warren Bernhardt, Jazz piano Sun., Sept. 1, 4 pm • Daedalus Quartet Rufus Müller, tenor

General Admission $25 • Students $5 • Book of 10 tickets $200 • Limited reserved seats $40 • Tickets at the door, online, or call 800-595-4849

120 M averick r oad • Woodstock, NeW York 845-679-8217 • www.MaverickConcerts.org


Film Rivers and Rides: Andy Goldsworthy Working with Time 8pm. Following a walk along Goldsworthy’s Storm King Wall (1997-98), enjoy this special outdoor film screening under the stars. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

Food & Wine 2013 Hudson Valley RibFest $5/children free/$4 advance tickets. Food festival and a sanctioned Barbeque Contest where winners can advance to the national finals in Kansas City. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. Hudsonvalleyribfest.org. An Art-B-Q: Pork and Poetry 8pm. $20. With Craig Dworkin and Mónica de la Torre. In these hybrid evenings, artists share their work with audiences, and then all feast together. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Health & Wellness Hudson Valley Health and Wellness Event 1pm. $10. An exciting lineup of Mind, Body and Soul vendors and practitioners set up in the beautiful gardens. Learn about the many ways to enhance your diet with a healthy lifestyle. Gaia’s Garden Retreat, Warwick. Gaiasgarden.retreat@gmail.com.

Kids & Family The Bindlestiff Family Cirkus 11am. $15/$10. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. WeeMuse: Countdown to Kindergarten Night 5pm. Includes model classrooms and activities that invite children and their parents to have a typical kindergarten experience. Adults can learn about the kindergarten registration process, child development milestones, and how to help their child be ready for school. Special performances, guests, and activities for the whole family. Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 443-7171.

Lectures & Talks Intro Lecture on Honeybees and Organic Beekeeping 11am-1:30pm. $30. Learn about the lives of honeybees. Hear about the current plight of honeybee colonies, and understand the intrinsic value of nurturing these amazing creatures. For the general public, gardeners, and wanna-beekeepers. Includes a visit into a working hive to experience the honeybee community. HoneybeeLives Apiary, New Paltz. 255-6113. Lenin, Hitler, and Stalin: Music, Ethics, and Politics 10am-noon. Panel discussion. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. This Heirloom Life with the Beekman 1802 Boys 10am. $50/$35/$25. A benefit for Friends of Taconic State Park. From gardening and farming, to raising goats, making soap, cooking, and more, Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell will share their adventures in homesteading. Church of St. John in the Wilderness, Copake Falls. (518) 966-2730. This Heirloom Life with the Fabulous Beekman Boys 10-11am. $25/$35/$40/$50. A talk about gardening, food and rural life presented by the Fabulous Beekman Boys, Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell. The lecture begins at 11:00. Breakfast and book signing with the Beekman Boys at 10 am. Continue to Margaret Roach’s Copake Falls gardens where Broken Arrow Nursery will be selling their extraordinary goods. Event benefits Friends of Taconic State Park. Church of St. John in the Wilderness, Copake Falls. (518) 966-2730. Wanderings & Wonderings with Matt Jensen 3pm. Join artist Matt Jensen on an imaginative exploration of Storm King. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

Literary & Books Nelly Reifler: Elect H. Mouse State Judge 5pm. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000.

Music Acoustic Fire 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Ben Vereen $26-$66. Actor, singer, and dancer Ben Vereen will display his full range of talents at Belleayre during his one-man show, “Steppin’ Out with Ben Vereen.” Preshow entertainment and food available starting at 6:15. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. 254-5600. Beyond a Simple Folk Song 8pm. $10/$8 seniors and members. The concert features compositions and arrangements by the following accomplished composers and songwriters: Kevin Becker, Melissa Holland, Rich Keyes and Fran Palmieri. First United Methodist Church, Highland. 229-0170. Clarence Penn with Seamus Blake, James Genus & Adam Rogers 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Conigliaro Trio 7:30pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Don Mikkelsen QT, Trombone 8pm. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. Escher String Quartet 8pm. $25/$22 seniors/$20 conributors/$5 studnets. Wworks by Benjamin Britten, Felix Mendelssohn and Amy Beach. Windham Civic and Performing Arts Center, Windham. (518) 734-3868. Glen David Andrews 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Lick The Toad 9pm. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. Lucky House 8:30pm. Classic rock. Piano Wine Bar, Fishkill. 896-8466. The Émigré in America 8pm. $30-$75. American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director. Preconcert talk at 7pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Perfect Lives 11am. An opera by Robert Ashley. Performed and staged by Varispeed. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. The Philadelphia Orchestra: Rite of Spring— Celebration of an Artist 8pm. $24-$80. Gianandrea Noseda Conductor. Jonathan Biss, pianist. Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Pianists Vassily Primakov and Natalia Lavrova 8pm. Tannery Pond, New Lebanon. (888) 820-1696. Pitchfork Militia 9pm. With a blend of country, blues, rock and punk, the band terms itself “Apocabilly.” This rockin’ three piece is in turn funny, raging, satirical and silly. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Ryan Montbleau Band 8pm. $39-$49. Distinctive, long-fermenting blend of neo-folk, classic soul, and kick-out-the-jams Americana. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (860) 542-5531. Sally-Jane Heit 6pm. $25. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Singer/songwriter Derek Knott 7pm. Performs pop, folk, and Americana tunes. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775. Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes 8pm. $38+/$32.40+ in advance. Classic blend of hardcore R&B and street-level rock, molten grooves, soulful guitar licks and blistering horn section. Sugar Loaf Performing Arts Center, Sugar Loaf. 610-5335. Stax of Soul 9:30pm. $12/$6 with dinner. Featuring Julius Dilligard. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Steve Gorn & Friends 6:30pm. Indian classical music. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Stravinsky in Paris 1:30pm. Pre-concert talk at 1pm. Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. Zac Brown Band 7pm. $38-$89. With special guest Levi Lowery. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits 1st Annual Classic Car Show 9am. $7 show cars/admission free. To benefit the fight against domestic violence and local missions. Cars, vendors, DJ music, food, and raffles. Fair Street Reformed Church, Kingston. 481-4171. Davy Crockett Day noon. Official dedication/ribbon cutting of new statue, a performance by the Catskill Ukulele Group, and a Davy Crockett look alike contest open to kids, adults, and pets, with valuable prizes. Mystery Spot Antiques, Phoenicia. 688-7868. Open House for Prospective Students and Their Families 10am. Tour our beautiful campus and learn about our programs. Ask questions about the admissions process. Storm King School, Cornwall-On-Hudson. 534-9860 ext. 210.

Outdoors & Recreation Ecology Walk at Hawthorne Valley Farm: Who Lives in our Wet Meadows? 10:30am. Join ecologists from the Farmscape Ecology Program for this activity for the whole family. Put on your rubber boots and explore the plants, insects, and reptiles who like the wet places on the farm. Hawthorne Valley Farm, Ghent. (518) 672-7994.

In the Jaws of Love 7:30pm. $12. A series of short plays and monologues by Ty Adams, Lisa Kimball, Lew Gardner, Karen Rich and more. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331. King Lear 8pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Meet the Artists Tea 3pm. $25. The Catskill Mountain Foundation and the Catskill High Peaks offers an opportunity to have an engaging dialogue with the artists and further highlight traditional Nordic and Russian themes. Washington Irving Inn, Hunter. (518) 263-2063. Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream 12:30pm. $15/$5 children and students. Bring your own seating and blanket for this 90-minute performance of Shakespeare’s beloved comedy performed outside. The Mount, Lenox, MA. Shakespeare.org. Sound Versus Sense: the Music of Revolution, Official Soviet Culture, Dissidence 11am. $10/$7 students. The Catskill Mountain Foundation presents scholar-in-residence Timothy Sergay. His topics will include the liturgical and folk roots of both Russian literature and Russian music, the Revolutionary and Silver Age periods of artistic experimentation, and the development of soviet-era official, “underground,” and emigre musical and literacy cultures. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-2063. Vaudeville: A Valentine to an Old Theatre Art Form 7pm. $25. Sally-Jane Heit will return for her 4th Annual Benefit Performance at the Guthrie Center on August 17 at 7:00pm. A Valentine to an Old Theatre Art Form will feature song, comedy, and other variety acts. honoring the true spirit of Vaudeville. A dessert and champagne reception with the artist will follow the performance. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. 4135281955. The Wharton Salon Presents Two By Wharton 3pm. $35. Two lighthearted, one-act short stories by Edith Wharton: “The Quicksand” and “The Looking Glass.” By popular demand, tea and cookies will be served. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (800) 838-3006.

Workshops & Classes Improv 10:30am. Enjoy the creativity of improvisation! We will use movement as the basis for theatrical improvisation. People of all ages and levels of experience are encouraged to participate. Wear comfortable clothes and shoes. Stephanie Glickman will run this program. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

SUNDAY 18 Dance Dance Omi at PS21: Critical Response to Dance Omi Works-in-Progress 2pm. Dance Omi Director Christopher K. Morgan will facilitate a showing of works-in-progress by dance artists in residence at Dance Omi for the 2013 session. Using his extensive experience with the Liz Lehrman’s Critical Response Process, Morgan will facilitate an exchange between the artists and the audience. Since 2005, the Dance Omi International Dance Collective has brought together accomplished dance artists from around the world for three weeks of creative exchange each summer. The emphasis is not a performance product, but rather, a gently facilitated process of experimentation and collaboration. A reception for the dance artists will follow the showing. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. West Coast Swing Dance 6-9pm. $8/$6 FT students. Dance to DJ’d music. Lesson at 5:30pm Reformed Church of Port Ewen, Port Ewen. Hudsonvalleydance.org.

Fairs & Festivals Fine Crafts Fair 10am-5pm. $10/$5 seniors. High-quality handmades by 85 regional artists. For collectors of fine craft and discerning buyers with food, gourmet goodies, and non-stop live music. Garrison Art Center, Garrison. 424-3960. Montgomery Place Car Show 9am-4pm. $15 reg. car/$10 in advance/$5 sepctator admisison/children free. Auto aficionados showcase a variety of antique and classic cars. Food concessions, music by Fox Oldies 98.9fm, tour the majestic historic estate Montgomery Place ($5 fee) or just walk the grounds and gardens. Montgomery Place, Red Hook. 902-8764.

Food & Wine 2013 Hudson Valley RibFest $5/children free/$4 advance tickets. Food festival and a sanctioned barbeque contest where winners can advance to the national finals in Kansas City. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. Hudsonvalleyribfest.org.

Spirituality

Kids & Family

Summer Full Moon Bonfire 7pm. $10. Ritual, singing, drumming. Gathering to begin at 7pm, ritual will start at 7:30. Our 18 ceremonial tipi will also be open for mediation and quiet reflection during the evening. Dreaming Goddess, Poughkeepsie. 473-2206.

The Bindlestiff Family Cirkus 11am. $15/$10. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

Theater Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 8pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204.

Children and Families: Tour with Wally McGuire 1pm. Visitors of all ages are invited to enjoy a special tour with celebrated educator Wally McGuire. Visitors of all ages are invited to enjoy a special tour with celebrated educator Wally McGuire. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

D. W. Counts Down to Kindergarten 1 and 3pm. Arthur’s younger sister gets help from her family and friends as she prepares to enter kindergarten. Presented by City Stage Co., Inc, and in partnership with the Boston Children’s Museum. Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 443-7171. Free to Be...You and Me 7pm. $35-$200. 40th anniversary celebration with Marlo Thomas, Alan Alda, and Letty Cottin Pogrebin. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

Music Annalise Emerick 12:30pm. Boston singer/songwriter, Annalise Emerick. Rondout Music Lounge, Kingston. AnnaliseEmerick.com. Back to the Garden: A Day of Song and Remembrance Honoring Richie Havens 3pm. $15. The ashes of music legend Richie Havens will be scattered across Max Yasgur’s farm, the field where the Woodstock festival took place in 1969, and today the site of Bethel Woods Center for the Arts. With guest speakers and artists. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Catskill High Peaks Festival: Season of the Midnight Sun 2pm. In advance $23/$18 seniors/$7 students/at door $27/$21 seniors/$7 students. Resonating with the season of the midnight sun, this performance brings to the fore the national composer of Norway, Edvard Grieg, as well as Russians of the same artistic latitude—Stravinsky, Rachmaninoff, and Tchaikovsky. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Tannersville. (518) 263-2066. The Classical Heritage 4:30pm. $30-$75. Works by Igor Stravinsky. Preconcert talk at 3:30pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Greg Westhoff’s 18-piece Westchester Swing Band 5:30pm. $5. The band performs classic Swing music, Sinatra, Broadway selections and songs from the '40’s, '50’s and more. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Mike Ferris 7:30pm. $20/$30. Intertwining rock, blues, and gospel has allowed him to rediscover and reinterpret traditional Black Gospel music and add his own mix of Stax influenced blue-eyed soul. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Parker Quartet: Inspired by Britten 4pm. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Paula Poundstone 8pm. $45/$35. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Peter Aaron & William Weber + Jeremy Kelly 7pm. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. The Poetics of Music and After 1:30pm. $35. Pre-concert talk at 1pm Olin Auditorium at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7003. Season of the Midnight Sun 2pm. $28/$23 seniors/$7 students/discount in advance. “Season of the Midnight Sun” highlights a range of Russian and Nordic composers, including Edvard Grieg (Norway’s national composer), Igor Stravinsky, Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky. Orpheum Performing Arts Center, Hunter. (518) 263-2000. Stravinsky, Spirituality, and the Choral Tradition 10am. $30. Fisher Center at Bard College, Annandaleon-Hudson. 758-7003. Terri White 7pm. Blues, Broadway, cabaret. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Vic Juris & Kate Baker Duo 11am-2pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Whispering Tree 4pm. Singer-songwriter. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Zac Brown Band 7pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 454-3388.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits Hairdressers’ Disco Ball & Fantasy Hair Show 7-11pm. $40. Presented by Four Star Salon Services. Join twenty local salons as they present wild, wacky, and wonderful hair looks on the runway. Benefiting the HIV/AIDS programs at Hudson Valley Community Services. Villa Borghese, Wappingers Falls. (914) 785-8277.

Outdoors & Recreation Dog Days of Summer Hike 10am-noon. Dogs on short leashes welcome. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. Mohonkpreserve.org. Free Vanderbilt Garden Tours 1pm. Tours of the six-terraced formal gardens at the Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site (weather permitting) by the volunteers who maintain and restore these historic gardens. Vanderbilt Garden Association Inc., Hyde Park. 229-6432.

chronogram.com Visit Chronogram.com/events for additional calendar listings and staff recommendations.

8/13 ChronograM forecast 117


SARATOGA

SPRINGS

NY

SEP 6-8

Featuring Mo Rocca FESTIVAL PARTNER

spac.org 518.584.9330

The theater will be under renovation during August & September. The box office and the entrance to the theater will be located in the alley on the side of the theater (behind the Big Cheese) Please note during renovations no late comers can be admitted to the theater. Thank you for your support! August 2 & 3 ShivA ArmS (BACk By PoPulAr demAnd!) $18 | 8 pm August 11 The BolShoi BAlleT: romeo & JulieT $10/$6 | 2 pm August 18 BeComing TrAviATA $7/$6 | 8 pm

Plus nightly films At 7:15 And WednesdAy mAtinees At 1:00 408 Main St, RoS endale, nY 12472 |

www.rosendaletheatre.org

August 2013 1/8 page, jan@janmdesign.com /845-642-3720

2013 River Tour

HUDSON RISING STAND IN THE PLACE WHERE YOU LIVE

WWW.HUDSONRISING.COM iloveny.com

118 forecast ChronograM 8/13

YONKERS KINGSTON BEACON OSSINING HAVERSTRAW

JUNE 30 JULY 20 AUG. 11 SEPT. 21 SEPT. 22


WEDNESDAY 21

Theater All’s Well That Ends Well 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 2pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204. The Wharton Salon Presents Two By Wharton 3pm. $35. Two lighthearted, one-act short stories by Edith Wharton: “The Quicksand” and “The Looking Glass.” By popular demand, tea and cookies will be served. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (800) 838-3006

Workshops & Classes Drop In & Draw 10am-noon. $15/$75 for six sessions. Drop in and draw the model with guidance from instructor Yura Adams. Save by pre-purchasing all six sessions for $75. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

MONDAY 19 Health & Wellness Shanti Darshanam Yoga Study and Teacher Training Level 2 Through August 30. Location availble, Stone Ridge. 778-1008.

Kids & Family

THURSDAY 22 Food & Wine

Comedy

Film Night: Shun Li and the Poet 6pm. Directed by Andrea Segre. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Open Mike 7pm. Every other Thursday. Hosted by Jack Higgins of Die-Hardz. Sign ups at 7pm Palaia Vineyards, Highland Mills. 928-5384.

Harrison Greenbaum 8pm. $26. One of Comedy Central’s “Comics to Watch.” Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. 254-5600.

Health & Wellness

Rita Rudner 8pm. $58. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

Health & Wellness Able Together Third Wednesday of every month, 6:30-8:30pm. A support group focusing on helping to support mothers with disabilities and families who have children with disabilities. Waddle n Swaddle, Poughkeepsie. 473-5952.

Music All-Ages Open Mike 7pm. For all-age musicians, all levels. This is the perfect opportunity for first time public performers as well as seasoned musicians. The Castle Fun Center, Chester. 469-2116. Ladies Night: Burgers & Bordeaux 7pm. Drink specials plus live music with the talented singer-songwriter Drew Bordeaux. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Lucky Peterson 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Introduction to The Dragon’s Way: Weight Loss and Stress Management utilizing Qigong and Chinese Medicine 7-8:30pm. With Meg Coons. Co-sponsored by the Rondout Valley Holistic Health Community and Family Traditions. Family Traditions, Stone Ridge. Rvhhc.org. Sleep Divine Yoga Nidra Fourth Thursday of every month, 6:30pm. $10.00 nonmembers. Participate in gentle movement to relax the body. Allow the guided meditation to soothe you into deep relaxation, presented by Jean Wolfersteig YMCA, Kingston. 338-3810 ext. 110.

Kids & Family The Philadelphia Orchestra: Johannes Moser Da! 6pm. $24-$80. Giancarlo Guerrero, Conductor. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Animation Camp 9am. Through August 23. It’s time for some innovative animation! Develop your own stories and create your own stop-motion mini-movie. Make a storyboard, set, and animated characters. Learn how to do a screen test and post-production. All of the animated creations will be featured in an animation festival held on the last day of camp Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 443-7171 ext. 40.

American Isis: The Life and Art of Sylvia Plath 4pm. $22/$20 members. Carl Rollyson Rollyson paints a new picture of Plath as a powerful force that embraced high and low culture to establish herself in the literary firmament. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (413) 551-5100.

Music Starlight Swing Night 8:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

Movie Tuesday: 100 Years of Dance on Camera 8:30pm. Free. An evening of short films and excerpts of some of the best dance film ever made, curated and introduced by Deirdre Towers, former producer of the annual Dance on Camera festival from 1994-2012. The films explore a range of dance forms. This collection “demonstrates the importance of dance, not only as a language, but as a sensibility.” PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Health & Wellness Community Holistic Healthcare Day 4-8pm. A wide variety of holistic healthcare modalities and practitioners are available free to the community. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. 687-0880.

Felice County Fair The local folk-rock band that went from playing Palenville backyard barbecues to international gigs around the world will host their first music festival at Opus 40 on August 31. Best known for their scratchy vocals and warm fleecy vibe, the Felice Brothers will play songs from their recently released album, God Bless You, Amigo. Hosted with Radio Woodstock, four other local bands will perform, including Amy Helm and experimental pianist Marco Benevento. Food trucks, including 'Cue BBQ and Pippy’s Hot Dogs, will serve up some local grub. The Saugerties sculpture park is located on six-acres of bluestone quarry, featuring a series of stone pedestals and platforms made by the late sculptor Harvey Fite. Partial proceeds will benefit Catskill Mountainkeeper, a grassroots advocacy organization dedicated to preserving the Catskill region. (845) 679-5395; Radiowoodstock.com Modern English 8pm. $34/$49. English rock band. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Nick Lowe 8pm. With special guest Kim Richey. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. The Philadelphia Orchestra: An Evening with Bela Fleck 8pm. $24-$80. Giancarlo Guerrero, Conductor. Bela Fleck, banjo. Bela Fleck: Concerto for Banjo and Orchestra Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Songwriters’ Workshop with Bill Pfleging 7pm. An open forum for all songwriters looking for feedback and/or inspiration. Inquiring Minds

Happy Ending Music and Reading Series 8:30pm. $25. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.

Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Ten Years After 8pm. $94/$69. Leo Lyons, Ric Lee, Chick Churchill, Joe Gooch. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306.

Tom DePetris Quartet Call for times. Jazz, blues, and original music Dave’s Coffee and Wine House, Saugerties. 246-8424.

Theater Berkshire Playwrights Lab Presents a Staged Reading of New Play 7:30pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 644-9040.

Outdoors & Recreation

Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis

Full Sturgeon Moon Walk 8-9:30pm. Greenport Town Park, Hudson. (518) 392-5252 ext. 209.

7pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204.

Spirituality Group Angelic Channeling 7-9pm. $20/$15. With author and medium Margaret Doner (Archangels Speak). Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

RubberbanDance Group: Gravity of Center 8pm. $30/$25 members/$18 students. Choreographer and dancer Victor Quijada founded RUBBERBANDance Group to create an exploratory base where he could mix his several influences to create a contemporary style that blends the spontaneity and exuberance of hip hop with the refinement of classical dance. This style incorporates theatrical interpretation, improvisational approaches, film, and impromptu performance. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Fairs & Festivals

Music

John Mayer 7:30pm. $67-$139. With special guest Phillip Phillips. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

Funk Haus 9pm. Fourth Friday of every month. $10. Live DJs spin funky music that will surely make you want to dance. This community dance event supports free and unconditional movement and dance. It is open to all ages. Bring your kids to Woodstock and get in the groove at the Funk Haus! Fourth Fridays this summer. Teens $5 and kids are free. Mountain View Studio, Woodstock. Funkhauspresents@gmail.com.

World Beat Dance Party 8pm. San Severia, Kingston. (917) 450-4295.

TUESDAY 20 Film

Dance

Swing Dance to Girl Howdy 8:30-11:30pm. $15/$10 FT students. Beginner’s lesson 8pm-8:30pm. Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571.

Mountain Path Festival Camp A week long arts gathering for the whole family combining workshops in performance, music, puppetry, improvisation theater, environmental art sculpting, children’s theater, relaxation, and more. Saturday will be a festival of the arts created during the week, with vendors, food, music, and more. The Abode of the Message, New Lebanon. (518) 794-8095.

Lectures & Talks

FRIDAY 23

Film

King Lear 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival.

Literary & Books Kingston Paranormal Society: Donna Davies 6:30pm. Author Donna Davies will be at the library to discuss her spooky children’s books. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Music The Big Takeover 5:30-7:30pm. Roots and reggae. Long Dock Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Marty Elkin 6pm. Jazz. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. Musicians Gathering 6:30pm. Hosted by the house band Stacy & Friends. Acoustic music in one of the best jams in the area Dancing Cat Saloon, Bethel. Dancingcatsaloon.com. Robby Krieger’s Jam Kitchen 8pm. $39/$59. The group will be performing Doors and Zappa hits along with some new material fashioned specifically for this tour. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306.

Outdoors & Recreation Seed-Saving in Your New England Garden 10:30am-12:30pm. $30/25 members. Learn about saving seed for future gardens. This program will focus on correct planting, harvesting, extracting, and storing of heirloom seeds. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

Theater

The Wharton Salon Presents Two By Wharton

Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 7pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204.

5:30pm. $35. Two lighthearted, one-act short stories by Edith Wharton: “The Quicksand” and “The Looking

The Wharton Salon Presents Two By Wharton 5:30pm. $35. Two lighthearted, one-act short stories by Edith Wharton: “The Quicksand” and “The Looking Glass.” By popular demand, tea and cookies will be served. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (800) 838-3006.

Summer Hoot Festival The down-home celebration of music, food, and community will feature world-class music from the great state of New York and beyond, including performances by Pete Seeger, Natalie Merchant, Dirt Farmer Band, Dan Bern, AC Newman, The Wiyos, Mike + Ruthy, Jay Ungar & Molly Mason, Elizabeth Mitchell and Dan Zanes, and many more. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Lectures & Talks Snakes and Frogs 10:30am. An introduction to the 30 different frogs, salamanders, turtles, and snakes that inhabit Berkshire County. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Literary & Books Barry Lewis Presenting From Brooklyn to Bucolic 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775. Poetry Reading 7pm. Featuring Joann Deiudicibus, Jacqueline Ahl, Wendy Barnes-Thomassen, James Sherwood, and Amy Washburn. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300.

Music 11th Hour 9:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Bill’s Toupee 9pm. Skytop Steakhouse and Brewing Co., Kingston. 340-4277. Chris Brown Band 7:30-10:30pm. $10. Singer/songwriter BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Confederate Railroad 8pm. $35/$50. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Dan Bern 8pm. $30/$25. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. Jay Collins and the Kings County Band 7pm. Mixing New Orleans funk, classic jazz, rock, and blues to create a powerful brew of original music. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Lucky Five Swing Band 8pm. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. Luke Bryan 7pm. $35.75/$66. With Thompson Square, Florida Georgia Line. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. The Philadelphia Orchestra: Fantasia 8pm. $24-$80. Instrument Petting Zoo sponsored by The Alfred Z. Solomons Foundation, children’s workshop on the lawn. Cristian Macelaru, Conductor. Fantastia without film: Toccata and Fugue, Dace of the Hours, Claire de Lune, Night on Bald Mountain. Fantasia with film – Nutcracker Suite, Pastoral, Sorcerer’s Apprentice Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Tibetan Culture and Tibetan Buddhism Through August 26. The Tashi Kyil monks will be constructing a sacred sand mandala, offer children’s workshops, present talks on the History of Tibet and Tibetan Astrology, and host a Tibetan Dinner to benefit their monastery in northern India. Tibetan Center, Kingston. 383-1774.

Glass.” By popular demand, tea and cookies will be

Third Wednesday of every month, 6:30pm. $35

Workshops & Classes

Rothstars 9pm. Rock and roots. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

Theater

includes materials. Surround yourself with women,

All’s Well That Ends Well 7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

emerge with something beautiful. Fiberflame Studio,

Botanical Painting with Watercolor 10am-4pm. $290/$260 members. Two-day workshop. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-3926.

Surreal Cabaret 7:30pm. Acts may cross genres, mixing poetry, drama, dance, and music while featuring conceptual play, experimentation, and improvisation. Seligmann Center for the Arts, Sugar Loaf. 469-9459.

served. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (800) 838-3006.

Workshops & Classes Dirty Girls: A Crafty Night Out

make a mess, get those creative juices flowing and Saugerties. 679-6132.

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Trumystic All-Stars 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. The Wiyos 8pm. $25/$20. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

Theater Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 2 and 8pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204. King Lear 8pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. The Pub: Revisited 7:30pm. $20/$18 seniors and children under 12. Variety show with singing, dancing, and comedy routines. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. The Wharton Salon Presents Two By Wharton 5:30pm. $35. Two lighthearted, one-act short stories by Edith Wharton: “The Quicksand” and “The Looking Glass.” By popular demand, tea and cookies will be served. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (800) 838-3006.

Workshops & Classes Texas Two-step Workshops $15/$20 both. 6:30-7:15pm and 7:15-8pm with Barry Koffler & Margot Bloom Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571.

SATURDAY 24 Art Galleries & Exhibits Open Studios and Reception 2-4pm. Drink some wine, enjoy the gardens, and meet our artists-in-residence from around the world. See their paintings, drawings, sculpture, and installations, and have a discussion about their work. The Art Students League of New York Vytlacil Campus, Sparkill. 359-1263.

Dance Ballroom by Request 9-11pm. $12. Lesson 8pm-9pm. With Joe Donato & Julie Martin. Hudson Valley Dance Depot, Poughkeepsie. 204-9833. RubberbanDance Group: Gravity of Center 8pm. $30/$25 members/$18 students. Choreographer and dancer Victor Quijada founded RUBBERBANDance Group to create an exploratory base where he could mix his several influences to create a contemporary style that blends the spontaneity and exuberance of hip hop with the refinement of classical dance. This style incorporates theatrical interpretation, improvisational approaches, film, and impromptu performance. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Fairs & Festivals Summer Hoot Festival The down-home celebration of music, food and community will feature world class music from the great state of New York and beyond, including performances by Pete Seeger, Natalie Merchant, Dirt Farmer Band, Dan Bern, AC Newman, The Wiyos, Mike + Ruthy, Jay Ungar & Molly Mason, Elizabeth Mitchell & Dan Zanes, and many more. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Food & Wine An Art-B-Q: Pork and Poetry 8pm. $20. With Craig Dworkin and Mónica de la Torre. In these hybrid evenings, artists share their work with audiences, and then all feast together. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Busy Moms 2pm. Learn to make delicious and nutritious vegan lunches your kids will actually enjoy eating! These quick and easy lunches plus nutritious desserts will wow your kids. You’ll learn how to create dishes like; Chickpea “Un-tuna” Salad, Pretty Purple Roll-ups, No-bake Chocolate Chip Protein Bars and more. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447. Moroccan Nights: Tribute to the Film Casablanca 3pm. $115. Charity event to benefit The Food Bank of the Hudson Valley and Chef Robert Briggs Memorial Scholarship Fund. At 3:30 guests will be shuttled to the dock where they will board the MV Mystère Cruise Ship and cruise along the Hudson River for a cocktail reception, passed hors d’oeuvres, and a silent auction. Back at the CIA enjoy a four-course dinner with live entertainment. Culinary Institute of America (CIA), Hyde Park. 905-4674.

Literary & Books Elizabeth Cohen: The Hypothetical Girl 4pm. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000. Robert Dunn: Stations of the Cross 2pm. The Golden Notebook, Woodstock. 679-8000.

120 forecast ChronograM 8/13

Music

Theater

Peter Levin Trio

Acoustic with Shannon & Rich 8:30pm. Blues. Piano Wine Bar, Fishkill. 896-8466.

All’s Well That Ends Well 8pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

11am-2pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

CATCH Takes the Catskills 8pm. $20. Art-B-Q event. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

(518) 671-6006.

Cirque Éloize: Cirkopolis 2 & 8pm. Proctor’s Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204.

49th Annual Bazaar & Chicken BBQ

Albert Lee 8pm. $55/$35. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. The Alex Jornov Band 9pm. The Alex Jornov Band doesn’t rehash the same, tired blues set list but has the ability to gracefully flow between blues, civil rights era R&B, funk/soul, and even throw in a jazz standard or two. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. America 8pm. $87.50. Classic rock. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795. Ben and Slava: the Britten/Rostropovich Connection 6:30pm. Zuill Bailey, cello; Robert Koenig, piano. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Biocentrics 7:30pm. $5. Acoustic. The Annex @ NorthEast-Millerton Library, Millerton. (518) 610-1331. The Christine Spero Group 9-11pm. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. (800) 772-6646. The Daedalus Quartet 4:30pm. $25/$20. Min-Young Kim and Matilda Kaul, violins; Jessica Thompson, viola; Thomas Kraines, cello, perform string quartets by Schulhoff, Beethoven, Schubert, and Smetana. New Marlborough Village Association Meeting House, New Marlborough, MA. (413) 229-2785. Keith Newman & Robert Leitner 8pm. Acoustic. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Live Society 9:30pm. $15/$7 with dinner. Motown, R&B, soul. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Native Soul 7:30-10:30pm. $10. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Noah Baerman Trio 8pm. Jazz. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. Open Book 7pm. Dave Kearney & Elly Wininger. Acoustic. Cafe Mezzaluna, Saugerties. 246-5306. The Philadelphia Orchestra: 1812 Tchaikovsky Spectacular 8pm. Cristian Macelaru, Conductor. Daniil Trifonov, pianist. Tchaikovsky: Polonaise – Eugene Onegin Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2. Borodin: Polovtsian Dances. Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Rita Rudner 8pm. $36-$66. Rita Rudner brings her droll one liners to Belleayre’s Main Stage headlining the second season of Comedy in the Catskills. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. 254-5600. Rock Camp Session Four Final Performance 12pm. Final concerts for New York School of Music’s award winning Rock Camp USA. The Chance, Poughkeepsie. 778-7594. Rosanne Cash 8pm. $59. Singer/songwriters. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Tallesin + Lunar Moss 8pm. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Elly Wininger and Dave Kearney 7pm. Acoustic. Cafe Mezzaluna, Saugerties. 246-5306. XCalibur 9:30pm. Dance. Cafe International at Ramada Inn, Newburgh. 567-9429.

Outdoors & Recreation Bug Hunt 2-4pm. In summer the park buzzes with dragonflies, grasshoppers, beetles, and other six-legged creatures. Learn the best ways to capture, observe, and identify these insects before setting them free. Long Dock Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org. Carriage Road Bike Ride 9-11:30am. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. Mohonkpreserve.org.

Spirituality Find Your Fire Empowerment Workshop 6:30pm. $75/$50 per person for repeat participants. We help individuals find their inner strength and overcome life’s fears and personal obstacles, whatever they may be. Through a series of self-discovery exercises we provide the tools to help one breakthrough boundaries and transform negative beliefs into new and positive energies. This workshop ends in a traditional firewalk. Inner Light Heath Spa, Poughkeepsie. 454-4644. Magical Trees 2-5pm. $35/$20. A workshop and walk with herbalist and author Susun Weed. Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100. Sekhem: Living Light Energy 2pm. $30. Group healing, meditation, and empowerment-journey with Adam Deion and John DiBlasi. Come and experience the energy of infinity, the ankh (the breath of life), and the Atlantean Ankh. Gaia’s Garden Retreat, Warwick. 544-7085.

The Pub: Revisited 7:30pm. $20/$18 seniors and children under 12. Variety show with singing, dancing and comedy routines. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

Wedding Favor + War Bonnet 8pm. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson.

Open Houses/Parties/Benefits 10am-6:30pm. $13/$8 children. Ascension Church, West Park. Ascensionholytrinity.org. Guided Walking Tour of Main Street 2pm. $3/children free. Hurley Reformed Church, Hurley. 331-4121.

The Wharton Salon Presents Two By Wharton 3pm. $35. Two lighthearted, one-act short stories by Edith Wharton: “The Quicksand” and “The Looking Glass.” By popular demand, tea and cookies will be served. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (800) 838-3006.

Spirituality

Workshops & Classes

currently pregnant or adoptive mothers-to-be to help

Busy Mom Love Quick n’ Easy Back to School Lunches 2-4pm. Guest chef: Roni Shapiro. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447.

SUNDAY 25

Erica’s Monthly Spiritual Pregnancy & Adoption Circle 6pm. Fourth Sunday of every month. Gathering of awaken the relationship between you and your child. Together we will explore and practice ways to intuitively connect with this being. Reservations required Wyld Acres, New Paltz. 255-5896.

Theater

Dance

King Lear

Community Lawn Dance Concerts: The Buzzards 6pm. $12/$10 members/$8 students. PS21 is initiating a series of Sunday late afternoon/early evening lawn concerts inviting audiences to bring a picnic and their dancing shoes. Three bands will offer diverse styles of music for audiences to dance to or simply kick back and enjoy. We’ll have local beer and wine as well as coffee and desserts for sale. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

7pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival.

Fairs & Festivals

Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org. The Pub: Revisited 2pm. $20/$18 seniors and children under 12. Variety show with singing, dancing, and comedy routines. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. The Wharton Salon Presents Two By Wharton 3pm. $35. Two lighthearted, one-act short stories by Edith Wharton: “The Quicksand” and “The Looking

Summer Hoot Festival The down-home celebration of music, food, and community will feature world class music from the great state of New York and beyond, including performances by Pete Seeger, Natalie Merchant, Dirt Farmer Band, Dan Bern, AC Newman, The Wiyos, Mike + Ruthy, Jay Ungar & Molly Mason, Elizabeth Mitchell & Dan Zanes, and many more. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

Glass.” By popular demand, tea and cookies will be

Health & Wellness

Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Death Cafe 2:30pm. Fourth Sunday of every month. Sponsored by the Circle of Friends for the Dying. Part of a global movement to increase the awareness of death to help people make the most of their (finite) life. Hudson Coffee Traders, Kingston. (914) 466-5763.

Kids & Family Children & Families: Monarchs, Milkweed and Migration 1pm. Meet the “kings” of butterflies in their Storm King habitat. Gather at Jose Contreras’s Infinite Flight to hear the story of the magnificent migration of monarchs to Mexico. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

Literary & Books Michael Finkelstein presents 77 Questions for Skillful Living: A New Path to Extraordinary Health 4pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. 255-8300. Words Words Words 3pm. $5 suggested donation. 6th annual summer afternoon gatherings of Hudson Valley authors, reading from and talking about their own work. Featured this month is Rob and Sam Rosenthal (Pete Seeger: In His Own Words) Christine Wade (Seven Locks) and Edward Lundergan (Kairos Consort, The Valley Sings). Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 297-4245.

served. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (800) 838-3006.

Workshops & Classes Drop In and Draw 10am-noon. $15/$75 for six sessions. Drop in and draw the model with guidance from instructor Yura Adams. Save by pre-purchasing all six sessions for $75. Hudson

MONDAY 26 Lectures & Talks The Astronaut Wives Club: A True Story 4pm. $22/$20 members. Lily Koppel, author of the bestseller The Red Leather Diary, follows the lives of these brave women, chronicling their friendships which spanned over fifty years. The Mount, Lenox, MA. (413) 551-5100.

Outdoors & Recreation Fore the Kids Golf Classic 11am. $145 per golfer, Sponsorships at many levels. Tee off “Fore the Kids” at the pristine West Point Golf Course, and help Big Brothers Big Sisters change young lives for the better, forever. Golf as an individual, form a foursome, or be a company sponsor—big or little—and enjoy great publicity and recognition. Dinner, drinks, friends, and prizes all will help make a positive lasting difference for local children facing adversity. West Point Golf Course, West Point. 562-5900 ext. 12.

Spirituality An Evening with White Eagle

Music

7-9pm. $30/$25. Group healing and channeled

20th Anniversary of the Great Divas of Gospel 4pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701.

Mirabai of Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-2100.

Celebration of Opera 2pm. $35/$30 seniors/$15 students. The program opens with the intense murder trial scene from the opera Sacco and Vanzetti by Anton Coppola, featuring Leonard J. Altamura. It wil be followed by a full production of Cavalleria Rusticana, Pietro Mascagni’s tragic drama of love. Altamura Center for the Arts, Jewett. (518) 622-0070.

guidance with White Eagle channel James Philip.

TUESDAY 27 Film Free Movie Tuesdays: Pina 8:30pm. Germany, 2011. Pina Bausch is a legendary German dancer and choreographer. Her unique creations transformed the language of dance and offer

Ens String Quartet: Lyric Masters 4pm. Celebrating the anniversaries of Britten and Verdi. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

a visual experience like no other. This revolutionary film

Keith Newman & Robert Leitner 2pm. Acoustic. Robibero Family Vineyards, New Paltz. 255-9463.

film about Pina Bausch when she died of cancer in 2009

Leon Redbone 7:30pm. $50/$35. Tunes from the turn-of-the-century, flapper-era radio ditties, Depression-spawned ragtime and World War II folk-jazz. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306.

to made this remarkable tribute. PS21: Performance

Newburgh Chamber Music: H. Peter Stern Concert Series 2pm. Enjoy a summer afternoon filled with the music of Haydn, Mozart, and more. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. 534-3115.

from director Wim Wenders captures the aesthetic of Pina Bausch’s greatest works. Wenders was making a and at first was too devastated to go on with the film. However, two years later he picked up the film again Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Health & Wellness Healing Steps Support Group Last Tuesday of every month, 5pm. Join in to encourage patients, family members, and caregivers emotionally and spiritually through all steps of wound healing Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 876-3001.


Kids & Family

Health & Wellness

iPad Games 3:30pm. Join other teenagers as we play multiplayer games on our new iPads. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

A Day of Healing with One Light One Touch 10am-5pm. $150. With Nancy Plumer, MS. Learn how to apply healing energies and clear emotional and physical blockages and bring greater balance to your Body, Mind and Spirit. Private Residence, Stone Ridge. 687-2252.

School Summer Reading Assignment Help 3:30-5pm. Read a book from your school summer reading list and then come do your summer reading assignment in a fun & helpful setting. Discuss the book you read, start your project, and have snacks. Field Library, Peekskill. (914) 737-0010.

Music Bridgit Mendler 8pm. $20-$45. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Vincenz, Hart & Brown 7pm. Jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Spirituality Sound Healing: Divine Light Activation with Himalayan Bowls played by Suzy Meszoly 7:30pm. Last Tuesday of every month. $15-$25. The Himalayan bowls have the dynamic power of creating a unifying energetic field, and allowing for the integration of human experience without judgment, without fear. MaMa, Stone Ridge. 616-0860.

Music Jim Campilongo Ensemble 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Sister Sparrow and The Dirty Birds 8pm. $25/$35. A blend of gut-busting soul, earthy rock, and New Orleans-inspired beats. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306.

FRIDAY 30 Dance Fifth Friday Dance Meet Up #3: Cajun Dance with Too Much Fun 8pm. $15/$10 members. Lesson at 7:30pm. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

The BTU’s: Jazz, Blues, & Funk 8pm. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. Off The Hook 9:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Professor Louie & The Crowmatix 8pm. San Severia, Kingston. (917) 450-4295. Tom Freund & Friends 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

Nightlife Baam Bada House Music Parties Last Friday of every month, 8pm-midnight. $5 includes a drink. Wherehouse, Newburgh. 561-7240.

Theater All’s Well That Ends Well 8pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

WEDNESDAY 28 Book Group 6:30pm. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317. Teen Club 3:30pm. Join other teens for games, crafts, and other miscellany. Saugerties Public Library, Saugerties. 246-4317.

Storytelling with Janet Carter 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Music All-Ages Open Mike 7pm. For all-age musicians, all levels. This is the perfect opportunity for first time public performers as well as seasoned musicians The Castle Fun Center, Chester. 469-2116. Jeff Entin’s Open Mike Night 7pm. Join Jeff Entin at the open mic night. Registration is at 6:30pm and music starts at 7pm. Come on down to hear some great music. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Jim Kweskin and the Jug Band 7:30pm. $34.50. Americana. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Kevin Hays New Day Trio 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Ladies Night: Burgers & Bordeaux 7pm. Drink specials plus live music with the talented singer-songwriter Drew Bordeaux. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Passero 6pm. Academy Green Park, Kingston. 334-3914. Tom DePetris Quartet Call for times. Jazz, blues, and original music. Dave’s Coffee and Wine House, Saugerties. 246-8424.

Workshops & Classes What Matters Most with Carole Maso Through September 1. Twelve hours of workshop time, all meals, and ample time to work, ruminate, and explore our lush natural surroundings The Millay Colony for the Arts, Austerlitz. Millaycolony.org.

THURSDAY 29 Fairs & Festivals 2013 Columbia County Fair $8-$12. Agriculture activities, live music, Schoolgirl Queen competition, demolition derbies, Painted Pony Rodeo, livestock judging, Firefighters Parade, monster tractor pull, and over 200 rides, shows, exhibits and other attractions. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 392-2121.

Food & Wine Berkshire Farm & Table Dinner 6pm. $170. Al fresco dinner featuring Chef Dan Smith from John Andrews Restaurant. Behind the scenes program begins at 5pm. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA. Stonehilltable-chefxclark-082913.eventbrite.com. Dave Koz & Friends’ Summer Horns Tour 8pm. $80. Includes a pre-show lobby wine and cheese tasting starts at 7:15 p.m. with an art exhibit and artist reception. Ridgefield Playhouse, Ridgefield, CT. (203) 438-5795.

Ben Kohn Trio 8pm. Castle Street Cafe, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-5244. Bryan Gordon 8:30pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. A Concert for the Friends of Maverick 4pm. Pedja Muzijevic, piano. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217. Daedalus String Quartet 8pm. $25/$22seniors/$20 contributors/$5 students. The program includes Schubert’s Quartettsatz, Britten’s String Quartet #1, and the Saint-Saens Piano Quintet in A major. Windham Civic and Performing Arts Center, Windham. (518) 734-3868.

Jazz at the Maverick 8:30pm. Singer-songwriter Marc Black and jazz piano master Warren Bernhardt. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Fairs & Festivals

Literary & Books

All Heart : Celebrating the Music of Heart 8pm. $34/$49. All Heart plays all the best of Hearts most recognizable and popular hits. As a tribute act, All Heart delights its audiences with material that is known and loved from five decades of radio airplay. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306.

Felice County Fair 12pm-dusk. Featuring the Felice Brothers, Amy Helm, Marco Benevento, Connor Kennedy, and more. Local food and partial proceeds to benefit Catskill Mountainkeeper. Opus 40, Saugerties. Radiowoodstock.com.

Clubs & Organizations

2013 Columbia County Fair $8-$12. Agriculture activities, live music, schoolgirl queen competition, demolition derbies, painted pony rodeo, livestock judging, firefighters parade, monster tractor pull, and over 200 rides, shows, exhibits, and other attractions. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 392-2121.

Music

Bracelet by Mira Bowin Summer DIY Craft Fair One person’s trash is another person’s DIY project. On August 10, come support 30 local vendors with their handcrafted work at the third annual fair hosted by Kingston’s Cornell Street Studios in collaboration with the Art Riot. Meet the artists who make products out of green and renewable resources, like recycled knit wares, food-themed jewelry made of polymer clay by Mother May I, and yarn and button bracelets by Mira Liane Bowin Arts. Attendees can put their artistic vision to work at a 3D fairy assembling booth, or try constructing a personalized hula hoop out of PVC pipe. Afterward, join a free instructional class on how to hula or one of the five fitness classes available in the dance studio. Mr. O and Kyle McDonough provide music. (845) 331-0191; Cornellstreetstudios.com Parsons Dance 8pm. $40/$35 members/$25 students. PS21 is delighted to welcome Parsons Dance back to the Tent. This season Parsons will present new works including Nascimento Novo, Caught, In the End, and other works. Parsons Dance, an internationally renowned contemporary dance company under the artistic direction of dancer/choreographer David Parsons, tours nationally and internationally and maintains a repertory of more than 80 works choreographed by David Parsons. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Fairs & Festivals 2013 Columbia County Fair $8-$12. Agriculture activities, live music, schoolgirl queen competition, demolition derbies, painted pony rodeo, livestock judging, firefighters parade, monster tractor pull, and over 200 rides, shows, exhibits and other attractions. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 392-2121.

Film VOB International Film Festival 7pm. $5. Three-day event showcasing short films on the great lawn, and feature films and documentaries at Studio Around the Corner. Food, ArtBeat sidewalk art show, live music. Check website for specific events and times. Walter Brewster House, Brewster. 278-0018.

Food & Wine Berkshire Farm & Table Dinner 6pm. $170. Al fresco dinner featuring Chef Dan Smith from John Andrews Restaurant. Behind the scenes program begins at 5pm. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA. Stonehilltable-chefxclark-082913.eventbrite.com.

Music Adam Erza 8pm. $25/$40. Infinity Music Hall, Norfolk, CT. (866) 666-6306. Albert Lee 9pm. $30. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Bill Staines 8pm. $20/$15. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955.

SATURDAY 31 Art Galleries & Exhibits 6th Annual Art Studio Views Tour 11am-5pm. Meet 17 talented artists and step into their private (and some hidden) studios. Village of Rhinebeck. Artalongthehudson.com.

Dance Parsons Dance 8pm. $40/$35 members/$25 students. PS21 is delighted to welcome Parsons Dance back to the Tent. This season Parsons will present new works including Nascimento Novo, Caught, In the End, and other works. Parsons Dance, an internationally renowned contemporary dance company under the artistic direction of dancer/choreographer David Parsons, tours nationally and internationally and maintains a repertory of more than 80 works choreographed by David Parsons. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Fairs & Festivals 2013 Columbia County Fair $8-$12. Agriculture activities, live music, schoolgirl queen competition, demolition derbies, painted pony rodeo, livestock judging, firefighters parade, monster tractor pull, and over 200 rides, shows, exhibits and other attractions. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 392-2121. Woodstock-New Palt Arts and Crafts Fair 10am-6pm. $8/$7 seniors/children free. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. Quailhollow.com.

Film VOB International Film Festival 4pm. $5. Three-day event showcasing short films on the great lawn, and feature films and documentaries at Studio Around the Corner. Food, ArtBeat sidewalk art show, live music. Check website for specific events and times. Walter Brewster House, Brewster. 278-0018.

Literary & Books Laura Ludwig Presents Performance Art and Poetry 6:30pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 246-5775.

Maureen McGovern: A Long and Winding Road 8pm. $49.50. The Bradstan Cabaret Series. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. The Music of Pink Floyd: A Rock Symphony 8pm. $26-$66. Following their fantastic Music of Led Zepplein performance last year, the Belleayre Festival Orchestra under the direction of Brent Havens returns with the second installment of its Rock Extravaganza series. Belleayre Music Festival, Highmount. 254-5600. Pauline Oliveros Outdoor solo performance. Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild, Woodstock. 679-2079. Sandra Bernhard 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Shall We Gather at the River? 4:30pm. $25/$20 members. A sampling of Connecticut Yankee composer Charles Ives’ rich repertoire of vocal and instrumental works. Deborah Rentz-Moore, mezzo soprano; Donald Berman, piano; Daniel Stepner, violin. Pre-concert talk at 3:30pm. New Marlborough Village Association Meeting House, New Marlborough, MA. (413) 229-2785. Tom Freund & Friends 7pm. Latin. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Vishten 8pm. $25/$20. Guthrie Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-1955. The Woodstock Concerts on the Green 1-5pm. Village Green, Woodstock. Woodstockchamber.com.

Outdoors & Recreation Volunteer Restoration Day 10am-2pm. Learn to identify local flora and proper techniques for removing invasive plants that wreak havoc on the valley’s fragile ecosystem. Then put your newfound knowledge to use, uprooting invasives and replacing them with a diversity of native plants. Madam Brett Park, Beacon. Scenichudson.org.

Theater From Storm King, to KaaterskillThe Hudson River School in Story and Song with the Hudson River Ramblers 1pm and 3pm. $10/$30 family. Master Storyteller Jonathan Kruk and local Folksinger Rich Bala, perform authentic stories and songs of the landscape inspiring Frederic Church, Thomas Cole, and the Hudson River School of Painting. The mystery and majesty of the river from the spirits haunting Storm King to the “Kindred Spirits” standing above Kaaterskill Falls revealed in the lore and folk songs. Olana State Historic Site, Hudson. (518) 828-1872 ext. 109. King Lear 8pm. $27-$55. Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. Boscobel, Garrison. Hvshakespeare.org.

8/13 ChronograM forecast 121


by eric francis coppolino

Moving Mountains

N

early everyone in the Hudson Valley is familiar with the land preservation efforts of Mohonk Preserve. The name is synonymous with forests, trails, and rock climbing. The Preserve has the reputation of being an excellent steward of its land holdings, estimated at 8,000 acres. When lawsuits involving Mohonk Preserve occasionally make the news, their standard response is that the Preserve, a New Paltz-based nonprofit, tax-exempt 501(c)3 corporation, buys only from willing sellers and rarely engages in litigation. In that light, it’s noteworthy that in late May, State Supreme Court Judge Christopher E. Cahill issued a decision in a nine-year lawsuit that involved Mohonk claiming title to 75 acres of land that the court held actually belonged to its neighbors, Karen Pardini and Michael Fink. The land is located along Clove Valley Road in the Town of Rochester. More noteworthy is that Mohonk and its agents have sued Pardini and Fink four times, trying to take their land, keeping them tied up in nearly nonstop litigation and appeals for 19 years. In all that time Mohonk has never once won a case; one of the smaller ones was settled. Yet as of July, Mohonk was fundraising to prosecute the most recent case further. Pardini and Fink’s 300-acre property, formerly known as Smitty’s Dude Ranch, is the largest privately held, undeveloped tract on the Shawangunk Ridge not owned by Mohonk or Open Space Institute (OSI), a much larger, regional land preservation organization. Located directly in Mohonk’s viewshed and developable as a commercial property, Pardini and Fink’s land is surrounded by the Preserve, which has contested nearly every boundary the two neighbors share. Mohonk, OSI, and other organizations work closely together to acquire property along the ridge, for which they raise funds from the public. The Preserve started as the Mohonk Trust in 1963, when the Mohonk Mountain House, a for-profit resort hotel, put the majority of its land into a conservancy, thereby taking it off of the property tax rolls. The King’s Lane Lot Land in this area of the county is divided into Lots 1-19, part of a land grant from 1770 called the Nineteen Partners Tract, which was subdivided into 19 sections or lots in 1799. In 1841, the property boundary of a farm (called the Curran Farm) was drawn following a ridgeline laterally through Lots 1 to 5 and has not changed since. The ridgeline and boundary divides the properties of Pardini and Fink from their neighbor, Gloria Finger. She owns 26 acres at the north end of Lot 1, land known since the 1800s as the King’s Lane Lot, because an historic road called the King’s Lane leads into it. Pardini and Fink’s land includes 75 acres at the south end of Lot 1, on the other side of the ridge, close to Clove Valley Road. In 1994, Mohonk “purchased” for $82,000 a deed for the 75 acres owned by Pardini and Fink from Finger, falsely claiming it was the King’s Lane Lot. The transaction was arranged by Robert K. Anderberg, general counsel to both the Open Space Institute and the Shawangunk Conservancy. Anderberg served on Mohonk’s board of directors from 1981 to 1988. Anderberg’s plan to acquire the 75 acres on Mohonk’s behalf dates back to a March 24, 1993 memo from Anderberg to Van Valkenburgh, and Glenn Hoagland, Mohonk’s executive director. In that memo, Anderberg writes, “One of the landowners on Rock Hill, a Gloria Finger, is interested in selling a portion of her acreage to the Mohonk Preserve.” A survey map was prepared and certified by Norman Van Valkenburgh, the longtime in-house surveyor for Mohonk, which claims that the 75 acres of Lot 1 at the west end 122 planet waves ChronograM 8/13

illustration by Lizanne Webb

Planet Waves

of Fink and Pardini’s land belongs to Mohonk. Mohonk filed the map with the county and used it to get Planning Board approval for a subdivision from the Town of Rochester in 1994. The same map was used to secure title insurance from First American Financial. Title insurance is a form of coverage that protects the buyer in case it turns out the purchased land was not actually owned by the seller. The Preserve then brought a lawsuit in State Supreme Court against the actual owners of the property, Pardini and Fink, attempting to get the courts to affirm what they claimed was “record title.” The litigation was paid for by First American, which now must either sponsor an appeal or reimburse Mohonk for its cost of purchase. While it may seem that Finger tried to trick Mohonk into buying land that she didn’t really own, it was Anderberg—an attorney—who arranged the transaction on Finger’s and Mohonk’s behalf. It’s not the first time he’s tried to buy land from someone who didn’t own it; the same court found that he did the same thing in a 1997 case involving the Shawangunk Conservancy. In trying to prove that a smaller 26-acre piece of land was a neighboring 75-acre tract, Mohonk presented conflicting theories that in effect rearranged the ownership history along that section of the Shawangunk Ridge. Over nine years of litigation, the court heard from 30 witnesses, reviewed 100 exhibits, and read 1,299 pages of trial testimony. After all of this, Judge Cahill ruled on May 29 that Mohonk Preserve had no claim to the 75 acres in question. The court rejected every single claim made by Mohonk and its attorney, John Connor of Hudson. It accepted every fact and argument presented by Pardini and Fink and their attorney, Sharon Graff of Kingston, calling theirs the “more coherent” of the two descriptions of history. Smitty’s Bar and Dude Ranch Many old-timers in the Hudson Valley remember Smitty’s Bar and Dude Ranch on Clove Valley Road. It was owned by Wilbur Smith, known to everyone as Smitty. For more than a generation, Smitty’s was the place to hang out by the stream, ride horses, camp, and go hiking. Regulars and staff stayed in a little hotel above the bar. Smitty patrolled his land on horseback wearing a revolver on his hip. The place was a mecca for countless hippies and nature lovers from the 1960s until Smitty sold the property to Pardini and Fink in 1987. The couple closed the business and made a project of cleaning up the land from decades of overuse, removing 74 dumpsters of garbage and debris the first few years. Part of the irony of this case is that the location of Smitty’s and the lay of the land there are so deeply ingrained in local folklore. Smith had been hounded by Mohonk with threats and legal actions during the 1970s and 1980s. Too poor to defend himself and unable to read survey maps, he sold the bar and the surrounding lands to Pardini and Fink. The couple was first sued by the Shawangunk Conservancy, which serves as a land acquisition agent of Mohonk, in 1994. That suit unsuccessfully attempted to take 136 acres from them. State Supreme Court Judge Vincent Bradley said in his 1997 ruling that Pardini and Fink had standing to bring a fraud action against the Conservancy. When I interviewed Van Valkenburgh about that lawsuit in 1997 as a reporter for the Woodstock Times, he told me that he was after “the whole farm, whatever they [Pardini and Fink] own.” He really meant it. For example, Pardini and Fink’s property includes about 200 acres on the north side of Clove Valley Road. In various lawsuits (including the most recent one), Mohonk or its agents have claimed every acre except for Smitty’s former house.


Fink said in July that he and Pardini have spent more fighting lawsuits by Mohonk and its agents than they paid for the whole ranch. One can only imagine Mohonk’s legal bills. The Case of the Moving Mountain As is in true many places, rural land along the Shawangunk Ridge is often described by the neighboring properties. These are called adjoiners. Once something is described by its relationship to adjacent lands in all directions, you know where it is. No two parcels of land have all of the same adjoiners; each is unique. This is why adjoiner descriptions are so dependable. Your land describes that of your neighbors; their land describes yours. Change any one adjoiner description and you have to rearrange the descriptions of every property in the area, since they all depend on one another. It’s a little like turning a Rubik’s Cube. When you turn any one section, you simultaneously rearrange the patterns on four sides of the cube and shift the orientation of the other two. In its lawsuit, Mohonk asserted that the 75-acre portion of Lot 1 was the King’s Lane Lot, when in fact the King’s Lane Lot is the smaller 26-acre portion of Lot 1 to the north. At the trial, Pardini and Fink pointed out that Mohonk failed to explain why its claim to the 75 acres was missing many necessary adjoiners and that it listed others not called for by the deed record. One example involves land formerly owned by John I. Davis in the 19th century, now called the Davis parcel. The real King’s Lane Lot—the 26-acre one owned by Finger—calls for Davis as its eastern adjoiner. But Mohonk claimed that Davis was next to the 75 acres owned by Pardini and Fink, which it is not. To do this, they had to pretend that the adjoiners for the real King’s Lane Lot would work simultaneously for that lot and for the 75 acres they were claiming. In other words, Mohonk claimed that the Davis parcel existed in two places at once. In Van Valkenburgh’s survey of the 75 acres that was used to make the purchase and secure title insurance, Van Valkenburgh accurately lists Pardini and Fink as the eastern adjoiner. Then in court, Mohonk tried to claim that the John I. Davis parcel was the eastern adjoiner to the 75 acres, in effect attempting to kick Fink and Pardini off of even more of their land. Davis is nowhere to be found in Pardini and Fink’s chain of title, for a good reason. The Davis parcel is located east of the real Kings Lane Lot, not the 75 acres that Mohonk was pretending was the King’s Lane Lot. That Van Valkenburgh originally listed Pardini and Fink as the eastern adjoiner to the 75 acres in the survey used for the purchase and title coverage proves he knew Davis was not located there and that he knew who the real owners of the 75 acres were. Doing a survey involves researching the ownership history of each adjoiner. But he had another reason to know the real history: He had been surveyor and expert witness in every prior lawsuit against Pardini and Fink. At trial, Mohonk failed to present a witness who had actually done a survey of the property it was claiming. Notably, Van Valkenburgh was not called as a witness by Mohonk to tell the story of his survey, which is the usual practice. But he sat in court every day of the trial and assisted Mohonk. Had he been called as a witness, Pardini and Fink’s lawyers would have asked him to explain how the Davis parcel got up and walked down the mountain. Presented with these and other facts, Judge Cahill concluded that Finger never owned the land Mohonk had “purchased” from her, and ruled that Pardini and Fink hold both proper title and common law possession of their land. In late July, I went to Mohonk Preserve to interview its top leaders—Glenn Hoagland, the executive director, Ronald Knapp, the board president, and Gretchen Reed, the director of marketing and communications. They spent an hour and 20 minutes attempting to convince me that Michael Fink was trying to take their land from them. They also claimed that Pardini and Fink didn’t believe they owned the 75 acres that the judge determined were part of the couple’s own property. None of the Preserve’s officials would answer any of my questions about why the adjoiners to the land they were claiming did not match known reality on the ground, saying they didn’t remember the details and didn’t want to “re-litigate” the case in their conference room. Mohonk recently said that its board of trustees had voted to appeal Cahill’s ruling. In a July 5 letter to the Preserve’s members and supporters, Hoagland and Knapp claimed that Mohonk still owns the 75 acres. They trivialized Judge Cahill’s decision as being just three pages long when in fact it’s 90 pages. Hoagland and Knapp wrote, “The continuing litigation...underscores the importance of the Preserve’s critical land protection work, which deals not only with acquisition of land and conservation easements but with the perpetual protection of lands in our care. With your continued support, we will remain steadfast in our 50year heritage of saving the land for life.” Sure sounds good. chronogram.com Read Eric Francis Coppolino’s weekly Planet Waves column.

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Planet Waves Horoscopes ARIES (March 20-April 19) If you understood how much of your insecurity was about trying to please others, you might find yourself getting angry. And if you do find yourself getting angry, consider that it’s about trying to make sure that everyone approves of everything—from your plans to your state of mind—before you allow yourself to make a move. I suggest you try this month to seek nobody’s approval for anything. Make up your own mind about everything. Even in matters involving family or household, you’re entitled to your own opinion, which means an opinion that others might not agree with. As you start to do this, you might notice that you’re sloughing off layer after layer of submission, conciliation, people pleasing, and what you believed was give-and-take. All of that is the opposite of taking authority. And taking authority is what you’re about to do. This will require some actual courage, and I believe you’ve got that available. You will need to follow what both your instincts and intuition tell you. The information is coming into your awareness from a deep place. You know what is true for you. Now what you must do is count that as relevant and make a decision that the emotional dramas of others are irrelevant to you living your life in the way that is right for you.

TAURUS (April 19-May 20)

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GEMINI (May 20-June 21) You’re about to begin a new chapter of the season, based on a recent discovery that has helped you get your priorities in order. Said another way, you seem to have figured out what you want and don’t want. This has come at a cost, such as being dragged through a bath of uncertainty and self-doubt, though at least it’s served a purpose—mainly to teach you what is not true. Now all you need to do is shift your emphasis to what is true. This can be a little tricky; there are negativity traps everywhere, and it takes some discipline to emphasize the positive. It’s clear from your chart that if you do, you will get a lot more of it. Any way you look at your life, this is an abundant moment: The variable is what abundance you get. It takes us humans a while to figure out that what we focus on multiplies. Therefore, focus on what you know is true, on what is important to you. Pay attention to the people you want to go deeper with, and focus on what you want to create for them. Regarding money, I would translate “make money doing what you love” to “seek your fortunes doing what’s actually meaningful to you and you will be successful.” Meaning is a form of love, and, if you remember that, you’ll have a lot of room to maneuver.

CANCER (June 21-July 22)

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You’ll have more fun when you can take a risk without obsessing over everything from trivial concerns to your worst fears. This may come in the form of thinking through every single possible contingency, which is good for some things in life and not so helpful for others. It’s good for things like marketing campaigns and investigative reporting. Love, friendship, art, and music require far less cerebral strategizing. The problem is that once your particular mind gets hold of something, it doesn’t like to let go—and this is especially true when there is some chance to be taken, or even some relatively minor unpredictable factor. You could tidy up this situation by considering the theme of emotional boundaries. Whatever the source of your anxiety or concern, you’ll feel better and be stronger if you define some space and time wherein you’re free to be yourself. That’s the space where anything can happen, and it’s okay—you can go with the flow of your creativity. Then I suggest you do the same thing with selected friends. Choose the people around whom you can “risk” being yourself, which means being fully present with your ideas, your passion, your creativity, and your sexuality. You may not find many people you can experiment with, though you may find a few—the most significant one being yourself. With dropping inhibitions, practice goes a long way.

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If you’re finally tired of not really living the life you want, now is your chance to step out. To some degree we are all pushed into a state of compromise between our potential and actually expressing it. Some of that is about circumstances. Some is about how difficult it is to connect with the wild creative core that you contain, and the many pressures that exist against doing so. It’s challenging on Earth with all its complications and obstacles to hold the frequency of one’s original intentions for coming here. Now all of these factors are changing simultaneously. You’re in a position to take advantage of favorable environmental factors and stretch what seem like your physical and emotional limits. Simultaneously, you’re coming into contact with your deeper confidence—perhaps for the first time. Though this may seem like emotional movement, it’s more like certain challenges you’ve confronted are putting you into contact with your spiritual strength. It would be helpful to recognize the difference, so that you can work on the much larger scale that you’re being called to. That seems to be the central message of the astrology: moving onto an entirely new level. It may look to others like your ship coming in, but in reality what’s happening is an internal phenomenon based on your devoted contact with the truth of who you are.


Planet Waves Horoscopes

CLAIRVOYANT

PSYCHIC

MEDIUM

LEO (July 22-August 23) There is astonishing strength that comes from devoting your life to service. I don’t mean servitude, codependency, or subjugation. I mean devotion to something in yourself that connects to the world around you in a profound way. It’s helpful to get the order of things correct: Devotion is an inner phenomenon, not a commitment to something outside you. But the inner aspect is not a “this is for me” thing. It’s not really about you, it’s about something you contain for the purpose of expressing. There’s a useful image from across the wheel in Aquarius, where your counterpart there has an urn of water that she fills up for the purpose of giving away. You can think of yourself as being the guardian of the sacred hearth. You tend this hearth because it’s the thing to do, then it provides heat, light and energy for everyone around you. I suggest you get used to the idea that this is a 24-7/365 kind of commitment, though that mostly pertains to the inner relationship involved. Then, you offer your time and energy when called upon and when appropriate. The planet involved is Vesta, and there’s always some element of “doing without” where this goddess is concerned. I would look at that as an exchange. If you get rid of everything that is trivial, gossipy, and designed for appearances only, you will have abundant time and energy.

VIRGO (August 23-September 22) Note the presence of a different kind of intelligence—the kind that does not run in circles or work against itself. It’s off the plane of mental cognition and accesses the level of direct knowledge. This kind of intelligence knows something is true and then figures out how it works in practical terms. As you get a feeling for this experience, you’ll shift your relationship to yourself, and could discover that you have access to something deeper, something that transcends the usual boundaries of what you think of as your mind. Your mind is indeed part of something larger. It’s only the idea that it’s not that prevents you from experiencing this directly. It’s therefore essential that you do the one thing with your mind that is eminently possible for anyone who wants to do so: Keep it open. Then I suggest you observe the ways in which information comes in from modalities other than what you might normally consider to be thought. Actual creative thought is not bound by anything physical; it needs no grounding in experience or learned knowledge. It’s a truly generative experience. Yet to get there, you need to think of yourself differently, which first means noticing your prior limits and being willing to go beyond them. Limits serve the purpose of creating a comfort zone—one that you no longer need, and that I doubt you want.

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LIBRA (September 22-October 23) If you recognized that you don’t have to go it alone, you would feel a lot better and your life would be easier. This transformation would happen without much fuss, and the results would be easy to see. It’s true that you are subject to forces outside your ability to control them, and lately you’ve really been feeling this. You may also be questioning whether there is any solid ground to stand on. Then the sensation that you have to do it all yourself—endure everything and live in a world where people don’t understand you—just feeds on itself. Shift the dynamic by taking the initiative and gathering people to whom you relate. Take that one risk. Reach out to others who you’ve noticed have some similar values or ideas, or who reach you with their positive ideas. As you do this, you’ll begin to realize how influential you are. You don’t want power; you want the ability to connect with others in ways that are meaningful, to share ideas, and to experience the pleasure of common ground. You may feel like you’re miles away from such a space, when in truth you’re much closer than you think. All you need to do is stop waiting for something positive to happen and recognize that you’re the attracting force. You’re the one who will set into motion the changes you want to see and experience.

SCORPIO (October 23-November 22) You are being handed an opportunity to think of your career in a whole new way, to redefine your idea of achievement and to embrace a notion of success that has the power to change your life. There is something in the chart—something strong and beautiful—about doing what you do for its own sake, rather than for some other common motive (money, prestige, recognition, etc.). Yet it looks like you’ll be doing whatever it is in an unusually visible way— and it’s up to you not to become distracted by this, and to keep your focus where it belongs. Your charts for August have a profound theme of service. This is a concept that gets a lot more talk than it needs and less action than it deserves. It would be helpful if you would deflect any and all recognition that you get back into the basic service that you are providing to the world. It would help even more if you take the time to refine your ideas about what that service is, and concentrate on how you can become the point of contact between what you do and who benefits from it. The more it seems that other people benefit, the better you’re doing. What you get from it needs to be secondary, because it only distracts from what you’re offering.

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 22) Speaking at the recent Queer Astrology Conference, I started my talk by reminding everyone that sex leads to existence, and that people who don’t like or don’t approve of sex are likely to have some deep misgivings about being on the planet. Your charts are reminding you of this connection. Because religion has gone so far out of its way to build its fortunes on shaming sex, we take for granted that it must be inherently unspiritual. This is straight out of the Toxic Sludge Is Good For You school of public relations: Tell a lie often enough and it seems to be true. Your chart is issuing a bold reminder that there is nothing more spiritual than sex. If you know this, then let it inform your whole life. If you’re struggling with it—if you have some moral aspersions around the topic, and they are irritating you—I suggest you check out the whole “relationship to existence” angle. If you belong here, then how you got here is a good thing. If you don’t belong here, then you might have an issue with the way you got here. Consider this long enough and it’ll start to make more sense—to you. You might not be able to do much with or for others who are still waging war against themselves. Thankfully, they’re not the only people on Earth.

CAPRICORN (December 22-January 20) As you make your way through life, pay attention to who notices you, who makes eye contact, who returns your smile, who offers you emotional resonance. Notice who laughs at your jokes and who cares when you talk about a topic or issue that’s important to you. You may have become so accustomed to the feeling of intimidating others that you expect people to respond to you that way. It would help if you could set aside that expectation, because it has a way of perpetuating itself. It’s true that people are generally intimated, timid and self-centered. You don’t need to light up the whole room—you merely need to notice the one or two people nearby who have some light in their eyes. And they are likely to be the ones who notice you. One thing remains constant through the whole extended phase of Pluto in Capricorn: that is insisting that you maintain inner focus, which is to say, your inner awareness. You may notice that some people enhance that focus no matter what you’re doing together (and some distract you from it). They’re the ones to cultivate relationships with, because they support your relationship with yourself and vice versa. Codependency is a great reason to avoid certain kinds of relationships. Fortunately, there is an alternative.

AQUARIUS

(January 20-February 19)

Your charts suggest that this is an interesting, even cosmic, moment in your relationships. Yet the same astrology is also cautioning that you may feel like everyone but you is getting what they need. There’s an illustration of you in the role of healer, facilitator, or the one who holds space for others. You may feel like you’re the last stop before people find the thing they’re looking for; you may feel like you’re the one safe place where others open up, but then somehow you get overlooked as the one to make contact with. Usually when I see this kind of astrology, it’s clear that someone is playing what you might call a karmic role, something they’re accustomed to and are good at. But the planet involved, Vesta, often leaves people yearning for personal experience that they can imbibe for their own pleasure. I suggest you take the step and cross that threshold yourself. Make choices that bring you closer to getting what you want. When you find yourself with the option to offer yourself in service to someone, carefully consider whether you want to offer yourself. It’s a different role than the person with the human need for play and creature comforts, and at this stage in your life, either option really is a matter of choice.

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Your charts say you have everything going for you, all at the same time. These are rare moments and thanks to astrology you can have some confirmation that this particular one is real. The highlight of your astrology is not just equal emphasis on both creativity and work, but the removal of the dividing wall between the art studio and the office. Similarly, there is emphasis on passion and on healing, on self-focused experience, and absolute devotion to service. There is equal emphasis on what you do in private spaces and how this radiates out into the culture around you. If there’s a problem with this astrology, here it is: Most humans I’ve met or heard about struggle with recognizing their capacity to be so much at once. Said another way, we struggle with our human potential; with our potential to be fully human. In my experience on the planet, that’s the biggest risk a person can take. It calls for courage and for setting aside the fear of consequences that in so many lifetimes has proved to be worth heeding. Sooner or later we all must get over the pain and sense of limitation that we’ve accumulated from past experiences, and for you this is an excellent time to do just that.


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Parting Shot

New York City, 1985, Leonard Freed In the early 1960s, Leonard Freed snapped a photo of a Black American soldier standing at the Berlin Wall. Freed thought about the steadfastness with which the soldier defended America’s vision of freedom abroad, and about the chokehold imposed by America on Black people at home. Compelled by the critical issue of race in America, he packed his bags and headed home, going on to shoot legendary photographs familiarizing the Black Freedom struggle for middle American readers of iconic publications like Life magazine. Freed, who passed away seven years ago at his home in Garrison, shot photographs that focused on the lives of working people. His lens acted as a witness to injustice, inspiring empathy from the viewer rather than smug voyeurism. New York City, 1985 documents another, absurdist side of Freed. Showing a 17-foot boa constrictor partially wrapped around the bottom of an 128 ChronograM 8/13

occupied stroller, the piece gains its humor from a disarming lack of seriousness, tempting the viewer to believe that the boa is taking the baby for a stroll. Likely, Freed didn’t know what his picture was about either. Speaking on the impact of his work, Freed said, “Photography is like life...What does it all mean? I don’t know, you get an impression, a feeling.” Whether capturing the March on Washington or a baby’s stroll with a snake, Freed’s work has a feeling of brutal honesty and great sensitivity. And, unlike many great artists, Freed leaves his viewers with an impression that is empowering to all. “Leonard Freed, Man and Beast” will be exhibited at Gallery 66 NY in Cold Spring through September 2. An opening reception will be held on Friday, August 2 from 6 to 9pm. (845) 809-5838; Gallery66ny.com —Schuyler Kempton


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August 2013 Chronogram