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1,000

$

WILLIAMS

Gift Card With a 12 cabinet purchase of Masterbrands Dynasty by Omega, Schrock or Omega Cabinetry before 6/3/18. Not available on Schrock Entra Line.

WILLIAMS LUMBER & HOME CENTER

Planning a kitchen starts at Williams Lumber. Our expert designers can help your vision come to life with Omega cabinets. Visit our displays in Rhinebeck, Hudson and Pleasant Valley to start dreaming of the possibilities.

WILLIAMS

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Rhinebeck • Hudson • Hopewell Junction • Tannersville • Red Hook • Pleasant Valley • High Falls • Hyde Park

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Dowling 2230 - 41622 NY

Your Vision • Your Life • Your Lindal Home At Lindal we are very proud that for over 70 years we have been producing homes that are modern in spirit and warm in nature. At the heart of the Lindal Experience lives progress and tradition, inspiration and predictability – the cutting-edge architecture is delivered through the time-honored building systems of Lindal Cedar homes and backed by a lifetime structural warranty. Lindal Cedar Homes has designed and produced over 50,000 homes, built throughout the world in every climate, on every type of terrain, and in every regulatory environment. Since the introduction of its modern design program in 2008, Lindal has been the modern systems-built ‘prefab’ home of choice for our clients.

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4/18 CHRONOGRAM Beaumont Ranch - 39902 WA1


2 CHRONOGRAM 4/18


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FA C T O RY S A L E 3 1 0 F I S H K I L L AV E . U N I T 1 1 BEACON, NY 12508 A P R I L 2 8 TH 1 0 - 6 P M A P R I L 2 9 TH 1 0 - 4 P M

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4 CHRONOGRAM 4/18

[ T H I S S A L E I S C A S H O N LY ]


: f l e s r u o Y e s r Immeof Events that Welcome the Public

YOUR PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Dozens

SCIENCE

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f Michigan niversity o fronting U , k c lla o Henry P on “Con Presenting professor emeritus s” on s Challenge enter 100. ic e ys th re a t geoph a h Lecture C . hange: W Climate C pril 5, at 7:30 p.m. in edu/speakerseries z. lt A a y, p a w d Thurs ww.ne ilable at w M Tickets ava N ETAR IU KIR K PLA . R hursday N d H and thir T at the t OMY: JO rs N fi O e R T th S n A ing ws o scope view netary sho Indoor pla th followed by a tele ble at ila on of each m ervatory. Tickets ava bs . Smolen O ltz.edu/planetarium pa www.new

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T H E AT E R

Q AVE N U E MANCE: PE R FOR TH EATR E nts A Arts prese MCKE N N of Theatre

rtment The Depa on April 19—22 d tickets ” Q w times an atre. “Avenue o h S . 9 2 — 6 he and April 2 www.newpaltz.edu/t t a available

APR IL J O INnUupSfoTrHmISonthly updaitte: s

To s ig v e n ts , v is c o m in g e nts ab out up .e d u / e v e

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adams fairacre farms

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4/18 CHRONOGRAM 5


free

publicprograms

Drugs in our Freshwaters April 20 at 7 pm

Cary Institute aquatic ecologist Emma Rosi was recently featured in a PBS documentary on pharmaceutical pollution. Watch the piece, learn more about Rosi’s research on impacts to stream life, and discover how citizens can make a difference. Seating is first come first served.

Zoos and Conservation May 4 at 7 pm

What role do zoos and aquaria play in advancing environmental understanding? A discussion with Dan Ashe, President of the Association of Zoos & Aquariums, and Dennis Kelly, former director of the Smithsonian’s National Zoo. Seating is first come first served.

MAY DAY C E L E B RATI ON & S PR IN G FA IR SATURDAY, MAY 5 | 10-3:30

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Full Service Animal Hospital ■ Wellness

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Large Inventory of refurbished computers, phones and tablets

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ELECTRONIC RECYCLING

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6 CHRONOGRAM 4/18

2611 Rt 52 Hopewell Junction NY 12533 845-221-PETS (7387) ■ www.hopewellanimalhospital.com Dr Kim Buchanan, Dr. Jerry Scheck


JERRY DOUGLAS CARL PALMERʼS QUINN SULLIVAN MURALI CORYELL NICK PANKEN ELP LEGACY

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04.21

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05.04

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Bruce offers ordinary dental services like implants, root canals, periodontal treatments, and lnvisalign braces, but he also goes one step further. ''Transcend means to go beyond normal limits. I also wanted to go beyond my limits in terms of different protocols," he says. ''I've invested in a lot of equipment that makes my job more interesting and helps others." State-of-the-art technology allows him to offer magical improvements in care like one-visit crowns and laser fillings, which treat cavities painlessly. No drill. No anesthesia. D E NTISTR Y

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4/18 CHRONOGRAM 7


Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 4/18

VIEW FROM THE TOP

HOME & GARDEN

14 ON THE COVER

29 THE HOUSE THAT MARKO BUILT

Marco Anelli documents the construction of Magazzino and the workers behind it.

20 WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING A KFC crisis, corruption in Israel, Ghandi’s correspondence, and other juicy tidbits.

21 BEINHART’S BODY POLITIC: GINA, SHE WOLF OF THE CIA Beinhart speculates on the gruesome future of the CIA under torturista Gina Haspel.

FEATURE

43 HEIRLOOMS ALONG THE HUDSON

ART OF BUSINESS 26 ART OF BUSINESS This month: High Tea, Mikel Hunter, N&S Supply, Out of the Closet, PS21, and Rocket Number Nine Records.

COMMUNITY PAGES 69 A PLEASANT PLACE TO BUILD A TOWN Set on the Newburgh Bay, with the Catskill Mountains looming nearby, the municipalities of Newburgh and Cornwall are scenic centers of arts and commerce.

29

The ceiling fan in the master bedroom of Motria and Marko Shuhan’s timber frame home in Accord. Photo by Deborah DeGraffenreid.

HOME & GARDEN

8 CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Horticulturalist Susan MacAvery explains what heirloom plant varieties are.

FOOD & DRINK 58 SOMETHING’S BREWING Timothy Malcom examines the state of the craft beverage industry in New York and where it’s headed.

22 A QUESTION OF FORCE In light of the endless string of national police brutality incidents, Hillary Harvey tackles institutional bias and police misconduct here in the Hudson Valley.

Marko Shuhan shares the 15-year odyssey of building a timber frame home in Accord with just a chainsaw and an Alaskan mill tool.

68 HUDSON VALLEY CSA ROUNDUP A compendium of local farms offering fruit, veggie, meat, and flower CSA shares.

WHOLE LIVING 76 HYPNOSIS DEMYSTIFIED

Far from the antics of hynoptist showmen on TV, therapeutic hypnosis can be a powerful healing modality for change, growth, and healing.

COMMUNITY RESOURCE GUIDE 65 TASTINGS A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 74 BUSINESS DIRECTORY A compendium of advertiser services. 78 WHOLE LIVING Opportunities to nurture mind, body, and soul.


www.scenichudson.org/parks Robert Rodriguez, Jr.

BARDAVON PRESENTS

Straight no chaser

actress Mary Stuart Masterson narrates an Elegy for Anne Frank

Saturday April 14 at 8pm - UPAC

Saturday April 21 at 8pm - Bardavon

HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC

HOPE IN TIMES OF WAR

TOM JONES LIVE

42 parks. Reboot. Come visit our Shaupeneak Ridge, Ulster County #42SHparks

#SHexplore

#SHShaupeneakRidge

Birds of Prey Day

Polar Bears Go Up Sunday April 22 at 3pm - UPAC

Tuesday May 1 at 7pm - Bardavon

BARDAVON - 35 Market St Poughkeepsie • 845.473.2072 UPAC - 601 Broadway Kingston • 845.339.6088

BARDAVON.ORG TICKETMASTER.COM COME AND EXPLORE

Sunday June 3 10am - 4:30pm

SHOP EAT & DRINK STAY LEARN ENJOY! Join Green Chimneys’ famous annual tradition dedicated to children, the environment and magnificent birds of prey. • • • • •

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SPONSORED BY ANDES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

4/18 CHRONOGRAM 9


Chronogram ARTS.CULTURE.SPIRIT.

CONTENTS 4/18

ARTS & CULTURE

THE FORECAST

46 GALLERY & MUSEUM GUIDE

84 DAILY CALENDAR Comprehensive listings of local events. (Updated daily at Chronogram.com.)

50 MUSIC: THIS LITTLE LIGHT

Peter Aaron talks with Mike Merenda and Ruthy Ungar of The Mammals about their hope-fueled, politically-charged folk rock and their upcoming album, Sunshiner. Nightlife Highlights include 24-Hour Drone, Eleanor Friedberger, Bettye LaVette, The Molice, and Rodriguez. Reviews of Mikrojazz! Neue Expressionistische Musik by Philipp Gerschlauer and David Fiuczynski; Pushback by Stephen Clair and the Pushbacks; and Time Bomb by The Suicide Commandos.

PREVIEWS 83 Atlanta hip hop legends Arrested Development slide onto the scene on April 15. 85 Get cosmic with Laird Scranton at Vassar College on April 21. 87 Percussive dancers Caleb Teicher and Nic Gareiss kick off PS21’s spring season. 89 LANAAAA!!! H. Jon Benjamin, the voice of “Archer,” reads at the Fisher Center. 91 TMI Project presents #BlackStoriesMatter, live storytelling followed by a panel. 92 Jon Bowermaster’s Hope on the Hudson makes the rounds at local theaters. 93 Basilica Hudson shines the spotlight on renewable energy with ONE Fair.

54 BOOKS Six literary picks for April, ranging from psychological thrillers to detective mysteries. James Conrad reviews My Ex-Life, Stephen McCauley’s latest comedy-of-errors about ex-spouses who reconnect after 25 years.

56 POETRY Poems by Evelyn Augusto, Jared Bertholf, Ingrid Blaufarb Hughes, Christine Castellana, Nancy A. Ebel, Chala Fidan, Jennifer Fiorile, Kerry Hegarty, Mare Leonard, Kathleen MacKenzie, Robin Perls-Shultis,

6

95 LA artist Tom Youd publicly retypes The Group on a typewriter at Vassar. 97 15 photographers wow in “Effects that Aren’t Special,” now up at Opalka Gallery.

PLANET WAVES 98

X FACTORS, NOT WEARING BUSINESS SUITS

100

The astrology behind new actors and upcoming shifts in the political climate. HOROSCOPES

What’s in our stars? Eric Francis Coppolino knows.

Howard Sage, Giles Selig, Lotus Streetpoet, Mike Vahsen, and Caroline Wolfe.

104 PARTING SHOT

Edited by Phillip X. Levine.

46

Matrix, an installation by Judy Thomas, part of the Beacon Open Studios weekend April 27-29.

ARTS & CULTURE

10 CHRONOGRAM 4/18

A signed screenprint of Gaia’s Tiger Bunny is up for bid at the O+ Spring Gala.


Summer Camps at Primrose Hill

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���..................

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Drs. Maureen and Jeffrey Viglielmo Biological Dentistry

The beautiful smile we create with you is the gateway to a healthy body As biological dentists we provide safe mercury removal, biocompatible restorations and customized periodontal therapy.

56 Lucas Avenue, Kingston (845) 339-1619 • drvigs.com 4/18 CHRONOGRAM 11


EDITORIAL

YOUR DREAMS

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com

NOW MORE AFFORDABLE

CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Perry dperry@chronogram.com

RA

EDITOR-AT-LARGE Hillary Harvey hharvey@chronogram.com HUMAN

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Anne Pyburn Craig apcraig@chronogram.com S

I BUS

PSY

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VIC ES

EDITORIAL INTERN Andrew Solender asolender@chronogram.com

DEGREE AT THE MOUNT

S IN NURSING)

IL CH

ION

DIES

DHOOD EDUCA T

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B TO

STU

* (HYBRI D

INARY TOWARD

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INTE R DI

DISCIPLINAR

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EDITORIAL INTERN Briana Bonfiglio bbonfiglio@chronogram.com

IN

TER

IN

COMPLETE YOUR

N

HOME EDITOR Mary Angeles Armstrong home@chronogram.com EDITORIAL INTERN Kurt Karlson kkarlson@chronogram.com

Mount Saint Mary Mount Saint MaryCollege College

G*

HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com MUSIC EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com

ER

T IO

OGY OL

ASSISTANT EDITOR Marie Doyon mdoyon@chronogram.com POETRY EDITOR Phillip X Levine poetry@chronogram.com

E

MINIST

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ANA SS M GE M

& AD

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New lower tuition rate designed to make degree completion and career enhancement a reality Register for an info session to learn more at msmc.edu/infosession or call 845-569-3223

CONTRIBUTORS Mary Angeles Armstrong, Anna Barton, Larry Beinhart, Roy Brueckner, Michael Campbell, James Conrad, Eric Francis Coppolino, Larry Decker, Deborah DeGraffenreid, James Keepnews, Timothy Malcolm, Jeremy Schwartz, Sparrow, Michelle Sutton, Mosa Tanksley

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ADVERTISING & MARKETING (845) 334-8600x106 MEDIA SALES SPECIALIST Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com MEDIA SALES SPECIALIST Anne Wygal awygal@chronogram.com

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MEDIA SALES SPECIALIST Kris Schneider kschneider@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Dorothea Swiac dswiac@chronogram.com MEDIA SALES SPECIALIST Bob Pina bpina@chronogram.com

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MEDIA SALES SPECIALIST Kelin Long-Gaye kelin.long-gaye@chronogram.com MEDIA SALES SPECIALIST Michele Eldon meldon@chronogram.com ADMINISTRATIVE SALES ASSISTANT KAREN MENDOZA LUIS karen.mendozaluis@chronogram.com DIGITAL MARKETING COORDINATOR Emily Baldwin ebaldwin@chronogram.com CONVERSATIONS & DEVELOPMENT CATALYZER Brian Berusch bberusch@chronogram.com ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS MANAGER Phylicia Chartier office@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107

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MISSION

Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Media 2018.

12 CHRONOGRAM 4/18


4/18 CHRONOGRAM 13


Insuring what’s most important to you

ON THE COVER

Since 1947

HOME • BUSINESS • AUTO • LIFE

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14 CHRONOGRAM 4/18

TinoYannitelli marco anelli | photograph | 2016

M

arco Anelli’s photographs have been exhibited worldwide for the past 20 years. The leading Italian photographer captures art, architecture, and intimate portraits. A native of Rome, Anelli has published 10 books of photography, including Shadow and Light (1998), which features black-and-white photos from inside St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican, and Portraits in the Presence of Marina Abramovic (2010). Now, Anelli brings his talent to the Hudson Valley as Magazzino’s first artist in residence. Magazzino, which translates to “warehouse,” is a new Italian art center in Cold Spring founded by art collectors Nancy Olnick and Giorgio Spanu, whose mission is to bring awareness to postwar and contemporary Italian art. From 2014 to 2017, Anelli documented the conception and construction of the private art institute. His gripping photos are featured in his latest photography book, Building Magazzino, published by Skira Rizzoli in December. “My intention was to understand how something was made, and it’s been much different than taking photos of something that already existed,” Anelli says. The photo series captures a stunning before-and-after sequence—from dirt, concrete, wood planks, and sheetrock to an illuminated 18,000-square-foot space. But the three-year photographing process wasn’t only about the expansion of a 1960s factory or about building a space large enough to hold precious artwork from Olnick and Spanu’s collection. It was also about the people who have made Magazzino happen. “Marco’s book highlights an important part of the building that many people overlook,” says Magazzino director and project curator Vittorio Calabrese. “This project is an explanation of [the] human condition and the community of everyone involved.” The book features individual portraits of each of the project’s participants: electricians, landscapers, plumbers, painters, construction workers, and more. Anelli photographed each person standing in his or her workspace. “I wanted to portray the workers without any artifice, but with honesty and respect, trying to make their personality emerge,” Anelli says. “In order to do so, I asked them not to smile, as the smile is oftentimes a mask we wear. Instead I waited, talked to them—even faked problems with my camera until they trusted me enough to relax— and a more authentic part of themselves surfaced. Also, I aimed at portraying the whole figure because the gestures, the pose, the way they stand or adjust their hands can tell as much as their facial expression or the look in their eyes.” Presenting the diversity of the workers and others involved in the project is a vital aspect of Anelli’s book. “There were immigrants from all over the world, all building a space for art,” Calabrese says. “What I really like about Anelli’s work is it goes beyond first impressions. It really looks at the other side of an image, not implying what you see, but what’s behind it.” An exhibition of photographs, “Marco Anelli: Building Magazzino,” will be shown at the Desmond-Fish Library in Garrison, June 1 through June 17. —Briana Bonfiglio


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4/18 CHRONOGRAM 15


ESTEEMED READER

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16 CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: What is a human being for? This is a question that appears in my consciousness like Hale-Bopp streaking across the sky at unpredictable intervals. It appears at random times, on a schedule completely independent of the regular movements of celestial bodies or other contrivances like hours, weeks, or years. The question popped in yesterday as I watched a high school theater group perform a production of the Broadway musical “Pippin.” A cast of young adults paraded across the stage in a grand spectacle, meant, as best I could tell, to convey the myriad alluring characters and contexts of ordinary life. In the play a protagonist, Pippin, is a narcissistic and self-involved “spoiled brat” seeking “fulfillment” through diverse experiences—excelling in learning at the academy, finding glory in battle, exercising political power, partaking of sexual extravagance and the creative fervor of art, even familial domesticity—and none contain the answer he craves. Meanwhile, there’s a “lead player” orchestrating the unfolding events to keep Pippin preoccupied with his quest for elusive assuagement, and in a perpetual state of vexation. The play reminded me of P. D. Ouspensky’s book of short stories, Talks with a Devil, in which the devil’s mission is to keep characters occupied with the satisfaction of desires and ambitions, fleeing discomfort and failure, and always striving beyond their current experience. Like the devil in Ouspensky’s story, the goal of the lead player and the cast representing the thousands of relationships and situations of life is to lead Pippin into “the grand finale”—a pyretic act of terminal self-indulgence—suicide. But Pippin turns away to a more essential, albeit ordinary, path and the lead player and cast boycott the event, removing all the props, music, and costumes. Pippin and his mate and adoptive child are left on the stage naked and content (though there are portents of a recurring cycle of illusion-chasing). Meanwhile, I had my doubts that high school students playing the players had a sense of the multileveled, self-conscious implications of the play they performed, though perhaps I am wrong. The play invites an existential inquiry: What is the purpose of human life and of my life in particular? There is, it seems, an opportunity to inhabit the same set of circumstances in diametrically different ways. At one end of the spectrum is to waste one’s circumstances in pursuit of satisfaction, comfort, and “fulfillment”; while at the other end is a wish and willingness to make use of the raw joy and suffering offered up in the moment, to “digest” and refine the material to give rise to a “something,” which is the correct product of a human life. For me, a step in the direction of arousing answers to the question is indicated in the Sufi suggestion to know the difference between the container and its contents. There’s two elements in this equation. Discerning their difference gives conceptions and birth to a third—the knower of both the container and its contents. The container for a human being is her instrument—the apparatus of her inner life, just as the cello or the pipe organ has the possibility of conveying a characteristic timbre, modes of musicality, and musical compositions. The container is the instrument playing an endlessly varied polyphony. It is a magnificent instrument, conducting a range of intelligences, an instrument we barely know from the inside, in the way that Pythagoras meant, when he inscribed in the lintel of the entrance to his academy: Know Thyself. The content for a human being comprises the whole spectrum of experience, this endlessly varied and infinitely rich blend of thoughts, sensations, feelings, moving, instinctive, and sexual intelligences that are the media through which all experience is known. It is through this media of the inner life that all apparently outer experiences—all relationships and roles, achievements and thrills, acquisitions and accomplishments—are known. Beyond this, what a person can do or manifest is a resultant of the concerted quality of these blended streams of intelligence, and every deed is imbued and impregnated with the resultant emanations. “Every tree is known by her own fruit.” The knower is both the result and the reconciler of the container and the contained. The knower is invoked when one undertakes to tell the difference. Herein is a paradox—attempting to discern, in the moment of experience, the difference between the instrument and its sound evokes a third part, a knower, or witness; and the presence of the witness itself alters the integrity of the instrument and its voice. Like Pippin, our collective malaise is to seek experience to provide fulfillment, and as an escape from some undesirable experience. Meanwhile experience is the gift given to us in general and in particular to inhabit fully as it is, not in surrender but with a will to inhabit every iota of experience we are given. —Jason Stern


Roy Gumpel

Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note Trunk Sale “What’s the point of trying to please everybody?We can’t fit them in here anyway.” —Rich Reeve, chef and co-owner of Elephant

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ack in the early aughts, Lee Anne and I used to frequent a place for brunch called 23 Broadway. The food was mediocre, but the Bloody Marys were good, the atmosphere was cozy, and it was within walking distance of our house. It wasn’t great, but it was our Sunday place and many a New York Times crossword was worked in its precincts. Then one afternoon, we noticed something had changed at 23 Broadway. The steak and eggs were being served with duck eggs, gloriously rich and vibrantly golden-yellow; there was a thoughtfully curated cheese and charcuterie board; a small selection of tapas suddenly appeared on the menu, hidden on the back of the regular menu. The food tasted phenomenal. Someone who cared deeply about what he or she was doing was now cooking here. After a couple more exceptional meals, I needed to find out who was behind this. So I got up from our table and walked into the kitchen. There, I found a big guy with a shaved head and tattoos on his arms nonplussed to see a diner stroll into his kitchen. I asked him what the hell he thought he was doing, and he told me. That’s how Rich Reeve and I became friends. Fast forward a few years. Joe Concra1, an artist who owned a building Uptown on Wall Street, was in need of a tenant for his ground floor retail space now that the band who had been storing their equipment there, Mercury Rev, was moving out. Joe called his old friend Rich, who had cooked at a couple different restaurants since 23 Broadway2. Joe suggested that Rich, who had never owned his own place, should open a restaurant in his building. Lease terms would be favorable. Now, for those who don’t remember what Uptown Kingston was like in 2006, here’s how I described it in a profile I wrote of Elephant shortly after it opened: “Uptown Kingston is in a bit of a slump. Retail businesses have been especially hard hit, with vacant storefronts sprouting like so many daffodils. The bagel shop closed less than a month after it opened. Hickory BBQ, which took over a prosperous luncheonette from Jane’s Ice Cream, is gone. The billiard hall that opened for a couple weeks in the former Woolworth’s building is a glass mausoleum for two dozen pool tables. The city closed the Chinese restaurant with the 1950s “Chop Suey” sign for code violations. The parking garage at the corner of Wall and North Front Streets—always an eyesore, but a useful place to park—is ringed with a six-foot high chain-link fence and is being torn down.” At the time, life in Kingston was a bit of a bummer, but Joe convinced Rich and his

In 2010, Joe Concra co-founded the O+ Festival, which manifested the city’s creative spirit in a physical way, visually transforming Kingston with enormous and colorful murals painted on the sides of drab brick buildings.

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Lee Anne and I followed Rich around to each new restaurant like a couple of food groupies.

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Too many to name, but one not to be missed: Richie Serringer. RIP.

During its run, Elephant won numerous Best of the Hudson Valley awards, including Best Wine, Best Tapas Bar, and Best Restaurant in Ulster County.

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And that spark kindled a fire that we are still basking in the glow of. It’s worth noting that Elephant was the trailblazer for many now-iconic institutions like Stockade Tavern, Fish & Game, Boitson’s, and Phoenicia Diner, to name a few. Those of us we enjoy the cultural flowering that’s taken place in Kingston in the past decade have a lot to thank Elephant for.

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wife, Maya Karrol, to take a chance. What followed was a restaurant build-out camouflaged as community barn-raising, with friends3 pitching in their expertise—general contracting, electric, plastering, stencil creation, and painting, on a shoestring budget. Observing the building process as it progressed, the sense of shared vision from all involved was evident in the hard work that doubled as earnest play. The DIY, “let’s-puton-a-play” ethos was hardwired into the place. Elephant, a 40-seat eatery, opened to acclaim in 20064. In the kitchen, Rich made a virtue of necessity: Instead of installing a commercial stove and ventilation system, an investment in the tens of thousands of dollars, he planned a tapas menu around his limitations. “One day I sat down and came up with 444 dishes I could do without a stove or a grill,” Rich says. Some of those early dishes—roasted marrow bones, chorizo and chocolate, whipped salt cod crostini, blood sausage dumplings in ginger broth, pork belly and clams, snail toasts, and sautéed beef heart—not only subverted expectations but also compressed big flavors into small dishes with almost magical finesse. Elephant represented a new spark of creativity5 in the city, in the region, and it became a clubhouse of sorts for a cross-section of gourmands, record store employees, writers, yoga instructors, boutique owners, artists, restaurant industry folks from near and far, musicians, and culinary pilgrims from out of town, all grateful in their good fortune—that such a place as Elephant should exist in Kingston. That it should exist at all in a world of bloodless, lowest-common-denominator cooking and renew our faith in food. Elephant wasn’t a place for everybody, as the Yelp reviews will attest6. It was a cult favorite, and being a cult favorite ain’t easy. It wasn’t vegetarian-friendly, but then neither is Spain. If you’re looking for a place for everyone, go to an airport. Or Applebees. Have it your way at Burger King. Well, Elephant exists no more. On March 24, Rich cooked his last order of tacos al pastor7. Maya served the final glasses of Cava. The final song on the record player was “Tonight” by Iggy Pop: “I am going to love her to the end / I will love her until I die / I will see her in the sky, tonight.” Twelve years is a long run for a restaurant, especially one so innovative and expectation subverting. A long run for a joint that never played it safe, lived its ideals, and always played the music loud. If you didn’t like it, you didn’t have to be there. Maybe what bonded us to Elephant was its appeal to the uncompromising, punk rock part of ourselves that we still cling to, despite the day-to-day bullshit that grinds our souls down till we’re all beveled edges and no jagged points. Or maybe the food was some of the most revelatory we’re likely to ever eat. Elephant is dead. Long live Elephant.

One of the most hilarious moments of the 2014 O+ Festival occurred at the Literary Salon, when Rich took the stage to read Elephant’s Yelp reviews, accompanied by Sean Gallagher on accordion. Here’s an excerpt of one Rich read from Nikki B. of Flagstaff, Arizona: “Do NOT go here. There is a full-on lunatic working there! Because I need gluten-free, I asked a few questions about what I could eat that didn’t have gluten. Suddenly, a man who I can only assume is the chef, comes out from the back and starts yelling at me to get out, telling me that I have been yelling at his waiter. Because I asked a few questions! I never raised my voice until he pulled the table out for me and told me to get the F out. I’ve never been more shocked or appalled in my life. I am not a New Yorker, so maybe that’s my problem; I am just not used to this! Everyone should know about this lunatic.”

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Lee Anne and I ate it. The pork belly and pineapple tasted more bittersweet than usual. 4/18 CHRONOGRAM 17


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Mahoney’s Cojones To the Editor: I am concerned about the lack of focus, piss, vinegar, and pizzazz in Brian Mahoney’s recent writings. What was once looked to as a monthly joy which my wife and I read aloud to one another is now a run of the mill letter from the editor. Bring back Mahoney’s cojones.  —Scot Sedey and Kathleen Finn

Extraordinary Flowers, Beautiful Jewelry and Unique Gifts 1204 RT. 213, HIGH FALLS, NY THEGREENCOTTAGE.COM 845-687-4810

Opening Day May 5 New Paltz, NY | huguenotstreet.org

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18 CHRONOGRAM 4/18

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A Call to Work To the Editor: I’ve spent the last 18 months building a business in Stone Ridge—and it’s the most challenging and rewarding endeavor I have ever undertaken. I recently received an email from your publication, informing me my business was mentioned in an article of yours. I was “invited” to share said article on my social media. As I read the article, finding the hyperlink of my name nestled in a paragraph about our Hamlet of Stone Ridge, I noticed an error. I was surprised to learn that I served “specialty blends” in my shop—I pride myself (although not too seriously) on only carrying the highest quality, single-origin, in-season coffees in the region, working with partners locally and from New York City. I have designed the space, my menu, and constructed a customer experience that reflects that intent. I am incredibly grateful for the support my cafe has received and would not be able to do the work I do without their financial and personal support. I have done this for a purpose somewhat divorced from caffeine consumption—I have a vision of cooperative economics and society. I see the decay of our social contract, the displacement of our communities’ most vulnerable, and the consistent, systematic abuse perpetrated by employers and capitalists in our region—(they know exactly who they are, and are closer to the norm than the exception) and it’s no surprise our government and country exemplify such values. Our society has normalized the abuse and the material conditions imposed by American Empire. The error about my cafe did irk me, but there was another feeling I couldn’t shake. What was the intent behind this email blast? This “invitation” to promote a publication, that I knew knew of me but had not made any prior formal contact...I could imagine the strategy. In an era of digitization, social media, cross-referencing, and e-commerce, aggregation is one of the few paths to continued survival for profitmotivated, advertising-supported media. And it’s a strategy that is almost completely useless to someone like me and with my intent. I don’t like being leveraged as filler, plain and simple—though what I like even less are unethical employment practices. Accountability starts at the top, a principle of hierarchy oft forgotten by those quickest to utilize such stratification. Realizing the article was written by someone remotely, that this email was signed by an intern, I made a commitment to not carry/affiliate with Chronogram or purchase advertising with you until I felt confident that you embodied the values necessary to advocate for and publicize our community in a responsible and thoughtful (and equitable) way. While the invitation to write this letter is a concession I did not anticipate and am thankful for, the judgement of our progress must be defined by the material conditions and liberty of the poorest and most confined among us, not by how much business we do or how many people want to buy our ads—or drink our coffees. When my friends can afford to live in the towns they grew up in, and my peers can earn not just a living wage but control of the profits they generate—we can rejoice in our surplus unashamed. Until then, our institutions and communities won’t socialize themselves. We have work to do. —Andrew McCarthy Carthaigh Coffee, Stone Ridge


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

SPONSORED

Turn Off the Gaslight We received the following letter, regarding “Take a Step Back,” a column by Eric Francis Coppolino, to include in the March issue, so we are printing it now. The original article by Eric Francis Coppolino can be found at Chronogram.com. To the Editor: In his column about the #MeToo movement, Eric Francis Coppolino is at worst gaslighting his readers, and at the least condescending to the movement and to woman writ large. He does this by holding himself up as a feminist and leftist who is only interested in the healing of those who have been harmed by sexual harassment and assault, and in systemic change, while he is actually undermining the voices of those most impacted and ignoring their organizing work. He positions himself as a both an authority on the issue, and a confused bystander with earnest concern about the implications (particularly on hypothetical boys and men). He shows and tries to create sympathy for this imaginary young man/ boys potential fear of dating (a common reactionary trope) rather than/ and in opposition to showing true sympathy for those who are coming forward to share their actual experience-based fear of dating (not to mention working, walking, and just existing) and listening and respecting their movement. He tries to make it seem that the issue is not the hostile, violent, current culture of sexism, but rather the imaginary sex-panic world in which women have power and men are scared. This focus also ignores all of the articles, books, and work put out by sex-positive feminists about affirmative consent, and the clear option available to have conscious, and considerate intimate relationships. He says that he won’t just support something that he doesn’t understand, when actually he chooses to “be confused” rather than listen, empathically, to those who are speaking up, to try to understand their reality. He then cherry picks articles written by women that support his positions, to avoid responsibility for expressing the opinions that he clearly has to begin with. He says that he is interested in real systemic change, but ignores the powerful Time’s Up movement and moments for transformative justice, led by survivors and allies, that focus on exactly that. If he is looking for effective organizing models, he could look to the movement that he is disparaging and condescending to find them. —Dana Barnett

EAT. PLAY. STAY. NE WS LE T T E R

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Cosmic Jumper peter max | acrylic on canvas| 1970

Maximum Impact Peter Max at Bethel Woods

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ong before Lisa Frank and her technicolor Trapper Keepers arrived on the scene, Peter Max was revolutionizing the art world with his psychedelic pop imagery, paving the way for the next generation of artists. “Peter Max was one of the first artists to mass market his imagery to the public, making him an international cultural icon,” says Robert Casterline, an art dealer whose collection of Max paintings will be included in an upcoming special exhibit at the Museum at Bethel Woods. Throughout the 1960s and ’70s, Max’s pop art career was both a mirror for the changing cultural tides and a formative force. He rejected the historic exclusivity of the art world and leaned into the commercialization of his images using bright colors and eye-popping designs. “He had his images printed on fondue pots, cups, mugs, clocks, clothing,” Castlerine says. “He was really getting his imagery into the hands of consumers through whatever vehicle was allowed at the time.” “Peter Max: Early Paintings,” is a never-before-seen survey of the artist’s work from the pivotal period between 1967 and 1972, when Max hit his stride creating visionary cosmic works that embodied the spirit of the psychedelic era. The show, which draws from the collections of Casterline and New York City restaurateur Shelly Fireman, focuses on paintings (rare for the artist, who preferred printmaking), with a selection of sculpture, drawings, and vintage fashion (think Peter Max bell bottoms). “Peter Max was the forefather of what most artists are doing today— Banksy, Murakami, Keith Haring,” Casterline says. “He really was at the center of popular iconic imagery, and this is the first time a museum in US is showing his vintage work all together.” As the setting of the historic 1969 Woodstock Festival, Bethel Woods is a fitting venue for a retrospective of the artist whose work personified the summer of love. This special exhibit kicks off the 10th anniversary season of the Museum at Bethel Woods and runs April 7 through December 31. Bethelwoodscenter.org —Marie Doyon 4/18 CHRONOGRAM 19


After spending more than half his life on death row, Doyle Hamm returns there once again after a “gory” and “botched” attempt at lethal injection left him very much alive but with 12 puncture wounds. Hamm’s lawyer argues the state tried to rush through a specialized execution protocol because his health history–which includes having terminal cancer and past intravenous drug use–left his veins severely compromised and less susceptible to the injection. Shortly after the execution was called off, the Alabama Correction Department’s Commissioner stated, “I wouldn’t necessarily characterize what we had tonight as a problem.” Source: Guardian An unlikely nation has been caught ramping up its surveillance capability and carrying out a massive program of domestic spying. Norway built a massive, state-of-the-art surveillance base code named “Victory Garden” and has been working closely with the NSA to spy on Norwegian citizens and their foreign colleagues. The oversight committee that monitors the country’s espionage programs deemed Norway’s searching of its citizens’ communication records to be “legally dubious.” The Victory Garden facility was being pitched to both voters and allies as a necessary asset for Norway’s overseas defense and fight against global terror. Source: Intercept

There was some good news and some bad news for a beloved global fast food chain this month. Kentucky Fried Chicken had quite a dilemma on its hands in late February when its British stores ran out of chicken to sell. This development, which was due to KFC’s parent company, Yum Brands, switching to a new delivery contractor, had KFC lovers across Britain in panic mode, with some even contacting the police about it. On the lighter side, KFC is also introducing a new food innovation that promises to boost profits and benefit the environment: edible coffee cups. The cups will be made out of wafer coated in sugar paper and lined with white chocolate. Source: New York Times According to billionaire Warren Buffett, President Trump’s tax reform bill helped Buffett’s multinational conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway rake in an extra $29 billion in profits this year. The bill, entitled the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,” was passed in December and has begun started taking effect. It has been roundly criticized by Democrats both for eliminating the state and local tax deduction–which is seen as a swipe at bluer and non-Trump voting states–and for cutting the corporate tax and taxes for the richest 1 percent of Americans. Buffett, who has long been an outspoken advocate of progressive taxation, believes it has had its intended effects for billionaires and their companies. Source: Quartz It’s a common perception that gig-economy jobs for companies like Uber or Seamless are generally higher quality than jobs in the service or manufacturing industries, but a new survey of 1,100 ride-sharing drivers is casting doubt on this assumption. A study by MIT’s Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research found that the median pretax income of Uber and Lyft drivers is a meager $3.37, well below the $7.25 federal minimum wage. It also showed that 74 percent make an income that is below their state’s minimum wage, and 30 percent make a net loss when accounting for the fact that they have to pay for their own vehicle expenses. The legality of this low pay may hinge on the fact that drivers for these companies are technically contractors and not employees, and therefore Uber and Lyft are not required to set a rate of pay for drivers. Source: NPR Since Andrew Wakefield, a disgraced former doctor from the United Kingdom and a prominent anti-vaccination activist, arrived in Texas in the early 2000s, the rate at which children aren’t vaccinated for measles, mumps, and rubella has skyrocketed. Wakefield is now delving into politics by backing Susanna Dokupil, a conservative Republican running an anti-vaccination-charged campaign against a moderate Republican state lawmaker who fought to mandate HPV vaccines for foster children. Dokupil’s Houston district houses 2.1 miles of hospitals and research institutions, and a win by her, Wakefield, and their allies would give anti-vaxxers a huge foothold in a state in which they’ve already been making inroads. Source: Guardian 20 CHRONOGRAM 4/18

In order to obtain an EB-1 immigration visa, often referred to as an “Einstein visa,” a candidate for US citizenship through the program must prove they have won a major award—think Nobel Prize, Pulitzer prize, or Olympic medal—or meet three out of ten criteria, such as commercial success in the arts, evidence of an original contribution to a field, or evidence of artistic work being displayed in an exhibition or showcase. It is possible that First Lady Melania Trump may have met those criteria when she applied for, and ultimately obtained an EB-1 visa, as was revealed in February. However, many reporters believe that the First Lady’s resume at the time doesn’t appear to have been strong enough to qualify her for the visa, prompting some to wonder if her husband had a hand in tipping the scales. Source: Star, Washington Post After over a year of investigations, Israeli police say the evidence of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the powerful fourth-term premier, giving political favors in exchange for $280,000 in gifts and other fraud is sufficient for an indictment. Netanyahu has been the nation’s head of government and defacto head of state, serving from 1996 to 1999 and again from 2009 to now, and is seen as the most powerful politician in Israel. This isn’t the first time Netanyahu is facing questions about his lawfulness; he has faced accusations of corruption since as early as 1997. He has been quick to denounce the police as politically motivated, described media coverage of the recommendation as “fake news,” and vowed to not give up without a fight. Source: Washington Post Following Delta Airlines’ decision to end a discount for NRA members as a result of the Parkland school shooting, Georgia lawmakers took punitive measures against the Atlanta-based company by killing a tax exemption for jet fuel that would’ve saved Delta $38 million. If there was any question of whether this was to penalize the airline for breaking with the NRA, the Lieutenant Governor of the state, Casey Cagle, answered it by tweeting, “I will kill any tax legislation that benefits @Delta unless the company changes its position and fully reinstates its relationship with @NRA.” USA Today later determined that only 13 NRA members had taken advantage of the special discount, meaning that “each discount [cost] the airline about $3 million in tax breaks.” Source: USA Today A letter that iconic Indian activist and international peace symbol Mahatma Gandhi wrote to a religious elder in the United States about Jesus Christ went on sale recently in the US for $50,000. In the letter, written in 1926 to Milton Newberry Frantz, an American Christian elder, Gandhi expressed his respect for all faiths and praised Jesus, calling him one of the “greatest teachers of mankind.” It is the only known mention of Jesus by Gandhi, who was an outspoken advocate of Hindu rights in Colonial and post-Colonial India. This is not the first such piece of Gandhi memorabilia to have been priced at a hefty sum. In 2012, soil and grass from the scene of his assassination were sold for $14,000; and in 2013, another letter, a plea for his freedom from imprisonment, sold for $160,000 after being expected to fetch about $14,000. Source: BBC, CNN Compiled by Andrew Solender


GILLIAN FARRELL

Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

GINA, SHE-WOLF OF THE CIA

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emember the special 1970s genre that combined Nazisploitation and sexploitation? Perhaps not, as there was only one film that really nailed it: Ilsa, SheWolf of the SS! Ah, the poster! Visualize Stormy Daniels in a Nazi uniform, blouse unbuttoned to the navel, so it must be only her nipples that keep it from falling fully open, with her hands on her hips and legs spread. Ah, the story! Ilsa is the Kommandant. She performs sadistic experiments on women. She has sex with a new male prisoner every night and when they ejaculate too quickly—as, sigh, they always do—she cuts off their male parts. Back then, we knew what Nazis were and how they were different from us. They had secret camps. They performed “medical experiments” that were actually torture and ended in murder. There was often an aura of sick sexual sadism about it all. Then came 9/11. The Bush administration leapt into action. They set up secret camps. They hired psychologists and doctors to run experiments—“enhanced interrogation,” not torture—specifically conceived to destroy personalities and create helplessness, dependence, and compliance, so that the subjects would reveal all their secrets. These often involved sexual humiliations, amply documented in the prisoner photos from Abu Ghraib. Gina Haspel, Trump’s nominee to head the CIA, ran one of these black sites. She presided over at least one set of “enhanced interrogations.” According to all known reports, it produced zero useful intelligence. Many Americans still want to argue over whether these actions were torture and war crimes. Here’s a simple test. If Iraqis or Iranians or Russians treated captured Americans the same way, what would you call it? Senator Rand Paul stepped up to oppose Haspel. Ah, Rand Paul. He’s special. Even when he’s right, he is factually challenged. He quoted a report that depicted Haspel as taking “joyful glee” in torture, as in a scene from Ilsa. That report existed, but was almost instantly retracted. The important facts were true and they remain. Believe it or not, torture—even of suspected terrorists—is illegal under American law. In 1994, the US “ratified” the UN Convention Against Torture as a “treaty.” Regular treaties are simple agreements between nations that can be executed by the president alone. However, according to Article II, Section 2, of the Constitution, when it’s submitted to the “advice and consent” of the Senate,and is approved by two-thirds of the vote, it becomes a “treaty” as the term is used in Article VI, Section 2.Treaties made by that process “shall be the supreme Law of the Land.” The US helped write the Convention Against Torture. Many members of the Senate hate the idea of giving up even the appearances of sovereignty. Ratification was made contingent on the US passing its own anti-torture laws first. 18 USC §§ 2340, 2340A, made it a crime for a US national or foreigner present in the US to have committed torture outside the US. Torture inside the country was already covered by existing statutes. 18 US Code § 2340A—Torture—is clear and blunt: “Whoever outside the United States commits or attempts to commit torture shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both, and if death results to any person from conduct prohibited by this subsection, shall be punished by death or imprisoned for any term of years or for life.” A person, like Gina Haspel, need not commit hands-on torture. Supervising,

directing, aiding, and abetting, all come under section (c) Conspiracy: “A person  who conspires to commit an  offense  under this section shall be subject to the same penalties (other than the penalty of death).” Then there’s 18 US Code § 2441, the War Crimes Act of 1996. It defines a “war crime” as any “grave breach” of the Geneva Conventions, including torture, cruel or inhuman treatment, and sexual assault or abuse. The penalty is to be “imprisoned for life or any term of years...if death results to the victim... the penalty of death.” From reading the law, it’s very hard to see why Gina was hidden away in a very high CIA rather than put on trial. Unless we return to the defenses that the Nazis tried to use at Nuremberg. First, they claimed that the whole idea was invalid. It was simply the vengeance of the victors and had nothing to do with justice. While America certainly deviated from those standards in practice, it held to them in principle, even prosecuting a few US citizens for war crimes. Until 9/11. The excuse was fear! Antonin Scalia, widely considered to be a “brilliant” Supreme Court justice explained why torture had to be legal! “Jack Bauer saved Los Angeles. He saved hundreds of thousands of lives.” In case anyone doesn’t know Jack, he was a fictional character in the TV show “24.” The “ticking bomb” scenario makes torture seem normal and necessary. It happens in fiction all the time, but there were no real examples for Scalia to call on. For the record, the failure to stop 9/11 was a result of conflicts between the CIA and the FBI, taking place for months, not a failure to torture in a race against time. Torture would only have helped if it had been applied to force US bureaucrats to talk to each other. The next Nazi defense was that they were only following orders. At Nuremberg, the judges said that people had a positive duty—if it was possible— to refuse orders that were common crimes or crimes against humanity. For decades afterward, “I vas only following or-ders!” became a ubiquitous tag-line and gag line. Conversely, the Nuremberg Principles became the actual standard of the American military and, to a lesser degree, to the intelligence services, which demanded that their missions meet legal rules. If the Bush Administration wanted torture, they had to find lawyers who would come up with arguments that would convince CIA operators and military personnel that it was legal. The theory they came up with was that while the president was in his “commander-in-chief ” role, his orders trumped any law or rule. Anything done at his behest was an extension of his legality. The Nazi defense, “I vas only following or-ders!” was now made valid. Adolf Eichmann’s conviction should have been reversed posthumously. How much was Gina like Ilsa? There were tapes of the tortures but she had them locked away, then participated in having them destroyed. To the conventional mind, that would appear to be obstruction of justice. Gina has her defenders. Some on the left. Some who are very reputable people. They depict her as being very competent, thorough, and professional. But no one ever accused the Nazis of being sloppy, inept, and amateurish. They were accused of war crimes. An apology: In my last column I wrote, “A 2.9% improvement in wages averages out as just 9¢ (nine cents)  an hour.” That was an error. The 2.9% referred to annual growth,  9¢ an hour referred to  growth in just the month of January 2018. Thanks to Brad Kendall for pointing out the error. 4/18 CHRONOGRAM 21


Feature

A QUESTION OF FORCE

POLICING THE HUDSON VALLEY Text and photos by Hillary Harvey

In March 2012, Newburgh police officers shot 22-yearold Michael Lembhard nine times in his family’s living room. Lembhard was wanted for not reporting to court on a domestic violence charge, and when they went to apprehended him, police said he lunged at them with a kitchen knife. Michael Sussman, the family’s lawyer, said 20 shots were fired. Bullet holes were found in the walls, floor, and sofa.

Lembhard was one of six men killed by Newburgh police between 2006 and 2012, and the deaths sparked a series of protests in the city. Crying, Cherry Lembhard interrupted a press conference to accuse Police Chief Michael Ferrara and the NPD of murdering her brother; during meetings, angry relatives and friends demanded outside investigators. A grand jury cleared the officers of any wrongdoing in the death of Lembhard, and the Newburgh City Council narrowly approved an $81,378 settlement for the family in 2016. Between 2003 and 2009, more than 4,800 deaths were reported to the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Arrest-Related Deaths program. Of those, 61 percent were classified as homicide by law enforcement personnel. The small cities and towns of the Hudson Valley are not immune to problems of excessive use of force by law enforcement. Some communities are, in certain respects, a window into the national issue. Through conversations sparked by the Black Lives Matter movement, and concern around the Trump administration’s support for policing tactics that target immigrants and communities of color, the issue is being pushed to what many hope will be a tipping point. Discussions of policing often reveal deep divisions between civilians and law enforcement, especially in communities of color. Community activists point to racial profiling police practices and news blotter reporting in the media, which both disproportionately target and present people of color as being inherently threatening. For law enforcement advocates, the dangers of being first responders causes intense stress and ill health effects. Around 2006, Newburgh led the state in violent crimes per capita, and gang violence was the culprit for all but two or three of the city’s 16 homicides. According to a 2010 New York Times article, “By law enforcement estimates, gang members with national affiliations outnumber the city’s police by a ratio of three to one, not counting the hundreds of young people in homegrown groups.” Fear was rampant among police officers and residents. 22 FEATURE CHRONOGRAM 4/18

FOILed Again Omari Shakur  now lives in the apartment where Michael  Lembhard  was killed. Sixty-two years old, he’s father to 12, grandfather to 28, with one great-grandchild and one on the way. He’s lived in Newburgh his whole life. An activist with the Nu-Poets, Shakur began to question and film police officers during arrests that he witnessed, which resulted in Shakur’s own arrest three times. Shakur fought those charges and was ultimately found not guilty, but he believes there was retaliation for his criticism of police. In October 2006, 14 days after Shakur filed federal suits against the department for those arrests, his 23-year-old son was shot in the back of the head by a City of Newburgh police officer during what police described to the press as a shootout. “Over the past few years, our nation has seen tragic cases, captured on video by bystanders and police, but this has been going on for years,” says Shannon Wong, the Lower Hudson Valley chapter director of the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), a state affiliate of the ACLU, which has a history of monitoring and receiving police complaints and working on criminal justice reform. “The reality is that communities of color have historically been oppressed by police departments.” In a 2017 study, the NYCLU asked New York police departments for information on their policies, trainings on cultural competency, language access, and de-escalation techniques, all of which must be disclosed in response to a FOIL (Freedom of Information Law) request. The three Hudson Valley municipalities examined—Newburgh,White Plains, and Mount Vernon—did not respond to the FOIL request within the legal deadline. Newburgh took 23 months from the initial request to complete it, and then the NYCLU received heavily redacted documents, which they ultimately deciphered as irrelevant to their request. The NYCLU wants to see the Police Statistics and Transparency (STAT)


Fabian Marshall with his mother, Liz Baker, at Broadway Arts in Kingston. Marshall was tased multiple times in 2016 in an altercation with police after a case of mistaken identity.

Act passed. STAT requires uniform data collection and reporting on arrests and deaths in custody, including the race, ethnicity, age, and gender of people who are charged with violations and misdemeanors, plus reporting on the geographic location of enforcement activity. According to Wong, STAT is unlikely to pass anytime soon. “It looks like, statewide, there is momentum on bail reform, which will mean, for now, police transparency is not on the top of everyone’s mind,” Wong says. Newburgh’s Rise On the sixth anniversary of Lembhard’s death, the annual memorial held by the community—a balloon release at Washington’s Headquarters—was postponed because of a snowstorm. The week before, Shakur had been honored by the NAACP.The week after, he was honored by Newburgh’s City Council. But that week, he attended the funeral of Lembhard’s father, who had been in a mostly vegetative state since his son’s death. “That could have been me,” Shakur sighs. “Lemdhard lost his will to live when he lost his son.” Shakur always carries voter registration paperwork on a clipboard, in the hopes of raising Newburgh’s voter turnout rate. He estimates he’s helped over 3,000 people register. That’s one reason people say Shakur is the unofficial Mayor of Newburgh. In fact, Shakur has run for both mayor in 2011 and Orange County Legislature in 2017, with narrow losses. Shakur grew up going to City Council meetings with his mother, a former Black Panther. When his son was killed, he thought, “If it’s a choice between vengeance or justice, I want justice.” Newburgh’s police chief retired in 2013, and the city has been without one since. Shakur worked to create a relationship with Acting Chief Daniel Cameron. They had each other’s cell phone numbers, and Shakur says they had an understanding that they wanted to work together to solve issues of

gang violence, drugs, and police shootings. When he ran for mayor, Shakur’s platform was for increased job training and employment opportunities for young people. Shakur thinks that rather than putting people in jail for $70,000 a year, Newburgh should give them jobs. “Somehow, we have turned Newburgh into a warehouse for the prison system,” Shakur says. “We gotta take the business out of poverty.” But Shakur is optimistic. He says that as a result of the misery and violence that’s happened, the city has become closer. “Newburgh’s at a turning point right now. We’re trying to rise, we’ve just got a couple things to put in place.” Like getting a permanent police chief. In February, Doug Solomon was sworn in as Newburgh’s provisional police chief, pending an upcoming exam. Solomon has said he wants to build on the city’s initiatives—the Group Violence Intervention program and the Youth Police Academy. A Tasing in Kingston Growing up, Fabian Marshall split his time between Woodstock and Kingston. In 2015, he was living in Midtown, near his mother’s art gallery, Broadway Arts. He wanted to be part of the rap scene and near his girlfriend, and he was working at a restaurant. According to Marshall, he sometimes gets stopped by the police when they are looking for a black suspect. “In Woodstock, there were like a total of five black people,” Marshall says, so he could understand why he, one of the only black people, was frequently questioned during police investigations. Usually, a conversation would clear up his involvement or lack thereof. One day in Kingston, while waiting for a ride to work, he was approached by Police Officer Jeremy Arciello, who was investigating an argument that happened earlier that day when a black man in red shorts pushed someone off a bicycle. By the end of their interaction, Marshall was handcuffed, tased 4/18 CHRONOGRAM FEATURE 23


when any use of force is deployed by KPD, it’s automatically investigated by the Police Commission. (Kingston is one of the only cities in the Hudson Valley with one.) The board of four civilians and the mayor has regulatory authority and the ability to make policy. One policy the Police Cosmmission and mayor are interested in passing is the Right to Know Act (RTKA)—an NYCLU initiative to train officers to introduce themselves, end stops that don’t end in arrest with a business card, and ultimately allow civilians to ask officers questions during a stop. A draft of the resolution based on Albany’s model is making its way through the Kingston Police Commission and Common Council this month. Albany was the first municipality in the state to pass an RTKA, and Noble hopes Kingston will be the second. This year, racial justice activists have begun to file complaints on older incidents in an effort to raise awareness about the KPD’s use of force and to advocate for increased transparency in the Police Commission’s processes. They’re frustrated with the practice of reviewing complaints in executive session. Because of Section 50-A of state civil service law, the identity of civil service workers, like police officers, is protected during any job performance review. That’s currently being challenged through litigation by the NYCLU because it prevents disciplinary actions and the identity of abusive officers from being publicly available. Effectively, it also means that citizens who make complaints feel harassed and targeted through the process. During Marshall’s complaint, he was taken into a conference room without his lawyer, with one witness and two advocates, and questioned by the City of Kingston’s lawyer and the Police Commissioners. Marshall says making his complaint was a hopeful gesture. For the past three years, Marshall has gone to court dates, trial, paid legal fees, and is now appealing a conviction of obstruction of governmental administration. He lost his job, was fingerprinted and swabbed for DNA, and has to do a year of what’s akin to probation. “Now I’m in the system,” Marshall says. At the time of this story’s writing, Kingston was awaiting the Police Commission’s decision on Marshall’s complaint, to either find the use of force against Marshall justified or to recommend the officer receive disciplinary action. Marshall hopes for the latter and says, “I need a win somewhere here.” Omari Shakur, whose 23-year-old son was shot and killed by police in Newburgh in 2006. Shakur has run for mayor and carries voter registration paperwork with him at all times.

multiple times, and arrested. In a video from Marshall’s cellphone and KPD-released dashcam footage, which was edited together by Citizen Action of the Hudson Valley, Officer Arciello is seen accusing Marshall as he approaches him. The situation escalates quickly when Marshall asks for clarification of what Arciello is investigating. When Marshall starts to film their interaction on the phone he’s holding, Arciello handcuffs him and is seen smashing the phone into the pavement. It keeps recording Marshall’s screams as he is tased, by Citizen Action’s count, 21 times. Marshall wasn’t counting, but he says he had at least 16 taser holes in his legs afterward. At the end of the video, officers are heard telling each other to get rid of the phone, and the incident prompted a question from community members: Even if he had pushed someone off a bicycle (which Marshall was cleared of any involvement in), is multiple tasing warranted? New York State has a three-tase limit, but officers have the discretion to go over that limit and use whatever other tools are necessary to gain compliance. New in Kingston this year is the acquisition of bodycams.Though the city is still determining logistics of collecting and reviewing all the video collected, each shift supervisor will be required to randomly audit patrol footage. According to the website of Campaign ZERO, a police reform campaign proposed by activists associated with Black Lives Matter, “Police usually investigate and decide what, if any, consequences their fellow officers should face in cases of police misconduct. Under this system, fewer than 1 in every 12 complaints of police misconduct nationwide results in some kind of disciplinary action against the officer(s) responsible.” A new policy put in place by Kingston’s Mayor Steve Noble says that, now, 24 FEATURE CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Building Trust Over the past three years, there have been 12 police forums in the City of Kingston, where Chief Egidio Tinti and two different mayors sat down with the community to discuss policing issues. One of the issues often discussed is the length of time it takes to review complaints and video evidence. At a forum in November, the reason given was that people’s jobs were on the line. A mother retorted, “My son’s life is on the line.” “In order to have community, we need to be able to have dialogue,” says Mayor Noble. “In the end, we have to start to trust each other. And I think building trust is hard.” Part of that effort is to bolster community policing— the practice of fostering connection between police and the community. Chief Tinti says that over the years, police have gotten away from the walking beat because of an increased call volume. Kingston receives 26,000 calls for service each year. KPD also developed a COP (community-oriented policing) position, where one unit each shift is on foot or bicycle, and also attends community events. But at the last two policing forums, members of the black community invited KPD to the local community centers for kids’ activities because they haven’t seen COP units there. “I don’t think there’s any apprehension on discussing the hard topics,” says Chief Tinti. “Whether it’s body cameras, transparency, accountability, or the use of force that the officers are trained in, the discussion of implicit bias and racism in law enforcement—I think those are all good topics that we need to have hard talks about. At this point, whether or not there’s trust across the table, I think there are lines of communication that are open now that weren’t open before.” As for Marshall, he doesn’t visit Kingston very often anymore. He moved to Catskill where he finds it peaceful. He likes to swim and hike. “The community isn’t trained in how to deal with a hostile police officer coming up to you,” Marshall says. “It’s not all police officers, but you can’t make an excuse for one; all of them have to be accountable.”


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Art of Business PROFILES OF OUR ADVERTISING PARTNERS

The small businesses of the Hudson Valley are the engine of our local living economy. These enterprises are of a different type than national and global business brands. They are owned and run by our friends, neighbors, and fellow participants in the community. Rather than being siphoned off to Wall Street, the money these businesses take in is immediately circulated back into the local economy, a natural reinvestment in the commons. This Art of Business section in Chronogram is to introduce the founders and creators, and tell the inspiring and instructive backstories of these local businesses.

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MIKEL HUNTER

HIGH TEA

When she saw her sister taking hemp extract to treat chemotherapy side effects, a light bulb went off in Miriam Novalle’s head. Hemp extract provides medicinal benefits such as relief from inflammation, pain, and anxiety, without the psychoactive effects of herbal remedies like medical marijuana. (Hemp is currently being studied as a potential treatment for arthritis, diabetes, MS, chronic pain, schizophrenia, PTSD, and epilepsy, among other ailments.) As an entrepreneur with a background in blended teas and perfume, Novalle was well-positioned to take advantage of what she saw as the impending hemp extract boom. “This is the green rush,” she says. Since 1992, Novalle has run T Salon, an organic, and sustainable tea company with 650 gourmet blends, and she saw the opening for a line of hemp-extract teas. “I took 14 of my Wellness teas and blended them with organic, full-spectrum hemp extract.” The result is the cleverly named High Tea company, which makes bottled cold-brew teas and tea bags, which are blended, packed, and shipped out of Kingston. Novalle’s herbal and caffeinated varieties like Queen of Earl, Healing Heaven, Before and After Yoga, and Detox are available at several Woodstock retailers and online. Novalle is also working on a line of hemp extract cookies, chocolates, ice cream, and bath salts. “Hemp extract is what fish oil was, or what Vitamin C was in the ’70s,” Novalle says. “You’re looking at the beginning of something so big and extraordinary, it’s going to be life-changing.” Hightea.today 26 ART OF BUSINESS CHRONOGRAM 4/18

“I believe in defining your own silhouette through fashion,” says Mikel Hunter, owner of the eponymous fine art and clothing boutique on Warren Street in Hudson. Throughout a 25-year career as a fashion stylist and art director in New York City, Hunter developed his brand in a boutique on Martha’s Vineyard, curating a tight selection of high-end, artisanal products and limited-edition collaborations with designers, all the while fighting the Lilly Pulitzer undertow. “For me every artist and artisan has a story to tell, and my boutique starts a conversation with clients eager to hear their tale,” Hunter says. His Hudson location opened in November 2017; the 2,000-square-foot space includes men’s, women’s, and gender-fluid fashion. “At least 65 percent of my stuff is unisex. Savvy people can interchange pieces and make them work,” he says. An advocate of self-expression through fashion, Hunter prides himself on the quality of his products and delights in expanding his customers’ awareness. “So much of what I do is education, really letting people look at workmanship and the details.” he says. “That is a huge part of my passion.” While fashion is at the forefront, Hunter’s shop also features work by handpicked contemporary artists like Robert Szot and Terry Rodgers. And he has plans to turn his curator’s eye to home goods in the near future, stocking a selection of exquisitely crafted products like murano glass and Patch NYC quilts. Instagram: Mikel_hunter

ROCKET NUMBER NINE RECORDS

Over his 22-year career at Sony Music, Doug Wygal had a front-row seat for trends in the industry. The writing on the wall was clear: Vinyl would make a comeback. As a lifelong musician with a history in record retail, Wygal welcomed this news. “I always wanted to have a record store of my own. Ten years ago, I saw licensing and manufacturing of vinyl picking up,” he says. So in 2014, he took the leap and purchased Wright Gallery Records in Uptown Kingston. After a month of renovations, he reopened as Rocket Number Nine Records. “I have a lot of people that come in weekly, and a handful that come in daily because I am constantly looking for records and updating the selection,” Wygal says. “It’s always a challenge to keep used inventory fresh and bring in new titles, but I do it every day.” While he does go to record shows and flea markets, Wygal primarily buys from individuals. “I really believe in being fair as a buyer and paying people what records are worth.” Rocket Number Nine sells every format across all genres from soul to psychedelic to classical, from $1 up. “You never know what will turn up, so record stores become a meeting place for like-minded people looking for that next thing. Being a collector myself, finding a great record is like hitting gold. I can’t wait to get it back to the store.” Facebook.com/rocketnumberninerecords


N&S SUPPLY

What began as a Depression-era pawn shop in Fishkill called “Lou’s New and Used,” evolved and expanded over the next 80 years to become N&S Supply. With seven locations throughout the Hudson Valley and Connecticut, N&S is now one of the region’s premier plumbing and HVAC supply companies. “Even though the company has changed and grown, we have always kept our roots in the community,” says Jessi Lowry, a showroom representative and marketing assistant. “That drives everything we do—from where we advertise to the products we carry to people we hire.” The family-owned business caters both to industry professionals, with their service parts counters, and to homeowners, with their kitchen and bath showrooms in Fishkill, Brewster, Kingston, and Catskill. “What helps us in competition with box stores is our professional advice and assistance. A lot of people want to make sure they don’t have the same problems again. They want to know what a product’s warranty is, what to do if a part is missing, or if their faucet leaks again,” says Lowry. “We’re not going anywhere, we’ll be here to help you in another 80 years.” In the Fishkill showroom, the salespeople boast a combined 150 years of experience in the industry. Whether you’re a contractor or a homeowner in need of a water heater, bathroom vanity, or a boiler, N&S Supply has everything you need for your next heating, cooling, or plumbing project. Nssupply.com

PS21

For the past 12 years, appreciators of the arts have flocked to the foothills of the Berkshires to see world-class performances of dance, music, and theater in PS21’s open-air saddlespan tent. The breeze, birdsong, and surrounding apple orchards made it a picturesque setting, but the tent presented its own production hurdles and limitations. This spring marks the launch of PS21’s 13th season and the grand opening of their new state-of-the-art black box theater. The facility took two years to construct and houses 99 seats. “The enclosed space means you can create a greater sense of intimacy with fewer distractions, which will really allow us to try out a new quality of programming, including smaller pieces and experimental works,” says Susan Davies, administrative director at PS21. “The theater offers a whole different level of control over theatrical environment than openair.” State-of-the-art LED lighting, a sophisticated sound system, and a flexible floorplan are just a few of the improved features the new facility offers. And PS21 is not forsaking its connection to the outdoors; in summer, the east wall of the theater will slide open and the black box will transform into the proscenium stage for the 300-seat open-air pavilion theater. The spring season will feature a mix of dance and theater with timely themes including gun control and women’s rights. The black box theater opens April 14 with a performance by Caleb Teicher and Nic Gareiss, and the pavilion theater opens June 30. PS21chatham.org

OUT OF THE CLOSET

Lucille Martin has always had a knack for finding statement pieces. “I just loved vintage clothes and the process of finding them. Everyone was always asking me where I got my clothes,” Martin says, who came of age before vintage was a widespread trend. “At some point, I realized I didn’t just have to buy something that fit me, I could buy for a friend.” What began as a hobby morphed into a 40-year career in vintage fashion, throughout which Martin collected, sold, and styled. For a period, she ran a fashion photography studio called Photo Op with a large cyclorama wall. “We did covers for all different magazines— Vogue, Japanese Vogue, Self magazine, US,” Martin says. The second floor of the studio housed over 5,000 garments that she used to style photo shoots and rented for films and productions. She also had a 25-year stint running a high-end vintage boutique in the Hamptons. Two years ago, she decided to return to the Catskills, where she’s always had a home, bringing enough inventory with her to fill a retail space in Tannersville. Though Martin favors the Victorian and Edwardian fashions of the 1920s and ’30s, she stocks a full range of apparel and accessories. “I have pretty much every year. I have a lot of funky stuff, military stuff, t-shirts, denim—tons of Levi’s from the ’60s and ’70s,” she says. “I like when people find what they like. That’s what it’s all about—the hunt.” Facebook.com/OutofClosetVintage/

FOR MORE PROFILES OF INSPIRING LOCAL BUSINESSES VISIT CHRONOGRAM.COM/ARTOFBUSINESS 4/18 CHRONOGRAM ART OF BUSINESS 27


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The House

Marko and Motria Shuhan’s 2,800-square-foot home was built over the course of 20 years. To the right lies their original FirstDay kit home; to the left is the new timber frame construction completed in 2017. Stone mason Kim Spurlock built the adjacent back patio and arbor.

The House That Marko Built

TWO ARTISTS BUILD A HOME, AND A COMMUNITY, IN ACCORD

I

by Mary Angeles Armstrong photos by Deborah DeGraffenreid

t all started with a chainsaw. Artist Marko Shuhan was working at a tie-dye shop in Rosendale when a coworker gifted him a book he’d picked up at a yard sale. The book was Chainsaw Milling, and along with the present the friend offered a simple, offhand suggestion: “You could do this.” Marko was intrigued. With his wife, Motria, he had already built a house: The first FirstDay Cottage kit home to be erected in the Hudson Valley, on six secluded, wild acres they had bought in the ’90s. FirstDay Cottage houses are designed to be built by almost anyone, and the couple had handily mastered a two-story, two-bedroom, single-bath home in under a year. However, with two young sons growing up as fast as saplings, they realized they’d eventually require a bit more than the house’s original 1,200 square feet of space, so they’d been thinking about some sort of addition. Marko admits to being an ambitious guy: “I like to conquer things,” he explains. So, when another friend, the local contractor Charles Blumstein, came by to help with some repairs, the two men got to talking. That’s when Blumstein made his own suggestion: Marko should build his own timber-frame house. Blumstein even drew out some plans on a napkin. Marko says he knew the process would be hard, but he wanted to heed the call to adventure that DIY timber framing promised because the experience would be “really cool. And it was,” he adds, “but it was also 20 times harder than I ever imagined.” Marko and Motria Shuhan in their living room. Marko Shuhan received help and moral support from a wide range of friends and neighbors while building his home. He credits his wife Motria above all. “She was gracious through the whole thing,” Marko says. “Without her grace and support, I would have fallen apart.”

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The Shuhans gather in their dining room with some of the friends who helped in their home-building odyssey. From left to right: Zen Bilewycz, who helped with the electrical and carpentry; Alicia Tyree, who helped with the building; Tom, a friend and neighbor; Zali Win, all-around excellent house building helper, donator of trees, friend, and neighbor; Larry Jackson, allaround excellent house building helper and friend; and Marko Shuhan.

Throughout the home, Shuhan’s abstract oil paintings are on display. A Morso Danish wood-burning stove, refurbished by friend Alex Queen, efficiently heats most of the home. Shuhan salvaged a chalkboard from a Catholic school in Yonkers, repurposing it as baseboard and framing for the wood stove.

The home’s south-facing kitchen is aligned perfectly with the solstice—the sun rises in the kitchen window at 6am each June 21st.

In 2002 Marko bought an Alaskan mill tool.With two rails attached to the bar of the small chainsaw blade, it allowed a solo woodworker to trek into the woods, or set up in the backyard, and cut entire tree trunks down to size. The first logs Marko milled came from a property on Pine Tree Lane off Route 209, where friends were building another FirstDay cottage.Through trial and error, and with the determination of a budding craftsman, Marko learned to make level cuts, measure right edges, and miter corners. Eventually, he transformed that original donation of hemlock into 40 planks and himself into a bona fide sawyer. “I milled the first few beams and I just fell in love with the process,” he remembers. That was the beginning of Marko’s 15-year odyssey and rite of passage— as interesting as it was difficult—which eventually resulted in an expanded, 1,600-square-foot, barn-style home with an elegant, earthy aesthetic, built from a mosaic of hardwoods and hard work, all of it bound together by 10-inch oak pegs, mortise, tenon, and community ties. “Every plank has its story,” he says. And he remembers each one.

Shared Roots, Shared Roofs The DIY instinct for home building runs in Marko and Motria Shuhan’s bloodstreams. Both children of Ukrainian immigrants who came to New York in the aftermath of World War II, the couple spent their childhood summers in a tightly knit Ukrainian community in Sullivan County. “Our parents knew each other before we were born,” Motria explains. “They held onto their connections very tightly. Preserving their native language and culture and their strong community ties was imperative because it was being annihilated back home.” The community’s proclivity to rely on each other for shelter extended beyond the spiritual and emotional senses to include the creation of actual physical shelters as well. “They were a community of people who helped each other build their homes,” Marko says. As each family’s home went up, they would stay with their neighbors during construction and then help others out in turn.

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The upstairs master bedroom. The home’s timber frame is displayed throughout the house. The home’s interior was designed “like an envelope” with the framing on the inside, the plaster walls on the outside and then the home’s insulation comprising the exterior of the structure. Shuhan is still completing the handmade plugs to finish the wooden floorboards.

“It was a case of ‘I’ll help you put your roof on, then you help me put my roof on,’” says Motria, whose grandfather and father both built cottages in the woods of Sullivan County. Marko’s family had done the same thing in Pennsylvania. “I think that part of it was this question: ‘Are we going to just survive or are we going to really live again?’” says Marko. “They came together to learn to recreate and blossom—to really come back to life. They bonded over working together and helping each other out.” At the back of their minds, the Shuhans knew that not only could they build a house, but also how to go about it. “I guess it was in there, like good compost,” says Motria. “Come on, Marko, with courage” In 2005, with friends standing by for moral support, Marko began building. After hiring professionals to dig the basement and lay the concrete foundation, he placed the first post—an oak which had been standing dead on a friend’s property in the hamlet of Vly— and made the first cut. Over the course of the next year, more and more friends pitched in, helping to place two more foundational posts—also oaks, donated from another friend in Ulster Heights— and then to lay those first 40 hemlock planks, creating the ground floor. Season by season, and tree by tree by tree, resources trickled in and Marko was able to complete new sections of the home; all the while working full-time and taking part-time gigs to help cover expenses. Friends from throughout the Hudson Valley called whenever they had logs available. There came a hickory from New Paltz, a black walnut from Bard College, a butternut from Stone Ridge, and then an ash from the banks of the Hudson River. A birch was brought from Kerhonkson, and a spalted maple was donated by the Vivekananda Retreat on Leggett Road in Stone Ridge. The Shuhans’ neighbor, Zali Win, donated a strand of pines, and Marko saved a 300-year-old chestnut from becoming firewood.

The couple’s younger son Omelyan has the home’s second upstairs bedroom.

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The home’s original basement now serves as a sort of mancave for Marko. Heated by radiant floor heating, the space is decorated with some of his work and memorabilia and also serves as the “final resting place” for his extensive record selection.

As Marko’s collection of hardwoods grew, his skills as a sawyer expanded. He hired C. J. Greene of Ulster Sawing, who utilized a hydraulic Wood-Mizer, which speeded up milling time considerably. Builder Robert Blumstein stepped in to help calculate the finer points of the architecture, and the house’s framing was completed in 2009. In 2010, Marko sold his truck to hire Blumstein to complete the metal roof. The Spaces Between Meanwhile, Motria was nurturing a different kind of seed. Having trained in childhood as a ballet dancer, she worked a variety of jobs until the couple’s two sons, Ihor and Omelyan, were born. Through a chance encounter, she discovered Waldorf-style education and enrolled her sons in a home-based Waldorf program. They eventually moved to the Mountain Laurel Waldorf School in New Paltz, where Motria began volunteering in the classroom. “It really just called to me,” she explains. “I just went with it.” The experience was life changing, she says, setting her on a new path of both self-development and self-discovery. Motria enrolled in a Waldorf teacher-training program at the Sunbridge Institute, and eventually became a kindergarten teacher at Mountain Laurel. In 2011, she began her own kindergarten program, the Acorn School, in Accord. Starting with eight children in a summer camp, the program has grown every year, and is now year-round with 30 students and five teachers. Motria believes her success comes down to cultivating a strong relationship between teacher and student. “What’s happening in the space between us is essential,” she explains. “It has been humbling to be in front of these small children who are on their destiny path. In the end, I get much more out of it that I can ever possibly give.” 34 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Community of Angels Meanwhile, Marko’s home-building journey was lonely and difficult at times. Right after the basement was completed, an early winter storm came, filling the space with snow and ice—a harbinger of difficulties to come. Every step provided a new lesson in all that could, and would, go wrong. “When tarps are blowing, or things are covered in ice, or you injure yourself and you fall off a ladder—it all seems impossible,” Marko says. “There were times I just couldn’t see the end.” But the generosity and support of friends both old and new proved to be as perennial as springtime greening. Friends came to sand beams and hoist rafters into place. They lent their time, gantries, chain posts, heavy-duty vehicles, and expertise. There were many corresponding potlucks and barbecues. (“I did spend some money on fine beer and wine,” Shuhan admits.) At the end of 2016, the couple was able to tear down a wall separating the ground floor of their original FirstDay cottage from the new house Marko had built next door. That New Year’s Eve they held their first gathering in the new space. Since then, they’ve been settling in. The beige plaster walls of the downstairs open living-dining-kitchen area are the ideal backdrop for Marko’s large abstract paintings. Upstairs, a new master suite includes a walk-in closet and tiled bathroom. The couple’s younger son has the second bedroom upstairs. Their older son has converted the original two bedrooms of the FirstDay cottage into a semi-autonomous apartment. Meanwhile, Marko’s great work continues: He is readying planks for a screened-in porch with French doors and planning to replace some of the pine stair treads with maple. He also wants to make new kitchen cabinets. “I have this joke about the whole process,” he says. “I run into people after 10 years of building, or even now, and they always ask, ‘You’re still doing that!?’ and I say, ‘Yeah, I’m still doing it.’ Then they say, ‘Call me, I’ll help you.’ ‘Great!’ I answer. ‘Come on over!’”


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rom the river that gives the region its name to the serpentine network of creeks, brooks, ponds, and lakes that dot the map, water features are a defining characteristic of the Hudson Valley’s lush landscape. Driving upstate, it seems that around every bend there is a winding creek or an expansive reservoir that leaves you in breathless awe. These tranquil bodies of water are the cornerstone of the region’s wilderness and unspoiled beauty, providing habitat to a diverse mix of plants and animals. The wealth of water features throughout the region also provides endless opportunities for recreation—tubing and rafting excursions, canoe and kayak paddles, fishing trips, boating outings, and plain old swimming—you name it, you can do it all in the upstate waters. But our connection to water runs deeper than simple recreation. There’s a primordial pull that draws us to it. “People have this fascination with water—whether it’s a flowing river, the oceanfront, or a pond, they just want to be near it,” says Harris Safier of Westwood Metes & Bounds Realty. Humans seek out water for its beauty, but it also holds an elemental magnetism. Water is the basis of all life, and a connection to its source quenches a deep primal need in us. We’ve selected a handful of gorgeous waterfront properties that will nurture your soul and feed your appetite for beauty. Westwoodrealty.com

36 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Witten Pond, with its three residences, spring-fed pond, and countless vistas, blends wild mountain rusticity with urban minimalist modernity. When the art collector who owns the 17-acre property first discovered Witten Pond as a summer rental 40 years ago, there was only one livable structure, a hunting-and-fishing lodge built in 1920. The 1920 house is decidedly Adirondack, with a wraparound porch, twig banisters, river-stone fireplace, and hardwood floors on both levels. The collector resided part-time in this space until the mid-1990s, when he began constructing a larger principal house out of the circa-1835 post-and-beam barn. The main house is a stunner, anchored by a great room with a cathedral ceiling and a wall of windows facing the pond. A gatehouse offers guest accommodation and includes a fireplace, spiral staircase, kitchen, and upstairs loft. The three residences plus a Scandinavian wood-fired sauna are all situated around the pond, which features a waterside stone patio perfect for leisurely gatherings. While each structure at Witten Pond is singular in its design, the entirety of the property stands as the creative realization of an integrated artistic vision at the foot of the historic Catskills. Broker: Hayes Clement


Above: 645 County Route 2, Accord. $1,400,000 Pond or pool, you can have it your way with this stunning property in the historic hamlet of Lyonsville. Behind an antique wrought iron gate lies the 18th-century estate of the hamlet’s namesake: John Lyons. The expansive and well-manicured seven-acre property features mature ornamentals, a large pond with Monet-caliber water lilies, and a gunite pool with an adjoining jacuzzi. A tasteful renovation of the three-story stone house has maintained the best of the historic charm while incorporating a modern sensibility, creating a comfortable and elegant environment. The original fireplaces, chestnut beams, and wide-board flooring are paired with an open-plan layout and updated kitchen with new appliances and stone countertops. Outbuildings include a two-car garage with a guest suite upstairs, a chicken coop, and a deluxe pool house, complete with an outdoor kitchen, washer and dryer, and changing rooms. This secluded paradise is waterfront luxury at its finest. Broker: Amy Levine

Right: 98 Floyd Ackert Road, West Park. $895,000 Calling all lovers of the Hudson River with a dream. This distinctive riverfront property has amazing bones but needs refinishing from the inside out. The nine-acre lot is nestled between Route 9W and the Hudson River, offering a rare blend of total privacy, river frontage, and easy access to shopping and restaurants in both Kingston and New Paltz. With steel I-beams and concrete walls, the existing structure offers a remarkably solid basis to work from; plus, a driveway, electric, two wells and a septic system are already in place. The rest of the vision is up to you. Investors, take note—this property has the potential for subdivision, yielding multiple parcels with riverfront views. Broker: Amy Levine

Opposite bottom left: 476 Old Route 209, Hurley. $895,000 Situate yourself in history. This 1663 Dutch Colonial, built only two years after the first settlers arrived in Hurley, was one of Ulster County’s earliest homes. The house features five en-suite bedrooms, a gracious living room, formal dining room, eat-in country kitchen, library, and den. The house is teaming with authentic details—patinaed wideplank flooring, Dutch doors with hand-forged hardware, and vintage built-ins. Located in the famously fertile Hurley flats with ample frontage on the Esopus Creek, this property is a fecund wonderland for vegetable and flower growers alike, so bring your gardening gloves. An insider’s heads up: Every year in July, Hurley homeowners throw open the doors to their historic homes and welcome the public for guided tours on Stone House Day. Broker: Jeff Serouya

4/18 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 37


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ack in the heyday of the Borscht Belt, families from downstate would head to the Catskills for summers spent in idyllic resorts. These days, folks are still coming to the Catskills, but instead of staying in all-inclusive resorts, they’re sleeping under the stars in tents and cooking meals over an open flame. In fact, tourists visiting New York State spent $65 billion in 2016. If you’re a landowner in the Hudson Valley or Catskills, you can get in on that action by becoming a Campkeeper with Tentrr. The New York City-based company is like the Airbnb of camping. Campkeepers with Tentrr open a portion of their property to a Tentrr site, and Tentrr provides the campsite set-up. According to Tentrr, Campkeepers can make $8,000 per year or more hosting campsites. Campers book a campsite through Tentrr’s online reservation system, and when they arrive, everything the campers need to enjoy the experience is right there waiting for them. Along with a canvas tent set up on a platform,Tentrr campsites also include a queen size cot, wood stove, an outdoor shower, dry food storage, five-gallon water container, fire pit, cooking grill, and Adirondack lounge chairs. Campkeepers can also provide additional perks, like fresh produce and firewood on site, to make even more money. What makes an ideal Tentrr campsite? According to Tentrr, privacy (site must be over 10 acres), accessibility (campers should be able to park next to their site), and “wow” factor (water features, views, and natural beauty galore). After a potential Campkeeper applies and pays a one-time fee, a Tentrr 38 HOME & GARDEN CHRONOGRAM 4/18

scout comes to get the lay of the land and pick suitable campsites. As for the vibe and aesthetic of the campsites, that’s left up to the individual Campkeepers. They can string up fairy lights, lay down ornamental rugs, embrace an Americana theme, or simply allow the beauty of the surroundings to create its own backdrop. Campkeeper Hall Smyth, who hosts Tentrr campers on his property near the Delaware River, said that his favorite aspect of Campkeeping is the interactions with campers. “I think that campers who enjoy their trip the most are the ones that I say hello to, tell them about local spots, and get them out in the community.” Smyth has two campsites on his land, one called River’s Edge on the Delaware, and the other called Quarry Pond. Both sites offer campers the a chance to enjoy the water, go fishing, or take a rowboat out and spend the day on the pond. Overall, Campkeepers claim that the majority of campers treat their land and campsites with the kind of respect you’d expect to find from true lovers of the outdoors. “From my experience, most campers leave it the way they found it,” explains Campkeeper Owen Wright. “Everyone who has stayed at our campsite has been very respectful.” Got a bunch of gorgeous land burning a hole in your pocket? Need some extra dough? Potential Campkeepers can start the process with Tentrr at Tentrr.com/apply.


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Heirloom tomatoes make up in personality what they lack in uniformity—they generally have superior flavor over hybrids.

Horticulturist Susan MacAvery with the A-frame tomato trellis at the Locust Grove Heritage Vegetable Garden.

The Garden

Heirlooms Along the Hudson, with Susan MacAvery By Michelle Sutton Photos by Larry Decker The Heirloomist Horticulturist Susan MacAvery recently underwent a major job transition, a move further up the Hudson that makes total sense given her talents with heirloom garden restoration. If you’ve been to Locust Grove, the National Historic Landmark in Poughkeepsie, you have likely seen the Heritage Vegetable Garden that MacAvery and Anna de Cordova restored in 2001 and which MacAvery oversaw until the end of 2017. The garden’s soil is rich, its heirlooms and themes are well-researched and interpreted, and its volunteer program is strong. In light of that stability, MacAvery couldn’t resist the chance to join de Cordova and the National Park Service in the restoration of another vegetable garden of historic significance, the Roosevelt Home Garden in Hyde Park. The original Roosevelt Home Garden was paved over (gasp) in 1948; in the past few years, the Park Service has worked to remove the asphalt to reveal the garden. MacAvery is the right woman for the next phase of restoration, which will include historic research into heirlooms of the Roosevelts’ time, development of interpretation, and overseeing a new volunteer program. MacAvery has gardened her whole life. “I came from a big family with a huge vegetable garden,” she says. “My dad was an avid vegetable gardener and I always enjoyed being out there with him, even weeding.” By the time she was 12, she was caring for ornamental plants for neighbors, and by the time she got to high school, she knew she wanted to study plants in college. After earning a degree in plant science from Cornell, MacAvery worked for the Hudson Valley Fruit Research Station in a plant pathology lab for two years. From there, she worked in landscape design and commercial greenhouse management before going to work for Cornell Cooperative Extension-Orange County as a horticulture educator. In 2001 she arrived at Locust Grove; she relished her 17 years there just as much as she now embraces the challenge of bringing the Roosevelt Home Garden back to life. Can you explain what heirlooms are, and how they differ from hybrids? Susan MacAvery: There’s not a standardized scientific definition for “heirloom” like we have a standard for, say, “organic.” The word “heirloom” means that it’s handed down from generation to generation through families and communities. There is no rule of how old the variety has to be in order to be considered an heirloom. Heirlooms have to be open-pollinated, meaning a plant whose flowers can accept pollen from itself or from a nearby plant, and it will produce seeds that will grow to become plants that are of similar overall characteristics—not genetically identical, but similar. So, for instance, if you’re growing the Brandywine heirloom tomato and collect seeds and plant them out, you’re going to get a Brandywine tomato. It will be genetically different than the Brandywine you started out with, but overall it has the same characteristics. That’s in contrast to a hybrid, where you’re crossing varieties in order to take desired traits from each of the parents.When you have a packet of seeds for a hybrid, they are genetically uniform and the plants that grow from them are virtually identical to each other. But if you collect and plant their seeds, you’ll get all kinds of reversions back to characteristics of previous generations, and these offspring differ widely from one another. One misconception is that heirlooms are always better than hybrids. It’s a mixed bag. Hybrids are developed for a reason; for instance, vegetables that have had disease resistance bred into them so that you can avoid spraying and have better production. Or tomatoes that are bred with shipping and shelf life in mind, to increase profitability for the growers. But generally that breeding sacrifices flavor and texture. Heirlooms, by contrast, tend to have much better flavor, and a bigger range of flavor. They have more distinct personalities in the non-uniform way they grow. That said, there are some deli-

cious hybrids out there, like Sungold, an orange cherry tomato that produces uniform and very flavorful fruits; I grow it every year. Heirloom tomato growers should be prepared to lose the top quarter or third of every fruit in a phenomenon called “green shoulders,” where that part of the tomato never ripens. Some heirlooms are just more prone to green shoulders, no matter what the site conditions. However, the bottom two-thirds of the tomato are delicious enough to make you forget about having to cut off the top. What are the basic cultural considerations for growing heirlooms? SM: As with any form of gardening, you have to start with good soil preparation. When I started working in the Heritage Vegetable Garden in 2001, there were actually streaks of gray clay running through one corner of the plot. After all the years of adding organic matter—composted horse manure in the spring, and leaf mulch in the fall—you can’t tell that the clay was ever there. The soil is really beautiful—deep and loamy—throughout. Vegetable gardens require at least six hours a day of direct sunlight. Selecting good seeds from quality vendors is important. At Locust Grove, I ordered from 15 different heirloom seed companies. Protection from animals is key, of course. If you’re doing an organic garden, expect to do some hand work, like bug picking to keep ahead of the cabbage worms, squash bugs, cucumber beetles, and the like.You can cut the top off a milk jug, leaving the handle on, and fill it with soapy water. Then you just drop the bugs into the soapy water. Starting in July, bug picking should be a twice-weekly activity. Tomato plants require support. You will see these nifty tomato trellises at Locust Grove; there’s an interesting story behind them. Prior to 1830, tomatoes were considered to be poisonous by Americans. When they learned otherwise and started growing them, there was initially a good deal of comically bad advice going around. For instance, in horticultural publications from the 1850s, we read things like, “Once the plant starts to fruit, take all the leaves off so the fruits get full sun exposure.” Also, Americans were letting tomato plants sprawl and the fruits would just rot on the ground; there was a need for a means of support. In our research, we came across a design for a tomato trellis that was sent in to a gardening magazine from a gentleman [in] Milton in the 1850s. It was a design that we replicated in the garden with great success. It’s an A-frame, supporting a section of lathe at a 60-degree angle to give optimum sun exposure to the vines and fruits. This system gives good air circulation so you have fewer diseases; you can remove the lower leaves easily, preventing the spread of fungi and bacteria; you can pick tomatoes from both sides; and in the winter, the trellises fold up like an accordion and are easily stored. What are a few of the most curious or iconic heirlooms? SM: Some folks are surprised to see dinosaur kale, also known as Lacinato kale, in the heirloom gardens, as it’s perceived as something new and fancy. It’s from the 1700s! The beautiful Moon and Stars melon is really the poster child of the heirloom seed movement. It was almost out of existence for many years when Seed Savers Exchange decided to go all out to retrieve it. The dark green rind of the fruit sports bright yellow spots on its surface, and the pink flesh is delicious. There’s a green tomato called Aunt Ruby’s German Green that remains green even when it’s ripe. You learn to tell when it’s ripe by feeling the bottom of the fruit and waiting until it’s soft to the touch. It’s one of the most unusual and delicious heirloom tomatoes. To learn more about volunteering with the Roosevelt Home Garden restoration, email susan_macavery@nps.gov. 4/18 CHRONOGRAM HOME & GARDEN 43


STEVEN HOLL: MAKING ARCHITECTURE VILLAGE-WIDE SCULPTURE EXHIBITION

April 7-30, 2018

Opening Reception: Sat. April 7, 5-8pm PA RT I C I PAT I NG A RT IS T S Colin Chase Michael Ciccone Susan Spencer Crowe Stuart Farmery Lorrie Fredette Barbara Gordon Jan Harrison Ken Hiratsuka Alex Kveton Ian Laughlin

Steven Holl, Exploration of IN House (interior), photograph, copyright Paul Warchol, Steven Holl Architects

THROUGH JULY 15, 2018

Iain Machell Susan Mastrangelo Lowell Miller Tony Moore Ze’ev Willy Neumann Shelley Parriott Gustav Pedersen Debra Priestly David Provan Christy Rupp

Judy Sigunick Nadine Slowik The Estate of Jan Sawka The Estate of Jeffrey Schiller Alison Slon Melissa Stern Christina Tenaglia Grace Bakst Wapner Millicent Young

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44 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 4/18


ARTS &

CULTURE

James Meyer’s etching on paper Sheltering Sky, part of the exhibition “Works by James Meyer,” showing through April 29 at Place Gallery in Millerton.

4/18 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 45


galleries & museums

Rolph Scarlett’s 1938 monoprint Geometric Abstraction, part of the exhibition “American Modernist,” showing through April 23 at Fletcher Gallery in Woodstock.

510 WARREN ST GALLERY 510 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-0510. “H. David Stein: Orchid Homunculus.” April 6-29. Opening reception April 7, 3-6pm. ALBERT SHAHINIAN FINE ART GALLERY 22 EAST MARKET STREET SUITE 301, RHINEBECK 876-7578. “Margaret Crenson (1934-2011): Delving A Sense Of Place.” Through April 29. ALBERT WISNER PUBLIC LIBRARY MCFARLAND DRIVE, WARWICK ALBERTWISNERLIBRARY.ORG. “Taos Journey: High Desert Portraits of Time.” Through April 30. AMITY GALLERY 110 NEWPORT BRIDGE ROAD, WARWICK 258-0818. “Three Different Tracks: Work by Frank Shuback (Sculpture), Peter Kopher (Photography) and Richard Weber (Collage).” Opening reception April 7, 5-7pm. ANN STREET GALLERY 104 ANN STREET, NEWBURGH 784-1146. “Anthropocene.” This exhibition will explore the impact of a changing climate and its devastating effects on our environment. Through April 7. ART SOCIETY OF KINGSTON 97 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 338-0333. “The Annual Fine Art Juried Show.” April 7-28. ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER 24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS (518) 945-2136. “Light & Found.” Tina Chaden’s sculptures reflect the beauty and ingenuity of nature. April 14-30. BANNERMAN ISLAND GALLERY 150 MAIN STREET, BEACON 416-8342. “Small Works: New Paintings by Amanda Brown, Stephanie Del Carpio, and Kate Manire.” Through April 8. BARRETT ART CENTER 55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550. “Changing Spaces: An Artistic Exchange.” The first joint exhibition that is open to all members of both Barrett Art Center and The Tivoli Artists Gallery. Through April 28. BCB ART 116 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-4539. “Edition.” A group show highlighting the multiple/edition artwork in various media. Through April 15. BEACON INSTITUTE GALLERY 199 MAIN STREET, BEACON BIRE.ORG. “Luminous Waterways.” Watercolor landscapes by Betsy Jacaruso. April 14-May 27. Opening reception April 14, 3-9pm. BEACON ARTIST UNION 506 MAIN STREET, BEACON 222-0177. “The Doors of Perception.” Through April 8. BYRDCLIFFE KLEINERT/JAMES CENTER FOR THE ARTS 36 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2079. “In the AiR: Byrdcliffe Artists in Residence 2017.” April 6–June 3. Opening reception April 7, 4-6pm.

46 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 4/18

CAFFE A LA MODE 1 OAKLAND AVENUE, WARWICK 986-1223. “Primavera.” Outdoor photography by Alanna Floreck. Through May 11. CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY 622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1915. “Peculiar Rarities.” The exhibition will include media from porcelain to Play-Doh. Through April 22. CATALYST GALLERY 137 MAIN STREET, BEACON 204-3844. “Catherine Welshman, Margot Kingon, Andrea Moreau Perform Feats of Derring-Do.” CCS BARD 33 GARDEN ROAD, ANNANDALE-ON-HUDSON 758-7598. “Warhol Unidentified.” An exhibit of 83 photographs by Andy Warhol whose subjects are currently unidentified, shown as part of “Warhol x 5.” April 8–May 27. Opening reception April 8, 1-4pm. CLINTON STREET STUDIO 4 SOUTH CLINTON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE (917) 333-3333. “Sunday: New Paintings by Sam Meyerson.” April 6-May 4. DUCK POND GALLERY 128 CANAL ST. TOWN OF ESOPUS LIBRARY, PORT EWEN 338-5580. “Joanne Cuttler: Watercolors.” April 6-28. FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER AT VASSAR COLLEGE 124 RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5237. “People Are Beautiful: Prints, Photographs, and Films by Andy Warhol”. Through April 15. GALLERY AT RHINEBECK 47 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK 876-1655. “Rhinebeck Gallery Art Reception.” A showcase of art from children at Anderson Center for Autism who meet weekly with artists from the Rhinebeck Gallery. April 1-30. Opening reception April 12, 6-8pm. GARDINER LIBRARY 133 FARMER’S TURNPIKE, GARDINER 255-1255. “Ulster County Women of Note.” Through April 30. GARRISON ART CENTER 23 GARRISON’S LANDING, GARRISON 424-3960. “Marco Bagnoli, Domenico Bianchi, Remo Salvadori.” Three Italian Arte Povera artists explore the relationship between body and soul, material and ephemeral. Through April 8. GREEN 92 PARTITION STREET, SAUGERTIES 418-3270. “Sean Noonan: Collages Paintings & Monotypes.” Oil pigments on handmade paper. Through July 31. HOTCHKISS LIBRARY 10 UPPER MAIN STREET, SHARON, CT (860) 364-5041. “Color Changes: Art Works by John Carter.” Through April 30. HOTCHKISS TREMAINE GALLERY 11 INTERLAKEN ROAD, LAKEVILLE, CT (860) 435-3663 “Gala Narezo: Voice|Time” Through April 25. HOWLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY 313 MAIN STREET, BEACON 831-1134. “The Yellow Wallpaper: A Group Show.” The exhibit features the work of nearly 30 local women artists inspired by the classic 19th century feminist short story by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Through April 6.


U P C O M I N G R E T R E AT S

APRIL 5 - 8

M AY

La Sarmiento, Madeline Klyne, and Gavin Harrison

4 - 6

Meg Levie

John Tarrant

SEARCH INSIDE YOURSELF

A WORKSHOP ON THE CREATIVE STORIES OF ZEN

and Marc Lesser

LGBTIQ RETREAT

M AY 25 - 27

For our full calendar of more than 100 retreats and programs in the year ahead, check our website.

garrisoninstitute.org AT

GLENCLYFFE GARRISON, NEW YORK 10524 845.424.4800

Maggie Marguerite Photography

14 MARY’S WAY, ROUTE 9D

4/18 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 47


APRIL

at

See For lf ! Yourse

April 14 - 7:30pm

PATRICE PIKE & SHELLEY KING

Two women at the forefront of Austin, Texas’ music legacy, Patrice Pike and Shelley King will hold court, tell stories and blow the walls out with acoustic versions of the songs that put them on the national scene.

E A RT H DAY C E L E B R AT I O N ! April 20, 21, 22 - 7:30pm

JANE co-sponsored by

From Brett Morgen, acclaimed director of “Kurt Cobain: Montage Of Heck” and National Geographic Films, with music by Philip Glass. This cinematic documentary tells the story of Jane Goodall and her chimpanzee research which challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time. April 21 - 11am CLOTHING SWAP At Gallery 222 In celebration of Earth Day, we are swapping our gently used clothing and accessories for some sweet new finds. Clothing swaps are a great way to downsize your closet and give life to pre-loved items by shopping sustainably in a and socially conscious way. April 21 - 4pm

RAIL TRAIL WALK & HERBAL COCKTAILS

Join Laura Silverman, Founding Naturalist at , for a walk along the Rail Trail to observe native plants and other natural phenomena of early spring. After, we will gather at the Arts Centre for refreshments made with local and wild-foraged ingredients. GALLERY Plus IMAGES ON VIEW BY JULIE LARSEN MAHER OF THE WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY ©WCS At 222

LUMINOUS WATERWAYS

Opening Sat. April 14 3-9pm

April 26 - 7pm

HOPE ON THE HUDSON

Three Short Films One Great River; Part III of the “River At Risk” series, these compelling short films focus on the efforts to preserve and restore the Hudson River, both environmentally and socially. The series will be followed by a Q&A with local and regional experts April 27 - 6:30pm

Sat 3-9 Sun 10-2 Mon 1-5

HOW TO DEFUSE A BOMB

This film looks at the work of the Project Children organization, established in 1975 by NYPD bomb squad member Denis Mulcahy. The organization allowed over 23,000 children from Catholic and Protestant backgrounds in Ireland to escape the “The Troubles” and live together in the United States over the course of a summer. There will be a Q&A following the film with Denis Mulcahy himself. April 28 - 6:30pm

LIKE ANY OTHER KID

This film follows the relationships between incarcerated youth and staff in three secure facilities across the country. As staff provides the basics of love, guidance, and structure, the youth transform before our eyes. followed by a Q&A with award-winning director Victoria Mills.

PLEASE VISIT HURLEYVILLEARTSCENTRE.ORG OR CALL 866-811-4111 FOR TICKETS & INFO WE ARE LOCATED IN HURLEYVILLE, NY IN BEAUTIFUL SULLIVAN COUNTY!

Hudson River Valley Landscapes in Watercolor by Betsy Jacaruso

Image: Orb of Night, watercolor original, 38.5”x24”

Hudson River valley landscapes in watercolor by Betsy Jacaruso BEACON INSTITUTE GALLERY

ART SCIENCE & HISTORY OPEN DAILY

39 South Street, Pittsfield, MA 413.443.7171 Berkshiremuseum.org

Mission Aerospace

Through May 13, 2018

48 ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM 4/18

APRIL 14 - MAY 27

199 Main St Beacon, NY

bire.org


galleries & museums

© Liliana Porter, 2016

A still from Actualidades / Breaking News, a 2016 digital video conceived and directed by Liliana Porter, showing through May 19 at Art Omi in Ghent.

HUDSON AREA LIBRARY 51 N. 5TH STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1792. “Bish Bash Falls Exhibit.” Through April 30. HUDSON BEACH GLASS GALLERY 162 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-0068. “Walks of Life: Works by George B. Davison.” Sculpture. Through April 8. HUDSON HALL 327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-1438. “Stephanie Bernheim: Pixels and Particulates.” Through May 13. HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 788-0100. “Bleeding Edge.” An exhibition investigating human-technological entanglements. Through May 15. JEFF BAILEY GALLERY 127 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-6680. “Line and Curve.” An exhibition of the Ellsworth Kelly and Jack Shear Shaker Collection with a selection of iconic Kelly prints from the 1960s through the 1980s. Through May 13. JOHN DAVIS GALLERY 362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907. “John Lees: Drawings.” Through April 22. JOYCE GOLDSTEIN GALLERY 19 CENTRAL SQUARE, CHATHAM (518) 392-2250. “Sculpture by George Spencer.” Through April 29. KINGSTON ARTIST COLLECTIVE 63 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 282-0182. “6th Annual Charlie Chaplin Tribute Exhibit.” April 7-29. LOCUST GROVE, SAMUEL MORSE HISTORIC SITE 2683 SOUTH ROAD, POUGHKEEPSIE 454-4500. “Art of the Needle 2018.” An exhibit of needlework and hand crafted items. April 13-15. MARK GRUBER GALLERY NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241. “Andrea MacFarland: Landscapes Near and Far.” Through May 5. MATTEAWAN GALLERY 436 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-7901. “Paola Ochoa: What the Thunder Said.” Through April 15. THE MUROFF KOTLER VISUAL ARTS GALLERY @ SUNY ULSTER 491 COTTEKILL ROAD, STONE RIDGE 687-5113. “Kerhonkson Fashions: The Collection of Verna Gillis.” Through April 13. OMI INTERNATIONAL ARTS CENTER 1405 COUNTY ROAD 22, GHENT (518) 392-4747. “Works by Liliana Porter and Ana Tiscornia.” Through May 18. Artists’ talk April 7 2pm. PELHAM ART CENTER 155 5TH AVENUE, PELHAM (914) 738-2525. “High School Art Salon.” April 5-20. PLACE 3 MAIN STREET, MILLERTON (347) 622-3084. “Works by James Meyer.” Through April 29.

RIVERWINDS GALLERY 172 MAIN STREET, BEACON 838-2880. “Inner Sense.” Paintings by Virginia Donovan. Through April 8. ROOST STUDIOS & ART GALLERY 69 MAIN STREET, NEW PALTZ 675-1217. “ART: Action Resistance Transformation.” Ceative works that inspire and empower. Through April 22. SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART 1 HAWK DRIVE, NEW PALTZ NEWPALTZ.EDU/MUSEUM. “Abstract Minded: Works by Six Contemporary African Artists.” Through April 15. THE STOREFRONT GALLERY 93 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 338-8473. “Katherine Burger: Felines & Feathers.” April 7-28. Opening reception April 7, 5-7pm. STUDIO 4 GALLERY 925 SOUTH STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 393-2382. “Promise of Spring, II.” Spring Flowers in watercolor by Artist Maureen Winzig. April 8-30. THE CHATHAM BOOKSTORE 27 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-3005. “Mary Anne Davis: Women and Power.” Ceramic art inspired by the Mary Beard manifesto. Through April 6. THE LACE MILL 165 CORNELL STREET, KINGSTON 331-2140. “MEN: A Men’s Art Show Curated by James Martin.” Through April 26. Opening reception April 7, 5-9pm. THEO GANZ STUDIO 149 MAIN STREET, BEACON (917) 318-2239. “Prints and Ghosts.” An exhibition of recent work by printmaker Elana Goren. Through April 8. THOMAS COLE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 218 SPRING STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-7465. “Picturesque and Sublime: Thomas Cole’s Trans-Atlantic Inheritance.” Opening reception April 28, 4-6pm. TIVOLI ARTISTS GALLERY 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI 757-2667. “Six Artists/Six Perspectives.” Through April 22. TREMAINE GALLERY AT THE HOTCHKISS SCHOOL 11 INTERLAKEN ROAD, LAKEVILLE, CT (860) 435-3663. “Gala Narezo: Voice/Time.” Through April 25. VILLAGE OF SAUGERTIES PARTICIPATING VENUES “Village-Wide Sculpture Exhibition.” April 7-30. THE WESTCHESTER GALLERY AT WCC PEEKSKILL EXTENSION 27 NORTH DIVISION STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 606-7321. “Fun and War Games: Works by Tricia McLaughlin.” Through May 4. WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM 28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2940. “FOCUS: Abstract Heart.” 10 artists express passion, emotion, and deeply-held beliefs through an abstract vocabulary. Through April 29.

4/18 CHRONOGRAM ARTS & CULTURE 49


Music

The Mammals: Konrad Meissner, Ruth Ungar, Mike Merenda, Ken Maiuri, and Jacob Silver. Photo by Roy Brueckner.

This Little Light The Mammals By Peter Aaron

T

o say these are dark times seems so inadequate as to be some kind of a sick joke. The day-to-day assault on our democracy from within, by the toxic tinhorn who slimed, slithered, and swindled his way into the presidency, continues. It seems like every social media visit ends with us wanting to squeeze through the screen and throttle someone—and ultimately feeling bad about letting our emotions get the better of us. Yeah, it’s dark, all right. But then, when all seems lost, a sliver of light appears. “Just be kind to the people you know and love / and give a little more to the one you want to shove,” sings the Mammals’ singer, fiddler, and guitarist Ruth Ungar on “Open the Door,” from the recently resurrected Americana band’s new album, Sunshiner. “The [2017 immigrant] travel ban was going on when that was being written and it relates to that, but it’s more of a mom kind of song,” explains Ungar, who has two kids with the group’s cofounder, singer, guitarist, and banjoist Mike 50 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Merenda. “It’s about trying to teach principles to your kids but realizing you can really only do that by living them. It’s also saying, ‘We do this work, and even if it’s imperfect we go on working.’” Lately, Merenda and Ungar are better known as the duo Mike & Ruthy, but they have been Mammals much longer, forming the politically charged combo in 2001 with guitarist and banjoist Tao Rodriguez-Seeger, Pete Seeger’s grandson. In the face of the second Bush era, the New York-born group, augmented with a changing cast of accompanists, released four albums and toured North America, Europe, and Australia before going on hiatus in 2008 as the newly married Ungar and Merenda retreated into family life and their more selfcontained musical incarnation. But in 2017, Merenda and Ungar were inspired to reactivate the Mammals, much like when bassist Charlie Haden reunited his Vietnam War-period jazz-protest ensemble, the Liberation Music Orchestra, to rail against the Iraq War.


“We’d actually been toying with the idea of doing it when were we making [2015 Mike & Ruthy Band album] Bright as You Can,” says Merenda. “And then the 2016 election happened, and that just emboldened us. It was, like, ‘Okay, now we have to do this.’” Rodriguez-Seeger, though, opted to sit this one out. “Tao was tired of touring and being what he called ‘a professional grandson,’ so we bought the rights to the band name from him. I’d been writing songs for a solo record I was going to call ’69 Protest Songs [a nod to Magnetic Fields’ 69 Love Songs], but then I started feeling like a long album of heavy protest songs could be a bit much. So I put that idea aside and we ended up doing some of the songs from that project for Sunshiner. We learned all kinds of things from playing with Pete Seeger for so many years, and one of them was that sometimes one or two well-placed protest songs surrounded by some fun dance songs can win the day.” And although the lines between the two acts are frequently blurred, it’s the fiddle-driven dance tunes, along with the emphasis on political topics (over Mike & Ruthy’s stronger focus on matters of family and the heart), that, as Merenda points out, define the music of the Mammals. Sunshiner radiates with upbeat, dance-friendly ditties like “Make it True,” “Fork in the Road,” and “Doctor’s Orders.” The couple’s bandmates include longtime bassist Jacob Silver, current B-52s keyboardist Ken Maiuri, drummer Konrad Meissner, and pedal steel player Charlie Rose. Among the guests on the album are Ruth’s father and stepmother, violinist Jay Ungar and bassist Molly Mason; her mother, folksinger Lyn Hardy; and local luminaries Amy Helm, Connor Kennedy, Lindsey Webster, Sarah Lee Guthrie, and Andy Stack on harmony vocals. Due out this month, the disc is also home to two powerful, moving tracks that saw online release in 2017: Ungar’s tender Standing Rock dedication “My Baby Drinks Water” and Merenda’s sweeping “Culture War.” The title track, as fine an example of a singalong number as one could want from a folk rock record, plays on several levels. The word “sunshiner” is the band’s own term for those who strive to improve the world “in any field of endeavor,” and the song’s old-timey feel and lyrics (“Yes, my daddy was a miner but I’m gonna be a sunshiner / And my granddaddy was a miner but I’m gonna be a sunshiner”) allude to traditional folk themes. But on top of that the quietly hopeful tune is also, to use an obvious term, a beacon, highlighting the inherent progress of solar power (that the Kentucky Mining Museum recently installed solar panels on its roof is, as the band points out, downright poetic). Raised in Saugerties, Ungar pursued a theatrical career before meeting New Hampshire native Merenda, who played in college ska and indie rock bands, in 1998. The two formed the string trio Rhinegold, named for their favorite cheap beer, which morphed into the Mammals once they began collaborating with Rodriguez-Seeger. Although the latter group’s youthful energy made them

popular on the folk circuit, in the early days, their defiant idealism occasionally caused controversy. At one Louisiana festival, the Merenda-penned, au courant “The Bush Boys,” from 2004’s Rock That Babe, stirred up such a fracas that the event’s organizers reprimanded the band and forbade them or any other artist from playing the song there again. The upshot was that the folk community rallied around the outspoken outfit, whose profile was subsequently raised by a tour with Arlo Guthrie. “If you tell the whole truth you won’t please everyone,” says the song’s author, who cites the similar situations that famously beset their mentor Pete Seeger during some of his brave moments. “When we were in our 20s it was easy to yell about what we were against, but now we’re about broadcasting what we’re for. I think it’s an easier way to achieve things, doing that.” Ungar points out that since making the shift, they have gotten more positive audience feedback about their lyrics. “Especially lately with ‘Sunshiner,’” she says. “I’ve had people come up to me and thank us for singing that song, saying, ‘My father and my grandfather really were miners, and I really do want a better life for me and my kids than the one they had.’” “When Pete [Seeger] was talking about writing songs to me and Mike and so many others, he always said, ‘You never wanna be too teachy-preachy,’” recalls Sarah Lee Guthrie, Arlo’s daughter and, yes, the granddaughter of Woody himself. “When it comes to writing songs that deal with social issues, there’s a fine line between being pointed and being off-putting. And I think the experience that Mike and Ruth have from doing it so long has made them really good at keeping that balance. They’re able to nail it every time now, and they just keep getting better at it.” Presently, the Mammals are on tour with Merenda and Ungar’s 10-yearold son, Will, and five-year-old daughter, Opal, in tow, as the band shines some light on Sunshiner along with the progressive causes they advocate. While the group prepares to head out on the road again, with the world being as bleak as it’s been lately, our narrative here bends back around to home in on the undeniably optimistic undercurrent that, against all odds, permeates the new album. Where does the group find such unshakeable positivity? “Hope can be hard to come by, but there are alternative visions out there and someone needs to present those visions,” Merenda says. “And it might as well be us.” Sunshiner is out April 20 on Humble Abode Music Music and can be preordered prior to the official release date via the band’s website. The Mammals will perform at the Egremont Barn in Egremont, Massachusetts, on April 27 and Colony in Woodstock on May 19.Themammals.love.

The Mammals performing at the Grey Fox Folk Festival in 2016. Photo by Dave Lee aka Gypsyshooter. 4/18 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 51


NIGHTLIFE HIGHLIGHTS Handpicked by music editor Peter Aaron for your listening pleasure.

The Molice brings their “Lo-Fi Sci-Fi Love” music to the Low Beat in Albany on April 27.

BETTYE LAVETTE April 7. Fifty years after making her recording debut, vocalist Bettye LaVette has finally gotten her due. Although she hasn’t had a bigger hit than 1962’s “My Man—He’s a Lovin’ Man,” LaVette, who here returns to Club Helsinki, has long been a legendary favorite among deep soul fans. Her 2003 album A Woman Like Me won a W. C. Handy Award, and 2005’s I’ve Got My Own Hell to Raise, a set of covers of songs by contemporary female artists, took her to a larger audience. Arguably the greatest living soul singer after Aretha Franklin, LaVette performed at the 2008 Kennedy Center Honors and for President Obama’s 2009 inauguration and again upped her following with 2010’s Interpretations: The British Rock Songbook. (Shemekia Copeland sings April 14; Eilen Jewell shines May 4.) 9pm. $35-$50. Hudson. (518) 828-4800; Helsinkihudson.com.

RODRIGUEZ April 18. Detroit singer-songwriter Rodriguez’s inspiring oblivion-to-redemption story is the subject of the award-winning 2012 documentary Searching for Sugarman. Born Sixto Rodriguez Diaz in 1942, the brooding tunesmith waxed 1970’s lost psychedelic folk masterpiece Cold Fact and its likewise worthy 1971 follow-up Coming from Reality before returning to obscurity. But unbeknownst then to anyone in the US—least of all Rodriguez himself—his socially conscious music would eventually make him an icon in South Africa and, in turn, the subject of the moving film that put him back on the map. Still being charted, that map features this stop at the Paramount Hudson Valley Theater. (Christopher Cross sails in April 5; Steve Earle & the Dukes rollick April 15.) 8pm. $45-$90. Peekskill. (914) 739-0039; Paramounthudsonvalley.com.

THE MOLICE April 27. From the Mops and the Golden Cups in the 1960s through the Plastics in the 1970s, Shonen Knife in the 1980s, and Guitar Wolf in the 1990s, it appears Japan is a font of contagiously cartoony, endlessly entertaining rock bands. The Molice, who hit the Low Beat this month, are among the newer exponents of this phenomenon. Reportedly, their name is

52 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 4/18

a tribute to both their mutual faves the Police and their shared heroes whose monikers begin with the letter m (Morissey, Mo Tucker, Jim Morrison, etc.). The band’s self-described “Lo-Fi Sci-Fi Love” music blends quirky new wave, perky punk, and infectious indie sounds for a fun, florescent mix. With Bruiser & Bicycle and Postage. (The Neutron Rats rock April 13; Khalif Neville croons April 20.) 8pm. Call for ticket price. Albany. (518) 432-6572; Thelowbeat.com.

24-HOUR DRONE April 28, 29. Basilica Hudson’s ’round-the-clock celebration of continuous sound marks its fourth year in the chasmic former foundry adjacent to the Amtrak station and riverfront. Copresented by Dutch organization Le Guess Who? and streamed live via community radio station WGXC (terrestrially, and online at WGXC.org), the 24-hour-event will once again feature an uninterrupted sonic relay of some of the foremost names in experimental music and audio art. This year stars Pharmakon, Laraaji, Marilu Donovan and Tristan Kasten-Krause, New London Drone Orchestra, Sabha Sizdahkhani, pipers from the Capital Region Celtic Pipe Band, Hotel Neon, Sontag Shogun, Bill Brovold, and more. Food, beverages, and vendors will be on site, so bring a sleeping bag and settle in for the duration (or just one night). See website for full schedule. $36. Hudson. (518) 822-1050; Basilicahudson.org.

ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER April 28. Eleanor Friedberger burned up the indie scene in the early 2000s as half of the Fiery Furnaces, the duo she formed with her brother Matthew. With the Furnaces cooling off since 2011, the siblings have each been focused on their solo careers, with Eleanor, who performs this late-April date at BSP, releasing four albums to date. The newest is Rebound, which sees the singer-songwriter, a recent addition to the Hudson Valley music community, making sweet, synth-based pop that belies the frequent and frantic Captain Beefheart/PJ Harvey moments of her previous project. With Purr and Robert Earl Thomas. (The Low Anthem drops in April 7; the Messthetics and SAVAK crush it April 21.) 7:30pm. $15. Kingston. (845) 481-5158; Bspkingston.com.


ROCKET NUMBER NINE RECORDS

PHILIPP GERSCHLAUER/DAVID FIUCZYNSKI MIKROJAZZ! NEUE EXPRESSIONISTISCHE MUSIK (2017, RARENOISE RECORDS)

Independently, German saxophonist Philipp Gerschlauer and New York guitarist David Fiuczynski have explored microtonality, the musical practice that plumbs the infinitude of tones between C and C sharp. On this bracing new collaboration, their mastery of many untraditional tunings finds wide, uncanny expression. Gerschlauer’s artful reconsideration of Coltrane’s “Giant Steps” in the opener “MikroSteps” sets a hall-of-mirrors tone for the recording, with Fiuczynski letting fly ringing bursts of altered pitches like the lovechild of Bern Nix and U. Srinivas. It’s one tangled web of just-intonation Gerschlauer and keyboardist Giorgi Mikadze weave on Fiuczynski’s “Walking Not Flying,” matched by fretless bassist Matt Garrison’s seismic glissandi and, elsewhere, his superb solo on “Last Chance.” The not-so-secret weapon is legendary Woodstock-based drummer (and past employer of Fiuczynski and Garrison) Jack DeJohnette, imbuing this singular project with his own distinctive delicacy, iridescence, and jouncing wallop. Rarenoiserecords.com. —James Keepnews

Painting by Sean Sullivan

CD REVIEWS

The best selection of vinyl in the Hudson Valley. Selling your vinyl? Talk to us first.

Saturday, April 21 In-store with AMY RIGBY and BRIAN DEWAN 7:00 PM 50 N. FRONT ST. UPTOWN KINGSTON 845 331 8217

Check our Facebook for upcoming in store events

STEPHEN CLAIR AND THE PUSHBACKS PUSHBACK (2017, INDEPENDENT)

With the vocal delivery similar to the Kinks’ Ray Davies or Brad Roberts of the Crash Test Dummies, and the songwriter’s melodicism of a more morose postReplacements Paul Westerberg, Stephen Clair and the Pushbacks’ Pushback has a restrained fervor. Don’t get me wrong, the songs definitely rock. But it’s rock in check, a learned and well-studied rocking. It should come as no surprise, since Clair is an instructor at Beacon Music Factory, that there is measure and thoughtfulness to the output contained in this disc’s eight tracks. Stephen Clair and the Pushbacks will be at the Towne Crier on May 4, speakin’ of Beacon, and at the Linda in Albany on May 11. Having seen the band live a handful of times before hearing this EP, I can safely say that the live incarnations of these tunes are not to be missed. Stephenclair.com. —Mike Campbell THE SUICIDE COMMANDOS TIME BOMB (2017, TWIN/TONE RECORDS)

Originally active from 1975 to 1979, the Suicide Commandos lit the fuse for the combustible Twin Cities punk rock scene. In 1978, the trio of Chris Osgood (guitars/ vocals), Steve Almaas (bass/vocals), and Dave Ahl (drums/vocals) released the crucial Make a Record and a crackling live album before going their separate ways. Almaas fronted Beat Rodeo before moving to West Saugerties and releasing solo records.The Commandos have reunited sporadically over the decades, and now, nearly 40 years later, comes a proper follow-up to their inspirational debut. Their original raw energy, commitment, and lyrical irreverence are fully intact, with added flourishes of country twang, hard boogie, swagger, and plenty of beautiful guitar distortion. “Hallelujah Boys” is a paean to playing rock ’n’ roll with lifelong friends, while “Boogie’s Coldest Acre” boasts the exhortation to “put that fucking thing down!” The Almaas-penned “For Such a Mean Time” is a searching folk rocker attempting to make sense of a zeitgeist lacking in human compassion. Thesuicidecommandos.com. —Jeremy Schwartz

Purveyors of fine Violins, Violas, Cellos, and their Bows

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CHRONOGRAM.COM LISTEN to tracks by the artists reviewed in this issue.

4/18 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 53


SHORT TAKES From suspenseful fiction to self-help guides, these six new books will take you down interesting new roads, both familiar and previously untraveled. —Briana Bonfiglio

THE OTHER MOTHER CAROL GOODMAN WILLIAM MORROW, 2018, $15.99

An Inspired Home & Decor Quarterly

Struck by intense fear and self-doubt, new mother Daphne Marist joins a motherhood support group. When she befriends another new mom, a disturbing secret slowly unravels, and she navigates post-partum mood disorder, an unstable marriage, and identity. This psychological thriller is New York Times bestseller Carol Goodman’s 20th novel. Goodman lives in the Hudson Valley and teaches creative writing at SUNY New Paltz.

BACK FROM THE BRINK: SAVING ANIMALS FROM EXTINCTION NANCY F. CASTALDO HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT, 2018, $17.99

Alligators, whooping cranes, American bison, Galapagos tortoises, California condor, and bald eagles have all been on and off the endangered species list for years. Hudson Valley nonfiction children’s author Nancy F. Castaldo takes a hopeful approach to educating young readers about how to keep these animals thriving for years to come. The full-color book for ages 10 to 12 is accompanied by breathtaking photos and helpful resources on saving endangered species.

LEARNING TO FLY GENE KRACKEHL INDEPENDENT, 2017, $15.95

Explore the topics of meditation, reincarnation, lucid dreaming, gratitude, and practicing forgiveness in Learning to Fly, Gene Krackehl’s latest self-help book. Krackehl has been practicing alternative healing methods for over 20 years— first at Northern Westchester Hospital’s Center for Health & Healing, and now in his own private practice in Katonah.

A NEW GLOBAL AGENDA: PRIORITIES, PRACTICES, AND PATHWAYS OF THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY EDITED BY DIANA AYTON-SHENKER, FOREWORD BY ANDREW ZOLLI ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD, 2018, $44.40

Edited by Rhinebeck resident and founder of Global Momenta Diana Ayton-Shenker, A New Global Agenda rallies against national resentment of foreign nations and argues for better methods of interacting with our global neighbors. The book contains compelling, well-researched essays from 26 contributors, including CEO of Women for Women International Laurie Adams and international reporter for the Boston Globe Michael A. Cohen.

HOW TO WRITE AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL NOVEL: ESSAYS ALEXANDER CHEE MARINER BOOKS, 2018, $15.99

In 16 essays, Ulster County author Alexander Chee explains how life and literature collide. The book teeters on the line between memoir and writing manual. Chee addresses issues of identity, national politics, and building a career—including his identity as a gay, Korean American; events like 9/11, the AIDS crisis, and Donald Trump; and the odd jobs he took to support his writing. All the while, he emphasizes the impact that reading and writing fiction has on life.

RED ALERT: AN NYPD RED MYSTERY JAMES PATTERSON & MARSHALL KARP LITTLE, BROWN AND COMPANY, 2018, $28

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Hudson Valley author Marshall Karp has been cowriting the NYPD Red series with James Patterson since 2014. Red Alert is the fifth and newest addition to their collection of mystery novels. The story follows detectives Zach Jordan and Kylie MacDonald on a hunt to uncover scandalous corruption. The authors’ research for the novel included interviewing Jerry Brainard of the Ulster County Sheriff’s Department and several retired NYPD sheriffs.


KIDS’ BOOK LAUNCH! April 28, 4pm - Oblong Rhinebeck

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My Ex-Life: A Novel Stephen McCauley

Flatiron Books, 2018, $25.95

Y

ou can recognize great writers in their minor characters. For every inspiring Elizabeth Bennet, there’s a devious Caroline Bingley, and for every devastating Mr. Darcy, there’s an unfortunate Mr. Collins. Stephen McCauley belongs to an elite club of authors who create such memorable supporting roles, and in his latest, My Ex-Life, he serves up a narcissistic, San Francisco real estate agent, a bitter, tourist-town shopkeeper, and an exotic next-door philanderer, to name just three. Do great minor characters threaten to steamroll main characters off the stage at any given moment? Of course they do, and that’s how they earn their unforgettable characteristics. But the two main characters making up the main “ex” in the “Ex-Life” hold their own just fine. Once upon a time David and Julie met and fell in love. She got pregnant, they got married, she lost the baby, he came out of the closet, and they divorced. Twenty-five years later, after they have both found and lost their next life partners, leaving Julie with a somewhat dilapidated New England home and a struggling teenage daughter, and David with a well-appointed Bay Area carriage house and an extremely generous landlady, they reconnect. What they now have in common is eminent eviction, and David uses this as an excuse to spend the summer at Julie’s repairing and redesigning her home’s Airbnb business and coaching her daughter on college admissions. Julie’s moody daughter Mandy plays the catalyst not only in initially getting them back together, but keeping them together when everything conspires to send them back to their opposite coastal corners. Her character is a classic overall-jeans-wearing, lack-of-ambition teenager with a talent for social ostracism and lousy boyfriends. She is also the heart of the story as she draws out the complexities of a mother/daughter relationship for Julie and provides a crystal ball for David’s “what-if” of paternal emotions. Toss in a jerk of an ex-husband and the literary rom-com writes itself. There’s actually one other major character that impacts the potential reunion of David and Julie: real estate. David’s carriage house rental in the city on the Pacific has come to an end (to be purchased by his ex and his new lover, no less) and he is contemplating holding out for a hefty pay-out. Meanwhile Julie has mere weeks to come up with the funds to buy out her ex-husband or lose her beloved home on the Atlantic. The resolution might seem obvious, but McCauley is a pro and switches up the game in surprising and satisfying ways up to the very last page. Having written a half a dozen comedy-of-error, literary romances, McCauley is still probably best known for his first novel, Object of My Affection, which was made into a successful movie. That novel focused on a young woman expecting a child and her gay best friend who decides to raise the child with her. Flash forward 30 years later and McCauley has returned to the familiar territory of this novel, an almost “meta-McCauley” sequel. What has changed are the bodies and faces, youthful carefreeness replaced with financial realities. But what has remained is the intimacy and history between a man and a woman. They might not be cast as lovers, but they perform all the other major and minor roles in each other’s lives. The Golden Notebook in Woodstock hosts Stephen McCauley for a reading and signing on June 16 at 2 pm. ­—­James Conrad

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4/18 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 55


POETRY

Edited by Phillip X Levine. Deadline for our May issue is April 5. Send up to three poems or three pages (whichever comes first). Full submission guidelines: Chronogram.com/submissions.

All You Hear Is a Squeak

small success

The creaking as the wind holds the door open. The breeze pushes back the yellow tipped grass with a swish. As you gaze out the window you see your own reflection. You reach out to touch it but all you feel is the firm flat surface of glass and all you hear is a squeak.

one foot in front of the next with only one toe stubbed —p

—Ingrid Blaufarb Hughes (9 years old)

INDIGO CHILD God’s messenger drifts through the hallway, scattering scraps in her wake. She keeps The Word on a Post-it, mistranslates Rilke to taste truth in a foreign tongue, tears leaves from old books and whites out lines to reveal the kernel that sprouts because poetry is the seed of all things. Every day she composes scripture. Dear child, in time I have come to realize there is only one verse at the center of this whirling cosmos, but still we will not see it. Keep scraping away at your palimpsest, child. The Thousand Things are only clouds between us and the light by which we read the poem at the center of the wheel. When you have erased so much ink that the paper itself transmits the truth, you will know. —Nancy A. Ebel

DÉJÀ VU We make eye contact Instantly, I am dazzled. I know that sparkle because it’s inside of me, too and always has been. Déjà vu This is the first time I’m here, but it is my home-sweet-home. Oh, how I’ve missed this place I’ve never been. —Christine Castellana 56 POETRY CHRONOGRAM 4/18

NO FISHING ALLOWED No Se Perite La Pesca On the Rondout Creek, we watch a heron tiptoe across a tight rope from dock to boat. We cheer him on to rev the engine, speed out on the water, wave his legs to a gaggle of geese. Boys equipped with worms and rods, ignore the signs, throw out lines, catch bass, drop them in pails of water. Safe in our car, we see golden leaves on the old oaks sway, blocking dark clouds, but not the light show in the sky. From the parking lot we hear, Vamanos, Vamanos! The boys scatter back to dads’ dented pickups for the drive home to barbecue fish and drink sweet tea. —Mare Leonard

THE BUS STOP GANG You were all tiny then, excited to play with each other in the morning on the patch of grass in front of our home until the yellow bus appeared. In the afternoons, we rushed from work to gather you up with twirls and hollers of joy, tussling your heads, or sometimes with silence and a quiet, questioning glance. We bundled you up in coats to sled down a hill, and then we would join you, piled onto each other like stacking toys. Some nights we called each other to meet in town to talk, walking street light to street light to each other’s front doors. In summer we celebrated with barbeques and in groups of two or five we bobbed and swam in the pool down the street. We became our own sort of gang, the Bus Stop Gang, and for a brief moment, all together, we felt invulnerable. Illness found its way to us, and divorce, and death and moving— and you drive cars now, instead of riding the bus. We could not protect any of you from much, and instead we each and all of us love you through it, whatever it is, and watch as you bob up smiling, to the surface of yourselves, carrying forever, our gang of love inside your hearts, as you climb, once again, up and on to your own adventures. —Robin Perls-Shultis

LOVE LETTERS

LEAF AND TREE

You don’t write to me anymore Cursive curves and letters forgotten You don’t want to waste the paper

Number six train: dad reads book to son amid din; leaf and tree seem one.

—Kerry Hegarty

—Howard Sage


SEEKING CONQUISTADORS

STREETPOET

I REMEMBER

I can’t explain to you why I’m suddenly in the market for antique Spanish swords from our war against Iberians in Teddy Roosevelt’s Caribbean but here I am hoping that geographic cures will work— A call to arms that only the wounded would heed.

I live in the street I sleep in the gutter Among the shabby hordes that stumble and mutter I do my best to sing for my supper And distinguish myself before you It’s true

I remember a Sunday winter in the Bronx the barren streets enveloped by a bitter cold sky a grey blanket covering our apartment buildings

I do steal cigarette butts from ash cans And I have been known to drink But suffer me my friends I am a man I can still think

I remember the wind cutting through the alleyways whipping across the elevated train tracks lifting falling swirling passing McArdle’s bar the cutting wind issuing a drunken howl before turning the corner

It hurts to be so sober on a Friday, half past eight scouring Bannerman catalogues 110 years old for militaria that one can no longer purchase though if your love has left you then perhaps you can relate. A product description catches my eye: “SPANISH INFANTRY OFFICER’S SWORD, with blade and scabbard broken in two. Probably done so as not to surrender complete sword. Blade is Marked... Captured in Cuba. Price $6.00.” Instantly I want it but the time machine required is almost as improbable as Jackie coming back. We Spaniards are so stubborn even in defeat and some of us still breathing never came back from battle. —Mike Vahsen

OUROBOROS I found you coiled on my doorstep, patiently waiting for the locks to turn so you could show me how to shed my old skin. But I hissed and slithered back to safety, unwilling to accept the time had come. —Chala Fidan

IMAGERY Pushed by the wind, A leaf skates across the icy pond Though the day is mild. —Jennifer Fiorile

And with this sidewalk as my stage I know that I can entertain you still With poetry Pure verse In the most beautiful way I know how let me converse with you About how I tried to be like you To do things the way the way that you do Until I broke my hands, and my ribs, and my mind on the task Now all I ask is to be forgiven And be given one last chance to dance for you With all that is left of me And if I can make you laugh If I can make you cry if it’s worth anything at all to you help me survive I am the last of the living poets That ply my trade in the streets And I live and I die in the hearts and the minds Of the beautiful strangers that I meet. And try to make my friends —Lotus Streetpoet

THE THIEF “Grieved I, when, as the hope-hour stroke its sum, You did not come…”—Thomas Hardy I stole a jelly jar of wishbones once from a dead man— they sang like a rattle, those ten conjoined clavicles, and I spent the day dreamily shaking them like a cup of dice— wondering if I could harvest hope; wondering if one day you would return; wondering if un-granted wishes arrived like a still-born? I buried the forked bones in the yard. —Evelyn Augusto

The barbershop pole of colored stripes whirling red white and blue the sweetshop awning flapping fiercely Joe’s shoe repair sign creaking back and forth I also remember so clearly on that Sunday afternoon snapping Liz’s picture as she stood in close-up smiling facing the wind —Kathleen MacKenzie

EPIPHANIES VIII. Through April mud I track cloven hooves to tread the trail of hidden deer, though a subtle music on the boughs suggests instead that Pan is near. —Jared Bertholf

A POEM FOR JOEL A poem for you sits meditates on the blazing woodstove puts its feet up on the hearth oak smoke permeates every line This particular poem talks freely says what it wants breaks a sentence but does not judge knows when to stoke the fire —Caroline Wolfe

APRIL IS NATIONAL POETRY MONTH So every year around this time I ask myself (I’m stumped!) Where are all the words that rhyme With April, poetry, or month? —Giles Selig 4/18 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 57


Food & Drink

SOMETHING’S BREWING THE UPSTATE CRAFT BEVERAGE INDUSTRY FLOURISHES By Timothy Malcolm

A Farmers & Chefs food truck dinner at Angry Orchard in Walden.

D

uring a serious cold snap in January, when the mercury barely reached 10 degrees, five staff members at Sloop Brewing Co. prepared their Elizaville brewery and taproom for a Thursday release of a new canned IPA called Liquid Sorcery. It took four people about three-and-a-half hours to fill, seam, and label about 2,200 cans before the doors were scheduled to open at noon. But the plans shifted. “It was about 11:15 in the morning and it was four below zero outside,” says Joe Turco, sales and marketing manager at Sloop. “Our tasting room manager came in and said I’m opening up early cause there’s 30 people lined up outside.” Sloop sold out of Liquid Sorcery in a little over an hour. Customers drove down from Boston and up from Philadelphia to the rustic barn in the Columbia County countryside to acquire another of Sloop’s juicy hop concoctions. It’s one reason the company has outgrown its Elizaville space and will open a 26,000-square-foot brewing complex in Fishkill this summer, making a bold move to be a major player in the Hudson Valley craft beverage scene. Sloop’s expansion isn’t the only recent development doubling down on the success of the local craft beverage landscape. Young breweries and distilleries keep popping up. The country’s largest hard cider producer, Angry Orchard, calls the region home and is pushing hard on the region’s Napa-like potential. Wineries are adding whiskey to their portfolios and boasting continued growth. And the distillery that broke down the doors for everyone else, Tuthilltown, was purchased in 2017 by William Grant & Sons, an international company that puts its bottles on shelves in London, Paris, and Athens. The regional, and statewide, growth certainly looks good, but can it continue? It’s clear that shelves are filling up with Hudson Valley beer, wine, cider, and liquor, while the crowds continue to gather at local craft facilities. But if there’s a next level, whether it’s Napa Valley east or something else entirely, craft experts say there are issues to confront amid an always uncertain future. 58 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Opening Act Then again, nobody could’ve figured the present, with 2,000 small-batch distilleries nationwide and 139 of them in New York as of February. The growth of distilleries in particular—713 percent since 2012—underscores just how much change the state and region has seen in craft beverage production. The total number of craft manufacturers statewide is up 112 percent since 2012, with the Hudson Valley proving integral in this surge. “Historically, the Hudson Valley is home to the oldest winery in America, and has always been a great region for growing grapes and apples,” says Stefan Fleming, assistant director of industry development at Empire State Development, a department of state government. “It’s a great location for craft production because of its history of growing high-quality crops; access to a reliable water source; access to a large population between Upstate New York, New York City and Boston; and its historic sites and picturesque landscapes.” The Hudson Valley’s role in the rise of craft starts back in 1976 when Mark Miller, founder of Marlboro’s Benmarl Winery, and John Dyson, for a time the state’s commissioner of agriculture and markets and, later, the founder of Millbrook Vineyards & Winery, helped push through the Farm Winery Act, which allowed grape growers to start wineries and sell to the public. Nearly 30 years later, Ralph Erenzo wasn’t able to sell his Tuthilltown Spirits Distillery products to consumers in a tasting room because the state still lived by antediluvian Prohibition legislation. So Erenzo and a few other small distillers lobbied heavily for the state to allow tasting rooms, leading to the Farm Distillery Act in 2007. The same happened with breweries, which before the Farm Brewery Act of 2012 couldn’t sell their product by the glass unless they held a separate tavern license. That law allowed brewers to offer tastings and sales of product permitting they were using a threshold percentage of state crop; plus, they could open multiple facilities to sell beer. One year later, New York passed the Microbrewery Act, which eliminated


Robert M. Davidson / Sloop Brewing Co. Juice Bomb, a Northeastern IPA, at Sloop Brewing in Elizaville.

the thresholds but limited operations to one facility. In 2013 the Farm Cidery Law allowed cider producers to open tasting rooms and sell product on and off premises permitting they were using crops grown exclusively in New York. In essence, in just over 10 years, the rest of the craft beverage industry has caught up to wine. Small Batch, Big Smash In the Hudson Valley we’ve watched as communities have filled up with breweries and distilleries; its 106 total farm breweries, distilleries, wineries, and cideries ranks it second among all state regions to the Finger Lakes. Hutch Kugeman, who was the first brewer at Crossroads Brewing Co. in Athens in 2010, was among the established brewers who saw the growth firsthand, calling the 2012-13 period after the Farm Brewery Act “that next wave of massive expansion.” Kugeman joined the Culinary Institute of America in 2015 to run its partnership facility with Brooklyn Brewery. That relationship was a sign that the culinary world had fully accepted craft beer as part of the fine dining experience and recognized its profit potential. Moreover, CIA will further its reach in alcohol education by partnering with Asahi Shuzo International, which announced in February a $28 million investment to transform a vacant Hyde Park building into its first American sake brewery. With these recent developments, Kugeman says the CIA is focused on educating students how to brew and, secondarily, how to operate a brewing facility. He sees, despite the recent wave of brewery openings and expansions, there will be opportunities for his students once they leave the classroom, and especially in smaller farm breweries servicing their local communities. “I think the guys who are going to get squeezed are the mid-sized breweries who we consider bigger for craft,” says Kugeman, talking about minimum 50-barrel brewhouses. “Most of their business is in package, in bottles and cans, and it becomes harder to differentiate yourself.” Plus, he thinks it’s hard to imagine the state doing anything to stifle the growth of

the craft beverage industry considering how much they’ve supported business. “You never know for sure what’s going to happen when it comes to politics, but I’d be surprised,” says Kugeman, who added that the State Liquor Authority has been helping producers secure licenses quickly while ensuring they’re compliant with regulations. “The governor is very supportive of the small craft industry; not just breweries but distilleries, wineries.” That wasn’t the case 15 years ago, when according to Erenzo, one of the leaders of the SLA said to his face, “I consider you a legal drug dealer. One of these days you’re gonna break the law and I’m gonna catch you.” But Erenzo’s lobbying group helped craft the Farm Distillery Act and broke down doors for small-batch distillers. Ten years later, through the American Craft Spirits Association, Erenzo and lobbyists ensured a reduction in federal excise tax for small distilleries from 100 percent to 20 percent, which is in line with small craft breweries and wineries. That change came as a bill packaged with the federal tax overhaul plan of December. Earlier in 2017, Tuthilltown announced its sale from Erenzo to William Grant & Sons, a Scottish distiller of brands like Glenfiddich, Hendrick’s Gin, and Tullamore D.E.W. Irish Whiskey. William Grant & Sons already owned the Hudson Whiskey brand, which they bought in 2010, but this move brings the international titan skin into the American whiskey game while giving Erenzo a chance to watch his former business grow in ways he didn’t think was possible if he continued to own Tuthilltown. He’s now serving as a brand ambassador of sorts for William Grant & Sons, while focusing efforts on lobbying for producers and keeping a long view of craft’s future. “What’s needed next is infrastructure,” says Erenzo. “We have all these producers—we have a huge number of craft beer, craft spirits producers, all of whom use malted barley. And almost all of the malted barley used in production doesn’t come from New York State.” Fleming says the state’s malting barley industry was just starting in 2013, but now 4/18 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 59


60 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 4/18


2-Way Brewing Company 18 West Main Street, Beacon 2waybrewingcompany.com

Arrowood Farms 236 Lower Whitfield Road, Accord Arrowoodfarms.com Bacchus 4 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz Bacchusnewpaltz.com Blue Collar Brewery 40 Cottage Street, Poughkeepsie Thebluecollarbrewery.com Brewery Lahoff 50 Vedder Road, Climax Brewerylahoff.com Bull And Barrel Brewery 988 Ny-22, Brewster Bullandbarrelbrewpub.com Catskill Brewery 672 Old Route 17 Livingston Manor Catskillbrewery.com Cave Mountain Brewing Company 5359 Main Street, Windham (518) 734-9222 Chatham Brewing 59 Main Street, Chatham Chathambrewing.com CIA/Brooklyn Brewery CIA, Hyde Park Ciachef.edu/student-brewedbeer-available Clemson Brewing Company 22 Cottage Street, Middletown Clemsonbrewing.com Clintondale Brewing Company LLC 59 Hurds Road, Clintondale (845) 883-9890 Cousins Ale Works 204 Pondview Loop, Wappingers Falls Cousinsaleworks.com Crossroads Brewing Company 21 Second Street, Athens Crossroadsbrewingco.com Dutchess Ales 4280 Route 22, Wassaic Facebook.com/DutchessAles Equilibrium Brewing 22 Henry Street, Middletown Eqbrew.com Fox 'N' Hare Brewing 46 Front Street, Port Jervis Foxnhare-brewing.com From The Ground Brewery 245 Guski Road, Red Hook Fromthegroundbrewery.com Gilded Otter Brewing Company 3 Main Street, New Paltz Gildedotter.com Glenmere Brewing Company 55 Maple Avenue, Florida Glenmerebrewingco.com Great Life Brewery 75 Clarendon Avenue, Kingston Facebook.com/greatlifebrewing Hammo's Brewpub And Lodge 39 County Road 65, Hensonville (518) 734-6500 Honey Hollow Brewing Company 376 E Honey Hollow Road, Earlton Honeyhollowbrewery.com Hudson Ale Works 17 Milton Avenue, Highland Hudsonaleworks.com Hudson Valley Brewery 2 Churchill Street, Beacon Hudsonvalleybrewery.com Hunter Mountain Brewery 7267 Street Route 23A, Hunter HMBCatskills.com Hyde Park Brewing Company 4076 Albany Post Road, Hyde Park Hydeparkbrewing.com

Keegan Ales 20 Saint James Street, Kingston Keeganales.com Long Lot Farm Brewery 153 Johnson Road, Chester Longlotfarmbrewery.com Mill House Brewing Company 289 Mill Street, Poughkeepsie Millhousebrewing.com New Paltz Brewing Company 7174 Old Route 209, New Paltz Newpaltzbrewing.com Newburgh Brewing Company 88 South Colden Street, Newburgh Newburghbrewing.com North River Hops And Brewing 1571 Route 9, Wappingers Falls Northriverbrews.com Obercreek Brewing Company 59 Marlorville Rd, Wappingers Falls Obercreekbrewing.com Old Klaverack Brewery 150 Thielman Road, Hudson Oldklaverackbrewery.com Pine Island Brewing 682 County Route 1 Suite B, Pine Island Pineislandbeer.com Plan Bee Farm Brewery 115 Underhill Road, Poughkeepsie Planbeefarmbrewery.com Rip Van Winkle Brewing Company 4545 Ny Route 32, Catskill Ripvanwinklebrewery.com Rock Cellar Brewing 46 Pine Tree Rd, Monroe 10950 Rockcellarbrewing.com Rough Cut Brewing 5945 Route 44 55, Kerhonkson Roughcutbrewing.com Rushing Duck Brewing Co. 1 Battiato Lane, Chester Rushingduck.com Sloop Brewing 1065 County Route 19, Elizaville Sloopbrewing.com Smart Beer Company PO Box 430, New Paltz Smartbeercompany.com Suarez Family Brewery 2278 Route 9, Livingston Suarezfamilybrewery.com Svendale Brewing Co . 127 Cooper Road, Millerton Svendale.com The Brewery At Orange County Hops . 771 Route 52, Walden Orangecountyhops.com The Peekskill Brewery 47-53 South Water Street, Peekskill Peekskillbrewery.com West Kill Brewing 2173 Spruceton Road, West Kill Westkillbrewing.com Westtown Brew Works 236 Schefflers Road, Westtown Westtownbrewworks.com Woodstock Brewery 5581 NY-28, Phoenicia Drinkwoodstock.com Yard Owl Brewery 19 Osprey Lane, Gardiner Yardowlcraftbrewery.com

Adair Vineyards 52 Alhusen Road, New Paltz Adairwine.com Alison Wines 231 Pitcher Lane, Red Hook Alisonwines.com

Allied Wine 70 Berme Road, Ellenville Alliedwine.com Applewood Winery 82 Four Corners Road, Warwick Applewoodwinery.com Baldwin Vineyards 176 Hardenburgh Road, Pine Bush Baldwinvineyards.com Benmarl Winery 156 Highland Avenue, Marlboro Benmarl.com Brimstone Hill Vineyard & Winery 61 Brimstone Hill Road, Pine Bush Brimstonehillwinery.com Brotherhood Winery 100 Brotherhood Plaza Drive Washingtonville Brotherhood-winery.com Brunel & Rafael Winery 180 South Street, Marlboro Brunelandrafael.com Cascade Mountain Winery 835 Cascade Mountain Road, Amenia Cascademt.com Cereghino Smith Winery 2583 Route 32, Bloomington Cereghinosmith.com Clear View Vineyard 35 Clearview Lane, Warwick Clearviewvineyard.com Clinton Vineyards 450 Clinton Corners Schultzville Road Clinton Corners Clintonvineyards.com Demarest Hill Winery 81 Pine Island Turnpike, Warwick Demaresthillwinery.com El Paso Winery 742 Broadway Route 9W, Ulster Park Elpasowinery.com Engel Wines 6 Quickway Road, Monroe (917) 365-7581 Enlightenment Wines & Meadry 67 Barclay Road, Clintondale Enlightenmentwines.com Ferreira Carpenter Winery 62 W Ridge Road, Warwick Ferreiracarpenterwinery.com Fjord Vineyards 202 Ridge Road, Milton Fjordvineyards.com Glorie Farm Winery 40 Mountain Road, Marlboro Gloriewine.com Hudson-Chatham Winery 1900 Route 66, Ghent Hudsonchathamwinery.com Kedem Winery 1519 Route 9W, Marlboro Kedemwinery.com Magnanini Winery 172 Strawridge Road, Wallkill (845) 895-2767 Milea Estate Vineyard 40 Hollow Circle Road, Staatsburg Mileaestatevineyard.com Millbrook Vineywards & Winery 26 Wing Road, Millbrook Millbrookwine.com Nostrano Vineyards 14 Gala Lane, Milton Nostranovineyards.com Oceane Vineyards 1661 Kings Hwy, Chester Oceanevineyards.com Palaia Winery 10 Sweet Clover Road, Highland Mills Palaiavineyards.com Pazdar Winery 6 Laddie Road, Middletown Pazdarwinery.com Robibero Family Vineyards 714 Albany Post Road, New Paltz Robiberofamilyvineyards.com

Shier Winery 439 Floyd Ackert Road, West Park Shierwinery.com Stoutridge Vineyard 10 Ann Kaley Lane, Marlboro Stoutridge.com The Vineyard at Windham 11 Mount View Estates Road, Windham Thevineyardatwindham.com Tousey Farms & Winery 1783 Route 9, Germantown Touseywinery.com Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery 114 Little York Road, Warwick Wvwinery.com Whitecliff Vineyard & Winery 331 Mckinstry Road, Gardiner Whitecliffwine.com Wild Arc Farm 918 Hill Avenue, Pine Bush Wildarcfarm.com Woodstock Winery 395 Wittenberg Road, Bearsville (845) 679-4514

Apple Dave's Distillery 82 Four Corners Road Warwick Appledavesorchards.com Arkadiya Distillery 714 Ulster Heights Road, Ellenville (718) 938-2467 Berkshire Mountain Distillers 356 S Main Street, Sheffield Berkshiremountaindistillers.com Black Dirt Distillery 114 Little York Road, Warwick Blackdirtdistillery.com Castle Spirits 18 Quickway Road, Monroe (845) 783-6332 Catskill Distilling Company 2037 NY-17B, Bethel Catskilldistilling.com Coppersea Distilling 239 Springtown Road, New Paltz Coppersea.com Delaware Pheonix 144 Delaware Street, Walton Delawarephoenix.com Denning's Point Distillery 10 North Chestnut Street, Beacon Denningspointdistillery.com Gardiner Liquid Mercantile 128 Main Street, Gardiner Gardinerliquidmercantile.com Harvest Spirits 3074 U.S. Route 9, Valatie Harvestspirits.com Hill Rock Estate Distillery 408 Pooles Hill Road, Ancram Hillrockdistillery.com Hudson Valley Distillers 1727 Route 9, Clermont Hudsonvalleydistillers.com Kas Spirits 46 Miller Road, Mahopac Kasspirits.com Mysto Mead Carmel Mystomead.com Old Yorke Farm Distillery And Cooperage 284 NY-23, Claverack Oldeyorkfarm.com Orange County Distillery 19B Maloney Lane, Goshen Orangecountydistillery.com Shady Knoll Orchards & Distillery 37 Brush Hill, Millbrook Shadyknolldistillery.com

Taconic Distillery 179 Bowen Road, Stanfordville Taconicdistillery.com Tuthilltown Spirits 14 Grist Mill Lane, Gardiner Tuthilltown.com Warwick Valley Winery & Distillery 114 Little York Road, Warwick Wvwinery.com

Angry Orchard 2241 Albany Post Road, Walden Angryorchard.com Annandale Cidery 4330 NY-9G Red Hook Montgomeryplaceorchards.com Bad Seed Cider 43 Baileys Gap Road, Highland Badseedhardcider.com Brooklyn Cider House at Twin Star Orchard 155 N Ohioville Road, New Paltz Brooklynciderhouse.com Doc's Draft 114 Little York Road, Warwick Wvwinery.com/cider Graft Cidery 218 Ann Street, Newburgh Graftcidery.com Hardscrabble Cider 130 Hardscrabble Road, North Salem Hardscrabbleciderny.com Hudson Valley Farmhouse Cider Centre Road, Staatsburg Hudsonvalleyfarmhousecider.com

Kettleborough Cider House 277 State Route 208, New Paltz Kettleboroughciderhouse.com King's Highway Cider Millerton Cider.nyc Little Apple Cidery 192 Orchard Lane, Hillsdale Facebook.com/littleapplecider Metal House Cider Esopus Metalhousecider.com Naked Flock Applewood Vinery 82 Four Corners Road, Warwick Applewoodwinery.com/naked-flock Orchard Hill Cider Mill 29 Soons Circle, New Hampton Orchardhillnyc.com Pennings Farm Cidery 4 Warwick Turnpike, Warwick Penningscidery.com Sundog 343 NY-295, Chatham Sundogcider.com Treasury Cider 9 Fishkill Farm Road, Hopewell Junction Treasurycider.com Weed Orchards Winery 43 Mount Zion Road, Marlboro Weedorchards.com Yankee Folly Cidery 69 Yankee Folly Road, New Paltz Yankeefollycidery.com

Salt Point Meadery Sold through distributors Saltpointmeadery.com Mysto Mead Sold through distributors Mystomead.com

4/18 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 61


The stills at Stoutridge Vineyard & Distillery in Marlboro.

there are 13 malt houses across the state growing more than 3,000 acres of the crop. Erenzo added that there’s room for distillery growth, but in smart ways. One option is a bar, restaurant, or catering model that has a small distillery to meet its needs alone. Tapping into the Future Some distillery growth has come from established producers in other craft. Steve Osborn of Stoutridge Vineyard in Marlboro is primarily a winemaker focusing on organic, all-natural product without adding water, sugar, sulfites, or sorbates. He was interested in making spirits and installed a distillery on his property but didn’t use it for nearly 10 years, partially because the wine was selling and he wasn’t ready to devote time to distilling. Also, back in 2008 a distillery and winery couldn’t be attached and had to have separate tasting rooms. Osborn lobbied early on with Erenzo to change the laws but left that loop around 2010; finally, in 2016, the laws changed so that a winery and distillery could coexist, helping spur Osborn to start producing spirits: vodka, brandy, whiskey, and gin. “Even though distilling is capital-intensive, we had amassed some capital in the business so it wasn’t as much of a stretch,” says Osborn. “And by waiting the 10 years it allowed us to see ‘Well, what does the customer really want?’, and it allowed us to do that.” Osborn is excited about the brandy as he uses local fruit for varieties, while Erenzo touted brandy and its variants as the next frontier in beverage production, primarily because the state has such a wealth of apples. NewYork is the second-largest applegrowing state in America, accounting for 29.5 million bushels of apples annually, and the Hudson Valley ranks second among regions in statewide production, at around six million bushels. All of those apples means a lot of potentially discarded apples, and Erenzo sees potential for distillers. His son Gable Erenzo, founder of Gardiner Liquid Mercantile, is working with a fruit farm to make brandy out of otherwise trashed apples; he thinks all local distillers and farmers should make the same connection. “It’s incumbent with all the fruit growers in the state to hook up with their local distiller, and whatever they’re not turning into their final product can be distilled into a spirit,” says Erenzo. “And even wine or cider that’s just not quite right—it doesn’t meet your standards, so you would otherwise dump it—you can take that back and make it into a brandy, and increase its value rather than throw it away.” As for cider, leaders in the local scene are hoping to boost its reputation on a national scale. Ryan Burk, head cider maker at Angry Orchard in Walden, comes from Western New York, the largest region of apple growing in the state, home to Mott’s and big 62 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 4/18

apple juice, which relies on the inexpensive Northern Spy and Golden Russet varieties. But Hudson Valley land is pricier, and apples here reflect pricier grocery industry demands, and those varieties aren’t the best for cider production. Burk says he’d like to change that reality, bringing those interesting cider varieties downstate while still responding to demands driven by the cost of land. “That’s the thing we’re working on now as an industry—to try to get people to understand that there can be two streams of juice,” says Burk. “It’s one of the reasons the Hudson Valley can be a great player in the cider industry:There are expert growers, with great growing conditions, that understand the value of fruit.” Angry Orchard chose the Hudson Valley, specifically Crist Brothers Orchards’ 50 acres in Walden, because of the area’s growing conditions and there being a partner willing to change his direction to supply the country’s runaway leader in hard cider production. According to a 2014 study, Angry Orchard, which is owned by the Boston Beer Company, accounted for 56.8 percent of all hard cider sales. While having the big boys in the backyard has brought some backlash from other producers, Burk says Angry Orchard is working to boost production throughout the valley. For example, they’ve opened up their on-site cider lab to smaller producers, and they’re working with Glynwood in Cold Spring to redistribute bittersweet cider fruit. In fact, Glynwood sponsors a local cider week, and in 2017 it created Ciders of the Hudson Valley, an effort to promote local cideries in an effort to boost the region’s cider output as comparable to Napa Valley’s wine culture. The work Glynwood and Angry Orchard are doing, along with Cornell Cooperative Extension through its research orchard in Highland, are designed to push the Hudson Valley’s cider culture as far as possible, but the challenge remains getting people on board with understanding cider. “The cider industry at large is at a place where it’s not sink-or-swim time, it’s educate-drinkers time,” says Burk, comparing this moment to craft beer just after its bubble burst around 1995. “People got their shit together and started to make real high-quality drinks and educate the people they’re selling it to. Our industry won’t grow until we start telling people how and when to drink cider, what cider is and where it comes from.” It’s probably easier to see the Hudson Valley’s cider industry sustain its growth, simply because its producers already have the most important ingredient in the local ground, and abundantly.With spirits and beer, there’s work to be done. Malting barley is still growing, and while New York used to be the top hop grower in America, that industry died during Prohibition and didn’t return until recently. Currently Fleming says there are more than 300 acres of hops in the state; for comparison, the average hop farm in the Yakima Valley of Washington is 450 acres. Fleming says there are enough hops available for farm brewers to source 20 percent of their hops from New York through 2018. That threshold grows to 60 percent starting in 2019, but again, Fleming says there’s enough supply to meet demand. “No, I’m not concerned,” says Fleming. “The Northeast Hops Alliance estimates that 50 to 100 acres of hops is enough to supply every licensed Farm Brewer in New York State at 100 percent.” The bigger issue is about variety. It takes several years for a hop variety to grow and flourish. Plus, hop varieties are proprietary to growers, so if brewers want to use some of the most popular styles, they have to acquire them from their home farm. Thus, if a local brewery wants to work with, say, Citra, the famous hop used in the popular New England IPA style, it has to source from the Pacific Northwest. That brings us back to Sloop. Turco, the brewery’s sales and marketing manager, says the moment the brewery realized it was time to move was after seeing the success of its New England IPA Juice Bomb (Sloop brands it a Northeastern IPA and won’t divulge its ingredients). Turco, who worked at Bell’s Brewing in Michigan—which distributes nationally and is a popular name in craft—says he’s never seen a flagship sell like Juice Bomb. So, while Sloop is keeping the Elizaville barn for a barrelaging program and tasting room, it’s moving its 30-barrel brewhouse and adding six 120 BBL fermenters to the Fishkill facility. The complex will ultimately include a downstairs taproom, an upstairs sit-down restaurant, and a rooftop beer garden. Sloop is betting on its flagship’s success, its current operational success, and its potential in this move. Despite the fact that the most popular hops are out of state, that the growing culture is still young for distillers and especially brewers, and the continued increase of producers throughout the region, makers are thinking like Sloop, that the market is still in their favor. As Turco said to Sloop’s co-owners, Adam Watson and Justin Taylor: “You can’t predict or dictate the industry at all, because there could be a beer in the portfolio now, or a beer that doesn’t exist yet, that becomes a Number 1 beer in five to 10 years.” You can apply that thinking to the entire craft industry in the Hudson Valley. Right now, it looks really strong. In five or 10 years…who knows?


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EMBARK ON A FOOD ADVENTURE

ciarestaurantgroup.com | 845-471-6608 1946 Campus Drive (Route 9) Hyde Park, NY 12538

Al orno

SEOUL KITCHEN

We are proud to be offering the freshest local fare of the Hudson Valley, something that is at the core of our food philosophy.

AUTHENTIC KOREAN FOOD

k e a M e e h C Spicy Fried Chicken & Beer

71 Liberty Street, Newburgh, NY 845.563.0796 Closed Monday – Tuesday

!

OPEN 5 DAYS A WEEK

Serving breakfast & lunch all day 8:30 - 4:30 PM Closed Mondays and Tuesdays CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS

845-255-4949 2356 RT. 44/55 Gardiner NY 12525 VISIT US ONLINE

www.miogardiner.com

Spring/Summer Issue Out Soon To advertise, email sales@explorethehudsonvalley.com 64 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 4/18


tastings directory Bakeries Alternative Baker 407 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-3355 www.lemoncakes.com 100% All butter, hand-made, small-batch baked goods with many allergy-friendly options. Open at 7am until 7:30pm Friday and Saturday. Until 5pm Thursday, Sunday, and Monday. Closed Tuesday and Wednesday. All-vegan vegetable soups in season, an array of JB Peel coffees and Harney teas, artisanal drinks, plus our awardwinning Belgian hot chocolate, also served iced! Unique wedding cakes for a lifetime’s treasure. All “Worth a detour”—NY Times. Truly “Where Taste is Everything!”

Butchers Jack’s Meats & Deli 79 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2244

Cafés Apple Pie Bakery Café Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY www.applepiebakerycafe.com (845) 905-4500 Bistro-to-Go 948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 www.bluemountainbistro.com Gourmet take-out store serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. Featuring local and imported organic foods, delicious homemade desserts, sophisticated four-star food by Chefs Richard Erickson, Jonathan Sheridan, and Dan Sherman. Off-premise full-service catering and event planning for parties of all sizes. Redstart Coffee 1 West Strand, Kingston, NY (845) 331-4700 www.redstartcoffee.com

Catering Lobster Lagoon Catering 259 South Pearl Street, Albany, NY (518) 536-4500 www.lobsterlagoon,com Lobster Lagoon Catering provides full service catering for gatherings large and small from 10- 500 guests. For all events, wedding, corporate event, summer barbecue, graduation, or other party.

Restaurants A&P Bar and Restaurant 83 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY www.aandpbar.com American Bounty Restaurant Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY www.americanbountyrestaurant.com (845) 451-1011 Bocuse Restaurant, The Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY www.bocuserestaurant.com (845) 451-1012 Café Mio 2356 Route 44/55, Gardiner, NY (845) 255-4949 www.miogardiner.com Colony Woodstock 22 Rock City Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-7625 www.colonywoodstock.com Daryl’s House Club 130 NY-22, Pawling, NY (845) 289-0185 www.darylshouseclub.com

The premier Sushi restaurant in the Hudson Valley for over 22 years. Only the freshest sushi with an innovative flair.

Daryl’s House Restaurant & Music Club serves up top-notch food along with amazing music Wednesday - Sunday. The weekends feature Free Music Brunch! Full calendar of shows, tickets + menus can be found on the website. Dutch Ale House 253 Main Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 247-2337 www.dutchalehouse.com The Eggs Nest 1300 Route 213, High Falls, NY (845) 687-7255 www.theeggsnest.com Henry’s at the Farm 220 North Road, Milton, NY (845) 795-1500 www.buttermilkfallsinn.com/eat-and-drink henrys@buttermilkfallsinn.com Henry’s at the Farm is a jewel of a restaurant, tucked away in the Hudson Valley’s orchard and wine country, at Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa. At Henry’s, contemporary American cuisine and sublime craft cocktails are only steps away from Buttermilk’s own Millstone Farm.

Coffee Bar & Café on the Historic Kingston Waterfront Serving breakfast & lunch, ice cream, pastries. Free wifi Indoor & outdoor seating

Osaka Restaurant 22 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7338 74 Broadway, Tivoli, NY (845) 757-5056 www.osakasushi.net Foodies, consider yourselves warned and informed! Osaka Restaurant is Rhinebeck’s direct link to Japan’s finest cuisines! Enjoy the freshest sushi and delicious traditional Japanese small plates cooked with love by this family owned and operated treasure for over 22 years! For more information and menus, go to osakasushi.net. Red Hook Curry House 28 E Market Street, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-2666 redhookcurryhouse.com Mohammed and his wife, Maksuda, are the chefs for Red Hook Curry House. Their creations have received excellent reviews – Zagat rated! Home-cooked traditional Hundi cuisine. Monday night is Bard night! Students or faculty get 10% off on Monday’s. Enjoy a Hundi buffet on Tuesday’s & Sunday’s! It offers 4 vegetarian dishes and 4 non-vegetarian dishes. It includes appetizers, soup, salad bar, bread, dessert, tea, and coffee! Ristorante Caterina de’Medici Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY www.ristorantecaterinademedici.com (845) 451-1013 Seoul Kitchen 71 Liberty Street, Newburgh, NY (845) 563-0796 Authentic Korean Food. Heewon (Owner and Cook) cooks her memory of childhood that her mother and friend’s mother always treated them warm rice and a soup with ban-chan (side dishes) from their mothers who were middle class. She likes a jip-bap (house meal) and wants people to try it. Saturday Ramen Special. Traghaven Whiskey Pub 66 Broadway, Tivoli, NY www.traghaven.com Yobo Restaurant Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-3848 www.yoborestaurant.com

Specialty Foods Applestone Meat Co. Stone Ridge, Accord, NY www.applestonemeat.com

1 West Strand Kingston, NY 845.331.4700 Redstartcoffee.com Hours 8am-6pm every day

79 Main Street New Paltz 845-255-2244 Open 7 Days

of Full Line uts C ld o C Organic ooking C e m o H and en Delicatess

Local Organic Grass-Fed Beef • Lamb • Goat • Veal • Pork • Chicken • Wild Salmon

No Hormones ~ No Antibiotics ~ No Preservatives Custom Cut • Home Cooking Delicatessen Nitrate-Free Bacon • Pork Roasts • Beef Roasts Bone-in or Boneless Ham: smoked or fresh Local Organic Beef • Exotic Meats (Venison, Buffalo, Ostrich) • Wild Fish

Voted Best Indian Cuisine in the Hudson Valley

Red Hook Curry House ★★★★ DINING Daily Freeman & Poughkeepsie Journal ZAGAT RATED

HUNDI BUFFET

TUESDAY & SUNDAY 5-9PM

4 Vegetarian Dishes • 4 Non-Vegetarian Dishes includes: appetizers, soup, salad bar, bread, dessert, coffee & tea All you can eat only $15.00 • Children under 8- $8.95 28 E. MARKET ST, RED HOOK (845) 758-2666 See our full menu at www.RedHookCurryHouse.com

OPEN EVERY DAY Lunch: 11:30am - 3:00pm Dinner: 5:00pm - 10:00pm Fridays: 3:00pm - 10:00pm

Catering for Parties & Weddings • Take out orders welcome

4/18 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 65


S PE C I A L A DV E RT IS IN G S E CTIO N

Craft Beverage Spotlight Walden

Saugerties

Angry Orchard Explore the Excitement and Innovation of Craft Cider Angry Orchard has been putting its own twist on traditional ciders and experimenting with new processes and techniques for more than 20 years. In 2015, the craft cider company established an official outpost for research and development in Walden, New York. The site’s Innovation Cider House is where cider makers develop new and unique styles, as well as welcome visitors from near and far to learn about the history and heritage of cider making. Nestled in the picturesque Hudson Valley region, guests can enjoy several of Angry Orchard’s year-round and limited-release styles in the tasting room, treehouse or cider garden. The orchard is a destination for cider aficionados and newcomers alike to explore the excitement and innovation of craft cider. 2241 Albany Post Road, Walden, NY 12586 (845) 713-5180 www.angryorchard.com/theorchard

Dutch Ale House The Dutch Ale House re-opens with a LARGE CRAFT BEER SELECTION, TRADITIONAL PUB MENU, COZY HISTORIC SPACE.

The oldest gastropub in Saugerties is bringing you more of what you love about your favorite pub in a larger, cozier, historic tavern atmosphere. Come and enjoy a cold craft beer and warm meal! · 16 Craft beers on tap with a focus on New York State brewers · Beer flights and pairings · New craft cocktail list · Updated seasonal menu including old favorites with a new twist · House smoked local meats and house made sausages · Newly renovated space

253 Main Street, Saugerties, NY 12477 (845) 247-BEER @dutchalehouse www.dutchalehouse.com

Glenmere Brewing Co. 55 Maple Avenue, Florida, NY (845) 651-1939 Spring/Summer Hours: Thurs & Fri 4-9, Sat 12-9, & Sun 12-7 www.glenmerebrewingco.com Choose from Glenmere’s eight-on-tap small batch craft beers produced with local hops, grains and select farmed ingredients that remain true to the style of each beer. Mastering award winning beer, a cozy tasting room and an industrial lounge & game area with live weekend music gives brewery guests a unique experience that aligns with their distinctive craft beer selection. 66 CRAFT BEVERAGES CHRONOGRAM 4/18

COMING IN JUNE by

FOR INFO & UPDATES, VISIT

Chronogram.com/hvpour


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Sustainable Entrepreneurship

-BEST GRASS-FED GOURMET BURGERS IN THE HUDSON VALLEY -ALL BEEF IS RAISED AT OUR OWN TRAGHAVEN FARM

A Model for Thriving Local Economies

-ONE OF THE LARGEST SELECTION OF IRISH WHISKEY IN AMERICA

Tuesday, May 8, 5pm —7pm

66 Broadway Tivoli, NY traghaven.com

hosting sponsor:

The Beekman Arms 6387 Mill Street, Rhinebeck

keynote speaker: Matt Stinchcomb, former Etsy vice president and founder of the Good Work Institute, will discuss the entrepreneurial spirit and ongoing economic regeneration of the Hudson Valley. followed by:

A panel of regional leaders will discuss their experiences, successes and failures, and what’s on the horizon for the Hudson Valley business ecosystem. Moderated by Chronogram Editorial Director Brian K. Mahoney.

10N Chestnut Street, Beacon

TAS T I N G ROOM HOURS Fri

4-8 pm ' Sat 2-8 pm ' Sun 2-6 pm

www.DenningsPointDistillery.com

Reserve your ticket in advance ($10) Chronogram.com/sustainable-entrepreneurship

Sample fare from The Tavern at The Beekman, as well as more food and beverage sponsors to be announced at Chronogram.com/Conversations.

Supported by

IF YOU’RE INTERESTED IN SPONSORING AN EVENT, PLEASE EMAIL: MARKETING@CHRONOGRAM.COM

4/18 CHRONOGRAM CRAFT BEVERAGES 67


CSA

Directory

Community Supported Agriculture in the Hudson Valley With spring upon us, it’s time to support your favorite local farm and sign up for a community-supported agriculture (CSA) share. Pay upfront for the whole season and receive weekly baskets of farm-fresh fruit, vegetables, flowers, eggs, meats, and herbs through the whole growing season. Through a recent study, Glynwood discovered that if CSA farms in the region were to sell at capacity, an estimated 5,100 additional households could be eating healthy, locally grown produce. Add your family to the list and support a local grower while you’re at it. Here is a list of farms throughout the region that offer CSA shares, compiled by the Hudson Valley CSA Coalition. Hudsonvalleycsa.org.

Putnam County Glynwood Cold Spring Egg, Meat, Vegetable Glynwood.org Longhaul Farm Garrison Vegetable Longhauling.blogspot.com Ryder Farm Brewster Vegetable Ryderfarmorganic.com

Ulster County

Columbia County Abode Farm CSA New Lebanon Herb, Vegetable Abodefarmcsa.com

Threshold Farm Philmont Fruit Localharvest.org/threshold-farm-M321

Poughkeepsie Farm Project Poughkeepsie Vegetable Farmproject.org

Evolutionary Organics New Paltz Egg, Fruit, Vegetable Facebook.com/EvolutionaryOrganics

Common Hands Farm Hudson Half Share / Small Size Commonhandscsa.com

Tiny Hearts Farm Copake Flower Tinyheartsfarm.com

Rock Steady Farm & Flowers Millerton Egg, Flower, Fruit, Herb, Meat, Vegetable Variety (whole diet/full plate) Rocksteadyfarm.com

Grass + Grit Farm New Paltz Egg, Meat Grassgritfarm.com

Hawk Dance Farm Hillsdale Herb, Vegetable Hawkdancefarm.com

Dutchess County

Hawthorne Valley Farm Ghent Dairy, Egg, Fruit, Meat, Vegetable Hawthornevalleystore.org Hearty Roots Community Farm Clermont Egg, Meat, Vegetable Heartyroots.com Ironwood Farm Ghent Vegetable Ironwood.farm Letterbox Farm Hudson Egg, Meat, Vegetable, Variety Letterboxfarm.com Lineage Farm Hudson Egg, Meat, Vegetable Lineagefarmcsa.com Little Seed Gardens Chatham Meat, Vegetable Littleseedgardens.com New Leaf Farm Lebanon Springs Flower, Vegetable Newleaffarm.net Roxbury Farm Kinderhook Fruit, Meat, Vegetable Roxburyfarm.com Ten Barn Farm Ghent Flower, Vegetable Tenbarnfarm.com

68 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Common Ground Farm Wappingers Falls Flower, Herb, Vegetable Commongroundfarm.org Hepworth Farms @ Primrose Hill School, Rhinebeck Fruit, Vegetable Primrosehillschool.com Fishkill Farms Hopewell Junction Egg, Fruit, Vegetable Fishkillfarms.com Full Circus Farm Pine Plains Flower, Fruit, Herb, Vegetable Fullcircusfarm.wordpress.com Great Song Farm Red Hook Egg, Flower, Fruit, Vegetable Greatsongfarm.com Maitri Farm Amenia Meat, Vegetable, Variety (whole diet / full plate) Maitrifarmny.com Meadowland Farm Clinton Corners Flower, Fruit, Herb, Vegetable Meadowlandfarmny.com Northwind Farms Tivoli Meat Northwindfarmsallnatural.com Obercreek Farm Wappingers Falls Egg, Flower, Fruit, Herb, Meat, Vegetable Obercreekfarm.com

Sawkill Farm Red Hook Meat Sawkillfarm.squarespace.com Shoving Leopard Farm Barrytown Flower Shovingleopardfarm.org Sisters Hill Farm Stanfordville Vegetable Sistershillfarm.org

Greene County

Heather Ridge Farm Preston Hollow Meat Heather-ridge-farm.com Huguenot St Farm, New Paltz Fruit, Vegetable Huguenotfarm.com Kelder’s Farm, Kerhonkson Flower, Fruit, Herb, Meat, Vegetable Keldersfarm.com Old Ford Farm Gardiner Vegetable (Half Share / Small Size) Oldfordfarm.com

Foxtail Community Farm Greenville Egg, Fruit, Meat, Vegetable Foxtailcommunityfarm.com

Phillies Bridge Farm Project New Paltz Vegetable Philliesbridge.org

Stoneledge Farm Leeds Vegetable Stoneledge.farm

Rondout Valley Organics Ellenville Egg, Flower, Fruit, Herb, Meat, Vegetable Rustyploughfarm.com

Orange County

Second Wind CSA Gardiner Egg, Flower, Fruit, Meat, Vegetable Secondwindcsa.com

Bialas Farms New Hampton Flower, Herb, Vegetable Bialasfarms.com Gray Family Farm New Windsor Egg, Meat Grayfamilyfarm.com Peace and Carrots Farm Chester Flower, Herb, Vegetable Peaceandcarrotsfarm.com Royal Acres Farm and CSA Middletown Vegetable Facebook.com/ RoyalAcresFarmAndCsa

Solid Ground Farm Kingston Egg, Vegetable Solidground.farm SustainAbility Farm Accord Vegetable Sustainabilityfarm.org The Farm Bridge Shares New Paltz Fruit, Vegetable Thefarmbridgeshares.com


Community Pages

A PLEASANT PLACE TO BUILD A TOWN NEWBURGH & CORNWALL BY ANNE PYBURN CRAIG

Barbara Smith Gioia in her studio at Atlas Studios in Newburgh.

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Kayaking the Moodna Creek with Storm King Adventure Tours.

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istorians are divided on whether Henry Hudson’s navigator was referring to Newburgh or Cornwall when he noted in his log that this would be “a pleasant place to build a town.” What we do know is that the Half Moon was anchored in Newburgh Bay, and that people have been falling in love with the place ever since. Cornwall, at the south end of the bay, is a peaceably lively place nestled in the shadow of Storm King Mountain. To appreciate His Majesty properly, sign up for a paddle with Storm King Adventure Tours; they’ll teach you kayaking and guide you to wonders: Bannerman’s Castle, the Moodna Marsh, Plum Point. For a loftier perspective, you can hike Storm King State Park; wear decent footwear and discover historic ruins on your way to magnificent views. The perfect follow-up to either is a wander through the warm-hearted, upscale, and charming village of Cornwall-on-Hudson. You can sate your hunger at Jones Farm, begun as a dairy operation in 1914 and still offering fresh produce alongside a country store, scratch bakery, cafe, gift shop, and gallery. Jones Farm is Sheree Morrison’s favorite local outing. “It’s just so cute, and the food and baked goods are wonderful,” says Morrison, who opened her fashion-forward thrift boutique, MOD, on Main Street in February 2015. “Of course, Painter’s Inn is great if you’re in an old-school mood.” Morrison, originally from East Fishkill, is loving the entrepreneurial life in the little village on the West Shore. “I have a close group of people who came here because they were sick of mall shopping; they’ve become friends of mine and of each other. I love helping people hone a personal style and hand-picking high-end designer stuff in city thrift shops.” Cornwall-on-Hudson highlights include a five-star Wiccan shop, Brid’s Closet, and the delightful 2 Alices Coffee Lounge, which offers beer, wine, art, music, and an outdoor patio. Just north of Cornwall, in New Windsor, take a surreal journey through rolling hills dotted with sculpture at the Storm King Art Center and/or immerse yourself in poignant military history at the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor. And just north of New Windsor, of course, you will find

Catching dragonflies at the Hudson Highlands Nature Museum.

4/18 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 71


1 MUSEUM ROAD, NEW WINDSOR, NY

2018 SEASON: APRIL 4 – DECEMBER 9

WWW.STORMKING.ORG Mark di Suvero, She, 1977–78. Private collection. ©Mark di Suvero, courtesy the artist and Spacetime C.C., New York. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson.

The Shops at

Jones Farm Since 1914

JONES FARM & COUNTRY STORE HOMEGROWN PRODUCE, CSA, LOCAL & GOURMET FOODS GRANDMA PHOEBE’S KITCHEN HOMEMADE BAKED GOODS & CAFE CLEARWATERS DISTINCTIVE GIFTS HOME DECOR, CANDLES, TOYS, LADIES CLOTHING, JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES CLEARWATERS GALLERY & CUSTOM FRAMING ARCHIVAL FRAMING • ORIGINAL ARTWORK BY TERRI A. CLEARWATER

ONLINE April 2018 - Read the entire issue online. Plus, check out these extras!

Our thrice-weekly newsletter brings curated events, coverage of local food and drink, and the real estate market to your inbox. Sign up now at Chronogram.com/ eatplaystay

“Baked & Grown, Just Like Home.” 190 Angola Rd. Cornwall, NY 12518 • www.Jonesfarminc.com Phone: 845-534-4445 Fax: 845-534-4471 Closed Tuesdays

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yourself in a true Hudson Valley legend: the City of Newburgh. Newburgh’s struggles in the late 20th century were epic. Named the All American City by LOOK magazine in 1952, Newburgh was a place where gleaming luxury sedans lined the widest Broadway in the state, where elegantly clad citizens imbibed theater and opera and shopped the bustling thoroughfare of Water Street. Before that, the city was a civic-minded and industrious powerhouse of the Gilded Age economy; and even before that, it was General George Washington’s chosen home base for planning and run ning the Revolution. As if the city were a mythological character struck by an ironic curse, it suffered a series of blows in rapid succession: the vanishing of the industrial base, the brief reign in the early 1960s of an administrator so racist he had to be brought to heel by the Feds, and a disastrous attempt at urban renewal are but three of the better-known. Even at its worst, the city inspired ferocious passion with its spectacular river views and architectural majesty. Through twists and turns that could fill a series of novels, ardent forces for revitalization tried tactic after tactic and never gave up, and the Newburgh of today is rising fast. “There’s nothing in the Hudson Valley that beats the Liberty Street Bistro for a great dinner—and that’s coming from a gourmand who spent six years exploring the great restaurants of Philadelphia,” says Austin DuBois, an attorney who returned to the Hudson Valley and chose Newburgh as home. “I also like Ms. Fairfax and The Wherehouse. Of course, the Newburgh Brewing Company for great craft beer. And it’s lesser known for now, but the guy running Graft Cidery has serious chops. He’s hitting all the right notes, from the product to the art on the label.” The Liberty Street area, perfectly situated to include a visit to Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, offers a lot of solidly established excellence (check out the kimchi dumplings at Seoul Kitchen and the signature salted chocolate chip cookies at Caffe Macchiato) and is now just part of a bigger picture of vitality springing up in many locations at once. Blacc Vanilla Cafe on South Street is another favorite with DuBois. “A local came back home and opened it, and I go there a few mornings a week for coffee, and the

John Garay

scene is organic as it gets,” he says. “Everybody, all the walks of life, getting to know each other and having fun.” Blacc Vanilla’s grand opening in late 2017 featured an appearance by Decora, a hip-hop artist, performance poet, and event curator with strong Newburgh ties. Blacc Vanilla’s Blacc Tie Gala, happening Saturday, April 21, will be held in the Regal Bag Studios, a magnificently refurbished industrial building on the river, and catered by the Liberty Street Bistro team. That event will benefit Newburgh Illuminated, an annual explosion of music, art, dance, and food that’s scheduled for June 2 this year. (Decora will perform.) All this resurgent culture (and we haven’t even mentioned the Newburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Queen of the Hudson chamber music series hosted at Atlas Studios, or the public art splendors of the Lightbulb Project) is backed up by solid community development. Under the deft leadership of Mayor Judy Kennedy, the city has benefitted from alliances among groups like Habitat for Humanity, Safe Harbors, and Ulster Countybased RUPCO working alongside the Newburgh Community Land Bank, a redevelopment organization that returned over 50 properties to the tax rolls in 2017. They have a powerful tool in A River of Opportunities. The nonprofit is building a successful track record helping to boost the visibility of available commercial properties through a strong Daniel Brown at The Wherehouse in Newburgh.

Katie Collins with Maria and Julio Rostran at Blacc Vanilla in Newburgh.

social media presence and in-person workshops. “There’s increased activity coming from not just downstate but northern New York as well,” says Brian Coleman of Pyramid Brokerage. “That website definitely helps. People are buying not just residences, but spaces for their businesses as well.” “If I was wealthy, I think I’d buy up every bit of real estate bordering Downing Park and hold it for 10 years,” says Dubois, referencing the 35acre green space at the city’s core that was the last project of the same team that created Central Park. “It’s such a jewel.” The park, all gently rolling hills and fanciful historic structures, is once again vibrant; the city is planning to host exhibits at the Shelter House, a soon coming coffee cafe in the park. And besides the replanted ornamental gardens, there’s the Downing Park Urban Farm. (Newburgh’s 3rd annual Urban Farming Fair is happening right on Broadway on April 28.) The Newburgh Preservation Association, formed in 1978, is happily hosting history tours, lectures, and croquet matches, whilst working up a list of contractors to provide to “our new neighbors in the historic district.” Visit the Newburgh Bay region this spring, when the arts and flowers alike will be blooming from pastoral Cornwall to “New York’s Other City” and beyond. “I came back from traveling to many places and said, ‘this is home,’ and I’m one of many,” says Dubois. “I can see the river from my second floor; I’m surrounded by cool little shops and bars and restaurants and history. The revitalization that’s happening now is strong and organic and thoughtful, and it just keeps gathering momentum.” 4/18 CHRONOGRAM COMMUNITY PAGES 73


business directory Accommodations Mohonk Mountain House

1000 Mountain Rest Road, New Paltz, NY (800) 772-6646 www.mohonk.com

Washington Irving Inn

6629 Route 23A, Tannersville, NY (518) 589-5560 www.washingtonirving.com

Wm. Farmer & Sons

20 South Front Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-1635

Antiques Barn Star Productions

7 Center Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-0616 www.barnstar.com

Artisans Fieldstone Artistry

Wurtsboro, NY (717) 368-3067 www.fieldstonearts.com contact@fieldstonearts.com Fieldstone Artistry is a hand-crafted furniture studio located in upstate New York. We specialize in contemporary furniture pieces exhibiting function, quality and beauty. With a focus on locally harvested materials and solid wood construction. We combine the use of traditional techniques with unique modern designs.

Attorneys Jacobowitz & Gubits

Kingston Consignment

66 N. Front Street , Kingston, NY (845) 481-5759 www.kingstonconsignments.com

Outdated

314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-0030 outdatedcafe@gmail.com

Beauty and Supply Columbia Wig and Beauty Supply

56 North Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 339-4996 www.columbiacostumes.com columbiacostumes@gmail.com Columbia is back with a wide array of beauty products, including high end wigs, headscarves, hair dye, hair styling products, and makeup. They also carry costume rentals, costume wigs, and theatrical accessories. Now located in their new location just down the road from the old store!

Beverages

Art Galleries & Centers

business directory

Beacon Intitute Gallery

199 Main Street, Beacon, NY www.bire.org

Berkshire Museum

39 South Street, Pittsfield, MA (413) 443-7171 www.berkshiremuseum.org

Cross Contemporary Art

99 Partition Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 247-3122 www.crosscontemporaryart.com

Dorsky Museum

SUNY New Paltz 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3844 www.newpaltz.edu/museum sdma@newpaltz.edu

The Gallery at Rhinebeck

47 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY www.galleryrhinebeck.org

Hurleyville Arts Centre

219 Main Street, Hurleyville, NY (845) 707-8047 www.hurleyvilleartscentre.org

Mark Gruber Gallery

New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 www.markgrubergallery.com

The Rodney Shop

362 Main Street, Catskill, NY (917) 334-8022 therodneyshop.com shop@therodneyshop.com A unique creative store and gallery featuring the artwork and products of artist Rodney Alan Greenblat. Rodney’s whimsical, brightly colored paintings, prints and constructions are offered, as well as a selection of t-shirts, toys, gifts and housewares. Open Friday and Saturday 11am to 6pm and Sunday 11am to 4pm.

(845) 331-0504 www.binnewater.com

Esotec

(845) 246-2411 www.thirstcomesfirst.com esotec@msn.com

Book Publishers Epigraph Publishing Service

22 East Market Street, Suite 304, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4861 www.epigraphps.com paul@monkfishpublishing.com Epigraph Publishing Service is a home for books where authors can find solutions to their many publishing needs including design, editing, printing, and distribution. Epigraph is a DBA of Monkfish Book Publishing Company, an award-winning traditional small press founded in 2002, specializing in books that combine literary and spiritual merits.

Books

74 BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 4/18

L Browe Asphalt Services (518) 479-1400 www.broweasphalt.com

N & S Supply

www.nssupply.com info@nssupply.com

Carpets & Rugs Anatolia-Tribal Rugs & Weavings

54G Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5311 www.anatoliarugs.com anatoliarugs@gmail.com Thurs.-Mon., 12-5; closed Tues. & Wed. Established in Woodstock 1981. Offering old, antique and contemporary handwoven carpets and kilims, from Turkey, Afghanistan, Iran, Central Asia, in a wide range of styles, colors, prices. Hundreds to choose from, in a regularly changing inventory. Also, kilim pillows, $45-55, and overdyed carpets. We are happy to share our knowledge about rugs, and try and simplify the sometimes overcomplicated world of handwoven rugs.

Cinemas Rosendale Theater Collective Rosendale, NY www.rosendaletheatre.org

Upstate Films

6415 Montgomery St. Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2515 132 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-6608 www.upstatefilms.org

Clothing & Accessories Mikel Hunter Art and Apparel 533 Warren Street, Hudson, NY www.mikelhunter.com

Out of the Closet Vintage Boutique 6017 Main Street, Tannersville, NY (518) 589-4133 @OutofClosetVintage

Computer Services Computing Solutions

Oblong Books

Custom Home Design and Materials

26 Main Street, Millerton, NY (518) 789-3797 www.oblongbooks.com

Building Services & Supplies Associated Lightning Rod Co.

Glenn’s Wood Sheds

Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2079 www.woodstockguild.org events@woodstockguild.org

3572 US Route 9, Hudson, NY (518) 851 9917 www.alvarezmodulars.com “Let us make our house your home.” Our goal is to provide the best quality manufactured homes, to surpass our home owner’s expectation when purchasing a home, provide a high level of service to our customers, and to maintain a safe and healthy environment for our employees.

(845) 687-9458 alan-silverman-computers.com alan.silverman.computers@gmail.com Are computers impossible? At your wit’s end? Alan Silverman – Computer Concierge, I’m here when you need me. Helping people on three continents stay sane with computers since 1986. Home users and small businesses. I help buy the best built PCs, then set them up for you.

WAAM - Ulster Artists On-line

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild

Maplebrook School

198 Main Street, Oneonta, NY (607) 433-8898 www.greentoadbookstore.com Green Toad Bookstore is an independent community bookstore located in the center of downtown Oneonta. A gathering place for all your book needs, and a home to locally made crafts and accessories. We are happy to facilitate you in sharing your stories and ideas in our comfortable, welcoming space.

Green Toad Bookstore

(845) 534-3115 www.stormkingartcenter.org 28 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2940 www.woodstockart.org

John A. Alvarez And Sons Custom Modular Homes

Binnewater/Leisure Time Spring Water

(518) 789-4603, (845) 373-8309, (860) 364-1498 www.alrci.com

Storm King Art Center

Hotchkiss School

1 Long Mountain Court, Hopewell, NY (914) 456-9862 www.homeenrichmentcompany.com

(845) 778-2121 www.jacobowitz.com

Fairground Shows NY

P.O. Box 3938, Albany, NY (518) 331-5004 www.fairgroudshows.com fairgroundshows@aol.com

Home Enrichment Company, Inc.

Atlantic Custom Homes

2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY www.lindalny.com

Education Bard MAT

(845) 255-4704

Bard College (845) 758-7151 www.bard.edu/mat mat@bard.edu

Herrington’s

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Hillsdale, NY: (518) 325-3131 Hudson, NY: (518) 828-9431 www.herringtons.com

2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5343 www.caryinstitute.org

Herzogs True Value Home Center

Green Chimneys

Kingston Plaza, Kingston, NY www.herzogs.com

Green Chimneys, Brewster, NY www.greenchimneys.org

11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, CT (860) 435-3663 www.hotchkiss.org/arts Route 22, Amenia, NY (845) 373-9511

Middle Way School

Saugerties, NY (845) 272-0141 www.middlewayschool.org

Natural Gourmet Cookery School Flatiron District, Manhattan, NY www.ngihca.edu

SUNY New Paltz New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3860 www.newpaltz.edu

Environmental and Land Conservation Scenic Hudson

Hudson Valley, NY (845) 473-4440 www.scenichudson.org info@scenichudson.org We help valley citizens and communities preserve land and farms and create parks where people experience the outdoors and Hudson River. With new possibilities but also the impacts of climate change, we focus on maximizing the benefits all can enjoy from beautiful natural places and vibrant cities and town centers.

Events Chronogram Eat.Play.Stay. Newsletter

www.chronogram.com/eatplaystay

Garnerville Arts Center Annual Arts Festival

55 W. Railroad Ave. , Garnerville, NY www.garnerartscenter.org

Newburgh Illuminated Festival

www.newburghilluminatedfestival.com

Farm Markets & Natural Food Stores Adam’s Fairacre Farms

1240 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 569-0303, 1560 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-6300, 765 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-4330 www.adamsfarms.com

Hawthorne Valley Farm Store 327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7500 www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org

Mother Earth’s Store House

1955 South Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 296-1069, 249 Main Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-9614, 300 Kings Mall Court, Route 9W, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5541 www.motherearthstorehouse.com

Financial Advisors Third Eye Associates Ltd.

38 Spring Lake Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 752-2216 www.thirdeyeassociates.com Third Eye Associates provides Financial Life Planning, Financial Transition Planning, and Wealth Management strategies to help clients realize their greatest asset — a rewarding life. We are a fee-only registered investment advisory firm. Our goal is to help you clarify your vision, reconnect with your dreams, and use the resulting energy and motivated purpose to create both greater financial security and emotional fulfillment.

Graphic Design & Illustration Luminary Media

314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 334-8600 www.luminarymedia.com

Hair Salons Lush Eco-Salon & Spa

2 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 204-8319 www.lushecosalon.com


SaLune Hair Studio

6 Park Place, Hudson, NY (518) 267-9744 www.salunehudson.com salune@salunehudson.com SaLune is a full service hair salon featuring Master, Senior, and Junior stylists who are trained in the art of Intuitive Dry Cutting as well as all types of coloring. Hair is typically cut prior to the wash, in order for the stylist to address each person’s individual hair growth pattern, allowing for low-maintenance hair that grows in attractively for longer. SaLune uses and sells all-natural and organic products. Ask us about wedding packages!

Home Furnishings & Décor A & G Custom Made Furniture 4747 Route 209, Accord, NY (845) 626-0063 www.agcustommade.com

Insurance Agency Curabba Agency

334 E Main Street, Middletown, NY (845) 343-0855 www.curabba.com

Interior Design & Home Furnishings Cabinet Designers

Internet Services Computer Hut

71 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 750-5279 www.computerhutsales.com computerhutsales@gmail.com At Computer Hut sales and repairs, our goal is to find you the right computer at the best price or fix the one you currently have for the best rate around. We fix Mac and PC Computers, iPhones and iPads as well. Large stock of used and refurbished electronics.

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts Dreaming Goddess

44 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 dreaminggoddess.com At the Dreaming Goddess, we offer unique gifts, ranging from stunning sterling silver jewelry, artful cards, to a vast array of crystals and gemstones. With a selection of therapeutic grade essential oils, candles and herbs, we have everything for your magical needs. Workshops, classes, and tarot & psychic readings are available, and we also offer rental space for practitioners and healers.

Green Cottage

1204 Route 213, High Falls, NY (845) 687-4810 www.thegreencottage.com

Hudson Valley Goldsmith

71A Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-5872 www.hudsonvalleygoldsmith.com

Hummingbird Jewelers

23 A. East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4585 www.hummingbirdjewelers.com hummingbirdjewelers@hotmail.com

LC Studios

11 Wheeler Avenue, Warwick, NY (845) 544-4896, (845) 275-3994 LCStudios.co LCStudiosJewelry@gmail.com Collage artist Lisa Cullen brings her creative talents to jewelry design, using her signature medium, paper. Completely handcrafted in her Warwick, NY studio, Cullen’s designs are contemporary, light as a feather and

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts

Shops at Jones Farm

661 Route 308, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 232-2320 www.centerforperformingarts.org

190 Angola Road, Cornwall, NY (845) 534-4445 www.jonesfarminc.com

Kitchenwares Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 895-2051 www.warrenkitchentools.com

Landscaping Augustine Landscaping & Nursery 9W & Van Kleecks Lane, Kingston, NY (845) 338-4936 www.augustinenursery.com

Poison Ivy Patrol

(845) 687-9528 www.poison-ivy-patrol.com

Lawyers & Mediators Karen A. Friedman Esq.

30 East 33rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY www.newyorktrafficlawyer.com (212) 213-2145 | (845) 266-4400 k.friedman@msn.com Handling a variety of traffic and criminallyrelated traffic matters throughout NY State, including speeding, trucking violations, misdemeanors, and appeals.

Lighting Niche Modern

5 Hanna Lane, Beacon, NY (212) 777-2101 www.nichemodern.com

Music The Falcon

1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY (845) 236-7970 www.liveatthefalcon.com

Rocket Number Nine Records 50 N Front Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-8217

Musical Instruments Stamell Stringed Instruments

18 Kellogg Avenue, Amhesrt, MA (413) 256 0936 www.stamellstring.com info@stamellstring.com Stamell Stringed Instruments is a shop devoted to the violin family of instruments and bows. Here we provide unique services for the players and owners of stringed instruments. As specialists in violin, viola, cello, and bass, we can assist our customers with appraisal information, insurance valuations, repair and restoration, rentals, sales, and helpful advice. We also sell all of the best cases and accessories currently on the market.

Organizations Hudson River Housing

313 Mill Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-5176 www.hudsonriverhousing.org

YMCA of Kingston

507 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 338-3810 www.ymcaulster.org

Performing Arts Bardavon 1869 Opera House

35 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2072 www.bardavon.org The Bardavon 1869 Opera House, Inc. (the Bardavon) is a nonprofit arts presenter that owns and operates a historic theater of the same name in Poughkeepsie, and the region’s premiere orchestra, the Hudson Valley Philharmonic. It offers affordable, world-class music, education programs, dance, theater, Met Live in HD broadcasts, and classic films for the diverse audiences of the Hudson Valley.

to work hand-in-hand with other real estate companies. By working together we help create an efficient real estate market. Every buyer has an equal opportunity to purchase any property available on the market. We strongly believe that both buyers and sellers are best served when the market is open and efficient as possible, that is why we split our commissions equally when presenting a selling client. It is our mission to deliver the highest level of Professional Service to the Columbia County New York real estate community.

Bethel, NY (800) 745-3000 www.bethelwoodscenter.org

Center for Performing Arts

Kaatsbaan International Dance Center

33 Kaatsbaan Road, Tivoli, NY (845) 757-5106 www.kaatsbaan.org

Kornelia Tamm Gary DiMauro Real Estate

The Linda WAMCs Performing Arts Studio

339 Central Avenue, Albany, NY (518) 465-5233 www.thelinda.org The Linda provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personnel with world-renowned artists, academy award winning directors, headliner comedians and local, regional, and national artists on the verge of national recognition. An intimate, affordable venue, serving beer and wine, The Linda is a night out you won’t forget.

Time and Space Limited

(845) 489-2000 www.garydimauro.com kornelia@garydimauro.com

Upstate House

www.upstatehouse.com

Upstater

www.upstater.com

Westwood Metes & Bounds Realty (845) 340-1920 www.westwoodrealty.com

Sunrooms Hudson Valley Sunrooms

434 Columbia Street, Hudson, NY www.timeandspace.org

Ulster Performing Arts Center

601 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 339-6088 www.upac.org The Broadway Theatre - Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC) is a 1927 former vaudeville theatre that is on the National Historic Register. It seats 1500 and is the largest historic presenting house between New York City and Albany.

355 Broadway, Port Ewen (Ulster Park), NY (845) 339-1717 www.hudsonvalleysunrooms.com

Tourism Andes Chamber of Commerce (607) 433-8898 www.andesnewyork.com

Historic Huguenot Street

Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1660

Photography

Veterinarian

Fionn Reilly Photography

All Creatures Veterinary Hospital

Saugerties, NY (845) 802-6109 www.fionnreilly.com

Picture Framing Atelier Renee Fine Framing

The Chocolate Factory, 54 Elizabeth Street, Suite 3, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-1004 www.atelierreneefineframing.com renee@atelierreneefineframing.com A visit to Red Hook must include stopping at this unique workshop! Combining a beautiful selection of moulding styles and mats with conservation quality materials, expert design advice and skilled workmanship, Renee Burgevin, owner and CPF, has over 25 years experience. Special services include shadow-box and oversize framing as well as fabric-wrapped and French matting. Also offering mirrors.

Pools & Spas Aqua Jet

1606 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-8080 www.aquajetpools.com

Real Estate Bronte’ Uccellini - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Hudson Valley Properties

Hopewell Animal Hospital

2611 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, NY (845) 221-PETS (7387) www.hopewellanimalhospital.com

Weddings Rev. Puja A. J. Thomson, Roots & Wings

New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2278 rootsnwings.com/ceremonies-overview puja@rootsnwings.com Wedding Wire Couples’ Choice Award 2016, 2017 & 2018 In the spirit of your tradition or beliefs, Rev. Puja Thomson will help you create a heartfelt ceremony that reflects the uniqueness of your commitment to each other. Puja welcomes inquiries from couples blending different spiritual, religious, or ethnic backgrounds as well as those with a common heritage. Her presence and lovely Scottish voice add a special touch.

Wine, Liquor, Beer & Cider

6384 Mill Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 705-0887 bronteuccellini.bhhshudsonvalley.com buccellini@bhhshudsonvalley.com Buying or selling a home? The rules are the same, but every home sale or purchase is a different play. Personalized care, unique attention to detail, and local real estate knowledge has been a proven recipe for my clients’ success. Call, text or email today for more information. See advertisement in the horoscope pages.

Columbia County Real Estate Specialists

14 N. Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1890 www.newpaltzvet.com Veterinary services including discounted wellness packages for puppies, kittens, adults and seniors. Boarding, daycare & physical rehabilitation services.

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Angry Orchard

Walden, NY www.angryorchard.com

Denning’s Point Distillery

10 North Chestnut Street, Beacon, NY www.denningspointdistillery.com

Glenmere Brewing Co.

55 Maple Avenue, Florida, NY (845) 651-1939 www.glenmerebrewingco.com

Westtown Brew Works

236 Schefflers Road, Westtown, NY www.westtownbrewworks.com

Writing Services Peter Aaron

www.peteraaron.org info@peteraaron.org

4/18 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 75

business directory

747 State Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2200 www.cabinetdesigners.com info@cabinetdesigners.com Cabinet Designers, your Kitchen & Bath Design firm is known for its handcrafted approach to design. This 30-plus-year-old company helps homeowners think out-ofthe-box with an extensive selection of custom, semi-custom, and stock cabinets. Choose from traditional, transitional, and modern styles by leaders in the field to create the Kitchen or Bathroom of your dreams.

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whole living guide

HYPNOSIS, DEMYSTIFIED MORE THAN JUST A PARTY TRICK, HYPNOSIS CAN HELP MAKE THE CHANGES YOU SEEK. by wendy k agan

P

eople come to hypnosis for a grab-bag of reasons. Smoking cessation. Emotional eating. Fear of flying. Achieving “flow” or peak performance as an artist or athlete. For Ann of West Hurley (who prefers to go by her first name), it was stage fright that led her to the hypnotist’s chair last summer. She was preparing to have an adult Bat Mitzvah, something she hadn’t done as a child and really wanted to do, yet performance anxiety was getting in the way. “I wasn’t sleeping well, and it was overwhelming to the point where I was avoiding the work I had to do,” she says. “Time management went out the window, and fear took over.” About six weeks before Ann’s big day at the synagogue, a friend, a “very wise woman,” suggested that she try hypnosis to allay her anxiety. “It never would have come into my own mind to do this,” Ann says. “She made the call right then and there. I didn’t have much time to think about it.” The fact that her friend trusted the hypnotist, Peter Blum of Woodstock, added an essential layer of comfort. Besides, she says, “I was desperate. I was also curious.” In her first meeting with Blum, Ann felt at ease right away, and was very direct with him. “I said, ‘Don’t tell me to find a beach or a garden where I can feel calm, or some shit like that. It’s not going to work.’” Blum didn’t. He asked Ann questions and got to know her. She liked his voice. “Somehow, in the process of talking, I started to relax,” she says. “I don’t know if I’d call it being in a trance; it was just very deep relaxation.” Blum talked about the process she was going through and the outcome she wanted. He made suggestions for how things would go. He sent her home with selfhypnosis instructions, and he gave her a technique that involved lifting one finger as a subtle cue to relax her shoulders and release tension. She remembers Blum counting to 10 to bring her out of the “trance.” “By the time the session ended, I was floating on air,” she says. 76 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Ann scheduled one more hypnosis session, recording it and re-listening to it as she prepared for her Bat Mitzvah over the next few weeks. She felt more open to doing the work, and although it still felt like a struggle, it wasn’t a negative struggle.The night before the event, to her amazement, Ann slept like a baby. The day itself felt like a dream. “Not that it was perfect,” she qualifies, “but it was perfectly imperfect. It had a magical quality. My family came from England, and it was a pretty spectacular day.” Tapping into the Unconscious Mind Hypnosis in a private, therapeutic session is nothing like the stage tricks we’ve seen on TV. You’ll never see a watch swinging from a chain, or be ordered to perform silly or outrageous acts, such as clucking like a chicken in front of a live studio audience. Trances don’t always feel like trances so much as a state of relaxed awareness. People don’t lose control and become the sleep-walking marionettes of a hypnotist-showman. “There are so many misconceptions about hypnosis,” says Blum, who has been practicing the modality for over 30 years, and who trains and certifies other practitioners through the National Guild of Hypnotists. “The use of the trance or hypnotic state goes back to ancient practitioners—medicine people and healers and shamans from tribal cultures from around world. They were getting themselves and people in their community into an altered state, where they could contact the vast resources of what they would have called the spirit world, but that we would now call the unconscious mind. They used it for healing.” Hypnosis success stories are mainly anecdotal, yet we’re beginning to understand what’s happening in the brain when people enter a hypnotic state. In 2016, researchers at Stanford University published a study that found


changes in certain areas of the brain in subjects undergoing guided hypnosis sessions similar to those used by practitioners to treat anxiety, pain, or trauma. Some describe the process as going from beta (active and alert) to more alpha and theta (relaxed and dreamlike) brainwaves. The Stanford researchers also noted that some people are more susceptible to hypnosis than others, possibly standing to absorb more benefits from it. No two people are alike, and not all hypnosis is alike either. “I gather information from people to understand what they need, because I don’t use a boilerplate approach,” says Blum. He uses a client-centered method known as Ericksonian hypnosis, which is more permissive than the old-school “authoritarian” style. So rather than giving commands such as “You are feeling sleepy” or “Your eyes are getting heavier,” he makes suggestions. “I might say, ‘I wonder if you can imagine yourself now as a nonsmoker in the future.’ It’s about giving the person a chance to make choices.” Blum notes that most people only need two or three sessions to effect change. “This is short-term, solution-oriented work. You’re addressing what you want and how you can change to get that.”

People involved in the trauma entered the dream, but he felt safe and wasn’t triggered. He could walk through the trauma and reclaim it, calling upon his adult self to comfort the little boy that he once was. What felt like a very vivid 10-minute dream was a two-and-a-half-hour session. “You’re in an altered state, but it’s one that you are navigating; it’s very much in your control,” he says. “When I came out, my body felt so clear and at peace. It was like I was finally awake. The trauma had me sleepwalking for so many years. I felt like I was someone I wasn’t.” After the session, his anxiety vanished and his relationship with his wife deepened. He says the trauma is still there but much more manageable; he is no longer forgetting, rediscovering, and reliving it. A holistic therapist himself, as well as a musician, Mojica now recommends Kristal to his clients for everything from trouble sleeping and recurring nightmares to unresolved heartbreak or grief.

“Hypnotherapy can be a process that begins to dissolve old neural loops that are no longer serving us and are keeping us from reaching our desired states, and replaces them with healthier ways of thinking, feeling, believing, and being in our life.”

Waking Up from Trauma Some mental health practitioners add hypnosis to their toolbox because it can help people go deep quickly and get to the source of their core issues. Stephanie Kristal, a certified hypnotherapist and counselor based in Kingston and High Falls, combines hypnosis with mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy as a way to instigate change at the root level. “Hypnosis is a deep state, but there’s nothing scary about it,” she says. “It’s similar to spacing out while watching a movie or becoming absorbed in a really good book.You drop below the level of the constantly chattering mind to a place in the subconscious that’s more open to suggestion.” Hypnotherapy takes hypnosis one step further by working with the mind-body connection and utilizing the modality of hypnosis for change, growth, and healing. People see Kristal for a variety of reasons, including common motivators like smoking cessation, overeating, and phobias, but her primary practice is with trauma. “When we have a trauma, we take on certain beliefs about ourselves, and we have associated thoughts and feelings because of it. It forms a neural loop that we keep repeating, which keeps us locked into being unhappy and limited in our lives,” she explains. “Hypnotherapy can be a process that begins to dissolve those old neural loops that are no longer serving us and are keeping us from reaching our desired states, and replaces them with healthier ways of thinking, feeling, believing, and being in our life.” It’s a way of flipping the switch on those neural pathways, so we’re not stuck in past traumas but can move forward with empowered awareness. When Luis Mojica of West Saugerties first came to Kristal, he was dealing with emotional fallout from complex trauma related to childhood sexual abuse. “I was having extreme anxiety, trouble sleeping, and issues in my relationship,” he says. “When Stephanie explained hypnotherapy, the idea of it really worked for me. I liked how you bypassed the brain to get to the body, and I felt like I could heal faster than I would with a decade of therapy.” Mojica had two counseling sessions with Kristal that helped her get to know him before embarking on a single yet powerful hypnotherapy experience. During the session, he lay back in a chair that made him feel like he was floating. Kristal held an eagle feather and told him to look at the feather while she counted backwards from 10. “By the time she hit ‘one,’ I was in a different state,” he says. “Her voice was like a narrative force in a waking dream.”

Good Trances and Bad Trances Hypnotherapy can be transformative for some people, but Kristal notes that it is not a magic wand—and it is not effective for everyone. “Whether it’s the modality that works for you, no one can guarantee that,” she says. “But the more that you’re open and willing to develop resources and tools to help strengthen the process, the more effective it is.” She is trained in two approaches: transpersonal hypnotherapy, which works on a psycho-emotional level to help people get unstuck and dissolve old ways of being, and medical hypnotherapy, which uses hypnosis to help people deal with fears and issues surrounding life-threatening illnesses and treatments. “It’s not something I’m doing to someone,” she explains. “I work with people to help them access their own inner wisdom for guidance. Really, the only person who can hypnotize you is yourself.” Blum jokes that he often calls the process “de-hypnosis,” because the practice is about helping people wake up from the trances they’re already in. “There are good trances and there are bad trances,” he says. “A bad trance has a lot of limitations. Good trances are empowering trances.” He once worked with someone who had to overcome the idea that she couldn’t go to college, since no one in her family had done so, and not being able to go was an early hypnotic suggestion that had come from her parents. Suggestions like these can come from teachers, politicians, and the culture at large. “Hypnosis is kind of an adjustable wrench,” he says. “Once you have it, you can use it for a variety of applications.” Blum is also trained in sound healing, and with certain clients he might use music and sound as an adjunct to hypnosis. Encouraged by her success with dispelling performance anxiety, Ann says she will return to Blum for hypnosis as she prepares for an upcoming surgery. She hopes it will work just as well as it did for her Bat Mitzvah. “I needed help and I was open to receiving help,” she says. “When you do something like this, I think you have to be ready. I don’t know if this works for everybody. In a million years, I couldn’t have imagined this outcome for myself.”

—Stephanie Kristal

Peter Blum offers a “Hypnosis for Smoking Cessation” group session at the Reuner Support House (part of HealthAlliance Hospital–Mary’s Avenue) in Kingston two or three times a year.The next session is April 4, from 5:30–7:30 pm. $10 donation. RESOURCES Peter Blum Soundsforhealing.com Stephanie Kristal Stephaniekristal.com 4/18 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING 77


whole living guide Acupuncture Transpersonal Acupuncture

(845) 340-8625 www.transpersonalacupuncture.com

Alexander Technique Institute for Music and Health Judith Muir M.M. M.Am.SAT

60 Eddy Road, Verbank, NY (845) 677-5871 www.JudithMuir.com IMHMUIR@gmail.com Lessons in the Alexander Technique will teach you about the mechanisms of balance and posture that exist in each of us and organize our daily movements. You will learn how to recognize and switch off the mental and physical patterns that have a negative influence on how you think and move, as well as learning how to send “directions” to activate your postural mechanisms. Better Balance, Better Health.

Aromatherapy Joan Apter, Aromacologist

(845) 679-0512 www.apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net Raindrop Technique, Emotional Release Raindrop, Neuro-Auricular Technique (NAT), Vitaflex for humans and Horses, dogs, birds and cats. Health consultations, natural wellness writer, spa consultant, classes, trainings and keynotes. Offering full line of Young Living Essential oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s and non-toxic cleaning products. Consultant: Prepare for Surgery, Heal Faster with healing statements for surgery and holistic approaches to heal faster!

Astrology Planet Waves

Kingston, NY (845) 797-3458 www.planetwaves.net

Beauty Allure Salon

47 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7774 www.allurerhinebeck.com At Allure, we strive to exceed all of your expectations and provide you with an experience that is above and beyond the usual. Our team of highly trained Aveda Specialists and dedicated stylists will provide you with a personalized experience that is tailored to your specific needs. As experts in classic and modern cuts, color and styling, we guarantee an amazing experience for a look you’ll love.

Dentistry & Orthodontics Dental Office of Drs. Jeffrey & Maureen Viglielmo 56 Lucas Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 339-1619 www.drvigs.com

Transcend Dental

269 Route 375, West Hurley, NY (845) 679-4000 transcenddental.net

Healing Centers Blue Deer Center

1155 County Route 6, Margaretville, NY 78 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 4/18

(845) 586-3225 www.bluedeer.org info@bluedeer.org Located in the Catskill Mountains, this land was recognized by indigenous peoples over a century ago as a place of healing. Come experience the natural world from a place of heart and connection. Blue Deer Center: A home for Ancestral Wisdom.

Holistic Health Cassandra Currie, MS, RYT‚ Holistic Health Counselor 41 John Street, Kingston, NY (845) 532-7796 www.holisticcassandra.com

Collaborative Medical Arts

2542 Route 66, Chatham, NY (518) 721-8417 www.collaborativemedicalarts.org collaborativemedicalarts@gmail.com Collaborative Medical Arts is a group of physicians and therapists offering: Conventional and Anthroposophic family medicine, Osteopathic cranial treatments, Neurology, holistic anthroposophic nursing, therapeutic eurythmy, painting therapy and rhythmical massage therapy. Kathleen DeRosa-Lazare, D.O.: Family Medicine, Anthroposophic

embodyperiod

439 Union Street, Hudson, NY (415) 686-8722 www.embodyperiod.com

John M. Carroll

715 Rte 28, Kingston, NY (845) 338-8420 www.johnmcarrollhealer.com John is a spiritual counselor, healer, and teacher. He uses guided imagery, morphology, and healing energy to help facilitate life changes. He has successfully helped his clients to heal themselves from a broad spectrum of conditions, spanning terminal cancer to depression. The Center also offers hypnosis, massage, and Raindrop Technique.

Kary Broffman, R.N.,C.H.

Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6753 karybroffman.com Karyb@mindspring.com New Year, New You. Integrate Your Life,-Its A Balancing Act. Mind /Body integration with hypnosis, nutritional coaching, stress management, visualization. Spiritual and intuitive readings. Utilize these modalities to help you find true north to a happier and more fulfilled life.

Hospitals MidHudson Regional Hospital

241 North Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 483-5000 www.midhudsonregional.org MidHudson Regional Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network, is home to the mid-Hudson Valley’s most advanced healthcare services. This 243-bed facility features the area’s only ACS-verified Level II Trauma Center, the Redl Center for Cancer Care, Center for Robotic Surgery, and the WMC Heart & Vascular Institute.

Northern Dutchess Hospital

6511 Springbrook Avenue, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3001 www.healthquest.org/ndh

Northern Dutchess Hospital is a healing environment where modern medicine meets compassionate care. From spacious, private patient rooms to state-of-the-art operating rooms equipped with minimally invasive and robotic technology, you and your family no longer need to travel far for advanced medical care. The hospital offers a holistic birth center, an expanded emergency department, orthopedic needs from sports medicine and pain management to minimally invasive surgery, general and bariatric surgery, wound care, a full spectrum of rehabilitation therapies and much more. Thanks to convenient, seamless access, you can visit a primary or specialty care provider then have your lab work or radiology procedure without leaving the campus. Excellent care for you and your family has been our priority since the hospital’s founding more than a century ago.

Obstetrics and Gynecology Chista Safajou, MD, FACOG 68 West Cedar Street, 1st Floor, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 433-0101 www.drsafajou.com

Osteopathy Stone Ridge Healing Arts Joseph Tieri, DO, & Ari Rosen, DO, 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-7589 www.stoneridgehealingarts.com Drs. Tieri and Rosen are NY State Licensed Osteopathic Physicians specializing in Osteopathic Manipulation and Cranial Osteopathy. Please visit our website for articles, links, books, and much more information. Treatment of newborns, children, and adults. By appointment.

Putnam Hospital Center

670 Stoneleigh Avenue, Carmel, NY (845) 279-5711 www.healthquest.org/phc For more than 50 years, Putnam Hospital Center has been the community’s resource for advanced and compassionate care. With a reputation for high patient satisfaction, our caring teams offer advanced orthopedic, robotic and bariatric surgical services. Discover the comfortable, private rooms and complimentary valet parking, all close to home.

Sharon Hospital

50 Hospital Hill, Sharon, CT (860) 364-4000 www.healthquest.org/sharon Sharon Hospital is now part of Health Quest. Offering the same warm and personalized care, Sharon Hospital now provides the benefits of an entire system including direct access to more advanced medical offerings, the latest technologies and a network of leading specialists. For residents of the Northwest Connecticut community, there’s no need to travel far for exceptional healthcare.

Vassar Brothers Medical Center

45 Reade Place, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-8500 www.healthquest.org/vbmc Since 1887, Vassar Brothers Medical Center has been committed to delivering sophisticated medical care with a personal touch in the Mid-Hudson Valley. As a regional medical center, Vassar is recognized for stroke and cardiac care, and has the area’s first and only cardiothoracic surgery center in the Mid-Hudson Valley. For women’s and children’s health services, we offer the first and only Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in the region for premature and critically ill infants. Vassar Brothers Medical Center recently became a Level II Trauma Center, further advancing our vision to provide the community with local access to state-ofthe-art medical care.

Medical Spas Essence Medispa

222 Route 299, Highland, NY (845) 691-3773 www.essencemedispa.com

Pilates Ulster Pilates Rosendale, Kingston, NY (845) 658-2239 www.ulsterpilates.com

Resorts & Spas Bodhi Holistic Spa 543 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-2233 www.bodhiholisticspa.com

Emerson Resort & Spa Route 28, Mt. Tremper, NY (845) 688-2828 www.emersonresort.com

Serenity Wellness Medical Day Spa 968 Columbia Street, Hudson, NY (518) 671-6700 www.serenitymedispa.com

Retreat Centers Garrison Institute Route 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 424-4800 www.garrisoninstitute.org info@garrisoninstitute.org Retreats supporting positive personal and social change in a renovated monastery overlooking the Hudson River. Featuring John Tarrant teaching Attention Is the Most Basic Form of Love: A Workshop on the Creative Stories of Zen, May 25-27; and Fr. Carl Arico, Mary Anne Best, and Gail Fitzpatrick-Hopler of Contemplative Outreach teaching Into Unity Consciousness: The Christian Contemplative Journey, June 13-17.

Spirituality Kol Hai: Hudson Valley Jewish Renewal (845) 477-5457 kolhai.org

Yoga A Mindful Healing Yoga Retreat Sky Lake, Retreat Center, 22 Hillcrest Lane, Rosendale, NY (845) 303-9729 labon53@yahoo.com or goochlm@gmail.com


COMING IN JUNE

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A Mindful Healing Yoga Retreat A Mindful Healing Yoga Retreat Retreat July 13-15, 2018 A Mindful Healing Yoga AA Mindful Healing Yoga Retreat MindfulJuly Healing Yoga Retreat 13-15, 2018 Pema Chodron Pema Chodron

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Sky Lake, Retreat Center, Rosendale New York Experienced Yoga instructors, Reiki practitioner, therapist and meditators, Louise and Leah Sky Lake, Retreat Center, Rosendale New York offer a dynamic and trauma informed healing retreat in the Catskill Mountain region. While holding a nurturing space, we invite you toinstructors, discover and explore a source Through meditation, breathwork, of tension. Experienced therapist and meditators, meditators, Louiseand and Leahoffer offerayoga, a ExperiencedYoga Yoga instructors, Reiki Reiki practitioner, practitioner, therapist and Louise Leah intuitive painting, creative writing, silence and other contemplative practices - we will holding begin learning “what Experienced Yoga instructors, Reiki practitioner, and meditators, Louise and Leah offer a dynamic and trauma healing retreat Catskill Mountain Mountain region. While nurturing dynamic and traumainformed informed healing retreat in in the thetherapist Catskill region. While holding aanurturing we need to know” from the experiences we carry with us. Experienced Yoga instructors, Reiki practitioner, therapist and meditators, Louise and offer a space, we invite you to discover and explore a source of tension. Through meditation, breathwork, yoga, space, we informed invite you to discover explore in a source of tension.Mountain Through meditation, yoga,Leah dynamic and trauma healingandretreat the Catskill region.breathwork, While holding a nurturing All Levels Welcome. practices intuitive other contemplative contemplative practices--we wewill willbegin beginlearning learning“what “what intuitivepainting, painting,creative creativewriting, writing, silence silence and and

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dynamic and trauma healing retreatainsource the Catskill Mountain region. While holding a nurturing space, we invite you informed to discover and explore of tension. Through meditation, breathwork, yoga we experiences we carry carrywith withus. us. weneed need to to know” know” from from the experiences we of tension. space, wepainting, invite you to discover and explore aAll source Through meditation, breathwork, yog intuitive creative writing, silence and other contemplative practices we will begin learning “wh Levels Welcome. All Welcome. Location: Skyknow” Lake, and Retreat Center -experiences 22 Hillcrest Lane we Rosendale, 12472 will intuitive painting, creative we writing, other practices - we begin learning “wh needsilence to from thecontemplative carryNY with us. we need to know” from the experiences we carry with us. AllSpecial Levels Welcome. before April 30, 2018 $600 Regular price Cost: Early Registration Location:EXTENDED SkyLake, Lake, Retreat Retreat 22 Hillcrest Lane Rosendale, NY Location: Sky Center -$500 Hillcrest Lane Rosendale, NY12472 12472 All Levels Welcome. before EarlyRegistration Registration EXTENDED or $500 30, $600 Regular Cost:Early Cost: EXTENDED Special before April April 30,2018 2018limited $600enrollment Regularprice price Registration: labon53@yahoo.com goochlm@gmail.com 845.303.9729,

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“ John is an extraordinary healer whom I have been privileged to know all my life. Miracles still do happen.” —Richard Brown, MD Author Stop Depression Now “ John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.” —Gerald Epstein, MD Author Healing Visualizations See John’s website for schedules of upcoming classes and events.

johnmcarrollhealer.com or call 845-338-8420

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April 20 - 29 8pm Fri & Sat 3pm Sun Tickets: $23

LEAR

The year is 2020. The setting is Lear Global Office Tower and surrounding metropolis. Lear, a Titan of Industry, unexpectedly divides his holdings amoung his three daughters. An adaptation of Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tragic tale directed by Bill Ross.

Art Gallery & Contemporary Crafts Open Friday - Saturday - Sunday 12:00 - 6:00 1396 Route 28 West Hurley NY 12491 646-256-9688

THELINDA.ORG

339 CENTRAL AVENUE, ALBANY, NY,12206

EAT. PLAY. STAY. NE W S L E T T E R

JOHN PRIMER W/ JIMY GRAHAM APR 6 AT 8PM

APR 8 AT 2, 4:30, AND 7PM

Rodriguez PARAMOUNT THEATER Peekskill | April 18

APRIL 14, FEATURING RUBY BOOTS, 8 PM $20

KIM RICHEY APR 19 AT 8PM

THE CACTUS BLOSSOMS APR 21 AT 8PM

APRIL 23, 6 PM FREE

AN EVENING W/ MARY GAUTHIER APR 25 AT 8PM

WITH THE LATE SHIFT APR 28 AT 8PM

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82 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 4/18


the forecast

EVENT PREVIEWS & LISTINGS FOR APRIL 2018

Arrested Development plays Colony in Woodstock April 15.

Tested and Relevant With their Afrocentric themes, positive, socially conscious lyrics, colorful image, and sunny, uplifting grooves, Arrested Development, who will perform at Colony on April 15, hit the early ’90s hip hop scene like a Day-Glo comet. Formed in Atlanta in 1988 by lead rapper Speech and turntablist DJ Headliner, the multigender, multigenerational troupe (an original member was sexagenarian “spiritual elder” Baba Oje) ruled the charts with the Top 10 hit “Tennessee” and its follow-up singles “Mr. Wendall” and “People Everyday,” all of them found on their millions-selling debut, 3 Years, 5 Months & 2 Days in the Life Of… It’s the latter track, a rewrite of Sly and the Family Stone’s 1968 classic “Everyday People,” that, arguably, best embodies Arrested Development’s optimistic oeuvre. In 1993, the success of 3 Years, 5 Months… saw the band become the first rap group to win a Grammy for Best New Artist; the outfit also took home another Grammy that year, for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group. In addition to composing a song for Spike Lee’s 1992 film Malcolm X, the band performed for the likes of Nelson Mandela and Bill Clinton. Alas, the glow was to go dim not long after the group had grabbed the brass ring. The response to their sophomore effort, 1994’s Zingalamaduni, was lukewarm, and their earnest message was soon eclipsed by the hard-edged rise of gangsta rap. Internal strife saw the band disintegrate two years later, with Speech going on to a solo career. In 2000, however, the rapper reactivated the project (sans DJ Headliner) and recommenced recording and touring. Ahead of their visit to the Hudson Valley, Speech answered a few questions via e-mail. Arrested Development will appear at Colony in Woodstock on April 15 at 7pm. Tickets are $45-$75. (845) 679-7625; Colonywoodstock.com. —Peter Aaron One could say your lyrical stance is even more relevant now than it was in the early ’90s, given the present social climate. Did you at all envision this being the case when the group began? I never could have imagined the acceptance we would get from our music, nor the

relevance it would have years later. We knew it was exceptional and groundbreaking, but in my experience, that happens often and too many times such music gets overshadowed by clearly under-par material. Arrested Development enjoyed several huge hits in America in the early 1990s, but since the band reunited much of its success has been in places like Japan, Indonesia, Australia, and Europe. What is it that you think makes far-flung audiences especially receptive to your music this time around? Maybe because many of those fans don’t know what the heck we’re talking about! LOL! Nah, for real, they’re less jaded and conditioned. Americans are force-fed.   In 1994, you shared the stage with Nelson Mandela in South Africa at an event benefitting the African National Congress. Amazing! What was that experience like? Were you able to speak with him? Yes, it was very amazing, we’ve had Forrest Gump-like moments in our journey where we’re, like, “God, why do you consider us to be worthy of this?” We spoke to him briefly and handed to him and the ANC a bunch of money to help keep Africans free!   In 2016, after not releasing an album for four years, you released two albums, Changing the Narrative and This Was Never Home. How did that come about? Why not release both together as a double album or hold one back until the following year? Record sales are such that releases are less about strategy and more about publishing. We publish the music and let the crowd find it, when they find it.   Despite dealing with some heavy themes, your music always seems to have an underlying message of hope; “Let’s Build” and “Better Days” from Changing the Narrative  are examples of this. How do you keep that sense of hope flowing, especially in trying times such as these? It’s about placing the negatives to the side and focusing on the solution only! 4/18 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 83


SUNDAY 1 FAIRS & FESTIVALS Newburgh Mall Carnival 12-11pm. Ride ticket prices vary. This familyfriendly event features rides for all ages, from whimsical kiddie rides to state-of-the-art thrill rides, carnival games, and favorite fair food. Newburgh Mall, Newburgh. (866) 666-3247. HEALTH & WELLNESS Journey into Self Awareness 10:30am. $15. Join Theo Meth for a morning filled with music, humor, divine celebration, laughter, howling, dancing, shaking, gibberish, chanting, guided self inquiry and silent meditation. Milkweed, Sugar Loaf. Yoga Sutras Study Group 7-8:30pm. $60. Anne-Marie Serre is once again leading a discussion group for those who are interested in reviewing and discussing the Yoga Sutras, a seminal text of yoga. This series will be exclusively digital. Lilananda Yoga, Glenville. (518) 470-5240. MUSIC Abby Z and The New Utility: "abandoned playground" 2pm. $25. A hyperkinetic contest of physical daring and extreme virtuosity, abandoned playground is the latest exhilarating performance by acclaimed choreographer Abby Zbikowksi. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandaleon-Hudson. 758-7900. Ester Brunch with Alexis P Suter Band 11am. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Big Joe Fitz & The Lo-Fis 11am. Swing and blues. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. THEATER "Cabaret" 2-4pm. Set amid the backdrop of 1930’s Germany as it begins to slide toward the Nazis, an American writer living in Berlin meets an eccentric dancer at a decadent cabaret called The Kit Kat Club, who changes his life forever. Ghent Playhouse, Ghent. (800) 838-3006. "Frankie & Johnny in the Clair De Lune" 2-4pm. A fresh take on Terrence McNally’s contemporary American classic. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (518) 943-3818. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Mindful Movement Class (monthly) 12-1pm. $15. Learn to use the principles of the Alexander Technique to build awareness of your body in order to notice and release habits of movement and thinking that are not serving you. MaMa, Stone Ridge. 917-373-6151.

MONDAY 2 ART GALLERIES AND EXHIBITS Margaret Crenson (1934-2011): Delving A Sense Of Place Reception April 21, 5pm-8pm Albert Shahinian Fine Art Gallery, Rhinebeck. 876-7578. Works by Liliana Porter and Ana Tiscornia Artists Talk, April 7, 2pm. Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. FAIRS & FESTIVALS Newburgh Mall Carnival 5-10pm. Ride ticket prices vary. This familyfriendly event features midway rides for all ages, from whimsical kiddie rides to stateof-the-art thrill rides, carnival games and favorite fair food. Newburgh Mall, Newburgh. (866) 666-3247. KIDS & FAMILY Farm Spring Break Day Camp 8am-4pm. Seeds and sprouts, cooking, nature’s plants, Native American skills, and multi-arts activities. Seed Song Farm, Kingston. 902-8154. LITERARY & BOOKS Writers Speak Easy 7pm. A monthly open mic roundtable where Participants are not only encouraged to perform their work and the work of others, but to engage with one another throughout the evening. The People’s Cauldron, Rosendale. WritersSpeakEasy.com. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

84 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 4/18

MUSIC Dayme Arocena 8pm. 428. From Havana, Cuba, Dayme Arocena’s powerful singing and buoyant music defy expectations, drawing on the rhythms of Afro-Cuban traditions, the nimble athleticism of jazz, and the catchy hooks of pop melodies. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

TUESDAY 3 FAIRS & FESTIVALS Newburgh Mall Carnival 5-10pm. Ride ticket prices vary. This familyfriendly event features midway rides for all ages, from whimsical kiddie rides to stateof-the-art thrill rides, carnival games and favorite fair food. Newburgh Mall, Newburgh. (866) 666-3247. FILM Hope on the Hudson 7:15pm. Screening three new films about the Hudson River. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. HEALTH & WELLNESS Alzheimer’s Support Group 7-8:30pm. Open to the public. All Sport Fishkill Health and Fitness Club, Fishkill. (800) 272-3900. Zumba with Maritza 5:30-6:30pm. $5. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 913-6085. KIDS & FAMILY Earth Day Education: Recycling Heroes 3:30pm. Through storytelling, crafts and games, kids will learn why recycling is important and what we can make with recycling. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. 758-3241. LECTURES & TALKS Union Speaker’s Forum 7:30pm. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921. MUSIC Big Joe Fitz and the Lo-Fis Blues and Dance Party 7-10pm. Featuring a sophisticated blend of jazz and blues which is always soulful, always swinging, and always in an engaging style that never fails to connect with the audience. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. THEATER Agatha Christie’s 'A Murder Is Announced" 7:30pm. $20/$18 seniors and children under 12. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

WEDNESDAY 4 BUSINESS & NETWORKING Tourism Trends Conference Day-long event for Dutchess County tourism partners. Luncheon & afternoon presentations open to Hudson Valley Region. Villa Borghese, Wappingers Falls. 297-8207. FAIRS & FESTIVALS Newburgh Mall Carnival 5-10pm. Ride ticket prices vary. This familyfriendly event features midway rides for all ages, from whimsical kiddie rides to stateof-the-art thrill rides, carnival games and favorite fair food. Newburgh Mall, Newburgh. (866) 666-3247. FILM Hope on the Hudson 7:15pm. Screening three new films about the Hudson River. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. HEALTH & WELLNESS Alzheimer’s Support Group 11am-12:30pm. Open to the public. Vassar Warner Home, Poughkeepsie. (800) 272-3900. DYBO (Dance Your ‘Buts’ Off) $5. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 309-2406. Intro To Mindfulness 1-2pm. Join Susanna Nicholson on a journey to mindfulness. This five part series is designed to bring out a more focused, relaxed, and present you. Zephyr Float, Kingston. 853-2400. Qigong and Tai Chi Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 672-5391.

LECTURES & TALKS Polyphonic Intension: The Sound of the Hammond Organ in the Black Church 5:30-6:30pm. Ashon Crawley, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and African American Studies at the University of Virginia, will discuss the Hammond B-3 organ and sound experience in Black popular culture. Rockefeller Hall Room 200 at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. LITERARY & BOOKS Gardiner Library Book Club 3-4pm. The Dry by Jane Harper. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. MUSIC The Falcon Underground Songwriter Sessions 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Tommy Castro and the Painkillers 7pm. $20-$30. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. THEATER TMI Project Presents #blackstoriesmatter 7-10pm. Inspiring true stories and monologues about black people surviving and thriving in the Hudson Valley--for the school community as well as the general public, followed by a panel discussion. Bard College, Annandaleon-Hudson. Tmiproject.org/performances/. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Color Mixing For All Artists 9am-4pm. $141. With Christie Scheele. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

THURSDAY 5 BUSINESS & NETWORKING Westchester Home Design Awards 6-9pm. $25. Join the celebration as we announce the winners of Westchester Home’s annual Design Awards live, on-stage with an elegant cocktail reception and awards ceremony. The Performing Arts Center at Purchase College, Purchase. (914) 251.6200. COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. DANCE A Meditation on Tongues by Ni’Ja Whitson 7pm. A live-dance adaptation of filmmaker and activist Marlon T. Riggs’ 1989 film Tongues Untied, Whitson focuses on what masculinities look like in the contemporary moment, especially in relation to the invisibility of lesbian and gender non-conforming bodies within the cultural dialogue on race. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Empac.rpi.edu/events/2018/spring/ meditation-tongues. FAIRS & FESTIVALS Newburgh Mall Carnival 5-10pm. Ride ticket prices vary. This familyfriendly event features midway rides for all ages, from whimsical kiddie rides to stateof-the-art thrill rides, carnival games and favorite fair food. Newburgh Mall, Newburgh. (866) 666-3247. LECTURES & TALKS Confronting Climate Change: What are the Challenges? 7:30pm. Internationally renowned climate scientist Henry Pollack comes to New Paltz to lead a timely discussion about our climate’s uncertain future, at a moment in planetary history when the scientific consensus about humanity’s role in contemporary climate change has been met with mixed responses from local and national governments, the private sector, and the international community. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-3880. Jennifer Doudna of U.C. Berkeley: CRISPRCas Gene Editing: Biology, Technology and Ethics 5-7pm. Gene editing with CRISPR technology is transforming biology. Doudna will discuss how bacterial CRISPR adaptive immune systems inspire creation of powerful genome editing tools, enabling advances in both fundamental biology and applications in medicine. Sanders Classroom Building, Spitzer Auditorium at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

Relatives As Parents Program Introductory Information Session 6:30pm. The Family and Consumer Education Program at Cornell Cooperative Extension Dutchess County. Howland Public Library, Beacon.

MUSIC Andy Stack’s American Soup 8pm. American classics. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Christopher Cross 8-10pm. $50/$60/$75/$115. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. First Thursday Singer Songwriter Series 6-9:30pm. Host Don and Maureen Black welcome Emily Barnes, Grampa Joe’s Washboard Band, and Patrick Dodge to the Cafe stage. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Middle Blue “Love Chords” CD Release 8pm. Groove and fusion. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. One Night of Queen performed by Gary Mullen & The Works 8pm. $35-$50. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390. Open Mike for the People, By the People 7:30pm. Copperfield’s, Millbrook. 677-8188. Vincent Pastore’s Gangster Squad 8pm. $15-$20. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Forty Under 40 Mover & Shaker Awards 5-8:30pm. $50. Bestowed annually to 40 people under the age of 40 who have shown a strong commitment to the Hudson Valley, the Shaker Awards honor the next generation of leaders in our region. Changepoint Theater, Poughkeepsie. Dcrcoc.org/40under40. THEATER "Frankie & Johnny in the Clair De Lune" 7:30-9:30pm. Bridge Street Theatre offers a fresh take on Terrence McNally’s contemporary American classic. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (518) 943-3818. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Drawing Better: Vince Natale 9am-noon. $160/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing, Painting and Composition with Eric Angeloch 1-4pm. $160/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Knitting 101: Scarf Workshop 6-7:30pm. Learn all the basics and leave with a scarf around your neck! Choose between child or adult size and we will provide the materials (included in fee). Loopy Mango, Beacon. 765-2476. LGTBIQ Retreat La Sarmiento, Madeline Klyne, and Gavin Harrison. Through April 8. Garrison Institute, Garrison. 424-4800. Middle-Stage Music Social 2-3:30pm. Middle-Stage Music Socials are a fun and safe way for people with middlestage Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia to get out, socialize and enjoy interactive musical fun with their family caregivers. Wingate at Ulster, Highland. (800) 272-3900. Vet2Vet Veterans Program Featuring a variety of workshops and support groups. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 672-5391.

FRIDAY 6 BUSINESS & NETWORKING New Paltz Chamber Monthly Membership Coffee 8-9am. Come enjoy delicious bagels and French pressed coffee and bring plenty of business cards along with your 30 second elevator speech. Registration is required. Beyond Wealth Management, New Paltz. 255-0243. Nonprofits TALK 8:30-10am. Nonprofits TALK is a facilitated adhoc forum open to representatives of Hudson Valley nonprofits and interested others. The Lace Mill, Kingston. 876-5472. COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778.


COSMOLOGY LAIRD SCRANTON & ED NIGHTINGALE

Laird Scranton with cairns atop Cuween Hill in the Orkney Islands off Scotland.

Enter the Dogon Curious about the origins of the universe? Head to Vassar College on April 21 for “A Day of Instruction on Ancient Cosmology” given by Laird Scranton and Ed Nightingale. Scranton’s ideas are based on the traditions of the Dogon tribe in Mali. “The Dogon say that their symbolic system describes how matter forms. So, my job as a comparative cosmologist is to take that clear statement and test it,” Scranton explains. “I started educating myself about matter, and discovered yep, they got it right. Their descriptions and their drawings, you can set them side by side with diagrams from Stephen Hawking or from Brian Greene, and it’s all the same stuff. The Dogon have the concept of matter right, from waves all the way up to the atom.” According to Scranton, this tribe’s lore simultaneously explains the beginning of the universe, the creation of matter, and the nature of sexual reproduction, all with the same progression of symbols. Scranton was drawn into esoteric studies by happenstance. His wife Risa was reading the book Unexplained! by Jerome Clark, and drew his attention to a chapter on the Dogon, a culture that possesses sophisticated knowledge of astronomy without telescopes or textbooks. For example, they know that Sirius is a twin star, consisting of a bright astral body called Sirius A and a faint white dwarf, Sirius B—though the second star is invisible to the naked eye. The Dogon closely protect their cultural heritage, like Jews. In fact, the tribe shares other traits with Judaism: skullcaps, fringed shawls, the practice of circumcision, and the celebration of a Jubilee year. Scranton’s studies led to his first book, The Science of the Dogon: Decoding the African Mystery Tradition. Scranton’s studies have a political dimension. Western civilization, with its advanced technology and science, believes it has a monopoly on truth. How could an illiterate tribe in Africa know more about quantum physics than the brilliant Europeans? Scranton suggests that there are ways of attaining knowledge which do not involve the chemistry lab and the mainframe computer.

As Scranton continued his research, he found that other groups had made arcane discoveries similar to the Dogon’s, including priests of ancient Egypt, the Sakti cult in India, the Na-Khi of Tibet, the Jewish Kabbalists, the Maori of New Zealand, and, on our continent, the Hopi, Navajo, and Cherokee tribes. “When you cross this boundary between the nonmaterial and the material, it’s like shining a white light into a crystal; what comes out the other side is a rainbow,” observes Scranton. “There’s a unity-tomultiplicity dynamic.” Scranton has published seven books with Inner Traditions, a Vermont-based publisher. His most recent work is Seeking the Primordial: Exploring Root Concepts of Cosmological Creation. Scranton has articles in the Encyclopedia of African Religion and the Encyclopaedia Britannica. He has appeared three times on Coast to Coast, the late-night radio show with a cult following of mystics, truck drivers, and insomniacs. For an audience of 2.75 million, host George Noory investigates poltergeists, numerology, aliens, the Mattress Firm conspiracy, phantom clowns, and other nonrational phenomena. Ed Nightingale is a master woodworker who has done restoration for New York's Trinity Church and the Vatican. Visiting the Egyptian pyramids in 1997, he had a builder’s intuition that a complex symbology was involved. Returning home to Pennsylvania, Nightingale began analyzing aerial photographs of the nine pyramids at Giza. Drawing four circles over the landscape, he found sophisticated geometric relationships that relate to the structure of spiral constellations and of DNA. Nightingale’s recent book, The Giza Template: Temple Graal, Earth Measure, elucidates these findings. “A Day of Instruction on Ancient Cosmology” will take place at Vassar College Alumnae House on April 21 at 9am. For further information, contact scrantonlr@aol.com. —Sparrow 4/18 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 85


JB Smoove 8-10pm. $49/$60/$70. Comedic funk. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039.

DANCE Liam O Moanlai & The Solas An Lae Dance Company 7:30pm. Laszlo Bito Conservatory Performance Space, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7196. FAIRS & FESTIVALS Newburgh Mall Carnival 5-11pm. This family-friendly event features midway rides for all ages, from whimsical kiddie rides to state-of-the-art thrill rides, carnival games and favorite fair food. Newburgh Mall, Newburgh. (866) 666-3247. ONE Fair Our New Energy (ONE) Fair will feature renewable energy companies and Earthfriendly groups showcasing their services; education, and advocacy groups in panel talks and discussions and opportunities for practical problem solving. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050. HEALTH & WELLNESS Foundation Retreat Weekend-long retreat. Dharma Drum Retreat Center, Pine Bush. 744-8114. KIDS & FAMILY Teen Night: Jackbox Video Games 4-5pm. One needs a smartphone to be able to play. The library has three Galaxy Tabs to use if you do not have a smartphone. (We also have four laptops available) Pizza will be served (while supplies last) thanks to Broadway Pizza in Tivoli. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. LECTURES & TALKS The Fellows Presentations 5pm. Discover new research on Thomas Cole and this historic place with 2017-18 Cole Fellows. Thomas Cole National Historic Site, Catskill. 518-943-7465. Legitimizing iel 5pm. A Trans Symposium about Language in Francophone and Anglophone spaces. Taylor Hall Room 203 at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. MUSIC David Kraai with Chris Macchia 10pm. Fine country folk music. Birdsall House, Peekskill. (914) 930-1880. Hollywood Nights: Bob Seger Tribute 8pm. $20-$40. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. John Primer with Jimy Graham 8pm. The Linda, Albany. thelinda.org. Matthew Stevens & Joanna Teters 8pm. Guitar virtuoso & neo-soul vocalist. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. THEATER Agatha Christie’s "A Murder Is Announced" 7:30pm. $20/$18 seniors and children under 12. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. "Frankie & Johnny in the Clair De Lune" 7:30-9:30pm. Bridge Street Theatre offers a fresh take on Terrence McNally’s contemporary American classic. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (518) 943-3818. "The Lion in Winter" 8pm. King Henry II wants to his kingdom to stay unified after his death but all three of his sons want to rule. Who survives Christmas in Chinon? Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Birding with Nick Martin, Minnewaska State Park Educator 9-10:30am. During this program, Nick will lead participants on a walk on the trails near the library to discover birds in the area. Participants are encouraged to bring binoculars, a birding field guide or a smart device with a field guide installed. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

86 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 4/18

SATURDAY 7 COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. Cuzin Maine 7:30pm. $39/$34. A family-friendly comedian. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945. Nick Di Paolo 8pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Vic DiBitetto 8-10pm. Comedian Vic DiBitetto churns energy, honesty and humanity into nonstop laughter at a frenetic pace. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. DANCE "Mother Goose" Ballet: New York Theatre Ballet at Kaatsbaan 11am-12pm. "Goose!" brings to life characters from the Mother Goose nursery rhymes. Jack and Jill, Little Bo Peep, Little Boy Blue, Little Miss Muffet, and other favorites kick up their heels in this delightful ballet. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 10. FAIRS & FESTIVALS Japanese Cherry Blossom Festival 1:30-3:30pm. Cherry blossoms are a symbolic flower of spring, celebrated in Japan as a herald of hope and a bright future- a time of renewal. Pelham Art Center, Pelham. (914) 738-2525. Newburgh Mall Carnival 12-11pm. This family-friendly event features midway rides for all ages, from whimsical kiddie rides to state-of-the-art thrill rides, carnival games and favorite fair food. Newburgh Mall, Newburgh. (866) 666-3247. ONE Fair The Our New Energy (ONE) Fair will feature renewable energy companies and Earthfriendly groups showcasing their services; education, and advocacy groups in panel talks and discussions and opportunities for practical problem solving. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050. Sugaeventr Shack Weekend 12-5pm. $5. We’ll transform our Cider Garden into the Stone Barn Sugar Shack for two days of maple and cider filled festivities. Enjoy a glass of the instant classic Maple Wooden Sleeper by the fireplace. Crown Maple will be onsite serving syrup samples all weekend. Live music from HillBilly Parade Saturday and The Bunker Boys. Angry Orchard Ciderie, Walden. Theangryorchard.tumblr.com/. FILM The Buddy System Movie Screening 4-6pm. The Buddy System tells the intimate stories of three families touched by autism, who experience meaningful change when a specially trained assistance dog comes into each of their lives. Q&A after screening and puppies. Merritt Bookstore, Millbrook. 677-5857. Jack and the Beanstalk 2pm. $10/$7 children. Shadowland Theatre, Ellenville. 647-5511. To Kill a Mocking Bird 1:30-3:30pm. $6. With live pre-show organ music starting 30 minutes before the feature. Paramount Theatre, Middletown. 346-4195. FOOD & WINE Cheesemaking with Brent Zimmerman 9:30-11:30am. $85. Learn the basics of cheesemaking while making your own Caciotta, an Italian style fresh cow cheese, and ricotta. Valley Variety, Hudson. (518) 828-0033. KIDS & FAMILY Abracadabra: It’s Melvin the Magnificent 10:30am-12:30pm. Spend the morning with Melvin the Magnificent, as he performs an interactive magic show that is sure to amaze you. FASNY Museum of Firefighting, Hudson. (518) 822-1875.

Creature Feature Weekend: Trout Tales Check out New York’s native Brook Trout babies and adults as we celebrate the opening of trout fishing season with help from Black Rock Forest Consortium. Fish feeding after “Meet the Animal” presentations at 1pm and 2:30pm. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781. High Five! Talking, Singing, Reading, Writing, Playing with Your Child: Spring Edition! 11am-1pm. A 5-week early literacy family program for children ages birth to 5 and their families. This Springtime edition includes story-time and crafts, guest instructors including a musician, a chef-educator, and The Columbia Land Conservancy, plus a trip to Hudson Children’s Book Festival. Hudson Area Library, Hudson. (518) 828-1792 ext. 101.

The Sweet Clementines 8pm. SmART rock. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970.

LECTURES & TALKS Legitimizing iel 5pm. A Trans Symposium about Language in Francophone and Anglophone spaces. Taylor Hall Room 203 at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. Panel Talk with Alumni Exhibit Artists 3pm. Byrdcliffe Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, Woodstock. 679-2079.

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Invasive Species Removal Day 9am-12pm. Get down and dirty removing invasive weeds at our first volunteer workday of 2018! SIegel Kline Kill Conservation Area, Ghent. (518) 392-5252.

LITERARY & BOOKS St. Rocco’s Reading: Mary-Kim Arnold, Karla Kelsey, Shira Dentz, Kristin Prevallet. 4-6pm. Reception at 4pm. Reading begins at 4:30pm. Thomas Cole National Historic Site, Catskill. (646) 351-9859. MUSIC Bettye LaVette 9pm. Soul rock. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Celebrated Irish Musicians in Concert 7:30pm. Paddy Keenan & Liam O Moanlai , with special collaborative dance performances by Solas An Lae American Irish Dance. Arts at the Chocolate Factory, Red Hook. Artsatthefactory.com. David Kraai with Chris Macchia 8:30-11pm. Country music. Grand Cru Beer and Cheese Market, Rhinebeck. 876-6992. Frankie Valli and the four Seasons 8pm. Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC), Kingston. 339-6088. JB3 Trio 7-10:30pm. Brothers Barbecue, New Windsor. 534-4227. Johnny A 8pm. $20-$25. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Marc Black and A History of the 1950’s and 60’s through Popular Song 7-9pm. A multidimensional evening of song, storytelling and laughter.A unique evening of music, discussion, and slideshow to follow. Unison Arts, New Paltz. 255-1559. Mutlu 8pm. $15-$20. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Olli Soikkeli & Cesar Garabini 8pm. $15. Django-style Finnish guitar whiz will be playing duets with Cesar Garabini, the mostly-Brazilian 7-string guitar artist. Brazilian chorinho and Gypsy jazz are a natural pair. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Pitchfork Militia 9-11:30pm. With a blend of country, blues, rock and punk, the band terms itself “Apocabilly”. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Purpl’s 7th Annual Battle of the Teen Bands 8pm. $12/$8 students. Talented teen bands will perform onstage for our renowned panel of judges for the chance to win the 2018 title and a mix and mastered recording of their live performance from the event. Purpl, HastingsOn-Hudson. (914) 231-9077. Ray Blue CD Release 8pm. Jazz. Bean Runner Cafe, Peekskill, United States. 9147371701. Rensselaer Music Association Spring Concert 2pm. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921. Roots Music in the Music Room 8-10pm. The American roots music tradition thrives in the Music Room of the Rosen House. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. (914) 232-1252. RPI and College of Saint Rose Clarinet Choir 6pm. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Antique Appraisal Day Event 10am-4pm. $10 each/$25 for 3 items. Presented by Astor Galleries to benefit Good Shepherd Women’s Society. Stephen Cardile long time appraiser and founder of Astor Galleries will be bringing a team of recognized expert appraisers to appraise all types of Antiques, Collectibles and Vintage Items. Good Shepherd Church/Father Brogan Center, Rhinebeck. (800) 784-7876. First Saturday Reception 5-8pm. ASK’s openings are elegant affairs with wine, hors d’oeuvres and art enthusiasts. Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0331.

THEATER "#9 Lives" 8pm. $25/$20 in advance. La Boss Presents #9Lives Monologue Play. All female cast channeling the various emotions. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 784-1199. Agatha Christie’s "A Murder Is Announced" 7:30pm. $20/$18 seniors and children under 12. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. "Frankie & Johnny in the Clair De Lune" 7:30-9:30pm. Bridge Street Theatre offers a fresh take on Terrence McNally’s contemporary American classic. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (518) 943-3818. "Gift Wrapped for Murder" 6:45-11pm. $40 for dinner and show. A fundraiser for the Fishkill Food Pantry. Attendees are requested to bring nonperishable food to the event. Wappingers Elks Lodge, Wappingers Falls. 896-0911. "The Lion in Winter" 8pm. King Henry II wants to his kingdom to stay unified after his death but all three of his sons want to rule. Who survives Christmas in Chinon? Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Play Reading: “Love Letters” by A.R. Gurney 7:30-10pm. Brian Keeler and Peggity Price in A.R. Gurney’s “Love Letters,” directed by Joe Capone. The play is a tender, tragicomic examination of the shared nostalgia, missed opportunities, and deep closeness of two lifelong, complicated friends. Tompkins Corners Cultural Center, Putnam Valley. 528-7280. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES American Heart Association Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED Combination Course 9am-4pm. $65. This course covers basic first aid, CPR techniques, maneuvers for choking victims and how to use an automated external defibrillator. For ages 14 and up. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 475-9742. Breakthrough M2: Recognition Celebration 10am-2:30pm. Be inspired by clients who have lost weight, kept it off, and transformed their lives. Taste recipes from current and former Breakthrough clients and then vote on your favorites. Homewood Suites Hotel by Hilton at Stewart Airport, New Windsor. 713-4320. Janie Greenwald Perservation Series: Dehydrating 10am. $65. bluecashew Kitchen Homestead, Kingston. 514-2300. Drawing and Painting with Les Castellanos 9am-noon. $200/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Kingston Clay Day 2-4pm. $25. Guests of all ages/abilities can play with clay on Kingston’s First Saturday! Try out the wheel, learn basic handbuilding techniques, and have fun making something from your imagination! Kingston Ceramics Studio, Kingston. 331-2078. Large Scale Drawing in Abstraction 9am-4pm. $252. Two-day workshop with Meredith Rosier. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.


DANCE CALEB TEICHER & NIC GAREISS

Deirdre Malfatto

Nathan Bugh, left, and Caleb Teicher dancing in "Meet Ella." Teicher headlines a performance at the opening of PS21 new black box theater on April 14-15.

Lords of the Dance

The nimble footwork of Caleb Teicher and Nic Gareiss, two of the most elegant interpreters of traditional American dance forms, will kick off PS21’s new black box theater in Chatham on April 14. Despite their youth, the dancers have already been favorably compared with Fred Astaire (Gareiss) and referred to by ArtsAmerica as “suave with a groove incarnate” (Teicher). He couldn’t know all the future would hold, but Caleb Teicher knew it held dance in one fashion or another from the time he was in his teens. Headed towards New York City after graduating high school a year early, Teicher left his hometown of Mahopac to pursue the world of traditional American dance. He was connected with tap extraordinaire Michelle Dorrance, who was just starting her company, Dorrance Dance, at the time. In 2015, he began Caleb Teicher & Company, the organization through which he would promote his own choreography and collaboration with other artists. These days, you can find him entrenched in his modern twist on tap, Lindy Hop, and jazz. Now 24 years old, you don’t have to look deeply into Teicher’s life to see his accolades speaking volumes about the direction of his career. When Caleb Teicher & Company performed at the Joyce Theater in Manhattan this past January, the nationally known dance venue was entirely sold out. Notably, the New York Times raved about this performance, noting how striking his “impulsive, elusive eccentricity” was on stage. Joining Teicher is Michigan native Nic Gareiss, whose work in Irish stepdance and

percussive dance has led him to both teach and perform in 14 countries. Gareiss is a scholar of dance, studying the occupation of the human body as a musical instrument. The Boston Herald hails Gareiss as “the most inventive and expressive step dancer on the scene.” This won’t be the duo’s first time performing for an adoring audience at PS21; their visit last summer for the Chatham Dance Festival “made the audience fall in love with them,” says Susan Davies, administrative director of PS21. Teicher’s pieces last summer included a witty translation of Bach’s Goldberg Variations into tap, as well as a touching tribute to renowned jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald. Such an upbeat, expressive act is just what PS21 was looking for to open their new facility. Davies says that this act “embodies what we celebrate about the performing arts,” and will be replete with a ribbon cutting and champagne toast as PS21 anticipates an exciting future. Davies suspects the new theater, which houses 99 seats, will fill up quickly, so it’s wise to reserve a seat ahead of time. Caleb Teicher & Company performs at PS21 in Chatham on April 14 at 8pm and April 15 at 2pm. Tickets for the performance inaugurating the black box theater on April 14 are $45/$40 for PS21 members. Tickets for the April 15 performance are $25/$20. (518) 392-6121; Ps21chatham.org. —Anna Barton 2/18 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 87


Moving Through Pain: Experiencing Strength and Resilience 11am-12pm. You will be guided through exploration of body awareness, using techniques of deep relaxation and understanding one’s personal movement style. This four-week workshop can be taken in total or as individual sessions. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Repair Cafe: Cornwall 12:30-3:30pm. Cornwall Public Library wants to help reduce waste, connect people, and highlight the skills and talents in our community. Cornwall Public Library, Cornwall. Repaircafehv.org. US Coast Guard Captains License Course 8am-5pm. $400. 4-weekend course. Obtain your OUPV [6 Pack] and Masters Upgrade with Tow Endorsement at Riverport Wooden Boat School/Hudson River Maritime Museum. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. Seatechmarinetraining.com/service.html.

SUNDAY 8 COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. An Evening with David Sedaris 7pm. $48-$68. Sedaris has become one of America’s preeminent humor writers. The great skill with which he slices through cultural euphemisms and political correctness proves that Sedaris is a master of satire and one of the most observant writers addressing the human condition today. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390. FAIRS & FESTIVALS Newburgh Mall Carnival 12-11pm. This family-friendly event features midway rides for all ages, from whimsical kiddie rides to state-of-the-art thrill rides, carnival games and favorite fair food. Newburgh Mall, Newburgh. (866) 666-3247. One Fair Working in partnership with Virago Futures, Basilica Hudson will be launching a new event for 2018 with a focus on renewable energy. The Our New Energy Fair will feature renewable energy companies and Earthfriendly groups showcasing their services; education, and advocacy groups in panel talks and discussions and opportunities for practical problem solving. Building on Basilica Hudson’s long-standing commitment to sustainability, ONE Fair aims to show how it is possible for everyone to run their home with renewable energy. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050. Sugaeventr Shack Weekend 12-5pm. $5. We’ll transform our Cider Garden into the Stone Barn Sugar Shack for two days of maple and cider filled festivities. Enjoy a glass of the instant classic Maple Wooden Sleeper by the fireplace. Crown Maple will be onsite serving syrup samples all weekend. Live music from HillBilly Parade Saturday and The Bunker Boys Sunday. Angry Orchard Ciderie, Walden. Theangryorchard. tumblr.com/. HEALTH & WELLNESS Journey into Self Awareness 10:30am. $15. Join Theo Meth for a morning filled with music, humor, divine celebration and laughter, howling, dancing, shaking, gibberish, chanting, guided self inquiry and silent meditation. Milkweed, Sugar Loaf. Yoga Sutras Study Group 7-8:30pm. $60. Anne-Marie Serre is once again leading a discussion group for those who are interested in reviewing and discussing the Yoga Sutras, a seminal text of yoga. This series will be exclusively digital. Lilananda Yoga, Glenville. (518) 470-5240. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

88 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 4/18

KIDS & FAMILY Circle of Trauma: Beacon 2-4pm. Training for adoptive foster and kinship families. In this workshop, we’ll tackle the challenge of raising adoptive children and children in foster care with adverse childhood experiences and difficult past histories. Beacon Hebrew Alliance, Beacon. (646) 688-4321. Creature Feature Weekend: Trout Tales Check out New York’s native Brook Trout babies and adults as we celebrate the opening of trout fishing season with help from Black Rock Forest Consortium. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781. Planting, Growing & Composting for Young Gardeners 2-3pm. There will be hands-on activities in which young people ages 6-10 years old will plant seeds and cuttings, and explore the importance of composting. Registration is limited to 15. Hudson Area Library, Hudson. (518) 828-1792. Marco The Magician 2-3pm. A magic show for all ages. The Chapel Restoration, Cold Spring. 265-5537. LECTURES & TALKS Idyllic and Industrial Visions: Thomas Cole, William Guy Wall, and the Hudson River 2pm. Sophie Lynford, Ph.D. Candidate, History of Art, Yale University. Thomas Cole National Historic Site, Catskill. 518-943-7465. Sunday Salon: Idyllic and Industrial Visions 2-3:30pm. Sophie Lynford is a Ph.D. candidate in the History of Art at Yale University. The lecture will be held in Thomas Cole’s New Studio in Catskill, NY. Thomas Cole National Historic Site, Catskill. (518) 943-7465. LITERARY & BOOKS Meet the Authors Luncheon: Alison Gaylin & Randy Susan Meyers. 12-4pm. $35. Alison Gaylin and Randy Susan Meyers. Proceeds from the luncheon support programs at the Moffat Library. Round Hill House, Washingtonville. 496-5483. MUSIC Common Tongue: Tribute to Jeff Beck 8pm. Jazz rock fusion. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. John Stetch & Vulneraville 8pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Merlin and Polina Shepherd Klezmer Duo 7pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Metroplitan Hot Club 12-3pm. Gypsy jazz group that plays hot swing of the 30s and 40s. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. NYSM All Stars 3pm. Student rock showcase. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Parker String Quartet 4pm. With Charles Neidich, clarinet. Howland Cultural Center, Beacon. Howlandmusic.org. Stringendo 3pm. This performance will feature the premiere of “The Hudson Valley Suite” by renowned composer Conni Ellisor and represents the culmination of a four-year commissioned-work project with Stringendo. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Vito Petroccitto & Little Rock 11am. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Guest Bartending to Benefit Friends of the State Historic Sites of the Hudson Highlands 1-4pm. At this annual fundraiser, members will be meeting and greeting the public, manning the spouts and, maybe even waiting on tables. Newburgh Brewing Company, Newburgh. 561-2327. THEATER Agatha Christie’s "A Murder Is Announced" 2pm. $20/$18 seniors and children under 12. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. "Frankie & Johnny in the Clair De Lune" 2-4pm. Bridge Street Theatre offers a fresh take on Terrence McNally’s contemporary American classic. Bridge Street Theatre, Catskill. (518) 943-3818. "The Lion in Winter" 3pm. King Henry II wants to his kingdom to stay unified after his death but all three of his sons want to rule. Who survives Christmas in Chinon? Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) Renewal Course 9am-3pm. This is a recertification of the ACLS course. You must have an ACLS certification to take this course. For ages 18 and up. Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel. 475-9742. ECG & Pharmacology Course 9am-3pm. $125. This classroom-based, facilitator-led course is designed to improve electrocardiogram (ECG) recognition skills and pharmacology knowledge for treating cardiovascular emergencies. For ages 18 and up. Preregistration and payment are required. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 475-9742. New Paltz Ballet Theatre’s Spring Master Class Series $30. With Contemporary Dancer Bradley Beakes. All dancers welcome. Ages 8-11, 1-2:30pm. Ages 12+, 3-4:30pm. New Paltz School of Ballet, New Paltz. 255-0044.

MONDAY 9 MUSIC Amy Helm: Woodshed Residency Tour 2018 8pm. Neo-Americana. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Bobby Previte Trio 8pm. $10. Jazz. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Portraits from Photographic Reference 9am-4pm. $350. Through April 11. With Claire Lambe. Includes a package to stay at the Emerson. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

TUESDAY 10 ART EVENTS & OPEN STUDIOS Art-in-Ed Opening Reception & Slide Night. 5-7:30pm. Join Women’s Studio Workshop for the opening of its Art-in-Education Program, slide night presentations, and artist talks by artists-in-residence Trudy Barnes and Alison Owen. Women's Studio Workshop, Rosendale. Wsworkshop.org.

FILM Walk with Me 7:15pm. A meditative film about a community of Zen Buddhist monks and nuns who have dedicated their lives to mastering the art of mindfulness with their world-famous teacher Thich Nhat Hanh. Narrated by Benedict Cumberbatch. The Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. HEALTH & WELLNESS Zumba with Maritza 5:30-6:30pm. $5. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 913-6085. LECTURES & TALKS Monthly Open House with Dharma Talk Meditation: 6-7pm, Talk 7pm, followed by tea, cookies, and converation. Sky Lake Lodge, Rosendale. 658-8556. Ethnobotany and the Search for New ALS & Alzheimer’s Drugs in Island Villages 2-4pm. Dr. Paul Alan Cox. As one of the world’s leading ethnobotanists, Dr. Cox has lived in small, remote villages around the world searching for new medicines. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 687-5261. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) Provider Certification 5:30-9:30pm. This class is appropriate for new or recertifying students. Ages 16 and up. Vassar Brothers Medical Center, Poughkeepsie. 475-9742.

WEDNESDAY 11 BUSINESS & NETWORKING Disability Employment 12-1:30pm. Dawn Wilson, The ARC of Dutchess. Matching the best people with the right mix of education, talent and experience is critical to your business’s success. The Arc of Dutchess Employment Services is designed to assist people with disabilities in gaining and maintaining successful employment. Learn how we work to ensure staffing solutions that will make a difference in your company’s profile and bottom line. Boardman Road Library, Poughkeepsie. 485-3445.

Hudson Valley Job Fair 1-5pm. Meet many employers and learn about the variety of job opportunities. Open to students and the community. Please wear appropriate work attire and bring resumé. Please park in Lot D. Hosted by the Center for Career and Entrepreneurial Services at DCC and the New York State Department of Labor. Dutchess Community College, Fairview. 790-3750.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Breast Cancer Support Group 2-3:30pm. Peer led support group. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 339-4673. DYBO (Dance Your ‘Buts’ Off) $5. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 309-2406. Qigong and Tai Chi Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 672-5391.

KIDS & FAMILY Scrabble Club Second Wednesday of every month, 5-6pm. For youth from third to eighth grades. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. LECTURES & TALKS ART!??!!! A Discussion with EMPAC Director Johannes Goebel 7pm. An open conversation on the subject of art, jump-started by EMPAC Director Johannes Goebel. Why is there art at all? Why should anyone care? Isn’t everything art and everyone an artist? EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Empac.rpi.edu Do You Love What You Do? 6-8pm. $15/$10. Featuring Tom Smith of Garden State Koi. Pennings Farm, Warwick. 986-1059.

LITERARY & BOOKS Indian Annie, A Grandmother’s Story: Native Americans Who Refused to Leave with Sally Bermanzohn 7-8:30pm. A reading of historical fiction about a 19th century Choctaw woman from the deep South. During the Indian Removal, they hid in Freedom Hills in Alabama and survived against all odds. Book-signing. Rosendale Public Library, Rosendale. 658-9013. MUSIC Gabriele Tranchina Quartet “Of Sailing Ships and the Stars in Your Eyes” 8pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Jazz Sessions at The Falcon Underground 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Pros and Icons 7pm. $10-$15. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Garrison Institute Writer’s Circle 6:30-8:30pm. Free. A monthly collaborative writing workshop that includes time for meditation, reflection, writing, and sharing. Garrison Institute, Garrison. 424-4800.

THURSDAY 12 BUSINESS & NETWORKING Hudson Valley Garden Association Monthly Meeting Second Thursday of every month, 7pm. Shawangunk Town Hall, Wallkill. 418-3640. COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. The Comics at The Underground 8pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970.


BOOKS H. JON BENJAMIN

What were some of your early pre-entertainment industry jobs? I spent my twenties pretty much getting fired from a bunch of waitering jobs but did finally land a steady gig stacking books at the Cambridge Public Library in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It was a pretty good job, if you enjoyed public masturbation and cleaning up after public masturbation. It was also good if you like to get paid less than thirteen thousand a year. How did you get into TV writing? My first script for a network was called Squash Club...The script, appropriately, was about a young man who played squash with old men in New York City and they became his only friends. It was really about not wanting to be young—something I strongly felt in real life. Being young means you have so much left to do, but being old means just settling in quietly for the remaining days. You know, just tucking yourself in with a bowl of popcorn or some soup and welcoming the final breath (that’s how I imagine death). Anyway, the pilot script was declined, and I moved onto the next idea, which was subsequently rejected, and so on, for many, many years. Tell us how you came up with the characters for Bob and Archer. I did the same voice. The end. What’s a weird thing people don’t know about you? My earliest memories are of my parents cleaning. I still get bizarre pleasure in watching people clean. One of the first things I did after making some money was hire a cleaning woman to come to my studio apartment in New York City. She was young and cute, but it was less sexual attraction than an attraction to cleaning. I would sit and marvel at it, which made for an uncomfortable situation. There was always this very present energy coming from her saying, “Why are you always hanging around here in your small apartment and watching me clean?” my intentions were very easy to misread, and it was a hard distinction to communicate, like, “I’m not gawking at you the way you’re thinking. I just like to watch people clean. Because of my childhood. Seriously I just need to watch!” Give us a good name for a band. During the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, people of my faith fast for twenty-four hours and on the night of the fast, they go to synagogue and pray to God to be absolved for all the sins they committed that calendar year...Every sin listed, each and every one, would make an excellent band name. C’mon tell me Casting Off the Yoke is not a really good band name. And Forty Lashes? Fucking gold. And don’t tell me some prog-rock kid wouldn’t want his first band to be called Obduracy. All kids who are starting a band, check out the full list in the Jewish High Holiday prayer book. What about for an airline? Just wingin’ it.

H. Jon Benjamin speaks and signs books at the Fisher Center on May 2.

A Future in Failure “Oh my God!” These are familiar words to fans of the adult cartoon “Bob’s Burgers” (there’s even a two-and-a-half-minute compilation of all the times Bob says it on YouTube). Now it’s our turn to take the lord’s name in vain, because H. Jon Benjamin, the voice behind Bob Belcher and Archer, from the eponymous hit animated series, is coming to town. The voice actor-cum-comedian-cum-author is slated to give what is sure to be a side-splittingly inappropriate and rambling talk about his new book at Bard College. After getting lost in the red tape labyrinth of publicists and promoters and failing to get in touch with Benjamin for a direct interview, we decided to embrace the central premise of his book: Failure is An Option. Our Plan B: to engage in dialogue with the ever-accessible, immutable record of the printed word, namely to interview the book itself. As the back cover boasts, “With stories, examples of artistic and literary failure, and a powerful can’t-do attitude, Failure Is An Option is the book the world doesn’t need right now but will get regardless.” Fans of “Archer” and “Bob’s Burgers” are sure to hear Benjamin’s blasé, unmistakable intonation in the responses below. You’re welcome. In an event co-sponsored by Bard College and Oblong Books & Music, H. Jon Benjamin will read and sign books at the Fisher Center for Performing Arts in Annandaleon-Hudson on May 2 at 8pm. Fishercenter.bard.edu. —Marie Doyon

A game show? Survival of the Fattest. By no means, though, am I connecting fat with fail. Why did you decide to write a book? Looking at it with a critical eye, my story is something of a cautionary tale. It is the story of a failure. But by the same token, it is an aspirational tale, in that most failures never get to tell their tales. You know the old saying ‘History is written by the victors.’ It’s like that. Failures are a voiceless mass of unrealized promise. Where would we be if this world was solely composed of failures? By nature, survival itself is a narrative imbued with a success imperative. To be clear, this is a polemic in favor of failure. It’s an assertion that failure is an option and even, at times, a viable prescription for a better life, despite its longstanding stigmatization. Failure can be incredibly freeing and an end in itself, not just that tired platitude that is a necessary step on the road to success. Despite my own success, I maintain that failure is my prevailing life force and my success has been a parallel and unrelated condition, not a consequence of my failure(s). If you’re not following, that’s because I’m a failure. Or because you’re a failure. But either way, that’s a good thing. What are some of your best failed pickup lines? “Do you work out or are you just naturally tense?” “Am I seeing double, or do you have two tits?” “I know this might sound old-fashioned, but do you want to have sex with me in a cave?” What would you say is the central takeaway of your new book? The key to failure being an option is a way forward. Failing at something is a signal, but not a signifier. It doesn’t mean the end of something. Often, it’s a springboard toward something better, or worse, but isolating a failure and fueling it with too much pressure to reverse it is never a good path. With this, I will say, I hope you fail well. 4/18 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 89


FILM Lunafest: Short Films By, For, About Women 5:30pm. $40/$45-$100 reception and options. Please join us to enjoy 9 incredible short films by and about women. Beneficiaries of the evening are the Girls’ Leadership Worldwide program at the Eleanor Roosevelt Center @ Val-Kill and Breast Cancer Prevention Partners. Both groups work tirelessly to empower and improve the lives of girls and women, and this event is a perfect opportunity to celebrate and support their missions. There will be a pre-screening buffet supper/reception, and fantastic raffle prizes. Henry A. Wallace Visitor Center, Hyde Park. Lunafest.org/screenings/hydepark-ny-041218. FOOD & WINE Andrea Lubrano Goldstein Ayurveda 6pm. A millenary science with integrative approach (Vegan) Organic Wine Tasting. bluecashew Kitchen Homestead, Kingston. 514-2300. HEALTH & WELLNESS Breast Cancer Support Group Peer led support group. 84 Greene Street, Hudson. 339-4673. Landscape Painting For Women with Cancer 6:15-8:15pm. Open to people living with breast, ovarian or gynecological cancer. Registration required. Led by an instructor from The Art Effect . East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. (914) 962-6402. LECTURES & TALKS Holocaust Memorial Program 7pm. Join our candlelight Yom HaShoah service with second generation survivors, remembering those who perished in the Holocaust with poetry, songs and readings. Jewish Federation of Ulster County, Kingston. 338-8131. MUSIC David Lindley 8pm. $25-$40. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Latin Jazz Express: Tribute to Tito Puente 8pm. Salsa meets jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Open Mike Night with Jeff Entin 7-9:30pm. Jeff Entin welcomes musicians from all around the Hudson Valley to Open Mic night. Bring your instrument and talent to the stage or enjoy a tasty dinner listening to the music. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Open Mike for the People, By the People 7:30pm. Copperfield’s, Millbrook. 677-8188. Soul Purpose 7pm. Motown, R&B. Colony Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-7625. THEATER "Crimes of the Heart" by Beth Henley 7pm. Featuring SUNY Ulster students and directed by Stephen Balantzian, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Theatre. Under the scorching heat of the Mississippi sun, past resentments bubble to the surface when 3 sisters must come to terms with the consequences of each their own “crimes of the heart.” Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. Arts.sunyulster.edu/. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Drawing Better: Vince Natale 9am-12p. $160/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing, Painting and Composition with Eric Angeloch 1-4pm. $160/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Vet2Vet Veterans Program Featuring a variety of workshops and support groups. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 672-5391. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

90 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 4/18

FRIDAY 13 COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. DANCE Dances of Universal Peace 7-9pm. Using sacred phrases, chants, music and movements from many different spiritual traditions, we cultivate joy, peace, and integration within ourselves, in our communities, and in the greater world. Dances taught by certified leaders. Sadhana Center for Yoga and Meditation, Hudson. (518) 828-1034. Dancing with the Stars Ulster Style 7-10pm. $10-$75. Benefits Ulster County United Way. Diamond Mills, Saugerties. 331-4199. Zydeco Dance with ZydeGroove 7pm: free dance lesson; 8-11pm: band plays. No partner necessary. All are welcome. White Eagle Hall, Kingston. (914) 388-7048. KIDS & FAMILY Adoptive Families Group 5:30pm. Red Hook Public Library welcomes adoptive families to the library for community and conversation starting. With games and art projects for the children, parents can talk with each other and/or join in the messmaking mayhem. Red Hook Public Library, Red Hook. 758-3241. MUSIC Black Violin 7:30pm. $29.50-$49.50. Classically trained violist and violinist Wil B. and Kev Marcus combine their classical training and hip-hop influences to create a distinctive multi-genre sound that is often described as “classical boom.” Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945. Friday The Thirteenth: Four Bands 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Hit Men 8-10pm. $27.50-$60. Featuring legendary performers with Frankie Valli, Carole King, Cat Stevens & more. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Jane Monheit & Frank Vignola with the John DiMartino Trio 8pm. $34. Vocalist Jane Monheit’s sincere and romantic interpretations of songs and the tasteful virtuosity of guitarist Frank Vignola have straddled the worlds of jazz, swing, standards, pop and show tunes, and now they will join forces with the John DiMartino Trio to celebrate the music of Leonard Bernstein on the occasion of the legendary composer’s centenary in 2018. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Jason Eady 8pm. Classic Mississippi country roots. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Journeyman: A Tribute to Eric Clapton 8pm. $20-$35. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Mala Waldron Quartet 8pm. Jazz. Bean Runner Cafe, Peekskill, United States. 9147371701. Paul de Jong Album Release Show 7-9pm. Dutch cellist and composer Paul de Jong (The Books) performs from his new solo album “You F*cken Sucker”. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8100. Purpl’s Open Mike Night $8. This is not your average open mike: the big stage, amazing acoustics, high-end equipment, and experienced sound engineer create a concert-like experience. Two songs per artist.Purpl, Hastings-On-Hudson. (914) 231-9077. Spring Jazz Series 7:30pm. $10. Midtown Music’s first curated jazz series strives to cover different aspects of jazz from a funk opera to swing, we’ve got it covered. ARTBar Gallery, Kingston. 338-2789. The Suitcase Junket 9pm. Indie-blues. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

THEATER "Crimes of the Heart" by Beth Henley 7pm. Under the scorching heat of the Mississippi sun, past resentments bubble to the surface when 3 sisters must come to terms with the consequences of each their own “crimes of the heart.” Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. Arts.sunyulster.edu/. "The Lion in Winter" 8pm. King Henry II wants to his kingdom to stay unified after his death but all three of his sons want to rule. Who survives Christmas in Chinon? Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Mary Poppins 8pm. $10/$8 students and seniors. Presented by The Rhinebeck High School Drama Club. Rhinebeck High School, Rhinebeck. 871-5500. Men’s Beauty Pageant 2018 by Hudson Valley B.R.A.W.L. 7-10pm. Hudson Valley BRAWL, the midHudson Valleys charity fund raising, theatrical women’s arm wrestling league, has conspired once again to bring you the Men’s Beauty Pageant. Eight contestants, self identifying as men, will compete for the illusive crown in three categories; talent, swimwear and evening attire. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. Hudsonvalleybrawl.com/. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Birding with Nick Martin, Minnewaska State Park Educator 9-10:30am. Participants are encouraged to bring binoculars, a birding field guide or a smart device with a field guide installed. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

SATURDAY 14 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS O+ Spring Gala Auction 7-11pm. Bid on art, tickets to performances, guided mural tours, gift certificates to restaurants, stores, and health and wellness experiences. Also includes savory hors d’oeuvres, select wine and beer, and exclusive entrance to live bidding on artworks and experiences not available in the online auction. The Beverly, Kingston. 514-2570. COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. What’s So Funny About My Family? 6pm. Includes three-course dinner and standup comedy show. Charlotte’s Restaurant and Catering, Millbrook. 677-5888. DANCE Community Contra Dance 6pm supper, 6:45pm dancing. Suitable for all ages and abilities. Live music by Tamarack (fiddle, flute, penny whistle, banjo, guitar). The McNary Center, Kinderhook. (518) 758-6271. Festive Opening of PS21 Black Box Theater: Caleb Teicher & Nic Gareiss 8-9:30pm. $45/$40 PS21 members. Opening weekend features two of America’s most elegant interpreters of traditional American dance forms, including tap, clogging, flatfooting, Irish step, and contemporary hybrids. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. FAIRS & FESTIVALS Beacon Second Saturday Second Saturday is a city-wide celebration of the arts held on the second Saturday of every month where galleries and shops stay open until 9pm, most of which are right along Main Street. Downtown Beacon. Beaconarts.org International Punch Hooking Day 10am-3pm. $10. Bring your current punch needle project to the Tivoli Fire House. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. HEALTH & WELLNESS Metastatic Breast Cancer Support Group 12-1:30pm. Peer led support group. Christ the King Church, New Paltz. 339-4673.

KIDS & FAMILY 1209 Arts presents A Chocolate & White Affair 7-11pm. $20-$25. The Chocolate & White Affair offers a fantastic evening for the adult supporters of the MyKingstonKids organization to connect, dance and enjoy while also assisting in raising funds for the Kids Fest event. The evening will include a live dj, casual food, drink, surprise performances, chocolate treats and more. We encourage all guests to wear either all white or mainly white for the event. Feel free to dress casual and comfortable as the energy of motion will take control of you. Arts Society of Kingston, Kingston. Fwaters@ mykingstonkids.com. Celebration of Storytelling 10-11:30am. For parents and children ages 2-6 years-old presented by Carol Garboden Murray, Nancy Van Laan & Karen Pillsworth. Join us in celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Rosendale Library with an exciting morning of storytelling by professional authors and storytellers. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-9347. LECTURES & TALKS 19th Annual Garden Day: Trowel to Table 8:30am-4:15pm. $50/$45 in advance. Join in the fun of learning how to grow your best garden ever. “Garden Day”, presented by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County Master Gardeners, welcomes all gardeners from beginners to experts to take part in this day-long gardening experience. This year’s theme, “Trowel to Table”, features 16 classes and a Keynote by Fredda Merzon, metal sculptor and gardener who creates botanically-inspired sculptures from found metal objects. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 340-4990 ext. 335. Actor Harry Lennix: Art and Spirituality 2:30-3:30pm. Martel Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. Art and Spirituality 2:30pm. Actor Harry Lennix. Martel Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. Digging Deeper: The BudgetWise Gardener 11am. $35. This lecture is based on Kerry Ann Mendez’s newest book, The BudgetWise Gardener—an essential guide to creating the garden of your dreams without breaking the bank. Plant the best for less! Money-saving tips for purchasing plants plus cost-saving garden designs. Discover a wealth of ideas for getting the best price and value for exceptional plants. Also covered are striking design concepts for eye-popping, pollinator-friendly landscapes requiring less maintenance and water. And, container gardening takes on a whole new spin with these cost-effective, creative ideas. Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook. (888) 842-2442. LITERARY & BOOKS Kingston Spoken Word 7pm. $5. hosted by Annie LaBarge. Featuring poets Lee Gould and Linda Sonia Miller, followed by open mike. Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Catskills, Kingston. 331-2884. Survival and Writing: Lessons from the Other Side 5-6pm. Author Audrey Berger Welz, while fighting for her life, was determined to finish her novel, “Circus of Queens: The FortuneTeller’s Fate.” Welz will talk about how she used writing and music to survive and will read from the book that was so important to her survival. Woodstock Public Library, Woodstock. 679-2311. Volume Presents: Monika Woods, Bud Smith, and Rachel Lyon 7-8pm. Readings run from 7-8, followed by book-signing and a special guest DJ from 8-9. The Spotty Dog Books & Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. MUSIC 3 Ravens 7:30-10pm. $18. An evening of originals, instrumentals, and traditional songs, with Donna Hébert on the fiddle, Lui Collins on the piano, banjo and ukulele, and Max Cohen on the guitar; three strong voices blending harmonies and conversing fluently with one another. Tompkins Corners Cultural Center, Putnam Valley. (203) 215-3385. Alan Doyle plus Fortunate Ones 8pm. $25-$40. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. David Kraai 5-8pm. Fine country folk music. Angry Orchard, Walden. (888) 845-3311.


Diane Moser’s Birdsong Trio CD Release Concert 5pm. $10. Beattie-Powers Place, Catskill. Electro-acoustic Ensemble Plan B 8pm. $20. LP release concert. Howland Cultural Center, Beacon. 831-4988. Festival of Praise 7pm. $39-$59. Featuring Fred Hammond, Take 6, Donnie McClurkin, James Fortune and Pastor Charles Jenkins. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. The Good Rats 8pm. Rock. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. John Tropea Band 8pm. Salsa meets jazz. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Judith Tulloch Band 8:45pm. Singer/songwriter. Chill Wine Bar, Beacon. 765-0885. Latin Pasión 8-10:30pm. The night will sizzle with two Latin inspired pieces. First, Four Seasons from Buenos Aires by Piazzolla featuring soloist Marka Young, violinist and NDSO concertmaster. Second, the “exotic” instruments of the NEXUS percussion ensemble will join NDSO for The Carmen Ballet written for string orchestra and fortyseven percussion instruments. NDSO at the Marriott Pavilion - The Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park. 635-0877. Pratrice Pike and Shelley King 7:30pm. Two women at the forefront of Austin, Texas’ music legacy, Patrice Pike and Shelley King will hold court, tell stories, and blow the walls out with acoustic versions of the songs that put them on the national scene. Hurleyville Arts Center, Hurleyville. 707-8047. Rensselaer Orchestra Spring Concert 4pm. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921. Roots Music Festival Featuring Ruby Boots 8pm. $20. The Linda, Albany. thelinda.org. Shemekia Copeland 9pm. Club Helsinki, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Straight No Chaser 8pm. $50/$70/$90. Male a cappella group. Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC), Kingston. 339-6088. The Trapps 8:30-11:30pm. The Trapps are an original roots rock band that was formed in New Paltz, New York in the winter of 2003 bywith singer-songwriter Sean Schenker, bass player Jason Sarubbi, and guitar player Warren Gold. John Burdick and Josh Roy Brown have joined the band adding a rhythm guitar and lap steel player guitar and the band is often graced with the rich, beautiful tones of vocalist Robin Baker. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Wycliffe Gordon and His International AllStars: Presented In Collaboration with Jazz at Lincoln Center 8-10pm. $20/$35/$50/$65. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. (914) 232-1252.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Information Session for Prospective Families 10am-12:15pm. The Storm King School Admission team cordially invites prospective students and their families to take a tour and learn more about our academic, sports, arts, and service programs. The Storm King School, Cornwall on Hudson. 458-7536. OUTDOORS & RECREATION Garden Day 8:15am-4:30pm. $45. Master Gardener Annual Garden Day Conference. Choose from 16 Gardening classes. Plants, problems and solutions will be the main themes of the classes. Enjoy the keynote speaker and mini trade show. For more information contact Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County, Dona Crawford. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 340-3990 ext. 335. THEATER Agatha Christie’s "A Murder Is Announced" 7:30pm. $20/$18 seniors and children under 12. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476. "Crimes of the Heart" by Beth Henley 7pm. Under the scorching heat of the Mississippi sun, past resentments bubble to the surface when 3 sisters must come to terms with the consequences of each their own “crimes of the heart.” Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. Arts.sunyulster.edu/.

"The Lion in Winter" 8pm. King Henry II wants to his kingdom to stay unified after his death but all three of his sons want to rule. Who survives Christmas in Chinon? Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. "Mary Poppins" 8pm. $10/$8 students and seniors. Presented by The Rhinebeck High School Drama Club. Rhinebeck High School, Rhinebeck. 871-5500. Met Live in HD: Verdi’s "Luisa Miller" 12:30pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Drawing and Painting with Les Castellanos 9am-noon. $200/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Moving Through Pain: Experiencing Strength and Resilience 11am-noon. $35 4 sessions/$10 per class. You will be guided through exploration of body awareness, using techniques of deep relaxation and understanding one’s personal movement style. The objective is for participants to discover their path to greater resilience. This four-week workshop can be taken in total or as individual sessions. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Repair Cafe: Poughkeepsie 9am-noon. Knowledgeable advice, repairs and inspiration. ​First Evangelical Lutheran Church, Poughkeepsie. Repaircafehv.org. Tools for Writing and Self-Publishing 1-3pm. $30/$20 members. Second session April 19. Arts Mid Hudson, Poughkeepsie. 454-3222.

SUNDAY 15 COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. DANCE Caleb Teicher & Nic Gareiss 2pm. Opening weekend features two of America’s most elegant interpreters of traditional American dance forms, including tap, clogging, flatfooting, Irish step, and contemporary hybrids. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. MorDance: UpStream Showcase Performance 2:30-3:30pm. $10. Kaatsbaan is pleased to present MorDance under the artistic direction of Morgan McEwen. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 2. Swing Dance 6-9pm. $15/$10 for full time students. Dance to the Pops and the Weasels. No partner needed. Beginners’ lesson 6:00. Dance 6:30. Arlington Reformed Church, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571. HEALTH & WELLNESS Journey into Self Awareness 10:30am. $15. Join Theo Meth for a morning filled with music, humor, divine celebration and laughter, howling, dancing, shaking, gibberish, chanting, guided self inquiry and silent meditation. Milkweed, Sugar Loaf. Yoga Sutras Study Group 7-8:30pm. $60. Anne-Marie Serre is once again leading a discussion group for those who are interested in reviewing and discussing the Yoga Sutras, a seminal text of yoga. This series will be exclusively digital. Lilananda Yoga, Glenville. (518) 470-5240. KIDS & FAMILY “Mother GOOSE!” New York Theatre Ballet 3pm. Goose! brings to life characters from the Mother Goose nursery rhymes. Jack and Jill, Little Bo Peep, Little Boy Blue, Little Miss Muffet, and other favorites kick up their heels in this delightful ballet. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. MUSIC Ana Popovic 7pm. $25-$35. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Big Joe Fitz & The Lo-Fis 11am. Blues and swing. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Bluegrass Brunch: Long Steel Rail noon. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185.

TMI Project’s #BlackStoriesMatter After the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin and rise of the national #BlackLivesMatter movement, TMI Project spent five years planning to take action the way they know best: by telling stories. TMI Project hosted the first #BlackStoriesMatter performance last year in Kingston. People took the stage to tell their truth about being black, discussing issues of racism, gentrification, media representation, and so on. This year, TMI Project is partnering with Bard College’s student-service organization, BRAVE, to present an encore live storytelling experience on April 4 at 7pm at Bard College. Storytellers will perform a version of the original performance, followed by a panel discussion by local activists: Brothers of Bard founder Dariel Vasquez, former Citizen Action lead organizer Callie Jayne, and TMI Project directors Tameka Ramsey and Eva Tenuto. Tmiproject.org. —Briana Bonfiglio The Fabulous Hackers 2-4pm. A group of golf buddies get together and play favorites ranging from folk to classic rock to country intersperse with a growing list of original songs. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Jesse Cook 7:30pm. $36/$29. World music guitarist. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945. Joan Osborne: Songs of Bob Dylan 8pm. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. 866-781-2922. Richard Goode 3-5pm. Goode, known in particular for his interpretations of Beethoven, will offer one of the composer’s late masterpieces, the Sonata Op. 101, together with Debussy’s enchanting Preludes, Book II. The program begins with Renaissance and Baroque masters Byrd and J.S. Bach. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. (914) 232-1252. Rustles of Spring: A Celebration of Paul Lustig Dunkel 3-5pm. Music from Copland House salutes one of America’s foremost flutists, Paul Lustig Dunkel, who left a major legacy at Copland House, and beyond. This program features the work of three composers who symbolized Paul’s devotion to the music of our time. He was directly involved with a group of other young flutists who banded together in the 1960s to commission Aaron Copland’s now-classic Duo for Flute and Piano. Almost a half-century later, he joined with Copland House to commission and premiere Pierre Jalbert’s ‘Crossings’. Finally, William Albright’s ‘Rustles of Spring’; represents exactly the kind of formidable artistic intellect he loved. Copland House at Merestead, Mt. Kisco. (914) 788-4659. Steve Earle and The Dukes: 30th Anniversary of Copperhead Road 7-9pm. $47/$60.05/$74.35. Performing Copperhead Road in its entirety. With special guest, The Mastersons. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Tower Music Series presents George Tilley 3:30-5pm. $15. Organ concert. The Reformed Dutch Church of Poughkeepsie, poughkeepsie. 452-8110.

SPORTS Roller Derby: Draculadies VS Apocalips 7pm. Roller Magic, Hyde Park. 229-6666. THEATER Agatha Christie’s "A Murder Is Announced" 2pm. $20/$18 seniors and children under 12. The Coach House Theater, Kingston. 331-2476.

"Crimes of the Heart" by Beth Henley 2pm. Under the scorching heat of the Mississippi sun, past resentments bubble to the surface when 3 sisters must come to terms with the consequences of each their own “crimes of the heart.” Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. Arts.sunyulster.edu/. "The Lion in Winter" 3pm. King Henry II wants to his kingdom to stay unified after his death but all three of his sons want to rule. Who survives Christmas in Chinon? Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Mary Poppins 2pm. $10/$8 students and seniors. Presented by The Rhinebeck High School Drama Club. Rhinebeck High School, Rhinebeck. 871-5500.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) Provider Certification 9am-1pm. $50/$65 with text. This class is appropriate for new or recertifying students. The textbook is required (February 2016 AHA BLS) and AHA allows students to use it when taking the written exam. Ages 16 and up. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 475-9742. Honey, Bee Happy: Honey Bee and Beekeeping Basics with Sarah Stygles 3-4:30pm. Join Sarah Stygles for this family friendly discussion of basic beekeeping. You will learn the importance of bees in our environment as well as some basic bee keeping information. There will be activities for kids and adults. This class is by donation for A Peace of HapBEEness. All donations will be utilized for purchasing the essential oils, equipment and medications needed to sustain the health of a growing apiary in Glenville. Lilananda Yoga, Glenville. (518 ) 470-5240. Knitting 101: Knitted Blanket Workshop 10:30am-12:30pm. $292. In this class we will learn the basics of knitting while making a fabulous blanket. 1 giant skein of merino wool, size 100 circular needles, and a Loopy Mango tote bag are included in the class fee. You will leave class with at least half the blanket finished. This is a great first project. Easily see any mistakes and understand your stitches. Blanket measures 30’’x50’’. Loopy Mango, Beacon. 765-2476. Painting the Nude 9am-4pm. $550. Through April 18 with Hongnian Zhang. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

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Breast Cancer Support Group 6-7:30pm. Peer led support group with chair massage provided by Breast Cancer Options, a local non-profit organization serving the Hudson Valley with free support and education services. The organization is committed to providing people with the information, support and advocacy they need to make informed health choices. St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital, Cornwall. 339-4673. DYBO (Dance Your ‘Buts’ Off) $5. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 309-2406. Qigong and Tai Chi Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 672-5391. This Is Us: Hudson Valley 6-8:30pm. A moderated panel discussion about adoption, family and relationships. Please join the Adoptive and Foster Family Coalition of New York and SUNY New Paltz for a real life discussion with our panel of characters including birth parents, adoptive parents, adoption professionals and, adopted persons. Sponsored by the SUNY New Paltz Department of Sociology and the Concentration in Human Services. Science Hall rm 118, New Paltz. (646) 688-4321.

Hope on the Hudson Filmmaker Jon Bowermaster is looking forward. After the success of his cautionary documentary series Hudson River at Risk, he’s following up with a more positive message in Hope on the Hudson. The new series is made up of three short films: City on the Water, Restoring the Clearwater, and Seeds of Hope. They feature stories of people dedicated to a cleaner Hudson River, past progress, and what’s to come. Captains of the Clearwater, environmental activists, and students all offer insight on the river’s future—and yes, there is hope. There will be several places to catch the film series in the coming months, including Rosendale Theatre on April 3 and 4, Westchester Community College in Peekskill on April 5, and Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on April 22. Hudsonriverstories.com. —Briana Bonfiglio

MONDAY 16 MUSIC Amy Helm: Woodshed Residency Tour 2018 8pm. Neo-Americana. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Monotyye I 9am-4pm. $360. Three-day workshop with Kate McGloughlin. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

TUESDAY 17 BUSINESS & NETWORKING I Wanna be a Millionaire: the 99 minute way 6-8pm. The 99 Minute Way is a personal educational program for sound, longterm investing taught by two investment professionals, Dr. Phillip Kasofsky, Michael Harvey, ESQ. The 99 Minute Way offers clear direction information and support to audiences hungry for guidance on managing their personal investing and on building wealth. Think Dutchess Alliance for Business, Poughkeepsie. 363-6432. HEALTH & WELLNESS Alzheimer’s Support Group 1-2:30pm. Are you caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease? You don’t have to face it alone. Sharing with others who understand can bring relief and help everyone who participates. Our groups are open to the public. Hopewell Reform Church, Hopewell Junction. (800) 272-3900 Third Tuesday of every month, 2-3:30pm. Are you caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease? You don’t have to face it alone. Sharing with others who understand can bring relief and help everyone who participates. Our groups are open to the public. Christ’s Lutheran Church, Woodstock. (800) 272-3900. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

92 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Community Holistic Healthcare Day 4-8pm. Offered on a first-come first-served, offered by a variety of practitioners including a holistic medical doctor, acupuncturists, massage therapists, psychologists and a wide variety of energy healers. See our Healing Modalities web page for information about the kinds of services available. Though no money or insurance is required, RVHHC invites patients to give a donation or an hour of volunteer community service if they can. Marbletown Community Center, stone ridge. Ww.rvhhc.org. Effective Communication Strategies 1-2:30pm. Individuals living with dementia often experience changes in behavior that can be confusing to friends and family. This program will help to explain the communication changes that take place in a person with dementia and identify strategies to connect and communicate at each stage of the disease. Hopewell Reform Church, Hopewell Junction. (800) 272-3900. Zumba with Maritza 5:30-6:30pm. $5. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 913-6085.

KIDS & FAMILY Coloring Night with Hudson Valley Tattoo Co Third Tuesday of every month, 6-9pm. Join us for a free night of relaxation, zen, fun all through the magic of some coloring. Add some color to exclusive artwork and illustrations from the artists over at Hudson Valley Tattoo Company, including Mike Shishmanian Jason Carpino Diego Martin, Rick Lohm and more. We’ll have some crayons, markers and more on-hand but you are welcome to bring your own crayons/ markers/whatever as well. Darkside Records, Poughkeepsie. 452-8010. MUSIC George Thorogood and The Destroyers Rock Party Tour 2018 8-10pm. $45/$65/$79.50. It’s that moment when the house lights go down and the audience erupts: a drumbeat punches through the darkness, and the stage lightsalmost blindingly bright at first- reveal a killer band ready to unleash a catalog of classic hits like none other. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039.

WEDNESDAY 18 BUSINESS & NETWORKING The Halo Effect: The Synergy of Aligning Your Brand with Influential Media Channels 12-1:30pm. Strong media brands define the character and tempo of a community economy. They represent the community both to itself and to an outside audience of potential visitors. These media brands enjoy strong recognition and influence among their audiences through ongoing conversations across a spectrum of media channels. Strategic alignment through editorial relationships and advertising enable businesses to benefit from the ‘halo effect’ of the respect media brands have earned. Jason Stern, Luminary Media, will discuss best practices for engaging editorial teams & strategies to optimize ad campaigns. SpringHill Suites Fishkill, Fishkill. 896-8100. COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. FOOD & WINE Paint and Sip 7-9:15pm. $40. A spring themed Paint & Sip. Bring your mother and receive $15 off a pair of tickets. First cocktail on the house. Complimentary wine tasting offered by Excelsior wines. 10% off your dinner at the Gilded Otter (same night). Gilded Otter, New Paltz. Roostcoop.org. HEALTH & WELLNESS Breast and Ovarian Cancer Support Group Putnam 7pm. Support Connection, Inc., a notfor-profit organization that provides free, confidential support services for people affected by breast and ovarian cancer, offers a Breast and Ovarian Cancer Support Group on the 3rd Wednesday of each month at Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel, NY. Open to women with breast, ovarian or gynecological cancer. We all know there are many common factors to any cancer diagnosis. Join other women who have also been diagnosed as we discuss all stages of diagnosis, treatment and post-treatment. Registration required. Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel. (800) 532-4290.

Understanding and Responding to Dementia-Related Behavior 6-7pm. Behavior is one of the primary ways people with dementia communicate their needs and feelings once the ability to lose language is lost. Learn to decode behavioral messages, identify common behavior triggers and learn strategies to help intervene with some of the most common behavioral challenges of dementia. This program is supported in part by a grant from the New York State Department of Health. LaGrange Library, Poughkeepsie. 452-3141.

KIDS & FAMILY Wild Krats Live! 6:30pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. LECTURES & TALKS Diversity Lecture/Forum: Addressing Ageism 1-2:30pm. This event will expose the ugly truth about age discrimination. Whether you are five or ninety-five, there is much to be gained by combating ageism. This forum will stimulate awareness, thought, and discussion about the topic. It will also give insight to the importance of elder care with the aged population currently at its highest level in human history. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 687-5160. Lorna Simpson, Artist 5-7pm. Bard College : CCS Bard Galleries, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7598.

MUSIC Guitar prodigy Quinn Sullivan Cohoes Music Hall, Cohoes. (800) 745-3000. Kim Richey 8pm. The Linda, Albany. thelinda.org. Music Fan Film Series Presents Marley 7:15pm. $8/$6 members. The life story of musician, revolutionary, and legend Bob Marley, from the early days to international superstardom. Features rare footage, performances, and interviews. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. Petey Hop’s Roots & Blues Sessions 7pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Rodriguez 8-10pm. $45/$60/$70/$90. Rodriguez, the legendary singer/songwriter known only by his surname, is a self-taught guitarist. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Shelley King, Patrice Pike & Special Guest Carolyn Wonderland 8pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS The Art Effect After Hours 5:30-7:30pm. $40/$70 couple. Mix and mingle with Art Effectors and community members, enjoy tastings and live music, and experience student art and media exhibits. The Art Effect, Poughkeepsie. 471-7477.


WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Design Your Own Wardrobe: 5 Day Sewing Immersion 9am-5pm. $900. If you have always wanted to make the clothes YOU envision in your head, here is your chance! Using the techniques from her book, Design-It-Yourself Clothes, Cal will teach you how to draft your own basic patterns for a T-shirt, skirt and shift dress based on the measurements of your unique body. Then you will learn how to take those patterns and stylize them into endless variations. For each you will make a muslin, fit and correct your pattern, and finally sew one or more finished garments. Before you know it, you’ll have a whole new handmade wardrobe. Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson. (518) 545-4028.

THURSDAY 19 LECTURES & TALKS Francesco Mastalia 7pm. $15. Writer, photographer and author of Yoga: The Secret of Life. Gallery at Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck. 876-1655. Natives on the Land: American Indians in the Mid-Hudson Valley 6-7pm. The Jacob Leisler Institute, in cooperation with Hudson Area Library and the Gotham Center for New York History, will present Natives on the Land: American Indians in the Mid-Hudson Valley by Dr. William A. Starna. Dr. Starna is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the State University of New York, Oneonta. He is a long-time student of the Iroquoian and Algonquian peoples of eastern North America, in addition to federal and state Indian relations. A question and answer period and refreshments will follow the talk. Hudson Area Library, Hudson. (518) 828-1792. LITERARY & BOOKS Non-Fiction Book Group Third Thursday of every month, 6-7:30pm. A new nonfiction book group focused on history and social and political life in North America. The group will utilize the best in nonfiction books chosen by the participants to explore issues that are topical today. All persons are welcome with the hope that we will impact each other through discussion and community. Hudson Area Library, Hudson. (518) 828-1792. PageTurners Book Club: New Boy by Tracy Chevalier 7-8pm. Starting his fifth school in five years, Osei Kokote, a diplomat’s son, hoping to survive his first day. The tragedy of Othello is transposed to a 1970s suburban Washington schoolyard, where kids fall in and out of love with each other before lunchtime, and practice a casual racism picked up from their parents and teachers. Peeking over the shoulders of four 11 year olds – Osei, Dee, Ian, and his reluctant ‘girlfriend’ Mimi – Tracy Chevalier’s powerful drama of friends torn apart by jealousy, bullying, and betrayal will leave you reeling. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. MUSIC bigBANG 7pm. Large ensemble improv jazz. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Joan Osborne: Songs of Bob Dylan 8pm. $40-$55. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Mark Geary with Brendan O’Shea & Jenna Nicholls 8pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Open Mike for the People, By the People 7:30pm. Copperfield’s, Millbrook. 677-8188. Perception Album Release 7:30pm. $15. Accomplished, vocalist, composer and arranger Kristina Koller will present music from her debut album ‘Perception’. Koller is an original contemporary jazz vocalist, one that anyone interested in jazz, or progressive music, needs to hear. ARTBar Gallery, Kingston. 338-2789. Saints of Swing: Klezmer meets Gospel 7pm. Music Institute of Sullivan & Ulster Counties, Inc. MISU, Ellenville. 399-1293. Thunderhead Organ Trio 8pm. Jazz. Wherehouse, Newburgh. 561-7240.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS CoveCare Center’s 9th Annual Adult Spelling Bee 5:30-9pm. $35. Teams of up to 10 spellers, cheerleaders or spectators are invited to join us for a lively evening of spelling and fun, all in support of CoveCare Center. Includes a buffet dinner, soda, coffee, tea and dessert. Beer and wine will be available at a cash bar. Get your team together and test your spelling skills in support of CoveCare Center’s mental health and substance use counseling, prevention and treatment services. Starr Ridge Banquet Center, Brewster. 225-2700 ext. 136. THEATER "Crimes of the Heart" by Beth Henley 7pm. $10 suggested/students free. Featuring SUNY Ulster students and directed by Stephen Balantzian, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Theatre. Under the scorching heat of the Mississippi sun, past resentments bubble to the surface when 3 sisters must come to terms with the consequences of each their own “crimes of the heart.” Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. Arts.sunyulster.edu/. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Drawing Better: Vince Natale 9am-noon. $160/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing, Painting and Composition with Eric Angeloch 1-4pm. $160/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Library Knitters Third Thursday of every month, 7-8pm. Sit and knit in the beautiful Gardiner Library. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255. Vet2Vet Veterans Program Featuring a variety of workshops and support groups. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 672-5391.

FRIDAY 20 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Support Connection’s 2018 Spring Benefit 7-11pm. $150/$135 in groups of 10. A gala event that includes a cocktail hour, dinner, music and dancing, as well as a silent auction and many beautiful prize baskets. A highlight of the evening is the presentation of Support Connection’s Annual Spirit Awards. Proceeds will benefit Support Connection’s free support services and programs for people affected by breast and ovarian cancer. Villa Barone Hilltop Manor, Mahopac. (914) 962-6402. COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. Comedian Rory Albanese 8pm. $27/$22 in advance. Producer of The Daily Show. Cohoes Music Hall, Cohoes. (800) 745-3000. FAIRS & FESTIVALS Bruce Molsky & Debra Clifford’s Old Time Rollick With workshops led by Bruce Molsky, Debra Clifford, Becca Wintle, Allison de Groot, Val Mindel, Stash Wyslouch, Maggie Shar, and Mark Wholley. Fiddle, nightly dances, clawhammer banjo, guitar, old time singing & ballads, Gospel sing, slow jams, impromptu classes, and hiking. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333. FILM Gremlins 7:30pm. Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC), Kingston. 339-6088. Jane 7:30pm. From Brett Morgen, acclaimed director of “Kurt Cobain: Montage Of Heck” and National Geographic Films, with music by Philip Glass. This cinematic documentary tells the story of Jane Goodall and her chimpanzee research which challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time. Hurleyville Arts Center, Hurleyville. 707-8047.

ONE Fair at Basilica Hudson Hudson Valley residents can meet with local environmental activists at the premiere of the Our New Energy (ONE) Fair. Representatives from over a dozen organizations, including Green Mountain Energy, Bread Alone, and Riverkeeper, will be onsite in Basilica Hudson’s main hall, sharing information about their work. Event organizers from Virago Future will host workshops where attendees can share tips and ideas for sustainability. “What we hope for with ONE Fair is for people to discover, imagine and create a sustainable future together,” says Virago Futures CEO and ONE Fair founder Jeanne Brooks. Seeds of Hope, Jon Bowermaster’s new short film, will also be screened during the event. ONE Fair takes place on April 7, from 10am to 5pm at Basilica Hudson. (518) 822-1050; Basilicahudson.org/one-fair. —Briana Bonfiglio HEALTH & WELLNESS Catskills R&R Retreat : Boost your Energy 3pm. $636/$476. Relax and refresh for serenity, vitality and empowerment this year at one of our Catskills R&R Retreats. Over 3 days and 2 nights, give yourself the precious time and gift to move inward and release and restore through guided classes, meditations and wellness workshop. EarthMind Wellness, Ellenville. 210-3154. An Evening of Transcendental Sound: Peter Blum and Naz Hosseini 7:30-9pm. $30/$25 in advance. Please join us for a special evening of transcendental sound featuring SoundShifter/Pulse Field duo with violinist and master vocalist Naaz Hosseini, and sound magician Peter Blum, on Himalayan singing bowls, gongs, bells, cymbals, flutes, & drums. In this concert of improvised sound and music, it is the intention of the musicians and listeners to create a sacred space. Participants are invited to sit comfortably or lie on mats or blankets in the center of the room, surrounded by sacred sounds. Zephyr Float, Kingston. 853-2400. Girfriends' Getaway Weekend. Get together with your favorite friends for a weekend of live music, Zumba, wine tasting, makeup sessions, and more. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. 765-3286. LECTURES & TALKS Drugs in Our Freshwaters 7pm. Free. Watch the recent PBS documentary on pharmaceutical pollution, learn about aquatic ecologist Emma Rosi's research on impacts to stream life. Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook. (888) 842-2442. Tony Kushner on Leonard Bernstein 7:30pm. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandaleon-Hudson. 758-7900. MUSIC Chris O’Leary Band 8pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. The Progression Ensemble 7-9pm. $9/$7 members and students. The Progression Ensemble will premiere six brand new works written for them by composers Christopher Cook, Dan Cooper, Eric Despard, Michael Dilthey, Gene Pritsker and Bjorn Bolstad Skjelbred. Guitarist Eric Despard, cellist Michael Gilbert Ronstadt and accordionist Rocco Anthony Jerry. Two composers will be present to discuss their new works: Dr. Michael Dilthey and Bjorn Bolstad Skjelbred. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8100. Johnny Hoy & the Bluefish 9pm. Blues. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Mark Geary with Brendan O’Shea & Jenna Nicholls 8pm. Heavy mellow rock. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Ms. Lisa Fischer and Grand Baton: Night One 8pm. $35-$55. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Singer-Songwriter Showcase Third Friday of every month, 8pm. $6. Acoustic Music by three outstanding singer-songwriters and musicians at ASK GALLERY, 97 Broadway, Kingston 8-10:30 pm Arts Society of Kingston (ASK), Kingston. 338-0311. Singer/Songwriter Todd Snider 7:30pm. $29.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS A Taste of Sicily: Food and Wine Pairing 7-11pm. $100. A Spectrum Services Autism Awareness Month fundraising event. Also featuring silent auction. The Chateau, Kingston. Centerforspectrumservices.org. SPIRITUALITY Earth Day Weekend 7-9pm. Join us in celebrating Earth Day weekend as we explore new ways to cultivate mindful awareness and compassion toward the environment. Indoor and outdoor sessions will be led by Buddhist teachers and environmental advocates. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012. THEATER "The Gun Show" 8pm. Through the prism of her own personal experiences, award-winning playwright E. M. Lewis tells the story of America’s relationship with guns. This critically-acclaimed play jumps into the middle of the gun control debate. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. "Crimes of the Heart" by Beth Henley 7pm. $10 suggested/students free. Featuring SUNY Ulster students and directed by Stephen Balantzian, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Theatre. Under the scorching heat of the Mississippi sun, past resentments bubble to the surface when 3 sisters must come to terms with the consequences of each their own “crimes of the heart.” Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. Arts.sunyulster.edu/. "Lear" 8pm. In 2020, Lear, a titan of industry, unexpectedly divids his holdings among his three daughters in this adaptation of Shakespeare's tragic tale. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

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WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Birding with Nick Martin, Minnewaska State Park Educator 9-10:30am. During this program, Nick will lead participants on a walk on the trails near the library to discover birds in the area. Participants are encouraged to bring binoculars, a birding field guide or a smart device with a field guide installed. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

SATURDAY 21 COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778. DANCE Frolic All-Ages Ecstatic Dance Party 6:30-10:30pm. $2-$15. The Frolic is an allages dance party for dance lovers: a not-forprofit all-volunteer freestyle dance event in the Mid-Hudson Valley. Frolic dances are alcohol free, smoke free, and drug free which keeps the focus on dancing. Dancers of all kinds attend, ranging from people who are serious about dance and want to expand their experience and learn from other dancers, to people who just want to get down in a fun, open atmosphere. Marbletown Multi-Arts, Stone Ridge. 687-6090. New York Theatre Ballet 7:30-9:30pm. $30. Diana Byer’s revitalized company of 12. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 2. FAIRS & FESTIVALS Bruce Molsky & Debra Clifford’s Old Time Rollick With workshops led by Bruce Molsky, Debra Clifford, Becca Wintle, Allison de Groot, Val Mindel, Stash Wyslouch, Maggie Shar, and Mark Wholley. Fiddle, nightly dances, clawhammer banjo, guitar, old time singing & ballads, Gospel sing, slow jams, impromptu classes, and hiking. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333. The Chancellor’s Sheep & Wool Showcase 11am-4pm. $8-$10 per car. The Chancellor’s Sheep & Wool Showcase is a family festival that celebrates historic fiber arts, culture, and craft. The Showcase boasts over two dozen local vendors, and is a great place to support small businesses. As the first of the wool festival season, we are the place to get over your cabin fever with brilliantly colored yarns, roving, and hand-woven scarves. Craft guilds will demonstrate spinning and weaving throughout the day. Herding and sheep shearing—using three different historic techniques—form the centerpiece of the action. Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. (518) 537-4240. FILM Jane 7:30pm. From Brett Morgen, acclaimed director of “Kurt Cobain: Montage Of Heck” and National Geographic Films, with music by Philip Glass. This cinematic documentary tells the story of Jane Goodall and her chimpanzee research which challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time. Hurleyville Arts Center, Hurleyville. 707-8047. LECTURES & TALKS Artists Talk: Inspiration 2:30pm. Docent tour following the event. Come to the KMA to hear from Baseera Khan, Jordan Nassar, and other Long, Winding Journeys artists about how visual tradition shapes their highly original creative practices. The Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah. (914) 232-9555. CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

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How To Write A Personal Essay That Sells 11am-4pm. The essence of a personal essay: viewpoints filtered through the lens of your personal experience. But what secrets covers under style we call personal essay? Leona Henrynson has an answer on this though question. We will analyze greatest examples written by EssaySupply college essay writing service and gone viral. During this event, there will be a little workshop on writing a personal essay using modern and interesting techniques. Best Western Hotel, Kingston. 338-0400.

LITERARY & BOOKS Annual Spring Poetry Dinner $125. Celebrate National Poetry Month. Held in a private home with limited seating. Details available with ticket purchase. Hotchkiss Library, Sharon, CT. (860) 364-5041. Hudson Valley History Reading Festival 10am-3pm. Authors of book on Hudson Valley history will present author talks followed by book signings. FDR Presidential Library, Hyde Park. 486-7751. The Muse, Stage Center 5-6pm. Members of Actors & Writers, Ulster Country’s acclaimed troupe of theater,film and television professionals, will give kudos to the Muse during National Poetry Month in a generous program of spoken poetry that embraces immortal (or painfully mortal) work from the Shakespearean stage to urban slams. Guaranteed snoozefree poetry! Woodstock Public Library, Woodstock. 679-2311. MUSIC Alva Nelson Quintet 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Ang ‘n Ed Acoustic Duo 8pm. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. Billy Squier and GE Smith 8-10pm. $50/$60/$70. Billy Squier and GE Smith are an exquisite coupling, highlighting conversation and collaboration, featuring Squier’s music, stripped down to the bone. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039. Bluegrass Brunch: Out on a Limb 12PM. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Cabaret at the Byrdcliffe Barn 5:30-7:30pm. Fashion, music, dance, art, poetry, short film, silent auction, live band, performance, singers, and dancers.Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild, Woodstock. 679-2079. The Cactus Blossoms 8pm. The Linda, Albany. thelinda.org. David Kraai with Josh Roy Brown 8-11pm. David Kraai doles out two sets of fine country folk music with the help of Josh Roy Brown on lap steel. The New York Resturant, Catskill. (518) 943-5500. Debbie Major Birthday Bash 6pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Ed Palermo Big Band “Blasphemy” 8pm. Rock orchestra. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Eric Erickson 8pm. Singer-songwriter. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Get Your Wings 9pm. Classic rock. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Hudson Valley Philharmonic: "Hope in Times of War" 8pm. Mary Stuart Masterson narrates an elegy for Anne Frank. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. The Jeremy Baum Trio 9pm-12am. Blues and funky souljazz sounds. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Jerry Douglas 9pm. Dobro master and 14-time Grammy winner Jerry Douglas, with opening act Nick Panken. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Ms. Lisa Fisher and Grand Baton: Night Two 8pm. $35-$55. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Raina Sokolov-Gonzalez 8-10pm. $25/$20 Unison Members/$15 students & seniors. Raina Sokolov-Gonzalez is a singer/composer based in Brooklyn whose singular soulful sound brings together jazz and R&B influences with depth and a fresh edge. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Red Molly 8pm. $34. Laurie MacAllister (bass), Abbie Gardner (Dobro), and Molly Venter (guitar) weave together the threads of American music - from folk roots to bluegrass, from heartbreaking ballads to barn-burning honky tonk - as effortlessly as they blend their caramel voices into their signature soaring, crystalline three-part harmonies. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Sanctified Soul: 1960s to Today 7:30pm. A spirited take on traditional sacred music, gospel and the Motown Sound, Sanctified Soul traces the lineage of those who changed the sound of gospel like the Clark Sisters, the Hawkins Family and Richard Smallwood, all the way to contemporaries like Donald Lawrence and Kirk Franklin. The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Travis Tritt 8pm. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Spring Barn Bash 6:30-9:30pm. $10/$3 children. Musical fundraiser for the Saugerties Historical Society. An evening of live local bands, food, wine and beer. Featuring the Paul Luke Band, Ian Flanigan and The North and South Dakotas. Saugerties Historical Society, Saugerties. 246-9529. Spring Fling 5:30-7:30pm. Start your spring with a joyful evening of music, performance art, and fabulous fashion. Byrdcliffe Barn, Woodstock. 679.2079. OUTDOORS & RECREATION 22nd Annual YMCA Kid's Classic All day. A running event where every kid is a winner. Registration is open now. Dietz Stadium, Kingston. YMCAulster.org. Earth Day Celebration and Hike-A-Thon 9:30am-3pm. Choose from four offered hikes, open to hikers of all levels and ages in this fundraising event. The Earth Day celebration, whose theme this year is “Reducing the Use of Plastics” is a family friendly event and features the Stillman Family Green Zone, filled with fun and informative games and activities. In addition, enjoy, live music, hay rides, nature play in Grasshopper Grove, live animals and more. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall. 534-7781. Newburgh Community Cleanup 8am-noon. Team up to clean up the city of Newburg. At 12pm, return to Safe Harbors for a post-cleanup barbecue. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 784-1110. Rail Trail Walk and Herbal Cocktails 4pm. Join Laura Silverman, Founding Naturalist at The Outside Institute, for a walk along the Rail Trail to observe native plants and other natural phenomena of early spring, followed by locally foraged herbal cocktails. Hurleyville Arts Center, Hurleyville. 707-8047. SPIRITUALITY Earth Day Weekend 10am-9pm. Join us in celebrating Earth Day weekend as we explore new ways to cultivate mindful awareness and compassion toward the environment. Indoor and outdoor sessions will be led by Buddhist teachers and environmental advocates. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012. THEATER "The Gun Show" 8pm. Through the prism of her own personal experiences, award-winning playwright E. M. Lewis tells the story of America’s relationship with guns. This critically-acclaimed play jumps into the middle of the gun control debate. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. "Crimes of the Heart" by Beth Henley 7pm. $10 suggested/students free. Featuring SUNY Ulster students and directed by Stephen Balantzian, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Theatre. Under the scorching heat of the Mississippi sun, past resentments bubble to the surface when 3 sisters must come to terms with the consequences of each their own “crimes of the heart.” Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. Arts.sunyulster.edu/.

"Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" 7:30-9:30pm. One of the most enduring shows of all time, this musical is a warmhearted and brilliant celebration of words, music, dance and color, about Joseph, the phophetic boy with the coat of many colors who changed the course of history. Spa Little Theater, Saratoga Springs. (518) 587-4427. "Lear" 8pm. In 2020, Lear, a titan of industry, unexpectedly divids his holdings among his three daughters in this adaptation of Shakespeare's tragic tale. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Drawing and Painting with Les Castellanos 9am-noon. $200/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Fusion Dance 11am-noon. $35/$25 members. Arts Mid Hudson, Poughkeepsie. 454-3222. Instruction on Cosmology 9am-4pm. $25. discussing the underlying processes of material creation along with underlying motives for the esoteric tradition itself. The outlook is driven by what the Dogon explicitly represent to be true (in relation to scientific theory), but with crossconfirmation and clarification primarily from Buddhism and Kabbalism. After lunch, Nightingale will be demonstrating how values that pertain to the same creational science are evoked by the physical plan of structures on the Giza Plateau, and how what’s set in place on the plateau reflects significant astronomical cycles that play out in macrocosmic structures above it. Vassar Alumnae House, Poughkeepsie. 437-7100. Learn to Knit 10am-noon. $45. We will loan chunky yarn and giant knitting needles to teach you all the basics: Cast on, knit stitch, purl stitch, rib stitch (combination of knit and purl), and cast off. At the end of the class you’ll be all set to start on your first project, whether it be a beanie, scarf, or sweater! Our focus is on learning to knit fast and being able to complete a project within one or two sessions. Loopy Mango, Beacon. 765-2476. Repair Cafe: Beacon 12-4pm. Bring a beloved but broken item to be repaired for free by experts who are also your neighbors. Sponsored by Green Beacon. Beacon Recreation Department, Beacon. Repaircafehv.org. Repair Cafe: Woodstock 10am-2pm. Share skills. Reduce waste. Make friends. We’re an expression of our community. Sponsored by Transition Woodstock. St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church, Woodstock. Repaircafehv.org. Visioning for Change 10:30am-6pm. $125-$150. Calling all innovative entrepreneurs + leaders, artists + activists, doers + dreamers, thinkers, visionary changemakers, creators + catalysts! Join Amy Soucy and Scott Tillitt (BEAHIVE, Re>Think Local, Antidote Collective) for an intimate spring retreat to open your mind, body, and heart to fresh possibilities. A unique, profound way to map your purpose and envision your future by combining mindfulness practices with strategic visioning exercises and community building. We’ll move, we’ll play, we’ll envision and connect over a transformative day. Beahive Beacon, Beacon. 418-3731. Writing Workshop with Author Steven Lewis 1-3:30pm. $30. Join us as author Steven Lewis teaches about the journey of novel writing and overcoming some common obstacles. Includes a copy of Lewis’s book. Merritt Bookstore, Millbrook. 758-2665.

SUNDAY 22 CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS 19th Annual Walk for Housing 12:30-3:30pm. The 19th Annual Walk for Housing to support Habitat for Humanity of Greater Newburgh. Registration begins at 12:30 pm. Walk will kick-off at 1pm. Mallika Rao, Newburgh. Habitatnewburgh.org/newsevents/feature-events/walk-for-housing.html. COMEDY Clove Creek Dinner Theater Presents: "Getting Sara Married, a Comedy" 6-10pm. $65-$70. Sara Hastings is an unmarried lawyer in her mid-thirties, much too busy to get involved in romance. Her Aunt Martha has decided to take matters into her own hands and find her a husband. Clove Creek Dinner Theater, Fishkill. 202-7778.


Monthly Open Mike Night Fourth Sunday of every month, 7:30-10pm. This event is open to all genres/modalities/ talents. We have had singers, magicians, stand up comedians, poets, short story readings, guitarists, flutists, Native American storytellers, spoken word, and even a few dance performances. We are all about creating an enviting environment that allows the focus to be given to the performer in a casual, yet respectful environment. Hudson Valley Dance Depot, LaGrangeville. 204-9833.

DANCE New York Theatre Ballet 2:30-4:30pm. $30. Diana Byer’s revitalized company of 12. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 2. Solo Jazz & Lindy Hop Workshop with Gaby Cook 1:30-6pm. $60 series/$20-$25 session. Uptown Swing Kingston presents: an afternoon of dance classes with renowned NYC-based dancer Gaby Cook. The classes will be followed by Uptown Swing at BSP, with live music from the Heartstrings Hot Club. 1:30-2:45PM Chorus Girl ($20); 3-4:30PM Solo Jazz ($25); 4:30-6:PM Lindy Hop ($25). BSP, Kingston. Uptownswingkingston.com/ workshops.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS 19th Annual Walk for Housing 12:30-3:30pm. Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Newburgh. Habitatnewburgh.org/news-events/ Bruce Molsky & Debra Clifford’s Old Time Rollick With workshops led by Bruce Molsky, Debra Clifford, Becca Wintle, Allison de Groot, Val Mindel, Stash Wyslouch, Maggie Shar, and Mark Wholley. Fiddle, nightly dances, clawhammer banjo, guitar, old time singing & ballads, Gospel sing, slow jams, impromptu classes, and hiking. Ashokan Center, Olivebridge. 657-8333.

FILM Celebrating Auroville’s 50th Film Festival 2-8pm. We will screen a series of hourlong and short documentaries between 2 pm and 8 pm and invite friends who have been to or lived in Auroville to share their insights and memories. Refreshments will be served throughout the afternoon and evening. Matagiri Sri Aurobindo Center, Mount Tremper. 679-8322. Jane 7:30pm. From Brett Morgen, acclaimed director of “Kurt Cobain: Montage Of Heck” and National Geographic Films, with music by Philip Glass. This cinematic documentary tells the story of Jane Goodall and her chimpanzee research which challenged the maledominated scientific consensus of her time. Hurleyville Arts Center, Hurleyville. 707-8047.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Earth Day Yoga Retreat 9:30am-1pm. $65. Class size limited to only 10 participants to allow for personalized attention. Join three of Izlind’s talented yoga teachers- Skip Paynter (Kundalini), Jessie Lee Montague (Vinyasa) and Claudia Gukeisen (Yoga Nidra) for a half-day of exploring three yoga practices to ground yourself we well as connect with and balance the element of Earth. Izlind Integrative Wellness Center and Institute of Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck. 516-4713. Journey into Self Awareness 10:30am. $15. Join Theo Meth for a morning filled with music, humor, divine celebration and laughter, howling, dancing, shaking, gibberish, chanting, guided self inquiry and silent meditation. Milkweed, Sugar Loaf. Yoga Sutras Study Group 7-8:30pm. $60. Anne-Marie Serre is once again leading a discussion group for those who are interested in reviewing and discussing the Yoga Sutras, a seminal text of yoga. This series will be exclusively digital. Lilananda Yoga, Glenville. (518) 470-5240.

KIDS & FAMILY Polar Bears Go Up 3pm. $10. Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC), Kingston. 339-6088.

LITERARY & BOOKS Book Event: Tennessee Williams and James Laughlin 1-3pm. The Luck of Friendship: The Letters of Tennessee Williams and James Laughlin chronicles the unlikely yet enduring literary and personal relationship between a celebrated playwright and the founder of New Directions, which serves to this day as Williams’s publisher. Join the book’s editors– Peggy L. Fox and Tennessee William’s last editor, Thomas Keith- for a reading and discussion of their new book, moderated by Kevin Sessums. Time and Space Limited, Hudson. (518) 822-8100. MUSIC Anthony Roth Costanzo, Countertenor with Ruckus 3-5pm. A captivating concert of cantatas by Scarlatti, Handel and Vivaldi featuring American countertenor Anthony Roth Costanzo. Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Katonah. (914) 232-1252. ASEFA Concert: Mediterranean Encounters: Judeo-Islamic Soundscapes 5-7:30pm. The group showcases the music of the Jewish communities of North Africa and the Middle East, with a modern sensibility rooted in the northeastern United States, highlighting instances of MuslimJewish intercultural exchange. There will be a pre-concert talk at 4pm. Main Building Villard Room at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 232-1029. Bluegrass Brunch:The Meadows Brothers noon. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Brad Mehldau Trio 7:30pm. $34.50. Along with bassist Larry Grenadier and drummer Jeff Ballard, the trio is at home performing Thelonious Monk classics, American Songbook standards, as well as contemporary tunes and original works. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Bucky’s Jazz Brunch with Frank Vignola, and Martin & Bucky Pizzarelli noon. $20. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Carbon Leaf plus Katie Rose 7pm. $25-$45. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Carl Palmer's ELP Legacy 8pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 6794406. David Liebman’s Expansions 8pm. Free jazz voyage. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Eric Erickson 8pm. Singer-songwriter. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. HvJAZZ Concert featuring Jim Snidero 4pm. $10. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. (914) 466-0480. Monthly Open Mike Night Fourth Sunday of every month, 7:30-9:30pm. Do you sing? Play an instrument? Write and read your own poetry? Dance? Sign up on arrival. Food is potluck-style. Bring a snack to share if you like. There’s always leftovers from the previous night’s party. Sound system includes a guitar, some music stands, and/or vocal amp, two microphones, and a weighted 88 Korg keyboard. Hudson Valley Dance Depot, LaGrangeville. 204-9833. NEXUS Percussion 3pm. Church of the Holy Cross, Kingston. Ulsterchambermusicseries.org. Project/Object: The Music of Frank Zappa 8pm. $22-$27. Cohoes Music Hall, Cohoes. (800) 745-3000. They Might Be Giants 7pm. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. OUTDOORS & RECREATION Earth Day Festival 10am-4pm. Music-making for all ages, artisan market with re-purposed treasures, followed by a lantern walk through the Treecycle Forest at 7pm. Stanley Deming Park, Warwick. (917) 922-0943. SPIRITUALITY Earth Day Weekend 10am-4pm. Join us in celebrating Earth Day weekend as we explore new ways to cultivate mindful awareness and compassion toward the environment. Indoor and outdoor sessions will be led by Buddhist teachers and environmental advocates. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra, Woodstock. 679-5906 ext. 1012.

Retyping The Group If you visit Vassar College from April 19 through May 4, you may come across a man diligently plugging away at an old-fashioned typewriter. Los Angeles-based artist Tom Youd will be on campus for two weeks for the 56th iteration of his ongoing project, 100 Novels, in which he retypes famous books at locations that are significant to their plots. At Vassar, Youd will retype 1933 alumna Mary McCarthy’s The Group in its entirety. McCarthy’s novel is about the lives of eight women after they graduate from Vassar. Every day, Youd will go to a different spot on campus and type on the same make and model typewriter that McCarthy used. On April 19 at 5pm, Youd will give an opening performance at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center. (845) 437-5370; Vassar.edu. —Briana Bonfiglio

THEATER "The Gun Show" 8pm. Through the prism of her own personal experiences, award-winning playwright E. M. Lewis tells the story of America’s relationship with guns. This critically-acclaimed play jumps into the middle of the gun control debate. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. "Crimes of the Heart" by Beth Henley 2pm. $10 suggested/students free. Featuring SUNY Ulster students and directed by Stephen Balantzian, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Theatre. Under the scorching heat of the Mississippi sun, past resentments bubble to the surface when 3 sisters must come to terms with the consequences of each their own “crimes of the heart.” Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. Arts.sunyulster.edu/. "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" 2-4pm. One of the most enduring shows of all time, this musical is a warm-hearted and brilliant celebration of words, music, dance and color, about Joseph, the phophetic boy with the coat of many colors who changed the course of history. Spa Little Theater, Saratoga Springs. (518) 587-4427. "Lear" 3pm. In 2020, Lear, a titan of industry, unexpectedly divids his holdings among his three daughters in this adaptation of Shakespeare's tragic tale. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

MONDAY 23 KIDS & FAMILY Polar Bears Go Up 10am & noon. $10. Ulster Performing Arts Center (UPAC), Kingston. 339-6088. STEAM Series: Fun with Art and Science Every other Monday, 5:30-6:30pm. Description:Come join us for fun with art and science with The Bard Center for Civic Engagement. Open to children of all ages. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. MUSIC Amy Helm: Woodshed Residency Tour 2018 8pm. Neo-Americana. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Color and Energy with Karen O’Neil 9am-4pm. $250. Two-day workshop. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

TUESDAY 24 FILM Agnes Varda’s: Faces Places 7:15-9pm. $8. Director Agnès Varda and photographer and muralist JR journey through rural France and form an unlikely friendship. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. HEALTH & WELLNESS Zumba with Maritza 5:30-6:30pm. $5. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 913-6085. KIDS & FAMILY Disney Junior Dance Party On Tour 6pm. $29.50-$62. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

WEDNESDAY 25 FILM Agnes Varda’s: Faces Places 7:15-9pm. $8. Director Agnès Varda and photographer and muralist JR journey through rural France and form an unlikely friendship. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. HEALTH & WELLNESS DYBO (Dance Your ‘Buts’ Off) $5. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 309-2406. Qigong and Tai Chi Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 672-5391. KIDS & FAMILY First Literacy: How Parents Can Build Readers and Writers 7-9pm. Presented by Carol Garboden Murray and Karen Pillsworth. Rosendale Public Library, Rosendale. 658-9013. LECTURES & TALKS Lia Gangitano, Founder and Director, Participant Inc. 5-7pm. Bard College : CCS Bard Galleries, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7598.

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The Tet Offensive Revisited 5:30pm. Sanders Classroom Building, Spitzer Auditorium at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

MUSIC An Evening with Mary Gauthier 8pm. The Linda, Albany. thelinda.org. Hudson Valley Philharmonic Young People’s Concert 10 & 11:45am. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Ike Willis Project 7pm. $25-$35. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Matt Flinner Trio with Gyan Riley 8pm. Acoustic, bluegrass. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Poet Gold’s Poelodies 7pm. Spoken word hip hop. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Encaustic Comprehensive $400. Three-day course. The Gallery at R&F, Kingston. 331-3112.

THURSDAY 26 FILM Hope on the Hudson 7:30pm. Three Short Films One Great River; Part III of the “River At Risk” series, these compelling short films focus on the efforts to preserve and restore the Hudson River, both environmentally and socially. The series will be followed by a Q&A with local and regional experts. Hurleyville Arts Center, Hurleyville. 707-8047. Other Uses Film Series Finale 7pm. For the final episode of the yearlong film series Other Uses, three films chronicle the afterlives of sites that time has suspended, abandoned, or reclaimed. Beatriz Santiago Muñoz captures the convergence of plants, animals, and the local Puerto Rican population in Ojos para mis Enemigos (Eyes for my enemies) as they covertly share a decommissioned US military base in Ceiba. Jorge Jácome’s Flores transforms the autonomous Portuguese Azores Islands into a landscape rendered uninhabitable by the proliferation of hydrangeas, and a man is stranded at a disused Olympic airport in Naeem Mohaiemen’s first fiction feature Tripoli Cancelled. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Empac.rpi.edu/ events/2018/spring/other-uses/06. FOOD & WINE Andrea Lubrano Goldstein Arepa: Vegan and Gluten-Free Bread of Venezuela 6pm. $95. With organic wine tasting. bluecashew Kitchen Homestead, Kingston. 514-2300. LITERARY & BOOKS The Ashokan Way: Reading & Signing with Author Gail Straub 6:30-8pm. The Ashokan Way chronicles a year’s worth of walks near the Ashokan Reservoir and is at once a lyrical form of devotion, a vital addition to the maledominated catalog of nature writing, and a powerful call to recognize wilderness and unadulterated open space as key to our humanity, especially in divisive and techaddled times like today. Catskill Interpretive Center, Mount Tremper. 688-3369. MUSIC Casting Crowns 7-10pm. $35+. Pop acoustic. Mid-Hudson Civic Center, Poughkeepsie. 454-5800. Ethan Bortnick 7:30pm. $34/$20 student. Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy. (518) 273-8945. An Evening with Bruce Cockburn 8pm. $45-$65. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Gov’t Mule 7:30pm. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

CHRONOGRAM.COM These listings do not include weekly recurring events, such as classes that take place every Wednesday, for example. Visit Chronogram.com for events updated daily, recurring weekly events, and staff recommendations. You can also upload events directly to our Events database at Chronogram.com/submitevent.

96 FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 4/18

Hudson Valley Philharmonic Young People’s Concert 10:30am. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Kurt Hnnry Band 7pm. Contemporary ccoustic/urban country rock. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Open Mike for the People, By the People 7:30pm. Copperfield’s, Millbrook. 677-8188. Patty Smyth and Scandal 8-10pm. $35/$45/$62.50. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039 8pm. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. 914-739-0039.

NIGHTLIFE Trivia Night with Paul Tully and Eric Stamberg 7-9:30pm. Teams test their knowledge in this fun game. First place and second place prizes awarded. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Conscious Eldering Through Relational Wisdom $385. During the 3-day retreat we will develop mutual respect and an understanding of fair exchange in our intergenerational relationships and in society today; discover the unique opportunities that each life stage can contribute; explore elderhood from various cultures and traditions; navigate the role of younger people in wisdom reciprocity and learning exchange with our elders; chart a future in collaboration that is inclusive of hindsight, insight, and foresight. noon. Lifebridge Sanctuary, Rosendale. Wildearth. org/adults/eldering-relational-wisdom. Drawing Better: Vince Natale 9am-noon. $160/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing, Painting and Composition with Eric Angeloch 1-4pm. $160/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Vet2Vet Veterans Program Featuring a variety of workshops and support groups. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 672-5391.

FRIDAY 27 DANCE Jamal Jackson Dance Company: Rob Day 8pm. $35/$30 members. This evening-length production of “Rob Day” explores gun culture and our connections to it. In this performance that merges contemporary dance forms with traditional West African dance movement, Rob is a 9mm pistol. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Swing Dance 7:30-11pm. $15/$10 students. Dance to the music of The Swingaroos- a youthful, high energy band. No partner needed. Beginners’ lesson 7:30. Band 8. Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571. FILM A Fantastic Woman 7:15-9pm. $8. Daniela Vega gives an awardwinning performance as a transgender singer who faces scorn and discrimination after the sudden death of her older boyfriend. Rising Chilean director Sebastián Lelio celebrates the endurance of a woman under suspicion of murder. In Spanish with English subtitles. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. How to Diffuse a Bomb Screening 6:30pm. This film looks at the work of the Project Children organization, established in 1975 by NYPD bomb squad member Denis Mulcahy. The organization allowed over 23,000 children from Catholic and Protestant backgrounds in Ireland to escape the “The Troubles” and live together in the United States over the course of a summer. There will be a Q&A following the film with Denis Mulcahy himself. Hurleyville Arts Center, Hurleyville. 707-8047. MUSIC Almost Queen 8-10pm. A deliberate 4 piece band, Almost Queen delivers an authentic live show consisting of signature four-part harmonies and genuine costumes while recapturing the live energy that is THE ultimate Queen experience. Paramount Hudson Valley Theater, Peekskill. (914) 739-0039.

Classical Music Mini Series 7:30pm. $5/students free with ID. Enjoy an evening of classical chamber music, curated by Drew Youmans, our classical violinist and curator of classical music for Midtown Music. Featuring local musicians and musicians from The Orchestra Now! ARTBar Gallery, Kingston. 338-2789. David Lang’s “darker” 7:30pm. Scored for 12 strings, "darke"r is a slow exploration of sound by Pullitzer Prizewinning composer David Lang. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. Empac.rpi.edu/events/2018/spring/davidlangs-darker. Honors Recital 3-4:30pm. The concert will feature facultyselected solo and chamber performances by students in its applied lesson program chosen based on outstanding performances at the convocation series. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 687-5262. The Jon Bates Band 9pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Kitty Fisher’s Army 8pm. Power rock. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Kofi Baker’s Cream Experience 7pm. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Mary Mancini & Mario Tacca 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. The McCartney Years: The Premiere Paul McCartney Experience 8pm. $38-$48. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390. Quinn Sullivan 8pm. $20-$35. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Seven Days Gone 8pm. Modern rock. Copperfield’s, Millbrook. 677-8188. Slam Allen 8-10:30pm. $20/$15 in advance. This dynamic entertainer uses the genres of blues, soul, R&B, and a touch of rock and roll to deliver powerful soul-stirring performances. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 784-1199.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Beacon Open Studios Kickoff Party/ Exhibition 6-9pm. Oak Vino Wine Bar, Beacon. 765-2400. Red Sand Gala 4:45-8pm. A night of art, education, and empowerment to fight human trafficking. Dinner will be provided, and semi-formal wear, specifically red, is not required but encouraged. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. THEATER 3rd Annual Director’s Challenge 8-10pm. $25/$20 Unison Members/$15 students & seniors. Six short plays, six directors, one winner! Vote for t he best comedy and drama written and performed by Hudson Valley based playwrights, directors, and actors. Produced by Theatre on the Road, staged at Unison Arts Center. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" 7:30-9:30pm. One of the most enduring shows of all time, this musical is a warmhearted and brilliant celebration of words, music, dance and color, about Joseph, the phophetic boy with the coat of many colors who changed the course of history. Spa Little Theater, Saratoga Springs. (518) 587-4427. "Lear" 8pm. In 2020, Lear, a titan of industry, unexpectedly divids his holdings among his three daughters in this adaptation of Shakespeare's tragic tale. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Birding with Nick Martin, Minnewaska State Park Educator 9-10:30am. During this program, Nick will lead participants on a walk on the trails near the library to discover birds in the area. Participants are encouraged to bring binoculars, a birding field guide or a smart device with a field guide installed. Gardiner Library, Gardiner. 255-1255.

SATURDAY 28 DANCE ABT Studio Company Performance 7:30-9:30pm. ABT Studio Company, the top level of the American Ballet Theatre training ladder, is a classical ensemble made up of 12 dancers of outstanding potential. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 2. Jamal Jackson Dance Company: Rob Day 8pm. $35/$30 members. This evening-length production of “Rob Day” explores gun culture and our connections to it. In this performance that merges contemporary dance forms with traditional West African dance movement, Rob is a 9mm pistol. PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. FAIRS & FESTIVALS 24-Hour Drone: Experiments in Sound and Music Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050. 28th Annual Beltane Festival at Stone Mountain Farm: Phoenix Rising! 1-7pm. Come dressed in your fanciful best to celebrate with our merry band of musicians, the Vanaver Caravan Dancers, puppets, players, clowns, fine artisans, and vendors. Center For Symbolic Studies, New Paltz. Symbolicstudies.org. FILM Like Any Other Kid 6:30pm. This film follows the relationships between incarcerated youth and staff in three secure facilities across the country. As staff provides the basics of love, guidance, and structure, the youth transform before our eyes. followed by a Q&A with award-winning director Victoria Mills. Hurleyville Arts Center, Hurleyville. 707-8047. FOOD & WINE Citron Melon Jam Session 1-3pm. $10/kids free. Citron melons- and the delicious jam made from them- were a springtime staple in 19th century New York. Join us in making your own takehome fresh citron melon jam and learning other seed crafts. Registration is required. Clermont State Historic Site, Germantown. (518) 537-6622. HEALTH & WELLNESS Pilates with Angela Last Saturday of every month. $15. Proceeds benefit Safe Harbors Historic Ritz Theater. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. APGpilates.com. KIDS & FAMILY Hudson Valley KidVenture 11am-4pm. $10/$8 in advance. An inclusive two day weekend event for all abilities, Hudson Valley KidVenture will allow children of all ages to explore, discover and, most of all, have fun. Featuring entertainment, demonstrations, hands-on activities, Touch A Truck and more. Mid-Hudson Civic Center, Poughkeepsie. HVKidVenture.org. PJ Masks Live! Time to Be a Hero 1 & 4pm. $32.50-$52.50. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. LECTURES & TALKS Susan Orlean and Sarah Thyre’s Crybabies 7:30pm. A live podcast with Malcolm Gladwell. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. LITERARY & BOOKS Poetry reading for “Art & Words: An Exhibition of Art & Poetry Inspiring One Another” 4-6pm. Emerge Gallery & Art Space, Saugerties. 247-7515. MUSIC Breakaway with Robin Baker 8:30-11:30pm. Rock. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. Corey Glover Band 8pm. Rock and soul. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Gerry Malkin Quintet 8pm. Jazz. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Fair City Fire with The Late Shift 8pm. The Linda, Albany. thelinda.org. Good Enough to Eat $125. A night of culinary classics for jazz fans and gourmands alike led by vocalese and bebop expert Veronica Swift. 6pm dinner, 7:30pm show. Culinary Institute of America (CIA), Hyde Park. 452-9430.


Isle of Klezbos 8pm. $15. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Max Weinberg’s Jukebox 8-10pm. Pop, soft rock. Paramount Hudson Valley, Peekskill. 914-739-0039. Neil Alexander & NAIL: Birthday Concert 8pm. The Falcon Underground, Marlboro. 236-7970. Nobody’s Girl 8pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Beacon. 855-1300. Quinn Sullivan 8pm. With opening act Murali Coryell. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. RPI Dance Club Spring Recital 11am. EMPAC at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. (518) 276-3921. Sail On: The Beach Boys Tribute 8pm. $20-$30. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Soul Purpose 7pm. Lydia’s Cafe, Stone Ridge. 687-6373. Tony Garnier/ Rob Scheps Quartet 7-10pm. Bob Dylan’s bassist Garnier steps out with a steallar jazz/ rock/ soul quartet. Denning’s Point Distillery, Beacon. Denningspointdistillery.com.

OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Open House for Children and Families 10am-noon. The Middle Way School of the Hudson Valley, offering an innovative, wellrounded education merged with the Buddhist view of wisdom and compassion, is opening in September 2018. Middle Way School, Saugerties. 272-0141. OUTDOORS & RECREATION Newburgh Community Yard Sale 11am-4pm. Safe Harbors of the Hudson, Newburgh. 784-1110. Spring Open House 10am-2pm. Guides from the NY State Outdoor Guides Association and Catskill Center staff will be on hand leading short guided walks, outdoor skill demos, and lots more! We will also be celebrating the launch of our new Fishing Rod Loaner Program. Catskill Interpretive Center, Mount Tremper. 688-3369. SPIRITUALITY Messages From Love Ones in Spirit 5-6pm. Medium Hollister Rand will channel spontaneous messages to audience members from loved ones in spirit, followed by a reading from her book. Woodstock Public Library, Woodstock. 679-2311. THEATER 3rd Annual Director’s Challenge 8-10pm. Six short plays, six directors, one winner! Vote for the best comedy and drama written and performed by Hudson Valley based playwrights, directors, and actors. Unison Arts Center. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Center. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. Hudson Valley Storytelling: THE PORCH 8pm. Live storytelling. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" 7:30-9:30pm. One of the most enduring shows of all time, this musical is a warmhearted and brilliant celebration of words, music, dance and color, about Joseph, the phophetic boy with the coat of many colors who changed the course of history. Spa Little Theater, Saratoga Springs. (518) 587-4427. "Lear" 8pm. In 2020, Lear, a titan of industry, unexpectedly divids his holdings among his three daughters in this adaptation of Shakespeare's tragic tale. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Murder Me Always: A Night of Comedy Dinner Theater 7-9:30pm. $40/$35 Unison Members. Make reservations for a one-of-a-kind dinner theater experience at Unison. Ticket includes buffet dinner catered by Bridgecreek Catering and show. Wine will be available. Unison, New Paltz. 255-1559. White, Reis and Weiner: Irregular Rhymers 5-7pm. The Amity Gallery, in conjunction with National Poetry Month, presents three exciting poets who enjoy appearing together and riffing off each other. Open mike to follow. Amity Gallery, Warwick. 258-0818. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Drawing and Painting with Les Castellanos 9am-noon. $200/4 sessions. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Newburgh Open Movement 1-4pm. Workshop 1-2 p.m. with Ophra Wolf. Open Jam 2-4 p.m. with live music. Open to all ages, creeds, abilities, colors, shapes and sizes. Safe Harbors Lobby at the Ritz, Newburgh. 784-1199.

SUNDAY 29 DANCE ABT Studio Company Performance 2:30-4:30pm. ABT Studio Company, the top level of the American Ballet Theatre training ladder, is a classical ensemble made up of 12 dancers of outstanding potential. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5106 ext. 2. FAIRS & FESTIVALS 24-Hours Drone: Experiments in Sound and Music $24 early bird. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. (518) 822-1050. FILM A Fantastic Woman 7:15-9pm. $8. Daniela Vega gives an awardwinning performance as a transgender singer who faces scorn and discrimination after the sudden death of her older boyfriend. Rising Chilean director Sebastián Lelio celebrates the endurance of a woman under suspicion of murder. In Spanish with English subtitles. Rosendale Theatre, Rosendale. 658-8989. HEALTH & WELLNESS Journey into Self Awareness 10:30am. $15. Join Theo Meth for a morning filled with music, humor, divine celebration and laughter, howling, dancing, shaking, gibberish, chanting, guided self inquiry and silent meditation. Milkweed, Sugar Loaf. Yoga Sutras Study Group 7-8:30pm. $60. Anne-Marie Serre is once again leading a discussion group for those who are interested in reviewing and discussing the Yoga Sutras, a seminal text of yoga. This series will be exclusively digital. Lilananda Yoga, Glenville. (518) 470-5240. KIDS & FAMILY Back From the Brink Book Launch 4pm. Kids' book launch with author Nancy F. Castaldo. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. oblongbooks.com. Hudson Valley KidVenture 11am-4pm. An inclusive two day weekend event for all abilities, Hudson Valley KidVenture will allow children of all ages to explore, discover and, most of all, have fun. Featuring entertainment, demonstrations, hands-on activities, Touch A Truck and more. Mid-Hudson Civic Center, Poughkeepsie. HVKidVenture.org. MUSIC The Bernstein Bard Trio 12-3pm. The Trio features brothers Mark Bernstein on guitar and vocals, Steve Bernstein on mandolin and vocals, and Robert Bard on upright bass and vocals. Acoustic. High Falls Cafe, High Falls. 687-2699. An Evening With Madeleine Peyroux 7pm. $40-$70. Jazz and blues. Tarrytown Music Hall, Tarrytown. (914) 631-3390. Grand Piano Trios: Mendelssohn and Smetana 3-5pm. $50 orchestra/$27 balcony/$15 students. The versatile composer-pianist-conductorpainter Mendelssohn personifies genius and musical prodigy and his second Piano Trio in C minor (1845) is a true expression of the exquisite sensibility of his life and art. The style of the profoundly moving Piano Trio in G minor of 1855 is close to that of Robert Schumann, with hints of Liszt, Wagner and Berlioz. Two of today’s brightest young performers join cellist Yehuda Hanani for a juxtaposition of these passionate works. Roman Rabinovich, piano; Soovin Kim, violin; Yehuda Hanani, cello. Harlem String Quartet 4pm. With Michael Brown, piano. Howland Cultural Center, Beacon. Howlandmusic.org. Kick: The INXS Experience 7pm. $15-$25. Daryl’s House Club, Pawling. 289-0185. Leo Kottke 7:30pm. $38.50. Leo Kottke’s astounding virtuosity on six- and 12-string guitars is never less than awe inspiring and his unique musical vision has placed him among the foremost acoustic guitar stylists of our era. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1061. Saints of Swing 11am. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. OPEN HOUSES/PARTIES/BENEFITS Official Beacon Open Studios After Party 6:30pm. Quinn’s, Beacon. Quinnsbeacon.com.

"The 40th Annual Photo Regional: Effects that Aren't Special" The photographers exhibited in “Effects That Aren’t Special” draw empathy through editing. The exhibit is based on the belief that photography can pull the viewer into unfamiliar worlds and make them feel for people they’ve never met. With blurring techniques, discoloration, and other Photoshop effects, the 15 artists create a wide range of distortions that are closer to reality than they seem. Curated by artist, wiseguy, and Bard College photography professor Tim Davis, the exhibit features work from several local artists, including Chad Kleitsch of Rhinebeck, Seth David Rubin of Stone Ridge, and Parker Shipp of Hudson. “Effects That Aren’t Special” is on display at The Sage Colleges’ Opalka Gallery in Albany now through April 21 as the gallery’s 40th Annual Photo Regional exhibition. (518) 292-7742; Opalka.sage.edu. —Briana Bonfiglio PETS 3rd Annual 5K Run/Walk to Benefit Pets Alive 9am-noon. 25.00. Course features a double loop around the scenic lake. First 100 Registrants get a 5K exclusive t-shirt. Age Group Recognition Fancher Davidge Park, Middletown. 386-9738. THEATER "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" 7:30-9:30pm. One of the most enduring shows of all time, this musical is a warmhearted and brilliant celebration of words, music, dance and color, about Joseph, the phophetic boy with the coat of many colors who changed the course of history. Spa Little Theater, Saratoga Springs. (518) 587-4427. "Lear" 3pm. In 2020, Lear, a titan of industry, unexpectedly divides his holdings among his three daughters in this adaptation of Shakespeare's tragic tale. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. WORKSHOPS & CLASSES Edgar Cayce Remedies Workshop 1-3pm. Join us and learn about the Cayce remedies from a man who has healed himself from Parkinson’s disease, Reynaud’s disease and arthritis using Cayce’s remedies, and who has been teaching others how to use and make them for over fifty years. Marbletown Community Center, Stone Ridge. 687-0880. Pet First Aid, CPR and Disaster Preparedness Course 9am-1pm. $45. This course covers basic first aid, CPR and disaster preparedness for dogs and cats. For ages 14 to adult. Preregistration and payment are required. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. 876-3001.

MONDAY 30 HEALTH & WELLNESS Congestive Heart Failure Support Group for Patients and Caregivers Last Monday of every month, 12-1pm. At each meeting, participants will learn how to optimally manage this disease and improve their quality of life through educational, social and emotional support. Participants will have also the opportunity to hear from guest speakers, engage in question and answer forums, and connect with others living with congestive heart failure. VBMC Center for Cardiac Rehab, Poughkeepsie. 471-4643. LITERARY & BOOKS Picture and Prose Book Club 11am-12:30pm. The gathering will begin with a special tour of Long, Winding Journeys, followed by an in-depth discussion of Leila Aboulela’s novel Minaret. The novel, selected by facilitator Aida Mansoor from the Muslim Coalition of Connecticut, follows Najwa, a young Muslim woman, as she navigates her journey through political exile, changing class status, romantic love, and a new relationship with her faith. The Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah. (914) 232-9555. MUSIC Amy Helm: Woodshed Residency Tour 2018 8pm. Neo-Americana. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970. Bruce T. Carroll: Finding You 8pm. Singer songwriter showcase. The Falcon, Marlboro. 236-7970.

4/18 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST 97


Planet Waves BY ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

Heaven Beside You by Christine Yates.

X Factors, Not Wearing Business Suits

S

ome fresh faces have arrived on the political scene. Did you ever have the experience of sitting in your living room on a spring day, with the windows open, and the sound of a leaf blower stops? And suddenly you feel a sense of relief, because the leaf blower stopped, though you hadn’t consciously noticed it was even there. But you notice when it’s gone. That’s how I feel about our new players on the political scene, whose presence makes their previous absence suddenly noticeable. One is a porn actress and director named Stephanie Gregory Clifford; better searched by her stage name, Stormy Daniels, or my preferred artistic name she sometimes uses, Stormy Waters. The others are a whole bunch of kids from all over the United States, born in 2000 and after. Spurred to action by the February 14 shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, it would seem that, finally, a new generation is stepping up to the challenges of our world. These are the kids who have declared that there have been enough school (and mall and movie theater and nightclub and concert) shootings and it’s time to rein in who gets to have a gun. You might ask what these two new elements in the discussion have in common, besides being human. The answer is: They have something to say, and nothing to lose. Also, neither are wearing business suits. I’m writing this article in advance of two big events scheduled to take place during the weekend of March 24-25. They are happening under similar astrology, which will have peaked the evening of March 25, when an interview with Stormy Daniels is scheduled to appear on “60 Minutes.” Prior to that, the

98 PLANET WAVES CHRONOGRAM 4/18

March for our Lives took place Saturday morning in Washington, DC, and in cities around the country. As I write, just about everyone appearing in the news is drowning in their own deception: The massive Facebook data heist that helped Trump win (and Trump personally calling Vladimir Putin to congratulate him on getting “reelected”), the FBI being gutted, the Russia probe closing in on Trump’s business transactions; while everyone wonders whether Robert Mueller will get fired before he can get to the bottom of the mess. Trump recently fired the secretary of state via Twitter. He’s appointed a torturer to lead the CIA. And so on. “I called President Putin of Russia to congratulate him on his election victory (in past, Obama called him also),” Trump tweeted, in response to everyone wanting to shove a fork in his ass. “The Fake News Media is crazed because they wanted me to excoriate him. They are wrong! Getting along with Russia (and others) is a good thing, not a bad thing.” As a connoisseur of old quotes, I can tell you that’s one that will get better with age. The week’s sunny spot was how the serial bomber in Austin was caught, and then blew himself up, without a single cop getting hurt. We are stretched for good news. Stormy Daniels is good news. Kids rising up against gun violence is good news. Both address two of the most serious issues now in the news: public corruption, and the gun lobby owning Congress and the presidency. First let’s consider Stormy Daniels. The astrology related to her broadcast is directly related to the March for Our Lives protest march the day before. The aspect of the weekend is Venus conjunct Eris. Daniels had an affair with Donald Trump in 2006, shortly after his third


wife and now First Lady of the Land, Melania, had given birth to his youngest child, Barron. Then in late 2016, Daniels was paid $130,000 by Michael Cohen, one of Trump’s many lawyers, to sign a nondisclosure agreement and to keep silent about the affair. In later news reports, we’ve also learned that she was allegedly coerced with threats of physical violence, making the $130K a kind of gratuity rather than an incentive. Despite several legal actions by Daniels to dissolve the NDA, and by Trump’s camp to enforce it, Daniels has had already completed the “60 Minutes” interview, though Trump has brought legal action attempting to enforce prior restraint against the CBS network: that is, to have a court block a news outlet from reporting the news, in advance; something unprecedented in US history. That alone tells us where he’s coming from. It’s interesting that despite Trump’s usual shameless charade—he really does seem to have none—personally, I think he reeks with guilt and embarrassment, which are driving him insane. His counterpart in popular culture is “South Park” character Eric Cartman, who does things like take a dump on the teacher’s desk in front of the whole class. Cartman’s antics are an attempt to conceal that he is deeply troubled. Daniels approaches life from another angle. Her artistic role is to put her sex on display. While this can mask deeper issues, I don’t get that’s true for her. The other evening, I finally decided to watch some of her videos. They are lighthearted in the genre of what would be called vanilla porn. In one, she’s a sex robot who transforms into a human. She’s strong enough to defend the household against an intruder, protecting big, strong men. She fixes the washing machine, and then does the laundry, which had been piled up for months while it was broken. She pleasures herself while she’s having sex, and she actually seems to be having fun. She gives no indication whatsoever of having body shame, and seems emotionally open. This is the antithesis, and a potential antidote, to Trump’s agonizing projection of his own issues onto women’s bodies. He spent his entire campaign and most of his career disparaging women, and has made many public comments about how disgusting he thinks they are physically. Daniels is not taking on those projections. They are not sticking to her. She is in her power, though not in the New Age or life-coaching meaning of that, but in the tantric sense. She is living evidence that the one with the pussy has the power. We forget so easily that the biological role of the vulva is to experience penetration, sometimes for pleasure, sometimes for reproduction, and sometimes both; and to birth children. In our obsession about sex as sin, and commodifying and denying it, and veiling it, and conflating it with abuse and violence, we forget the simple biology and emotions that are involved. This dance of denial is nearly all rooted in shame, shame that Daniels seems to have no part of, nor investment in. Stormy is having her heterosexual coming out party on “60 Minutes” in a time when sexual tensions have never been more shrill, and when the need to avoid the conversation of sex and pleasure has never seemed so urgent. We live in such uptight times. Most people are so wound up that it seems even the meekest attempt at an honest conversation might pop their spring. That is what Stormy is about to do. Thanks to an astrologer named Stefanie Iris Weiss, we know her birth time. Stefanie reached out to her via Twitter and Daniels responded with her data. That’s something of a miracle; we have birth times on very few newsmakers these days. Quick overview: She has the Sun and many planets in Pisces; she has the Moon in Scorpio; and she has Sagittarius rising, with the Galactic Core spot on the ascendant, and Neptune in Sagittarius right above the horizon. Another salient feature is that she has Venus in Aquarius—a kind of avatar position, bestowing both mental and emotional intelligence—conjunct the asteroid Pallas Athene. I could write a book about this chart, though let’s stick to three main elements: Venus, Mars, and the slow-moving planet of our day, Eris. As you

may know from my previous coverage, we are in the midst of the Uranus-Eris conjunction, a once-in-a-lifetime event that last occurred in the 1920s. That’s the one where I regularly defer to a media theorist for information—Professor Eric McLuhan, who explained both Eris and its conjunction to Uranus: “The body is everywhere assaulted by all of our new media, a state which has resulted in deep disorientation of intellect and destabilization of culture throughout the world. In the age of disembodied communication, the meaning and significance and experience of the body is utterly transformed and distorted.” This conjunction is to our era what Uranus conjunct Pluto was to the 1960s. There was before (1965) and after (1966) and they were distinctly different times. Most of what we think of as the `60s happened in 1966 and beyond. For us, there is before Uranus-Eris (2016) and after (2017). We are now seeing some correction of the distortion McLuhan is talking about. Eris, an ultra slow-mover taking 558 years to go around the Sun just once, is all over Stormy Daniels’s personal charts, especially right now. In Daniels’s progressed horoscope (an updated natal chart, not her transits), Mars and Eris are in an exact conjunction—to the degree, right now—something so rare, you might describe it as happening once in six lifetimes. This is the full embodiment of the sex warrior. What is more interesting is that this conjunction is exactly opposite the most vulnerable spot in Donald Trump’s chart: his Chiron in Libra. Had Trump done more of his spiritual work, his Chiron might represent a source of strength; but that does not seem to be the case. Second, on Sunday night as “60 Minutes” airs, Venus is in an exact conjunction to Eris. This happens once a year, for less than a day; and this year, Sunday is the day. You can think of this as the reconciliation of Eris with her full and overtly sexual female power. This power is about to be turned loose on the nation and its president. It’s not just Trump who is trying to hold 100 pounds of fetid, putrid shame in a 50-pound sack. A lot of people have this issue, mostly to a lesser degree. Stormy Daniels is going to help burst the boil. She will get down to business a lot faster than Robert Mueller, who has to fill in all the government forms correctly. My take is that Daniels is a one-woman sexual revolution, which is being aimed at the presidency. If there is any justice, Trump will be undone by a woman. With the space remaining, let’s consider the kids who are taking America by storm. Note that it’s kids born in 2000 or later who are starting this movement. All of them have in their charts two conjunctions (the most powerful aspect) that were exact that year. While these both occur far more frequently than Uranus conjunct Eris, they still pack some energy. The first is the actual aspect of the new millennium, Chiron conjunct Pluto in Sagittarius. This was exact December 30, 1999. The conjunction held all year, and every person born in 2000 has it. This is about radical spiritual awakening. Think of the combined healing power of Chiron, the evolutionary power of Pluto and the full-focus intention of Sagittarius, all in one place. Second, in 2000 Jupiter and Saturn were conjunct in Taurus. This is the full expression of one of the most useful signs of the lot: the one about values, selfrespect, and sticking to what you start. For these kids, the two largest planets, together about 2,000 times the size of Earth, are focused in a sign that, once it gets going, has the momentum of a freight train burning through the night. We adults have the opportunity to put our resources, our wisdom and our full support behind these young people, and I suggest we do it without hesitation. They are, in fact, getting a result even in just six weeks: a discussion, as well as protest movements; and an understanding that to get a result, the political system must be fully engaged. A woman who fully claims her sexuality, and young people who claim their voice and their right to speak: those are the things that have been missing, among a few others we may yet discover.

Stormy Daniels is a one-woman sexual revolution, which is being aimed at the presidency. If there is any justice, Trump will be undone by a woman.

CHRONOGRAM.COM READ Eric Francis Coppolino’s weekly Planet Waves column.

4/18 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 99


Planet Waves Horoscopes Listen to the Eric Francis podcast at PlanetWaves.fm

ARIES (March 20–April 19) You do exist. If you consider that long enough, and carefully enough, you will cause an earthquake. Much of the crisis of our society, its sickness and its violence and its obsession with identity, is all about a struggle to acknowledge existence. There are many ways to do this. Marshall McLuhan, the brilliant and infamous media theorist of the ’60s, said that identity is always established through aggression. I would say that’s true, when other more elementary biological factors are missing, such as living passionately and engaging your sexuality. Chiron is about to enter your birth sign and, after a brief phase-in, will be there for the next nine years. Along with Chiron is a potent, more recently discovered point called Salacia. Representing all things salty, you might say that Salacia offers the opportunity to grow and evolve through understanding and exploring your sexuality. When you combine this with Chiron—which will be the case for the next few years—you get an extended, though once-in-a-lifetime, opportunity to focus on an aspect of healing that everyone seems to understand needs emphasis but few know how to approach. And how do you approach it? You just start, and keep reading, having conversations and exploring physically till you catch on to the rhythm. There is a world awaiting you, and the taboo is rapidly falling away.

TAURUS (April 19–May 20) Inner awareness is a gift, and it’s one you can cultivate for yourself. This month, the very search-beam of consciousness—the minor planet Chiron—moves into the most sensitive and, in truth, amazing angle of your solar chart: your 12th solar house, Aries. I am always amazed when I hear about the lack of personal association with the notion of inner life or inner awareness, as if the whole universe exists outside of us. You, however, are aware that your reality is mostly within you; and though at times you may feel like a hot mess (particularly in recent years, with Uranus passing through Aries), you are very much awake and alert to your existence within yourself. Chiron is going to focus this for you and make your quest for identity feel like a natural process—if you are willing to cooperate. People tend to cling to ideas about who they are rather than seeking to understand what exactly they are drawing up out of the Earth and synthesizing that into the fabric of their soul. This is not a conceptual process. It’s not an intellectual exercise. You are a cosmic being, co-creating yourself with the universal creative force that sustains all life. You bring your absolutely unique approach to existence. Chiron will help you let yourself grow, and let yourself shine.

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Yours is one of the most social signs. This is partly about your willingness to converse with anyone, such as gangsters, monks, cheesemongers, philosophers, and space aliens. Yet the more interesting thing is why you do that: You establish and stabilize your presence in the world through social means. It would be nice if everyone did that; we would have more potluck dinners and fewer school shootings. However, there is an astonishing social phobia in the world, which is fueled by an obsession with elitism that is just torturing many, many people. Psychologists have studied ingroup/outgroup phenomena for years, and that has not helped matters much. You can, however. Your healing role through the extended run of Chiron in Aries (which will last into 2027) is that of social ambassador. You are excellent at subverting absurd social rules, mainly by walking up to people and talking to them. In everything you do, you will be helping usher people through the barriers, security checkpoints, and glass walls of our world. This is the work of a master healer; and if you don’t qualify today, you will embark on that path. At the outset, consider that what benefits others, benefits you—and that the secret to your magic is self-acceptance. A fairer, more open and communicative world, without absurd social barriers, will be a much happier world.

CANCER (June 21–July 22) Chiron in Aries is the transit you’ve been waiting for. You will either discover your true calling or, more likely, confirm that you’ve been following it all along. The added factor of Chiron is one of leadership. You must be willing to be visible and to be an example and mentor to others. And it’s essential that you venture into some new territory every single day. You may not think of yourself as a pioneer, though at least you tend to be an early settler in new and unusual country. You are counted on as someone who establishes basic norms, roles, and protocols, because your mind works well that way. You might think of these as family traditions. There is more, though. Chiron moving through the 10th has been described in the early literature as taking on the mantle of power. This may be subtle; it may be overt; though one thing is for sure: our world and our society needs a new concept of authority, one that is responsive to people’s feelings, needs, and personal gifts, and is not strictly centered on profit as its concept of the greatest good. If all this sounds appealing, the potential downside will be the need to live as if you have a TV camera trained on you at all times. In terms of your ethics, you will have zero wiggle room. You don’t need much anyway.


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The notion of “God” or even “god” has been so abused over the centuries that it’s warned many people off of their natural spiritual quest. Then, looking at things from the other direction, the notion of religion has been turned into a kind of mental virus, turning everything from Coca-Cola to the Republican Party into an act of worship. Yet you have a relationship to existence, and your sense of being and your relationship to the world depend on it. Enter Chiron into your 9th house, which is the astrological sigil of the spiritual quest. This is not about theory or armchair travel: it’s about gaining experience. It’s about the genuine practice of Know Thyself, Seek and Ye Shall Find, and learning as discovering that something is possible. There is an aspect to your journey that will benefit from reading and study, though I suggest you go to the old books rather than the new ones. You want literature written by authors, not marketing execs, and that never came close to the New York Times bestseller list. The way to travel places is by yourself, not with a group. You want the independence to spend three days somewhere that a group might spend three hours. Most of all, you need to seek your own understanding of reality and of existence. This is the beginning of a great adventure.

VIRGO (August 23–September 23) Barbara Hand Clow, author of one of the original books on Chiron, said she had very few clients with Chiron in the 8th house, because they were so secretive. Now, Chiron is about to enter your 8th solar house. After a nine-month transition in, it will remain there for almost a decade, which is similar to a natal placement. One thing we can say for sure is that this will take you on a journey through the mysteries of sex, death, transformation, rebirth, and money—all usually cloaked from view or considered too taboo to discuss. Your most vital task in these years will be to practice self-disclosure. Virgo has a way of acting conspiratorially, concealing your plans till the last minute and conducting your life on a “need to know” basis, like in a spy novel. While this focuses your sense of your own power, it limits your capacity for intimacy. It has a way of isolating you, and making you seem self-centered in a way that you don’t want to be. Revealing the truth of your reality, especially to the people you consider intimates, is the very essence of what will set you free. Allowing yourself to transcend any fear that might block you from doing this will help you learn how to be vulnerable, which, contrary to popular belief, is the only way to feel safe.

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LEO (July 22–August 23)

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LIBRA (September 23–October 23) Have you been able to make any sense at all of your relationships during the past seven years or so? There have been nonstop changes, genuinely odd people coming and going, various misadventures, and perhaps some who have stuck with you through thick and thin. With Chiron entering Aries, your mirror house of partnerships, you will soon feel drawn to engage in a healing process where close partners are concerned. This will apply to relationships in general and to the way that you see and experience the world (all of which also count for your experience of your environment). Chiron is going to drop a lens in front of this facet of your reality, and all at once, you will see what you’ve been missing. I propose one discovery you’ll make is that you’ve learned things you would never give up or do over, even if it meant your life being simpler or more stable. One of the crucial things you did during this phase is a kind of unlearning of patterns and tendencies that may have ruled your life in the past. You now get to refocus, and redesign your relationships in a way that works for you. Or, at least, you get to set some goals and boundaries and experiment with whether the people currently in your life are interested in playing along.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) Work is a vital part of your life, your growth, your wellbeing, and your sense of self. This is sometimes said to be an American phenomenon, though anyone who likes going to work is extremely fortunate. Seen another way, such people are not wasting their lives—and this is something that you of all people cannot do. Your work must be meaningful to you, and you must be the person you really are, when you’re in your day job. If this does not apply to you, you can still have a good long (or maybe short) talk with yourself about what you really want to do with your precious time and your precious mind. You have a calling. There is something you want to spend your days doing. Does it pay as well as what you do now? If it does not at the beginning, there’s nothing blocking your success in that regard, since you happen to be good with money. However, money is not the issue. Your ability to live with yourself is. Your ability to thrive is. Whatever you do, you will find a way to identify with it. Therefore, invest your energy into what you value, what you can be proud of, and what you can actually love. There is a word for this: Dharma, acting as if to hold the world together.

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SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 22) You’re in something of a personal renaissance. That’s a beautiful thing. From the look of your solar chart, you seem open to all kinds of experiences, which you want in actual, physical form—not in virtual form. You can afford to push your courage and try things you never would have done, as long as you remember that life is an experiment (which I like to call an experi-o-ment, because it’s about gaining experience). Now, Chiron is about to enter Aries. This is going to push the matter more than it already has been, which is quite a lot, over the past few years. If you’ve been living out your astrology during that time, you may have made a decision similar to my Sagittarius bandmate and music teacher Daniel Marc: you quit being the assistant manager of a little club in upstate New York so you can play music all the time. This is the moment when your art has to take over your life. Your art is the thing you do where you stay awake and alive the whole time. Your art is where you want to keep extending your awareness, creativity, and consciousness into existence, and you don’t want to pull back because it gets too intense. Your art is your passion, your true erotic connection, your sense of personal quest, and the validation that you’re alive for a very good reason.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 20)

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The theme of your life these days involves understanding your family connection. Family is tribe, in the closest sense we as members of Western civilization can get to the hunter-gatherers roaming around Africa eating magic mushrooms a million years ago. You identify strongly both with family and with the concept of the tribe; though, with Chiron’s arrival in Aries, you may start to question that. The thing with a tribe is that it tends to subjugate, or outright ban, too much individuality. And it would seem that the thing you want the most is to live life as a discrete being, rather than as a member of a hive or collective organism. One way to do some reality testing is to consider all the things you cannot say to your family of origin or your family of choice (including your closest friends). What you cannot say may be something you’ve stuffed so deep under the surface, in order to conform, that you’ve lost track of it. If you retrieve that feeling, thought or idea, you get a little panicky about whether you’ll still be acceptable to those you seemingly identify with so strongly. Pick the thing that would potentially be the most offensive, shocking, or embarrassing, and imagine having a little coming-out party. Could you actually do it? Could you say what you really say, do, feel, want, or know is true?

AQUARIUS (January 20–February 19) Yours is, somewhat famously, the sign associated with inventors, inventions, and technology. That’s another way of saying that Aquarius is one of the signs most associated with ideas. This appears astrologically for you as Aries, the sign of identity, in your 3rd solar house of ideas. You are your ideas; you cannot help yourself. Others may think you’re into abstractions and concepts for their own sake, but they are like food and water to you. Later this month, Chiron will make its first foray into Aries since the late 1960s. Your experience of life as mind as idea as invention will find a new peak and, in particular, a point of focus. Here is a clue: apart from any intellectual pursuit you may spark up, or deepen, the 3rd house is also about your community. It has its origins in describing the little cluster of homes that starts as a family farm and then becomes a hamlet and then a village. This is not community as in all the nurses of the world or people on a Facebook group; this is the community where you can walk around, open doors, and visit people face-to-face. It’s the community that can have potluck dinners and Scrabble night or contra dancing, or a political event; a community that can get together and solve a vexing problem requiring the brainpower of intelligent people.

PISCES (February 19-March 20)

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Chiron has been in your sign since April 20, 2010. That was a long time ago. In a certain way, despite much other astrology going by, this one transit has been a defining factor in your life. Chiron (a not-so-minor minor planet discovered in 1977) has a way of doing that: it makes itself known, and the more you acknowledge the subject matter that it’s presenting, the more productive that is. Chiron can also bring crisis (or one after the next), which would be especially possible if you were born between 1960 and 1968 and experienced your Chiron return in recent years. Yet despite any inconvenience, the role of Chiron is to help clarify and resolve the past and to put you in contact with your deeper being. It is fair to say that in these past eight years, you have made significant discoveries about who you are. Now that Chiron is entering Aries, you’re being called to invest these ideas into yourself, with full commitment. Aries is about taking action, based on what you have learned. You’ve been experimenting with this for a long time, since there’s been no shortage of planets in Aries, going back many years. Yet Chiron’s change of signs will enhance your focusing power, help you identify your priorities, and, most of all, guide you to connect with the resources (both inner and outer) to make things happen.


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Parting Shot

Tiger Rabbit, a screenprint by Gaia Internationally acclaimed street artist Gaia is an O+ Kingston alumnus and the mastermind behind two of Uptown Kingston’s largest murals: Artemis Emerging from the Quarry, behind BSP Kingston, and Pronkstilleven on Fair Street. About eight years ago, he designed Tiger Rabbit as a pasteup mural in Seoul, South Korea. The hybrid animal symbolizes the annual transition in the Korean calendar. Gaia also views it as a symbol of the entwined aggression and submission that addresses “the hierarchy of Japanese colonization and contemporary Korean identity.” A framed and signed limited edition screenprint of Tiger Rabit will be auctioned off at the O+ Spring Gala Auction on April 14 at The Beverly. To view all the items up for bid and to reserve a gala ticket visit Opositivefestival.org/gala. All proceeds from the auction will benefit O+ Festival. Gaiastreetart. com. 104 CHRONOGRAM 4/18

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Chronogram April 2018  

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