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Are You Missing Teeth?

Do You Wear A Denture?

Computer Planned Dental Implant Placement

(Above) Our in-office I-Cat™ Cone Beam CAT Scan Machine allowing 3D views. This is one of the first in our area. (Above Right) One of two specially designed surgical suites at Tischler Dental in Woodstock. (Right) View of Sim Plant™ interactive CT program allowing virtual planning of dental implants and bone grafting procedures.

why would you have dental implants without it? Safer

Through our in-office computerized tomography we can see all vital structures and nerves and pre-plan your implant case for the correct length and width of dental implants needed.

Faster

Through virtually pre-planning the case we can often place teeth on the dental implants immediately offering teeth in an hour or teeth in a day. Often performed in a minamally invasive manner.

Michael Tischler, DDS, FAGD is a nationally recognized lecturer, author, and leader in the field on dental implants, bone grafting and CT technology. He has been named by Dentistry Today as one of the leaders in the US in continuing education for the past four years in a row. He is also a NYU College of Dentistry research associate.

general dentistry  implant dentistry  cosmetic dentistry 845.679.3706

121 ROUTE 375

WOODSTOCK, NY 12498

T I S C H L E R D E N TA L . CO M


    

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2

NORTHERN DUTCHESS HOSPITAL & VASSAR BROTHERS MEDICAL CENTER: RECIPIENTS OF THE 2008/2009 HEALTHGRADES MATERNITY CARE EXCELLENCE AWARD™

You want the very best for your baby. And at Northern Dutchess Hospital and Vassar Brothers Medical Center, that’s exactly what you’ll find. Health Quest is proud to have two hospitals recognized for excellence by HealthGradesŽ—Vassar Brothers Medical Center in 2008/2009 and Northern Dutchess Hospital in 2007/2008 and 2008/2009. This prestigious honor ranks both facilities among the nation’s top 10% for maternity care, and is another example of how Health Quest is committed to providing you with a choice of truly comfortable and supportive environments for your birthing experience.

To learn more about our nationally recognized maternity care, please visit www.health-quest.org.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM 1


2 CHRONOGRAM 8/08


Just in time for planning your new home. Come to our Open House! Experience the strength and beauty of our post and beam Lindal Cedar Homes Display Model in Cold Spring, New York in the beautiful Hudson Valley. Atlantic Custom Homes Open House Saturday, August 23, 2008 10 AM – 5 PM Refreshments will be served throughout the day. Call 888-558-2636 today for information and directions.

INDEPENDENTLY DISTRIBUTED BY:

Atlantic Custom Homes 2785 Route 9 - Cold Spring, NY 10516 888-558-2636 www.lindalny.com 8/08 CHRONOGRAM 3


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4 CHRONOGRAM 8/08


TUESDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

AUG 2

AUG 3

AUG 12

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

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WEDNESDAY

AUG 13

4-PACK ON THE LAWN!

AUG 14

AUG 22

Keith Lockhart, conductor

SATURDAY

AUG 30

JOIN US THIS SUMMER AT OUR TWO NEW STAGES:

TERRACE STAGE

EVENTS GALLERY

AUG 1 AUG 7

AUG 3 SEPT 6

- CHANTICLEER - THE DEL MCCOURY BAND AUG 17 - PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND AUG 21 - SPANISH HARLEM ORCHESTRA

- BRAZILIAN GUITAR QUARTET - DAVID BROMBERG & THE ANGEL BAND SEPT 14 - TIME FOR THREE SEPT 20 - RICHIE HAVENS

Tickets available at BethelWoodsCenter.org | by phone 845.454.3388 Bethel Woods Box OfямБce | Ticketmaster.com or Outlets | Group sales 845.295.2521 | Info at 1.866.781.2922 Bethel, New York | Exit 104 off Route 17 at the site of the 1969 Woodstock festival

1.800.882.CATS www.scva.net 8/08 CHRONOGRAM 5


CONTENTS 8/08

NEWS AND POLITICS

FASHION & BEAUTY SUPPLEMENT

23 WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING

82 THREAD BY THREAD

The gist of what you may have missed in the back pages of the global media maelstrom: numbers of refugees increasing, new codes of behavioral conduct for doctors, and parts of Manhattan to become a temporary car-free park in August.

25 TREATING THE TORTURED Lorna Tychostup, reporting from Iraq, speaks with doctors from the country’s newly emerging mental health facilities for torture and trauma survivors.

32 BEINHART’S BODY POLITIC Larry Beinhart reminds voters of the previous problems that have occurred when presidential candidates promised to stimulate economy with tax cuts.

Erika Alexia Tsoukanelis describes her escape from the rigidity of mall fashions and explores stores in the Hudson Valley that cater to individuality.

EDUCATION SUPPLEMENT 86 LATCHKEY NO MORE Kelley Granger explores afterschool programs available to children of all ages.

88 NO MORE PENCILS, NO MORE BOOKS Amy Lubinski offers a guide to opportunites in adult education.

CAPITAL REGION

WHOLE LIVING GUIDE

34 THE REAWAKENING

98 THE SPIRIT OF THE PLACE

Molly Belmont examines the full-scale renassiance that has occurred in Schenectady in the past decade.

Lorrie Klosterman’s Q&A with Dr. Stephen Bergman, author of The Spirit of the Place, about the doctor-patient relationship and the state of the medical field.

FICTION

BUSINESS SERVICES

40 A PARTIAL CATALOG OF HAROLD’S MAJOR AND MINOR EPIPHANIES

71 TASTINGS A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 92 BUSINESS DIRECTORY A compendium of advertiser services. 103 WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY For the positive lifestyle.

A short story by Brent Robison on the life, love, and lamenatations of a man, that received an honorable mention in our 2007 short story contest.

44

Ryan Sullivan’s Hidden Face and The Tribe at his installation in Ellenville as part of the “10x10x10” exhibit. PORTFOLIO

6 CHRONOGRAM 8/08


8/08 CHRONOGRAM 7


CONTENTS 8/08

ARTS & CULTURE

68 FOOD & DRINK Brian K. Mahoney profiles Kingston’s Francophile haven Le Canard Enchainé.

44 PORTFOLIO Graffiti-inspred artwork by Ryan Sullivan.

46 LUCID DREAMING Beth E. Wilson examines the symbiotic relationship that exists between art and nature in the work of Katie Holten and Nina Katchadourian.

48 GALLERY & MUSEUM GUIDE 54 MUSIC Peter Aaron profiles the Pleshakov Piano Museum. Nightlife Highlights by DJ Wavy Davy and CD reviews of: Bob Gluck Trio Sideways Reviewed by Erik Lawrence. K. Osgood Play to Win Reviewed by Sharon Nichols. Stoney Clove Lane Stay with Me Reviewed by Jason Broome.

58 BOOKS Nina Shengold profiles memoirist and book reviewer Daniel Mendelsohn.

60 BOOK REVIEWS Anne Pyburn reviews A Spring Without Bees: How Colony Collapse Disorder Has Endangered Our Food Supply by Michael Schacker. Marx Dorrity reviews Thousand Mile Song: Whale Music in a Sea of Sound by David Rothenberg. Lee Gould reviews The Slow Creaking of Planets by Gretchen Primack and Meditations on Rising and Falling by Philip Pardi. Short Takes: A summer reading list complied by Nina Shengold.

64 POETRY Poems by Lisa Bove, Frank Boyer, Timothy Brennan, Brant Clemente, Susan Deer Cloud, Daniel Gilhuly, Michael David Golzmane, DB Leonard, Gregory Luce, Normal, Jill Pritzker, Jordan Reynolds, Natalie Safir, Aleda Schoonmaker, and Tillie Stern.

127

Peter Hutton’s film At Sea will be screened this month at Upstate Films. FORECAST

8 CHRONOGRAM 8/08

140 PARTING SHOT Migrating Birds, a black-and-white photo by Mary Lou Oliveira.

THE FORECAST 108 DAILY CALENDAR Comprehensive listings of local events. (Daily updates of calendar listings are posted at Chronogram.com.) PREVIEWS 117 Terri C. Smith profiles the late photojournalist Eugene Smith, whose black-andwhite photographs are now on permanent view at Dutchess Community College. 119 Cheryl K. Symister-Masterson profiles soxophonist David “Fathead” Newman, who will perform at the Belleayre Music Festival in Highmount on August 16. 121 In 97 minutes, three actors will stage pieces from all 37 of the Bard’s plays in “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged),” at Boscobel in Garrison. 123 Sparrow talks with Foster Reed, the founder of New Albion Records, a label to be celebrated at Bard College’s SummerScape series in the Spiegeltent, August 1 through August 10. 127 Bard professor Peter Hutton’s silent film about the life and death of a container ship, At Sea, will be shown at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on August 24. 131 Peter Shaffer’s “Black Comedy” at the Shadowland Theater through August 10. 133 “Impassioned Images: German Expressionist Prints” will be exhibited at Vassar College’s Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center from August 22 though October 26

PLANET WAVES 134 Bucky Fuller: This Is the Future Eric Francis Coppolino examines the life of the late author, architect, inventor, visionary, and futurist Buckminster Fuller. Plus horoscopes.


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Register online at eOmega.org or call 800.944.1001

Eighteen thousand pen caps. 20,000 thread spools. 10,000 Swarovski crystals. 27,000 pipe cleaners. The items that Devorah Sperber has used to fashion her large-scale installations range from dazzling to quirky, but all plays with viewers’ prejudices toward objects not typically associated with art. “I pick materials that have some dignity—a thread spool is a stunningly beautiful object,” Sperber says. “I’m using very lowly craft materials and yet I’m keeping them on the side of ‘high art.’” We may see it as just a material to sew clothing with, but to Sperber, a thread spool is a building block to mosaic-like re-creations of Monet’s water lilies, the holodeck from “Star Trek,” or the iconic photograph of Marilyn Monroe in a billowing white dress, straddling the updraft from a subway grate. Sperber, a Woodstock resident, began fashioning thread spool works in 1999 after she saw the Mona Lisa in the Louvre. Surprised at how small it is—21 by 30 inches—Sperber set out to “bring back the lost experiential component” of scale and re-created versions of The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa to scale. (Sperber has created a series of pieces based on the Mona Lisa in varying sizes.) “My focus has always been on how mechanical reproductions alter images as they exist in the mind’s eye, because my interest has been in how the human eyes and brain function and how they make up the sense of reality.” In recreating Leonardo da Vinci’s painting of Jesus’s last meal with hundreds of hanging columns stacked with 20,736 thread spools, the resulting work is an astounding 29 feet wide, the same size as da Vinci’s original. When viewed through an optical device placed in front of the installation, abstract modular units of color are transformed into an identifiable painting. The viewer is suddenly able to make out the pearl earring and blue hat on the young woman in a take on Vermeer; Mona Lisa imparts her mysterious, playful smile. “There’s something about the element of surprise that’s involved in each one of my works,” Sperber says. Sperber created her tribute to Jan van Eyck’s Portrait of a Man (SelfPortrait?) (1433) after stumbling upon a scientific study revealing that hundreds of artists throughout history had subconsciously depicted figures in portraits on a symmetrical axis. The brain’s inclination to symmetry—a phenomenon known as eye centeredness—is perfectly exemplified in van Eyck’s painting. But Sperber admits that there was also a simpler reason as well for why she finally chose the piece. “That stunning red turban,” she says. “It’s just such a beautiful color.” Sperber’s work is currently on display at Kidspace at MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts, until September 1. “Flash Back,” an exhibition of selected material-based works by Sperber, will be on display at the Kleinert/James Art Center in Woodstock, August 2 through September 7. www.massmoca.org; www.woodstockguild.org; Portfolio: www.devorahsperber.com. —Amy Lubinski


LIVE PERFORMANCES, FILM, THEATER, DEBATE

TICKETS & INFORMATION ONLINE AT THELINDA.ORG OR CALL 518-465-5233 Ex 4.

IT’S ALL HAPPENING AT THE LINDA! Meet the Composers

Dancing on the Air

Robyn Hitchcock

Graham Parker & Mike Gent

Jul/9 8pm

Jul/10 8pm

Jul/18 5pm workshop 8pm show

FEATURING

Annie & The Hedonists

Mark Frederick Band Katie Haverly Joe Nacco

Jul/19 8pm

Jul/24 7pm

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Keith Pray’s Big Soul Ensemble

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Live at The Linda!

Hear broadcasts of past live performances at The Linda, Wednesdays at 8pm on WAMC Northeast Public Radio 90.3FM or 1400AM on your radio dial. 7/2 - Gandalf Murphy & The Slambovian Circus of Dreams 7/9 - Dancing on the Air 7/16 - Melissa Ferrick and Chris Pureka 7/23 - Red Molly 7/30 - Chris Smither Dancing on the Air made possible by Tech Valley Communications. Meet the Composers is made possible in part by the City of Albany, NY. Media Sponsorship of CRUMBS Nite Out at The Linda by Exit 97.7 WEXT. Music programming supported by the New York State Music Fund, established by the New York State Attorney General at Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM 11


EDITORIAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Perry dperry@chronogram.com SENIOR EDITOR Lorna Tychostup tycho56@aol.com BOOKS EDITOR Nina Shengold books@chronogram.com HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR Lorrie Klosterman wholeliving@chronogram.com

THE SOURCE FOR ITALIAN SPECIALTY PRODUCTS IN THE HUDSON VALLEY

Leonardoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian Market In the Courtyard behind the former Rhinebeck Hardware Store 9 Imported Berretta Cured Meats and Italian Cheeses 9 Fresh Sweet, Hot, Fennel and Cheese & Parsley Italian Sausage 9 Fresh (Made Daily) Hormone-free Mozzarella 9 Italian Pastries, Italian Cookies, Tiramisu and Ricotta Cheesecakes 9 Fresh Green, Seafood and Pasta Salads, Marinated Vegetables and 8 Varieties of Imported Olives

POETRY EDITOR Phillip Levine poetry@chronogram.com MUSIC EDITOR Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com VISUAL ARTS EDITOR Beth E. Wilson visualarts@chronogram.com EDITORIAL INTERN Amy Lubinski alubinski@chronogram.com PROOFREADER Teal Hutton CONTRIBUTORS Emil Alzamora, Larry Beinhart, Molly Belmont, Jay Blotcher, Lisa Bove, Frank Boyer, Timothy Brennan, Jason Broome, Susan Deer Cloud, Eric Francis Coppolino, DJ Wavy Davy, Marx Dorrity, David Gilhuly, Michael David Golzmane, Lee Gould, Kelley Granger, Hillary Harvey, Annie Dwyer Internicola, Mark Joseph Kelly, Piter Kerrs, Jesse Kuhn, Erik Lawrence, DB Leonard, Gregory Luce, William Marsh, Jennifer May, Sharon Nichols, Normal, Finbarr Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilley, Jill Pritzker, Anne Pyburn, Fionn Reilly, Jordan Reynolds, Brent Robinson, Natalie SaďŹ r, Aleda Schoonmaker, Terri C. Smith, Sparrow, Tillie Stern, Cheryl K. Symister-Masterson, Erika Alexia Tsoukanelis

PUBLISHING

9 14 Varieties of Fresh Ravioli & Fresh Pastas. 6 Homemade Pasta Sauces

FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky

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PUBLISHER Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com

9 Large Selection of Fresh Legumes, Semolina Flour, Nuts & Honeys 9 12 Signature Sandwiches made on our real Italian Bread 9 Italian Sodas, Waters, Juices, Nectars, Syrups and Bitters 9 Imported Oils, Vinegars, Musts, Glazes and Truffles 9 Real Espresso and Cappuccino Illy Ground Coffees & Beans 9 Crunchy Semolina Bread, Baguettes and Our Incredible Proscuitto Bread 9 Our Famous Spumoni Ice Cream (Simply Unbelievable) 9 Italian Ices, Gelato, Sorbet, Italian Chocolates & Torrone 9 Italian Novelty Shirts, Hats, Aprons, Bibs, Books and Music

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ADVERTISING SALES Talisa Foulks tfoulks@chronogram.com; (518) 505-2907 France Menk fmenk@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x106 Eva Tenuto etenuto@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x102 Shirley Stone sstone@chronogram.com; (845) 876-2194 ADMINISTRATIVE CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Amara Projansky aprojansky@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x105 BUSINESS MANAGER Ruth Samuels rsamuels@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107 PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Jacky Davis-Soman jdavis@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Mary Maguire, Sabrina Gilmore, Eileen Carpenter OFFICE 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents Š Luminary Publishing 2008

SUBMISSIONS CALENDAR: To submit calendar listings, e-mail: events@chronogram.com Fax: (845) 334-8610. Mail: 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 Deadline: August 15

POETRY Submissions of up to three poems at a time can be sent to poetry@chronogram.com or our street address. See above.

FICTION/NONFICTION: Fiction: Submissions can be sent to ďŹ ction@chronogram.com. NonďŹ ction: Succinct queries about stories of regional interest can be sent to bmahoney@chronogram.com. 12 CHRONOGRAM 8/08


8/08 CHRONOGRAM 13


LETTERS Dis Not the Cat To the Editor: I was insulted by Beth E. Wilson’s unjustified tirade about Catskill’s cats and Hudson’s dogs [“Touch Not the Cat,” 7/08]. Wilson writes that the Columbia County Council on the Arts and the Chamber of Commerce should not sponsor this street art project because it is “enormously popular.” She likens the sculptures as “paint by number,” “dumbed down,” and “fast food” that “surrenders to the lowest common denominator.” She was disgusted by the positive comments the pieces received by people on the street. Wilson writes, “Popularity alone is not a proper gauge for the success or failure of a public art project,” and the “easy popularity that they (the cat sculptures) enjoy is a slap in the face to...more significant artistic projects.” Perhaps Ms. Wilson would whitewash the Sistine Chapel because the frescos are popular with the public. Wilson explains in her critique how she feels about art: “The average citizen will throw his or her hands in the air, shrugging helplessly when confronted with bleeding-edge contemporary art.” She describes a half-mile “path to nowhere” with no payoff at the end as engaging. The Chamber of Commerce and CCCA have the right idea to sponsor a project that is good for tourism. People come to look at free art and while they are there, they visit the town. There is nothing wrong with that. Everyone, except Wilson, is happy with that arrangement. If people hate the art, they won’t come. I made a day trip out of seeing Hudson’s dogs and Catskill’s cats. I had never been to Catskill and it was my sole reason for the trip. I knew what to expect and I wasn’t disappointed. I knew that of the 80 or so sculptures, I would find some to be ugly, some to be whimsical, and some (in spite of Wilson’s disagreement) would be very imaginative. I spent several minutes examining the hundreds of world stamps on The Philatelist, and a number of us were amazed at the amount of time it must have taken to glue thousands of cylindrical glass beads onto Starry Night. With so many animals, there were plenty to like. I not only spent money on a meal but also visited many galleries and shops that were open along Warren and Main Streets. Obviously, art is subjective. Wilson may believe that 30 or 40 heads on a floor qualifies as legitimate art (“Portfolio: Tatana Kellner,” 7/08) and that the street art in Catskill is “impervious to thought.” The cats and dogs aren’t meant to incite deep contemplation and they aren’t meant to change the world. They are just fun. If having a good time disturbs Wilson, she doesn’t have to look at them. I will use Wilson’s last line from her article to comment on her arrogance. “Stop the madness...NOW!” Erin Hart, Schenectady

Deep Summer To the Editor: I hate working Sundays, but today (Sunday, July 6) was made better by the fact I waited until this morning to read the July edition of Chronogram with the Lobster House Restaurant painting on the front cover while waiting for customers to come into Adams Fairacre Farms Poughkeepsie’s garden center. I found a copy lying atop a bag of grass seed just before leaving for home on Saturday. I was going to read it at home Saturday night but decided to wait until Sunday morning. What an excellent piece to convey “deep summer,” as I call this time of year, when it seems all but impossible to reap the harvest of the season’s offerings. I always feel as though I am going to miss something if I don’t hit every event or festival advertised in yours and other publications. I become a victim of the Madison Avenue “gotta be there” effect. Lobster House screams out to me, “Find your own summer!” as the boat driver scours an obviously open and lonely portion of the sea. As a result of finding my own summer, like the lobster boat guy, I and others become part of one another’s own summers in the long run. So even though I hate working Sundays, I do love early summer mornings, especially in summer, and even more so Sunday mornings in summer. Those early morning summer Sunday customers become part of “my summer,” as I am sure I become part of theirs. Thanks for a great magazine! Greg Draiss, Coxsackie

DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS In a profile of Tatana Kellner in our July issue, we erroneously stated that there were only three founders of the Women’s Studio Workshop and left out the fourth, Barbara Leoff Burge. Our apologies for the error.

14 CHRONOGRAM 8/08


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8/08 CHRONOGRAM 15


TRANSART presents

AUGUST 17, 2008 AT

HUDSON VALLEY RESORT & SPA

Fe at u r i n g Marlena Shaw Louis Hayesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cannonball Legacy Band featuring Vincent Herring & Jeremy Pelt

Maurice Brown Effect Larry Harlow and the Latin Legends Orchestra

Tickets $50 in advance - $55 at the door. Rain or Shine. Gates Open at 11am, Music begins at 12 noon Lunch available for purchaseBest Barbecue in the Valley. No coolers! No glass bottles! No alcohol! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tm tank 2 / 1 iss ext For a ...a full thi r a o s rdi of gas f great nar jaz o y z y a d e Mention Chronogram ad $5 off ticket price. . v c i ent mus !

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www.transartinc.org This program was made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency. Additional support provided by Hudson Valley Resort & Spa

16 CHRONOGRAM 8/08


LOCAL LUMINARIES GEORGE AND NANCY DONSKOJ LEADING LIGHTS OF THE COMMUNITY

The recurring joke of the Artists’ Soapbox Derby, held every year on the slope of lower Broadway in the Rondout section of Kingston: “It’s all downhill from here.” Started in 1995, the derby featured eight soapbox racers and attracted 300 people. This year’s kinetic sculpture “race,” the 14th annual organized by founders George and Nancy Donskoj, is expected to attract 7,000 people, and will showcase over 40 entrants in three divisions: adult, youth, and family. The derby is a singular event: part artists’ fantasia, part adolescent mechanics run

wild (all entries are vetted from an engineering perspective), and part family-friendly community spectacle, it knits together the diverse demographic elements of the region for an afternoon of the most moving kind of public art. I spoke to Nancy and George in late July in the upstairs of their gallery, Donskoj & Company, which faces the race’s starting line on lower Broadway. The Artists’ Soapbox Derby will be held on Sunday, August 17, at 1pm. www.artistsoapboxderby.com. —Brian K. Mahoney

NESTOR MADALENGOITIA

GEORGE AND NANCY DONSKOJ AT THE 2007 ARTISTS’ SOAPBOX DERBY

What was the first year like? Nancy: Well, we didn’t know what we were getting into. I remember being very worried that people would go too fast. We had eight entries and about 300 spectators and it went very well. We got a big front-page picture in the Times Herald Record and it looked like a lot of people because they used a big telephoto lens and it went really well, so we said, “Okay, we’ll do it again.” What motivates you to organize the derby after 14 years? Nancy: I think, after every event, you look at the crowd and everyone has a smile on their face. How could you end this? So we do it again, and after every year, and we’ve had such successful derbies where everything ran so smoothly the past couple of years. It just feels like we’re on a roll. It just keeps on going. It’s taken on a life of its own. George: Well, there’s a lot of work to it, but the fun is still there and the kids love it and the people clamor for it, and it’s a really nice family thing. I don’t think there are too many of those. Most of the people in this help you clean up, too. And we’re here for the arts community. And we do it for us; it still represents us and our gallery too.

Where did you come up with the idea for an "artists’ soapbox derby? George: Well we didn’t come up with the idea, “The Little Rascals” came up with the idea. I think every kid in the world who lived near a hill must have done that at some point. It was like sleigh riding on dry pavement, which is pretty much what we did. We got baby-carriage wheels and two-by-fours. It wasn’t formal. And it never left my mind from the time I was a small boy. But we really wanted to be an artists’ soapbox derby because we’re an art gallery and we thought this would be fun. And it’s turned out to be fun! What have been some of your favorite entries over the years? Nancy: A lot of my favorites have been Alan Adin’s. He comes up with the quirkiest ones. He built a giant head of [former Kingston ] mayor T. R. Gallo, and he did one called Hairball, where he gathered hair from his friend who has a hair salon and made a big giant hairball with this little cat behind it. But the one that really took the cake was when he did a full body cast of himself on wheels and rolled himself down the hill, and it looked just like him.

George: One year, Hank Dijk worked with kids from the Children’s Home of Kingston. They built a giant dragon with smoke coming out of its nose. It was quite spectacular. It really was an accomplished piece of work, all different colors, with snot dripping out of its nose and grueling teeth. It took months. All the kids worked on it with a couple of instructors as supervisors, but they made the whole thing. The derby serves as a kind of afternoon-long piece of performance art. George: You can be an artist for a day. You don’t have to be a professional artist. And we’re finding that a lot of kids are building the cars themselves; their parents aren’t helping. They’re doing an amazing thing and they are going to remember this their entire lifetime. Some of them are only 12 years old. So it’s kind of amazing to me that these children are growing up with art in their lives. Because once you get art, you don’t go back. It’s not something you outgrow. They grow up having art. They have a better understanding of what it is to be creative, and people are cheering for them! Little kids are really such hams out there.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM 17


Tibetan Chö Healing A Musical Healing Ceremony

PLEASE JOIN US FOR A RARE DAY WITH TWO TIBETAN BUDDHIST LINEAGE MASTERS

conducted by

Dungse Rigdzin Dorje Rinpoche & the monks and nuns of Zangdokpalri

NEW PALTZ, NY

August 2-3 (Sat&Sun)

OPENING THE DOOR TO WISDOM BUDDHIST WISDOM TEACHINGS & TRANSMISSIONS Saturday, August 30 ~ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Sat: 1-5pm (2 sessions) Sun: 9:30 - 11am & 2-4 pm Living Well Yoga 521 Main St New Paltz , NY 12561 Contacts: 845-255-8212 or contact@thelivingseed.com www.thelivingseed.com “The Healing Cho was one of the best things I’ve ever done for myself.” -Sharon Salzberg ADDITIONAL CONTACTS: Maya: 845 246 3042 mayapvdm@yahoo.com Moke: 212 741 4443 asianarts108@gmail.com

HUDSON, NY

August 23-24 (Sat&Sun) 12 noon - 4:00 pm each day Location: TSL Center (Time Space Limited Center) 434 Columbia St Truck Route 9G Downtown Hudson TSL Contact: 518-822-8448; fyi@timeandspace.org

CHO HEALING COST: $195 tax -deductable donation for this two-day event: 4 healing sessions! There’s no need to pre-register. Plan to arrive 15 minutes early to register. Bring a mat or blanket and pillow, lay down and relax . See full details & other tour venues at:

WWW.TOTALGOODNESS.ORG

18 CHRONOGRAM 8/08

H.E. GYANA VAJRA RINPOCHE Senior Sakya Lineage Holder & Younger Son of His Holiness the Sakya Trizin

LOCATION:

&

DZONGSAR KHYENTSE RINPOCHE

Head of the Renowned Dzongsar Monastery and Dzongsar College; also known as Khyentse Norbu, Filmmaker

Tsechen Kunchab Ling | 12 Edmunds Lane, Walden NY 12586 INFORMATION & REGISTRATION: www.sakyatemple.org EMAIL: tklspecialevent@mac.com

$100 for the day ~ includes catered vegetarian lunch on the Temple grounds


CHRONOGRAM SEEN The events we sponsor, the people who make a difference, the Chronogram community.

Quality Dental Care NEW PALTZ, NY

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In finding a dentist

it’s important to make the best choice. Dr. Schwartz is a knowledgeable, caring, and experienced professional. He LISTENS to your concerns and does a thorough diagnosis of any problems. Then we DISCUSS options and COMMUNICATE with you until you are satisfied with any plan of treatment or maintenance. We are a small office in a small town. But we offer a level of treatment that you would expect in a large city. Dr. Schwartz is a graduate of NYU College of Dentistry. He continues to pursue additional training at dental education centers across the nation in such subjects as periodontics, orthodontics, implantology, and surgery. Dr. Schwartz has been at this location for eleven years. You will see the same dentist every time. You will notice that the dentist spends more time with you and takes more of a personal interest in your care than just about any other health professional you’ve ever met! We provide general dentistry including family care, implants, artistic cosmetic dentistry, surgical and non-surgical periodontics, extractions, root canal, and other services.

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Top to bottom: The Rhodes at Cafe Chronogram at the Kingston Muddy Cup; a sample of Chatham Brewing’s porter; Tommy Keegan of Keegan Ales manning his taps. CHRONOGRAM SPONSORS IN AUGUST: CAFE CHRONOGRAM (8/16) ARTISTS’ SOAPBOX DERBY (8/17) READINGS AT MAPLE GROVE (8/24)

You should consider the Domini Funds’ investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses carefully before investing. Please obtain a copy of the Funds’ current prospectus for more complete information on these and other topics by calling 1-800-530-5321 or online at www.domini.com. Please read it carefully before investing or sending money. DSIL Investment Services LLC, Distributor. 06/08

8/08 CHRONOGRAM 19


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20 CHRONOGRAM 8/08


Esteemed Reader Come you lost Atoms to your Centre draw, And be the Eternal Mirror that you saw: Rays that have wanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d into Darkness wide Return and back into your Sun subside â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The Conference of Birds, Attar Esteemed Reader of Our Magazine: The gaggle of three and four-year-old children with their parents dispersed from the fire circle and picked their way over rocks and logs into the woods. Our nature teacher had suggested we find a â&#x20AC;&#x153;sit-spotâ&#x20AC;? where we would go and be aware. The sense-task of the day was to use our â&#x20AC;&#x153;deer earsâ&#x20AC;? and listen to the sounds of the world. But first was to find our spot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Here it is,â&#x20AC;? Asher said, without hesitation. I followed him to a small group of stones under a couple of maple trees. I was reminded of the scene in The Teachings of Don Juan in which aspiring shaman Carlos is told to find his beneficial spot on a porch (there is also the added pressure of a destructive spot that could be lethal if inhabited). Carlos searches all night trying to â&#x20AC;&#x153;seeâ&#x20AC;? the spot. But Asher had no doubt. This was his spot. We sat down, and put our hands behind our ears, which amplified the sounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What do you hear?â&#x20AC;? I asked after a while. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hear my knowledge, Dad.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;What does it sound like?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It sounds like wind and trees. And birdsâ&#x20AC;ŚI have a lot of knowledge, Dad.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Really?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes. Thirteen gallons.â&#x20AC;? Returning to the circle, there was an atmosphere of stillness in the group of adults and kids. I, for one, was seeing with fresh eyes. Trees, earth, faces, looked clean. In the newfound silence, alas, an association, with William Blake: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the doors of perception were cleansed, every thing would appear to man as it is, infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thruâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; narrow chinks of his cavern.â&#x20AC;? After Wild Earth camp ended (www.redfoxfriends.com), Asher chose a sitspot in our yard. Some days we sit together, connecting in succession to our sensesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;deer-ears, owl-eyes, raccoon-fingers (touch), dog-nose, and snake-tongue. And sometimes, when he is feeling overwrought, he departs from the family vortex and goes to his sit-spot, returning after some minutes, refreshed. What is the gunk that muddies perception? As I walked through the woods by myself yesterday, I asked this question. As is often the case with such inquiries, the answer was immediately available. I noticed my mind moving from one worrisome and unnecessary occupation to the next: rehashing things I had said or done, or things others had said or done to me; worries about my and my familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fortunes; plans for the future, but small ones; and benign associations that are like the mind idling, burning fuel to no purpose. These all showed up against the backdrop of trying to hear the sound of my shoes on the path. After a few moments of really hearing that sound, and sensing my feet inside the shoes, I noticed my body start to relax, and my back straighten. I noticed my gaze lift from the path a few feet in front of me, to the horizon. Suddenly I could see where I was going! What I learned at parent-tot summer camp has spilled over. I have taken to finding a sit-spot on the fly, when I notice that my mind is racing, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m seeing the world through â&#x20AC;&#x153;narrow chinks.â&#x20AC;? But inevitably, spending a few breaths on each sense returns a connection to myself that, in distraction, I forgot was possible. It is like taking a sip of a cool, refreshing drink. In The Conference of the Birds, a 12th-century Sufi epic poem, a group of hundreds of birds set out on a journey to find their true kingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the simorgh. After many difficulties and travails, crossing a desert and seven mountains, only 30 birds remain. Most have given up or died on the journey. When they reach the ramparts of the bird-kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s castle, and the gates open, they findâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;themselves. Indeed, simorgh literally means â&#x20AC;&#x153;30 birds.â&#x20AC;?What they had been looking for, they already were. But they needed to suffer and strive to realize this was always already the case. As Asher understood, the knowledge that comes from seeing-hearing-touching-tasting-smelling is not informational. It sparkles with energy (reallyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;light, sound, chemicals, and friction are all forms of energy); energy that we can ingest through our senses. It wakes us up and arouses the appetite for more wakefulness. The hardest thing is to bear to be awake. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jason Stern

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intruder (paris) by ralph stout

kathy burge

ralph stout

margaret crenson

lependorf + shire

margaret saliske

August 7 - September 7

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY 6 2 2 wa r r e n s t r e e t h u d s on n y 5 1 8 8 2 8 1 9 1 5

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June was the deadliest month for US troops in Afghanistan since the war began in late 2001. Twenty-eight US troops died due to roadside bombs, small arms fire, and rocket attacks. As of July 10. a total of 533 US combat deaths have occurred to date in Operation Enduring Freedom. Though summer traditionally brings increased fighting in Afghanistan as the mountainous terrain becomes more passable, experts on the war have noted that the level of violence has been incrementally increasing since 2002. Additionally, a shortage of ground troops in Afghanistan has led the Pentagon to significantly intensify its air campaign in the first half of the year to the highest levels since 2003 to fight the resurgence of the Taliban. Source: Washington Post and USA Today The European Union reached an agreement at the end of June to cap emissions from aircraft in an effort to regulate global greenhouse gasses. All airlines arriving or leaving airports in the EU would be required to buy pollution credits beginning in 2012, joining other industrial polluters that trade in the European emissions market. This could mean further fare increases for passengers. American officials warned that the requirements would be illegal under the convention governing international civil aviation, but the proposal still needs the approval of the European Parliament and individual countries before it is made official. Source: New York Times

The number of refugees crossing borders to escape conflict and persecution increased to 11.4 million people in 2007, an increase of 1.5 million since 2006, according to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. The conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan accounted for more than half of the world’s refugees in 2007. The United Nations said in June that this number could grow due to factors such as climate change and scarce resources. Eighty percent of the refugees remain in developing countries in the immediate vicinity of their own countries. Source: New York Times Noise pollution has been proven to be more than a just annoyance; recent studies conducted by the World Health Organization revealed that noise pollution can be detrimental to one’s physical health. Individuals who are subject to daily noise pollution are likely to have higher blood pressure, which puts them at an increased risk of developing heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and dementia. Even those who seem unaffected by the noise and remain asleep when a plane flies overhead experience increased blood pressure, as revealed in a sleep study conducted by Imperial College London. Source: Salon.com Seventy percent of Americans affiliated with a religion or denomination believe that other faiths beside their own can lead to salvation, according to a survey conducted in 2007 by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. The telephone survey of more than 35,000 adults also revealed that more than a quarter of adult Americans have left the faith of their childhood to join another religion or no religion, and 70 percent of the unaffiliated believe in God. The survey also confirmed findings from previous studies that most religiously and politically conservative Americans are those who attend worship services most frequently and that for them, the battles against abortion and gay rights remain the key issues in regard to an individual’s salvation. Source: New York Times New York City plans to convert 6.9 miles of Manhattan into a car-free park for three Saturdays this month—the least congested of the year in the borough—in the recreational experiment Summer Streets. The idea originated 32 years ago in Bogota, Columbia, in an effort to reduce car exhaust. Business owners have expressed concern that the experiment, which will take place from 7am to 1pm on August 9, 16, and 23, will reduce the flow of customers and hurt sales, and taxi drivers are worried about the inconvenience and reduced number of rides that may result from sealing off major traffic routes from the Brooklyn Bridge to East 72nd Street. Source: New York Times

Endangered species may be becoming extinct 100 times faster than previously thought. Leading ecologists claim that the methods used to predict when species will die out dramatically underestimate the speed at which some plants and animals will become extinct, as the models fail to include the proportion of males to females in a population, or the success rate of reproduction. If correct, some of the 16,000 endangered species worldwide threatened with extinction could have months instead of years left. An updated list of endangered species is due out from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature in October in October. Source: The Guardian/ UK Wal-Mart is sourcing more produce sold in its supercenters from local farmers in an effort to offset soaring transportation costs which are increasing food prices. In the past two years, Wal-Mart has increased the number of local US farmers it works with by 50 percent. Fruits and vegetables bought locally—grown and sold in the same state—now account for a fifth of the produce available in Wal-Mart stores. Source: NewsDaily.com Hospitals will be required to have codes of conduct and processes for dealing with inappropriate staff by next year, as mandated by Joint Commission, an independent organization that accredits most of the nation’s hospitals. Outbursts and condescending language from doctors toward nurses threaten patient safety and increase the cost of health care, as a nurse is less likely to correct or question a doctor’s actions and diagnoses if he/she is fearful of their superior, according to the safety alert issued by Joint Commission on July 9. Hospitals that fail to create behavioral codes of conduct will risk losing their accreditations. Source: Los Angeles Times The US ranks first in the world in consumption of marijuana, cocaine, and tobacco, according to a new study released in June by the World Health Organization. For this first cross-national drug-use study, more than 54,000 people in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and Oceania were surveyed using a standardized methodology. In the US, 73.6 percent of those surveyed admitted to having used tobacco, 42.4 percent admitted to having used marijuana, and 16.2 percent admitted to having used cocaine, far outranking New Zealand, the second highest-ranking country for cocaine with 4.3 percent having admitted to using the drug. Only in alcohol use was the US denied the top spot, taking sixth place. (Ukraine, where 97 percent of those surveyed have admitted to drinking alcohol, was tops.) WHO determined that drug use is more prevalent in wealthier countries and that a country’s drug policies have little impact on use. Source: Austin Chronicle Compiled by Amy Lubinski

8/08 CHRONOGRAM 23


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24 CHRONOGRAM 8/08


MARK JOSEPH KELLY

Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note The Marrying Kind

L

ee Anne and I had been dating for almost a decade, and living together for five of those years, when we decided to declare our intention to bond for life in a public ritual. On Memorial Day weekend in 2003, we exchanged vows in a Quaker ceremony on a small island off the coast of Puerto Rico in front of our family and friends. Everyone was barefoot. The sun set in the Carribean Sea behind us. After the exchange of rings and vows, our friend Joe Brill shouted a solemn “Shazam!” and that was it. Lee Anne and I were committed. We repaired to the hotel for Coronas and shark nuggets. But we were (and are) not legally married. Ours was (and is!) a spiritual marriage. Lee Anne has a perfectly functioning surname that she has kept. She is not my wife and I am not her husband. Lee Anne and I refer to each other as “partner.” (When I feel especially cheeky, I crib Spalding Gray’s line and call Lee Anne “my ex-girlfriend”—how Gray referred to his label-averse first wife.) The only time I refer to Lee Anne as my wife is in the presence of officialdom, where our alternative status might be a complicating factor. For instance, when we went to the emergency room last summer so I could get stitches in my elbow after crashing my bicycle, I introduced Lee Anne to the doctors and nurses as my wife. In the unlikely event that I was to go into a coma while getting sewn up, I wanted there to be no question as to who should call the shots regarding my health care. As Lee Anne and I are a “conventional” couple—a man and a woman—no one was likely question the validity of Lee Anne’s claim as my advocate or ask to see our marriage license. This was not the case for my colleague Jay Blotcher. (Jay’s preview of the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival’s performance of the Bard-based farce “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” is on page 121.) When Jay’s partner Brook was diagnosed with Lyme disease in early July and had to admitted to the hospital, Jay made sure to bring their health care proxy in case anyone questioned him. No one did, but it explained Jay’s response to my question about their recent marriage in California, “Why get married?” “It’s not about the toaster,” Jay said, “it’s about the health care.” Among other things, as Jay informed me. Like the 1,300 rights immediately conferred upon a couple when they are married—chief among them healthcare benefits, health proxy, inheritance, child custody, and immunity against testifying against your partner—that are not covered by domestic partnerships or civil unions. For Jay and Brook have jumped through those hoops already: In April 2000, they were declared domestic partners by New York City. In October 2000, they celebrated a civil union in Vermont. In February 2004, they were the fourth same-sex couple to be married by New Paltz mayor Jason West. (All the same-sex marriages West solemnized were later annulled.) That’s why Jay

and Brook flew to California to get married just days after Brook was released from the hospital. “Everyone should have the chance to get married, screw up, and get divorced,” Jay said. For those unaware of the legal issues involved: On May 15, the Supreme Court of California declared the state’s ban on same-sex marriages unconstitutional. Same-sex marriages were solemnized beginning on June 16. On May 29, Governor David Patterson issued an executive order directing all state agencies in NewYork to recognize same-sex marriages performed in other jurisdictions, offering de facto legal reciprocity in New York for same-sex couples married in California, Massachusetts, and Canada. As is to be expected, conservative legislators have filed a lawsuit against the governor. The question of marriage equality is far from resolved in New York, to say nothing of the larger question of the nonexistent rights for same-sex couples on the federal level. It’s a sad irony that Lee Anne and I, who do not wish to be legally married, enjoy almost all the rights accorded to married couples, while Jay and Brook, who’ve celebrated their union more times than Kid Rock and Pamela Anderson, still do not. Congratulations Jay and Brook. Your new toaster is on its way. I hope it’s your last, but I’ll gladly send another if you need to tie the knot again.You must really like toast. —Brian K. Mahoney

BROOK GARRETT (HOLDING LICENSE) AND JAY BLOTCHER WERE MARRIED BY SHARESE BYDON, DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY, ON JULY 11, IN THE WEDDING CHAPEL OF THE COUNTY REGISTAR’S OFFICE. PHOTO BY HANK DONAT.

Get your weekly dose of Chronogram on Monday mornings at 8:15 with Brian and Greg Gattine on “The Morning Show with Gattine and Franz.” WDST 100.1FM. 8/08 CHRONOGRAM 25


NEWS & POLITICS World, Nation, & Region

treating the tortured

Caring for Iraqi Victims of Human Rights Abuses Text and photos by Lorna Tychostup

T

here is a 55-year-old woman who has lived in northern Iraq for most of her life. In 1974, she married a farmer and by 1988 had six children with him—four girls and two boys. She lived in close proximity to her family—three sisters and two brothers who, together with their husbands and wives, had more than 50 children among them. It was also in 1988 that Saddam Hussein sent soldiers to her village, separated the men from the women and children—including 68 members of her family—and transported them to a place called Noogra Salman in central Iraq. In less than one year’s time—exactly 236 days—she watched 20 members of her family die slow deaths due to malnutrition, mistreatment, lack of sanitary living conditions, and other abuses. Today, this woman, one of her daughters, and two of her nieces are the only family members of the original 68 known to have survived. Her life forever marred through her suffering from the long-term effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PSTD) and depression, she recently made her way to the trauma recovery and training center in Sulaimania, where she is now receiving treatment. It’s a miracle of sorts in a country where mental illness is looked down upon and mental health workers are shunned in the Middle East. In Iraq, even those who are trained to give treatment to those suffering from mental illness carry this stigma. (For reasons of security, I cannot share with you her name or other identifying details—or that of any other “survivors” mentioned in this article. Out of respect, I have chosen not to give these survivors pseudonyms—I leave it up to you to provide them with names.) Located on a corner property facing a small but heavily transited road, the brand new facility—a previously unused building provided by the Kurdistan Ministry of Health and rehabilitated with $30,000 from the USAID Provincial Reconstruction Team and run under the auspices of the international arm of Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights, a non governmental organization, or NGO, based in Chicago—had its formal opening on July 8. 26 NEWS & POLITICS CHRONOGRAM 8/08

The center has been in operation since early January, with staff working out of a much smaller building. After three years, the building will revert back to the Ministry of Health, which according to its medical director, Dr. Ahmed Amin, is a good thing. “Government involvement adds to our potential sustainability,” he says. “Once the NGOs cut their funding, more than likely, the government will continue to fund the center.” Since its opening, the center has seen approximately 60 clients. Dr. Amin explains that the site is a training facility as well as a treatment center providing three kinds of service: “medical, psychiatric, and psychosocial. Basically, we do training and treatment. We treat individuals and groups such as families. And we also have a training component where we have conducted trainings for social researchers, psychologists, medical staff.” DESIGN, MONITOR, AND EVALUATE The center is a work in progress, with training procedures and treatment techniques under strict evaluation and review under the guidance of Heartland Alliance, experts from their Marjorie Kovler Center for the Treatment of Survivors of Torture and from Johns Hopkins University. “Our role is to assist NGOs in designing, monitoring, and evaluating mental health programs around the world,” says Paul Bolton, an associate scientist at the Center for Refugee and Disaster Response of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Bolton has been working since 1988 both with victims directly and as a technical consultant with NGOs in war, disaster, and development settings, including Rwanda, Cambodia, Angola, Mexico, and Kazakhstan. The Victims of Torture Fund at USAID partially funds Bolton’s work and it was USAID that asked him to work with Heartland Alliance and its trauma recovery and training center in Sulaimania. “You can’t have any design without data, so we do a process of needs assessment, says Bolton. “So, for example, for torture survivors here in Sulaimania we


REUTERS/SHANNON STAPLETON

THE NOTORIOUS AMNA SOURAKA PRISON IN SULAIMANIA, WHERE THOUSANDS OF KURDS WERE IMPRISONED AND TORTURED, IS IN THE PROCESS OF BEING TURNED INTO A WAR CRIMES MUSEUM, COMPLETE WITH PRESERVED PRISON CELLS, TORTURE ROOMS, AND EXHIBITION SPACES.

assist in designing programs by first assisting in collecting data.” Bolton began collecting data last April interviewing 70 torture survivors around Sulaimania using ethnographic interviewing methods. The questioning was open-ended. Yes/no, multiple choice, and leading questions were avoided. Trained interviewers spoke with the torture survivors on two separate occasions, probing them to give as many answers as possible to specific questions. Interviewers were also trained to set up a rapport with those they were interviewing. “If you show interest, and you’re not judgmental, you find that people just start to open up,” explains Bolton. “And then if you go back a second time and interview them again, you find that the second interview is usually much better than the first. We find in limited interviewing that if you ask a person, ‘What are your problems?’ they’ll just rattle off five or six to the last person who asked them or repeat what everyone else is saying. But if you ask somebody an open-ended question you’ll find that after the first five or six answers ,they actually start to think. And it’s the ones you get after the first five or six that are valuable.” Ethnographic studies are usually very small but produce in-depth responses that allow researchers to better gauge what the salient issues are. Since most NGOs like Heartland Alliance have limited capacity and are unable to deal with all the issues, Bolton’s process has helped them to formulate which issues are not only most important, but most addressable. “We always get more problems than we can address, so Heartland Alliance has to choose. In this case, it’s a mental health program, so which mental health problems you can actually deal with is determined by this process.” For the most part, Bolton’s research revealed the usual mental health problems of depression and anxiety normally associated with traumatic experiences. But there were some surprises. “In other countries, when you have people who have been tortured for something like a cause—like people who were tortured by Saddam, people who went through the Anfal from Saddam, or

people who fought for the Kurdish forces—what we usually find is that those people would be respectable after the event,” he says. “What has happened here in Kurdistan is the opposite. People have said to us, ‘You know, we are the bottom of society.The people who did not fight, who did not suffer do not respect us. In fact, they look down on us as fools saying why did you suffer? You are a fool.’ Even our families say this.” According to Bolton, the particular feeling of inferiority felt by survivors adds to their mental health problems. In all his years of research and work in this area, he has never come across this scenario. “[With] people who have suffered for some kind of cause,” he explains, “at the very least the people around them say this was a good thing and they feel some respect even if they don’t feel mentally well.” The other issue Bolton’s research revealed was a sense of betrayal at the hands of the Kurdish government. “This was amazing,” he recalls. “Almost to a man and a woman, the interviewees said, ‘This Kurdish government has betrayed us. We feel betrayed. We, too, feel that we were foolish to fight for this government.’” An example of how some feel betrayed was vividly expressed in March 2006 in what Iraqi journalist Mariwan Hama-Saeed, a resident of Halabja, reportedly called a “spontaneous act of rage” that saw thousands riot and torch the controversial Monument of Halabja Martyr, burning it to the ground on the annual day of commemoration organized by Kurdish political leaders. The modern, 100-foot-tall memorial was supposedly built to honor the reported 5,000 killed and 10,000 injured as a result of poisonous gasses dropped by Iraqi planes in what is considered the largest-scale chemical weapons attack directed against a civilian-populated area in history. However, located on the outskirts of Halabja, far from the rubble of the true site of the attack, townsfolk claim the memorial was simply built for use as a staging ground for corrupt politicians to capitalize on the attention, international visitors. “Every year, officials come and they promise 8/08 CHRONOGRAM NEWS & POLITICS 27


to rebuild the town and to take care of the sick people,” Hama-Saeed reportedly said, “but they never keep their promises.” As reported by Slate in June of 2007, “The village has been particularly hard-hit by government corruption and is in desperate need of this money. The town’s residents—most of whom must pursue costly treatments to deal with the residual affects of the attack—navigate unpaved roads strewn with trash, have spotty access to water and electricity, and live in ramshackle hovels made of concrete and scrap metal.”

WHO GETS TREATED The people being treated at the center can be divided into three groups, explains Dr. Afram Hassan, an Iraqi psychiatrist—he is one of three in all of the governorate of Sulaimania with its population of 1.7 million people. “First, there are the people who have been tortured by any source, either by an authority or some other group, for example, at the hands of a political group,” he says. “This group also includes those who are suffering from depression due to the witnessing of trauma, such as bombing and other events of war.The second group contains cases related to the Anfal genocide. We have many people, who in 1988 by way of a special project of the previous government of Iraq—the Baath regime—destroyed approximately 5,000 villages and removed 182,000 people and forced them to relocate to the mid and south of Iraq. Some of these people escaped later on and returned back to Kurdistan. But most died in the places where they were relocated.” The third group of people that visits the center seeking help are victims of gender-based violence (GBV), a widespread problem in the region. Since the trauma center has been open, Dr. Hassan has only seen 10 cases related to GBV. Although it is a small figure, Dr. Hassan cautions that one should not be mislead. “If you take into regard what we see in Sulaymania’s mental health center and hospital, and what we see our clinic here, everyday we are faced with this problem,” he says. “Despite all the attention given to it by the media and major organizations, cases of GBV remains a growing problem in the region with most occurrences happening in the villages rather than the city.” The number of victims of GBV is actually so large that Dr. Hassan says, “If we opened our center directly to deal with this problem we would need a larger staff. Even if we multiplied our staff by 10, we could not deal with this problem. So we just deal with a limited number cases.” With several centers in Sulaimania and one in Irbil dealing specifically with issues of GBV, the center usually recommends them to GVB victims as the more appropriate place to go for treatment. However, some refuse to go to these other centers that specialize in GBV, “and so we deal with them,” says Dr. Hassan. “But we try to concentrate on Anfal and torture victims.” THE “PATIENT” GROUP There is a 44-year-old man who has lived most of his life in northern Kurdistan. Imprisoned from 1982 to 1986, he received different types of torture both physically and psychologically. Information on where or by whom he was imprisoned is not available, but a record of his experiences is. Prevented from eating or drinking for more than one week, he would only be allowed to take a small bit of food each day, but never any fruit or vegetables. He was never allowed any form of communication such as visits or letters from family or friends and he received electrical shocks to his tongue, head, and testicles on a frequent basis. Deprived of sleep for periods of six days, on some occasions he was suspended by his feet with his hands tied behind his back for periods of eight hours, and on others prevented from going to the bathroom for four-day periods due to the placement of a “tight thing” in his rectal canal. The Trauma Recovery and Training Center is unique in that it in one of a small number that treat an ever-expanding number of torture victims and survivors. Although torture has been getting an ever-increasing amount of attention due to the work of international organizations such as the Red Cross, Human Rights Watch, and Amnesty International; media coverage of abuses at places like Abu Graib and Guantánamo Bay; and the actions of a Bush administration that appears to be bent on legalizing torture under its War on Terror doctrine, efforts to treat victims of torture are minimal. According to Sune Segal, spokesperson for the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT), there are only 200 to 300 such centers worldwide. “I cannot give you an exact figure of specialized centers and programs for torture 28 NEWS & POLITICS CHRONOGRAM 8/08

victims worldwide,” says Segal. “What I can tell you is that the IRCT comprises a membership of some 140 such centers and programs in 70 countries. It is a question of definition; there are numerous clinics and programs that treat torture victims without this patient group being their primary target.” While there is no good epidemiological information on the exact numbers of victims of torture or its survivors in Kurdistan, according to Heartland Alliance’s Scott Portman, “The number is in the hundreds of thousands, both before and subsequent to the fall of the regime.”The center has eight staff people, seven of them in clinical roles: one psychiatrist, one physician, and one psychologist, two senior mental health workers and two case managers. Victims of torture who have been seen by center staff date their experiences relating to periods of incarceration as far back as 1980. “We don’t pay attention to the time the person was put in prison or what specific kind of torture they have experienced,” says Dr. Hassan, who also sees clients at other mental health facilities in Iraq. “But we deal with the recent situation of this person:What are his mental or physical problems?” He explains that the details of where the person was tortured, how, and by whom are not ignored, but recorded, stored in the client’s file and added to the center’s database. But it is their treatment and care that are the focus. When asked if he has treated any people who had been at Abu Graib, he says, “Yes. From Abu Graib, from Baghdad, from Kirkuk and from many areas. However, most of the cases [stem from] Anfal.” But there are also more recent cases. “For example, I have a case of a person who was kidnapped in Baghdad for about 10 or 20 days and released after a payment was made of $100,000. This person received a large amount of torture,” he recalls. “As you know, $100,000 is not an easy amount to come up with.” Dr. Afram said the man claims he was taken by the US military while he was at work, at some point later on was handed over to an Iraqi group in a different area not in control of the US military, and was finally released after the payment was made. “The US military released him?” I ask. “No, not exactly released,” says Dr. Hassan.The man claimed he was handed over to the second group, who phoned his wife and told her she should pay $100,000 in exchange for her husband. “This is a very tragic event. Until now, this person continually mentions and has flashbacks of what happened. He still asks, ‘I cannot understand why the US Army [took] me and then later on gave me to this group [who demanded the money].’ Until now, he says, ‘I am sure the US Army soldiers take some of the amount of this money from this group. For this reason they give me to this group.’” Working in Baghdad since 2003, Dr. Hassan says that five or six of his clients have claimed that the US army is engaged in this kidnapping activity in the middle of Iraq. (Due to client-patient confidentiality strictures, the stories of Dr. Hassan’s patients being abducted by groups in collusion with members of the US Army could not be verified.) “But also, as you know, these groups in the middle and south of Iraq are very active,” he adds. “All say they are from a Sunni or Shiite group, and take a person from this group and later on replace it to the other.” Convinced it is done purely for business purposes, he explains, “For example, a Sunni group will take 30 to 40 persons of a Shiite group. And later on, this Shiite group will take some amount of the Sunni group. Later on, either they release them in an exchange with each other, or they take money from each other.” ANFAL One Barzani woman described the roundup of the menfolk: “Before dawn, as people were getting dressed and ready to go to work, all the soldiers charged through the camp [Qushtapa].They captured the men walking on the street and even took an old man who was mentally deranged and was usually left tied up.They took the preacher who went to the mosque to call for prayers. They were breaking down doors and entering the houses searching for our men. They looked inside the chicken coops, water tanks, refrigerators, everywhere, and took all the men over the age of 13. —Human Rights Watch, Iraq’s Crime of Genocide In his PBS “Frontline” report The Crimes of Saddam Hussein: 1988,The Anfal Campaign, Dave Johns says, “Al–Anfal, which is Arabic for ‘the spoils of war,’ is the name of the eighth sura, or chapter, of the Koran. It tells a tale in which followers of Mohammed pillage the lands of nonbelievers. Some say the government chose the term for its campaign against the Kurds of northern Iraq because it suggested a religious justification for its actions. Saddam’s Anfal was a mammoth campaign of civic annihilation, displacement, and mass killing.”


2nd Annual COTA - Celebration of the Arts Where Creativity Builds Community

Saturday, September 27, 2008 10 am - 5 pm Rain date: Sunday, September 28, 2008 Hasbrouck Park, New Paltz, NY Produced by The Arts Community

Application Deadline: August 27

Call to Fine Artists of All Disciplines

Pre-COTA Artist Mixer

Working and aspiring Hudson Valley artists are invited to showcase and sell their work at the 2nd Annual COTA. For info and applications visit CelebrationOfTheArts.net.

Water Street Market is hosting a COTA Artists' Mixer on August 4, 2008 at 6:00 p.m. Come and discover how COTA is working to promote our artists.

100+ Fine Artists – Showcasing and Selling Their Work Performances All Day - Music, Dance, Theater Local Writers’ Book Sales and Signings Arts Networking Tent COTA Corridors & Storefront Installations in Downtown New Paltz (between COTA and Historic Huguenot Street‘s Belgian Festival)

Water Street Market Galleries Open to the Public Guest appearance by Artist and Public Performer, Carl Welden Music New Artists Welcome Applications Available Water Street Market's Monday Night Outdoor Movie Following Mixer Water Street Market: 10 Main St. New Paltz. Free Event

PODS Art Installations (portable storage containers) Multi-Media Installation Habitats for Artists Installations curated by Simon Draper Free Professional Development Seminars for Artists Children’s Activities Food Vendors Free Event Habitats sponsored by ecoartspace

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8/08 CHRONOGRAM NEWS & POLITICS 29


For over two years, from March 29, 1987, to April 23, 1989, a genocide and gendercide campaign was orchestrated by Ali Hassan al-Majid, better known as “Chemical Ali,” under the special powers granted him by his cousin, Saddam Hussein. Although reported numbers differ, it is widely believed that up to 180,000 Kurdish men, women, and children were exterminated and 5,000 of their villages were destroyed. According to an extensive report written by Human Rights Watch, tactics of the miniature holocaust that consisted of eight separate attacks included the widespread use of chemical weapons in addition to “mass summary executions and mass disappearance of many tens of thousands of non combatants, including large numbers of women and children, and sometimes the entire population of villages” and their infrastructure “including all schools, mosques, wells, and other non residential structures in the targeted villages, and a number of electricity substations.” Hundreds of thousands that were not disappeared underwent forced displacement— “trucked into areas of Kurdistan far from their homes and dumped there by the army with only minimal governmental compensation or none at all for their destroyed property, or any provision for relief, housing, clothing, or food, and forbidden to return to their villages of origin on pain of death.” During this campaign, as decreed by al-Majid, all males found in the “prohibited areas” (despite the fact that these were their own homes and lands) were to be “detained and interrogated by the security services and those between the ages of 15 and 70 shall be executed after any useful information has been obtained from them.” As captured Kurdish populations arrived at detention centers, in Nazi-like fashion men were separated from women and small children, registered, warehoused under conditions of horrible overcrowding and deprivation, beaten, and after a few days taken out and trucked to sites where they were executed. In many cases women, children, and the elderly were also executed.”Those not exterminated were shipped to overstuffed relocation camps, where they were allowed to die of extreme malnutrition and disease. Some groups of prisoners were lined up, shot from the front, and dragged into pre-dug mass graves; others were made to lie down in pairs, sardine-style, next to mounds of fresh corpses, before being killed; still others were tied together, made to stand on the lip of the pit, and shot in the back so that they would fall forward into it—a method that was presumably more efficient from the point of view of the killers. Bulldozers then pushed earth or sand loosely over the heaps of corpses. Some of the gravesites contained dozens of separate pits and obviously contained the bodies of thousands of victims. —Human Rights Watch, Iraq’s Crime of Genocide A handful of the survivors, mostly women, have made their way to Sulamania’s Trauma Recovery and Training Center. “For most of these women, the man will not return back because he has been killed by the previous regime,” says Dr. Hassan. “Today, we have many widows, maybe 15,000 women, who, ’til now, don’t know where their husband is. Just the females returned back. Most of these women are not present in Sulaimania, but are present in areas south of Kurdistan—Kalar, Kifree, Khanaqan in the Diyala province, and Kirkuk.” One patient, a 40-year-old woman, along with her five children, was purposely separated from her husband and forced to relocate as part of the Anfal campaign. Due to lack of food, lack of proper hygienic facilities—“lack of everything,” Dr. Hassan says—“two of her children died before her very eyes.” In this woman’s case, there was no place to bury her dead children.With nowhere to go, she was forced to watch as animals devoured their bodies. According to Dr. Hassan, this story is not unique. “We have many many tragic stories just like this here in Sulaimania. I’ve had between 10 and 20 cases that mention this sort of tragedy.” WHAT WOULD FREUD SAY? “I am always very surprised by the need for clear signs to realize that the person is dead. Freud talks of the test of reality.When someone dies, the first reaction is denial, then the external signs arrive from the outside confirming that this is what happened.That’s strongly reinforced in cases where people were not able to see. They heard the screams. It’s so desperate. The image of being on the other side of the hill. hearing the screams and the machine guns.You get stuck on that image and can’t go beyond it.You need to see the body.” —Interview with Argentine anthropologist Mimi Dorett, from Kurdistan: In the Shadow of History Once the problems illuminated by Paul Bolton’s ethnographic research 30 NEWS & POLITICS CHRONOGRAM 8/08

study are identified and decisions are made by Heartland Alliance as to which they are capable of addressing, the work of discerning treatment begins. Who gets what treatment? On the road to answering this question, Bolton has created a long questionnaire of approximately 100 questions. With the help of some of the approximately 240 medical staff members that Heartland Alliance has trained as community mental health workers that currently operate in 15 out of Iraq’s 18 governorates, Bolton plans to use the questionnaire to interview another similar but different set of torture survivors to get feedback on the questionnaire itself. A revamping of the questionnaire will then take place and the final product will be used to screen torture survivors. “We’ll screen people for the problems, give them the intervention, and then after the intervention we’ll re-interview them and see if they got better,” he says. “Do some types of people get better and other types of people not get better? Do they get better in some ways and not in other ways? Is it a good intervention? Yes, let’s expand it. Is it a bad intervention that did nothing? Let’s get rid of it. This is actually rarely rarely done, particularly in international settings.You’ll find huge libraries full of books talking about all the interventions you can do with people, but if you went to the literature you’d find there is no evidence that they work.” Given that Bolton’s research has revealed this never-before-seen lack of respect given torture victims, which in turn spawns tremendous feelings of inferiority and only adds to the patient’s mental illness, will some innovative intervention need to be created? “Well, it’s going to require at least an adaptation from what we normally do,” he maintains. “We are going to have to think this through. Also, my recommendation to Heartland Alliance is, they will need to do more than just a mental health intervention. They need to talk to the government about how they treat these people.” High hopes indeed in a country that regards mental health work as abnormal. “Here in Sulai, we only have three psychiatrists,” say Dr. Hassan, who received his PhD from Baghdad University. “In another few months another two doctors will graduate and come here and we will become five psychiatrists, if these two students graduate. The population of Sulaimania is about 1.7 million.” Not only is there a dearth of psychiatrists in Iraq—there are about 50 in the country, with less than 15 of them in Kurdistan—but for those brave enough to choose the profession, life is difficult. According to Dr. Hassan, a family practitioner or a dermatologist can see between 70 and 100 patients per day, psychiatrists can only see eight to 10 “because each one needs about 20 to 30 minutes. The dermatologist fee is the same as mine—10 dinars, or $8 per patient.”Thus, psychiatry is regarded as the poor branch of medicine. “It is difficult for you to build a house or buy a car, even difficult for you to marry,” he says. Marry? “Yes, because not every person will accept you as a man. Most people, especially prospective brides, regard you as abnormal,” he explains. “A psychiatrist is regarded as a stigma. Not just the disease, but any person working in this field of mental illness, which is regarded as a stigma, is also regarded as a stigma. So not every woman will accept marriage to a psychiatrist.” Not daunted by such realities, Dr. Ahmed Amin, the center’s medical director, has high hopes of his own. “Our goal is to be included in the curriculum of the University of Sulaimania,” he says. “That the university will send their students to the hospital and this clinic to get special trainings and participate in internships.We’ve [discussed] this with the vice-president of the University of Sulaimania and he was pleased with the idea. And also, hopefully, this year we will approach their college of medicine and college of sociology.” When I ask how many victims of torture are in Iraq, Dr. Amin chuckles nervously. “How many victims of torture are there? So many, so many.” “Millions? Thousands? Hundreds of thousands?” I ask. “Maybe. Or millions.” “So it’s an impossible job,” I say. “Difficult but not impossible. We have started this center. It is in a small building, as you can see. We have a small number of staff. In all the world there are 200 programs and centers for torture survivors. I know 145 ratified the anti-torture convention, but so many countries participate in torture. So if you compare this center to all the need of Iraq…” It is a finger in the dike. “Exactly. But still, there should be a point where we should begin.”


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Omi International Arts Center Music Omi Concert August 9, 2008, 5 pm at Omi

Dance Omi Open Day Showings August 16th, 5-6:30 pm New informal salon in the barns at Omi International

August 31st, 3-5 pm Site specific collaboration of dance

The Fields Sculpture Park Charles B. Benenson Visitors Center and Gallery Summer Exhibitions 2008 Into The Trees

Curated by Lilly Wei & Amy Lipton

Polly Apfelbaum, Sanford Biggers, caraballo - farman, Stephen Dean, Elizabeth Demaray, Katie Holten, Jason Middlebrook, Alan Michelson, Cordy Ryman, Shinique Smith, Chrysanne Stathacos, and Saya Woolfak

Nina Katchadourain Twitchers and Cheaters

Curated by Kathleen Triem & Peter Frank

New Sculpture Williard Boepple, Tarik Currimbhoy, Lauren Ewing, Steven Rolf Kroeger, Oliver Kruse, Ken Landauer, Forrest Myers, Michael Rees, Mia Westerlund Roosen, Michael Somoroff, and Roy Staab

All events are free and open to the public

Omi International Art Center · 1405 County Route 22 · Ghent · NY · 518-392-4747 · www.artomi.org Visit our website or call for more information about our programs: Ledig House, Camp Omi, Art Omi, Music Omi, and Dance Omi

Forrest Myers “Valledor,” 1966

Jean Shin & Brian Ripel Stepping Stones

Curated by Kathleen Triem & Peter Frank

8/08 CHRONOGRAM NEWS & POLITICS 31


DION OGUST

Commentary

Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

DRIVE THE LEGEND! CRASH IN REALITY! The Nissan Xterra is sold as a high adventure SUV. Take it off road! Into the outback! The mountains! The desert! A blizzard! I happened to buy one, used. About a month later I was on Route 28, just east of Belleayre Mountain. There was a few inches of snow on the ground. I was going up hill. The road in that spot is three lanes wide and absolutely dead straight, probably the straightest section of road in the entire Catskills. There couldn’t possibly be a problem. Then the rear end broke loose. The Xterra went into a sideways slide. There was oncoming traffic and cars coming up from behind me. I tried to correct. The skid reversed, but too far. I found myself going up hill, barely losing any speed, like a maddened pendulum, back and forth across all three lanes. Finally, I managed to work the skid toward a driveway off to the right, clipped the guardrail on my way into it, and slowed to a stop. Now anybody, with any sense whatsoever would look at what they were doing when that happened, and never, ever, do it again. Buying a new car was not an option. Neither was staying home when it snows. The Xterra had been in two-wheel drive and had regular tires. With careful testing, I confirmed that balance was such that the tail would regularly break loose in snow, on gravel, and even in heavy rain. But in four-wheel drive and with real snow tires, it was safe enough to drive in any condition. I made the adjustments, and I’m alive to write this. When George Bush came into office, he sold America tax cuts. They would cause the economy to boom! Create jobs! So much, and so many, that tax revenues would actually increase! We would have a great adventure! Like when you take an Xterra on an offroad race! Tearing up the landscape, and arriving in first place! That didn’t happen.There was an instant recession. So he sold America more tax cuts and said, “Get out there and drive this economy!” The stock market stayed flat. There were few new jobs. Every possible form of debt—the deficit, the national debt, the balance of trade, personal debt— went up.There was “growth.” Strangely, nobody seemed to put the minuses and the pluses together and realize that the growth consisted entirely of borrowing on top of borrowing. Now the economy is careening wildly and every day there’s news of a fresh near-disaster. General Motors stock is selling at the price it sold for in 1955! American Airlines is cutting eight percent of its work force! US automakers are laying off 25,000 workers! One in every 519 American households received a foreclosure filing in April! The Dow Jones average, adjusted for inflation, is down over 20 percent since 2001! There have been five bank failures in the last year, regulators are expecting 100 to 200 more. If it cost you $3,000 to heat your home last winter, this winter it’ll cost somewhere between $6,500 and $8,000. If you’re lucky. And when I went to the gas station to fill up the damn Xterra, it was over $70. What should we do about it? How about doing the same thing that got us here? Tax cuts! More tax cuts! Yes! George Bush called for more tax cuts. Congress voted for them.The checks went out. People got them.The economy got worse! The news got scarier! 32 NEWS & POLITICS CHRONOGRAM 8/08

What should we do? The same thing again. More rebate checks! Both presidential candidates, McCain and Obama, are calling for tax cuts to fix the economy. It’s true that McCain’s cuts are stupider than Obama’s, but they’re both calling for cuts. But do tax cuts actually stimulate the economy? Vast sums of money have gone into creating that myth. Major intellectual industries have been created and sustained to sell that story. At the center of that claim is the legend of Saint Ronald Retro Reagan. Reagan cut income taxes, big time, but raised Social Security and Medicare taxes. That meant that rich people paid less, and working people paid more. The immediate result was that economy faltered. Then Reagan raised taxes (though not by as much as he cut them). At about the same time, oil dropped from $40 a barrel to $20. The economy did grow. That is until the stock market crash of ’87. There is vastly more evidence the other way. Tax increases stimulate the economy. It may not make sense, it may be counterintuitive, but here are the facts. What if taxes went up to over 90 percent? According to the Reaganauts and Bushwackers, the world would collapse! Business would grind to a halt. Investors would flee. Workers would lay down their tools. Back in World War II, taxes did go up that high. Americans who earned as little as $500 per year paid income tax at a 23 percent rate, while those who earned more than $200,000 per year paid a 94 percent rate. The result: The American economy expanded at an unprecedented (and unduplicated) rate between 1941 and 1945. According to Economic History Services (www.eh.net), the Gross National Product of the US, as measured in constant dollars, grew from $88.6 billion in 1939—while the country was still suffering from the Depression—to $135 billion in 1944. From 1946 to 1963, the top rate fluctuated from 86 percent to 91 percent. Average economic growth was 3.5 percent per year. The current top rate is 35 percent. Economic growth has been, at best, 2.5 percent, that is if you stop counting in 2007. And don’t consider the type of growth, which consisted primarily of increased debt and pyramids of borrowing. In 1992, the top tax rate was 31 percent. Bill Clinton increased it to 39 percent. The Dow Jones average went up 360 percent. The number of jobs went up 237,000 per month (under Bush, as of 2007, it was just 72,000 per month.). Median household income went up (instead of down). The budget was balanced. So here’s what I suggest: If a candidate says he’s going to fix the economy with tax cuts, or a pundit refers to tax cuts as a stimulus or a pro-growth package, lure them to a snowy road. Put them in a two-wheel drive Xterra with regular tires, and tell them there are voters over the next hill, eager to hear their message. Unfortunately, the reality is that we’re all in the car that they’re driving. Nobody is screaming sense at them. Fasten your seatbelts. Hope that you crawl out of the crash alive.Then, when we’re sitting together at the side of the road, maybe we can have a sane conversation about how economies work, based on reality, not their TV commercials.


A public interest message courtesy of Chronogram

by Melissa Everett, Executive Director Sustainable Hudson Valley - SHV

Gas Prices: Taking the High Road with People Power Everyone is worried about the cost of commuting, powering our homes, even producing our food, as fuel prices skyrocket. A tempting path is to trim gas taxes for short-term relief. But that misses the true costs of fossil fuels. There’s a smarter alternative. It’s time to use an unlimited resource to meet more of our needs: people power. Hudson Valley communities can spend less on energy, and improve quality of life, if they tap the opportunities to cut waste and use rediscover human-powered alternatives to fossil fuels. Join us as we save fuel by getting a grip on waste and, in the process, make life more interesting this summer. Create bike-friendly communities–and enjoy them! The League of American Bicyclists (www.bikeleague.org) has every resource you can possibly need, from case studies to a “how to overcome excuses and bike to work” tip sheet.

Carpool, vanpool, combine trips, get out of the car!!!! See www.metropool.com and www.nuride.org for help. Stop engine idling. It’s illegal in NY to idle for more than three minutes (and in Europe for more than 15 seconds!). Ask friendly businesses to put reminders near entrance or cash register. Use this tool kit from the EPA to take effective action: www.epa.gov/oms/schoolbus/antiidling.htm#irk. Buy local, buy in bulk, swap, and reuse – commit yourself to a lifestyle of “more fun, less stuff”–see the website of the Center for a New American Dream for tips and resources (www.newdream.org). And to really reconnect with people power, check out The Green Ride (www.thegreenride.org) a spectacular three day fundraising bike ride from New York City to the Catskills and back, Columbus Day Weekend, to benefit Sustainable Hudson Valley’s climate action work and the research of the Black Rock Forest Consortium. Ride, or sponsor a rider. Please spread these ideas widely. This invitation is brought to you by the members and friends of Sustainable Hudson Valley (www.sustainhv.org).

Citizen creativity is already in play. The New Paltz Green Team used May, National Bike Month, to launch “Ride To Eat/Eat To Ride,” wherein 17 area restaurants gave discounts and other incentives to customers who arrived by bicycle. For details on projects and events described above, visit www.sustainhv.org.

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CAPITAL REGION

THE REAWAKENING Downtown Schenectady Is Electric Once More By Molly Belmont Photos by Hillary Harvey

W

hen General Electric began making cuts to its Schenectady plant, it looked like it was lights out for the once-bustling company town, but these days, there’s a new electricity in the air—and it’s not coming from the old plant on the Mohawk River. In the last decade, the city has experienced a full-scale renaissance. Thanks to the cooperative efforts of a number of different organizations, Schenectady has transformed itself from a bombed-out industrial shell into an attractive and lively destination for arts and culture. “Schenectady hit rock bottom about 12 years ago, and since then it’s been pulling itself up by its bootstraps,” says Philip Morris, CEO of Proctor’s Theater in downtown Schenectady. “Ten years ago, I would [have said that] Schenectady was in a state of shock,” says Joseph Tardi, a member of the 440 Board, a Schenectady organization dedicated to building an arts scene downtown. “After so many years of having GE as a principal, they were now trying to find a direction. Ten years later, even GE is coming back.” “I don’t think the problem we had was so much different from [that of] other cities. I just think that we worked cooperatively, in a focused manner, and that was the key to making it work,” says Gail Kehn, vice president of visitor services for the Schenectady County Chamber of Commerce. She pauses for a moment before chuckling and adding, “Not that it was easy.” The trouble all started when the city’s major employers began moving out of the area, says Kehn. General Electric, which employed 40,000 workers, gradually cut its workforce to 4,500, and in 1969 another major employer, the American Locomotive Company, closed its doors for good. People began to drift out of the community and, as a result, surviving businesses lost customers. Soon, the once-vibrant electric city was in a full blackout; storefronts were boarded up, streets were in disrepair, and crime rates soared. And it stayed that way—for a long time. Today, State Street has become a bustling arts and entertainment dis-

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trict, with the Proctor’s and Bow-Tie Cinemas serving as lynchpins for the 10-block downtown area. The two theaters attract huge crowds, and those visitors spend money at other local establishments, including restaurants, artists’ studios, gallery spaces, and performing arts venues. “Those dollars filter into a lot of different pockets,” says Tardi. “You’d think that sports is bigger business, but we have seen statistics that show that the arts generates more commerce than sports activities,” says Miki Conn, executive director for the Hamilton Hill Arts Center and a member of the 440 Board since 1999. “These audiences head downtown for a show and end up eating out, or they go to see a movie and end up shopping at the bookstore or bead store nearby.” Nancy Niefield owns Two Spruce Pottery on Jay Street, and has seen a definite change in the area since she opened her shop in 1988. She points to the lunch crowd from new employers like MVP and the Department of Transportation, but she says that there’s also a weekend crowd from the more distant suburbs. More importantly, these new visitors aren’t just coming for a Broadway show; they’re coming for the day. “People are coming to make an afternoon out of it, to have lunch, and to shop,” Niefield says. “It’s much more of a destination than it ever was before.” The theater and the other small venues the theater helped support paved the way for a thriving commercial district. But art-and-commerce is a notoriously tricky pairing—hard to bring together, and even harder to keep together, so how did leaders make it work in Schenectady? Many people point to an early tribe of arts-minded businessmen who took the reins of Proctor’s Theater in 1988. Headed by then-chairman of the theater Harry Apkarian, this group immediately recognized the important role arts could play in breathing new life into the derelict downtown. “We knew the arts would be a great way to get people downtown,” he says. When Apkarian came on board, Proctor’s was facing foreclosure: “It was


Left to right: Peter Hughes, advertising manager of Proctor’s, surveys the renovated theater; Angelo’s Aperitivo Bistro and Wine Bar on State Street; The shops on the Jay Street, which has been transformed into a pedestrian thoroughfare; Executive Chef Danny DeLorenzo (left) with Head Lunch Chef Brian Bauhofer in the kitchen at Aperitivo; The Bow-Tie Cinema on State Street; a view down Jay Street.

flat on its back financially,” he says. The seasoned entrepreneur, who is now chairman and CEO of TransTech Systems, Inc., set about rebuilding the theater and, in so doing, rebuilt the neighborhood. “Proctor’s gave people hope. When Proctor’s came back, people saw a light at the end of the tunnel. They saw people coming back.” In 1996, these creative efforts were aligned under the umbrella of the 440 Board, which was incorporated with the mission of creating an arts scene downtown, and in 1998 the city designated the corridor on State Street that extends from Nott Terrace to Erie Boulevard as an arts and entertainment district, thus giving the area an official identity and destiny. That same year, Apkarian and fellow board members including Union College President Roger Hull lobbied then-Governor George Pataki to create an authority that would be funded through sales taxes. This authority would have the ability to bond projects downtown and make sites move-in ready. The Schenectady Metroplex Development Authority, as it has come to be known, is the commerce portion of Schenectady’s regenerative efforts, a complementary agency whose sole purpose is to recruit and groom the right businesses for downtown Schenectady. “We had a philosophy. We didn’t want our downtown to look like just any other downtown,” says Scott Cietek, vice president of economic development for the Metroplex. Instead, the agency focused on playing up regional offerings, attracting businesses that are distinct to this area, like Villa Italia, Bomber’s, and Aperitivo Bistro. Once it matches tenants with sites, the Metroplex has the authority to clear most obstacles, whether it is working out parking issues or building a new faÇade. In this way, the Metroplex has secured desirable investors like the Hampton Inn and Bow-Tie Cinemas, as well as local heroes like Angelo Mazzone and Matthew Baumgartner. Mazzone, who operates a number of successful restaurants in the region including The Glen Sanders Mansion and Angelo’s 677 Prime, was approached by the Metroplex to invest in the neighborhood in 2006. Mazzone bought five

buildings on State Street, and remade one into Aperitivo, an urban-chic bistro that caters to the theater crowd looking for a quick bite or drink before the show. The restaurant opened in November 2007 to rave reviews, and its high tables and long bar are filled with a lively crowd most nights of the week. Mazzone says that working with the Metroplex made the whole project easy. “Ray Gillen [Metroplex chair] coordinated the whole thing,” he says. “And I don’t think anyone could have done what he’s done for downtown Schenectady.” Matthew Baumgartner owns Bomber’s, a successful bar and restaurant in Albany’s Lark Street neighborhood that is known for its behemoth burritos and wild trivia nights. Last year, Metroplex invited him to open a similar venture downtown. One year later, and he has just closed on his $500,000 location on State Street and can’t wait to open its doors. “It’s been an amazing experience. I don’t know many cities with agencies whose sole responsibility it is to bring business to the area. [The Metroplex] really pulled for it and facilitated the whole thing,” Baumgartner says. The key to all that facilitation, of course, is money. (“How much money can you throw at it? That’s what it all boils down to,” explains Cietek. “The greatest idea—if you don’t have any money—that’s what it stays: a great idea.”) To fund what it does, the Metroplex collects a portion of the sales tax, about .5 percent, or $8 million last year. This gives the agency a budget for planning, financing, and maintaining buildings within the district. Over the course of the last 10 years the agency has spent about $60 million removing stumbling blocks for prospective tenants, which in turn has translated into $300 million worth of public and private investment downtown. This represents a level of investment that is usually found only near arenas or manufacturing plants. “We had none of that,” Cietek says with a laugh. “We started around a 2,600-seat vaudeville theater.” Metroplex got the development ball rolling by persuading MVP Health Care to expand their headquarters downtown, and they lobbied hard to bring 8/08 CHRONOGRAM CAPITAL REGION 35


Carol Markytan of the Artists’ Shops at 175 Jay Street does lampworking for a captive audience.

the state’s Department of Transportation offices downtown. These large employers provided a foundation for growth, putting workers on the streets at lunchtime and after work. Next, the area needed a movie theater, so Metroplex vetted 15 different companies before settling on Bow-Tie Cinemas, a Connecticut company with proven track record in first-run movies. The sixscreen theater opened last year, and welcomed a whopping 300,000 visitors, making it the second-highest-grossing theater in the region. The Metroplex also worked with the Downtown Schenectady Improvement Corporation to administer funds to fix up the street, first reconfiguring the parking, and then helping businesses repair their faÇades. Last year, the DSIC spent about $400,000 in federal grants, local grants, special assessment fees, and donated monies to keep downtown looking beautiful, says Jim Salengo, executive director of the DSIC. Meanwhile, the little “2,600-seat vaudeville theater” was in the middle of its own transformation process. In 2002, Morris was named CEO, and over the last six years, he has headed up $40 million worth of improvements to the facilities and programming. In 2006, the theater expanded its backstage area, making it possible to stage large-scale Broadway shows there. “We’re the only theater between Buffalo, Montreal, and New York City that has Broadway shows,” Morris says. The theater also added educational facilities, including an IWERKS movie theater and accompanying curricula in 2007. Last year, 75,000 kids participated in the programs, Morris says proudly. Proctor’s, the 440 Board, DSIC, and the Metroplex have also worked cooperatively to create additional arts spaces downtown, including studios and exhibition spots on Jay Street. Jay Street Studios opened in 2005 and now serves as a home base for seven artists, and in 2006, four adjacent storefronts were leased to arts-based retail, including the soon-to-open Mohawk Valley 36 CAPITAL REGION CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Guitar. The groups also host Art Night the third Friday of every month, when shops and restaurants in the district stay open later for exhibitions and performances. This June, the arts and entertainment district was officially renamed ElectriCity, a fitting name for the reenergized neighborhood. This now-thriving district welcomed between six and seven million visitors last year, which is on par with a midlevel mall. The block around Proctor’s had a five percent occupancy rate in 1998, and today, 95 percent of those buildings have tenants. “Between the Proctor’s schedule, and the movie theater’s first-run shows, you’ve got something going on every night of the week, 365 days a year,” Cietek says. This type of action is exciting for the local businesses that get a piece of all that discretionary spending, but it is also exciting for bigger companies, who see Schenectady as a location that would attract good employees and clients. “Companies say that their employees want to be in an ‘Ally McBeal’ type of experience,” says Cietek. “They want something eclectic, something lively, something flexible, with ready opportunities for fun.” By building up its arts and culture identity, Schenectady also becomes attractive to big employers. “This is the trend. If a city is going to make it, it can’t just rely on retail, it has to supply a lifestyle,” says Tardi. “You have to give people a reason to come, something to do.” The district’s success is also a testament to the transformative power of the arts, and it shows how arts and culture can be a coalescing force for a community, providing a center around which to gather. “The same as blight spreads, the opposite is also true. You develop a good core, and then that spreads outward,” Kehn says. “Arts is inspirational. It feeds the spirit in a way that grocery shopping just doesn’t,” Conn says. “It makes you feel like your community is worth saving.”


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AUGUST 2008

ARTS & CULTURE CHRONOGRAM

An illustration by Jesse Kuhn for Brent Robinson’s story “A Partial Catalog of Harold’s Major and Minor Epiphanies.” FICTION, p.40

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FICTION

40 FICTION CHRONOGRAM 8/08


Youth Night Harold wasn’t yet a teenager when he first had the feeling that a new vista of selfknowledge had just opened up before his inner eye. It was a Wednesday evening in spring, Youth Night at First Presbyterian, a weekly gathering that Harold had just begun attending now that he had reached the auspicious age of 12. But his usual sense of awkward misfit-hood had driven him to take a stroll around the dark grounds alone. As he rounded a corner of the building, he heard low murmuring, and he stepped softly on the lawn.There, standing in a shadow against the brick, screened by shrubs, were his 15-year-old brother Glenn and a girl.They were kissing.Their bodies were mashed together from their jean-clad knees to their overlapping noses and their mouths were locked liked leeches on each other’s lips, moving with faint wet sounds. Harold felt hot blood bloom to his face, and his feet almost turned away of their own accord, but he made them stop. No one could see him blushing here, and he just had to watch. Then, beyond anything imaginable, he saw the girl’s hand take Glenn’s hand and guide it from her waist up to her breast, and as his brother’s fingers squeezed whatever was under that white fabric, both moaned. Harold’s breath caught, his heart thudded, and he thought he might pass out. Then a light came on in a window nearby, and he ducked and raced silently toward the other side of the church, toward the brightly lit front door, inside which so much safe, wholesome fun was happening. As he ran, he suddenly realized who the girl was. Vicky Lamott, a high school senior, a pretty girl, a popular girl, of whom he was distantly aware because she attended their church, not someone Harold imagined would ever look twice at his goofy sophomore brother. He fervently, generously hoped they weren’t caught, for Glenn was his newfound hero. Inside, he followed the sound of music to a large room adjacent to the chapel, slipped inside along a back wall, and as his heart slowed down, he watched the crowd of friendly young faces, so familiar, all singing “Kumbaya.” He felt he was not one of them, could never be one of them, separated now and forever by a powerful knowledge dawning in him. What he had seen was what he wanted. That’s all he wanted, ever. He felt unique among all 12-year-olds because he was entirely filled up inside. He had found the definition of his life, the blueprint of his future: this amorphous, slippery vastness that was Love. Harold’s Essay for 11th Grade English, Which Was Never Handed In, Resulting in a C-Minus for the Semester On the assigned subject of “Loneliness,” I have had many thoughts. Such as: When you know something that nobody else knows, you could be said to be alone. That’s because you’re aware of your separateness. So maybe that’s what loneliness is—awareness of your own secrets. “God only knows,” some people might say. I guess He must feel pretty lonely. At least that’s what I’d say if I believed in God, like all my righteous family. But since I don’t, the things I know are all mine. Mine to live with, mine alone. Most people at this school know about the accident. But I’ve wondered if I would ever tell what actually happened that night. I could hardly bear those horrible days of sitting around in the hospital, I wanted to blurt out a confession so bad. At the funeral I was a blubbering mess, like a sponge being squeezed, but it was for more reasons than anyone might expect. He could be a real bastard when he was drunk. I mean, most of the time he was a real nice guy, you know, the girls always called him sweet. And it was true, even when he drank too much. But every now and then, I could see that little streak of belligerent asshole show itself. I mean, who knew him better than I did? So that’s why I have no excuse. I know he never would have hit me or anything. But I caved in when he threatened me, like I’d always done before. First I tried to tell him no, and say how we better get a bus home or something. But he said, “Look, Harry, you little fuck, wait’ll Mom hears what you been doin’ tonight.” He was so plastered his voice was all slurred like he was retarded, but he still knew how to scare me. That was the mean streak. As if he would ever tell Mom, because that would make him as guilty as me. But you know, I was fucked up, how could I think straight? Nobody was there in the parking lot to hear us. Later, I just told the story that he split without telling me, took off for that girl’s place in the South Valley. But that crazy fucker never even made it up the freeway ramp before he passed out at the wheel. Goddamn him. I played innocent. Told just enough truth to make a good lie. Made my Mom

cry and pray even more when she found out I’d been drinking too, but that’s something that just couldn’t be avoided. I pretended I didn’t know how shitfaced he was. I never said a word about how I just handed the keys over. And let him drive away. That’s my big fucking secret, so now you know. I am a spineless dickhead lying coward, and my big brother is dead. The Intellectual Bliss of University Life In the first week of his junior year of college, Harold had a revelation about what he had been doing, winding his way through the registration maze, chasing elusive professors for add/drop permissions, wrangling cheap textbook deals, bartering for lab time. Sitting in class day after day was merely the filler. It all became clear to him: The important life lesson to be learned was not about the principles of Cartesian dualism, nor the fundamentals of coding in C++, nor the finer points of communications management. It was all about how to work the system to get what you need. Enlightened, he set out chasing his degree with new zest, like a baby after a cookie. Smoking Harold surprised himself by becoming a smoker again. It had been years ago that he’d given it up, but now the world was changing, and he was changing with it. His proclivity had never been for tobacco; that was an addiction he just couldn’t relate to: the stale ashtray breath, the butts everywhere, the promise of cancer. The smoking habit he was resurrecting these days was an old teenage penchant for pot, an almost-forgotten marijuana jones. And although he felt oddly childish now as he sucked loudly on a joint, sitting alone with loosened tie in the living room of his own suburban ranch house, he nevertheless inhaled with great enthusiasm and a flamboyant flourish of the smoking match. The kids were in bed; as usual, he had waited a full hour before lighting up, to be absolutely sure they were asleep. He worried that his daughter, a much-toobright 8-year-old, was savvy to his law-breaking, but he had no real evidence. Nothing to require a change of behavior, not yet. Earlier today, after he’d picked up his 5-year-old son from the sitter’s house and they were driving home, the radio was playing a song with the lyric, Every time you go away, you take a piece of me with you. It sent Harold into glum thoughts about his wife, and he was surprised when his son said, “This song makes me feel sad.” Harold made sudden cartoon-growl sounds. He reached across the seat and tickled the boy until he surrendered a reluctant giggle. A week ago, Harold had spent an evening at his wife’s apartment downtown, helping her assemble a prefab bookcase. Afterward, they drank wine together and listened to music, and he tried to nuzzle her neck and murmur something sweet in her ear. She ignored the advance, tossed her hair, and moved across the room to wipe an invisible dust particle from her new shelves. Then, in just a couple of sentences, she managed to make casual references to three different male friends of hers, men that Harold had never met. One of them was a hip young photographer from somewhere in Eastern Europe, with whom she had spent several recent weekends, modeling for photo shoots in the farmlands and backwoods to the west, three hours away. They had slept in roadside motels, in the same room. It was a low-budget project, she had told Harold. He was aware of how it might be discussed by the photographer and his artsy academic cronies. It was Art: shadowy black-and-white studies in which the Human (Harold’s wife’s) Form (nude) is radically recontextualized (posed melodramatically) within a milieu of metaphorical decay (dilapidated old barns), symbolizing the devolution of fin-de-siècle Western man (whatever). “Just work,” was her stock phrase whenever Harold inquired, in his bewildered-becoming-bitter way, about her life. She would jump to defense: “Oh right, my friends are these losers who are, like, so desperate, they can’t keep their hands off the old mom with stretch marks.” Or, “Some people don’t think everything’s some sleazy soap opera, you know.” Her consummate skill with a sarcastic put-down never failed to shut him up in an instant, handing all the ugliness of suspicion back into his own upturned palms. It was nearing six months now since she had lived at home. They never used words like “temporary separation.” She wanted to “find herself,” she had said. But he wondered, couldn’t they do it together? Tonight was just like every other night. The TV was on, and Harold sat directly in front of it, with the sound low so as not to wake the kids. Staring 8/08 CHRONOGRAM FICTION 41


glassy-eyed at the screen, he worked his way up half the joint, until everything slowed to a stop. The tip’s smoldering glow went dark in his relaxed fingers. He fantasized about being 20 again, about things that had never happened and would never happen, about living with his wife in her bohemian apartment, going to the university with her, being students together. Being wild, young, free, pursuing ideas and art, hanging out in cafés debating politics, walking the streets after midnight in passionate discourse, with never a thought for mortgages or school lunch. He imagined making love in her little amber-lit bedroom, their bodies sweaty on summer nights, with the sounds of music and traffic from the street below.Young and in love; or, now, all these years later, not so young, and still in love. Every night he would take a journey, detail by detail, through his sweetest memories of her body, and surrendering to the pulse and fog of the smoke in his brain, he would masturbate. But the night before last, and last night, and again tonight, it wasn’t working. There was simply no response to his visions, no response to his fingers. He sat numbly, staring, feeling only emptiness. There was no sound from the kids’ rooms. The TV murmured nonsense. He sat still for a long time. Then he took a deep breath, zipped up, struck a match with the big, showy gesture of a stage magician, and lit the joint again. The Entire Contents of Harold’s First Journal Oct. 5. Well, families come and families go. Or: Life is shit and then you die. Or: I’ve never lived alone before; might as well try to enjoy it. I always believed so strongly in the big One, our ultimate indivisibility. What a putz. Phone’s ringing, probably a lawyer. Help Harold sits in his cubicle, typing. He is documenting the functionality of Release 2.3.1 of the Transaction Log Utility. A month ago, when he was still manager of Training and Documentation, his afternoon would have felt infinitely more vital. The soft gray walls muffle the keystrokes of the programmers and analysts in their cubicles on all sides of him. There is a low susurrus under everything, the processed air circulating endlessly. The windows on the far wall cannot be opened. Harold’s eyes are locked on the screen as black letters string out against white, under blue and gray bars. Earlier, they grouped sensibly into words and sentences, but now the digital characters have regressed into absurd hieroglyphics as his fingers continue to click in random repetitions of featureless sound on the beige keys. The string of senseless symbols just keeps on rolling out, rolling out. His eyes glaze. His fingers slow. His head nods. His eyes pop open, his fingers pick up again, another string of gibberish, then a fading, a letting go… Stars trail in slow motion across a vast night sky. Giant gargoyle silhouettes of gnarled stone wheel across the diamond field of stars. An owl hoots nearby, invisible. Coyotes yip on a distant ridge, the cries of aliens heralding the crescent moon just creeping over the ragged horizon. Sand grits against his skin, the flesh of his cheek. He lies on the ground, sweating, heart pounding like a fist. He knows that he has just been dancing, bare feet in the dirt, whirling madly to a savage drum, naked and shouting under the glittering stars, until, exhausted, he has fallen to the Earth. Harold snaps open his eyes. His fingers twitch. On the screen in front of him, centered in the monochrome field of lines and squiggles, is a gray rectangle containing words that slowly, dimly enter his conscious understanding. Error. No help is available here. The Look He drives. She stares. The silence is loud with Dionne Warwick, prepsychic, Bacharached thick with strings. The look. Of love. It’s on. Your face.The look.That time. Can’t era-ase. He drives. She stares out the passenger window. There are no sights to be seen there. On other drives, she has always ignored the view as she speaks and speaks, rubbing fabulously floral-scented lotions on her hands, checking and rechecking her makeup in the visor mirror, talking and talking without pause, all uppercase and exclamation points. But today she is silent, staring, the glass two inches from her nose. He drives. The suburbs of New Jersey blur past in the blue of evening. Her 42 FICTION CHRONOGRAM 8/08

neck is twisted just a bit too far for comfort, just enough to make it clear to herself and to him that she looks away. Away from him. He knows why she’s angry. He knows and he sympathizes. He can’t blame her. Any woman would be angry to learn that her husband doesn’t want children with her.The words were never said, and he will never say them, but he knows that she knows, because what else could his behavior mean? His two kids from his first marriage are difficult enough; why add more pain? This is one part of the swamp like resistance he feels, although he can’t put it into those words. He won’t admit the concept into his awareness because when it comes to his son and daughter, he’s cemented into a defensive posture: a concrete linebacker, ready for a hit. He loves the pair with a blind, helpless devotion, which just adds to the bewilderment he feels every time he attempts a conversation with either of them. The other part he has the words for, but he can never, never say them. Her continual, escalating criticism of his kids—they are hopeless sociopaths, future criminals, and he’s to blame, he with his sycophantic connection to his malevolent first wife—all this has finally worn a nasty little sore on his invisible innards. It hurts every day, and he has come to the conclusion that, with her, he never wants to be a parent. Now, the radio blares Dionne and neither of them speak. They are driving home from an aborted journey, a sweet task gone sour. Rather than leaving his sperm sample at the medical lab for a fertility test—the two of them together, all full of romantic hope that the miracle of science could fulfill their cute if unproductive new couplehood—they had instead been humiliated. “I will not jerk off in their bathroom looking at Penthouse,” he had announced a week ago. “I just won’t do it.” So she had volunteered to help out. She went to the lab, picked up a sterile container, and offered to help him summon up the juices, after which she would deliver the precious vessel back to the lab. But she included a dire warning that the results could be faulty if too much time elapses (“Remember, this Jersey traffic…”) between ejaculation and testing. Feeling guilty in the face of her generosity—after all, she had undertaken all the complicated but inconclusive tests of her own reproductive powers without any help from him—he made an impulsive offer. “They have evening hours, right?” He hugged her and murmured in her ear, “How about we pretend we’re high school kids fooling around in the car, something we never got to do? We’ll go park in the cemetery next to the hospital, climb in the back seat, do some fun stuff, fill the jar, and scoot for the lab.” He didn’t mention the extra benefit: that his plan would mean he wouldn’t have to take any time off work. She caught the vision, gave a low laugh and kissed him with a probing tongue and a hip press, and they made a date for the next evening as soon as he got home from the office. They hadn’t counted on Officer Bronsky making his rounds, cruising slowly through the cemetery at dusk. How long he stood by the window watching them, they will never know. Just as Harold squirmed and said, “Give me the bottle!” and she raised her face from his lap, Officer Bronsky tapped on the glass with his flashlight. She gasped, they jumped and fumbled with clothing, and Harold groaned as he made a mess on his pants. The officer’s brusque hand motion constituted an unmistakable command: roll the window down immediately. She reached across Harold and did it. “This ain’t a motel, folks.” “We’re a married couple; we’re just...see?” She held up the empty bottle. “We need a sample…” Harold just covered his eyes with his hand. “This ain’t your bedroom, either. This is a public place. Ever heard of public lewdness?” He pulled out his ticket book, stone-faced. “The judge can tell you all about it. ID, please. From both of you.” Officer Bronksy showed no trace of a smile, not even a twinkle in his eye, and ever since he handed them the ticket and drove away, they have not spoken. The look of lo-ove…is saying so much more than just words could ever say…. And what my heart has heard, well, it takes my breath away… Dionne sings and Harold drives. He wishes they could laugh it all off, but the look on his wife’s face warns him not to try. It is then that the realization comes to him: The end has been reached. There is no more road in front of them. Beyond this day, he can only see himself as alone, a lone man, pathetic and glorious in eternal solitude, and it is with both joy and terror that he rounds the final corner and pulls slowly into their driveway.


The Entire Contents of Haroldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Second Journal August 3. Here we go again. Kinda nice to be back in the old neighborhood. I always secretly loved urban decay. Harsh. Dangerous. Sexy. August 4.What am I supposed to learn? Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t I learn anything? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just a damned hamster on a wheel, round and round with the same asshole behaviors. I want a different life. Right. This is the life you deserve, dickhead. God help me. Visitation Harold thinks, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am at deathâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s door.â&#x20AC;? Some time later, he thinks, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grim Reaper approacheth.â&#x20AC;? Occasional thought-islands surface languidly in a vast fog. He thinks, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harold Soderquist, prepare to meet your maker.â&#x20AC;? He thinks, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wait! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go into the light!â&#x20AC;? He thinks, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on? Where the hell am I?â&#x20AC;? His chest, stomach, back, all the mysteries in the bulky center of him, are abruptly filled with grinding shards of glass. Fishhooks and fisted needles, twisting. Then someone is there at his side and a slow wave caresses him back into featureless mist. Haroldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s torso had received like a lover the thrusts of the sharp, little blade. His flesh had opened without resistance to the piercings, all 11, as if his heart knew what it needed. He will never again see the near-stranger, the one-night stand, the foolish infatuation, the woman who inflicted the wounds, but not because he is dying from them. This death is only imaginary, one of his many wish-fears. She will confess her crime and be sentenced while he lies sleeping, before he has healed and resumed his life, in which she was a momentary, if momentous, detour. As Harold reclines in white sheets, dozing, he hears his older brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry, you gotta wake up, man.â&#x20AC;? Glenn is standing at the bedside, throwing Harold a mock scowl while a grin hides on his lips. He is impossibly young, barely 20, his hair a blond tangle, that same old Led Zeppelin cut, his chin scruffy between the long pointed collars of his polyester shirt. Haroldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes feel sleepy. He is mildly curious. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How did you get in here, is it visitation hour?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter.You awake, so we can talk?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yeah, yeahâ&#x20AC;ŚWhatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up?â&#x20AC;? Glenn sits on the edge of the bed and leans forward to stare into Haroldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes. Harold is aware dimly that this is not Glennâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s normal behaviorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;much too serious, too fatherly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry,â&#x20AC;? Glenn says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m so much smarter than before.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Okayâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? Harold is beginning to feel that something is not right. His mind is a bin of fuzz and he tries to climb out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Okayâ&#x20AC;ŚWhatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Lennon knew the truth, man: I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glenn, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m too tired. He was also a walrus. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re you talking about?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was not your fault. It was just my path.â&#x20AC;? Something is noisy, like rustling fabric in Haroldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ears. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hear you.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes you can, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m shouting in your face! Listen!â&#x20AC;? Glenn leans even closer, close like when they were boys and it was after dinner and Glenn would hold Harold down on the ground and breathe horrible garlic-breath into his nose. Now Glennâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soft blue eyes and his mouth surrounded by downy young-manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s whiskers fill Haroldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not shouting at all. His voice is stern but quiet and suddenly very, very clear. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry, I forgive you. That means you forgive yourself. That means you can wake the fuck up!â&#x20AC;? Harold wants so, so much to make his big brother proud and happy. He feels a great cry wrench itself up from his guts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am, Glenn, I am awake!â&#x20AC;? He is sitting up in bed, but nobody is in the room, and there is an icy fire searing through his chest, a buzzsaw slicing him in half. A nurse bustles in as Harold slides down onto the pillow and she babbles cheery gibberish as he slips back into a fathomless, gray absence. Later, in secret, Harold will remember, and hold to, every word. But for this timeless moment, he drifts in perfect molecular unity, distributed across the interstellar distances between quantum particles, where logical mind has no purchase. Right now, Harold does not even know that his wounds are on the mend; that he has already begun to live by an all-new truth. He is, and was always, whole. Brent Robisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Partial Catalog of Haroldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Major and Minor Epiphaniesâ&#x20AC;? was chosen by juror Abigail Thomas for honorable mention in our 2007 Literary Supplement short story contest.

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A COMMUNITY SUPPORTED ARTS CENTER

look for the fall program guide in early August Check our website for video & audio Clips www.unisonarts.org and call ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;-ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x152; for information SCULPTURE GARDEN OPEN DAWN TIL DUSK YEAR-ROUND

 &(.'-"' +,- +( a '0 )%-3 a    8/08 CHRONOGRAM FICTION 43


JUDY SIGUNICK

Portfolio Ryan Sullivan

It’s relatively easy to assess the work of an artist who’s been at work for years—hindsight, as they say, is 20/20. But there’s something much more exciting (and risky) in the encounter with a newly-minted artist, someone just coming into his/her own as a creative force in the universe. Ryan Sullivan is an example of the latter. Growing up in Poughkeepsie, struggling with learning issues at school, Sullivan started as a teenage student at the Children’s Media Project, founded in 1994 by Maria Marewski “to create a teaching/learning environment where artists, educators, community activists and especially children and youth can learn to interact with the media arts both as creators and critical viewers.” He now works at CMP, located in Poughkeepsie, with the next generation of Dutchess County youth. He was recently selected by Judy Sigunick to participate in Ellenville’s “10x10x10” public art program to create an installation in an empty storefront downtown in the village. Drawing on his background in graffiti art and graphic design, Sullivan stepped up to the challenge by transforming himself into a painter, creating a vibrant, colorful series of two and three-dimensional works that explore the tension between street art chaos and expressionist abstraction. As Sigunick said to me, “Something true happened” in the work on this installation. His enthusiastic embrace of painting is obvious, energetic, and infectious, as I learned when I sat down to speak with him recently at CMP. The installations of “10x10x10” are on view through October 5 in downtown Ellenville. www.childrensmediaproject.org. —Beth E. Wilson RYAN SULLIVAN ON HIS WORK Lessons out of school Early on, they realized I had a learning disability, so I was in special ed from third grade to high school. It was a pretty rough road, but the lack I have in those areas, I make up for with art. I just don’t get the reading/writing thing so well. I’m more of a visual type of person. As I got older, I started reading up on these artists, and realized that I’m not weird, or I shouldn’t be labeled as a special education student—I’m really just a visual learner. What sucked about the school system is that they didn’t have an outlet, they didn’t have anything set up for me, so I was put in classes with some kids who were really messed up—some kids had behavioral problems, some kids had actual problems that they took medication for. It was hard for me until I got to high school, and then I realized that I need something else, something that the school can’t provide for me. Then I met Tim Sutton and Maria Marewski at the Children’s Media Project, so from ninth grade on, that’s all I did. I’ve been here since I was 15, since 1999. Their mission is to bring students up, and to employ them, and I’m an actual case of that. Now I’m

44 PORTFOLIO CHRONOGRAM 8/08

an employee, which is great. I started doing graffiti in sixth grade, trying to deal with being thrown into this big middle school. I was working mostly on paper, getting down my style. I wasn’t doing a name [with my graffiti]. I would just open the dictionary and pick a word at random, and I eventually learned how to spell words by doing it that way, but it was a longer process than I would have liked. After a while, I started watching movies about graffiti, and things that really inspired me. There’s a famous graffiti artist from Poughkeepsie named Ewok. I got a chance to meet him when I was really young, and he’s still one of my favorites, but I’ve kind of left that stuff behind to really find my own voice. My first piece [at CMP], was an antigraffiti piece, which was pretty funny, given my background. It was a cool perspective though, to have to step out and really look from the outside in. It opened my eyes to a lot of things. After I made the piece, I understood that I could be really good, and be respected, and I don’t need to be known, I

don’t need to run from the cops to do my art. I don’t get a thrill from that. I realized that doing illegal graffiti wasn’t something I really wanted to do—it’s a felony, and if you get caught three times, that’s three strikes. I can’t jeopardize my future for fame. The birth of an artist I’ve been doing art for a long time, but I would never consider myself as an artist. I thought that an artist was someone who sells their canvases of landscapes to millionaires, for thousands of dollars. It took the “10x10x10” show for me to think “I’m an artist.” That’s why I give Judy [Sigunick] such credit. Whenever there’s a book written about me, she’ll have a whole chapter about how she catapulted me into this world of art. Judy was at CMP for a meeting or something, and I hadn’t painted anything at that point. She saw some of my installation work that I’ve been doing with foamcore—I call it 3DG (for “3D graffiti”). She saw those and was really


PHOTOS OF ARTWORK BY FIONN REILLY

ABOVE (clockwise from left): Urban Boy, acrylic on foamcore, 2008; Life, acrylic on foamcore, 2008; The Tribe, acrylic on foamcore, 2008. OPPSITE: View of storefront installation, part of the “10x10x10” exhibit in Ellenville.

interested, and wanted to know more about me what I do. She explained the “10x10x10” concept, and asked me to do a window. When I realized I had to make the stuff, I almost backed out! Then I watched the movie Basquiat, and even before the movie was done I started painting. I just grabbed some house paint that I had lying around, and I started painting and painting and painting. I didn’t stop for a few days. Then I went out and actually got a canvas—wow, once I had the canvas, it took me to another level, and I just kept on going and going. Then I started buying bigger canvases, and more expensive canvases, getting paint that wasn’t house paint. I started bringing the paintings into work and had a couple of critique sessions here, so I could get a feel for whether they needed more, or less, or whatever. People were really responding, it was great. So right after seeing that movie, I was thinking about his story—why am I any different? He was just a young artist who had his own thing, trying to make it. It really put into perspective that I can be an artist, that I can do this.

Getting into the work People love the chaos drawn back to some of the linear swatches, to the structure. The four little paintings up top, with the drips, they’re an experiment with yin/yang and the four elements. Things work well in threes and fours. All the bigger ones that were lined up, they were in threes. I’m all about creating series of paintings, experimenting a lot. It’s really been a big breakthrough for me—it’s like everything that goes on in the painting is meant to go on there. I’ve trained myself not to get caught up in how people are going to react to it so I don’t change things just because of how I think people are going to react. In my room the walls are splattered [with paint], because I’d start flinging it at a painting, and I turn around and it’s all over my TV. I don’t know how the splats are going to go. I want my pieces to have an atmosphere, a feeling, instead of just being paintings.

Alternative labeling Through CMP and my mentor Tim Sutton, I realized that special education was just a label—and as long as you’re labeled, you’re going to be looked at a certain way. I eventually got out [in the high school], and I saw that there was more to the school than the one wing that they kept us on. I started branching out, and making more videos, and doing things like anti tobacco ads, getting my stuff seen. It was a good outlet for me, because I really struggled through school. Tim sat down with me, and I still have the list we made of things I had to do to graduate. It really helped, really worked. CMP was my art school. I took one art class [in public school], and every year after that, the art teachers would constantly tell me I should take their classes, told me I should go to art school. But I couldn’t grasp the concept of art that’s made as a project. I thought it was stifling. “Okay, we’re going to make a mobile today.” I don’t mind dipping into other stuff, but I didn’t feel that they would give me the freedom that CMP was giving me.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM PORTFOLIO 45


Lucid Dreaming BY BETH E. WILSON

UNEARTHLY DELIGHTS It’s an odd tree that greets visitors to The Fields Sculpture Park in Ghent— suspended in space, bare of leaves, a sprawl of spreading roots exposed. The tree expansively and emphatically fills the generous volume of the interior gallery space of the impressive new visitor’s center that is now both gateway and focal point of the park, yet the work never seems oppressive. It is huge, yet light as air, a sculptural confection by Irish artist Katie Holten that looks uncannily like a real tree, but that was actually improvised out of cardboard, newspaper, wire, duct tape, and a laundry list of other materials. In fact, the form of Holten’s tree was modeled on a photograph of an actual uprooted dogwood tree, which has obviously contributed to the authority of this doppelganger’s presence. But why on Earth should someone expend such time and effort to make a fake tree, when so many perfectly nice ones are available just a stone’s throw from this gallery? (You know, like that poem says ,“I think that I shall never see/a poem lovely as a tree.”) I think it has something to do with the very strange relationship we humans have spent the last eight or nine millennia building with what we’ve come to call “nature.” We invent tools, name things with language, build houses, drive SUVs to the country house—all these endless arrays of technologies have historically tended to remove us from the earthly realm, reinforcing our separateness from the natural world that surrounds us. The slickly packaged life that we’ve so ingeniously engineered for ourselves (in the technological, formerly industrialized West) is incredibly volatile, and the future seems to bode only more and more rapid, radical change. Ever since the Industrial Revolution kicked off in the late 18th century, forward-thinking artists have found themselves grappling with the impeccable (and unforeseeable) logic of the unintended consequences that we all face. Think of art as a peculiarly appropriate evolutionary adaptation—a realm of specialized technology (creativity) that is needed to cope with all the strange side effects of the social, economic, and environmental upheavals and all those other technologies. The Holten piece is part of the latest temporary exhibition to open at The Fields, “Into the Trees,” curated by Lilly Wei and the new director of the Fields,

46 LUCID DREAMING CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Amy Lipton. In stark contrast to many of the more traditionally monumental works that populate the sculpture park, this show invites the viewer to stroll through the wooded trails along one side of the pond in its center, to find works that for the most part have gently insinuated themselves into the landscape, and that require a bit of attentive looking to discover. Wei and Lipton invited the artists to select a living tree to create a site-specific installation, taking into consideration the temporary nature of the show, and asking only that they not harm the tree. A number of the works adopt intimate, overtly gentle strategies to insinuate themselves into the forest landscape. Shinique Smith, whose work normally involves making monumental bundles of discarded fabric (à la the 19th-century rag picker), has here adapted her process to wrap and bind colorful fabrics to the branches of two trees at one of the entrances to the path, an open invitation to enter the woods to discover the unexpected. A bit further in, Elizabeth Demaray has ingeniously knitted her Plant Sweater around four or five thick, woody plant stems.The piece required Demaray to literally camp out onsite to do the knitting, part a series of what she calls “inappropriate caregiving activities” that she’s developed over the past few years. The tour de force on this wooded path, however, has to be Nina Katchadourian’s Twitchers and Cheaters, a multichannel video piece installed on a series of small LCD monitors on tree branches overhead. The screens feature videos of all 228 North American birds whose range (whether resident or migratory) includes The Fields. The title refers to a British slang term for birdwatchers (twitchers), and plays on the phenomenon of avid birdwatchers who keep a “life list” of all the species of birds they’ve observed. Theoretically, you could cheat and complete your life list for the Hudson Valley simply by standing in one spot, observing all the birds recorded on the video in the span of just a few minutes. (You might even want to use binoculars to get a closer look!) Katchadourian’s work offers a fascinating way of reframing our relationship to nature in/through technology—are they really such separate dimensions of experience? After all, the videos she’s used have come largely from CDs and


Women of New Orleans

Teresa Cole Nicole Charbonnet Dawn DeDeaux Shawn Hall Gina Phillips

August 9th - September 8th Reception: Saturday August 9th, 6-9pm

gallery hours: thursday- monday 11-6

ABOVE: KATIE HOLTEN, EXCAVATED TREE (MISSOURI NATIVE FLOWERING DOGWOOD), CARDBOARD, NEWSPAPER, WIRE, PVC, STEEL, DUCT TAPE, 2007-08 OPPOSITE: NINA KATCHADOURIAN, TWITCHERS AND CHEATERS, 5 VIDEO MONITORS, 2008

DVDs that were made for birdwatchers in the first place, people who would be expected to use the images as a mental reference as they hiked into nature to see the “real thing.” But the technologies we have created are themselves something real, aren’t they? It’s tempting to think of technology as something that keeps us at arm’s length from that big world outside. Driving in my car, I can crank up the radio and the AC and remain entirely oblivious to the heat, the sounds, and the smells of the places I pass through all too quickly. But that obliviousness is a choice on my part—I don’t necessarily have to barricade myself from the cycles and realities of the natural world, I can choose to embrace them instead. Twitchers and Cheaters was not always the title of Katchadourian’s piece—her original idea was to create a “bird organ” to accompany the videos with a soundtrack of recorded bird calls.Yet, as she spent time on the site, the artist noticed that there was already a wealth of natural birdsong in the woods, and she recognized the intensity to be gained by allowing her video representations of birds to interleave themselves with the already rich aural reality of the place. It is in this spirit of free and open exchange—a recognition of the radical interdependence of humans and nature, and of the creative embrace of improvisation as our special contribution to the larger reality of the world (as seen in Katie Holten’s re-created tree)—that we can experience any hope for the future. Ironically, perhaps it is the apparent unreality of art that can serve to bring us, literally and figuratively, back to Earth. “INTO THE TREES” IS OPEN THROUGH NOVEMBER 30 AT THE FIELDS SCULPTURE PARK AT OMI INTERNATIONAL ARTS CENTER IN GHENT. (518) 392-4747; WWW.ARTOMI.ORG.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM LUCID DREAMING 47


galleries & museums ALBERT SHAHINIAN FINE ART

CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK

GRIMM GALLERY

415 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-4346.

59 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-9957.

6 BROADHEAD AVENUE, NEW PALTZ 255-1660.

“Stopping TIME: An Exploration through Object & Image.” August 2-September 21.

“The Camera Always Lies.” Regional triennial of the photographic arts. Through August 17.

“A Notion to Sew.” 19th century needlework of Hylah Hasbrouk and her daughters. Through October 31.

Opening Saturday, August 2, 5pm-7pm.

COLLABORATIVE CONCEPTS

THE HARRISON GALLERY

THE ALDRICH CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM

853 OLD ALBANY POST ROAD, GARRISON 528-1797.

258 MAIN STREET, RIDGEFIELD, CONNECTICUT (203) 438-4519.

“Farm Project 2008.” Sculpture and installations by more than 40 artists on an historic, working farm. August 30-October 31.

39 SPRING STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS (413) 458-1700.

“Elizabeth Peyton: Portrait of an Artist.” Comprehensive exhibition of photographs. Through November 1.

Opening Saturday, August 30, 1pm-5pm.

Opening Saturday, August 2, 5pm-7pm.

COLUMBIA COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

ANN STREET GALLERY

HUDSON OPERA HOUSE

507 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 671-6213.

140 ANN STREET, NEWBURGH 562-6940 EXT. 119.

327 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-1438.

“Best in Show Public Art Project.” Through October 8.

“Printed Matter.” A contemporary view of printmaking in its many manifestations. Through August 2.

“Cassandra Jennings Hall.” Abstract art. Through August 16.

DEBORAH DAVIS FINE ART, INC.

“Story Lines.” Jack Millard. August 23-September 20.

510 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 822-1885.

Opening Saturday, August 23, 6pm-8pm.

“Bamboo.” Paintings and monoprints of Maj Kalfus. Through August 4.

HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART

THE ARKELL MUSEUM 2 ERIE BOULEVARD, CANAJOHARIE (518) 673-2314 “Wyeth Family Paintings.” Through September 21. “Winslow Homer: Watercolors.” Through October 12.

“Angles and Curves.” Sculptures by David Montgomery and Andrew Roberts. Through September 8.

ART IN THE LOFT

THE FIELDS SCULPTURE PARK

MILLBROOK WINERY, MILLBROOK 454-3222.

OMI INTERNATIONAL ARTS CENTER, GHENT (518) 392-4568.

“Art in the Loft: Summer 2008.” Works by Phillip Lynch and Carol Pepper-Cooper. Through August 24.

ARTISTS’ PALATE

museums & galleries

307 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 483-8074.

“Clench 2008.” Oliver Kruse. Through November 30. “Stepping Stones (Pots and Pans).” Jean Shin and Brian Ripel. Through November 30. “Twitchers and Cheaters.” Nina Katchadourian. Through November 30.

ARTS UPSTAIRS

FOVEA EXHIBITIONS

60 MAIN STREET, PHOENICIA 688-2142.

143 MAIN STREET, BEACON 765-2199.

“All Together Now.” Through August 10.

“Dispatches from the Frontlines: 12 Women Photojournalists.” Through August 9.

HUDSON VALLEY GALLERY 246 HUDSON STREET, CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON (845) 534-5278. “Animals in Art.” Paintings by Lucy DiMiceli, Fred Mitchell, and Clayton Buchanan, and photo images by Sue Aikin and Don Fowler. Through August 31.

IRIS GALLERY 47 RAILROAD STREET, GREAT BARRINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS (413) 644-9663. “Photography by Brigitte Carnochan.” Through August 11.

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY

Opening Saturday, August 16, 6pm-10pm.

THE FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER

362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907.

ASK ARTS CENTER

VASSAR COLLEGE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5632.

97 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 338-0331.

“Slate and Steel: Sisyphean Circle- Beijing Series.” John Van Alstine. Through August 10.

“Sketchbook Fruition.” Kate McGloughlin. August 2-31.

“Facebook: Images of People in Photographs from the Permanent Collection.” Through August 10.

Opening Saturday, August 2, 5pm-8pm.

G.A.S.

HUNTER VILLAGE SQUARE, HUNTER (518) 263-2060.

ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER

196 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 486-4592.

24 SECOND STREET, ATHENS (518) 945-2136.

“Posthumous Eruptum.” Works by Michael X. Rose. Through August 10.

“First Year of the Hudson River School of Landscape.” Through August 22.

“Baby Carriers: The Work of Leah Rhodes and Native Americans.” August 2-September 2.

KAATERSKILL FINE ARTS

KENT CABOOSE GALLERY

Opening Saturday, August 2, 3pm-8pm.

12 TANNERY BROOK ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-0027.

11 RAILROAD STREET, KENT, CONNECTICUT (860) 248-8800.

BARRETT ART CENTER

“Josephine Sacabo.” Photographs from “Nocturnes” and “Geometry of Echoes.” Through August 4.

“Poetic Landscapes: Mutum Est Pictura Poema.” Featuring Mary Hart, John McConnell, and Susan Vrotsos. Through August 3.

“Secret Garden.” Yumiko Izu. August 8-September 8.

KINGSTON MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART

Opening Saturday, August 9, 5pm-7pm.

105 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON KMOCA.ORG.

“Latin American Views.” Contemporary artists from the Hudson Valley. Through August 16.

GALLERY 384

“Nuclear Family.” Robotic family portraits by Matthew Kelly. August 2-31.

BAU 161 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-7584.

“Remove the Landmark.” Work by Cannon Hersey and Aaron Yassin. Through August 9.

“Steel and Stone Sculpture by Tom Holmes.” Through August 3.

GCCA CATSKILL GALLERY

39 WEST DORSEY LANE, HYDE PARK 437-4688.

“Proposal of the Drunken Poet.” Stone and steel sculpture and ice works photographs by Tom Holmes. Through August 3.

398 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 943-3400. “Artists’ Coats.” Solo exhibition featuring coats, vests, and jackets created by textile artist Lila Hollister Smith. August 9-September 27.

“Eclectic.” Group exhibit by Robert Ashley, Paola Bari, Ana Laura Gonzalez, Scott Helland, Jurg Lanzrein, Scott Mayer, Vanessa Muro, and Samantha Stephenson. August 30-31.

116 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-4539.

Opening Saturday, August 9, 5pm-7pm.

Opening Saturday, August 30, 5pm-7pm.

“Little Dancer.” Recent ceramic sculpture by Garth Evans. Through August 30.

“Fiber Dialogues.” Juried exhibition for artists who work with fibers and textiles. August 9-September 27.

LEO FORTUNA GALLERY

“The Objects of My Affection.” Lynn Itzkowitz. Through August 30.

Opening Saturday, August 9, 5pm-7pm.

BE GALLERY

“Gardens and Trees.” Group exhibition exploring gardens and trees in all media. Through August 2.

55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550. “Miles of Hope.” Breast Cancer Foundation art exhibition. Through August 16.

BCB ART GALLERY

11 MOHONK ROAD, HIGH FALLS 687-0660.

GALERIE BMG

384 MAIN STREET, CATSKILL (518) 947-6732.

Opening Saturday, August 2, 5pm-7pm.

LE PETIT CHATEAU

422 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 697-7907. “Levitating Rabbit.” Works by Liliana Porter. Through August 17.

MARIANNE COURVILLE GALLERY 341 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 755-4208.

“New Work by Judith Hoyt.” Through August 11.

“Search for the Sublime.” Oils and pastels by Michelle Moran. Through August 2.

BERTONI GALLERY

GCCA MOUNTAINTOP GALLERY

1392 KING’S HIGHWAY, SUGAR LOAF (845) 457- ARTS.

5348 MAIN STREET, WINDHAM (518) 734-3104.

MARK GRUBER GALLERY

“Visions of Sugar Loaf III.” Plein air paintings of Historic Sugar Loaf, Chester, and the area. Through August 28.

“Beautiful Greene.” Juried group exhibition exploring six unique spots in Greene County. August 2-September 20.

NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241.

“Hans Namuth: Selected Portraits 1950-1981.” Through October 12.

Opening Saturday, August 2, 4pm-6pm.

“Hudson Valley Landscapes.” Group show. Through September 3.

622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1915.

GO NORTH GALLERY

MONTGOMERY ROW SECOND LEVEL

“Summer Group Exhibit.” Kathy Burge, Lependorf + Shire, Margaret Saliske, Ralph Stout, Margaret Crenson. August 7-September 7.

469 MAIN STREET, BEACON GONORTHGALLERY@HOTMAIL.COM.

6423 MONTGOMERY STREET, RHINEBECK 876-6670.

Opening Saturday, August 9, 6pm-8pm.

“Resurrection Insurrection.” Michael X. Rose. Through August 3.

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY

48

1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 788-0100. “Works by Chris Jones.” Through August 17.

“Works by Kristopher Hedley.” Through August 31.

“Dog Days.” August 16-September 14.

“Hale Johnson.” Realist landscapes. August 2-31.

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES CHRONOGRAM 8/08

“An Inaugural Solo Exhibit—Photographs & Landscapes.” By Nicole Sausto-Grady. Through August 30.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 53


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8/08 CHRONOGRAM MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

49


Karl Schmidt-Rottluff ( German 1884-1976) Head of a Woman, 1916, woodcut Syracuse University Art Collection, Collection purchase

GERMAN EXPRESSIONIST PRINTS August 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 26, 2008

museums & galleries

THE FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER VASSAR COLLEGE http://fllac.vassar.edu

(845) 437-5632

The exhibition is organized by the Syracuse University Art Collection.

Hummingbird Jewelers Creators of Fine Gold and Diamond Jewelry

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Master goldsmiths specializing in custom design, antique restoration and remounting.

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Gemologist Bruce Lubman 20 West Market St. Rhinebeck, New York (845) 876-4585 hummingbirdjewelers.com 50

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES CHRONOGRAM 8/08


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110 Partition St. Saugerties, NY 12477 Open Tuesday - Saturday | 12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6

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Winslow Homer, On the Cliff, 1881, Arkell Museum Collection

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845r246r5250 shelleykgallery.com

Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art SUNY New Paltz new exhibitions All Hot and Bothered: Photographs from The Center for Photography at Woodstock through September 28, 2008 Paul Anthony

3 blocks from Exit 29 on the NYS Thruway (I-90)

2 Erie Boulevard, Canajoharie, NY 13317 518.673.2314 s www.arkellmuseum.org Monday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Friday: 10:00 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 pm Saturday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday: 12:30 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 pm

museums & galleries

by appt. Sunday & Monday

FULL SCHEDULE OF PERFORMING ARTS YEAR ROUND

ANSELM KIEFER

SCULPTURE AND PAINTINGS

conversations with curators

Tuesday, August 5 at 7:00 p.m. A special conversation with the exhibition curators Ariel Shanberg, CPW executive director, and Brian Wallace, SDMA curator, in the Howard Greenberg Family Gallery.

Noongar Boodja: Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Ecology and Culture through September 28, 2008 Athol Farmer

guided tours

Sundays at 2:00 p.m. on August 3, August 10, & August 17 Docent-guided tours will examine works by the Noongar artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Athol Farmer, Troy Bennell and Graham Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;who were inspired by drawings of the Stolen Generation of Aboriginal children incarcerated at the Carrolup Native Settlement in Katanning in Western Austrialia. Museum hours: Tuesday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Friday, 11:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 1:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 p.m. Admission is free Wheelchair accessible (845) 257-3844

For a complete listing of upcoming programs and current exhibitions visit the website at:

www.newpaltz.edu/museum

87 Marshall Street

North Adams, Massachusetts

413.MoCA.111

www.massmoca.org

8/08 CHRONOGRAM MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

51


Pictured: John Douglas Thompson and Merritt Janson

Lenox, MA

By William Shakespeare Directed by Tony Simotes NOW THROUGH AUGUST 31

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museums & galleries

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Pictured: Jason Asprey and Kristin Villaneuva

7-3353 are.org or 413-63 Tickets4Shakespe

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The Goatwoman of Corvis County THROUGH AUGUST 31

Plus: Always FREE Bankside Festival Sponsored in part by Teddi and Francis Laurin

Art Instruction with

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246 Hudson Street, PO Box 222, Cornwall-on-Hudson, NY 12520 (845) 534-5ART www.hudsonvalleygallery.com Open Saturday & Sunday 1-5pm or by appointment

Now featuring beautiful hand made designer clothing.

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Fine Art

21 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY 12498 | 845-679-3775 52

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES CHRONOGRAM 8/08


galleries & museums MORTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY

SAND LAKE CENTER FOR THE ARTS

82 KELLY STREET, RHINECLIFF 876-2903.

2880 ROUTE 43, AVERILL PARK (518) 674-2007.

“Landscape and Seascapes.” Watercolors by Ginny Collins. Through August 16.

“Julia Johnson Rothenberg.” Through August 15.

MOUNT TREMPER ARTS

SHARADA GALLERY

647 SOUTH PLANK ROAD, MOUNT TREMPER 688-9893.

45 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK 876-4828.

“Signs.” Group photography exhibit. Through August 31.

“Paper.” Featuring works on paper by seven artists from New York, Massachusetts and Louisiana. Through August 3.

MUDDY CUP 305 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 486-1378.

SPIRE STUDIOS

“Capturing the Magic of the Hudson River.” August 8-31.

45 BEEKMAN STREET, BEACON WWW.SPIRESTUDIOS.ORG.

Opening Friday, August 8, 6pm-8pm.

“Habitat for Artists.” Group show curates by Simon Draper. Through September 30.

NICOLE FIACCO GALLERY 506 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5090.

TALEO ARTS CENTER

“Solo Exhibition of Photographs by Karen Halverson.” August 16-September 20.

275 WEST SAUGERTIES ROAD, WOODSTOCK 810-0491.

Opening Saturday, August 16, 6pm-12am.

NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM 9 GLENDALE ROAD, STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS (413) 298-4100. “In Full Bloom: Artists Design Garden Gates.” Through September 7.

ORANGE HALL GALLERY ORANGE COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE, MIDDLETOWN 341-4790. “Artists in the Garden.” Through August 17.

Opening Friday, August 8, 5pm-7pm.

UNISON GALLERY WATER STREET MARKET, NEW PALTZ 255-1559. “Photographs of Lucille Weinstat.” August 5-29. Opening Tuesday, August 5, 4pm-6pm.

VAN BRUNT GALLERY 460 MAIN STREET, BEACON 838-2995. “New Works by Susan English.” Through August 4. “Overlook Paintings.” Works by Barbara Friedman. Through August 4.

PALENVILLE BRANCH LIBRARY

“Women of New Orleans.” Group show. August 9-September 8.

3335 ROUTE 23A, PALENVILLE (518) 678-3357.

Opening reception Saturday, August 9, 6-9pm.

“Palenville Photography Premier.” Through August 3.

VARGA GALLERY

JAMES W. PALMER GALLERY

130 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-4005.

VASSAR COLLEGE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5370. “Erik Schoonebeek: Selected Recent Works.” Through August 15.

“An Outsider’s World.” Works by Mike Heinrich & friends. Through August 3.

PARK ROW GALLERY

WHITECLIFF VINEYARDS

2 PARK ROW, CHATHAM (518) 392-4800.

331 MCKINSTRY ROAD, GARDINER 255-4613.

“Michael Zelehoski.” Solo exhibit of new work. Through August 2. “New Paintings by Ruth Shively.” August 13-September 8.

museums & galleries

“Moore sand Moore—Artfully Together.” Paintings and photographs by Virginia and James Moore. Through August 17.

“Poets Gallery Reunion Exhibition.” August 8-29.

“Wine Country—Old World and New World.” Photography by Robert Goldwitz. Through August 31.

Opening Saturday, August 16, 4pm-6pm.

PEARL GALLERY 3572 MAIN STREET, STONE RIDGE 687-0888. “Where Are We?” Contemporary group exhibit. Through September 6.

PEARLDADDY GALLERY 183 MAIN STREET, BEACON 765-0169. “The Best Medicine.” Paintings and sculpture by Edie Nadelhaft. Through August 3.

THE PHOTOGRAPHY CENTER OF THE CAPITAL REGION 404 RIVER STREET, TROY (518) 273-0100.

WILLIAM MAXWELL FINE ARTS 1204 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 737-8622. “INside/OUTside.” Works by six artists exhibited inside and outside the gallery. Through September 21.

WILLIAMS COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 15 LAWRENCE HALL DRIVE, WILLIAMSTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS (413) 597-2429. “Laser Show: Six Perspectives on a Chaotic Resonator.” The relationship between visual, aural, and physical vibration and its ability to carry information. Through September 14.

“Vision Beyond.” Photographs by Andrew Davidhazy. Through August 10.

RIVERFRONT STUDIOS 96 BROAD STREET, SCHUYLERVILLE (518) 695-5354. “Summer Suite.” Through August 30.

ROSENDALE CAFE 434 MAIN STREET, ROSENDALE 658-9048. “New Works by Cindy Hoose & Jacinta Bunnell.” August 3-31. Opening Sunday, August 3, 2pm-4pm.

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM 28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2940. “Betty Sturges (1913-2003): A Retrospective.” August 9-24. Opening Saturday, August 9, 4pm-6pm. “For My Father.” Works by WAAM member September Heart. Through August 3. “Green.” Through August 17. “Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection.” Through September 21.

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART SUNY NEW PALTZ, NEW PALTZ 257-3858. “All Hot and Bothered.” Photographs from The Center for Photography at Woodstock. Through September 28.

“WAAM Active Members Show.” Rebecca Daniels, William Gotebeski and Sarah Mecklem. Through August 17. JENNIFER AXINN-WEISS

WOODSTOCK SCHOOL OF ART

Meeting Sky, oil on panel, 17.75” x 79”

“Defining Art: Recent Acquisitions 2005-2007.” Work by Abbott, Atget, CartierBresson, Chia, Nice, Oliveira, and Rauschenberg. Through August 31.

2470 ROUTE 212, WOODSTOCK 679-2388.

Represented by Sharada Gallery

“The Medium is the Message.” Hudson Valley Artists 2008. Through September 7.

“Regional Exhibition 2008.” August 9-September 6. Opening Saturday, August 9, 2pm-4pm.

Showing at Upper Catskill Council for the Arts August 22 through September 20.

“Noongar Boodja: Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Ecology and Culture.” Through September 28. “Reading Objects 2008.” Works from the Museum’s collection with texts created by University faculty and staff. Through September 28.

ZAHRA GALLERY 496 MAIN STREET, BEACON 838-6311. “The Native American Lowbrow Art of Chris Pappan.” Through August 16.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

53


Music

FIONN REILLY

BY PETER AARON

VLADIMIR PLESHAKOV AND ELENA WINTHER AT THE PRIDE OF THE PLESHAKOV PIANO MUSEUM, AN 1826 TISCHNER GRAND FORTEPIANO, ONE OF ONLY THREE IN THE WORLD.

PRESERVATION SOCIETY The Pleshakov Piano Museum An afternoon in Hunter. A darkened vestibule. A closed door.There’s music on the other side. Faint, twinkling, beautiful. It’s Chopin’s fourth ballade.Turn the knob and push the door open, ever so delicately… The sunny, white-walled, air-conditioned space is the size of a dance hall. This facility, however, is not one meant for dancing, but for listening and gazing, gazing at the dozens of breathtakingly gorgeous antique pianos that take up roughly two thirds of the room, their richly polished wood glinting in the light. Lining one long wall is a shelf holding hundreds of LPs and clothbound books; framed recital posters and a Baroque tapestry hang above tables filled with stacks of 19th-century music scores, their yellowed covers adorned with elaborately flourished, gold leaf lettering. At the opposite end of the long room sits a lone gray-haired man, his back to the door, playing one of the magnificent instruments. He glances back a couple of times but never lifts his hands from the keys, continuing to play for the next 15 minutes or so, until the supremely moving piece is completed. But when it does end, it ends too soon. 54 MUSIC CHRONOGRAM 8/08

One wishes the perfect scene could’ve just gone on forever. And if the player has his way, in some form it will. The pianist is Vladimir Pleshakov, and this is the museum that bears his name. The Pleshakov Piano Museum’s first incarnation was as the Pleshakov Music Center, opened by the musician and his wife and fellow concert pianist Elena Winther in Hudson in 2002. But eventually, that city’s higher property taxes forced the couple to relocate, and they purchased a house in Jewett, reopening the museum in nearby Hunter’s Doctorow Center for the Arts in 2006. At the facility, Pleshakov and Winther teach master classes and present concerts and lectures. But of course the real attraction is the museum’s collection of dozens of absolutely stunning antique pianos, organs, and harpsichords, many of which have been donated or loaned by collectors from around the world. Several of these highly ornate pieces date from as far back as the 1700s—and all of them have been fully restored to be completely playable; indeed, the couple


frequently stages programs of period music using the appropriate instruments. As far as the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staff knows, no other site in America has a remotely comparable collection of vintage keyboards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each of these instruments is a living time machine,â&#x20AC;? says Pleshakov, his Russian accent still intact after decades in America. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They represent the true height of human endeavor, and they show what life and people and the composers and musicians were really like in their day.â&#x20AC;? He points to a 1789 Longman & Broaderip pianoforte, made when Mozart was composing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The keys are so sensitive. You can pretty much blow on them and it will play,â&#x20AC;? he says, letting his fingers dance across the keyboard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It sounds soft compared to a modern grand [piano], but in its day it was a very loud instrument, because everything else in the world was quieter then. So, of course, the violins and cellos of the chamber groups were softer too.â&#x20AC;? Nearby is the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other crown jewel, an inlay-festooned 1826 Tichener, built for Russian royalty and acquired by the couple at a California estate sale years ago for â&#x20AC;&#x153;the price of an old jalopy.â&#x20AC;? Pleshakovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own story is at least as interesting as that of any of the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artifacts. Born to Russian parents in Shanghai in 1934, he moved between the famously international cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s French, British, and Chinese sectors, learning the language and culture of each. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shanghai was still the world capital of sin in those days, but I was too young to take advantage of it,â&#x20AC;? he says with a grin. His parents nurtured his interest in music with piano lessons, and after surviving the Japanese occupation during World War II, the family moved to Australia in 1949, where he debuted as the Syndey Symphonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concert pianist at the age of 16. In the mid 1950s, the Pleshakovs immigrated to California, where the young musician enrolled at UC Berkeley. There he met and dated local native Winther, who had made her own debut at 18 with the San Francisco Symphony under the direction of Arthur Fiedler. The pair went their separate ways until meeting again in 1984 and marrying two years later. They lived in France and toured the world until 1999, when they became Hudson Valley residents. Like most things in life, Winther says, the museum was never something the two had planned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just sort of materialized,â&#x20AC;? she explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d found the Tichener and had had it when we were in France, and then the others just started finding us. But people really seem to love the museum and want to see it continue. We actually had someone from the state call and ask us to apply for grants that we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know about to keep it open, if you can believe that.â&#x20AC;? Throughout the summer, the museum has been presenting its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Piano: King of Instrumentsâ&#x20AC;? concert series, which takes place in the Doctorow Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adjacent Weisberg Hall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perfect situation for us because the stage is right next to the museum,â&#x20AC;? Pleshakov says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can literally just open a door and roll the pianos right onto the stage and then begin the concert.â&#x20AC;? One of the seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; regular attendees, and an occasional performer at other museum concerts, is Michael Wedd, 16, who, along with his brother Patrick, 12, is also one of Pleshakovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s star students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To be able to hear something by Mozart played on a Mozartean piano is just an incredible experience,â&#x20AC;? says Wedd. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just adds something else entirely. Plus, [Pleshakov and Winther] are very good speakers; they make the subjects really interesting even to people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know so much about music. And I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imagine anyone not being awestruck when they get to see the pianos. To see so many different periods represented in one place is unbelievable.â&#x20AC;? Along with such supporters as esteemed French pianist Lucien Geurinel, Wedd has contributed an essay to Pianos on the Mountain, a collection of writings about the museum and its founders due to be published this fall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It really is an amazing, important place,â&#x20AC;? says Albany-area pianist, musicologist, and instrument collector William Carragan, whose Civil War-era Steinway is currently housed at the site. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That people can just walk inâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and even touch or playâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so many fantastic, historic instruments is just incredible. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m so glad it exists and that people can enjoy it.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are several more instruments weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come across that are waiting to be restored and brought in,â&#x20AC;? says Pleshakov. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really want and hope the museum will continue, and even keep growing, after Elena and I are gone.â&#x20AC;? Anyone who pays a visit to this magical mountain sanctuary will certainly hope the same. For the third installment of its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Piano: King of Instrumentsâ&#x20AC;? concert series,â&#x20AC;? the Pleshakov Piano Museum will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Russian Musical Treasuresâ&#x20AC;? on August 9 at 8pm in the Doctorow Center for the Artsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Weisberg Hall.The museum itself is open by appointment. (518) 263-3333; www.catskillmtn.org.

                  

  

   

  

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UPSTATE MUSICIANS AND ARTISTS: Your work deserves attention. Which means you need a great bio for your press kit or website. One thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tight. Clean. Professionally written. Something memorable. Something a booking agent, a record-label person, a promoter, or a gallery owner wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just use to wipe up the coffee spill on their desk before throwing away. You need my skills and experience.

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8/08 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 55


NIGHTLIFE HIGHLIGHTS Handpicked by local scenemaker DJ WAVY DAVY for your listening pleasure.

FRIDAY AUG 1st - SPIV C .D. Release Par ty SAT AUG 2nd - MAWAL / Infinite Will & Nina Mars

SUN AUG 3rd - THE SWEET CLEMENTINES / TWO DOLLAR GOAT FRI AUG 8 - GUS MANCINI with his SONIC SOUL AWE-KESTRA

SAT AUG 9 - “ROOTS OF THE 1969 WOODSTOCK FESTIVAL SUN AUG 24 - planet Noise music presents a JOHN LENNON tribute

JOHN LUDINGTON August 2. Songsmith Ludington, who describes his sound as “acoustic eclectic,” heads east from his Northern California home to the Hudson Valley of his youth, performing tonight at 60 Main with Seth Faergolzia of Dufus, Quitzow, and Setting Sun. Ludington’s second solo release, Some Glitter (2008, Independent), is a 10-track lo-fi album originally recorded in 1999 on a four-track analog recorder. The Some Glitter tour starts in Brooklyn, heads to Pennsylvania, and returns to California at summer’s end. Ludington’s voice has been compared to the likes of Greg Brown, Donovan, and Ben Harper; excellent company indeed. 9pm. Call for ticket prices. New Paltz. (845) 255-1901. www.60main.org.

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August 3. You could travel to Tennessee for Bonnaroo. But how about just to Sullivan County—where it all began, in more ways than one? After you hit the Museum at Bethel Woods, take a trip down the hill into Yasgur’s field and rock out to Eric Burdon & The Animals, Jack Bruce of Cream, The Turtles featuring Flo & Eddie (c’mon, it’s Flo & Eddie!), Melanie, Badfinger, and Terry Sylvester of the Hollies. A full line of flower-power paraphernalia, including tie-dye T-shirts, stickers, and posters will be available. Wait, just added: Jonathan Edwards! 2:30pm. $23-$60. Bethel Woods. (888) 297-3031. www.bethelwoodscenter.org.

BUTTER August 8. Club-hopping has other advantages besides free peanuts and chatty barkeeps. One night, while enjoying an early PBR at The Basement, the only other barfly and I struck up a conversation about music, and he turned out to be the harmonica player for hot new blues band Butter (named for legendary blues harpist Paul Butterfield). A quick click later on fave site HVMusic.com and, lo and behold, there’s Butter, led by hardy drummer Tony Parker (of the famous drumming Parker brothers and the late and lamented funk unit Blue Food), sliding into New World Home Cooking. This fivepiece blues/soul/R&B unit spreads it on thick, just the way we like it. 9pm. No cover. Saugerties. (845) 246-0900. www.newworldhomecooking.com.

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or visit our website: cpdmusic.com

TIFT MERRITT August 9. The lovely and soulful Merritt has long been bubbling under as the Next Big Thing, but this looks like her year (thanks in part to the patronage of Emmylou Harris, who praises Merritt as “like a diamond in a coal patch”). Her rock n’ roll, soul, and country songwriting voice is hard-earned: After dating alt-country bad boy Ryan Adams (who penned a tune about her) and getting out of a disappointing major-label contract, she’s back and independently fierce here at the Towne Crier in support of her highly-acclaimed new CD, Another Country (2008, Fantasy Records). Her 2004 album, Tambourine (Lost Highway), garnered Merritt a Grammy nomination and praise from Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone, and NPR. And, she’s appeared on both Leno and Letterman! Not bad for a lil’ ol’ surfer girl from North Carolina. The alluring Jess Klein opens this highly recommended show. 9pm. $20, $25. Pawling. (845) 855-1300.

JACK DEJOHNETTE/PAT METHENY/LARRY GRENADIER August 28, 29. Jazz legends and Hudson Valley neighbors DeJohnette, Metheny, and Grenadier team up at the Bearsville Theater for a doubleheader of incredible music in a benefit for the Karma Triyana Dharmachakra Tibetan Buddhist Monastery and Family of Woodstock. Despite being long time collaborators (Grenadier has been performing and recording with Metheny for over a decade), this will be the first time the three have shared a stage. All proceeds from the shows will be donated to the two beneficiaries. “Good vibes” doesn’t even begin to describe this harmonic convergence. 7pm. $35-$65. Woodstock. (845) 679-4406. www.Bearsvilletheater.com.

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CD REVIEWS BOB GLUCK TRIO SIDEWAYS (2008, FMR RECORDS)

FFor some of us in the early 21st century, tradition is the s sound of freedom. Such is the case with this new work l Albany’s Bob Gluck, an accomplished and passionled a pianist in the most elusive tradition of avant-garde ate m masters Cecil Taylor, Andrew Hill, McCoy Tyner, and D Pullen. He’s captured the magic of being at once Don s sentimental and Space Pong crazy. Here and there, G Gluck surprises the listener with the blast of a shofar ( (ram’s horn), doctored voice samples, and what he c “electronic expansion of acoustic instruments.” calls T techno addition is a surprising delight. With the This able-bodied support of Albany’s Michael Bisio on bass and the Hudson Valley’s excellent Dean Sharp on drums and percussion, Gluck crafts a language of intense thinking, feeling, listening, and creating, mostly all at once. Eight delicately structured originals and three tasty, personalized covers of tunes by Ornette Coleman and Joe Zawinul find these players conversing in ways that are sometimes silent as well as soaring and singing. These are seasoned improvising musicians who have found and honed their own communication skills and brought them to a greater whole. There’s no “follow the leader” and no “let’s make weird sounds” going on. This kind of mature freedom is very elusive to players and listeners alike—which is the tradition of improvised music, after all. www.fmr-records.com. —Erik Lawrence

K. OSGOOD PLAY TO WIN

Kingstonʼs 6th Annual

Latin Festival! Sunday August 10, 2008 TR Gallo Park on the Rondout in Kingston, NY 12 noon to 8 pm Cratfs, raffles, kids’ games & rides!

LIVE MUSIC! Alex Torres

and his Latin Orchestra

(2008, INDEPENDENT)

H Here’s yet another artist who is difficult to categorrize, as she doesn’t nestle comfortably into some sstale pop, rock, or jazz box. Think of settling back oon a rainy day with something remotely akin to Fiona A Apple or Norah Jones, and you probably have K. Osggood (aka Kathleen Osgood) half figured out.There’s ssomething melancholy and enigmatic about the 12 ddiverse tracks on Play to Win. These are not cheerful s songs; though mostly relationship-oriented, they’re s strangely delicate and brooding, cloaked in loneliness, l longing, and feelings of entrapment while ultimately r retaining a sense of hopefulness. Osgood’s vocals are di i i andd moody, d di l i unforgettable f distinctive displaying nuances that are somewhat haunting. Each track on the album offers a tight, catchy groove that stays with you long after the last note has faded. Recorded and mixed by coproducer Robert Bard at Skytop Sound in New Paltz, the CD also features first-rate studio players who add vital character to these songs—guitarist John Schrader, drummer Eric Parker, keyboardist Peter Vitalone, and many others (Osgood herself occasionally kicks in on keyboard bass). If you’re on the lookout for a musician with depth and warmth, the engaging and unpredictable Osgood is one to investigate. www.cdbaby.com/kosgood. —Sharon Nichols

Wayne Gorbea & Salsa Picante Dondé Esta tú Hermano? (“Where’s your Brother?”) by Michael Monasterial

a 25 Minute Play with Laughter, Music, & Tears begins at 1:15pm

Great Latino Food! Organized by R. T. Bruno/Bruno's Deli

STONEY CLOVE LANE STAY WITH ME (2008, WOODSTOCK MUSICWORKS)

S Stoney Clove Lane smacks of ’60s and ’70s rock influeences that will bring baby boomers back to the days bbefore condoms, crack, and neocons. Named after a rroad in Chichester, the band draws upon the woods ffor inspiration—and woodsy folks for guest appearaances on this record. The music is extremely thick, ssmoky, and syrupy, like a good country breakfast. But iit is cold-comfort food. The lyrics reek of lost love, eempty houses, and wistful days. Thankfully, singer JJeremy Bernstein has a voice born for sincerity and w woe, tainted from too much whiskey and cigarettes and late-night stokings of the woodstove. His partners capitalize on the drama with sound collages built from B3s and banjos. Peeking through the dirge are meaty electric guitar tones that would make the rock gods proud. The result melds contemporary voicings of Devendra Banhart and the Black Crowes’ Chris Robinson with the old-school roadhousings of the Steve Miller Band, Steppenwolf, Traffic, and early Nazareth. The songs don’t break new ground, nor do they claim to. This is homegrown roots rock with country spice and folk sprinkles. Although there are some extremely catchy gems (“Crawl,” “Castles Fall”), striking some of the lyrically and compositionally pedestrian tracks (the title cut and “Life Keeps Rollin’ By”) would have made for a much stronger record (that, and another ear on the drum mix). Even so, many will find Stoney Clove Lane an accomplished and pleasant respite from the frenetic bleeps and bloops of today. See the band live on August 17 at the Rosendale Sunday Summer Series. www.stoneyclove.com —Jason Broome

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Music and M.C. by R&M Promotions 8/08 CHRONOGRAM MUSIC 57


Books

BOOK OF DANIEL by Nina Shengold photo by Jennifer May

A

young boy walks into a room, and his elderly relatives burst into tears. The reason—usually offered in Yiddish—is that he resembles his great-uncle Shmiel, who, along with his wife and four beautiful daughters, was killed by the Nazis. This piece of family lore was repeated, with great displays of emotion and precious few details, throughout Daniel Mendelsohn’s childhood. After recounting it in his 1999 memoir The Elusive Embrace, the author set out to discover exactly what happened to Shmiel and his family, tracking down relatives and surviving witnesses on several continents. The resulting book, The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million, was a runaway bestseller, garnering literary respect while selling like hot cakes in 12 different countries. So what do you do for an encore? When Mendelsohn isn’t writing about himself or his family, he reviews books, plays, and films for the NewYork Review of Books, the NewYorker, and other A-list periodicals. “Being a critic is what I am,” he declares on a sunny afternoon in his Bard College apartment. After spending “a solid five years” on The Lost, he decided to collect his critical writings, “to have that part of my personality between covers.” How Beautiful It Is and How Easily It Can Be Broken, forthcoming from HarperCollins, has already won praise from PublishersWeekly and Booklist. Mendelsohn’s clearly enjoying his life. He just turned in a manuscript he’s been polishing for 10 years—a translation of C. P. Cavafy’s complete poems, to be released by Knopf in April 2009—and he’s about to fly to Capri; a packed red suitcase sits on the rug. It’s enough to swell anyone’s head, but Mendelsohn hasn’t forgotten his roots.When he finished his PhD and moved to NewYork in 1994, he wrote freelance magazine fluff like “Food Courts of Las Vegas.” “I lived on ramen noodles for three years. I knew every CVS that sold them for five for a dollar instead of four for a dollar.” He grins. “I am not one of those people who pretends to be blasé about having an international bestseller.” That grin flashes often; a slightly skewed tooth lends it a Mephistophelean air. Mendelsohn’s head is neatly shaved, his light-blue eyes rendered even more striking by high, arching brows. In repose, his gaze is intense, even challenging; one senses that nothing gets past him without being noticed. He wears his erudition lightly, with a vocabulary that swoops from “meretricious” to “nutty,” sometimes in the same sentence. His coffee table displays books in several languages; his sink displays Believe in God breath spray and Oy Vey body detergent. There seem to be a lot of Daniel Mendelsohns. This, indeed, is the theme of his extraordinary memoir. Subtitled “Desire and the Riddle of Identity,” The Elusive Embrace examines the multiple lives one person may lead, opening with “For a long time I have lived in two places.” One is the New Jersey suburb where Mendelsohn lives part-time with a woman and child while teaching classics at Princeton. The other is a studio apartment near Chelsea’s “gay ghetto,” the epicenter of a cruising life he describes with startling frankness. 58 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Daniel Mendelsohn in the living room of his apartment on the Bard campus.

Mendelsohn’s route to fatherhood was nontraditional. In 1996, when a friend was unpartnered and pregnant, he went with her to the delivery room. The depth of his bond with her son astonished him. He started staying with them several nights a week, at first because it was close to his teaching job, later because it was part of the complex geography of “home.” Four years later, she adopted a second son; Mendelsohn calls the boys, in print and in person, “my kids.” Since that time, “home” has expanded to a third address, at Bard, not to mention a plethora of hotels. “It’s easy to get caught up in this endless schlepping around promoting your book,” he says. At one point Mendelsohn flew to France four times in three months. “I’m huge in France,” adding, “There’s a different response in Europe because it happened in Europe. People come up to you afterwards and tell their stories, their family’s stories. It’s not theoretical.” His own family’s response to The Lost was “very emotional.” Mendelsohn’s four siblings joined him on many research trips to Eastern European villages and to Auschwitz; his brother Matt’s photographs appear throughout the book. “My mother had the hardest time—she had nightmares every night.” (Marlene Mendelsohn’s only request as her son wrote the manuscript was a plaintive “Did you put that I had nice legs?”) Publication was “a big thrill for everyone,” Mendelsohn says. “My father’s so cute—every day he checks my Amazon rating. This is two years after the book came out.” He anticipates a calmer reception for How Beautiful It Is And How Easily It Can Be Broken, which takes its title from a stage direction in Tennessee Williams’s “The Glass Menagerie.” The book includes 30 critical essays culled from a vast body of work. As he reviewed his reviews, Mendelsohn noticed recurring themes: masculinity and femininity, images of women, sexuality—and, of course, classics. (A graduate student once challenged him to write a review of anything without referring to Greek tragedy—‘‘a bet I lost,” he says ruefully.) In the book’s introduction, he defends this propensity. “If I mention Aristotle’s or Horace’s theories of poetry in my review of Troy, it’s not out of some kind of loyalty for my subject—product placement for the Classics—but because no one has ever stated as crisply and usefully just what it is that epic is supposed to do for its


audience.â&#x20AC;? His reviews of wannabe epics Troy and 300 are a hoot, including such zingers as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of the dialogue is in a mode perhaps best described as fauxlegendaryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the kind typically accompanied by much clasping of forearms.â&#x20AC;? How Beautiful opens boldly, with a sock in the jaw to The Lovely Bones. Analyzing why Seboldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clichĂŠ-ridden novel became a breakout phenomenon, Mendelsohn concludes that its â&#x20AC;&#x153;feel-good redemptionâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;infantine vision of Heaven as a cross between a rehab program (Susie gets an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;intake counselorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; when she arrives) and an all-you-can-eat restaurantâ&#x20AC;? was ideal comfort food for postâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;9/11 America. The bookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final entry, â&#x20AC;&#x153;9/11 at the Movies,â&#x20AC;? on Oliver Stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Trade Center and Paul Greenglassâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s United 93, also includes the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own wrenching account. Driving downtown to pick up a friend, Mendelsohn looked up as a plane streaked into the North Tower. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A gigantic ball of bright orange fire ballooned out of the tower, followed by vast plumes of dense, black smoke,â&#x20AC;? he reports. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first, irrational thought that came into my staggered mind was that someone was making a blockbuster disaster movie.â&#x20AC;? This tension between what is real and what is created to simulate reality informs the whole essay. Mendelsohn observes that â&#x20AC;&#x153;however random the assignments you accept, you always wind up writing your own intellectual autobiography,â&#x20AC;? and his essay on Brokeback Mountain is a case in point. When his editor assigned a review, he demurred. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a wonderful movie, yet thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no traction. But something was working my nerve.â&#x20AC;? After seeing it for the third time with his friend Michael Chabon, Mendelsohn saw a newspaper ad trumpeting â&#x20AC;&#x153;the movie everyone in America is in love with.â&#x20AC;? Lightning struck. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not something in the movie thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bothering me, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been received, the spin on it as not a gay movie but a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;universal love story.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? He went upstairs and pounded out the essay in one sitting, fueled by outrage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Both narratively and visually, Brokeback Mountain is a tragedy about the specifically gay phenomenon of the closet,â&#x20AC;? he wrote, underlining a crucial distinction from social tragedies of the Montague/Capulet model: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those lovers, no matter how star-crossed, never despise themselves.â&#x20AC;? (From The Elusive Embrace: â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no gay man of my generation whose first experience of desire was not a kind of affliction, that did not teach us to associate longing with shame.â&#x20AC;?) â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the things I like about writing for the NewYork Review of Books is that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like having a conversation,â&#x20AC;? says Mendelsohn, who exchanged pointed letters with the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s producer, James Schamus. But the critical scene is changing fast. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Books coverage is shrinking everywhere: newspapers, magazines.Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more competition for less coverage nationwide,â&#x20AC;? he observes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What interests me right now is the culture of criticism being transformed by the Internet and blogs, the blogosphere. Criticism used to be self-evidently a function of people having a certain training and background, which gave them a platform for opining. Now, everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a critic, to quote my grandmother.â&#x20AC;? Though Mendelsohn blames bloggers for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;glut of mean and snarkyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the snarky moment,â&#x20AC;? he also offers a corrective to the myth of the power-mad critic, sharpening his axe for the kill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Critics go into everything hoping to be delighted,â&#x20AC;? he asserts. The negative â&#x20AC;&#x153;comes out of disappointment that something you wanted to love has not met its potential.â&#x20AC;? Mendelsohn writes in bed, propped up on lots of pillows with his laptop. He starts by turning on the TV (â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stand to do it alone, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the worst part of writingâ&#x20AC;?), favoring Law & Order reruns or CNN. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I trick myself. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not writing, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just watching TV, and if an opening line happens to occur to me, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll write it down,â&#x20AC;? he explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I think of my lede, I can write the whole piece. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in. I know the terrain. If I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have that first sentence, I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t write anything else. I spend a lot of time eating Doritos and procrastinating: Oh, I should plant more lavender. Then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the point where my eyes roll back in my head and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m there; I have no idea the TV is even on.â&#x20AC;? He shrugs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I used to be ashamed of it, until a shrink I was seeing said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the problem? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re blocked.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m awed by friends who write 1,500 words a day, or 10 pages every morning. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s idiosyncratic.Whatever works for you. But I hate the icky period, the Doritos period. And people who leave off in midsentence?â&#x20AC;? Daniel Mendelsohn shudders extravagantly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is what comes of being raised by strict, neat parents. I have to get to the end.â&#x20AC;?

(PPE&OFSHZ Since 1987, Mirabai has provided a sanctuary for inspiration, transformation and healing in the heart of Woodstock. Come and experience an astounding array of books, music, gifts and workshops for a more conscious, healthy, peaceful life.

.JSBCBJ of Woodstock #PPLTt.VTJDt(JGUT Workshops Tarot Decks t Eastern Philosophy t Integrative Healing t Feng Shui t Reiki Essential Oils t Yoga & Bodywork t Channeled Materials t Energy Medicine Esoteric Christianity t Sufism t Nutrition t Meditation Cushions t Ayurveda Healing Music t Personal Growth t Crystals t Sacred Statuary t Celtic t Incense Kundalini t Astrology t Kabbalah t Consiousness t Shamanism t Mysticism

Nourishment for Mind & Spirit ÂŽ

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SHORT STORY CONTEST

Chronogramâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2008 short story contest is open to all writers in the greater Hudson Valley region. Submission deadline: September 8. Send entries of 4,000 words or less to ďŹ ction@chronogram.com.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 59


Tackling Tobacco Video Contest! CALLING ALL YOUTH FILMMAKERS fight Big Tobacco by making and sharing videos!

ENTER YOUR VIDEO BY SEPTEMBER 15th! ROCK THE VIDEO VOTE! Chance to WIN an iPod and More Open to Middle and High School Youth

children’s media project For more information go to

childrensmediaproject.org or call Mary Ellen at CMP (845)485-4480

WORDS WORDS WORDS

Writers Reading from Their Work Sunday, July 27, 3 to 5 p.m. Fergus Bordewich, Susan Richards, and Paul Russell Sunday, August 24, 3 to 5 p.m. James Howard Kunstler, John Darnton, and Hillary Jordan

Mystery Meets History: A Story Adventure at Maple Grove Sunday, October 19, 2 to 4 p.m. with storytellers Lorraine Hartin-Gelardi, Karen Pillsworth, and Patricia Tomlinson

Maple Grove is a “Hudson River Bracketed” country villa built in 1850. It is located in Poughkeepsie, New York. Its entrance is at 24 Beechwood Avenue. Check the website for further information: www.maplegroveny.org

60 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 8/08

A Spring without Bees: How Colony Collapse Disorder Has Endangered Our Food Supply Michael Schacker Lyons Press, , .

A

lert observers of current events may have noticed, half buried in the general melange of war/gas prices/ politics/ celeb gossip that passes for What’s Happening Now, some alarming news about bees cropping up in the past few seasons. They’re going missing. To anyone with a glancing familiarity with how ecosystems work, this is an upsetting prospect. Besides being iconic, bees play a crucial role in the agricultural process; without them, we can kiss a lot of food crops good-bye. When a news broadcast touches upon the subject of the missing bees, it’s usually in mystified tones. Where, oh, where could the bees be? What’s causing this phenomenon? Woodstock author Michael Schacker offers some plausible answers—ones that a lot of Powers That Be probably don’t want to accept. To the extent that one accepts his theory—and his evidence seems compelling—this explains both Colony Collapse Disorder (as the bees’ vanishing act is officially called) and the media silence surrounding its roots. Referencing the French experience with Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), Schacker implicates IMD, a relatively new pesticide and close cousin to DDT, manufactured in its most widespread form by Bayer. This revelation has a feeling of inevitability to it, like fi nding out that the murderer who drew the light sentence was the Congressman’s cousin. Though Schacker’s tone can sometimes get a little strident, any initial annoyance on the reader’s part is dissipated by the urgency of his message. By the time we get to the section titled “The Government Responds?” we are very much with him. As the front flyleaf of the book points out, it’s been 100 years since the birth of Rachel Carson, and A Spring without Bees makes a fi ne testament to how right she was—and how little she’s been heeded. Looking beyond IMD and Bayer to uncover the deeper whys, Schacker makes it crystal-clear that deregulation of pesticide manufacturers—and the lobbyists who currently steer the EPA and the FDA—have brought us all to the brink of a new defi nition of CCD. That would be Civilization Collapse Disorder, and intervening at this point will take a vast and basic paradigm shift. But Schacker doesn’t merely wring his hands and moan. He offers a potpourri of hopeful small suggestions that, if widely adopted, could have big results: nontoxic lawns, starting our own bee gardens, planting our streetscapes with lovely silver linden trees and our agricultural fields with hedgerows. Organic and regenerative agriculture, he points out, are things we know how to do. Natural predators can take care of bee mites without hurting a soul, and the Earth, properly understood, can still rebound enough to help us heal its biosphere. But there is no time to waste. Schacker has not only written a book that manages to convince, educate, and somehow amuse at the same time, he’s also the founder of The New Earth Institute, an online transformative learning center. At this writing, he’s recovering from a catastrophic stroke. He should be in all our thoughts. Not only is his heart very clearly in the right place, but his boring-but-erudite statistics are relegated to appendices, a habit more science writers might emulate. A Spring without Bees poses the question: could the humble honeybee be the agent of our planetary awakening? Michael Schacker’s book is a powerful wake-up call. There will be a presentation at the Woodstock Public Library on August 16 at 5pm. —Anne Pyburn


INQUIRING MINDS BOOKSTORE David Rothenberg Basic Books, , .

W

Upcoming Reading/Signing Events: Sunday, August 17 @ 2:30 p.m.

Encyclopedia of Shamanism by Christine Pratt, essential for mind and spirit.

Thursday, August 21 @ 6:30 p.m.

The Noteworthy Adventures of the Knights of No Renown by Andrew Austin, an epic poem about seven outcasts who go in search of a better life.

Saturday, August 23 @ 2:30 p.m.

Ladybug Girl by Jacky Davis and David Soman, a sweet and cheerful story about a curious not-so-little girl.

...also on Aug. 23 @ 6:30 p.m.

Journey from the Center to the Page by Jeff Davis, the first book to show how yoga can help create better writing.

Saturday, August 30 @ 6:30 p.m.

Award-Winning Catskill Poets: Philip Pardi, author of Meditations on Rising and Falling; Matthew J. Spireng, author of Out of Body; and Will Nixon, author of My Late Mother as a Ruffed Grouse.

Institute of Transpersonal Psychology SPERSON AL AN TR

OLOGY YCH PS

e owe much to whales. The first recordings of humpback whale songs, made in the 1960s, stunned the world. This music helped launch the green movement, and would have an immeasurable effect on wildlife conservation policy. The songs were different then, more melodic—a generation later, these whales are on to something else. Their sound, their aesthetic, is changing constantly. One might even wonder whether the songs from that era had a particular intention, a special hook, for our ears—whether these animals were trying, via music, to save themselves and their planet. Upon hearing these early recordings, artists and composers promptly took up the cause. Judy Collins, on her 1971 gold album Whales and Nightingales, sang a chantey with the backup accompaniment of a humpback. Captain Beefheart, David Crosby, Don Cherry, and John Cage all ventured in, finding ways to commune with the cetacean sensibility. Pete Seeger stated the case in the plainest terms: “If we can save our singers in the sea / Perhaps there’s a chance to save you and me.” Musician and philosopher David Rothenberg is at the current vanguard of interspecies music. His previous book, Why Birds Sing, detailed his jazzy duos with thrushes and other peregrinations in avian musicality. More recently, he has been jamming with whales—voyaging far and wide with his clarinet, and discussing the mysteries of these intelligent mammals with experts. Reading his searching chronicle, Thousand Mile Song, one never loses sight of the line between science and art; the ethical questions that arise as the author encroaches on this boundary become an important part of his inquiry. In general, his musical experiment is welcomed by the pros as an eco-educational opportunity, or even as a way for the animals to learn about us. One conservationist, however, scolds him. When Rothenberg defends himself, saying he wants only to make “interesting sounds…sounds that can’t be made by one species alone,” his antagonist shouts, “What’s the point if you haven’t got a hypothesis?” Rothenberg explains that he does have one, “but it’s musical, not scientific.” His approach and process nonetheless do entail speculating on salient discoveries that researchers have made. About spindle neurons, vehicles of empathy and intuition that until recently were known to exist only in the brains of higher primates, he observes,” We opened their brains and didn’t find the reason why whales sing, but there is evidence that they may be able to care about our question.” He’s always the humanities jock—while analyzing humpback phrase patterns, Rothenberg ponders the similarity of the sonograms to medieval musical notation, calling to mind the quirky derivation of our own aesthetic standards. To be sure, his cultural relativism does not exclude whale culture. The prevalent view among biologists is that male humpbacks’ songs— although collaborative, imaginative, and sometimes rhyming—are created purely for the business of attracting mates. The problem, though, is that there is no evidence the females are at all interested. As a musician, Rothenberg can coolly detach from the Darwinian premise of this question, and as a philosopher, he can do so without misunderstanding science. The author’s edgiest assertion may be simply that a whale can trade licks in a manner universal among all true musicians; by listening, replying, giving space—and searching out a certain kind of rightness. The CD that comes with Thousand Mile Song introduces a new genre of world music. The didgeridoo tonality of humpbacks or capoeira beats of sperm whales may hint at foreign sources from which our own species’ musical culture was invented. —Marx Dorrity

6 Church Street New Paltz NY 12561 845 - 255 - 8300 Sun - Thurs 9:30 am - 8:30pm Fri & Sat 9:30 am - 9:00 pm

TITUTE O INS F

Thousand Mile Song: Whale Music in a Sea of Sound

1975

Graduate Education for Mind, Body, and Spirit

650.493.4430

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www.itp.edu

Global Seminar: Earth, Creativity, and the Awakening of Spirit October 12 - 17, 2008

Menla Mountain Retreat and Conference Center Phoenicia, New York Students attending the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology’s Global Programs are given the opportunity to study from any location in the world by participating in a unique online learning environment supplemented by seminars held in various locations around the world. Seminars are an exciting way to get to know this dynamic learning community. To download a seminar brochure go to: http://www.itp.edu. Contact: Carla Hines, chines@itp.edu [ph] 650.493.4430 ext. 268.

Distance Learning Degree Programs: Ph.D. Psychology t Master of Transpersonal Psychology Certificate in Transpersonal Studies Transformational Life Coaching Professional Training

8/08 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 61


SHORT TAKES Looking for a great novel to tuck in that beach bag, or new ways to pamper the dog in your dog days? Read on!

The Slow Creaking of Planets

Meditations on Rising and Falling

LITTLE STALKER LIT

Gretchen Primack

Philip Pardi

JENNIFER BELLE JEN

Finishing Line Press, , 

The University of Wisconsin Press, , .

RIVERHEAD BOOKS, 2008, $14 RIVE

No dare call it chick lit. Bestselling Stone Ridge author Belle’s None black-comic universe shares more DNA with Nick Hornby bla than anyone wearing Manolos. Blocked novelist Rebekah th Kettle is wildly obsessed with a Woody Allenesque filmmaker. Ke When a fortuitously placed window gives her an eyeful of W his scandalous liaisons, she has some decisions to make. h Manhattan served very dry, with a definite twist. M THE MOUNTAIN TH RAYMOND J. STEINER RAY CSS PUBLICATIONS, 2008, $18

It d doesn’t get more local than this loving, intricately detailed saga of an Overlook-obsessed painter whose career spans sa six decades of Woodstock history, from the rival Byrdcliffe an and Maverick colonies to that concert in Bethel. Painter and Art Times editor Steiner surrounds his fictional hero with A so many real locations, you’ll swear you’ve seen his work. Reading at the Woodstock Artists Association Museum R A August 2 at 4pm. THE PAINTER FROM SHANGHAI JENNIFER CODY EPSTEIN JENN NORTON, 2008, $24.95 NOR

Pa Yuliang created a sensation in the artistic demimonde Pan of 1920s Paris with her startling nude self-portraits. This striking debut novel boldly reimagines the life of a Th Chinese teenager, who was sold to a brothel by her opiumCh addicted uncle and would later transform herself into an ad internationally notorious artist. Journalist and Glimmer Train in finalist Epstein just read at Oblong Books.

WHERE THE WIND BLEW WH BOB SOMMER THE WESSEX COLLECTIVE, 2008, $27.50

Yo don’t need a Weatherman to know which way the wind You blows, but you might need a novelist like Hyde Park native blo Sommer to put you inside the skin of Peter St. John—or So is it Peter Howell? This blistering, fast-paced tale of a man whose radical past catches up with him—after decades of w mainstream American life with his unsuspecting family— m ccross-examines our culture, then and now.

WHO CAN SAVE US NOW? WH EDITED BY OWEN KING & JOHN MCNALLY EDIT ILLUSTRATED BY CHRIS BURNHAM ILLU FREE PRESS, 2008, $16 FRE

Int a nearby phone booth...a what?? New Paltz author Into Owen King and partner McNally assembled a punchy Ow collection of superhero stories for the cell phone co generation, with contributions from 22 notable authors, ge in including Jim Shepard, Tom Bissell, Elizabeth Crane, and D David Yoo. The editors call these 21st-century superyarns “s “stories that suspend your disbelief without insulting your in intelligence.” Wham! ECO DOG EC CORBETT MARSHALL AND JIM DESKEVICH COR CHRONICLE BOOKS, 2008, $16.95 CH

W What happens when your Lab licks linoleum that’s been cleaned with harsh chemicals? Is that plastic be ch chew toy off-gassing toxins? Marshall and Deskevich, owners of Catskill’s Variegated, Inc., advocate ow ggreener lifestyles for pets and their people, with d dog-centric craft projects for your inner Martha and a recipe for interspecies meatloaf. Appearing at Oblong Rhinebeck August 2 at 7:30pm.

62 BOOKS CHRONOGRAM 8/08

S

ome poets write with an urgency to show us a moment from ordinary life that would otherwise disappear. Gretchen Primack and Philip Pardi, visiting faculty at Bard College and authors of notable first books, are two such poets. A grocery store cleaning woman “reaches / over to fill her hand / with a shower of gold dried/apricots.” (Primack); “the man / buying beer at 8 a.m. / ll smiles.” (Pardi) Primack’s chapbook The Slow Creaking of Planets begins by introducing Doris, one of the poet’s alter-egos, yearning for “an aviary of calling birds/the color of apples and oranges/Tonight, under the pitted planets.” Interestingly, these alter-egos have animal as well as human qualities. What they share is an intensity for life, even as life ends. “Midnight,” the collection’s last poem, witnesses the death of a “mixed Briquet Griffin Vendeen,” who, like Doris, yearns toward the stars. “But that was the night she gave over / to space, let the pulley of notes raise her as far / as she could go, and stayed…” while Orion “slipped out of the bowl, / leaving only his glittering belt unbuckled.” Primack’s vision is of connectedness in an attentive universe: “Wasn’t grief stuffed / into the marrow / of each trunk? But wasn’t the trunk sugared in joy?” Although often playful, the work can be edgy; the color Chartreuse becomes “A squint. A pint of over-frozen. / Contracted glands. A squirt.” Primack’s rich poems often surprise. Philip Pardi’s Meditations on Rising and Falling, winner of the 2008 Brittingham Poetry Prize, also emphasizes relatedness—particularly, as the title suggests, in the context of bird flight. “We drop as vultures rise embracing what is offered.” Observations become vehicles for philosophical speculation. “Sonata,” in language as musical as its title, depicts a birdwatcher befuddled, perhaps by love. “We’ve come to a place where I cannot name the birds / and because I look constantly / for tanagers (scarlet/or hepatic) here where they have no reason to be, / I see them constantly, / mistakenly/ in olive groves, small fig trees, in swift scattered dispersal.” A discussion of ornithology in “Drinking with My Father in London” reveals the closeness among three men. “Wilfred, who is dying” remarks: “Flight is easy, he says, lifting his cap, but / landing—he tosses it at the coat rack / landing is the miracle. Would you believe / thirty feet away the cap hits / And softly takes in the lone bare peg?” Birdlike, the cap alights, while Wilfred considers the darker aspects of “landing:” “I’d like to come back as a bird, Wilfred says. You already / were a bird once, / Wilfred….Next time you get to be the whole damn flock.” And this reader found herself in tears. Pardi’s concern with the lived moment is nowhere more evident than in his characterizations: a roofer frees a fly from tarpaper just before he himself falls; Don Pedro, a migrant farm worker, holds out his pesticide-soaked shirt to “the man with the clipboard;” a speaker notes his infant son “laughs / whenever I laugh / on faith / …also learning when to make a fist.” Pardi’s vision, ironic in its depiction of life’s difficulties, is “a testimony of faith and resistance in the world where ‘falling is the given.’” Primack and Pardi will read on August 9, 2pm, at the Woodstock Town Hall. —Lee Gould

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Portraits of Loved Ones

literary supplement

short

story contest

Chronogramâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2008 short story contest is open to all writers who live in the Hudson Valley, Capital Region, and the Berkshires. Jana Martin, author of the critically acclaimed Russian Lover & Other Stories, is the guest judge. The winning story will appear in the November Literary Supplement. A cash prize of $150 will be awarded. Send your best work (one story per author, please) to fiction@chronogram.com or Chronogram Fiction Contest 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401.

DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 8 WWW . PATSTATS . COM

â&#x20AC;˘

PATSTATS 1@ HVC . RR . COM

COMING NEXT MONTH: Literary Supplement Humor Contest guidelines

8/08 CHRONOGRAM BOOKS 63


POETRY

Edited by Phillip Levine. Submissions are accepted year-round. Deadline for our September issue is August 5. Send up to 3 poems or 3 pages (whichever comes first), by regular mail, to: Poetry, 314 Wall St., Kingston, NY 12401, or via e-mail (preferred) to poetry@chronogram.com. Subject: Poetry Submission. Full submission guidelines at www.chronogram.com/submissions.

I’m rhyme

the road is traveled once

—Brant Clemente (3 years)

then like a rope unravels

Why did Zeus chain Prometheus to a rock at the top of the mountain?

—p

Ahh...boys. —Tillie Stern (7 years)

THE BEST DAMN FIREWORKS

PACKING MY BOOKS

After only three minutes it began to get real good either the men on the boat had opted to blow their load early or this town had a lot more cash than they were letting on

I’m wearing an old shirt a half-size too large that my brother gave me. The books go into boxes as I think of you at the other end of the world, or so it seems tonight. Dust brings tears to my eyes and dries my throat so I stop for a drink of water and remember a day when I was fifteen and home from school, sick, wearing an old shirt of my father’s, and how good it felt, so soft against my hot skin.

It was like the grand finale except it had just started the commotion grew louder and louder, the arches of the rockets, lower and lower until it became clear the sky wasn’t the only thing on fire In the light of the magic they’d sent up silhouettes of men jumped overboard, their clothes in flames half a mile up the beach we could water down only our thirst I have to admit, best damn fireworks I’ve ever seen and certainly not the first time our boys have been sacrificed for show. —DB Leonard

RIP VAN WINKLE BRIDGE for Bascomb It was an excellent year for the foliage more color than memory can hold: the peaks of heightened experience and time out of mind. Every day while she was in the hospital, I’d cross that bridge over estuary flats where river birches would flame particular as ritual objects, glowing in the autumn sun, the branches flare out and explode like perfect symbols. Over to green pastures and first-rate real estate on the other side. Behind me the mountains where I’d started, the origin of streams that tumble down the stony cloves pelvic balls clacking in a fissure crack where he slept now just budging—imagine the stardust in his head, awakening after twenty years, soul spiritualized with sleep. A knifelike wind cuts into the womb. The doctor grabs the blue-green boy who dangles like a crab over the spilldrain stuck in her gut peering sideways from his head out into the lights. —Daniel Gilhuly

MY FIRST TEACHER, MISS MANN The raving child Of five, non-verbal Babbling— In the shifting sand— How gentle you were Teaching me The vowel sounds; How gentle you lay My fingers On your throat syllables. Vibrant— Flowers blooming In the sand. —Aleda Schoonmaker

—Gregory Luce

PACKS FROM PARSLEY And then we took-up and packed the parsley And removed it from the boxes in which it was; And we saw the parsley—we saw how it lay there, We saw how the greenery made it conditioned, And we split the shrubness wherewith our minds. —Michael David Golzmane

LAST NIGHT Last night I dreamed I was back in mountains. I was that girl again. A blue panther shadowed the girl into the meadows. Green butterflies swirled around burgeoning wildflowers. In the grass dance fields the girl dreamed of a boy who would love her. He’d be the sky-eyed one bearing an armful of clover. Last night I was back in mountains. I was that girl making love with the boy inside midsummer’s sun. His lips kissed the petals of her eyelids, lips, petals, quivering butterfly wings. His body singing became a meadow for the stem of hers. They were all redskin blossom pollinated by solstice. This morning girl woke five hundred miles away. This morning hair snowed down my arms. O Indian Paintbrush Boy. —Susan Deer Cloud

64 POETRY CHRONOGRAM 8/08


THE COMMUNE FOR UNWED MOTHERS “the bomb also is a flower” —William Carlos Williams the mission san fransisco 1972. hard times are coming the newspapers said the war is on & on the tv & radio said the poor are poorer the people on the street were saying, upstairs in the commune for unwed mothers things were settling in for the evening. the longhaired cuties were cooking big pots of lentils & rice garbonzos & umeboshi plums bok choy & red cabbage cumin & ginger spiced & sparkled pans slammed & rattled pale, sunned & unshaved legs flashed & moved smoothly over the creaked wood floorboards. on the kitchen walls black & white photos of bearded men winked across to each other. the kids were everywhere popping out of closets & hatboxes arigorn & sienna sappho & cloud django, dylan & galileo george carver, virgo & gandhi running crazy beneath the smiling rogues’ gallery of their way gone daddies, elizabeth played her guitar for me elizabeth, with her torn gingham dress & magdolene eyes elizabeth, princess of eternal hope– carrier of somebody’s flame I’m gonna make it big someday she said i know i said i just want it all—to be better she said sure you do i said, handing her the joint, in the doorway her three kids hopped foot to foot looking for their father, crazyhorse.

WIFE ON THE RUN

TILDE (~)

My wife is moving quickly. When I try to get a kiss, her lips slide past mine. Sometimes a spark pinpricks us both with a static shock as her slippers quick-slide across the floor, her shadow disappearing. Last week, a bounty hunter was seen snooping in the back yard, so now she’s making herself scarce.

you’ve been judged— jangled we declare you unfit hovering away your existence I knew I had seen you in a cloud in my shadow umbrella-ing my dog the reason he chases himself around the yard

—Timothy Brennan that’ll teach you that’ll show you to be high and mighty

WHAT I SAW ON THE STREET Fear: 1) An agitated feeling aroused by awareness of actual or threatening danger. 2) An uneasy feeling that something may happen contrary to one’s desires. 3) A feeling of deep reverential awe and dread. 4) A continuing state or attitude of fright, dread or alarmed concern. 5) The possibility that something unwanted might occur. —Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary Thin old man quivering lips walking fast cradling brown-bagged bottle comfort for the night shield against fear fear no mother can caress away she is dead this is not a puzzle of words she is dead god now nothing sledgehammer traffic down the asphalt slab street turning away stumbling manstone and metal cold light grey-green night grass neon smeared falling power plant giant sorcery hand claws the stars —Frank Boyer

ROADTRIP WEST A bright thought flies across my afternoon fighting to stay aloft as my finger, on an old roadmap traces a trip across the desert decades ago, driving west in the early summer of our marriage. We traveled by night in a compact car, small dog crouched in the backseat panting, fleeing from the flaming hands of heat, toward an ocean we could only picture.

you are the abomination of the mustache the Picasso of punctuation the New Formalist of accentuation you are where the line turns fowl O, tilde you no longer reign over our parade in your wavy contempt you no longer shroud the Spanish— N we have excommunicated you henceforth you are the lowest of lows accent the blue spitfire of Hades, thou foul mite! slosh and vessel the dribble of idiots you fiend! away from here you diacritical demon! OUT we say! and OUT! again! you have inflected your last piñata played your final Niño out you are not the Portuguese or Estonian nasal close-mid back rounded vowel you are not the Vietnamese creaky voice you are the bastard graph of an ocean wave the rotten rollicking of earthquaked carpet the lewd lapping of the termagant tongue if we could put you to work you would shovel our earth for all eternity your hills would contain Sisyphus and his twin forever ambling up and back on your foul spine we are infinitely kind in our charge swagger away past the furthest walls your humps ho-humming infinitely further

outside totally January.

Even trailer trucks behind us huffing across the Rockies could not make us give way,

earthquakes threatened a wino talked to his chained bear & vultures circled, looking to supper on the eyes of a clock

not fog banks or detours we met full face; challenged we pressed north to the redwoods.

yes, we are banning you beyond the nasal G infinitely beyond the contemplation of the variant A

These things I knew: we were young and capable; this was our America, our luck to belong here.

superscript no more

while upstairs dinner was served hot & jovial

We were following an instinct to find our edge, look back at our innocence from a distance.

in the commune for unwed mothers.

We saw rooms that were too small, doors to be opened to a wilderness of choices —daunting, perilous.

—Normal

—Natalie Safir

turn never back, thou palendromian polyp

sink for all we care become, if you must a cuttlefish a flat-faced flounder’s wiggling brow —Jordan Reynolds

8/08 CHRONOGRAM POETRY 65


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66 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 8/08

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Dinner till 8:30 pm Drinks/snacks available Closed for vacation August 2 - 12

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TUES. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THURS. 11:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:30 FRI. & SAT. 11:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:30

PM PM

8/08 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 67


Food & Drink

Just Ducky Le Canard Enchainé By Brian K. Mahoney Photos by Matt Petricone

O

n a recent visit to Le Canard Enchainé, I ordered the shrimp Indochine, one of the day’s specials, on a lark. As I normally gravitate toward the trustworthy classics at Le Canard—duck confit, snails in garlic butter, omelets—I was unsure what to expect from the bistro’s fusion cuisine. Displaying a lot of height, with petite breadsticks and a spring of thyme, the butterflied shrimp on skewers were decorated with nasturtiums, strawberries, and pickled ginger atop a bed of sweet, sticky rice and outlying sauce pools with notes of plum, coconut, wasabi, soy, and orange. At a neighboring table, a woman I just had been introduced to by the restaurant’s gregarious owner, Jean-Jacques Carquillat, marveled at the composition, then mock-complained that she had ordered the same dish earlier in the week, but it had been served sans flowers. Without skipping a beat,Carquillat reassured her in his rough-accented English, “But of course, you were the flower.” The woman, a Lebanese breast surgeon who told me she was moving to Las Vegas to helm its first breast-surgery clinic, then asked me if she could take a picture of my food with her cell phone. Welcome to Le Canard Enchainé (literal translation: “the chained duck”), where the owner prowls the floor like a jovial French bear throwing a neverending dinner party. Carquillat constantly greets the faithful, making sure the plates come out of the kitchen in perfect form (when he’s not cooking; Carquillat is also the executive chef), pouring wine, working the room, and introducing diners across tables. While some French restaurants tend toward austerity in food, service, and décor, (a rigor that can lead to rigor mortis), Le Canard is a decidedly unfussy place, casual in its manners but not its food. You can order a salad as an entrée and not be looked at askance, as if you were a cheapskate squatting on prime real estate. No meal I’ve had at Le Canard has ever been rushed—even when dining late on a Sunday night—and I’ve been made to feel as welcome in shorts as in a suit. Le Canard is a prêtà-porter kind of place—nothing too daring or fancy, but always in fashion. One of the defining features of a meal at Le Canard is the service. While

68 FOOD & DRINK CHRONOGRAM 8/08

some of the younger waiters can be a bit shaky on the particulars of the wine list—intimidating if you don’t know French wine—the attitude of the staff is helpful and charming, a quality Carquillat says he demands from his staff. “When you walk in the place, you feel like you’re welcome, like you become a friend,” he said. “You’re not just a number. To me, that’s the number-one issue, and it’s what I teach my staff. That’s why my key asset is my motherin-law, Elisabeth.” (Ah, Elisabeth. Anyone who’s ever been to Le Canard more than once knows the smiling short-haired blond who is Carquillat’s mother-in-law. If you’ve been there once, she’ll recognize you the second time around and greet you with a lively bonjour and a kiss on both cheeks.) But back to the shrimp Indochine: As a longtime crustacean lover who has lost his religion after years of flaccid, watery, flavorless shrimp, I found a reason to believe in this dish. (Carquillat later told me it was his best-seller.) The shrimp were snappy in texture, and had a fresh and vibrant taste that rendered the accompanying sauces almost superfluous…but not quite. The mix of hot and sweet in the sauce was as delicate as the taste of the nasturtium; the strawberries, pickled ginger, and wasabi combined in a unified shrimp sauce theory of France and Asia. They don’t skimp on the serving size at Le Canard either. The shrimp Indochine featured six large, fleshy shrimp, enough for dinner for two with a shared appetizer. When I asked Carquillat about this, he said he wanted to counter the stereotypical idea of a French restaurant: “Everything in the check, nothing on the plate,” he said, adding, “the portions are not small here.” Another fusion dish, the grilled Atlantic salmon, crusted in black pepper and glazed with honey mustard over a fennel and red cabbage ragout, sounds at first like a six-flavor pile-up. But as with the shrimp Indochine, subtlety carried the dish. The glaze was applied to the salmon with probity, not as a mask for frozen product, but as a soft complement to the flaky fish and the ragout,


ABOVE: THE BAR ROOM AT LE CANARD ENCHAINÉ IN KINGSTON; OPPOSITE: THE RESTAURANT’S MAIN DINING ROOM.

composed of an incredible lightness I did not know red cabbage possessed. The traditional French dishes are the real draw at Le Canard, however. (Garlic snails in butter are a big seller according to Carquillat.) Take the Coquilles Saint-Jacques, for instance. Scallops are almost a secondary concern in traditional Coquilles Saint-Jacques; it’s the sauce you’re after. Ordering Coquilles Saint-Jacques because you love the taste of scallops is like drinking gin because you enjoy the medicinal qualities of juniper berries. The two concepts are related, but not in a family way. Served in a crock with Gruyere cheese slightly charred on top, the scallops were floating in a béchamel with mushrooms that would not have been out of place on the dessert menu. Take your Lipitor and dig in. Creamy, savory scallop custard like maman never made. The trout almondine is also a winning throwback: two thin filets nestled atop a mound of rice, not fried but lightly sautéed with a crisp lemony zing. The calves liver in balsamic reduction, an exercise in contrast between sweet and mineral tones, is a simple preparation, but perfectly so. On my last visit, I enjoyed a sublime tomato-basil soup, a silky purée with an unexpected spike of sultry heat that charged the dish with extra body. The wine list at Le Canard tilts toward the expensive on the French side, but there are New World bargains to be had, as well as some affordable French wines, including the refreshing Tavel Longival rosé ($36), and the crisp Louis Michel and Fils Petit Chablis ($36). Carquillat spent 20 years working in top-tier restaurants in France and New York before he opened Le Canard. When I asked him why he hung out his shingle in Kingston in 1995, Carquillat told me that when he first visited the space, he pushed through the drop panels of the deli then occupying the space and found a tin ceiling above it. He took this as a good omen. But Carquillat was really sold on the place when he returned later that night and took in the view from inside. “With the buildings and the [Old Dutch]

church all lit up, at night, you feel like you’re in a little village in the south of France,” he said, describing the evening repose of Uptown Kingston. Walking out of Le Canard on a recent Sunday after a kiss bon nuit for each cheek from Elisabeth, French pop music trailing out the door, trout almondine and Chablis still on my tongue, the church bells ringing the hour, if I squinted, I thought I might just be able to see the Mediterranean in the distance. Le Canard inspires the most pleasant illusions.

Le Canard Enchainé 276 Fair Street, Kingston (845) 339-2003 www.le-canardenchaine.com Hours Open from noon to 10pm, Sunday to Thursday, until 11pm on Friday and Saturday. Price Range Lunch: A la carte entrées vary in price from $8 to $16. The two-course prix fixe lunch is $14.95, $10 on Mondays. Dinner: Appetizers range from $6 to $16. Entrées run from $22 to $38. There are prix fixe dinner specials throughout the week. Recommended dishes Endive salad with walnuts and Roquefort, duck confit, trout almondine, French onion soup, calves liver, grilled salmon over fennel-cabbage ragout, Coquilles Saint-Jacques, sautéed sweetbreads, shrimp Indochine.

Credits Cards All major. Wine/Beer/Liquor The wine list is a well-balanced tip through the regions of France, with half of the 75 bottles under $40, and a number of New World wines for under $30. Ten wines available by the glass. Twelve imported and domestic beers. Full liquor license. Reservations Le Canard takes reservations, but they are not usually necessary. Atmosphere Classic Parisian bistro: cabaret tables along a banquette, an exposed brick wall, tin ceiling, wood appointments, large windows onto the street. The bar is cozy chic, with a baby grand piano.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM FOOD & DRINK 69


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tastings directory CAFÉ Bread Alone Café East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3108 Route 28, Boiceville, NY (845) 657-3328 (headquarters) Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2108 Bread Alone Café offers fresh breads, pastries, soups, and sandwiches at three mid-Hudson locations.

CATERING Blue Mountain Bistro Catering Co. 948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 www.bluemountainbistro.com Gourmet take-out store serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. Featuring local and imported organic foods, delicious homemade desserts, sophisticated four star food by Chefs Richard Erickson and Jonathan Sheridan. Off-premise full-service catering and event planning for parties of all sizes.

COOKING CLASSES Natural Gourmet Cookery School

FARMERS’ MARKETS Sprout Creek Farm 34 Lauer Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 485-9885 www.sproutcreekfarm.org cheese@sproutcreekfarm.org Come to Sprout Creek Farm Market! Grassfed cheese from our own Guernsey and Jersey Cows... Free from artificial antibiotics and hormones. While you’re here you can also pick up... grass fed pork, veal, and beef as well as Remsberger Farms honey and maple syrup. Come meet all of our cows, sheep, goats, and ducks!

HOME COOKED MEALS Lagusta’s Luscious (845) 255-8VEG www.lagustasluscious.com Lagusta’s Luscious brings heartbreakingly delicious, sophisticated weekly meal deliveries of handmade vegetarian food that meatand-potatoes people love too to the Hudson Valley and NYC. We are passionate about creating political food—locally grown organic produce, fair wages, environmentally sustainable business practices—that tastes just as good as that served at the finest restaurants. Let us end weeknight meal boredom forever.

ITALIAN SPECIALTY PRODUCTS Leonardo’s Italian Market Rhinebeck, NY, in The Courtyard (845) 876-3980 The source for Italian specialty products in the Hudson Valley featuring Beretta meats, signature sandwiches, Italian cheeses, prepared entrees and salads, pastries/ cookies, Ricotta cheesecakes, Spumoni, Gelato, Italian ices, fresh sausage, oils,

PASTA La Bella Pasta (845) 331-9130 www.labellapasta.com Fresh pasta made locally. Large variety of ravioli, tortellini, pastas, and sauces at the factory outlet. We manufacture and deliver our excellent selection of pastas to fine restaurants, gourmet shops, and caterers throughout the Hudson Valley. Call for our full product list and samples. Located on Route 28W between Kingston and Woodstock.

RESTAURANTS Aroi Thai 55 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1114 www.aroirestaurant.com Aroi means ‘delicious’ in Thai; and delicious it is. David Thompson writes in ‘Thai Food,’ “Thai food creates a locus of flavor within each dish through its components, producing a complexity that can be dazzling.” And Aroi illustrates his description faithfully. The wine list is spare and perfectly paired to the flavors of Thai cuisine. Some selections are familiar and some are off the beaten track; all compliment the food. Enter a little clapboard house with a treed, outdoor patio, and be in an oasis of muted green walls, fabric lamps, birch chairs, and coral table runners; a perfect backdrop to the colors of the food. Thai artifacts and fabrics hang as the works of art they are. Each room is flooded with light and, for chilly evenings, has a working fireplace. Aroi is open seven days a week for dinner from 5-9; and Thursday through Monday for lunch from 11:30-3.

Emerson Organic Spa Café

Serevan

(845) 688-2828 Refreshing, organic veggie and fruit drinks. Made-to-order salads and wraps. Daily soup specials. Everything available to-go or for enjoying in the Asian-inspired design of the Café. Servers will bring your selections to you on the wrap-around sundeck with views of Mt. Tremper and the Esopus Creek. Open for lunch every day, 11am to 4pm. Located at the Emerson Resort and Spa in Mt. Tremper, just 10 minutes from Woodstock.

6 Autumn Lane, Amenia, NY (845) 373-9800

Gilded Otter 3 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-1700 A warm and inviting dining room and pub overlooking beautiful sunsets over the Wallkill River and Shawangunk Cliffs. Mouthwatering dinners prepared by Executive Chef Larry Chu, and handcrafted beers brewed by GABF Gold Medal Winning Brewmaster Darren Currier. Chef driven and brewed locally!

Kindred Spirits Steakhouse & Pub 334 Route 32A, Palenville, NY (518) 678-3101 www.caskillmtlodge.com Offering fine food and drink at reasonable prices. Open 7 days for breakfast and lunch and on weekends for dinner. The fireplace pub boast 13 taps and a great wine list. Visit our website to see our menus and call us for reservations.

Starr Place 6417 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2924 www.starrplace.com

Soul Dog 107 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-3254 Featuring a variety of hot dogs, including preservative-free and vegetarian hot dogs, chili, soup, sides, desserts, and many gluten-free items prepared in-house. Redefining the hot dog experience!

Sukhothai 516-518 Main Street, Beacon, NY (845) 790-5375 Sukhothai Restaurant, located in Beacon, NY, offers a delicious menu full of authentic Thai cuisine. From traditional dishes, such as Pad Thai and Som Tam, to custom dishes created exclusively by our master chef, our menu is sure to please any palate. Takeout is also available.

Suruchi—A Fine Taste of India 5 Church Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2772 www.suruchiindian.com

232 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2600 www.maincourserestaurant.com Four-star, award-winning, contemporary American cuisine serving organic, natural, and free-range Hudson Valley products. Wednesday and Thursday nights, food and wine pairing menu available. Voted Best Caterer in the Hudson Valley.

Suruchi offers a large selection of delectable Indian food in a beautiful, calm atmosphere. All dishes are made from scratch from fresh ingredients including free-range chicken, wild shrimp, and homemade cheese and yogurt. Many vegetarian/vegan choices. Menu is 95% gluten free. Enjoy your dining experience with soothing music in your choice of regular seating or Indian style cushioned platform booths. Wednesday through Sunday dinner.

Barnaby’s

Mexican Radio

Terrapin

Route 32 North Chestnut & Academy Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2433

9 Cleveland Place, NYC (212) 343-0140 537 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-7770 www.mexrad.com pmljs@ecoipm.com Voted Best Mexican Restaurant in NYC and Best Margaritas in the Hudson Valley, Mexican Radio features fabulous, homemade dishes made fresh daily. Extensive vegetarian/vegan choices. A Great Place for Parties!

6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3330 www.terrapinrestaurant.com

Bear Creek Restaurant and Recreational Park Corner of Route 23 A and Route 214, Hunter, NY (518) 263-3839 www.bearcreekrestaurant.com Bear Creek’s menu ranges from various smoked BBQ delights to entrees like Pan Seared Ahi Tuna and Cedar Planked Salmon. Whether it’s a great burger, steak, or maybe a novel goat cheese, pear, and apple salad, Bear Creek offers an action filled venue along with fine cuisine at family prices.

Egg’s Nest (845) 687-7255 www.theeggsnest.com Where Good Friends Meet. Located on Route 213 in the center of High Falls, NY, The Egg’s Nest is noted for its eclectic décor, unusual menu, and friendly, casual atmosphere. The Egg’s Nest offers creative cuisine with a southwestern flair, unique overstuffed sandwiches, vegetarian dishes, burgers, homemade desserts, and “Nest” Breads. Dinner specials start every night at 5:00pm and a cocktail lounge is also offered. The Egg’s Nest is open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner, 11:30am-11:00pm Sunday-Thursday and 11:30am to midnight on Friday and Saturday. We accept cash and personal checks, with an ATM on premises.

Main Course

Neko Sushi & Restaurant 49 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0162 Voted Best Sushi Restaurant by Chronogram readers and rated four stars by Poughkeepsie Journal. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Eat in or take out. We offer many selections of Sushi and Sashimi, an extensive variety of special rolls, and kitchen dishes. Live Lobster prepared daily. Parking in rear available. Major credit cards accepted.

Osaka Restaurant 74 Broadway, Tivoli, NY (845) 757-5055 18 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7338 or (845) 876-7278 Want to taste the best Sushi in the Hudson Valley? Osaka Restaurant is the place. Vegetarian dishes available. Given four stars by the Daily Freeman. Visit our second location in Tivoli.

tastings directory

48 West 21st Street, New York, NY (212) 645-5170, Fax (212) 989-1493 www.naturalgourmetschool.com info@naturalgourmetschool.com For more than 20 years people around the world have turned to Natural Gourmet’s avocational public classes to learn the basics of healthy cooking. They come to the Chef’s Training Program to prepare for careers in the burgeoning Natural Foods Industry.

vinegars, legumes, San Marzano tomatoes, pastas, imported condiments, Perugina and Cafferal chocolate, artesian pizzas, and more, including espresso, cappuccino, and catering. Wi-fi. Open daily 10am–7pm to 9pm on Friday and Saturday. Call ahead for sandwiches, pizzas and antipasto platters.

Welcome to Terrapin—Restaurant/Bistro/ Bar/Catering— where eating is believing! We are passionately committed to providing our guests with a delightfully unique dining experience. As a Hudson Valley dining destination, we strive to consistently provide you with the freshest, highest quality food, celebrating the robust local bounty. Whether a quiet dinner for two or large family gathering, our staff is dedicated to creating a personalized experience served in a warm, yet elegant environment. From kitchen to table, our holistic approach to the dining experience compels us to be uncompromising in the quality of our product. Join us in celebration of food, family, and friends. We look forward to serving you soon.

Woody’s All Natural 30 Quaker Avenue, Cornwall (845) 534-1111 woodysallnatural.com Eat seasonal. Eat local. Burgers and fries locally grown, fresh ingredients.

TEA LOUNGE AND STORE Harney and Sons Railroad Plaza, Millertown NY (518) 789-2121

8/08 CHRONOGRAM TASTINGS DIRECTORY

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From Monkfish Book Publishing Company

THE JOURNEY FROM THE CENTER TO THE PAGE Yoga Philosophies and Practices As Muse for Authentic Writing

B Y J EFF D AVIS 978-0-9766843-8-1 / $16 / 360 pages · available from your favorite bookseller ·

JOIN JEFF & THE JOURNEY at

Inquiring Minds Bookstore 6 Church Street, New Paltz Saturday, August 23, 6:30 pm

Reading, conversation, & signing www.newpaltzbooks.com / 845.255.8300

East-West Books Cafe 78 5th Avenue, NYC Friday, September 5, 8-9 pm

Reading, conversation, & signing Journey from the Center to the Page Writing Workshop East-West Books Yoga Studio 78 5th Avenue, 2nd floor, NYC Saturday, September 6, 2-4:30 pm tastings directory

$35, pre-register: 212.243.4995, www.eastwestnyc.com W W W . C E N T E R T O P A G E . C O M · 8 4 5 . 6 7 9. 9 4 4 1 jeffdavis@centertopage.com

get warm.

Kindred Spirits STEAKHOUSE & PUB at the Catskill Mountain Lodge

• A place for nature, art and music lovers. • Open seven days for breakfast and lunch. Dinner on weekends.

• Live Jazz—Friday and Saturday—Starts at 6pm • Call for reservations or to cater your event. • Fireplace pub has 13 beers on tap. Advertise in the Dispophsbn Efficient Heating Supplement and cozy up to some new customers.

EDITORIAL ROUND-UP FOR SEPTEMBER ’08 STAYING WARM, STAYING GREEN Chronogram explores environmentally friendly and cost-effective ways to heat up the home.

ADVERTISING DEADLINE: AUGUST 13 sales@chronogram.com Phone 845.334.8600 | Fax 845.334.8610

Dispophsbn delivers your message to over 65,000 high-quality readers with each issue. These are cultural creatives, a powerful market segment that values the local economy, health, the environment, and a sustainable lifestyle.

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TASTINGS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

334 Route 32A, Palenville, NY 518-678-3101 | www.catskillmtlodge.com


Fruit arranged like flowers? What a delicious idea!

CASCADE

MOUNTAIN Winery & Restaurant

Same day pickup & delivery available

At 835 Cascade Road

Visit our Gorgeous New Wine & Tapas Bar & Art Gallery r r r

Open for tastings daily 11 - 5 Buffet lunch weekends 11:30 - 3:30 Restaurant, wine bar, and grounds are available for weddings, rehearsal dinners, and other special occasions

For additional info. & directions call 845-373-9021 email info@cascademt.com ©1999

Delicious Party®

with Dipped Bananas

To order, please call or visit the location nearest you:

POUGHKEEPSIE 10 IBM Road, Suite B

845-339-3200

845-463-3900

EdibleArrangements.com Copyright © 2008 Edible Arrangements, LLC

845-373-9021 Amenia, NY 12501 w w w. c a s c a d e m t . c o m

Franchises Available. Call 1-888-727-4258

tastings directory

KINGSTON 900 Ulster Avenue

An American Bistro Heart of Rhinebeck

Outside Seating Sun brunch @ 10:00am

Live Music Fri & Sat @ 9:00pm

6417 Montgomery St 845 | 876 | 2924 www.starrplace.com

Catering too!

8/08 CHRONOGRAM TASTINGS DIRECTORY

73


BURGERS & FRIES

LOCALLY GROWN, FRESH INGREDIENTS

BRING THE KIDS

KNOW WHAT

tastings directory

YOU EAT

30 QUAKER AVENUE CORNWALL, NY (845) 534-1111

Railroad Plaza, Millerton, NY 518-789-2121 -̜ÀiÊUÊ/i>ʜ՘}iÊUÊ/>Ã̈˜}Ê,œœ“

d La Duchesse Anne

The Egg’s Nest where good friends meet

La Duchesse Anne is located in the central Catskills - beautiful country with trout streams and mountains, forests and picturesque hamlets.

B a r | R e st a u ran t | Hot el Zagat thinks we are in the top 10 “southern New York’s most romantic restaurants.”

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“One of America’s top 25 eating inns”... Conde Nast Traveler 1564 Wittenberg Road Mt. Tremper, New York 12457 845.688.5260 74

www.laduchesseanne.com

TASTINGS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Rte 213 | Village of High Falls | 845.687.7255 Open 7 days...11:30 to 10:00


LOCAL

S U S TA I N A B L E

SEASONAL

Relax in our gardens and enjoy a refreshing white sangria, a mango margarita or wine from our award-winning cellar. Perfect for a romantic dinner, a family weekend lunch or plan to have your special event here.

MARKET CAFÉ

845-677-5888

4258 Route 44 Millbrook, NY

http://charlottesny.net

Restaurant Now Open Thursday - Sunday from 6 pm Bar coming soon

108 Hunns Lake Rd Bangall, NY 12506 845 868 3175

55 E. Market St, Rhinebeck

845- 876-1114 Dinner: Everyday

Lunch: Thursday to Monday

Offering Outdoor Dining

Reservation Recommended

Helpful advice for the summer:

tastings directory

Market open 8am–6pm Breakfast served 8am–11am Lunch served 11am–3pm Closed Wednesday

w ww. a ro i R e s ta u ra nt . co m

Drink plenty of fluids. The Hudson Valley’s best selection of glassware, barware and bar accessories, fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances and kitchen tools.

The Edge...

6934 Route 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Just north of the 9G intersection 845-876-6208 Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30, Sun 11–4:30 On the web at www.warrenkitchentools.com

8/08 CHRONOGRAM TASTINGS DIRECTORY

75


tastings directory

OUR EXCLUSIVE SITES Alumnae House Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa alumnaehouse.vassar.edu

buttermilkfallsinn.com

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TASTINGS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08


Three levels of care for seniors. One campus. 845-876-3344

www.arborridgeliving.com

The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File No. C-050013

tastings directory

Opening: Rhinebeck, New York October 1, 2008

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Rondout Valley Farm Tour

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8th Annual Susquehanna Valley Garlic Festival

"%'&""(!',.&)%&')" September 20 Fall for the Arts ""#%&'"*!'&""(!',.(" September 21 6th Annual CauliďŹ&#x201A;ower Festival *%"(!',.(-"*%&')" September 27

Little Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day *%"(!',. #&% !," October 4 Winter Festival

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8/08 CHRONOGRAM TASTINGS DIRECTORY

77


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Cymbeline, Twelfth Night and The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

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tastings directory

,

Sign and Graphic Solutions Made Simple.® FASTSIGNS® uses innovation and technology to make the sign buying process simple for you – from concept to completion®. s #USTOM"ANNERS s ,ARGE&ORMAT'RAPHICS s %XHIBITSAND$ISPLAYS

s 7INDOW,ETTERING s ,ABELSAND$ECALS s 6EHICLE'RAPHICS

(845)298-5600 Hudson Valley

1830 Route 9 Ste 101 Wappingers Falls, NY 12590 www.fastsigns.com/455

Independently owned and operated. ©2007 FASTSIGNS International, Inc.

78

CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Photo: Walter Garschagen

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COME TO SPROUT CREEK FARM MARKET! Cheese from our own grass-fed Guernsey and Jersey cows... free from artificial antibiotics and hormones. Ann Street Gallery 104 Ann Street Newburgh, NY 12550 (845) 562-6940 x 8

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While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here you can also pick up... grass fed pork, veal, and beef. Starting March 1st, fresh and aged goat cheese available. SUMMER CAMP OPPORTUNITIES Day and Overnight Programs. Learn, connect, and eat healthy foodsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another way to save the children. Call for an application (845-485-8438) or apply on-line at www.sproutcreekfarm.org.

Drawing, Painting, Clay, Music, Photography, Portfolio Development, Animation, & moreâ&#x20AC;Ś

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34 Lauer Road, Poughkeepsie NY ~ 845-485-9885 www.sproutcreekfarm.org ~ cheese@sproutcreekfarm.org Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 ~ Open Sunday 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4

tastings directory

Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;iLĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; V>Â?Â?Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;LĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;i

A hand-picked selection of wine and spirits for everyday or once in a lifetime. Superior customer service with wine tastings every Saturday. Find what your palateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been searching for.

Wine tastings every Saturday starting at noon. 'SPOU4USFFUt.JMMCSPPL /:t .POo5IVSTBNUPQN 'SJ4BUBNUPQNt4VO/PPOUPQN 8/08 CHRONOGRAM

79


find your balance

Aveda introduces ChakraTM Balancing Body Mistsâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;grounded in Ayurveda, the ancient healing art of India. Balance the chakrasâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;energy centers of the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;with meditation and the power of aroma. Take home our ChakraTM Balancing Body Mistsâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Ayurvedic fusions to

The ďŹ rst to exclusively offer Laser Hair Removal and Fotofacial RFâ&#x201E;˘ in the Hudson Valley â&#x20AC;&#x153;Absolute Laser... can do what skin care products promise to and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;The New York Times 2006

enhance well-being. Balance the sensesâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;visit Allure today.

845.876.7100 Springbrook Medical Parkt Rhinebeck, New York 12572 www.absolute-laser.com 12 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY 12572 845.876.7774 Email: allure7774@aol.com

Hair Removalt Fotofacial RFâ&#x201E;˘t Microdermabrasiont Vitalize Peelt Glycolic Peel Sun Damaget Fine Linest Spider Veinst Uneven Skin Tonet Rosacea

Gifts with a Twist 299 WALL STREET â&#x20AC;˘ KINGSTON, NEW YORK 12401 â&#x20AC;˘ 845-338-8100

In The Heart of Uptown Kingston "TAKE SOME TIME OFF" t Skin Rejuvenation and Anti-Aging t Teeth Whitening

LIGHTING â&#x20AC;˘ JEWELRY â&#x20AC;˘ ART â&#x20AC;˘ GIFTS â&#x20AC;˘ SWELL STUFF

A N D R O G Y N Y " 3 5 * 4 5 * $  $ 3 & "5 * 7 &  # - " % &  8 0 3 ,

t Botox Cosmetic t Guaranteed Permanent Laser Hair Removal t Titan System Non-Surgical Face Lifts t Varicose and Spider Veins 4:-7*";6/*("%&4*(/&3

Stephen Weinman, MD | EssenceMediSpa.com

#6-,&-*.*/"5*0/t'"#6-064$0-034t$658&"3

845.691.3773 | 222 Route 299, Highland, NY 12528

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80 BEAUTY AND FASHION CHRONOGRAM 8/08


CHRONOGRAM 2008

BEAUTY & FASHION

JENNIFER MAY

TOOLS OF THE TRADE AT LOOMINUS HANDWOVENS IN BEARSVILLE.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM BEAUTY AND FASHION 81


BEAUTY & FASHION

THREAD BY THREAD

The Great Escape from Mall America By Erika Alexia Tsoukanelis Photos by Jennifer May

T

his is a story of freedom that begins with an honest confession: I was once the absolute worst kind of fashion victim. Without a surplus of money or subscription to Vogue, I put together a handful of outfits and called myself pretty. Don’t get me wrong; I didn’t look dreadful. Once in a while, I even attracted a compliment or two. I knew what colors matched my pale complexion, set my dark eyes to shine. It was just that there was something lacking. You see, I lived in a semi-urban neighborhood of Fairfield County, Connecticut, surrounded by wealth, privilege, and malls. Wearing scuffed shoes to Whole Foods was considered offensive. Wrinkled blouses were forbidden. It was best not to be caught wearing a scarf that did not match your stockings. Weekly manicures were a necessity for women, and chipped toenail polish was an indication of weak character. I scurried along, attempting to keep up. Every season required a new clothing collection. I visited the chain stores to find inexpensive pieces that were up-to-date and flattering, that still exuded an illusionary air of uniqueness. I got by. While my nails were often uneven and colorless, I did not necessarily stand out in a crowd at the locals-only beach. Yet, on some days, I could not help but feel bored with my wardrobe and sufficiently inferior to the clean-cut fashionistas about me. I was forever scratching the leather of my Dansko clogs, and noticing behind reflective store windows purses and slacks and earrings I desired and could never afford. I had a look, but during certain dark dressing hours, it didn’t seem precisely my own. With my move to the rural Ulster County hamlet of Willow, there came a great shift. Living and working in a cottage on the Old Beaverkill, I woke dazzled by the beauty of the mountains and went to bed inspired by the abundance of starlight. I spent my first few days there alone but for the gentle presence of my landlords; a painter and art dealer who lived on the exquisite four-acre property. The quiet was a balm. My first experimentation with fashion involved pajamas and the donning of those casual, comfortable items well into a few juicy summer afternoons. “I’m a writer,” I assured the UPS guy when he showed up at my door, as I was eating a grape popsicle and wearing a 10-year-old, bleach-stained nightgown. He offered a polite smile in return. It occurred to me as he walked away—brown shorts and white tube socks stark against the bucolic landscape—he didn’t care what I was wearing.This was my first step toward fashion liberation. Recognizing that I could wear whatever I liked and no one would look at me askance, I gave myself the go-ahead to be bold. When it came time for a trip into Woodstock, I opened my closet door. I peered into my jewelry box. In the spirit of my new life and permissive Hudson Valley locale, I selected a pink glass-beaded necklace, a sage-green top, a floppy straw hat, and a flowing black skirt. They were old wardrobe items, but I had never mixed and matched them before. I was to abandon my formulaic selection of attire in favor of a constantly changing, creative approach. I began to frequent privately-owned boutiques and to purchase original apparel and accessories because I thought they were super, not because they would fit some predetermined outfit in my mind. Experimenting with hairstyles became a source of entertainment. I trusted my own sense of style in a way I had never

82 BEAUTY AND FASHION CHRONOGRAM 8/08

before, and I crossed pedicures off my monthly budget list. They were a luxury I could enjoy on occasion. The greater luxury came in taking charge of my fashion life. By God, I had choices! The Hudson Valley was teeming with retail stores ready to help in my transition from fashion victim to fashion star. PEGAUS FOOTWEAR FLAIR WILL TAKE YOU FAR Pegasus Footwear bears an ultracompassionate motto: Love your feet. As someone who has never been able to squash my delicate toes into narrow compartments, I can think of no better premise from which to start a selection of footwear. The Woodstock-based company came to life two decades ago, and a second store was opened eight years back in New Paltz. Winter Gnip has managed the New Paltz location for much of that time. She switched from accounting to shoe sales because she wanted a fun, direct way to help people. Gnip loves the ever-changing world of shoe fashion, and appreciates even more the openminded, easy-going environment that she helps to maintain at Pegasus. “You have to have your own fashion, your own flair,” she says. “When a person has that, you can see it all over their face. Fashion is the way they feel. It’s their comfort level.” The shoes at Pegasus are comfortable and fashionable, and there is an enormous variety to choose from. Shopping here leaves customers light on their feet and ready to traipse over the hills of the Hudson Valley, looking at the views while looking good. SHELLEY K. FREE TO BE Shelley King was a costume designer who wanted to create beautiful things that had longevity, so she began crafting jewelry, and opened her shop Shelley K. in Saugerties. The place is full of timeless, one-of-a-kind pieces that King hopes will help their future owners make memories. She says, “Whether something makes you feel sexy, fun, alive, or serious, putting on a piece of jewelry should be like greeting an old friend. Jewelry is a fashion that lasts longer than a season.” In July of 2007, King had the opportunity to participate in a fashion show that was part of the HITS Horse Shows in the Sun, a series of equine competitions and fun recreational events. She accessorized every outfit flaunted on that Saugerties runway, showing everyone in attendance the power of jewelry to

make clothing more special or more subtle; to make it entirely one’s own.

“It was a great exercise,” says King, “in helping people feel free to be who they are, especially here in this area. Because we don’t live in an urban environment that dictates style, people are free to express their own individuality. Every person knows what looks best on their body, and what’s in fashion isn’t necessarily what looks best. We don’t have to go with the trends.” CASA URBANA A MOST COLORFUL GETAWAY David Iorio got a feel for Hudson Valley fashion shortly after he relocated from Manhattan to be with his partner Kenneth Jacobs. In broad daylight, he spotted a woman wearing a top from American Eagle Outfitters with a couture skirt. He knew he had left the city behind, and so had she.


OPPOSITE: CHENILLE THROW AT LOOMINUS HANDWOVENS IN BEARSVILLE. ABOVE (CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT): FRIDA KAHLO NECKLACE FROM HOTCAKES DESIGN, AT JEWEL IN WOODSTOCK; TSONGA SANDAL AT PEGASUS IN NEW PALTZ; HANDCRAFTED JEWELRY AT SHELLEY K IN SAUGERTIES: OXIDIZED STERLING AND SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND RINGS BY BILLY VAN BAKKER; RINGS BY KLAUS BURGEL (TOP); AND GOLD RINGS BY BARBARA ZUCKER (CENTER); HANDWOVEN CHENILLE JACKET AT LOOMINUS HANDWOVENS.

“There’s a sense of being by the river and having the countryside,” Iorio says. “That outfit worked for that woman. It looked wonderful and comfortable. Everything here is a little less structured and more laid back.” Yet Iorio and Jacobs knew that if area residents were not missing the stresses of city life, they were missing other, more pleasant elements. Jacobs had worked for years as a hair stylist in Westchester and Putnam County salons— discerning markets in which he had to prove that he was the best in order to satisfy his clientele. He had received extensive training in cutting and corrective coloring, and he wanted to open his own salon here in our valley. Both men believed that if they offered quality service and unique bath and beauty products, their customers would find themselves nestled in the lap of luxury along South Street in Hudson. In a time when traveling has become so dear, Iorio and Jacobs tender an easy escape with their modern apothecary and salon Casa Urbana. JEWEL BEYOND LIMITATIONS “I’ve never been into fashion in other places,” says Ronny Widener, co-owner of the clothing store Jewel in Woodstock. Widener and her husband opened Jewel in 2006. It was a long time dream for this self-proclaimed former bureaucrat. She had always shopped at annual crafts shows for one-of-a-kind clothing and jewelry, and was constantly frustrated by the dearth of such items on the street. She vowed to one day open a store where clients could find such treasures any time of the year. The Wideners traveled between SoHo and Woodstock for some time before hunkering down in the famously artsy upstate milieu. Jewel is their second ownership adventure—they operated Occasions on Rock City Road beforehand—and it is rich with stock. A West Coast designer provides items of hand-dyed and hand-painted silks; a Soho artisan contributes skirts, pants, and jackets in travelable fabrics, flattering for any figure; embroidered handbags are made by Vietnamese women whose village is handsomely rewarded for their fine, detailed work.

For the most part, Jewel is not cheap.This is a decidedly upscale Woodstock store, but its merchandise comes with a guarantee. As Widener says, “Clothing choices are so limited now because it’s Mall America.When people come here, they know that my pieces are always unique.” LOOMINUS WEAVING A NEW GAME It began with the purchase of a single loom. Twenty-five years later, Marsha Fleisher continues to practice what she refers to as the “meditative art” of weaving. Loominus of Bearsville is a cottage industry owned by a woman, which makes it an emblem of the gutsy and grassroots Hudson Valley community. It sells to over 100 stores, including Barneys New York, which makes it a thriving enterprise. The Route 212 building houses a full showroom of hand bags, scarves, jackets, pillows, and throws of gorgeous colors and textures. A working studio surrounds the showroom. Looms and samples abound. Every day Fleisher and her staff generate something out of nothing: fabric out of air and clothing born from their true creative hearts. Says Fleisher, “People here are both cosmopolitan and country. They enjoy getting dressed, enjoy the work of color and texture. They are aware of art and fashion, although by moving here, they choose not to play that game. With their sense of taste and tremendous life experience, they appreciate my wearable art.” SWEET TASTE OF FREEDOM A new fashion game has emerged from our fertile Hudson Valley, and it’s all about originality. The shoes on my feet, the bracelets at my wrist, the shade of my hair, and the threads across my back are all indications of who I am and who I can be. This former Connecticut girl, victim of uptight cookie-cutter fashion, seems to have escaped the bully of Mall America. May my scarves and my stockings forever clash in an enticing manner that is thoroughly me. May your blouse wrinkle in perfect line with your character, not perfect but perfect just the same. And may we all prevail in our thread-bythread escape from the dictates of fashion conformity. 8/08 CHRONOGRAM BEAUTY AND FASHION 83


BARD COLLEGE RETURNING TO COLLEGE PROGRAM

READY TO FINISH YOUR DEGREE? Bard College’s Returning to College Program offers a unique opportunity for adults seeking to complete their undergraduate degree. Founded on the premise that returning students benefit from participating in the regular undergraduate curriculum, Bard’s program creates the opportunity for them to study side by side with their younger colleagues. We recognize the real-world difficulties for adult students returning to college. Bard is committed to making this program more costeffective than the traditional undergraduate route and to providing academic and other support to returning students. In addition to traditional forms of financial aid, Bard is now offering $5,000 scholarships to eligible students. Interviews and applications for fall, 2008 admission accepted until August 22. For more information visit www.inside.bard.edu/academic/programs/returntocollege, or call Greg Armbruster, Associate Director of Admission, 845-758-7472.

BardCollege Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504

A SUMMER OF FUN AWAITS AT YMCA DAY CAMPS!

PRE-KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 9

CAMP SEEWACKAMANO Located in Shokan, NY. Monday-Friday (Phone: 845-338-3810 OR 845-657-8288)

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Learning is discovery. P.O. BOX 867 LENOX, MA 01240 413-637-0755

84 EDUCATION CHRONOGRAM 8/08

www.berkshirecountryday.org

Located at Camp Epworth in High Falls, NY. Monday-Friday (Phone: 845 255-2107) Fax (845-256-0327)

FOR MORE INFO CALL (845) 338-3810 or visit us on the web at

www.ymcaulster.org


CHRONOGRAM 2008

EDUCATION

LECTURING INSTRUCTOR STEPHEN EGLINSKI (LEFT) CONSULTS OVER AN ORANGE AND CRANBERRY SCONE DOUGH PREPARED BY CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA BOOT CAMP STUDENTS LINDA JOCHEM AND PAM BURT.

JENNIFER MAY

8/08 CHRONOGRAM EDUCATION 85


Latchkey No More The Evolution of Afterschool By Kelley Granger

ABOVE: ENERGY DANCE COMPANY REHERSAL; THE MEDIA LAB AT THE CENTER FOR CREATIVE EDUCATION IN KINGSTON OPPOSITE: MUSIC CLASSES AT BERKSHIRE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL IN LENOX, MA

A

ccording to a special report commissioned by the Afterschool Alliance, a non profit public awareness and advocacy organization based in Washington, DC, 56 percent of families in 1950 represented the “traditional” American image—one parent worked full-time and the other stayed home to care for the children. Today, less than a quarter of the families in the nation fit this image, leaving 14.3 million children to care for themselves after school. The rest of the world has changed a lot since the 1950s too. Jodi Grant, the executive director of the Afterschool Alliance, says that another study points out how much more likely kids were to partake in dangerous behaviors while unsupervised during these hours. “Teens who do not participate in afterschool programs are nearly three times more likely to skip classes than teens who do participate,” she says. “They are also three times more likely to use marijuana or other drugs, and they are more likely to drink alcohol, smoke cigarettes, and engage in sexual activity.” But the image of the traditional American family and the dangers in the after-school hours are not the only thing that’s changed. On a more positive note, the demand for afterschool programming has increased and has been met with a number of evolving, engaging options for parents who wish to use the afterschool hours in a constructive way. “There was a time when there were few afterschool programs, and what was available was more likely to be activities—a cheerleading group here, a chess club there,” says Grant. “We are making progress, the number of afterschool programs is growing, but we still have a long way to go. And the programs we have do more to provide the range of supports and activities that students need today than in the past. In many cases, afterschool programs engage students who may not be doing well in school by offering field trips, mentoring, opportunities to try art and music, physical fitness and sports, career exploration, and much more, as well as the homework help that students need.” Rather than just providing baby-sitting, today there are a range of choices in the region that go beyond standard child care to promote creativity, teach new skills, and prepare children and youth for the responsibilities they will face in the workforce. CENTER FOR CREATIVE EDUCATION “All you have to do is take a good walk around Midtown Kingston,” says Evry Mann, the founder and executive director of the Center for Creative Education in Kingston. “Kids today are confronting all types of serious risks and it’s dangerous out there—and not just in Midtown Kingston, it’s dangerous everywhere. You could sit in front of your big screen TV and it runs the gamut from drugs and alcohol abuse to the idiocy of too many hours playing video games.” 86 EDUCATION CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Mann’s antidote began in 1997, when his daughter was in third grade and he noticed a lack of arts programs in the schools.What started as one program in an elementary school quickly spread to three as Mann, a percussionist, utilized his friendships with working artists in the area who loved kids and could teach—a symbiosis that gave work to artists and enriched the education of children. Today, the Center for Creative Education operates programs from its own performing arts center in Kingston. The center offers studios for multi disciplinary visual arts, percussion, dance, a computer music lab, and a homework tutoring center. Funding has helped provide Apple computers and GarageBand software for the computer music lab, where beginning to advanced students can create their own compositions under the direction of Peter Wetzler, who does professional film and music scoring. The dance programs at the center are also widely acclaimed, and Bryant “Drew” Andrews’s Energy Dance Company has won awards from the Apollo Theater and BET. To participate in the dance groups that the center offers, Mann says that children must maintain a certain grade level at school—a further incentive to study and a way that the center ties together the arts and academics. “We know classroom teachers who have says that the [dancer’s] discipline and focus pays off in math class because they’ll spend 30 minutes working on a step to get it right, and that can carry over to academics as well,” Mann says. The center does charge for programs, but the fees are often covered by scholarships when students apply—Mann estimates that 86 percent of the 128 students currently enrolled at the center are on scholarship. The center also offers free programs at the George Washington and John F. Kennedy Elementary Schools, which provide theater, music, dance, visual art, and more to about 450 elementary school students. “My experience is that kids are going to do something—they have bundles of energy, so if we can provide them with experiences and positive energy they’ll gladly take us up on it,” Mann says. “Otherwise, they’ll use that energy another way, it will be expended somehow. Our job is to provide kids with meaningful things to do.” CHILDREN’S MEDIA PROJECT Based in Poughkeepsie, the Children’s Media Project (CMP) was founded by filmmaker Maria Marewski as a media literacy program for children where they not only become critical viewers, but learn to create media as well. The organization provides afterschool programs for middle schoolers, like one planned for this fall that will incorporate script-writing and character development for production of radio plays that will be hosted by Vassar’s WVKR. CMP also runs DROP TV (Direct Revolution of Programming Television), a program in which high schoolers are involved in every step of each show’s production, from


brainstorming material to editing, filming, and acting. Nicole Fenichel-Hewitt, CMP’s executive director, says that kids can come in as beginners during the afterschool apprenticeship and leave as advanced filmmakers. “One of the things that I think is a great advantage for DROP TV afterschoolers is that when summer comes around, we have paid apprentices,” FenichelHewitt says. “And they get the skill set for lots of different filmmaking jobs.” DROP TV apprentices learn basic camera skills and editing, and become proficient in software like Final Cut and Adobe Creative Suite. They also learn how to work sound and lighting—everything needed to be in production on a crew. Fenichel-Hewitt says that in addition to technical skills, the programming at CMP offers vital life skills as well. “[Kids] become more able to work in team settings, they build leadership skills and are increasing their critical thinking skills,” Fenichel-Hewitt says. “They also learn about how to troubleshoot and navigate change and be adaptable to different situations and settings. It’s not just about teaching kids camera skills and professional development, it’s also life skills and decision making and being able to navigate life.” Ryan Sullivan, a media educator at CMP who began as a student there more than eight years ago, credits the program with teaching him a number of critical skills and allowing him to have an outlet to positively affect his community. “Children’s Media Project is important to have because Poughkeepsie is a community that’s struggling,” Sullivan says. “It’s a place where a lot of drugs and violence are an everyday life for some of these teenagers.We give them a way to be a part of something that’s a healthy environment and hopefully we give them the knowledge to make it. It’s rough out there.”

have previously been offered include clay workshops, dance, painting, and a nature class where a naturalist educator takes the kids on hikes and explains the ecological systems they encounter. Music classes like African drumming are among the choices, and sports like baseball, horseback riding, and tennis are available as well. It’s been a help to parents who have children that are released from school at different times, too. “Last year, my 10-year-old began taking afterschool sports, which required that he take the late bus home,” says Donna Kittredge, whose children attend the school. “My younger son attended some afterschool programs because he could then take the late bus home with his brother. It is convenient to be able to make one trip to pick up the kids, especially with the high cost of fuel.” Other parents appreciate the range of material the enrichment courses expose their children to. Gundula Brattke enrolled her son in the program because she was impressed by the diversity of the classes. “Where else could a 6-year-old participate in moviemaking, where the kids develop their own story, build the props, care for the costumes, and eventually shoot their own movie?” asks Brattke. “My son also participated for several terms in chess class, tennis, baseball, nature walk, and drumming. He loved everything and definitely got a lot of knowledge and confidence out of it.” The enrichment program courses correspond with the school’s calendar, so parents can rely on it throughout the school year. The program is currently available to kindergarten through fourth-grade students enrolled at the Berkshire Country Day School, but Naylor-Pollart hopes to one day open the classes to more grades and to children enrolled at other schools.

MILL STREET LOFT When Carole Wolf started Mill Street Loft in 1981, she had no idea it would turn into the successful arts organization it has. “There was a need in this community to offer meaningful art classes to children and adults of all ages that was not being offered anywhere else,”Wolf says. “I was interested in something else; intergenerational programs, the wisdom of age and vitality of youth. I saw more and more two-parent families working, and more and more kids after school with nothing to do and no place to go.” Mill Street Loft offers programs to children from as young as four years old to high school age. This fall, elementary school children can choose from a variety of classes such as Clay Creations, in which kids produce functional and sculptural clay objects, and Art Camp, a series that explores the use of different materials and media. Older, middle school-aged children can sign up for the Junior Art Institute and learn animation and sequential drawing, drawing and painting, and more. High school students have the most class choices, with arts education opportunities ranging from figure drawing to photography and portfolio development. Mill Street Loft has established itself as a highly regarded organization among colleges, and Wolf says that to date, her students have received more than $12 million in merit-based scholarships. Mill Street Loft has also developed a number of outreach programs. Habilidad is an art-based program that reaches out to Spanish and Latino youth to help them develop career awareness through technology training, portfolio development, job exploration, and public art projects. The Poughkeepsie PASWORD program was designed to help at-risk girls ages 11 to 17 overcome gender-specific issues like domestic violence and teen pregnancy by using literary, media, performing, and fine arts as tools of empowerment. Beacon offers a similar program called Project AWARE. Local school districts cooperate with Mill Street Loft to nominate students to participate, and funding has allowed these outreach programs to be given tuition-free.

FINDING AND SUPPORTING AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMS There are a number of resources that will help parents locate quality afterschool programming. Start at the school district websites, where links to programs are often provided. Also consider getting involved with the organizations that help advocate these programs, like Afterschool Alliance, which operates at local, state, and national levels and which has a goal of making afterschool programs available to all children by 2010. “Afterschool programs are a terrific investment, as they keep kids safe, help working families, and inspire students to learn,” says Grant. “We need more state, federal, foundation, and corporate support for these programs to keep kids on the right track and give them every chance to succeed, and give working parents the peace of mind they need and deserve.”

BERKSHIRE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL ENRICHMENT PROGRAM Claire Naylor-Pollart decided to start an afterschool program nearly three years ago to help parents who needed an option to bridge the gap between the end of the school day and the end of the workday.The Berkshire Country Day School Enrichment Program was born, and lined up a number of activities that allow children to be enrolled after school from 3 to 4:30pm in creative, athletic, and educational pursuits, often right on the school’s campus. Naylor-Pollart is always adding to the range of classes offered. Those which

RESOURCES AFTERSCHOOL ALLIANCE 1616 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006, (866) KIDS-TODAY www.afterschoolalliance.org

BERKSHIRE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL ENRICHMENT PROGRAM PO Box 867, Lenox, MA 01240 , (413) 637-0755 www.berkshirecountryday.org

CENTER FOR CREATIVE EDUCATION 20 Thomas Street, Kingston, NY 12401, (845) 338-7664 www.cce-kingston.org

CHILDREN’S MEDIA PROJECT Lady Washington Firehouse, 20 Academy Street , Poughkeepsie, NY 12601, (845) 485-4480 www.childrensmediaproject.org

MILL STREET LOFT 45 Pershing Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601, (845) 471-7477 www.millstreetloft.org

8/08 CHRONOGRAM EDUCATION 87


“Get over the idea that only children should spend their time in study. Be a student so long as you still have something to learn, and this will mean all your life.” —Henry L. Doherty

MEGAN DWYER

NO MORE PENCILS, NO MORE BOOKS A Lifetime In Learning By Amy Lubinski

A

s an adult, most likely you’re managing a full-time job, a family, and a home.Your life may be so busy you have no time for anything but routine. Some days, as you measure your life out in coffee spoons, you think, “I am a robot.”What better way to liven up your life than with a class, a hobby, or a skill? Though you may try to create as many excuses as possible for not taking the time to challenge yourself or learn something new—“I’m too busy,” “I’m too tired,” or the classic “I’m too old”—the reasons why you should pursue learning as an adult are countless. What you get involved in can provide you the opportunity to make new friends, challenge you physically, help you advance professionally, serve your community, satisfy an inquiring mind, quell your “I’ve always wanted to do that but [insert excuse here]” statements, conquer fears, and, at the very least, provide a break from routine. No matter where you live in the region, there are places geared toward educating adults. It’s time to get out, and get learning. CHANNELING YOUR INNER EMERIL With the plethora of reality cooking programs on TV, knowing how to cook has become almost as much a competition as a means of providing sustenance. If you desire to expand your kitchen skills beyond your current repertoire and impress your friends at dinner parties, feel lucky to live so close to the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park.You can take your cooking to the next level by registering in one of their culinary Boot Camp programs. There is a program for nearly every cuisine—French, American regional, flavors of Asia, Italian-American, seafood, and even the tastes of the Hudson Valley. Depending upon which program you choose, your boot camp training can take two, four, or five days and includes cooking, lectures, as well as meals at the campus restaurants. (800) 888-7850; www.ciachef.edu. JUST KEEP SWIMMING, JUST KEEP SWIMMING . . . Knowing how to swim is a valuable life skill. But if you’ve never learned how, what better time than summer? Total Immersion in New Paltz will help you not

88 EDUCATION CHRONOGRAM 8/08

only quell what fears you may have about the water, but also transform you from a doggy paddler to a flying fish. Total Immersion claims to have a foolproof approach to teaching that brings results faster than conventional methods and can help any student, no matter what their age or fitness level. Whether you’re looking to finetune your techniques for an anticipated competition or you’re learning to swim for the first time, programs are customized for you to work towards personal goals. The facilities include two Endless resistance pools that can be adjusted to a stroke speed up to three miles per hour, and contain underwater mirrors and video cameras for constant visual feedback. (845) 256-9770; www.totalimmersion.net. TRANSFORMING THE SELF If you’re seeking a more holistic approach to your lifestyle, the Omega Institute in Rhinebeck will provide you with the means to do so through self-exploring education that will nurture the spirit, body, and mind. Since its founding in 1977, the Omega Institute has been offering its students opportunities for personal growth and wellness through classes, workshops, and conferences held all over the country. Over 16,000 people come to the 195-acre campus annually, “to be rejuvenated and gain life skills or just have a happier life,” explains Christina Pullicino, media relations associate. Workshops range from chanting, emotional healing, drum song, couples massage, African dance and drumming, and a “Crazy Sexy Cancer Boot Camp” led by Kris Carr to replace the fear that comes with a cancer diagnosis with a sense of strength and freedom. Omega also offers professional training to earn continuing education credits, and “learning vacations” in Costa Rica and the Virgin Islands. (877) 944-2002; www.eomega.org. EVERYTHING, INCLUDING HOW TO FIX THE KITCHEN SINK Want to know how to mix a mojito? Or how to go about publishing your first novel? A community college is an ideal starting place for anyone who is interested in learning a new skill or garnering a new hobby but doesn’t know where to center their interests, or want to break the bank doing it. SUNY Ulster—with campuses


TONY FIORINI

OPPOSITE: CLAIRE WOOLGER DOING A KNEE HANG TO CATCHER EDWARDO BLANCO AT THE TRAPEZE CLUB IN NEW PALTZ. ABOVE: CHESTER AND LINDA FREEMAN OF GOT2LINDY TEACHING DANCE ABOARD THE CRUISE SHIP EXPLORER.

in Stone Ridge and Kingston—offers an extensive catalog of noncredit classes for vocations, computer training, health and safety instruction, dancing and exercise, arts and crafts, home enhancement, languages, travel and recreation, writing and publishing, and more. Many classes are offered online. (845) 339-2025; www.sunyulster.edu. IT’S A BIRD! IT’S A PLANE! Who hasn’t wished for the ability to fly? If you’re still secretly aching to live out your Superman fantasy, or seeking another way to stay in shape that’s more interesting than hoofing it on the treadmill, sign-up for a two-hour introductory trapeze class at the Trapeze Club at the Center for Symbolic Studies in New Paltz. Daring, physically able first-timers can expect to do a swinging knee hang with a flip by the end of the class. Classes contain no more than 10 students with assistance from two to four instructors, and are offered from May through October to everyone age 4 and up. “We just had a 79-year-old woman do this for the first time,” said instructor Megan Dwyer. (845) 658-8540; www.trapezeclub.org. VOULEZVOUS COUCHER AVEC MOI, CE SOIR? If you have intentions of visiting Paris, how do you expect to seduce someone in the city of romance if you don’t know how to approach them? The Language Immersion Institute could be your saving grace. The institute offers intensive weekend courses—16 hours’ worth of class time acquired Friday through Sunday—with an emphasis on the development of conversational skills. From Arabic to Yiddish, 20 languages are taught to students seeking to expand their knowledge of foreign tongues. All languages and levels are offered at each session, and classes usually contain five to 10 students. (845) 257-3500; www.newpaltz.edu/lii. PAINT YOUR PALATE BLUE AND GRAY We all have to admit that at least once in our lives, we have been so moved by a piece of artwork that we have thought to ourselves, “I wish I could do that.” The Hudson Valley is teeming with locations to bolster your artistic talent. What-

ever your artistic medium of choice—painting, drawing, sculpting, printmaking, airbrushing, music, drama, folk arts—classes exist for it in the Hudson Valley, so you too can begin to incite jealousy with your own artistic creations. Work with charcoal, ink, and pastel at the Mill Street Loft in Poughkeepsie. Try your hand at water-based media as you paint the streams, rivers, and waterfalls of the the Catskills at the Woodstock School of Art. Create a painted rug of your own design for your home at the Walkill River School in Montgomery. Learn to fire pottery at the Unison Arts and Learning Center in New Paltz, or learn the basics of printmaking at the Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale. www.millstreetloft.org; www.woodstockschoolofart.org; www.wallkillriverschool.com; www.unisonarts.org; www.wsworkshop.org. PUT ON YOUR RED SHOES AND DANCE It has been said that there is no freer form of expression than dance—almost everyone can do it, and you can do it practically anywhere. As Matt dances his way across the world (for the few who may not know who Matt is, amuse yourself at www.wherethehellismatt.com), you can channel your inner Gene Kelly or Ginger Rogers with a dance course in the Hudson Valley. The Barefoot Dance Center in West Park emphasizes alignment—healthy placement of joints and bones—and every student choreographs as well as dances with control from the muscles in their bare feet. Or you can opt for the more traditional dance styles at Strictly Ballroom in Newburgh, learning the “graceful, free flowing movement of the waltz, the strong dramatic moves of the tango, or the expressive and sensuous sounds of the Latin rhythm.” But if you’re looking to do some time traveling in your dancing, you can learn the Lindy Hop, Jitterbug, or how to swing with Got2Lindy, which teaches in dance studios in Kingston, Highland, and Gardiner. Got2Lindy sponsors free student-run practice nights at the Muddy Cup in Kingston every Thursday. The Got2Lindy dance studios also offers ballroom classes in cha cha, the foxtrot, and waltz. (845) 384-6146, www. barefootdancecenter.com; (845) 569-0530, www.strictlyballroomdance.com. www.got2lindy.com. 8/08 CHRONOGRAM EDUCATION 89


THE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK

LECTURES

Creative Writing Workshop Using Amherst Writers & Artists Method

 Weekly Writing Workshops  Sundays beginning August 3, Thursdays beginning August 7

©

Dawoud Bey (detail)

MARY ELLEN MARK SATURDAY AUGUST 2 CONNIE IMBODEN SATURDAY AUGUST 9 CHRISTOPHER JAMES SATURDAY AUGUST 16 DAWOUD BEY SATURDAY AUGUST 23 CONSTANTINE MANOS SATURDAY AUGUST 30 LECTURES BEGIN AT 8PM

Wallkill Valley Writers, New Paltz Kate Hymes, Workshop Leader

(845) 255-7090 khamherstwriters@aol.com | www.wallkillvalleywriters

| ADMISSION $7/5 members, students, seniors | call ahead to confirm event if traveling from far

EXHIBITIONS

© Julianne Swartz (detail)

ON VIEW THRU AUGUST 17

THE CAMERA ALWAYS LIES REGIONAL TRIENNIAL OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS curated by Beth Wilson | artists: Joan Barker, John Dugdale, Jaanika Peerna, Rob Penner, Julianne Swartz, Sam Sebren, Kathleen Sweeney, Susan Wides, and Ion Zupcu

Gallery hours: Wednesday-Sunday, Noon-5PM

59 TINKER STREET WOODSTOCK NY | 845-679-9957 | WWW.CPW.ORG

Public shows, school programs and other events. www.hudsonriverplayback.org or call 845.255.7716

!

RE is AT ley E Val H

T on om uds ACK pot fr s H B d e s i i M he tor AY The f PL c on t true s

E o musi bers’ M HO tre ande mem e c h a t Theaudien

First Fridays of the month, 8pm at Boughton Place, Kisor Road, Highland, NY. Call 845.691.4118 or 845.255.5613

90 EDUCATION CHRONOGRAM 8/08


Pre-K through grade 12. Limited openings for Fall 2008. Financial aid available. Tuesday, March 18, 8:40 am For more information call 845-462-7600 ext. 201 admissions@poughkeepsie.org

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8/08 CHRONOGRAM EDUCATION 91


business directory ACCOMMODATIONS

ART GALLERIES & CENTERS

design services, large format color output,

BEAUTY

custom printing, personal stationery, legal

Catskill Mountain Lodge

Ann Street Gallery

forms, cards, maps and novelty gifts. Three

(518) 678-3101 www.caskillmtlodge.com

104 Ann Street Newburgh, NY (845) 562-6940, ext. 119 www.annstreetgallery.org

locations dedicated to enhancing your

The Ann Street Gallery is a non-profit gallery located in the City of Newburgh, specializing in contemporary emerging and established artists.

Manny’s Art Supply

www.medicalaestheticshv.com

83 Main Street, New Paltz, NY

Androgyny

The Catskill Mountain Lodge, celebrating forty years of hospitality, is set on the banks of the historic Kaaterskill Creek in Palenville, America’s first art colony. Accommodations include fireplace rooms, cabins, cottages, and a three-bedroom house.

ALTERNATIVE ENERGY Altren Geothermal & Solar Systems (845) 658-7116 www.altren.net

ANIMAL SANCTUARIES Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary

business directory

(845) 679-5955 www.WoodstockSanctuary.org A magical place where you can frolic with goats, cuddle with chickens, and give belly rubs to pigs! Visit with over 100 farm animals—all rescued from terrible situations. Open weekends from 11-4 (other times by appointment). Tours on the hour from 11-3. Van Wagner Road in Willow, take 212 8 miles west of downtown Woodstock.

ARCHITECTURE d-v design (518) 986-0876 or (518) 280-8992 www.d-vdesign.com info@d-vdesign.com Focused on green design, our firm provides a full range of services for residential projects. With extensive experience in design and construction management, we are dedicated to providing solutions that lead to significant cost savings and dramatic aesthetic results. Located in New York State, our firm serves clients nationwide.

EcoArch DesignWorks Woodstock, NY (845) 247-4620 Award winning design, harmonizing spirit, health and the environment, solar and “green” design. Licensed in New York, New Jersey and California, EcoArch DesignWorks specializes in planning, architecture and interiors for single-family or Multi-family homes, entertainment, retail or office environments. Recent projects in New York include the Oriental Emerson Spa, the Ram Dass Library @ Omega and numerous private homes and additions. Unlock the potentials of your site, home or office, to foster greater design harmony, prosperity, spirit, health, and ecological integrity.

92

BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

creative adventure—voted ‘Best in the Valley’ year after year.

(845) 255-9902

Center for Photography at Woodstock 59 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-9957 Info@cpw.org

Medical Aesthetics of the Hudson Valley 166 Albany Ave, Kingston, NY (845) 339 LASER (5273)

5 Mulberry Street in the Historic Huguenot

Since 1962, big-city selection and small-

Street of New Paltz, NY

town service have made Manny’s special.

(845) 256-0620

We offer a full range of art materials, craft and bookmaking supplies, as well as the best selection of handmade and decorative

Garrison Art Center

papers north of Manhattan. Manny’s, it’s

23 Garrison’s Landing, Garrison, NY (845) 424-3960 www.garrisonartcenter.org

more than just an art store.

BEVERAGE SERVICES Coffee System of the Hudson Valley 1 (800) 660-3175

R & F Handmade Paints

www.homecoffeesystem.com

84 Ten Broeck Avenue, Kingston, NY

Hudson Valley Gallery

(845) 331-3112

246 Hudson Street, Cornwall-On-Hudson, NY (845) 534-5ART www.hudsonvalleygallery.com

www.rfpaints.com

Paintings and limited edition prints of the Hudson Valley and beyond by Paul Gould. Changing exhibits of representational paintings, sculpture, and photography by established and emerging artists. Gallery offers painting and frame restoration services and art instruction in all media, beginners welcome. Gallery open Saturday and Sunday 1-5pm or by appointment.

Mark Gruber Gallery

Russell Law

New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 www.markgrubergallery.com

(608) 833-1555

Van Brunt Gallery

Entertainment. Russell Law serves musicians,

93 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY

writers, visual and performing artists.

(845) 679-2122

Elizabeth T. Russell is a musician herself,

www.overlookmountainbikes.com

admitted to practice law in New York,

From professional repairs, to integral sales,

Connecticut and Wisconsin. Remarkably

bicycle rentals,or just talking about your

fluent in “Plain English,” she is also the author

concerns and questions, we are here and

of Art Law Conversations: A Surprisingly

ready to assist you with all your cycling needs.

460 Main Street, Beacon, NY (845) 838-2995 www.vanbruntgallery.com Exhibiting the work of contemporary artists. Featuring abstract painting, sculpture, digital art, photography, and video, the gallery has new shows each month. The innovative gallery Web site has online artist portfolios and videos of the artists discussing their work.

ART INSTRUCTION

BEVERAGES

Internationally known manufacturer of

Esotec

Pigment Sticks and Encaustic paint right

(845) 246-2411

here in the Hudson Valley. Stop in for a

www.esotecltd.com

tour of our factory, get paints at discounted prices, sign up for an Encaustic or Pigment Stick workshop, or check out bi-monthly exhibits in the Gallery.

Choose Esotec to be your wholesale beverage provider. For 21 years, we carry a complete line of natural, organic, and unusual juices, spritzers, waters, sodas, iced teas, and iced coffees. If you are a

ATTORNEYS

store owner, call for details or a catalog of our full line. We’re back in Saugerties now!

BIKES

www.erklaw.com Copyright. Trademark. Arts and

Overlook Mountain Bikes

Readable Guide for Visual Artists.

BODY & SKIN CARE AUTO SALES DNL Automotive, Inc.

Essence MediSpa, LLC—Stephen Weinman, M.D.

(845) 236-2552

222 Route 299, Highland, NY

Mill Street Loft

dnlautomotiveny@aol.com

(845) 691-3773

(845) 471-7477 millstreetloft.org

A family owned and operated dealership

www.EssenceMediSpa.com

that specializes in finding rare and exciting

“Take Some Time Off” at Essence MediSpa

pre-owned vehicles of outstanding quality

with Skin Rejuvenation and Anti-Aging

and value.

treatments. Non-Surgical treatments for

ART SUPPLIES Catskill Art & Office Supply Kingston (845) 331-7780 Woodstock (845) 679-2251 Poughkeepsie (845) 452-1250 Art Materials, studio furnishings, custom picture framing, blueprint copies, graphic

age spots and skin lesions, teeth whitening,

AUTOMOBILES Ruge’s

Botox Cosmetic, Laser Hair Removal, Non-Surgical Skin Tightening using the Titan System, Varicose and Spider Vein treatments, Microdermabrasion, Chemical

Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY

Peels, Acne Treatments, Facials and

(845) 876-1057

Massage Services.


    

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Learn to Draw with Kathleen McGuiness Ongoing Small Group Instruction Individual Attention All Levels: Beginner to Advanced Private Instruction Available Personal Expression Encouraged Affordable Rates

www.woodstockartist.com / 845.679.1241

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business directory

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8/08 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY

93


BOOKSTORES

tendons, ligaments and muscles helps to

CONSIGNMENT SHOPS

DENTISTRY

Past ‘n’ Perfect

Center For Advanced Dentistry — Bruce D. Kurek, DDS, FAGD

fend off disease and old age. It prepares

Mirabai of Woodstock 23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 www.mirabai.com The Hudson Valley’s oldest spiritual/holistic bookstore, providing a vast array of books, music, and gifts that transform, renew, and elevate the spirit. Exquisite statuary and other art works from Nepal, Tibet, Bali. Expert Tarot reading, astrological charts/ interpretation available.

the body to withstand the rigorous training of Martial Arts and helps us to live a long life, free of degenerative diseases. Tai Chi Chuan, based on the same principles as Chi Gung, further embodies the expression of our intrinsic energy (CHI) in general physical movement and stillness meditation, as well as the deeply intricate movements found in the self-defense aspect of the Tai Chi form. Both of these practices were founded on the combination of Shaolin Buddhist meditation, Shaolin

Oblong Books & Music

martial body mechanics and Taoist

6422 Montgomery Street (Route 9), Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-0500 www.oblongbooks.com

spiritual alchemy, but the first step in

A true general bookstore, Oblong stocks the best and most interesting books in all categories. Oblong is more than just a great bookstore, also offering the region’s best selection of music. Our CD club rewards you with a free CD with every 10 purchased. Open daily.

These esoteric practices have brought

BUILDING SUPPLIES

attaining results in these arts depends on setting the body and mind to the true nature of things… there are no short cuts. health, vitality and youthfulness, to me and my students, some of which are in their 70’s and 80’s. The only requirements for Chi Gung and Tai Chi Chuan are: determined practice of the principles and the will to persevere.

CINEMA

1629 Main Street (Route 44), Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 635-3115 www.pastnperfect.com

494 Route 299, Highland, NY (845) 691-5600 www.thecenterforadvanceddentistry.com

A quaint consignment boutique that offers distinctive clothing, jewelry, shoes and accessories, and a unique variety of highquality furs and leathers. Always a generous supply of merchandise from casual to chic; contemporary to vintage; all sizes accepted. Featuring a diverse and illuminating jewelry collection. Conveniently located in Pleasant Valley, only 9 miles east of the Mid-Hudson Bridge.

Setting the standard for excellence in

The Present Perfect

exit 18.

23G Village Plaza, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2939

DOG BOARDING

Designer consignments of the utmost quality for men, women, and children. Current styles, jewelry, accessories, and knicknacks. Featuring beautiful furs and leathers.

CUSTOM HOME DESIGN AND MATERIALS

dentistry for more than 25 years, the Center for Advanced Dentistry attracts clients from throughout the northeast and abroad. Their client-centered approach to providing comprehensive dental services for adults and children includes old-school care and concern combined with the latest technologies. The office is conveniently located 1.5 miles east of the NYS Thruway,

Dog Love, LLC 240 North Ohioville Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-8254 www.dogloveplaygroups.com Personal hands-on boarding and daycare tailored to your dog’s individual needs. Your dog’s happiness is our goal. Indoor 5x10

business directory

Williams Lumber & Home Centers 6760 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-WOOD 317 Kyserike Road, High Falls, NY (845) 687-7676 2612 Route 44, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-2324 www.williamslumber.com The name you know and the name you trust. Our Design Centers are located at our Rhinebeck and Millbrook locations. Come meet with our outstanding design team and start creating your perfect kitchen or bath today!

Upstate Films 26 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2515 Showing provocative international cinema, contemporary and classic, and hosting filmmakers since 1972 on two screens in the village of Rhinebeck.

CLOTHING Pegasus Comfort Footwear 10 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock and 27 N Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 679-2373

CARPETS & RUGS

www.PegasusShoes.com Offering innovative comfort footwear by all

Anatolia Tribal Rugs & Weavings

your favorite brands. Merrell, Dansko, Keen,

54G Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5311

Clarks, Ecco and Uggs, and lots more.

Winner: Hudson Valley Magazine “Best Carpets.” Direct importers since 1981. Natural-dyed Afghan carpets; Balouchi tribal kilims; Russian sumaks; antique Caucasian carpets; silk Persian sumaks; Turkish kilims. Hundreds to choose from, 2’x3’ to 9’x12’. Kilim pillows, $20-$55. We encourage customers to try our rugs in their homes, without obligation. MC/Visa/AmEx.

CHI GUNG—TAI CHI CHUAN

94

Open 7 days a week—or shop online at PegasusShoes.com.

matted kennels with classical music and

2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY 1 (888) 558-2636 www.lindalny.com

windows overlooking our pond. Supervised

We are Atlantic Custom Homes, Inc., the Hudson Valley’s award-winning, premier distributor of Lindal Cedar Homes. We work with you to design your custom Post and Beam Lindal Cedar home, and provide a materials package that includes beautiful Western Red Cedar and architectural quality engineered lumber to build an energy efficient home. We find skilled contractors to erect and finish your beautiful custom home and assist you through the entire process of finding and developing land through completion.

CUSTOM PORTRAITS

531 Warren Street, Hudson, NY

Pet Painting (845) 679-7327 www.petpaintingusa.com

children. Furniture and home furnishings. With an Asian sensibility. Open 7 days.

COLLEGE ADVISING College Pathways—Kris Fox

The spiritual alchemy practices of ancient Taoist sorcerers and Shaolin Buddhist monks, yielded these two treasures of Chinese internal Gung Fu. Chi Gung: This meditative practice incorporates and integrates both stillness and motion to strengthen the body and mind. Its deep breathing techniques, stretching and massaging of the acupuncture meridians,

(518) 782-1270 or (800) 391-5272

Latham, NY The Capital District’s answer to Sensible College Planning. Specializing in Financial Aid, College Selection, Timeline

FAMILY FUN Reservoir Inn Redfield, NY (315) 599-7411 www.reservoirinn.com

FARMERS’ MARKETS Kingston Farmers’ Market Historic Wall Street, Uptown Kingston, NY www.kingstonnyfarmersmarket.com and Farmland with the BEST of the Hudson Valley. Over thirty vendors bring certified organic, and traditionally grown farm fresh fruits, vegetables, field-cut fresh flowers assorted cheeses, meats, poultry, eggs, fresh and dried herbs, artisan breads and

First Street Dancewear

sweet baked goods, herbal remedies,

Saugerties, NY (845) 247-4517 www.firststreetdancewear.com

prepared foods, honey, jams, condiments,

First Street dancewear in Saugerties, NY, offers quality dancewear for adults and children. We have dancewear, knit warmups, ballet, jazz, tap shoes, gymnastics wear, skatewear, accessories, and gift items. We also feature a line of women’s active wear clothing suitable for Yoga and Pilates.

DATING SERVICE

Management, PSAT and SAT Prep and Essay Writing for College Applications. If

Mass Match

your child is a high school sophomore or

(413) 665-3218 massmatch.com

junior, don’t delay—contact us today!

Homemade food and healthy treats.

and plants, hand made mozzarella and

DANCEWEAR

(518) 697-3500 Clothing and accessories for women and

playgroups in 40 x 40 fenced area.

Creating a Harmony of History, Community

White Rice

Red Land Internal Arts (845) 750-6488

BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Atlantic Custom Homes

olive oil and more. Weekly special events bring an festive and educational air to the rain or shine venue. Crafts on John join the Market on1st Saturdays, June September. Free parking and proximity to NYS Thruway (Exit 19) Saturdays May 24 until November 22.

FAUX FINISHES Down Under Faux Red Hook, NY (845) 758 1040 downunderfaux.com murielcalderon@downunderfaux.com


Faux Intentions (845) 532-3067 Cat Quinn, professional decorative artist, setting the standard for excellence in Custom Faux Finishes for your home and business. With infinite possibilities, your walls, floors, ceilings, fireplaces and furniture can be transformed using my faux finishing techniques. A full spectrum of decorative finishes using plasters, glazes and many other mediums, help to fill your home full of your unique personality and spirit. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss the beauty and exhilaration of transforming the rooms you live and work in every day into spaces that reflect your sense of style. Portfolio showing a phone call away.

HANDWOVENS Loominus 3257 Route 212, Bearsville, NY (845) 679-6500 www.loominus.com

INTERIOR DESIGN AND HOME FURNISHINGS Hammertown Pine Plains (518) 398-7075 Rhinebeck (845) 876-1450 Great Barrington (413) 528-7766 hammertown.com

747 Route 28, Kingston, NY (located 3.5 miles West of the New York State Thruway Exit 19 in the Green Building nest to The Hickory Smokehouse) (845) 338-0800 www.marigold-home.com Marigold Home offers professional interior design services and home furnishings for stylish living. Furnish your entire home with an elegant selection of upholstered furniture, wood and metal furnishings, interior and exterior lighting, wallcoverings, window shades and cusutom draperies, area rugs, outdoor furnishings, tabletop and accessories, decorative interior mouldings, and a variety of wonderful gift items. Marigold Home is the most remarkable home furnishings destination in The Hudson Valley!

Kitchens 2 Baths, Inc. 964 Main Street Great Barrington, MA (413) 528-3801 k2binc@verizon.net A kitchen and bath showroom, located south on Rt. 7, displaying cabinets for all rooms of your home, counter surfaces, hardware, plumbing fixtures, tile, marble and granite.Owners Stewart Sweet and Diana Jamieson, CKD. will bring your ideas into being. Design service, on-site consultation and installation is available.

INTERNET SERVICES Webjogger (845) 757-4000 www.webjogger.net Webjogger is a local company with offices in Tivoli and Kingston. We have a great solution for small businesses IT including

ITALIAN SPECIALTY PRODUCTS

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Leonardoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian Market Rhinebeck in the Courtyard (845) 876-3980 The source for Italian specialty products in the Hudson Valley featuring Beretta meats, signature sandwiches, Italian cheeses, prepared entrees and salads, pastries/cookies, artesian pizzas and more, including espresso, cappuccino and catering. Wi-fi. Open daily 10am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7pm to 9pm on Friday and Saturday. Call ahead for sandwiches, pizzas and antipasto platters.

JEWELRY, FINE ARTS & GIFTS Hummingbird Jewelers 20 West Market Street Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-4585 hummingbirdjewelers.com

7ITH THE GROWING AWARENESS OF THE EFFECT THAT FOOD HAS ON HEALTH AND WELL BEING THERE IS A GREAT DEMAND FOR CULINARY PROFESSIONALS WHO CAN PREPARE FOOD THAT IS NOT ONLY BEAUTIFUL AND DELICIOUS BUT HEALTH SUPPORTIVE AS WELL /UR COMPREHENSIVE #HEFS 4RAINING 0ROGRAM THE ONLY ONE OF ITS KIND IN THE WORLD OFFERS PREPARATION FOR CAREERS IN HEALTH SPAS AND RESTAURANTS BAKERIES PRIVATE COOKING CATERING TEACHING CONSULTING FOOD WRITING AND A VARIETY OF ENTREPRENEURIAL PURSUITS 0LEASEBROWSEOURWEBSITETOSEEHOWMUCHWECANOFFERYOU

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Jewel 21 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-3775

business directory

Marigold Home

symmetrical High Speed Internet, Offsite On-line Data Backup and Storage, Collaborative Archived Email, Web Hosting and Domain Registration, Server Collocation and Management, and IT support by phone or on site, with nice discounts for bundled services. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re big enough to have what you need and small enough to make it work for your individual needs. Many local companies swear by us, not at us! We also do high end routing and switching and Gigabit Wireless connectivity for local hospitals and radiology labs.

Spectacular jewelry and clothing designers from the U.S., Canada, Europe, and South America are represented here with many oneof-a-kind pieces of art. Owners Ronny and Michael Widener are committed to providing an inspired and diverse collection of jewelry, accessories, and artwork for your pleasure.

LODGING Garden of One 25 miles Southwest of Albany, NY (518) 797-3373 www.gardenofone.com A Center for Spiritual Evolution. Rejuvenate your body, mind & spirit in this sacred place.

Hampton Inn 1307 Ulster Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 382-2600 www.hamptoninn.com/

Inn at Stone Ridge 3805 Route 209, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-0736 Let us be your House in the Country! Available as a large private guest house or by the individual room on a bed and breakfast basis, daily, weekly, or monthly. The accommodations of our Inn take you back to an era of country comfort unparalleled in the Catskill Region. Set on 150 acres of lawns, manicured gardens,

8/08 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY

95


a working apple orchard, and untouched woods. Our rooms are furnished in a blend of period antiques and modern luxuries that provide a place of stress free relaxation. Nestled in the peaceful village of Stone Ridge, with the Hudson River to the east, Woodstock to the north, and the Catskill Mountains and Shawangunk Ridge all around, we are only 95 miles from Manhattan.

judygovintage ebay seller of vintage clothing & home decor, retro art & lighting gently used clothing in excellent condition, including flax, banana republic, j.jill, & betsey johnson

Frost Valley YMCA 2000 Frost Valley Road, Claryville, NY (845) 985-2291 www.frostvalley.org

close out on summer merchandise 263 Rt. 32 South, New Paltz

845.255.2027, call for appointment

(845) 331-0100 www.PathwaysMediationCenter.com

(845) 255-6648 or (845) 283-9969 Talarts@aol.com Nancy.lobb@gmail.com

business directory

MUSIC

Lessen your strife. Organize your life. Are you always: Tired of looking for your… keys, sunglasses, checkbook, cellphone, paperwork, clothes, favorite kitchen gadget…? Surrounded by clutter? Feeling overwhelmed by it? Wishing you could get organized? Let us help! Neatnik will create customized systems for organizing every room in your home-offices too! If you’re moving, we can help you eliminate clutter before and organize after.

Burt’s Electronics

PET SERVICES & SUPPLIES

549 Albany Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 331-5011

Pussyfoot Lodge B&B

Deep Listening Institute, Ltd.

70 Rock City Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5333 www.photosensualis.com

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96

BUSINESS DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

The Pioneer in Professional Pet Care! Full house-pet-plant sitting service, proudly serving three counties for 32 years. Experienced, dependable, thorough, and reasonable housesitting for your pets.

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We are a unique mediation practice for couples going through divorce or for families in conflict. Josh Koplovitz has over 30 years as a Matrimonial and Family Law Attorney and Myra Schwartz has over 30 years as a Guidance Counselor working with families and children. This male/female, counselor and attorney team can effectively address all your legal and family issues. Use our one-hour free consultations to meet us or visit us on the web.

The Thruxton is a modern cafe racer based on the hybrid specials that used to blast up and down British roads in the Sixties. It keeps faith with a single seat hump, upswept megaphones, rearset pegs, aluminum rims and floating front disc. The tweaked 69bhp 865cc twin keeps you charged until the next espresso.

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Michael Gold The Corporate Image Studios, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-5255 www.michaelgoldsphotos.com Artistic headshots of actors, singers, models, musicians, performing artists, writers, and unusual, outlandish, off-the-wall personalities. Complete studio facilities and lighting. Creative, warm, original, professional. Unconditionally guaranteed.

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8/08 CHRONOGRAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY

97


whole living guide

the spirit of the place Q&A with Dr. Stephen Bergman autobiography meets fiction and humor softens disaster in the story of a young doctor who reluctantly returns to his Hudson Valley hometown.

by lorrie klosterman illustration by annie dwyer internicola

I

t is with three decades experience as a doctor and a penchant for storytelling that Stephen Bergman, MD, PhD (pen name, Samuel Shem), writes with wit and heart about both sides of the doctor/patient relationship. His highly acclaimed first book, The House of God (1978), continues to sell beyond the two-million mark and is today required reading at many medical schools worldwide because of its authentic depiction of hospital internship, the grueling year medical students must endure as they transition from textbooks to the real world of doctoring. Specializing in psychiatry, Dr. Bergman lectures widely at colleges and medical schools, and has also written the novels Mount Misery (sequel to The House of God) and Fine, the nonfiction book We Have to Talk: Healing Dialogues between Women and Men, written with wife Janet Surrey and also penned with Surrey the off-Broadway play “Bill W. and Dr. Bob,” the story of the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous (available on DVD). I spoke with Dr. Bergman by phone, shortly after he launched his book tour for The Spirit of the Place (Kent State University Press, 2008) at the Hudson Opera House. Why Hudson? It’s the book’s setting (renamed “Columbia”), in the mid-1980s. Bergman grew up there, and “knows Hudson and all of Columbia County, inside and out,” he said. The history and details that come to life in the narrative are delightful whether you know Hudson or not. For instance, Bergman mused, “I was taught in school that Hudson was once a whaling port because of the river. I came back one time [after moving away] and Hudson had grabbed on to the whale as a symbol—it’s on their street signs, it’s everywhere. I asked a lot of people about it, but nobody knew why. The town was founded as a Quaker utopia, but later became known for its whorehouses. That’s very accurate. When those got shut down in 1950, the town kind of died. But now there’s a fight between the natives and the NewYorkers. It’s still an open question who’s going to win that one.” I asked Dr. Bergman to comment on how The Spirit of the Place draws from his unique perspective as a doctor who for years has experienced and contemplated the pitfalls of our medical system. 98 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 8/08

What are you showing us in the relationship between the young doctor who begrudgingly returns to this small town and the older doctor who has been the town’s doctor for ages? The Spirit of the Place is about a doctor [Orville] who’s been running around the world, doing good work, actually, working for Doctors Without Borders, and he’s called home by his mother’s death to a small town called Columbia, based on Hudson, NewYork. And then, through circumstance, he becomes the doctor for this town. He really disliked the place when he was growing up and couldn’t wait to get out of it. It was a very brutal, anti-Semitic experience for him. I’m not saying all of this is word-for-word my experience—but I grew up in Hudson; it was my home from when I was 2 until I was 18, when I left. So Orville doesn’t really want to stay there, but through the time he spends there—the wild, funny, rich experience—it works on him, and changes him for the better. Through his doctoring this town, it kind of doctors him. It heals him. The Spirit of the Place contrasts medical practice today and the good old time doctors, personified in the book by Bill Starbuck. He’s based on a wonderful doctor from Hudson, Harold Levine. He was a kind old country doctor. He never had an assistant. You just came in and waited your turn. The waiting room was totally packed. One time he tried to get an assistant to schedule appointments, and people got really pissed off. He was one of these doctors who knew everybody. He knew patients’ families and social histories. Starbuck is the narrator’s [Orville’s] mentor, and got Orville through his adolescence; he let Orville visit patients with him and help out. Levine had that role with me. He was a good doctor. In the `80s [the timeframe for The Spirit of the Place] there were a lot of advances that allowed country doctors to treat people fairly well. There were antibiotics, surgery, they knew how to deliver babies—when was the last time anybody went to a general practitioner for a delivery? The doctors then knew the holistic picture, to use a modern word. And they could take as much time as they wanted with a patient. A lot of people paid in cash, and if they couldn’t


窶認ROM THE SPIRIT OF THE PLACE BY SAMUEL SHEM, AKA DR. STEPHEN BERGMAN

8/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING 99


get payment, by and large, a doctor would treat for free—or take something, like a chicken, as payment. Medicine wasn’t that commercialized yet. That’s changed dramatically. What do you think has happened? The Spirit of the Place is looking back to 1983, to ‘84; House of God was 10 years earlier. These were significant periods in American medicine. When I graduated from medical school in 1973, everybody was excited about healthcare. And because we were products of the 60s, because we had been active in the civil rights movement and the movement to stop the Vietnam war, which were successful, then when we saw things in the medical system that were inhumane, we tried to stick together and change that. For example, when reps from drug companies came along and said, “Here, here are your free black bags and stethoscopes,” almost the whole class said, “We’re not taking those! You’re big pharma, and you’re just trying to control us!” Now it’s “We’ll take two!” What I was doing in the book, unconsciously to some degree, is to parallel the transition from the 60s [to today]. Lyndon Johnson is the one who put in the community mental health movement, trying to get better medical care for people, better welfare care—it was a tremendous movement—even Nixon was kind of part of it. What happened was, in reaction to the sixties, the politics all changed. The big, big change was Ronald Reagan, because what he did, not so subtlety, was start the movement toward privatization—removing the safety net from poor and underprivileged people. He didn’t care about mental health centers, he didn’t care about health care. He cared about insurance companies and corporations. So I think that in reaction to the social movements of the sixties, America got scared and found their hero in Ronald Reagan. He’s the one who said, “It’s morning in America!” It was a horrible lie. It was a terrible situation. He was assassinating leaders in Panama and Ecuador, and secretly doing the Iran Contra thing, and people were afraid of the Soviet Union. So to jump forward, now the economy is a disaster, the war is a disaster. And medical care is a disaster, because there’s no money for it and because, I believe, it continues to be a private insurance system instead of a public one that is the responsibility of the government. Healthcare is definitely worse now, in lots of ways. It’s the worst it’s been in my lifetime. There are almost 50 million uninsured, about a sixth of the population. It’s never been like that. And your chance of having a mistake made in your hospital stay is up around 40 or 50 percent now. That’s very disturbing. Why is that? Because the doctors and the staff don’t know the patients, patients are in for shorter stays so there is not a real ability to make a connection [between doctor and patient], and the financial crunch is such that it impinges on treatment. In inpatient treatment, doctors are in a hurry, nursing pay is down; in outpatient, doctors are rewarded for providing less care, because less care is less expensive. Plus, there is a tremendous crisis in getting primary care physicians. It’s almost impossible if you’re a new patient. It just doesn’t pay [to be a primary care physician], it’s hard work, there’s the threat of lawsuits—nobody is going into it anymore. In my class, in 1973 at the Harvard Medical School, probably 25 or 30 out of a hundred went into primary care or family medicine—we loved it. Now, just the other day, I talked to some people at the Harvard graduation, and something like two go into primary care. Two! Now they specialize in something like radiology—they make a fortune, set their own hours—or like cardiology, general surgery, even dermatology, things like that. So, medicine has certainly changed. But—and there is a big “but” here—The House of God sells more copies now than ever, it’s all over the world, almost every doctor knows about it or has read it. Why do you think that is? Because it is about elemental things. It’s very specifically set in 1973 to ‘74 in an urban hospital in America, but it’s relevant to people’s training as doctors today. They face the same problems. The basic problem is, how do you make a good connection with a patient? As I get older, I realize the most important thing in medicine that really helps people, either directly through giving them some hope or understanding, or indirectly by making it possible 100 WHOLE LIVING CHRONOGRAM 8/08

to do better medication or surgery because they like you, is the quality of the connection with the doctor. I would say the quality of the connection between the doctor and the patient is absolutely the most important thing in medicine. The rest is technical skill and judgment and all that. But if you have a good connection, and you know how to listen, the patient will tell you what’s wrong with them. When you talk about the quality of relationship with one’s doctor being very important, my reaction is, “What relationship?” Right. Now we use all these tests. Doctors have eight minutes a visit or something like that. What chance do they have? Part of the reason so many tests are being done, frankly, is the threat of lawsuits. It never used to be that way. When I grew up, nobody would sue a doctor. And, of course, the main variant in whether a person sues a doctor after a bad result is the quality of their connection with the doctor. Studies have shown that if they like the doctor, they’re not going to sue. I know from your other works and your website that you like to focus not just on what’s wrong, but also on how things can get better. Do you see any hope for medicine today? Yes, I do. Go spend time with medical students. They’re incredible people. They’re different than when I was in medical school. They’ve been everywhere, they’ve done everything…they’re very hopeful. Another reason to be hopeful is that over 50 percent of medical school graduates are women, and women are the carriers of connection in our culture, who do the relational work, mostly, and are valued for doing that work, whereas men are not as valued for that. Another thing that has gotten better is that what used to be called “alternative” treatments are now accepted, for example, Alcoholics Anonymous, and 12 step programs. What the founders of AA, Bill Wilson and Dr. Robert Smith, discovered in 1935 was that telling your story to another drunk could keep you sober. Mutual connection heals people. Not just connection, but mutual connection. They were pioneers of the idea in medicine—now it’s a normal and obvious treatment, but nobody gives them credit for it—that same-disease people can offer support and healing to each other. A third hope in medicine, as Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob said explicitly in the Big Book of AA, is that alcoholism is a physical, emotional, and spiritual disease, which was the start of the holistic movement—where you don’t treat just physical symptoms. And that’s engrained in medicine now. There is a lot of attention paid to the psychological aspect of disease. There is a lot of that in alternative treatments, like social work, and clergy, and really good doctors who do that, in spite of it being hard. The last thing is, we’ve got to get rid of insurance companies. Medical care in every other Western industrialized county is better. We’re the only one where the government doesn’t take care of it as a priority. It’s a no-brainer that the only way medicine is going to get better is to have a government-run single-payer system. But if we’re spending half our money on a defense budget, we don’t have the money for this. Some people are afraid of the single-payer model as being socialized medicine. People say, “Oh, socialized medicine!” That’s the [pejorative] buzz word. But I recently had a wonderful experience with the single-payer model. My father had lung cancer, and after a while, his doctor said we had better get hospice care. [The doctor arranged that] and the next day my father got two kinds of oxygen tanks, a terrific new wheelchair, a great bed, a nurse on call giving medications in his apartment. How much does it cost? Zero. It was from Medicare, and they were terrific, motivated caregivers. So, the hope is that there will be a universal, single-payer system. Doctors want it. They hate the private insurance system because they have to deal with insurance companies. You’ve got a third of the budget for medical care in the country going to administrative costs of insurance companies—that’s like $300 billion dollars a year just for paperwork! None of the presidential candidates would dare talk about that. They are still talking about using insurance companies. The insurance lobby is incredibly powerful. Nobody’s crossing them. But you’ve got to change the system.


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and Oriental medicine to provide effective treatments of acute and chronic pain conditions, and other medical disorders. In addition to our general practice we also offer a Low-Cost Acupuncture Clinic which is available for all people who meet our low income

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8/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

103


Classical Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs 303 Fair Street, Kingston, NY (914) 388-7789

therapy modalities along with acupuncture. Dr. Hoon Park is a board-certified physician in physical medicine and rehabilitation, pain medicine, and elec-

For those looking for a radical, nononsense approach to pain, physical, mental, and spiritual dis-ease or discomfort, Dylana Accolla and Classical Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs offers 17 years of experience in the healing

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APOTHECARY

of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, and completed post-graduate studies at the Hospital of Traditional

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845.679.9441

Regular classes for all levels.

nature. Effective, informative healthcare based in the profound traditions of Chi-

AROMATHERAPY

nese medicine. Both private and community acupuncture ($15-$35 sliding scale) is available to ensure affordability

Joan Apter

to all. Apothecary specializes in local,

(845) 679-0512

organic Asian and native herbs available

www.apteraromatherapy.com

in bulk, tincture, tea mixtures and much

japter@ulster.net

more. Workshops, apprenticeships, garden tours. Founded by Hillary Thing, MS, LAc., Professor and Clinic Supervi-

ART THERAPY

sor at the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in NYC, with over 10 years of

Deep Clay

clinical experience. (845) 255-8039 Hoon J. Park, MD, PC 1772 Route 9, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-6060 For the past 18 years, Dr. Hoon J. Park has been practicing a natural and

104

WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

www.deepclay.com deepclay@mac.com Michelle Rhodes, LMSW ATR-BC. Short term counseling and in-depth psychoanalytic arts-based psychotherapy. Ac-

gentle approach to pain management

tivates creative imagination to enhance

for conditions such as arthritis, chronic

healing and problem solving for life

and acute pain in neck, back, and legs,

transitions, bereavement, trauma and

fibromyalgia, motor vehicle and work-

dissociative disorders. Women’s group

related injuries, musculoskeletal disor-

and individual studio sessions. Children,

ders, and more by integrating physical

adults, and teens.


BIODYNAMIC

BODY-CENTERED THERAPY

Hawthorne Valley Farm Store

Irene Humbach, LCSW, PCâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Body of Wisdom Counseling & Healing Services

327 Route 21C, Ghent, NY

(845) 485-5933

(518) 672-7500, ext. 1 www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org

By integrating traditional and alternative therapy/healing approaches, including

An Organic and Natural Grocery Store.

Body-Centered Psychotherapy, IMAGO

Hawthorne Valley Farm Store features

Couplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Counseling, and Kabbalistic

delicious foods made here on our Biody-

Healing, I offer tools for self healing, to

namic organic farm, including raw milk,

assist individuals and couples to open

artisan cheese, yogurt, homemade bread

blocks to their softer heart energy.

and desserts. We also feature local and

Ten-session psycho-spiritual group for

organic fruits and vegetables, holistic

women in recovery. Offices in Pough-

body care and homeopathic remedies.

keepsie and New Paltz.

We are part of Hawthorne Valley Association, a non-profit organization dedicated to sustainable agriculture, education and the arts. Our farming practices reflect our commitment to the Earth and our education programs raise awareness of the social, ecological and economic importance of agriculture in our daily lives.

Julie Zweig, MA Certified Rosen Method Bodywork Practitioner and NYS Licensed Mental Health Counselor.

Celebrating our First Year

Locally Owned & Operated

New Paltz, NY (845) 255-3566 www.RosenMethod.com julieezweig@gmail.com

CA R E G I V E R S

Provide Rosen Method Bodywork and

BODY & SKIN CARE

Where our clients are treated like Kings and Queens

Body-Centered verbal Psychotherapy. 20 years experience. Rosen Method Body-

Absolute Laser, LLC

work is distinguished by its gentle, direct

Springbrook Medical Park, Rhinebeck, NY

manipulate, the practitioner focuses on

(845) 876-7100

chronic muscle tension. As relaxation

www.absolute-laser.com

occurs and the breath deepens, uncon-

Absolute Laser, LLC offers commitment to beautiful skin through outstanding care and service. Offering Laser Hair Removal, Microdermabrasion, Vitalize Peel, and Fotofacial RF. The Fotofacial RF is the next generation in high-tech skin en-

may emerge. The practitioner responds with touch and words that allow the client to begin to recognize what has been held down by unconscious muscle tension. As this process unfolds, habitual tension and old patterns may be released, freeing the client to experience more aliveness,

treatments are used to improve cosmetic

new choices in life, and a greater sense

appearance of the face, neck, hands,

of well-being. Verbal Body-Centered Psy-

and body. The results are brighter,

chotherapy utilizing doctoral level training

smoother, more radiant and luminescent

in psychology with many areas of spe-

skin. This process delivers results that

cialty, as well as the principles of Rosen

skin care products alone cannot do!

Method Bodywork, but without touch.

Recover and rediscover the youth and tary consultation: Janice DiGiovanni. Essence MediSpa, LLCâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Stephen Weinman, M.D. 222 Route 299, Highland, NY

ti-Aging treatments. Non-Surgical treat-

Farm Market Open to Public 4BUBNmQN 5IVSTBNmQN TUBSUT+VOFUI

www.taliaferrofarms.com

Inner Traditions/Bear & Co. 1 (800) 246-8648 www.InnerTraditions.com

CHILDREN

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take Some Time Offâ&#x20AC;? at Essence MediSpa with Skin Rejuvenation and An-

TALIAFERRO FARMS 1-"*/430"%r/&81"-5; /:r

BOOKSTORES

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87 East Market St, Suite 103, Red Hook QIPOFtGBY www.royaltycaregivers.com

scious feelings, attitudes, and memories

hancement. These gentle, no downtime

vitality of your skin. Call for a complimen-

Are you a senior living alone or are you family who are concerned about your loved one living alone? Call Us.

whole living directory

touch. Using hands that listen rather than

& CONSULTANTS

Madhuri Therapeuticsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Bringing Health to Balance

Relationships are tough. Are you feeling hopeless? Have your relationships gone nowhere? Are you struggling with the one you have? Are you tired of looking?

You deserve better. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Unlock Your Capacity to Build a Great Relationship t*EFOUJGZZPVSQBUUFSOTt(FUVOTUVDLt"TTFTTXIBUZPVOFFE t'JOEQSBDUJDBMTPMVUJPOTUP3FBM0CTUBDMFT

ments for age spots and skin lesions,

69 Main Street, New Paltz, NY

teeth whitening, Botox Cosmetic, Laser

(845) 797-4124

Hair Removal, Non-Surgical Skin Tighten-

madhurihealing@optonline.net

ing using the Titan System, Varicose and

MEG F SCHNEIDER, MA, LCSW

A Yoga-based mind-body approach for

Spider Vein treatments, Microdermabra-

children and special needs populations

sion, Chemical Peels, Acne Treatments,

of all ages. Gentle, safe and effective

Psychotherapist and author of many self-help books featured on National TV EMDR | Call 845 876 8808 for a consultation

Facials and Massage Services.

treatment for ASDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, developmental, at8/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

105


tention and learning differences; anxiety,

Shawangunk Horticulture

COUNSELING

depression, chronic pain and immune syndromes. Yoga for the Special ChildÂŽ,

IONEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Healing Psyche

Therapeutic Yoga, licensed Massage

(845) 339-5776

Edmund & Rachael Doty

Therapy, Flower Essences, Reiki and

Fax (845) 331-6624

Growing You Great Gardens

other traditional healing modalities can

www.ionedreams.org

Light up the space around your home with beautiful gardens and exceptional plants. We offer dynamic, experienced and GREEN garden designs, installations and maintenance.

naturally balanced state of health and

help bring your child or loved one to a

harmony. Namaste. Alice Velky LMT, RYT.

IONE is psycho-spiritual therapist, Qi Healer and inter-faith minister, who is director of the Ministry of MaĂĽt, Inc. Specializing in myth and heritage, dream phenomena

CHIROPRACTIC

and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issues, she facilitates writing workshops and Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mysteries programs and leads retreats to sacred

(845) 386-1515

|

Mount Hope, NY

|

Dr. David Ness

locations throughout the world. An author

(845) 255-1200

and playwright, her works include Pride

gunkhort.com

of Family; Four Generations of American Dr. David Ness is a Certified Active

whole living directory

When was the last time someone really listened to your body?

Release Techniques (ARTÂŽ) Provider

Women of Color and Listening in Dreams. Offices in Kingston and New York City.

and Certified Chiropractic Sports Practitioner specializing in helping athletes and active people quickly relieve their

Priscilla A. Bright, MAâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Energy Healer/Counselor

pain and heal their injuries. In addition

Kingston, NY

Roy Capellaro, PT

to providing traditional chiropractic

(845) 688-7175

care, Dr. Ness utilizes ARTÂŽ to remove

Specializing in womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stress, emotion-

Integrative Manual Physical Therapy Zero Balancing CranioSacral Therapy

scar tissue and adhesions in order to

al issues, and physical illness, including

restore mobility, flexibility, and strength

stress-related anxiety, depression, and

faster than standard treatments will

physical burnout. Women in transition,

allow. If you have an injury that has not

businesswomen, mothers, all welcome.

125 Main Street ¡ Gardiner ¡ NY 845.518.1070 www.roycapellaro.com

responded to treatment, call Dr. Ness

Experienced counselor. Faculty, Barbara

for an appointment today.

Brennan School of Healing. Convenient offices in Kingston and New Paltz. Initial phone consultation no charge.

COLON HEALTH CARE CRYSTALS & WELL-BEING Connie Schneiderâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Certified Colon Therapist

We can help you achieve the peace and ease of movement you are searching for in your body, in your mind, and in your spirit. CranioSacral Therapy, Energy Healing, Therapeutic Massage, Advanced Myofascial Techniques & Health Kinesiology are available to assist you with finding health. You take care of your car, why not take care of the primary vehicle that gets you through life â&#x20AC;&#x201D;YOU!

Hudson Valley Therapeutic Massage 243 Main St., Suite 220 Michele Tomasicchio, LMT, Owner New Paltz, NY 12561 Katie Hoffstatter, LMT (845) 255-4832 / hvtm@hvc.rr.com M-F: 8:30am - 7pm Sat: 9am - 3pm

Crystals & Well-Being Center

New Paltz, NY

116 Sullivan Street, Wurtsboro, NY

(845) 256-1516

(Inside the yellow church)

Colon hydrotherapy or colonics is a gentle approach to colon health. A healthy digestive tract helps support a healthy immune system, improving overall health, basics for a healthy lifestyle. Herbal Detox Programs available. See display ad.

(646) 286-9325 crystalshealing.googlepages.com crystalswellbeing@gmail.com Dedicated to your body and soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wellbeing, the center offers spectacular and energetically powerful crystals, holistic gifts and healing tools at extremely competitive prices. In this breathtaking

COOKING CLASSES

space, our licensed massage therapists, acupuncturist, chiropractor and certified

THE SASTROLOGICAL WHEEL O O AAND YOU 2nd Wednesdays: 10:30am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:00pm 4th Thursdays: 7:30pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:00pm

Have you ever wanted to know more about astrologyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially your own chart? Have you tried to ďŹ gure it out? Have you looked H in books and been lost in detail? Here is the k program for all of us who want to know more, â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spend mountains of time or money.

Ha Have y lost in de

Classes will meet once a month and are limited to 9 persons. $15 per class. Hopewell Junction, NY.

$POUBDU4QJSJU3PPU4FSWJDFT  tXXX4QJSJU3PPUDPN

106

WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Nourishing Wisdom Nutrition

energy healers will move your energy and pain away. Healing per appointment.

(845) 687-9666 www.nourishingwisdom.com

DANCE INSTRUCTION

Hollyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cooking Classes have been inspiring people to cook since 1999, and

Barefoot Dance Center

will inspire you too! We use seasonal,

West Park, NY

organic ingredients including produce

(845) 384-6146

from local farms. At the end of each

www.barefootdancecenter.com

class we sit around the table to enjoy a

info@barefootdancecenter.com

delicious feast. So come on your own

Barefoot Dance Center offers classes

or grab a friend, and join us for a great

in Modern Technique, Improvisation,

class that is sure to spark creativity in

Choreography, Creative Movement,

your kitchen! Visit us online or call for a

Ballet and Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dance. We emphasize

list of upcoming classes.

healthy alignment, skill-building and the


creative process in a supportive environ-

1st Saturdays, June - September. Free

ment. We are the home of the Barefoot

parking and proximity to NYS Thruway

Dance Company, a modern dance per-

(Exit 19) Saturdays May 24 until Nov 22.

formance group made up of dedicated teenagers. We also offer school residenbirthday parties.Jessie Levey, Director.

GOURMET FRUIT ARRANGEMENTS

DENTISTRY

Edible Arrangements

Tischler Family Dental Center

Poughkeepsie and Kingston Locations

Woodstock, NY

1 (877) DoFruit

(845) 679-3706

www.ediblearrangements.com

cies, performances, rental space and

www.tischlerdental.com With over 35 years experience, Tischler

HOLISTIC HEALTH

Dental is the leading team of dental care experts in the area. Dr. Michael Tischler is currently one of only two

Cassandra Currie, MS, RYTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Holistic

Board Certified Implant Dentists in the

Health Counselor

Hudson Valley Region of NYS and one

41 John Street, Kingston, NY

of only 300 dentists in the world to have achieved this honor. Sedation dentistry,

(845) 532-7796

acupuncture with dental treatment, den-

Cassandra is a Kripalu-Certified Yoga

tal implant surgery, cosmetic makeover

Teacher, and Certified Ayurvedic

procedures and gum surgery are just a

Nutritionist, with a MS in Counseling

few of the many unique services Tischler Dental offers. Their practice philosophy is that each modality of dental treatment is performed by the practitioner that is

Psychology. She offers integrative health counseling to individuals as well as

Massage

Thai Yoga Massage Dance Classes

Sauna

Dance Classes Stitch Lab

Acupuncture

Stitch Lab Boutique

Massage

Boutique

Sauna

groups, melding Ayurvedic nutritional counseling, yoga, and more traditional

team, they deliver ideal dental care.

therapeutic techniques to guide people toward greater self-awareness, em-

4HE,IVING3EED9OGA(OLISTIC(EALTH#ENTER

powering them to find joy, balance, and

2T.EW0ALTZWWWTHELIVINGSEEDCOM 

health in their daily lives. Call for classes, Deep Clay (845) 255-8039

appointments, and consultations. John M. Carroll, Healer

www.deepclay.com deepclay@mac.com Michelle Rhodes, LMSW ATR-BC. Activates

Kingston, NY (845) 338-8420

creative imagination to enhance healing

John Carroll is an intuitive healer,

and problem solving for life transitions, be-

teacher, and spiritual counselor who

reavement, trauma and dissociative disor-

integrates mental imagery with the God-

ders. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group and individual studio sessions. Children, adults, and teens.

):1/04*4t/-1t$0"$)*/( .Ä&#x2019;Ä&#x;Ä&#x2019;Ä&#x2DC;Ä&#x2013;4ÄĽÄŁÄ&#x2013;ĤĤt"ÄĄÄĄÄŁÄ&#x2013;Ä&#x2122;Ä&#x2013;Ä&#x;ĤÄ&#x161;Ä Ä&#x;Ĥt1Ä&#x2019;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x;t*Ä&#x17E;ĥģĠħÄ&#x2013;4Ä?Ä&#x2013;Ä&#x2013;ÄĄ 3Ä&#x2013;Ä?Ä&#x2013;Ä&#x2019;ĤÄ&#x2013;8Ä&#x2013;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x2DC;Ä&#x2122;ÄĽt4Ä&#x2013;ÄĽ(Ä Ä&#x2019;Ä?Ĥt$Ä&#x2122;Ä&#x2019;Ä&#x;Ä&#x2DC;Ä&#x2013;)Ä&#x2019;Ä&#x201C;Ä&#x161;ļĤ 1ÄŁÄ&#x2013;1ĠĤļ4ÄŚÄŁÄ&#x2DC;Ä&#x2013;ÄŁÄŞt(Ä&#x2013;Ä&#x;ÄĽÄ?Ä&#x2013;$Ä&#x2122;Ä&#x161;Ä?Ä&#x2022;Ä&#x201C;Ä&#x161;ÄŁÄĽÄ&#x2122; *Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;ÄŚÄ&#x;Ä&#x2013;4ĪĤļÄ&#x2013;Ä&#x17E;&Ä&#x;Ä&#x2122;Ä&#x2019;Ä&#x;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x2013;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x2013;Ä&#x;ÄĽ 1Ä&#x2019;Ĥļ-Ä&#x161;Ä&#x2014;Ä&#x2013;3Ä&#x2013;Ä&#x2DC;ÄŁÄ&#x2013;ĤĤÄ&#x161;Ä Ä&#x;t4Ä ÄŚÄ?3Ä&#x2013;ÄĽÄŁÄ&#x161;Ä&#x2013;ħÄ&#x2019;Ä? .Ä ÄĽÄ&#x161;ħÄ&#x2019;ÄĽÄ&#x161;Ä Ä&#x;Ä&#x2019;Ä?ĂŠ4ÄĄÄ&#x161;ÄŁÄ&#x161;ÄĽÄŚÄ&#x2019;Ä?(ÄŚÄ&#x161;Ä&#x2022;Ä&#x2019;Ä&#x;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x2013;

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given gift of his hands. John has helped individuals suffering from acute and chronic disorders, including back prob-

FARMERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MARKETS

H YPNOCOACHING M I N D / B O D Y I N T E G R A T I O N

whole living directory

best trained in that area. Working as a

EXPRESSIVE ARTS

YOGA

Naturopathic Doctor Naturopathic Doctor Thai Yoga Massage

Acupuncture

lems and cancer. Remote healings and telephone sessions. Call for consultation.

H Y P N O B I RT H I N G ÂŽ Kary Broffman, R.N., C.H. ď&#x2122;&#x2039;ď&#x2122;&#x2021;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;-ď&#x2122;&#x2039;ď&#x2122;&#x160;ď&#x2122;&#x2030;-ď&#x2122;&#x2030;ď&#x2122;&#x160;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x2020;

Kingston Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market Historic Wall Street, Uptown Kingston, NY

Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health

www.kingstonnyfarmersmarket.com

Lenox, MA

Creating a Harmony of History, Commu-

1 (800) 741-7353

nity and Farmland with the BEST of the

www.kripalu.org

Hudson Valley. Over thirty vendors bring certified organic, and traditionally grown

Omega Institute for Holistic Studies

farm fresh fruits, vegetables, field-cut fresh flowers and plants, hand made

1 (800) 944-1001

mozzarella and assorted cheeses, meats,

www.eomega.org

poultry, eggs, fresh and dried herbs, artisan breads and sweet baked goods, herbal remedies, prepared foods, honey, jams, condiments, olive oil and more.

Omega Institute is in its fourth decade of awakening the best in the human spirit. Join us for Winter Learning Vacations

Weekly special events bring an festive

in Costa Rica and St. John and keep

and educational air to the rain or shine

your eye on our websiteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;our 2008

venue. Crafts on John join the Market on

Rhinebeck season will be for sale soon.

Jill Malden RD, LMSW Specializing in Nutrition & Eating Behavior "OPSFYJB/FSWPTBt#VMJNJB/FSWPTB #JOHF&BUJOH%JTPSEFSt$PNQVMTJWF0WFSFBUJOH 0QUJNJ[F.FUBCPMJTNt4UBCJMJ[F#MPPE4VHBS *NQSPWF&OFSHZ$PODFOUSBUJPO .FEJDBM/VUSJUJPO 20 Years of Experience Warm & Caring Treatment 1 Water Street, New Paltz, NY ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x2030;ď&#x2122;&#x201E; 0Ä&#x2014;Ä&#x2014;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x2013;Ä&#x2019;Ä?Ä¤Ä Ä&#x161;Ä&#x;.Ä&#x2019;Ä&#x;Ä&#x2122;Ä&#x2019;ÄĽÄĽÄ&#x2019;Ä&#x;

845.489.4732 8/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

107


HOMEOPATHY

JEWISH MYSTICISM & KABBALAH

Suzy Meszoly, DSH/Classical Homeopathy

Irene Humbach, LCSW, PC

(845) 626-7771

(845) 485-5933

Safe, effective, natural, individualized

Kabbalistic Healing in person and long

homeopathic health care for chronic

distance. 6 session Introduction to Kab-

and acute illness. Suzy Meszoly is an

balistic Healing based on the work of

internationally trained and experienced

Jason Shulman. See also Body-Centered

homeopath, hands on healer and coun-

Therapy directory.

selor. Using a gentle approach suitable for newborns, infants, pregnant moms, adults and the elderly for a wide range of

LIFE COACHING

physical, mental and emotional issues.

HYPNOSIS

& &

Crystals Alternative Healing Beauty Power

Shirley Stone, MBA, Certified Empowerment Life Coach Rhinebeck, NY

Kary Broffman, RN, CH

(845) 876-2194 www.findingthecourage.com

Hyde Park, NY

Shirley@findingthecourage.com

(845) 876-6753 Want to convert fear into courage, stress A registered nurse with a BA in psy-

Therapeutic Massages by LMT Reiki, Acupuncture, Reflexology

chology since 1980, Kary is certified in Ericksonian Hypnosis, Hypnobirthing, and Complementary Medical Hypnotism,

Large selection of beautiful Crystals

hypnocoaching with the National Guild.

whole living directory

She has also studied interactive imagery Chakra stones, Healing tools, Jewelry, & more at prices you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find anywhere else.

for nurses. By weaving her own healing

Crystals & Well-Being Center 116 Sullivan St, Wurtsboro - Renovated Yellow Church crystalshealing.googlepages.com - 646-286-9325

helps to assist others in accessing their

(845) 389-2302 Increase self-esteem and motivation; break bad habits; manage stress,

This program is for anyone interested in becoming a certified hypnotist. t Expert Instruction & Training t 12 Month NGH Membership t Business Start-up Portfolio t And So Much More Training Dates: Weekends of October 10 & 24 and November 21 & 28 at St. James Episcopal Church, Hyde Park, NY For more information call or e-mail Dr. John Carter jhcjr@optonline.net

(845) 471-1527

Liz Granados lgranados@optonline.net

(845) 229-2403

30,)44).'ä50 -!+%ä4(%ä%-0/7%2%$ ä2%30/.3)",%ä#(/)#%

-%$)!4)/. $ESIGNä9OURä/WNä&UTURE .URTUREä9OURä#HILDREN 0RESERVEä9OURä!SSETS

RODNEY WELLS, CFP   ääWWWMEDIATED DIVORCECOMä

108

WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

coaching. Get clarity on the life you want plus the tools and techniques to make your dreams a reality. Stop being a problem solver and become a vision creator.

MASSAGE

inner resources and healing potential.

New Paltz and Kingston, NY

The NGH Hypnosis Certification Training Program

satisfaction? Consider empowerment life

journey and education into her work, she

Sharon Slotnick, MS, CHt.

Dr. John Carter Hypnosis Presents

into power, depression into joy, worry into

stress-related illness, and anger; alleviate pain (e.g. childbirth, headaches, chronic pain); overcome fears and despondency; relieve insomnia; improve

River Rock Health Spa 62 Ricks Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-7800 www.riverrock.biz Your day retreat for rebalancing and rejuvenation. Guests rave: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to live here! AR, New Paltz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the best spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the world. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been to many.â&#x20AC;? SN, Portland. Guests are nurtured and

learning, memory, public speaking and

pampered by large staff and luxurious

sports performance; enhance creativity.

state-of-the-art spa. Massage, facials,

Other issues. Change your outlook. Gain

body scrubs/wraps, waxing, and more.

Control. Make healthier choices. Certified Hypnotist, two years training; broad base in Psychology.

INTUITIVE ANALYSTS & REMOTE VIEWERS

MASSAGE THERAPY Conscious Bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ellen Ronis McCallum, LMT 426 Main Street Rosendale, NY (845) 658-8400

Marisa Anderson

www.consciousbodyonline.com

P.O. Box 83, Milton, NY

Ellen@consciousbodyonline.com

(845) 566-4134

Offering deep, sensitive and eclectic

www.marisaanderson.com

Massage therapy with over 22 years of

Specializing in Individual Concerns, Law

experience as a licensed Massage Ther-

Enforcement, Personal Healing and

apist working with a wide variety of body

Health Issues, Corporate Analysis, Animal

types and physical/medical/emotional is-

Concerns, and Science/Technology Data.

sues. Techniques included: deep tissue,

Guest speaker on many radio programs,

Swedish, Craniosacral, energy balancing

featured in noted publications nationally,

and chi nei tsang (an ancient Chinese

and in books, and on The Discovery Chan-

abdominal and organ chi massage). Hot

nel. Available for private sessions (in person

Stone Massage and aromatherapy are

or by phone), parties, and corporate events.

also offered. Gift certificates available.


Hudson Valley Therapeutic Massage

MIDWIFERY

Michele Tomasicchio, LMT

Jennifer Houston, Midwife

Katie Hoffstatter, LMT Gia Polk, LMT 243 Main Street, Suite 220, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4832

(518) 678-3154 womanway@gmail.com Since the 1970s Jennifer has been actively involved in childbirth. She is an expert in

Are your muscles feeling tight and congest-

preserving natural birth and has attended

ed? Are you dealing with stress from emo-

over 3,000 births in hospitals, high-risk

tional, physical or environmental causes? Do

medical centers, birth centers, and

you just feel overwhelmed? Our conscien-

homes. She is uniquely qualified to pro-

tious and skilled NY Licensed Massage

vide women with personal, safe, and sup-

Therapists can help you discover a place

portive pregnancy and birth care in their

of ease within your body, mind and spirit.

homes. Certified Nurse Midwife and NYS

Let us help you to feel whole! Craniosacral,

licensed with excellent medical backup.

C LASSICAL A CUPUNCTURE & C HINESE H ERBS dylana accolla

m.s.,l.aC.

Kingston (914) 388-7789 DYL ANA@MINDSPRING.COM

Energy Healing, Therapeutic Massage and Health Kinesiology. Monday-Friday 8:30am7:00pm, Saturday 9:00am-3:00pm.

NON-TOXIC CLEANING SERVICES

Joan Apter

Bless Your Hearth

(845) 679-0512

(845) 706-8447

www.apteraromatherapy.com

Soundofspheres@aol.com

japter@ulster.net

Experienced, professional, non-toxic clean-

Offering luxurious massage therapy,

ing and organizing service. Pet Sitting. home/

including Raindrop Technique, with

business blessings. Excellent references.

therapeutic essential oils to relieve stress, boost the immune system, and address

classes, and keynotes. Essential Oils,

(845) 687-9666

nutritional supplements, personal care,

www.nourishingwisdom.com

products from Young Living Essential Oils. For more information, contact Joan Apter.

tIntegrated Energy Therapy tHomeopathy tYoga & Relaxation Techniques tReiki

Marnie McKnight-Favell /PSUI"WFOVFt#FBDPO /: tXXXESBHPOnZIPMJTUJDDPN

In addition to private sessions, our programs include cooking classes, teaching tangible ways to incorporate nourishing

Madhuri Therapeuticsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Bringing Health to Balance

foods into your life. Shopping trips to

whole living directory

and personal concerns, spa consultant,

Holly Anne Shelowitz, CNCâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Director of Nourishing Wisdom Nutrition

pet care, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and home cleaning

New dimensions of well-being

NUTRITION COUNSELING

system imbalances. Natural animal care, individual consultations for a healthy home

Dragonfly Holistic llc

natural food stores and local farms are part of our work together, as well as telephone

69 Main Street, New Paltz, NY

classes and retreats. For the most effective

(845) 797-4124

and supportive nutrition counseling you will

madhurihealing@optonline.net

ever experience, call us or visit us online.

Whether your goal is to relieve stress

Long- distance telephone clients welcome.

and pain, address a health concern, or simply to pamper yourselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;our tranquil

Jill Malden, RD, LMSW

healing space in downtown New Paltz

1 Water Street, New Paltz, NY

offers individualized sessions to nour-

(845) 489-4732

ish and repair body, mind, and spirit. Licensed Massage Therapy, Therapeutic Yoga, Flower Essences, Ayurvedic treatments and products, and master-level Reiki; all-natural and organic oils, herbs and body products; 15 years experience. Alice Velky LMT, RYT.

Prominent Nutritionist specializing in eating behavior and eating disorders for 15 years. Warm, nonjudgmental treatment. Understand the effects of nutrition on your mood, anxiety level, cravings, concentration, energy level, and sleep, in addition to body weight. Recover from

Mid-Hudson Rebirthing Center (845) 255-6482

your eating issues and enjoy a full life! Vicki Koenig, MS, RD, CDN

Sarah Samuels, LMT

7 Innis Avenue, New Paltz, NY

(845) 430-2266

(845) 255-2398

Graduate of the Swedish Institute of Mas-

www.Nutrition-wise.com

sage Therapy. Licensed and practicing

Creating Wellness for individuals and

since 2001. Specializing in Deep Tissue,

businesses. Nutrition counseling: combin-

Trigger Point, Swedish, and Medical

ing traditional and integrative solutions to

massage. Also available for corporate

enhance well-being. Corporate Wellness

and event chair massage. Gift certificates

fairs, assessments, classes and pro-

available. Massage by appointment.

grams for businesses wanting to improve 8/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

109


Dr. Amy Jo Davison

TAROT on the HUDSON with Rachel Pollack

Specializing in Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Caring for infants, children, adolescents & adults Open Tuesday thru Saturday Call for an appointment 518-567-9977 197 County Route 10, Germantown, New York 12526

Tuesday Evenings New Paltz, New York

Facilitator: Amy Frisch, CSWR some insurances accepted space is limited

(845) 706-0229

whole living directory

for more information

A group designed especially for teenage girls focusing on issues of adolescence: relationships, school, dealing with parents, coping with teen stress, and more. Group sessions include expressive art activities - it‛s not all talk!

71 Main St. New Paltz Nothing will benefit human health and increase chances for survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet. ~ Albert Einstein

FACIALS • WAXING • SKINCARE

T H E

B O D Y STU D I O

www.thebodystudionewpaltz.com 845-255-3512

110

WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

internationally renowned Certified Tarot Grand Master & Award Winning Novelist

Monthly classes - Rhinebeck & NYC Lectures Workshops Private Consultations Mentoring in Tarot and Writing Telephone: 845-876-5797 rachel@rachelpollack.com www.rachelpollack.com


employee productivity. Providing help

Tim Ronis McCallum are dedicated to

with Diabetes, Cardiovascular conditions,

helping you achieve and maintain a

Weight loss, Digestive support, Women’s

strong healthy body, a dynamic mind

health, and Pediatric Nutrition.

and a vibrant spirit. We are perceptive, experienced and certified instructors

OSTEOPATHY Osteopathy—Joseph Tieri, DO, and Ari Rosen, DO 138 Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY

who would love to help you achieve your goals whatever your age or level of fitness. Private and semi private apparatus and mat classes available. Visit our studio on main street in Rosendale.

(845) 876-1700 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY

Moving Body

(845) 687-7589 www.stoneridgehealingarts.com

276 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-7715

Drs. Tieri and Rosen are New York State Licensed Osteopathic physicians special-

www.themovingbody.com

izing in Cranial Osteopathy. As specialists in Osteopathic manipulation, we are dedi-

PSYCHICS

cated to the traditional philosophy and hands-on treatment of our predecessors.

Psychically Speaking

We have studied with Robert Fulford, DO, Viola Freyman, DO, James Jealous, DO,

(845) 626-4895 or (212) 714-8125

and Bonnie Gintis, DO, and completed

www.psychicallyspeaking.com

a two-year residency in Osteopathic Ma-

gail@psychicallyspeaking.com

nipulation. We treat newborns, children,

Psychic Consultations by Gail Petronio,

and adults. By Appointment. For more

internationally renowned psychic. Over

information call or visit the website.

20 years experience. It is my sincere hope to offer my intuitive abilities and in-

PASTORAL COUNSELING

sights as a means to provide awareness

whole living directory

of one’s life and destiny. Sessions are conducted in person or by telephone.

Lifepath (845) 657-9835 www.lifepathtransformations.com

PHYSICIANS

PSYCHOLOGISTS Emily L. Fucheck, Psy.D. Located across from Vassar College in

Amy Davison D.O., LLC

Poughkeepsie, NY

205 Old Route 9, Fishkill, NY

(845) 380-0023

(518) 567-9977

Licensed psychologist. Doctorate in

Integrated Health Care for Women

clinical psychology, post-doctoral training focused on adolescents and young

Poughkeepsie, NY

adults, post-graduate candidate for

(845) 485-7168

certification in adult psychoanalysis and

Dr. Jemiolo is board certified in Family

psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Offer-

Practice and certified by the American

ing psychotherapeutic work for adults

Society of Clinical Hypnosis. She has 25

and adolescents. Additional opportunity

years experience in patient care. She offers

available for intensive, supervised psy-

group sessions in meditation as well as in-

choanalytic treatment at substantial fee

dividual treatment of stress-related illness.

reduction for appropriate individual.

applied kinesiology t acupressure t t soft tissue therapy t t cranial sacral therapy t facial rejuvination t t

t pain t sinusitus t stress reduction t t stomach/gastrointestinal distress t t GYN disorders t fertility t

Sessions are designed to teach self-help tools based on mindfulness based stress reduction, guided imagery, Twelve Steps,

PSYCHOTHERAPY

Reiki and Qigong. Her individual practice combines traditional medical practice

Amy R. Frisch, CSW-R

with an integrative approach in an effort to

New Paltz, NY

decrease dependency on medication.

PILATES Conscious Body 426 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-8400 www.consciousbodyonline.com

(845) 706-0229 Psychotherapist. Individual, family, and

Deep Clay

Dreamwork Expressive Arts Sandplay

group sessions for adolescents and adults. Currently accepting registration for It’s a Girl Thing: an expressive arts therapy group for adolescent girls, and The Healing Circle: an adult bereavement group offering a safe place to be-

Ellen@consciousbodyonline.com

gin the healing process after the death of

Husband and Wife team Ellen and

a loved one. Most insurances accepted.

Michelle Rhodes LMSW ATR-BC 845-255-8039 deepclay@mac.com www.deepclay.com

8/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

111


+PIO.$BSSPMM H EALER, TEACHER, S PIRITUAL COUNSELOR â&#x20AC;&#x153;John is an extraordinary healer whom I have been privileged to know all my life and to work with professionally these last three years. His ability to use energy and imagery have changed as well as saved the lives of many of my patients. Miracles still do happen (with Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help).â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Richard Brown, M.D. Author, Stop Depression Now

Debra Budnik, CSW-R

Emerson Resort & Spa

New Paltz, NY

(845) 688-1000

(845) 255-4218

www.emersonresort.com

Traditional insight-oriented psychotherapy

There is a Silk Road running through the

for long- or short-term work. Aimed at

Hudson Valley. Introducing the new Emer-

identifying and changing self-defeating

son Resort and Spa. A place just minutes

attitudes and behaviors, underlying anxiety,

from Woodstock offering the comforting

depression, and relationship problems.

sense that one is no longer part of the

Sliding scale, most insurances accepted in-

outside world. The new Spa, with 10

cluding Medicare/Medicaid. NYS-licensed.

beautifully designed treatment rooms,

Experience working with trauma victims,

celebrates the old-world traditions of India

including physical and sexual abuse.

and the Orients with Ayurvedic rituals and

Educator on mental health topics. Located

Japanese and Chinese therapies. Modern

in New Paltz, one mile from SUNY.

spa-goers will also appreciate more wellknown treatments like Swedish, sports,

Irene Humbach, LCSW, PC

and deep tissue massage, manicures,

(845) 485-5933

facials, and body wraps. Individually-

Body of Wisdom Counseling and Healing Services. See also Body-Centered Therapy directory. Judy Swallow, MA, LCAT, TEP

â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gerald Epstein, M.D. Author, Healing Visualizations

tailored treatments are created by the experienced therapists who are skilled at delivering virtually all the Emerson Spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 40+ treatments. Spend the day enjoying the Spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hot tubs, steam showers, sauna, resistance pool, cardio equipment,

25 Harrington Street, New Paltz, NY

yoga/meditation room and relaxation

Integrative body/mind therapist using

area... all included with your Spa visit. Day

Rubenfeld synergy and psychodrama

spa appointments available.

whole living directory

in her work with individuals, couples,

All levels of healing from chronic back problems to cancer.

3FNPUF)FBMJOHTt  tKPIONDBSSPMMIFBMFSDPN

groups, and families. Inquire for workshops and training, as well as therapy. Kent Babcock, MSW, LMSWâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Counseling & Psychotherapy

62 Ricks Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-7800 www.riverrock.biz bmr@ureach.com

(845) 679-5511, ext. 304 Your day retreat for rebalancing and

Julie Zweig, MA

Julie Zweig, MA

Development of solutions through simple self-observation, reflection, and conver-

Rosen Method Bodywork & Body-Centered Psychotherapy

sation. Short- or long-term work around

CertiďŹ ed Rosen Method Bodywork Practitioner NYS Licensed Mental Health Counselor

tions; ethical, spiritual, or psychic dilem-

difficult relationships; life or career transimas; and creative hurdles. Roots in yoga, dreamwork, spiritual psychology, and existential psychotherapy. Sliding scale.

SKIN CARE Body Studio, The (845) 255-3512 www.thebodystudionewpaltz.com

Save the date! Monday, October 13, 2008 at 7pm in Garrison, NY

Rosen Method Bodywork & Marion Rosen, founder of Rosen Method Bodywork, will give a lecture and Body-Centered Psychotherapy demonstration of her work that is now recognized and practiced world-wide. This is a rare opportunity to learn about and witness the transforming work of Marion Rosen here in New York. At The Desmond-Fish Library in Garrison, NY (http://dďŹ&#x201A;.highlands.com/). For more information, contact Julie Zweig or see website (info below). No RSVP or attendance fee. Donations requested to offset presentation costs.

New Paltz, New York t (845) 255-3566

New Paltz, New York t (845) 255-3566 t julieezweig@gmail.com

w w w. R o s e n M e t h o d . o r g w w w. R o s e n M e t h o d . c o m

112

River Rock Health Spa

WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

SPAS & RESORTS Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa

rejuvenation. Guests rave: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to live here! AR, New Paltz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the best spaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the world. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been to many.â&#x20AC;? SN, Portland. Guests are nurtured and pampered by large staff and luxurious state-of-the-art spa. Massage, facials, body scrubs/wraps, waxing, and more.

SPIRITUAL Healing, Pathwork & Channeling by Flowing Spirit Guidance (845) 679-8989 www.flowingspirit.com It is our birthright to experience the abundance of the universe, the deep love of God, and our own divinity! It is also our birthright to share our own unique

220 North Road Milton, NY (877) 7-INN-SPA (845-795-1301)

gifts with the world. We long to do it. So why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we? Our imperfections get in the way. As we purify, we experience

www.buttermilkfallsinn.com

more and more fully the love and the

www.buttermilkspa.com

abundance of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s universe. We can

Located on 75 acres overlooking the

have it in any moment. We can learn to

Hudson River. Brand new full service

purify our imperfections AND experience

geothermal and solar spa. Organic prod-

heaven on earth. Jaffe Institute Spiritual

ucts, pool, sauna and steam room. Hiking

Healing; Pathwork and Channeling avail-

trails, gardens, waterfalls, peacock aviary.

able. Contact Joel Walzer for sessions.


LIFE TRANSITIONS AND CHANGE support for women INTERNATIONAL HEALER - PRISCILLA BRIGHT, MA 26 years experience | Opening your energy system & clearing blocks





























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whole living directory

845.255.6482

1995

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Judy Swallow MA, LCAT, TEP

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Rubenfeld SynergyÂŽ Psychodrama Training

~

25 Harrington St, New Paltz NY 12561 (845) 255-5613

Monarda Herbal Apothecary Annual Herbal Classes Beginning Every Spring.

Monarda Offers: Full Herbal Products Line, Certified Organic Alcohol Tinctures, Private Consultations.

www.monarda.net Thank you for supporting local herbalists. Amy ColĂłn, Herbalist

845-339-2562

48 Cutler Hill Road Eddyville, NY 12401

8/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

113


THE SANCTUARY A Place for Healing

5 ACADEMY STREET NEW PALTZ

845.255.3337 www.newpaltzsanctuary.com Tune In & Tune Up jin shin jyutsu Anita Falcone, Practitioner Unblock the door of your body, mind and spirit... (845) 926-7096 for appointments $5 off with this ad

Summer Special: Pre-pay Massage Series Therapeutic massage annie serrante, lmt, lmsw $15 off each massage – 3 to 9 sessions For more information: 255-3337 ext. 1

GENTLE YOGA JENNIFER HUNDERFUND, RYT, lmt Fridays, 12–1pm — Core strengthening and hip openers Drop-in rate: $12. Monthly rate: $40

Counseling & Psychotherapy

whole living directory

ARiella Morris, LCSW-R EMDR, Somatic Experiencing, Mindfulness Body-Centered and Talk Therapy for Trauma, Abuse, Relationships, Accidents, Illness/Surgery & the hurts of life (Sliding scale) 853-3325

Treatment ROOMS available DAILY & ANNUAL RATES

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Enlightenment and Beyond WITH SPIRITUAL TEACHER

Sep. 27&28th, Elka Park, NY

Oct. 11&12th, Elka Park, NY

Enlightenment Intensive

Beyond Enlightementment Intensive

Jen Paradise 114

WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY CHRONOGRAM 8/08

www.mysticmama.com


SWIM LESSONS Total Immersion Swim Studio

endurance, and correct body alignment in addition to flexibility and relaxation. Standing poses are emphasized: building

246 Main Street, Suite 15A, New Paltz, NY

strong legs, increased general vitality,

(845) 255-4242

and improved circulation, coordination

www.totalimmersion.net

and balance. 12 years teaching yoga, 20 years practicing. 12 trips to India. Exten-

TAROT

sive training with the Iyengar family.

Tarot-on-the-Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Rachel Pollack

Jai Ma Yoga Center

Rhinebeck, NY

69 Main Street, Suite 201, New Paltz, NY

(845) 876-5797

(845) 256-0465

rachel@rachelpollack.com

www.jmyoga.com

Exploratory, experiential play with the

Established in 1999, Jai Ma Yoga Center

Tarot as oracle and sacred tool, in a

offers a wide array of Yoga classes, seven

monthly class, with Certified Tarot Grand

days a week. We offer classes for every

Master and international Tarot author

level of student. Our classes are in the lin-

Rachel Pollack. All levels welcome. Tarot

eages of Anusara, Iyengar, and Sivananda,

Readings in person or by phone.

with certified and experienced instructors. Private consultations and Anusara Thera-

VEGAN LIFESTYLES

peutics available. Owners Gina Bassinette, RYT and Ami Hirschstein, RYT have been

Andrew Glickâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Vegan Lifestyle Coach

teaching locally since 1995.

(845) 679-7979 www.meatfreezone.org andy@meatfreezone.org The single most important step an individ-

Satya Hudson Valley Yoga Center Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2528 www.satyayogarhinebeck.com

cious resources, improve and protect oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Satya Hudson Valley Yoga Center is lo-

health, and stop the senseless slaughter

cated in the heart of Rhinebeck village, on

of over 50 billion animals a year...is to Go

the third floor of the Rhinebeck Department

Vegan. What could make you feel better

Store building. We offer classes for all

about yourself than knowing you are help-

levels, 7 days a week. There is no need to

ing the planet, your own health, and the

pre-register: we invite you to just show up.

IRENE HUMBACH, LCSW, PC OďŹ&#x192;ces in New Paltz & Poughkeepsie (845) 485-5933

lives of countless animals all at the same time? If the idea is daunting and seems un-

The Living Seed

doable to you, then let your personal Vegan

521 Main Street (Route 299, across

Lifestyle Coach take you through steps A

from Econo Lodge), New Paltz, NY

to Z. Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a cattle rancher eating meat three times a day or a lacto-vegetarian wanting to give up dairy, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a process

(845) 255-8212 www.thelivingseed.com

Acupuncture by M.D.

Hoon J. Park, MD, P.C.

that can be fun, easy, and meaningful. You

Open to the community for over 5 years.

Board Cer tified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

can do it easily with the proper support,

Inspiring movements of inner freedom

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guidance, and encouragement from your

and awareness. We offer Yoga classes for

Vegan Lifestyle Coach.

all levels of students, gentle/beginner to

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advanced. Including pre- and post-natal

YOGA

Yoga, family and kids yoga, as well as a variety of dance classes, massage, acupunc-

Ashtanga Yoga of New Paltz

ture, sauna and organic Yoga clothing.

71 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 430-7402

Wen Barn & Gardens

www.ashtangaofnewpaltz.com

Accord, NY

Offering Ashtanga / Vinyasa style yoga

679-9441

classes for all levels seven days a week.

www.wenbarn.com

This style of yoga is both therapeutic and

Open May 17-October 13. Practice yoga,

dance-like. By first warming up the body

meditation, and Yoga As Muse in the rus-

naturally we can stretch safely, gaining

tic, open-air WEN Barn to the sounds of

an understanding of how to move from

songbirds and falling water. Caring teach-

our core. We also offer â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community

ers, 6 days a week. Community Yoga,

Yoga classesâ&#x20AC;? which are by donation.

Mon. eve. Special 2-hr indoor-outdoor

Barbara Borisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Woodstock Iyengar Yoga Mountain View Studio, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-3728 www.barbaraborisyoga.com

whole living directory

ual can take to help save the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pre-

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298-6060 4PVUI3PBE 8BQQJOHFST'BMMT /: ½ mile south of Galleria Mall

MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICARE, NO FAULT, AND WORKERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COMPENSATION

yoga/meditation class, Sat. morn. Workshops in permaculture and herbalism, non-violent communication, and more. Jeff Davis, member of the national Green Yoga Assn., and Hillary Thing, an herbalist

bxboris@yahoo.com

developing WENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medicinal teaching

The Iyengar method develops strength,

gardens, co-steward WEN. 8/08 CHRONOGRAM WHOLE LIVING DIRECTORY

115


WHY NOT TUBE THE ESOPUS?

#'

10 Bridge Street, Phoenicia, New York Memorial Day Weekend to September 30th

(845) 688-5553 www.towntinker.com

SAVE 10% WITH THIS AD

Performing Arts Summer Program Ages 11 - 18 (2 groups) Acting, Vocal Coaching, Music, Dance, Theater Craft (1) Two Week Session Left

Register Now for Fall Youth Theater!

PHOTOGRAPH BY DION OGUST

AUGUST

:06/(1&01-&4$0/$&354rSATURDAY - 11 A.M. 8/2 MARIA BACHMANN, SOLO VIOLIN | 8/16 MARILYN CRISPELL, IMPROVISATORY PIANO | 8/23 ZUILL BAILEY, CELLO

A variety of spaces are available for most

2 3

Sat 8 pm Sun 4 pm

STRING TRIO OF NEW YORK TRIO SOLISTI

Multimedia Functions

9 10

Sat 6 pm Sun 4 pm

A MAVERICK MINI-FESTIVAL: GREAT VIENNESE QUINTETS ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET with DAVID YING, cello BORROMEO STRING QUARTET with MICHAEL KLOTZ, viola

16 17

Sat 8 pm Sun 4 pm

MARILYN CRISPELL, improvisatory piano AMERNET STRING QUARTET with JAMES TOCCO, piano

23 24

Sat 6 pm Sun 4 pm

ZUILL BAILEY, cello, SIMONE DINNERSTEIN, piano MIRÃ&#x201C; QUARTET

29 30

Fri Sat

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BACKSTAGE STUDIO PRODUCTIONS

845.338.8700 | 323 Wall Street, Uptown Kingston teri@backstagestudios.net 116

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FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/08

31 

FINAL WEEKEND MARK PELOQUIN, piano MAVERICK CHAMBER PLAYERS, ALEXANDER PLATT, conductor MARIA JETTE, soprano, STEPHEN HARGREAVES, piano Sun 4 pm FRIENDS OF MAVERICK CONCERT FOR DONORS, AMERICAN STRING QUARTET    / :: > @=5@/;A AC0831B  B= 1 6/<53     8 pm 6 pm

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EVENT LISTINGS FOR AUGUST 2008

the forecast

W. Eugene Smith, Three Generations of Welsh Miners, 1950

BETWEEN THE SHIRT AND THE SKIN Despite much evidence to the contrary, photographs are assumed to be authentic records of a moment. If you combine this fact with the ethics of truth-telling that surround journalism, photography might be considered a more powerful medium than the text that accompanies it in newspaper and magazine articles. The terms surrounding photography intimate its brawn: The photographer “captures” someone in a photograph or “shoots” a subject. Even the most common phrase, “to take a picture,” implies stealing something from the world and encasing it infinitely (or at least archivally) in two dimensions as a kidnapped souvenir of reality. The contradictions surrounding the subjective nature of any art and the alleged objectivity of the camera have been discussed to the point of exhaustion. When speaking about photojournalist W. Eugene Smith (1918—1978), however, it is vital to touch on these themes. For Smith, truth was as much a medium as the black-and-white negatives (there are 100,000 in the Smith archive) and gelatin silver prints he produced. Smith, who began photographing for the local paper in Wichita, Kansas, at 16, was outspoken about the complexity and gravity of these issues as early as the 1940s, when he worked for magazines such as Colliers, Life, and Parade. However, he understood that truth and objectivity are not the same. In 1971, Smith stated: “The journalistic photographer can have no other than a personal approach and it is impossible for him to be completely objective. Honest, yes. Objective, no.” His colleague, famed photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, indicated that this honesty was visible: “I feel Gene’s photographs reflect a great turmoil. They are captured between the shirt and the skin; this camera, anchored in the heart, moves me by its integrity.” Smith’s career walked the high wire between art and truth, fact and feeling.

Now, 25 black-and-white prints by W. Eugene Smith are on permanent view at Dutchess Community College. The prints were donated by Smith’s son, K. Patrick Smith, and given in memory of the photographer’s first wife, Carmen Smith Wood, a graduate of the school’s nursing program. Smith is known for his unique, poetic approach to the photographic essay, wherein pictures are ordered intuitively to convey the essence of a story. Images from several important essays are represented in this gift. Four pictures from his two-year project documenting the city of Pittsburgh (1955—56), five from the Spanish Village essay (1951), and single images from the popular “Nurse Midwife” (1951) series and the Man of Mercy essay (1954) are among the works hanging in DCC’s Martha Reifler Myers Gallery. There are not enough images from each to fully convey Smith’s pioneering approach to the photographic essay, but many of his most iconic images are there, including The Spinner, Three Generations of Welsh Miners, and The Wake. At the beginning of an article on Minor White (another photographer from Smith’s generation) in the New York Times, famed Museum of Modern Art photography curator John Szarkowski wrote: “If people who think ever think about photography, they probably think.” Eugene Smith was a person who thought, and who constantly thought about photography. The works at Dutchess Community College can be seen as a potent completion of Szarkowski’s provocative introduction writ in images—one that emerges from more than 40 years of dedication to rethinking the medium of photojournalism. Twenty-five photographs by W. Eugene Smith are now on permanent display in the Martha Reifler Myers Gallery in Hudson Hall at Dutchess Community College, 53 Pendell Road, Poughkeepsie. (845) 431-8000; www.sunydutchess.edu. —Terri C. Smith

8/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

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FRIDAY 1 AUGUST ART Open Studio for Young Artists 10am-12pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Bearsville Theater â&#x20AC;&#x153;committed to bringing music back to Woodstockâ&#x20AC;?

August 9th

Dickey Betts And Great Southern August 16th Upstate Reggae Presents Live From Jamaica, Culture Featuring Kenyatta Hill

August 23 An Evening With Robbie Dupree CD Release Of Tide And Time

August 26

David Lindley August 28 & 29

Jack DeJohnette, Pat Metheny And Larry Grenadier In Concert To Benefit KTD Monastery And Family Of Woodstock

August 30 James Hunter Presented By WDST Full Bar, Streamside Lounge, Gourmet Dining at The Bear Cafe! 2 miles west of Woodstock on Rt.212... Tickets (845) 679-4406 www.bearsvilletheater.com

Passing Through This World 6pm-8pm. Paintings by Pennie Brantley and Robert Morgan. Eclipse Mill Gallery, North Adams, MA. (413) 664-9101.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Passion, Power & Possibilities: Awaken the Magic & Mystery of the Divine Feminine! Call for times. Miriamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Well, Saugerties. 246-5805.

Short and Long Pose Drawing Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced. Beginner jazz and tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, MA. (413) 663-7962.

DANCE David Michalekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Slow Dancing Call for times. Dance and video image performance. $29. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Halau I Ka Wekiu 6:30pm. Experience the history, music, and rich movement of Hawaii. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Mimulus 8pm. Brazilian dance troupe. $58. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Kalaruci 8pm. SEEDS Festival. Earthdance, Plainfield, Massachusetts. (413) 634-5678. Take Dance Company 8:30pm. $25/$20. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

EVENTS

Peter Steiner Call for time. Author reading. Oblong Books, Millerton. (518) 789-3797. Breaking Dawn Party starting 9pm. Final book in Stephenie Meyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twilight Saga. Barnes & Noble, Kingston. 336-0590.

THEATER Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival Call for times. Cymbeline. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-on-Hudson. 265-3638. The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Community Playback Theatre 7:30pm. Improvisations of audience stories. $6. Boughton Place, Highland. 691-4118. West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Finks 8pm. $35. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Menopause the Musical 8pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Short Play Festival 8pm. Works by the ASK Playwrights Lab. $10. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Climate Confluence Call for times. Youth organized gathering. Epworth Methodist Retreat, High Falls. (914) 449-6514.

Sixth Annual Rock On Workshop Call for times. Instrument instruction and ensemble training. Berkshire Community College, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 447-9964.

Casting for Recovery Retreat Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 205.

Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Camp Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 205. Tennis Camp Call for times. Ages 8-18. $269. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 687-5263. Kids in the Kaatskills Call for times. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/08

SPOKEN WORD

Souvenir 8pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

KIDS

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MH2 9pm. Pamelaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on The Hudson, Newburgh. 562-4505.

Bard Summerscape Call for times. Call for specific events including music, theater, and art. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

The Bet Collector Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

845.331.6949

Matt Rae Trio with Ruby Hogg 9pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300.

Four Guys in Disguise 10:30pm. Noahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ark, Poughkeepsie. 486-9295.

The Roosevelts: Life and Legacy of Eleanor and Franklin Call for times. Elderhostel Program. Mount Gulian Historic Site, Beacon. 831-8172.

FILM

www.tuttlesoundlabs.com info@tuttlesoundlabs.com

Hamell on Trial 9pm. $15. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394.

CLASSES

Breaking Away Release Party 9pm. Barnes & Noble, Kingston. 336-0590.

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Hudson Valley Philharmonic 8pm. Conducted by Vladimir Feltsman. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869.

Da411 9:30pm. Funk. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900.

Phoenicia Phirst Phriday 7pm. Featuring Brad Scribner. $3. Arts Upstairs, Phoenicia. 688-2142.

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San Stokes 8pm. Beebâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Newburgh. 568-6102.

Advanced Yoga 9:30am. Wen Barn and Gardens, Accord. jeffdavis@centertopage.com.

Schuetzenpark Biergarten Open 4pm-10pm. German-American Club of Albany, Albany. (518) 265-6102.

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Spiv 8pm. Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Digital Photo Fun Camp 9am-4pm. Ages 9-12. $249. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025. Marching Percussion Camp 9am-3pm. Ages 11-17. $230. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025. Sprouts Summer Arts Program 11am-11:45am. Ages 3-7. Greenville Middle School, Greenville. (518) 943-3400. Smart Movesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Girls Only! 2pm. Ages 12-15. $150. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

MUSIC Eric Erickson 5pm. Singer/songwriter. Steelhouse, Kingston. 338-7847. Annual Civil War Heritage Music Gathering & Encampment 6pm-10pm. Centre Church, Windham. (518) 734-5655. Sonny & Perley Trio 7pm-10pm. Stockade Inn, Schenectady. (518) 346-3400. Taj Mahal Trio 7pm. Springfield Museums, Springfield, Massachusetts. (413) 586-8686. The Police 7:30pm. $46.00-$231.00. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. The Wizard of Verse 7:30pm. Music of Yip Harburg. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272. Aston Magna Concert 8pm. Music of the 17th and 18th centuries performed on period instruments. Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7216. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636.

WORKSHOPS

Acrylic Painting for Beginners 10am-12pm. $30. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Poetry Workshop 10am-4pm. With acclaimed poets Dorianne Laux & Joseph Millar. $150. Call for location.

SATURDAY 2 AUGUST ART Baby Carriers: The Work of Leah Rhodes and Native Americans 3pm-8pm. Athens Cultural Center, Athens. (518) 945-2136. Beautiful Greene 4pm-6pm. Juried group exhibition exploring six unique spots in Greene County. GCCA Mountaintop Gallery, Windham. (518) 734-3104. Hale Johnson 5pm-7pm. Realist landscapes. The Harrison Gallery, Williamstown, MA. (413) 458-1700. Nuclear Family 5pm-7pm. Robotic family portraits by Matthew Kelly. Kingston Museum of Contemporary Art, Kingston. Kmoca.org. Stopping TIME: An Exploration through Object & Image 5pm-7pm. Albert Shahinian Fine Art, Hudson. (518) 828-4346. Sketchbook Fruition 5pm-8pm. Kate McGloughlin. ASK, Kingston. 338-0331.

DANCE Mimulus 2pm. Brazilian dance troupe. $58. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. David Michalekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Slow Dancing 2:15pm. Dance and video image performance. $29. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. The School at Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow: Jazz/Musical Theatre Dance 6:30pm. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. A Perfect Gift: All that is Jazz Music and Dance Review 8pm. Muddy Cup, New Paltz. 338-3881. Land Mass 8pm. SEEDS Festival. $5. Earthdance, Plainfield, Massachusetts. (413) 634-5678. Stacks 8pm. Collaboration of poetry and dance. $15. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Take Dance Company 8:30pm. $30/$25. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

EVENTS Antique Fair and Flea Market Call for times. $2/$1 seniors/children free. Washington County Fairgrounds, Greenwich. Kingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History Tour Call for times. 18th-century cooking, crafts, and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786.


MUSIC DAVID "FATHEAD" NEWMAN IMAGE PROVIDED

David Fathead Newman plays the Bellearyre Music Festival on August 16..

Groovin' Highmount The noted critic Gerald Early said, “I think there are only three things America will be known for 2,000 years from now when they study this civilization: the Constitution, jazz music, and baseball.” His is truly an epochal prediction (Early served as a consultant to Ken Burns on his documentaries Baseball and Jazz). Jazz keeps its stock value high by releasing diamonds from its inner core periodically, strewn on the Earth for all to see. One sparkler will be on view at this year’s Belleayre Music Festival on August 16: saxophonist David “Fathead” Newman. Newman’s appearance at the festival coincides with other worldwide events centered on his 75th birthday (February 24) this year. His brazen Texas tenor tone has given body and soul to works by Aretha Franklin, Queen Latifah, B. B. King, Eric Clapton, and, most notably, Ray Charles. His 12 years with Charles gave Newman enough cachet for steady employment in jazz, R&B, and pop. While on tour with saxophonist Buster Smith (a mentor to bebop icon Charlie Parker), Newman, whose main horn is alto saxophone, initially joined Charles in 1954 on baritone but later switched to tenor and doubled on flute. Newman gave Charles’s bands swagger and reams of energetic solos to riff behind. His debut album as a leader is Fathead: Ray Charles Presents David Newman (Atlantic) in 1958. In 2004, the life of Charles was put upon the big screen in the biopic Ray, which the singer did not live to see. Newman continues to refute his portrayal as someone who got Charles hooked on drugs. “I was bothered by it,” Newman lamented in a 2005 interview. “I understand that’s what sells movies. I could’ve

done with more music and less sex and drugs. I actually would have liked to have seen more of Ray Charles and what he brought to the table.” A year after Ray’s 2004 premier, Newman honored Charles on his HighNote Records release I Remember Brother Ray. Another lengthy stay was with flutist Herbie Mann—10 years. Newman also recorded for Mann’s label, Kokopelli, and released Mr. Gentle Mr. Cool in 1994 and Under a Woodstock Moon in 1996. Both recordings reflect the spiritual shift in Newman’s life from New York City to the Hudson Valley. Newman has had a stable home life at HighNote since 1999’s Chillin’. His ninth release for the label is Diamondhead, on which two of his band mates for the Belleayre gig, pianist Cedar Walton and trombonist Curtis Fuller, appear. The other sidemen for the Belleayre show are also superb—bassist Rufus Reid, drummer Jimmy Cobb, and just added, saxophonists Joe Lovano and Jimmy Heath. The Belleayre festival offers an appetizing plate of folk, rock, opera, classical, Broadway, dance, and “America’s classical music”—jazz. “Jazz has always been a major part of the festival, with four to five concerts each season,” comments Litoff. “We’ve been privileged to hear the greatest musicians in the world play—and Newman and Fuller are certainly among them.” David “Fathead” Newman will perform at the Belleayre Music Festival in Highmount on August 16 at 8pm. (845) 254-5600; www.belleayremusic.org. —Cheryl K. Symister-Masterson

8/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

119


Pakatakan Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326.

THE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK

LECTURES

Riverside Farmers’ and Artisans’ Market 10am-2pm. Live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. Archaeology Day on the Street 10am-4pm. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. Tannersville Crazy Race and Festival 11am-4pm. Main Street, Tannersville. (518) 589-5765. African American Family Day 12pm-7pm. State Plaza, Albany. (518) 443-5333. Woodstock Fringe Kick-Off and Fundraiser 4pm. Jamaican music, food, champagne, and dessert. $90. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

FILM Dinner and a Movie 6:30pm. Chocolate with Francine Segan/Chocolat. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. ©

Dawoud Bey (detail)

MARY ELLEN MARK SATURDAY AUGUST 2 CONNIE IMBODEN SATURDAY AUGUST 9 CHRISTOPHER JAMES SATURDAY AUGUST 16 DAWOUD BEY SATURDAY AUGUST 23 CONSTANTINE MANOS SATURDAY AUGUST 30 LECTURES BEGIN AT 8PM

| ADMISSION $7/5 members, students, seniors | call ahead to confirm event if traveling from far

EXHIBITIONS

KIDS Bee Buzz for Kids Call for times. Two sessions: ages 4-9 and 10-15. $10. HoneybeeLives, New Paltz. 255-6113.

MUSIC NY Doo Wopp Show Call for times. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Local Singer/Songwriter Showcase and Brunch Saturday 10:30am-12pm. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Young People’s Concert 11am. Maria Bachman, solo violin. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. Eric Erickson 5pm. Singer/songwriter. Steelhouse, Kingston. 338-7847. Annual Civil War Heritage Music Gathering & Encampment 6pm-10pm. Centre Church, Windham. (518) 734-5655. Big Blue Big Band 6pm-8pm. Waterfront Park, Hudson.

THEATER Menopause the Musical Call for times. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. The Pied Piper 11am. Kids on Stage Performance. $6-$9. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Finks 2pm. $35. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Jamaica, Farewell 4pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Finks 8pm. $35. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Souvenir 8pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667. Stephen Belber’s Fault Lines 8pm. Directed by David Schwimmer. $20. Martel Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5902.

WORKSHOPS Photographing the Nude in Nature 10am-4pm. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Intensive Oil Painting 10am-1pm. En plein air. $70. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Rhythm & Movement 10:30am-12pm. Ages 8 and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Painting Portraits in Pastel or Oil 2pm-5pm. $70. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Denise Jordan Finley 7:30pm. Guitar workshop. Hyde Park Library Annex, Hyde Park. 229-7791.

SUNDAY 3 AUGUST

Mark Raisch 6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411. © Julianne Swartz (detail)

ON VIEW THRU AUGUST 17

THE CAMERA ALWAYS LIES REGIONAL TRIENNIAL OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS curated by Beth Wilson | artists: Joan Barker, John Dugdale, Jaanika Peerna, Rob Penner, Julianne Swartz, Sam Sebren, Kathleen Sweeney, Susan Wides, and Ion Zupcu

Gallery hours: Wednesday-Sunday, Noon-5PM

59 TINKER STREET WOODSTOCK NY | 845-679-9957 | WWW.CPW.ORG

Denise Jordan Finley and Daniel Pagdon 7:30pm. Hyde Park Library Annex, Hyde Park. 229-7791. The People’s Open Mike 8pm. Peint o Gwrw Tavern, Chatham. (518) 392-2943. Belleayre Festival Opera 8pm. Ruggero Leoncavallo’s “Pagliacci” + Famous Opera Choruses. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. String Trio of New York 8pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. John Mueller 8pm. Acoustic. Muddy Cup, Poughkeepsie. MAWWAL and Rock the Reactors 8pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Vans

DISTRIBUTION & DELIVERY

Midnight Image 8pm. Pamela’s on The Hudson, Newburgh. 562-4505. Richard Julian 8pm. $25/$20 members. Marbletown Multi-Arts, Stone Ridge. 687-4143. Rock the Reactors Benefit 8pm. Featuring Mawwal. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Keith Pray’s Big Soul Ensemble 9pm. Tess’ Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779. Eddie Fingerhut 9pm. Acoustic. New Paltz Cultural Collective, New Paltz. 255-1901. John Ludington, Seth Faergolzia, Quitzo, and Setting Sun 9pm. 60 Main, New Paltz. 255-1901. Modern Man with Guest Ethan James 9pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. The Sacred Shakers 9pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394. Planeside 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

THE OUTDOORS

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120

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Trail Work in Pawling Nature Preserve Call for times. Appalachian Trail, Pawling. 471-9892. Canoe Trip to Buckley Dunton Lake 9am-12pm. $20/$15 members. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320. Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables Hike— Giants Workshop 10am-3pm. 7-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. Historic High Falls—The Rustic Nooks of Mohonk and American Landscape Design 10am. Slide presentation. Bevier House Museum/Ulster County Historical Society, Kingston. 339-7858.

SPOKEN WORD Eco Dog Call for time. Reading and signing. Oblong Books, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

ART Plein Air Painting Call for times. Kierman Farm, Gardiner. 457-2787. New Works by Cindy Hoose & Jacinta Bunnell 2pm-4pm. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Very Beginner Yoga Series 12:30pm-1:30pm. $65. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528.

CLASSES A Wealth of History and Fine Food in the Hudson River Valley Call for times. Elderhostel Program. Mount Gulian Historic Site, Beacon. 831-8172. Tango Argentino Classes Call for times. $70. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 255-8212. Atelier-Figure Painting 9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

DANCE Mimulus 3pm. Brazilian dance troupe. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. David Michalek’s Slow Dancing 5pm. Dance and video image performance. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Antique Fair and Flea Market Call for times. $2/$1 seniors/children free. Washington County Fairgrounds, Greenwich. Ellenville Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Market and Center Street, Ellenville. 647-5150. 2008 Rosendale Farmers; Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467. Turning the Wheel of Dharma 8pm. Glimpse of Tibetan art, crafts, culture, food, music, and religion. Pumpkin Hollow Retreat Center, Caryville. (518) 325-3583.

KIDS The Three Bears 1pm. Children’s opera. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344.

MUSIC The Christine/Elliot Spero Duo 1pm. Historic Catskill Point, Catskill. (518) 622-9820. The Sammy Kaye Orchestra 2pm. Big band. National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, New Windsor. 561-1765 ext. 28. Trio Solisti 4pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. Cloudnyne 5pm. Dance. Pamela’s on the Hudson, Newburgh. 562-4505. The Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. Steve Kaiser and Friends 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595.

Poetry Reading by Walter Worden 4pm. Baby Grand Bookstore, Warwick. 294-8085.

HippieFest 6pm. Features performances from Eric Burdon & The Animals, Jack Bruce of Cream, The Turtles featuring Flo & Eddie, Melanie, Badfinger, and Terry Sylvester of The Hollies. $23-$60. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

Disappearing Dutch Brooklyn: Where Have All The Houses Gone? 7pm-9pm. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Benefit Concert for Woodstock Meals on Wheels 6pm-11pm. $25. Woodstock Reformed Church, Woodstock. 679-7454.

National Dance Institute 7pm. $10/$7 children. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Hunter. (518) 263-2066.

Fuerza 6pm. Latin. Thomas Felton Community Park, Modena. 883-6022.

Discussion and Book Signing—Lindy Hop Ambassador 4pm. Blake’s Barn. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.


THEATER HUDSON VALLEY SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL WILLIAM MARSH

Jason O’Connell, Noel Velez, and Christopher V. Edwards star in the “Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged),” at the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival through August 28.

Brisk Bard For 21 years, The Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival has performed the works of the Bard—the old chestnuts as well as the lesser-known plays—to Elizabethan fanatics and groundlings alike. While high school traumas of being force-fed “The Merchant of Venice” die hard, HVSF has amassed a faithful following. Each summer they trek out to the grounds of the sumptuous Boscobel mansion in Garrison. There, perched on the high banks of the Hudson under the stars, they savor Shakespeare’s enduring poetry and stagecraft. This year, however, HVSF changes gears by offering the first contemporary play in its history, albeit a Shakespeare-inspired piece. “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)”, which runs through August 28, is Willie the Shake as you might have craved him during those attention-deficit days of high school English class: In the course of 97 minutes, three actors stage pieces from all 37 of the master’s works, with an emphasis on speed and chaos. Will purists balk at such monkeyshines, claiming an irreverence to their hallowed idol? Terrence O’Brien, Artistic Director of HVSF, dismisses the notion. “The Complete Works” admittedly “makes fun of Shakespeare, but at same time is an homage to Shakespeare, and to the theater and the Elizabethan theater in particular.” But a lighthearted dissection of their god is not out of step with the HSVF philosophy. From the first performances beginning in 1987, O’Brien and his HVSF colleagues aimed to rescue Shakespeare from his hidebound scholarly limbo. As their mission statement explains, “We communicate the stories with energy, clarity, and invention and we distill rather than embellish the language and action. We challenge ourselves and our audiences to take a fresh look at what is essential in Shakespeare’s plays.” While all play texts are preserved, the company seeks to bring the playwright into the modern world, occasionally excising archaic 16th-century words and instead mining

the situations for contemporary meaning. Therefore, last year’s “Richard III” became a sobering meditation on the abuse of power (any relation to the current occupant of the Oval Office was entirely coincidental) and this year’s “Twelfth Night,” a romantic romp about masquerade and mistaken identity played up the modern travails of sexual and gender politics. “The Complete Works” allows the brisk wind of improvisation to air out some of the more musty texts in the Shakespeare canon. In fact, the authors of the 1987 parody, known as the Reduced Shakespeare Company, encouraged individual interpretations by theater groups. In the stage directions of the play, they urged actors to insert as many asides and contemporary political references as possible. (This selfsame technique illuminated productions of the long-running “Godspell.”) When O’Brien first saw a staging of “Complete,” he was dazzled by the agile company, who were groomed in clowning and vaudeville. Accordingly, he cast an eclectic trio of actors for the HVSF production. While all have been groomed as “strong classical actors” and possess “very quick minds,” Christopher Edwards has a strong background in the physicalities of stagecraft, especially choreographed combat. Noel Velez can assay a mean pratfall and Jason O’Connell took his first show business lumps as a stand-up comedian. While the company had only three and a half weeks of rehearsal, O’Brien feels too much polish would undercut the strength of the play. “It is meant to feel as if the production could fall apart at any minute.” The Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival will perform “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” through August 28, in repertory with “Cymbeline” and "Twelfth Night,” at Boscobel in Garrison. (845) 265-9575; www.hvshakespeare.org. —Jay Blotcher

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You’re invited to join us for . . .

Annual Civil War Heritage Music Gathering & Encampment 6pm-10pm. Centre Church, Windham. (518) 734-5655.

Coil, Crochet, and Collage 9am-12pm. Ages 9-14. $120. Hearst Education Center, Schenectady. (518) 382-3884 ext. 133.

CD Release Party 7pm. Ian Charles, Chuck E. Costa, John Holt, and Dave Kearney. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Wayfinder Experience 9am-4pm. Ages 8-16, young adults become characters in magical worlds where fantasy comes alive. $380/$350 members. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. The Sweet Clementines 8pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

THE OUTDOORS Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables Hike-High Peters Kill 10am-3pm. 7-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Wickets & Wine Wine and Croquet on the lawn of the 1894 Deyo House Historic Huguenot Street Friday, July 18th, 5:30pm Saturday, August 30th, 4pm $5 per person Space is limited. Register at 845.255.1660 or register@huguenotstreet.org

No experience necessary . . . Just the desire to have fun! 18 Broadhead Street, New Paltz (btw Huguenot & Chestnut Streets)  www.huguenotstreet.org

Farm Camp 9am-2pm. Ages 6-11. $200/$180. Phillies Bridge Farm, Gardiner. 255-1559. Improv Made Easy Workshop Camp 9:30am-4:30pm. Ages 11-16. $235. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

SPOKEN WORD

Sprouts Summer Arts Program 10am-11:45am. Ages 3-7. Hunter Mountain, Hunter. (518) 943-3400.

A Spy for Washington 2pm-4pm. A look into the clandestine world of 18th century spies. $4/$3 children. Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Newburgh. 562-1195.

THEATER Obituaries 2pm. Featuring Bob Balogh. Micro Theater, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 442-2223. Souvenir 2pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667. Teens on the Green Acting Classes 2pm-3:30pm. $12/$45. Woodstock Reformed Church, Woodstock. 679-4561. Finks 2pm. $35. Powerhouse Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5599. Menopause the Musical 2:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. West Side Story 3pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Mozart’s Don Giovanni 3pm. Based on the character of Don Juan, the most notorious womanizer in literature. $25/$22 seniors and students/$15 children. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272. The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Stephen Belber’s Fault Lines 7pm. Directed by David Schwimmer. $20. Martel Theater, Poughkeepsie. 437-5902.

WORKSHOPS Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001.

I’ll Tell You Mine If You Tell Me Yours 10:30am-6pm. A vehicle for awakening, prompting selfawareness, spiritual growth, and fun. $35. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. Teacher Training Orientation 4pm. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528. Creative Writing Workshop Call for times. Weekly writing workshop with Kate Hymes. New Paltz. 255-7090.

MONDAY 4 AUGUST BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Summer Yoga on the Lawn 6pm-7:15pm. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-onHudson. 265-3638.

CLASSES

MUSIC Summer Sing 7:30pm. Bernstein, Chichester Psalms with professional soloists, Gwen Gould director. $10/$8 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Celtic Session 7:30pm. Traditional Irish music. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, MA (413) 881-1636. Open Mike and Vinyl Showcase 10pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

THE OUTDOORS Evening at the Beaver Ponds 7pm-8:30pm. Enjoy an evening in the valley visiting the beaver ponds. Search for beavers and other wildlife. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320.

SPOKEN WORD Poetry Open Mike 7pm. Featuring Wendy Klein and Brent Robison. $4. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

THEATER Auditions for She Loves Me 7:30pm. Pawling Theater Company, Pawling High School, Pawling. 855-1965.

WORKSHOPS Integrate Call for times. All work is crafted from found materials. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Introduction to Asian Papermaking Call for times. Women’s Studio Workshop Gallery, Rosendale. 658-9133.

TUESDAY 5 AUGUST ART Photographs of Lucille Weinstat 4pm-6pm. Unison Gallery, New Paltz. 255-1559.

CLASSES Flamenco Levels I & II 1pm-3:30pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611. Rhythm Tap Dance Classes 5:30pm. Introduction to the art of sound and movement taught by Stefanie Weber. $50/ 5 classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 281-6734.

EVENTS Chess for Adults 2pm-4pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

Intensive Watercolor Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

FILM

Movement Classes for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12 class/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

KIDS

Drawing and Painting 9am-12pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Moving Fundamentals for Adults 12pm-1:30pm. $15 class/$80 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Acting for the Camera 6pm-9pm. Casting director Jenny O’Haver teaches how to hone acting skills to the camera. $25/$100 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 528-6728.

DANCE

On the Riviera 8pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Drop In For Some Fun 9:30am-11:30am. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. Creativity Camp 1pm-Friday, August 8, 3pm. Art camp for ages 6-11. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

MUSIC Cantinero with Salix 8pm. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881. Junior Jones 8pm. $5. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Swing Dance Classes Call for times. Various levels offered. $60/4 weeks. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Watts the Deal 8pm. Saratoga Chamber Music Festival. $35.50-$41.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

EVENTS

SPOKEN WORD

Family Game Time 6:30pm-8:30pm. DDR, Guitar Hero, Wii, board games. Bethlehem Public Library, Delmar. (518) 439-9314.

Women’s Circles Rhinebeck & Red Hook/Tivoli Call for times. Networking dinner. The Starr Bar, Rhinebeck. 876-6816.

KIDS

All Hot and Bothered: Photographs from the Center for Photography at Woodstock 7pm. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz. 257-3858.

Hudson Community Book Group Call for times. Ages 5 and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Movement Class for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Vocal Camp 1:30pm. Ages 11-14. $135. Main Stage at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Swim Camp 8:30am-4pm. Ages 8-17. Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh. 569-3179. Baseball Camp 9am-2:30pm. Ages 7-16. $165. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/08

People & Portraits Camp 9am-4pm. Ages 7-12. $239. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Life Drawing 10am-1pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

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Mad Science “The Garden” Camp 9am-12pm. Ages 4-5. $160. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Summer Artist Slide Lectures 7:30pm. Carolyn Chadwick, Shelley Thorstensen and Kate Carr. Women’s Studio Workshop Gallery, Rosendale. 658-9133.

THEATER Auditions for She Loves Me 7:30pm. Pawling Theater Company, Pawling High School, Pawling. 855-1965.

WORKSHOPS Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir, or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) Call for times. Led by Iris Litt. $60/$15 per session. Call for location. 679-8256.


MUSIC PAULINE OLIVEROS & THE DEEP LISTENING BAND PITER KERS

Pauline Oliveros and the Deep Listening Band will play the Spiegeltent at Bard, part of the New Albion festival, on Sunday, August 10.

Deep Listening in the Big Tent Foster Reed refers to himself as “founder and chief perpetrator of New Albion Records.” I asked him if he has an official title, and he replied, “No, I don’t think I have a title. I don’t even have a business card!” Nonetheless, Foster has recorded and archived legendary figures in American music: John Cage, Morton Feldman, Anthony Braxton, Lukas Foss, and many others in the 25 years that New Albion has existed. Bard College’s SummerScape series will celebrate the label with a festival within a festival in the exotic Spiegeltent, August 1 through August 10. Reed began his recording career on the other end of the microphone. In high school, he co-founded a psychedelic jug outfit called the Free Band, which released one record on Vanguard in 1969, then promptly disbanded. In 1976, Reed moved to San Francisco. He founded New Albion in 1983 to fill a gap in the recording industry. Composer friends of his like John Adams, Paul Dresher, and Daniel Lentz were writing fine music that was nearly unknown. Some of Reed’s albums have taken as much as 10 years to make, from initial conception until release. Others were almost immediate. One of his remarkable stories is about Kingston composer Pauline Oliveros. “My involvement with Pauline began when she and [musician] Stuart Dempster had gone into a cistern on the Olympic Peninsula at Fort Worden [in Washington State], and discovered that it had an echo which lasted for about 54 seconds,” recalls Reed. “And since the cistern was round, the echo kept on going and going and going. So it was like an infinity of perception.” Oliveros, Dempster, and Panaiotis recorded the album Deep Listening in the

cistern, which had formerly held two million gallons of water, in October 1988. The instrumentation is accordion, voice, conch, trombone, didjeridu, garden hose, whistling, and metal pipes. In 1991, New Albion released the sequel, The Ready Made Boomerang. The second album’s 45-second opening cut, “Balloon Payment,” consists of one echoing crash. Oliveros’s music overlaps with physics and the study of sound. It’s fitting that she teaches at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy. Deep Listening is a philosophy as well as a record title. Oliveros believes that music is ultimately an attitude in the listener; that a dripping faucet, properly heard, is as profound as the Brandenburg Concertos. Oliveros teaches Deep Listening workshops around the world. On August 10, the Deep Listening Band, consisting of David Gamper (keyboards and electronics), Stuart Dempster (trombone and didgeridoo), and Oliveros (accordion and electronics), will perform in the Spiegeltent, the mirrored dance hall now in its third year at SummerScape. The same day, in the lobby of Theater Two of the Fisher Center, Ellen Fullman will perform on a contraption called the Long String Instrument, in which wires up to 60 feet long will oscillate as she plays them with her rosined fingertips. Her performance is free. The Deep Listening Band will appear in the Spiegeltent at Bard College on August 10, at 8:30pm. Ellen Fullman’s performance at the Fisher Center is at 5:30pm. (845) 758-7900; www.fishercenter.bard.edu. —Sparrow 8/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

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Kingston Farmers’ Market Wall Street – Uptown Kingston Saturdays until November 22

9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Rain or Shine free parking available

WEDNESDAY 6 AUGUST ART Watercolor Painting 9am-12pm. $220/8 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Drawing, Painting and Composition 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Flamenco Levels I & II 1pm-3:30pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611.

Pilates at the Pavilion 6am-7am. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. Svaroopa Yoga 5:30pm-7pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

CLASSES Impressionism with Oil 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Drawing for Painting 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Figurative Clay Sculpture 1pm-4pm. $166/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing, Painting and Composition 6pm-9pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Beginner Pilates Mat Workout 6:30pm-7:30pm. $119. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

DANCE Swing Dance Classes Call for times. Various levels offered. $60/4 weeks. Boughton Place, Highland. 236-3939. Shantala Shivalingappa 6:30pm. Classical Indian dancer Shantala Shivalingappa performs excerpts from Gamaka. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Stockholm 59° North 8pm. Soloists of the Royal Swedish Ballet. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS

8/2 Corn Roast 8/9 Eating for Energy 8/30 Tomato Festival 1st Saturday · Crafts of John St. Glass Blowing Demonstration www.kingstonnyfarmersmarket.com

Woodstock Farm Festival 4pm-8pm. Farm products, children’s activities, live music, and gardening advice. Maple Lane, Woodstock. 679-7618. You Wanna Play? 7pm. Scrabble and other board games, food, and fun. Russ’s Country Cafe, Phoenicia. 688-2337.

FILM Luxury Car 7:30pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Storytelling & Art-Making 10am-11am. Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany. (518) 463-4478. Yoga for Kids 11:30am-12:15pm. $66. Ashtanga Yoga of New Paltz, New Paltz. 430-7402. Statues and Surroundings 1pm-4pm. Ages 13-15, creating art in the City of Albany. $20/$15 members. Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany. (518) 463-4478. Sudbury School Information Meeting 7pm-9pm. Overview of the school and our educational philosophy. Hudson Valley Sudbury School, Kingston. 679-1002.

MUSIC Piet & Ron 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595. Aztec Two Step 6pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Betty MacDonald Quartet 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. $18.00-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Open Mike Night 9:30pm. Sign up at 8:30 p.m. Tess’ Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

THE OUTDOORS The Beauty of Butterflies 10am-12pm. $6/$4 members. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320.

SPOKEN WORD

PESTICIDES CAUSE CANCER They contribute to autism, Did youcan know also that home and garden pesticide use can birth increase defects, the risk of childhood leukemiarespiratory by almost seven times? Or that even at relatively low neurotoxicity, and immune-system damage, levels, pesticides may increase an individual’s risk of developing Parkinson’s liver and kidney damage, endocrine disruption, disease by 70%? and asthma.

Introduction to Watercolor 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Scene study/technique. $90/month. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154. Life Drawing 7pm. No materials or instructor provided, just a live model. $4 to $8. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348.

DANCE Lorraine Chapman The Company 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Muddy Lindy 8pm-10pm. Kingston’s Casual Swing Stomp. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881. Stockholm 59° North 8pm. Soloists of the Royal Swedish Ballet. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Shantala Shivalingappa 8:15pm. Classical Indian dance and music in the quicksilver Kuchipudi tradition. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Barbecue and Music 5pm. Barbecue 6pm-7:30pm, music after 8pm. $25/$12 children/$10 music only. Garrison Arts Center, Garrisonon-Hudson. 424-3960.

FILM Luxury Car Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Paste Paper Call for times. Decorating paper. Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany. (518) 463-4478. Drop In For Some Fun 9:30am-11:30am. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. United Tweets of America by Hudson Talbott 11am. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

MUSIC Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877. Aztec Two-Step 6pm. Folk/rock duo. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Piet & Ron 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595. Big Blue Big Band 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Tommy Verrigni Trio 7pm-10pm. Stockade Inn, Schenectady. (518) 346-3400. Dan Stokes 7pm. Big Easy Bistro, Newburgh. 565-3939. Open Mike 7:30pm-9:30pm. Joshua’s Java Lounge, Woodstock. 679-5533. Bluegrass Clubhouse 8pm. $5. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Summertimes with David Grover 8pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-8418. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. $18.00-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Bearaoke 9pm. With Miss Angie. The Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

SPOKEN WORD Pirates, Pilferers, and Pranksters: A Brief History of Photographic Appropriation 7pm. A lecture by Laurie Dahlberg. $5. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

THEATER

Jane Sherman’s Century 5pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

West Side Story Call for times. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Poetry Reading by Patricia Spears Jones and Elaine Sexton 7:30pm. The Hudson Valley Writers’ Center, Tarrytown. (914) 332-5953.

Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

THEATER

Souvenir 7:30pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Dark Wood 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Souvenir 7:30pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change 8pm. Up in One Productions. $22/$20 seniors. Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. 687-5263.

WORKSHOPS

WORKSHOPS

Teacher Training Orientation 7:45pm. Satya Yoga Center, Rhinebeck. 876-2528.

Creative Writing Workshop Call for times. Weekly writing workshop with Kate Hymes. New Paltz. 255-7090.

THURSDAY 7 AUGUST

FRIDAY 8 AUGUST

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Formerly BAN PESTICIDES in ULSTSER COUNTY ALLIANCE

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FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Intro to Kabbalistic Healing: A Framework for Living a Healed Life 6pm-8pm. Miriam’s Well, Saugerties. 246-5805.

ART

CLASSES

Capturing the Magic of the Hudson River 6pm-8pm. Muddy Cup, Poughkeepsie. 486-1378.

Figure Painting and Drawing Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Poets Gallery Reunion Exhibition 5pm-7pm. Toleo Arts Center, Woodstock. 810-0491.

Michelle Rhodes Summer Pottery Sale 7pm-9pm. Deep Clay, New Paltz. 255-8039.


BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Advanced Yoga 9:30am. Wen Barn and Gardens, Accord. jeffdavis@ centertopage.com.

CLASSES Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced. Beginner jazz and tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 663-7962.

DANCE Rindfleisch Dance 6:30pm. Contemporary. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Swing Dance 7:30pm. Lesson at 7pm. $10/$8. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Stockholm 59° North 8pm. Soloists of the Royal Swedish Ballet. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Shantala Shivalingappa 8:15pm. Classical Indian dance and music in the quicksilver Kuchipudi tradition. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Funk & Disco Dance Party 9:30pm. $5. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

MUSIC Prokofiev and His World Call for times. Music performances, lectures, panel discussions. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. The Sultan of Sonic Soul Gus Mancini with his Sonic Soul Awe-kestra 7pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Artists’ Coats 5pm-7pm. Solo exhibition featuring coats, vests, and jackets created by textile artist Lila Hollister Smith. GCCA Catskill Gallery, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. Fiber Dialogues 5pm-7pm. Juried exhibition for artists who work with fibers and textiles. GCCA Catskill Gallery, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. Summer Group Exhibit 6pm-8pm. Kathy Burge, Lependorf + Shire, Margaret Saliske, Ralph Stout, Margaret Crenson. Carrie Haddad Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-1915. Women of New Orleans Opening 6pm-9pm. Group show. Van Brunt Gallery, Beacon. 838-2995.

DANCE Stockholm 59° North 2pm. Soloists of the Royal Swedish Ballet. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Shantala Shivalingappa 2:15pm/ 8:15 pm. Classical Indian dance and music in the quicksilver Kuchipudi tradition. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. The Vanaver Caravan 5:30pm. SummerDance on Tour. Opus 40, Saugerties. 256-9300. The School at Jacob’s Pillow: Jazz/Musical Theatre Dance 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Eight Years and Not Without You 8pm. Lice music, dance, and spoken word. $15. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Stockholm 59° North 8pm. Soloists of the Royal Swedish Ballet. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS

Lee Shaw Trio 7pm-10pm. Stockade Inn, Schenectady. (518) 346-3400.

German Alps Festival Call for times. Hunter Mountain, Hunter. 1 (800) HUNTERMTN.

Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636.

Kingston’s History Tour Call for times. 18th-century cooking, crafts and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing, with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786.

Dickey Betts and Great Southern 8pm. $20-$32. Main Stage at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Pakatakan Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. 3-D Archery Competition 9am. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 205.

K.J. Denhert Quintet 8pm. Soulful fusion of jazz, R&B, rock and folk. Belleayre Jazz Club, High Mount. (800) 942-6904.

Coxsackie River Festival 10am-9:30pm. Live music, fireworks, arts and crafts, kids’ activities. Riverside Park, Coxsackie.

The Blue Ribbon Boys 9pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394.

Riverside Farmers’ and Artisans’ Market 10am-2pm. With live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400.

Butter 9:30pm. Funk. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900.

Second Annual Batavia Kill Stream Festival 10am-7pm. Children’s activities, educational environmental programs and exhibits, fly casting and tying demonstrations, art gallery, vendors, music, and performing arts. Country Suite Bed and Breakfast, Ashland. (518) 589-5765.

THE OUTDOORS Twilight World of Bats 7pm-9:30pm. Learn about bats found in our area. $3-$6. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320. Dancing with the Stars 9pm-10pm. Outdoor trip through the little known wonders of the August heavens, with emphasis on our place in the expanding universe and its greatest mysteries. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SPOKEN WORD Tom Daddario and 3 Guys From Gotham 9pm. Comedy. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595.

THEATER

FILM

I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change 8pm. Up in One Productions. $22/$20 seniors. Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. 687-5263.

Summer Projection Series 7:30pm-10pm. Live music and outdoor screening. Fovea Exhibitions, Beacon. 765-2199.

GALLERY Collages of Diana Levinson Eckert Fine Art, Kent, Connecticut. (860) 927-0012.

KIDS Children’s Flamenco Classes Call for times. 3 class series. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611. Thomas Edison: Man of the Millennium Call for times. Schenectady Museum & Suits-Bueche Planetarium, Schenectady. (518) 382-7890.

WORKSHOPS

Children’s Workshop: My Own Book 10:30am-12pm. Harness Racing Museum, Goshen. 294-6330.

Acrylic Painting for Beginners 10am-12pm. $30. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

The Magic of Derrin Berger 11am. $6/$7 children/ $8/$9 adults. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

SATURDAY 9 AUGUST ART Michelle Rhodes Summer Pottery Sale 9am-9pm. Deep Clay, New Paltz. 255-8039. Otis Arts Festival 9am-4pm. Artists represent all forms of media. Farmington River Elementary School, Otis. (413) 269-0220. Annual Windham Summer Art Fest 10am-4pm. Call for location. (518) 734-3366. Regional Exhibition 2008 2pm-4pm. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Betty Sturges (1913-2003): A Retrospective 4pm-6pm. Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, Woodstock. 679-2940. Secret Garden 5pm-7pm. Yumiko Izu. Galerie BMG, Woodstock. 679-0027.

Dancing on the Air 8pm. Jay Ungar & Molly Mason WAMC broadcast. Linda Norris Aud., Albany. (518) 465-5233, ext. 4. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Eric Erickson 8pm. Singer/songwriter. Gilded Otter, New Paltz. 256-1700. Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Ramsey Lewis 8pm. Jazz piano. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344. Russian Musical Treasures 8pm. Pleshakov Piano Museum, Hunter. (518) 263-3333.

MUSIC Prokofiev and His World Call for times. Music performances, lectures, panel discussions. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Roots of Woodstock Festival Panel Discussion and Sound-Out 12:30pm. Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Phil Butta of The Last Rights 2pm. Contemporary. The Dubliner, Poughkeepsie. 454-7322. Jesse Lage 2pm-4pm. Cajun accordionist. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786. The Rhodes 3pm. Rock. The Anchor Pub, Wappingers Falls. 297-3330.

EVENTS German Alps Festival Call for times. Hunter Mountain, Hunter. 1 (800) HUNTERMTN. Summerfest-Anglers’ Market-Jubilee Day 8:30am-4pm. Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum, Livingston Manor. 439-4810. Ellenville Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Market and Center Street, Ellenville. 647-5150. 2008 Rosendale Farmers’ Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467. Beacon Corn Festival 12pm-5pm. Hudson River Waterfront, Beacon. 496-5617.

KIDS

Upstate Reggae 25th Anniversary Party & History of Reggae 9pm. Jamaica’s own Starcade Sound System. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Kids’ Camp Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 205.

Tift Merritt 9pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300.

Prokofiev and His World Call for times. Music performances, lectures, panel discussions. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900.

Tom Goss 9pm. $7. Griffs, Poughkeepsie. 471-8913. Hyngd 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

THE OUTDOORS Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables Hike— Gertrude’s Nose 9:30am-4pm. Strenuous 9-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

MUSIC

Mellifluous Franz and Foxy Igor 2:15pm. Saratoga Chamber Music Festival. $35.50-$41.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Borromeo Quartet with Michael Klotz 4pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. 2008 Music Omi International Musicians Residency Program Concert 5pm. Art Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4568.

Nuclear Lake Hike 9:30am. Call for location. 452-9086.

The Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200.

How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

The Rhodes 5:30pm. A Fragile Tomorrow, The Big TakeOver, RatBoy, Legion, Tomorrow’s Alibi. The Chance Theater, Poughkeepsie. 486-0223.

Butterflies and Moths 11am. Learn about the life cycles of butterflies and moths. $5/$3 members. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall-onHudson. 534-5506 ext. 204.

SPOKEN WORD Book Signing and Reading with Matthew J. Spireng 1:30pm. Hurley Heritage Museum, Hurley. 338-5253. Contagion 2pm-4pm. Borders Books and Music, Middletown. 695-2233. Woodstock Poetry Society Meeting and Festival 2pm. Featuring Gretchen Primack and Philip Pardi. Woodstock Town Hall, Woodstock. 246-8565.

THEATER

West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Dark Wood 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Shantala Shivalingappa 5pm. Classical Indian dance and music in the quicksilver Kuchipudi tradition. $29/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

A Call to Peace 11am-3pm. Annual peace ceremony and celebration. World Peace Sanctuary, Wassaic. 877-6093 ext. 205.

Donizetti’s Don Pasquale 7:30pm. $25/$22 seniors and students/$15 children. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272.

Short Play Festival 8pm. Works by the ASK Playwrights Lab. $10. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

A Maverick Mini-Festival: Great Viennese Quintets 6pm. St. Lawrence String Quartet with David Ying, cello. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Christine Lavin 8pm. Comedy. $25/$20. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Galaxy Entertainment: Summer Magic 7:30pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

Souvenir 8pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

Stockholm 59° North 2pm. Soloists of the Royal Swedish Ballet. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Three Neighborhood Churches 10:30am-12pm. Second Saturday Walking Tour. Springfield, Massachusetts.

Almost Obscene 5pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Menopause the Musical 8pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

DANCE

Concert for World Harmony 6pm. Featuring Premik Russel Tubbs and friends. Woodstock Community Center, Woodstock. 797-1218.

Preserving Dance Traditions 4pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Hudson Athens Lighthouse Tour 11am-4pm. $20/$10. Waterfront Park, Hudson. (518) 822-1014.

9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Dickey Betts & Great Southern 6pm. $20/$25/$100. Cantine Field, Saugerties. (800) 594-8499.

Native American Pow Wow 10am-6pm. Celebrating, drumming, dancing, and eating. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469.

Perfect Picnic 1pm-3pm. Taste samples of Executive Chef Ross Fraser’s favorite picnic cuisine, discover “best kept secret” picnic locations, and take home our staff’s favorite picnic recipes. Emerson Inn and Spa, Mount Tremper. 688-7900.

The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411.

Menopause the Musical Call for times. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Young Man from Atlanta 2pm. Presented by Horton By the Stream. Outdoor Summer Theatre, Elka Park. (518) 589-5383. Almost Obscene 5pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. The Odd Couple 7pm. Presented by the Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286. Divas on the Delaware 7:30pm. Program of favorite opera highlights by Verdi, Puccini, Mozart, and others. $25/$22 seniors and students/$15 children. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272. West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Souvenir 8pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667. Dark Wood 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change 8pm. Up in One Productions. $22/$20 seniors. Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. 687-5263.

WORKSHOPS Intensive Oil Painting 10am-1pm. En plein air. $70. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Eating for Energy 11am. Nourishing Wisdom series. Kingston Farmers’ Market, Kingston.

SUNDAY 10 AUGUST ART Plein Air Painting Call for times. Kierman Farm, Gardiner. 457-2787. Michelle Rhodes Summer Pottery Sale 9am-9pm. Deep Clay, New Paltz. 255-8039.

Steve Kaiser and Friends 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595. Breakaway 6pm. Latin. Thomas Felton Community Park, Modena. 883-6022. Second Sunday Songwriters Series 7pm. With Pal Shazar, Maria Sebastian, and Kathleen Pemble. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Greg-Stock: A Benefit for Greg Bucker 7:30pm. $10. The Chance Theater, Poughkeepsie. 486-0223. Robyn Hitchcock 8pm. Singer-songwriter. Linda Norris Aud., Albany. (518) 465-5233, ext. 4. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Red Rooster, Banjo Jack and Andy Laird 8pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. Deep Listening Band 20th Anniversary 8:30pm. $25. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 338-5984.

THE OUTDOORS Canoe Trip to Upper and Lower Goose Ponds 8am-12pm. $25/$20 members. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320. Beacon to Pollepel Island 8am. Beacon Railroad Station, Beacon. 297-5126. How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. The Fourness of Things 10am-12pm. Understand how Native Americans solve problems using the four directions. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469.

THEATER West Side Story 3pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Mozart’s Don Giovanni 7:30pm. Based on the character of Don Juan, the most notorious womanizer in literature. $25/$22 seniors and students/$15 children. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272. Teens on the Green Acting Classes 2pm-3:30pm. $12/$45. Woodstock Reformed Church, Woodstock. 679-4561. Obituaries 2pm. Featuring Bob Balogh. Micro Theater, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 442-2223. Souvenir 2pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667. Young Man from Atlanta 2pm. Presented by Horton By the Stream. Outdoor Summer Theatre, Elka Park. (518) 589-5383. I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change 2pm. Up in One Productions. $22/$20 seniors. Quimby Theater, Stone Ridge. 687-5263. Dark Wood 2pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. Menopause the Musical 2:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Annual Windham Summer Art Fest 10am-4pm. Call for location. (518) 734-3366.

The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

CLASSES

Music Omi Outdoor Concert 5pm. Art Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4568.

Tango Argentino Classes Call for times. $6-$70. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 255-8212.

The Odd Couple 7pm. Presented by the Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286.

Mark Raisch

Atelier-Figure Painting

Almost Obscene

8/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

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8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

WORKSHOPS Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001. Life Drawing 10am-1pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. You Can Be Happy No Matter What 10am-6pm. $150. Sheila Pearl’s Office, Newburgh. (203) 303-5990.

MONDAY 11 AUGUST

KIDS Drop In For Some Fun 9:30am-11:30am. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. Funky Fashions Camp for Girls Only 1pm-3pm. Art camp for ages 6-16. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Dog on Fleas 9pm. Children’s music. Mohonk Mountain House, New Paltz. 255-1000.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

MUSIC

Summer Yoga on the Lawn 6pm-7:15pm. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-onHudson. 265-3638.

Allman Brothers Band 6:30pm. $25-$79. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

CLASSES

Jim Photoglo & Craig Bickhardt 8pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Collage Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Movement Classes for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12 class/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Drawing and Painting 9am-12pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Moving Fundamentals for Adults 12pm-1:30pm. $15 class/$80 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Acting for the Camera 6pm-9pm. Casting director Jenny O’Haver teaches how to hone acting skills to the camera. $25/$100 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 528-6728.

DANCE Swing Dance Classes Call for times. Various levels offered. $60/4 weeks. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

KIDS Hudson Community Book Group Call for times. Ages 5 and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Movement Class for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Teen Photo Camp Call for times. Ages 13-17. Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock. 679-9957.

Community Music Night 8pm-9:45pm. Six local singer-songwriters. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048. Timeless Masterpiece 8pm. Saratoga Chamber Music Festival. $35.50-$41.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Summer Artist Slide Lectures 7:30pm. Eugenie Barron, Kyla Luedtke, Nicole Dul and Olivia Antsis. Women’s Studio Workshop Gallery, Rosendale. 658-9133.

EVENTS Perseid Meteor Event 12pm-4pm. Schenectady Museum & Suits-Bueche Planetarium, Schenectady. (518) 382-7890. Chess for Adults 2pm-4pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145. Green Drinks 6:30pm-9pm. Networking session for people in the environmental fields, sustainably-minded, and ecocurious. Terrapin Catering, Staatsburg. 454-6410.

FILM Shall We Dansu? 8pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/08

CLASSES

Dark Wood 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

WORKSHOPS Program on Patent Law 7pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

FRIDAY 15 AUGUST

CLASSES

Create Abundance, Peace, & Health 6:30pm-8:30pm. A class based on spiritual healing and Pathwork. Flowing Spirit Healing, Woodstock. 679-8989.

Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Scene study/technique. $90/month. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154.

CLASSES

Life Drawing 7pm. No materials or instructor provided, just a live model. $4 to $8. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348.

DANCE

Rhythm Tap Dance Classes 5:30pm. Introduction to the art of sound and movement taught by Stefanie Weber. $50/ 5 classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 281-6734.

Intro to Kabbalistic Healing: A Framework for Living a Healed Life 6pm-8pm. Miriam’s Well, Saugerties. 246-5805.

West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Flamenco Levels I & II 1pm-3:30pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611.

Celtic Session 7:30pm. Traditional Irish music. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900.

Flamenco Levels I & II 1pm-3:30pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611.

THURSDAY 14 AUGUST

Souvenir 7:30pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

Svaroopa Yoga 5:30pm-7pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Beginner Pilates Mat Workout 6:30pm-7:30pm. $119. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

CLASSES

Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Taking up the Green Practice Path 8/15-8/17. Buddhist environmental activism. Zen Mt. Monastery, Mt. Tremper. 688-2288.

MUSIC

TUESDAY 12 AUGUST

Souvenir 7:30pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

THEATER

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Drawing, Painting, and Composition 6pm-9pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Western Papermaking: Cotton, Flax Abaca, and Non-Traditional Papers Call for times. Women’s Studio Workshop Gallery, Rosendale. 658-9133.

Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Signs and the Language of Photography 7pm. $5. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Drawing, Painting, and Composition 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Clowning Magic 101 Camp 3pm-5:15pm. Ages 7-14. $89. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

WORKSHOPS

The Odd Couple 2pm. Presented by the Durham Irish Repertory Theater. $15. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286.

SPOKEN WORD

Advanced Yoga 9:30am. Wen Barn and Gardens, Accord. jeffdavis@ centertopage.com.

Watercolor Painting 9am-12pm. $220/8 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Figurative Clay Sculpture 1pm-4pm. $166/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Poetry Open Mike 7pm. Featuring Susan Lewis. $4. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

THEATER

Sunset Sensations 5:30pm-7:30pm. Wine and food sampling series. Locust Grove Historic Site, Poughkeepsie. 454-4500.

Introduction to Watercolor 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

ART

Sprouts Summer Arts Program 10am-11:45am. Ages 3-7. Catskill Community Center, Catskill. (518) 943-3400.

SPOKEN WORD

Poetry Reading by Renato Rosaldo and Javier Huerta 7:30pm. The Hudson Valley Writers’ Center, Tarrytown. (914) 332-5953.

Body / Mind / Spirit

The Art of Playmaking Camp 9:30am-4:30pm. Ages 11-16. $235. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Open Mike and Vinyl Showcase 10pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Easy Paddle on the Esopus 11:30am. Saugerties Village Beach, Saugerties. 255-7671.

Acrylic Painting Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

WEDNESDAY 13 AUGUST

Drawing for Painting 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Open Mike Music 10pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

THE OUTDOORS

Presenting Dance 5pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Eckhart Tolle Silent Meetings and Meditation Call for times. Call for location. 687-8687.

Impressionism with Oil 10am-12pm. $150. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Martha and The Boys 8pm. Saratoga Chamber Music Festival. $35.50-$41.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

SPOKEN WORD

After-Hours Mixer 5:30pm-7:30pm. $5/free for NPRCC members. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Circus Theatricks Camp 9am-3pm. Ages 7-14. $285. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Judi Silvano Quartet 8pm. Turning Point Cafe, Piermont. 359-1089.

Bearaoke 9pm. With Miss Angie. The Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Swing Dance Classes Call for times. Various levels offered. $60/4 weeks. Boughton Place, Highland. 236-3939.

Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636.

Open Mike Night 9:30pm. Sign-up at 8:30 p.m. Tess’ Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

SPOKEN WORD

All-Terrain Tracker Camp 9am-4pm. Ages 7-12. $169. SUNY Ulster, Stone Ridge. 339-2025.

Summer Sing 7:30pm. Mendelssohn, Elijah with professional soloists, Gwen Gould director. $10/$8. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

126

Footloose 8:30pm. The Tent at PS/21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Kate Weare Company and Maureen Fleming 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet 8pm. $58/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Woodstock Farm Festival 4pm-8pm. Farm products, children’s activities, live music, and gardening advice. Maple Lane, Woodstock. 679-7618. You Wanna Play? 7pm. Scrabble and other board games, food, and fun. Russ’s Country Cafe, Phoenicia. 688-2337.

FILM Surfwise Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Bolt 2pm. Bolshoi In Cinema. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Storytelling & Art-Making 10am-11am. Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany. (518) 463-4478. Snack Attack 11am. Healthy snack workshops ages 8 and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Yoga for Kids 11:30am-12:15pm. $66. Ashtanga Yoga of New Paltz, New Paltz. 430-7402. City Neighborhoods 1pm-4pm. Ages 13-15, creating art in the City of Albany. $20/$15 members. Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany. (518) 463-4478.

MUSIC Maroon 5, Counting Crows, and Sara Bareilles Call for times. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

DANCE Gallim Dance 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Muddy Lindy 8pm-10pm. Kingston’s Casual Swing Stomp. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet 8pm. $58/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Kate Weare Company and Maureen Fleming 8:15pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Barbecue and Music 5pm. Barbecue 6-7:30pm, music after 8pm. $25/$12 children/$10 music only. Garrison Arts Center, Garrison-on-Hudson. 424-3960. Live Jazz 9pm. Suruchi Indian Restaurant. $10 food/drink minimum. New Paltz. 225-2772.

FILM Surfwise Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. The Wizard of Oz Call for times. Main Stage at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Drop In For Some Fun 9:30am-11:30am. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. Little Wonders of Science: Ladybug Girl 10:30am. Schenectady Museum & Suits-Bueche Planetarium, Schenectady. (518) 382-7890.

Waterways Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced. Beginner jazz and tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 663-7962.

DANCE Cherylyn Lavagnino Dance 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet 8pm. $58/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Kate Weare Company and Maureen Fleming 8:15pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Hudson Valley Ribfest Call for times. $5/children free. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz.

MUSIC Prokofiev and His World Call for times. Music performances, lectures, panel discussions. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Loose Cannon Live! 5pm. Rock It In The Circle series. The Circle, Schenectady. NCM 7pm. Punk, garage, alternative. Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Brian Patneaude Trio 7pm-10pm. Stockade Inn, Schenectady. (518) 346-3400. Celtic Rock Legends The Elders 7:30pm. $16. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636.

MUSIC

Jazz Me Blues 8pm-10pm. Leonard Wagner Park, Putnam Valley. 526-3292.

Jonas Brothers Call for times. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922.

Ken Peplowski #1 Clarinetest 8pm. Jazz. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344.

Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877.

Songwriter’s Circle: An Open Mike 8pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Piet & Ron 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595. United States Military Academy Band’s Jazz Knights 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Dave Gleason Duo 7pm-10pm. Stockade Inn, Schenectady. (518) 346-3400. Open Mike 7:30pm-9:30pm. Joshua’s Java Lounge, Woodstock. 679-5533.

Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. European Extravaganza. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Prezence 9pm. Led Zepplin tribute. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595. Sonny Landreth 9pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. The Afromotive 9pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington. (413) 528-0248.

Piet & Ron 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595.

Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Alpine Symphony Night sponsored by PEF-MBP. $18.00-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Derrick James Quintet 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198.

Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636.

Bar Scott 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Bluegrass Clubhouse 8pm. $5. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636.

Summertimes with David Grover 8pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-8418.

Carol Goodman Call for time. Reading and signing. Oblong Books, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. The Magic of Marin Alsop. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Steve Earle and Allison Moorer 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

Open Mike 7:30pm. $3. The Hudson Valley Writers’ Center, Tarrytown. (914) 332-5953.

Crawdaddy 9:30pm. Cajun, zydeco. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900. DJ Dance Party with Magic Juan 10pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Four Guys in Disguise 10:30pm. Noah’s Ark, Poughkeepsie. 486-9295.

SPOKEN WORD


FILM AT SEA IMAGES PROVIDED

Stills from Peter Hutton’s At Sea, screening at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on August 24.

Sea of Stillness Peter Hutton's films look like still photographs. This is not surprising, given his methodology: Hutton's films are silent, and the camera holds a static position for minutes at a time, allowing events to unfold (or not) within the camera's frame without editing. A truck backs up in the distance. Rain lashes a window. A curious figure approaches the lens. Each shot comprises a mini-film, connected to, but separate from, past and future scenes. Very little happens in a conventional cinematic sense. Hutton, a Bard professor, is considered a film artist rather than a filmmaker—more Lumière than Lumet. Hutton's latest film, At Sea, his most narrative to date, tells the story of the birth, life, and death of a container ship. The opening section is shot at a shipbuilding operation in

Korea, where the massive hulls dwarfs human activity. The middle section is the view from inside a container ship crossing the Atlantic, the vessel a long needle pointed across the waves. The last, most affecting section is of the ship-dismantling operation on the coast of Bangladesh. Barefoot workers with hand tools scuttle like crabs about the beached cargo vessels, tearing apart the hulls of ships for scrap, carrying the ship off a piece at a time, as well as the weight of Hutton's critique of transnational capitalism. At Sea will be shown at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on Sunday, August 24 at 8:30pm, followed by a discussion with Peter Hutton. (845) 876-2515; www.upstatefilms.org. —Brian K. Mahoney 8/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

127


The Rhinecliff Waterfront Committee Town of Rhinbbeck Presents the Fourth Annual

THEATER Almost Obscene 5pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

A day of family fun!

Esopus Creek Puppet Suite 7:30pm. Arm of the Sea Theater. Tina Chorvas Waterfront Park, Saugerties. 246-7873.

The Wizard of Verse 7:30pm. Music of Yip Harburg. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272.

Evenings of Psychodrama 7:30pm. $6/$4 students and seniors. Boughton Place, Highland. 255-7502.

The Merry Widow 7:30pm-9:30pm. Light opera/comedy. $35/ $25 seniors/$15 students. Altamura Center for Arts and Cultures, Round Top. (518) 622-0070.

Souvenir 8pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667. Dark Wood 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Come celebrate the Hamlet of Rhinecliff and our wonderful waterfront resource! For more information, call Jennifer at (845) 876-1125

Mark Raisch 6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411.

Jamie Kay in Concert 7:30pm-9pm. Benefit for Independent Living, Inc. $20/$35 pair. Cornerstone Residence, Newburgh. 565-1162 ext. 242. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. American Roots & Branches Concert Series 8pm. Rufus Wainwright. $35. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845.

Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Philadelphia Orchestra 8pm. Tchaikovsky Spectacular. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

WORKSHOPS

Rennie Cantine & Rip Van Ren 8pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Acrylic Painting for Beginners 10am-12pm. $30. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

SATURDAY 16 AUGUST ART

• LIVE ENTERTAINMENT FOOD • VENDORS • GAMES • CONTESTS • A COAST GUARD BOAT TOUR

Gargerelli 2pm. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595. Bar Scott 5pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Menopause the Musical 8pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

11 am - 4 pm, Rain or Shine!

Mikhail Horowitz & Gilles Malkine 2pm. Performance and book-signing. Village Square Bookstore, Hunter. (518) 263-2050.

Mozart’s Don Giovanni 7:30pm. Based on the character of Don Juan, the most notorious womanizer in literature. $25/$22 seniors and students/$15 children. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272.

West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Saturday, August 16, 2008

Chillin’ and Grillin’ 2pm. Bodles beach bash. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595.

New Paintings by Ruth Shively 4pm-6pm. Park Row Gallery, Chatham. (518) 392-4800. Dogs Days 6pm-10pm. Arts Upstairs, Phoenicia. 688-2142. Solo Exhibition of Photographs by Karen Halverson 6pm-12am. Nicole Fiacco Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-5090.

DANCE Extreme Ballet Call for times. Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Tivoli. 757-5107. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet 2pm. $58/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Kate Weare Company and Maureen Fleming 2:15pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, MA. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Dance Omi Residencies 5pm. Art Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4568. The School at Jacob’s Pillow: Jazz/Musical Theatre Dance 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Two Jazz Diamonds 8pm. 75th birthday celebration—David “Fathead” Newman, Curtis Fuller, Cedar Walton, Rufus Reid, Jimmy Cobb. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. 1 (800) 942-6904 ext. 344. Woodstock Legends IV 8pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. Big Kahuna 10pm. Dance music. Ramada Inn, Newburgh. 564-4500. Statues of Liberty 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

THE OUTDOORS Summer Parks Festival 9am. Scavenger hunts, quests, croquet, kickball, live music, dancing, refreshments, games, and raffles. Poets’ Walk, Red Hook. 473-4440 ext. 117. Moonlight Walk 7:30pm. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. Walk When the Moon is Full: Family Fun 7:30pm-9pm. Explore the fields and forests of Spring Farm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SPOKEN WORD Discussion and Book Signing: The Dancer Within 4pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

’Til The Cows Come Home 7pm. Saugerties Democratic Committee barn dance. Avallone Farm, Saugerties.

Amy Goldman Call for time. Reading and signing. Oblong Books, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet 8pm. $58/$10 youth matinee. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

THEATER

Fluer-de-lis and Apian Way 8pm. $15. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Menopause the Musical Call for times. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Kate Weare Company and Maureen Fleming 8:15pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Young Man from Atlanta 2pm. Presented by Horton By the Stream. Outdoor Summer Theatre, Elka Park. (518) 589-5383.

EVENTS

First Looks 2pm. Staged readings of new plays—Her Fault Only. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Hudson Valley Ribfest Call for times. $5/children free. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. Kingston’s History Tour Call for times. 18th-century cooking, crafts, and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786. International Celtic Festival Call for times. Traditional and popular Celtic bands, bagpipe competition, caber tossing, authentic Celtic products. Hunter Mountain, Hunter. (800) HUNTERMTN. Civil War Encampment and Activities Weekend Call for times. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786.

The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Esopus Creek Puppet Suite 7:30pm. Arm of the Sea Theater. Tina Chorvas Waterfront Park, Saugerties. 246-7873. West Side Story 8pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Souvenir 8pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667. Dark Wood 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Hudson Valley Ribfest Call for times. Organized by the Highland Rotary Club. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz.

Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Pakatakan Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326.

WORKSHOPS

Riverside Farmers and Artisans Market 10am-2pm. With live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. Hurley Corn Festival 10am-4pm. $3. Hurley Reformed Church, Hurley. 331-4121.

FILM Bolt 5pm. Bolshoi In Cinema. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Little Wonders of Science: Ladybug Girl 10:30am. Schenectady Museum & Suits-Bueche Planetarium, Schenectady. (518) 382-7890.

Painting Glowing Still Lifes 10am-1pm. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Transform Fear to Power 10am-6pm. $150. Sheila Pearl’s Office, Newburgh. (203) 303-5990. Solar Power and Electronic Arts 2pm-5pm. Students ages 12 and up will learn about renewable energy and do-it-yourself electronics. Catskill Community Center, Catskill. (518) 943-4950. Painting Water En Plein Air 2pm-5pm. $50. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613. Energy Efficient Renovation + Construction for Residential Structures 7:30pm. Forum and discussion with simple tips and whole hog solutions. Town of Bedford Courthouse, Bedford Hills.

Alice in Wonderland 11am. $6/$7 children/ $8/$9 adults. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

MUSIC

For additional festival info call 845-647-4620 www.wawarsingny.net 128

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/08

Prokofiev and His World Call for times. Music performances, lectures, panel discussions. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Young People’s Concert 11am. Marilyn Crispella. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217.

SUNDAY 17 AUGUST Art Plein Air Painting Call for times. Kierman Farm, Gardiner. 457-2787.

CLASSES Tango Argentino Classes Call for times. $6-$70. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 255-8212.


Atelier-Figure Painting 9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Cartooning Camp 1pm-3pm. Art camp for ages 6-11. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Kayak Skills Class 9am. With Hudson River Paddle. Plum Point, New Windsor. 457-4552.

WORKSHOPS

MUSIC

Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001.

Jens Wennberg 8pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Life Drawing 10am-1pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Annie & The Hedonists 8pm. Linda Norris Aud., Albany. (518) 465-5233x4.

Intro Lecture on Bees and Organic Beekeeping 11am-1:30pm. $25. Sustainable Living Resource Center, Rosendale. 255-6113.

Vadim Repin and Nikolai Lugansky 8pm. Saratoga Chamber Music Festival. $35.50-$41.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

DANCE Kate Weare Company and Maureen Fleming 5pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Swing Dance Jam 6:30pm-8pm. Beginner lesson at 6pm. $5. White Eagle Hall, Kingston. 339-3032. A Jazz Happening 8pm. Celebration of the art of Broadway jazz dance. $100. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Hudson Valley Ribfest Call for times. Organized by the Highland Rotary Club. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. International Celtic Festival Call for times. Traditional and popular Celtic bands, bagpipe competition, caber tossing, authentic Celtic products. Hunter Mountain, Hunter. (800) HUNTERMTN. Civil War Encampment and Activities Weekend Call for times. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786.

Watercolor Intensive 1pm-1pm. $70. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

MONDAY 18 AUGUST Body / Mind / Spirit Summer Yoga on the Lawn 6pm-7:15pm. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-onHudson. 265-3638.

CLASSES Movement Classes for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12 class/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Drawing and Painting 9am-12pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Hudson Valley Ribfest Call for times. $5/children free. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz.

Moving Fundamentals for Adults 12pm-1:30pm. $15 class/$80 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Ellenville Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Market and Center Street, Ellenville. 647-5150.

Acting for the Camera 6pm-9pm. Casting director Jenny O’Haver teaches how to hone acting skills to the camera. $25/$100 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 528-6728.

Round Top Car & Bike Show 8am-5pm. Antique cars and bikes. Riedlbauer’s Resort, Round Top. (518) 622-9584. 2008 Rosendale Farmers’ Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467. Butterfly Garden Tour and Talk 10am-12pm. With Maraleen Manos-Jones, The Butterfly Lady. With a talk Butterfly Stories, Myths, & Garden Tips. Butterfly Gardens, Shokan. 657-8073.

MUSIC Prokofiev and His World Call for times. Music performances, lectures, panel discussions. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Temple Dudes 2pm. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595. Orchestra of St. Ignatius Loyola 4pm. This concert celebrates the return to the former Federated Church of its original 1880s Palace pump organ. $20. Cragsmoor Historical Society, Cragsmoor. 647-6487. Amernet String Quartet 4pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. Cloudnyne 5pm. Dance. Gully’s, Newburgh. 565-0077. Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. Steve Kaiser and Friends 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595. Riverbank Banjo Band 6pm. Latin. Thomas Felton Community Park, Modena. 883-6022. Jazz in the Hudson Valley Call for time. Marlena Shaw, Maurice Brown Effect, more. Hudson Valley Resort, Kerhonkson. 384-6350. America 7pm. $80/$60/$55 Mahaiwe members. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Jess Klein 8pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394.

THE OUTDOORS Five Mountains In Five Days: Hiking The Catskill Peaks Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA’s Straus Center Inn, Claryville. 1 (800) 454-5768. Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables Bike and Hike—Stony Kill Falls 9:30am-3:30pm. Meet at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve Upper Lot, New Paltz. 255-0919. How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

THEATER

The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Almost Obscene 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

ART Watercolor Painting 9am-12pm. $220/8 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

Flamenco Levels I & II 1pm-3:30pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611. Drawing, Painting and Composition 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Scene study/technique. $90/month. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154. Life Drawing 7pm. No materials or instructor provided, just a live model. $4 to $8. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 499-9348.

DANCE LEVYDance 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Muddy Lindy 8pm-10pm. Kingston’s Casual Swing Stomp. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881. Trey McIntyre Project 8pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Keigwin and Company 8:15pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Barbecue and Music 5pm. Barbecue 6-7:30om, music after 8pm. $25/$12 children/$10 music only. Garrison Arts Center, Garrisonon-Hudson. 424-3960. Live Jazz 9pm. Suruchi Indian Resturant. $10 food/drink minimum. New Paltz. 225-2772.

KIDS Hudson Community Book Group Call for times. Ages 5 and up. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

Figurative Clay Sculpture 1pm-4pm. $166/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Movement Class for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

Casablanca Call for times. Main Stage at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

Drawing for Painting 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

Sprouts Summer Arts Program 10am-11:45am. Ages 3-7. Catskill Community Center, Catskill. (518) 943-3400.

Married Life Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

Drawing, Painting and Composition 6pm-9pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

KIDS

Kids Who Write & Teens 2 1pm-4pm. Writing workshop by Angela Batchelor. $125. Our Savior Lutheran Church, Fishkill. (914) 420-4522.

DANCE

Auditions for Robin Hood 3pm. Missoula Children’s Theatre. $7. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-4101.

Swing Dance Classes Call for times. Various levels offered. $60/4 weeks. Boughton Place, Highland. 236-3939.

FILM

Drop In For Some Fun 9:30am-11:30am. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

MUSIC Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877.

MUSIC

Keigwin + Company 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Celtic Session 7:30pm. Traditional Irish music. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900.

Trey McIntyre Project 8pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, MA. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

Matt Jordan’ Big Band 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198.

Summer Sing 7:30pm. Verdi, Requiem with professional soloists. $10/$8 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

EVENTS

Pat DiCesare Trio 7pm-10pm. Stockade Inn, Schenectady. (518) 346-3400.

Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Graham Parker & Mike Gent 8pm. Singer-songwriters. Linda Norris Aud., Albany. (518) 465-5233, ext. 4. Alla Hungarese With Pianist Yuja Wang 8pm. Saratoga Chamber Music Festival. $35.50-$41.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

Woodstock Farm Festival 4pm-8pm. Farm products, children’s activities, live music and gardening advice. Maple Lane, Woodstock. 679-7618. You Wanna Play? 7pm. Scrabble and other board games, food, and fun. Russ’s Country Cafe, Phoenicia. 688-2337.

FILM The Pharaoh’s Daughter 2pm. Bolshoi In Cinema. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

Open Mike and Vinyl Showcase 10pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Edge of Heaven 7:45pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

SPOKEN WORD

KIDS

Poetry Open Mike 7pm. Featuring Carol Graser and Allen Midgette. $4. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Storytelling & Art-Making 10am-11am. Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany. (518) 463-4478.

WORKSHOPS

MUSIC

Silkscreen Monoprint Call for times. Women’s Studio Workshop Gallery, Rosendale. 658-9133.

Piet & Ron 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595.

The Late Light Workshop 2pm-Friday, August 22, 8pm. $400. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

TUESDAY 19 AUGUST

Rhythm Tap Dance Classes 5:30pm. Introduction to the art of sound and movement taught by Stefanie Weber. $50/ 5 classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 281-6734.

Donizetti’s Don Pasquale 3pm. $25/$22 seniors and students/$15 children. Delaware Valley Opera, Narrowsburg. 252-7272.

WEDNESDAY 20 AUGUST

THURSDAY 21 AUGUST CLASSES

Floorcloth Workshop 10am-12pm. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

Teens on the Green Acting Classes 2pm-3:30pm. $12/$45. Woodstock Reformed Church, Woodstock. 679-4561.

Menopause the Musical 2:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir, or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) Call for times. Led by Iris Litt. $60/$15 per session. Call for location. 679-8256.

CLASSES

Flamenco Levels I & II 1pm-3:30pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611.

Dark Wood 2pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

WORKSHOPS

Swing Dance Classes Call for times. Various levels offered. $60/4 weeks. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Innisfree Gardens Walk 1pm. Innisfree Gardens, Millbrook. 373-8202.

Young Man from Atlanta 2pm. Presented by Horton By the Stream. Outdoor Summer Theatre, Elka Park. (518) 589-5383.

Summer Artist Slide Lectures 7:30pm. Roni Henning, Tatana Kellner, and Laura Moriarty. Women’s Studio Workshop Gallery, Rosendale. 658-9133.

DANCE

CLASSES

Souvenir 2pm. StageWorks, Hudson. (518) 822-9667.

Turning Genes On and Off 7pm. Catherine Klein, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine. $3. It’s All Good Restaurant, Newburgh. toby.rossman@nyumc.org

Svaroopa Yoga 5:30pm-7pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

West Side Story 3pm. Up In One Productions. $22/$20 children and seniors. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Obituaries 2pm. Featuring Bob Balogh. Micro Theater, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 442-2223.

SPOKEN WORD

Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Lithography Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

EVENTS Dutchess County Fair 10am. Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck. www.dutchessfair.com. Chess for Adults 2pm-4pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

FILM Edge of Heaven 2:45pm. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. High Society 8pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

KIDS Toddlers on the Trail Walk—In Search of Native Americans 10am-12pm. Meet at Spring Farm Trailhead, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Sumi Tonooka Trio 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Hothouse Flowers 8pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. Midsummer Night’s Dream 8pm. Philadelphia Orchestra. $18.00-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Open Mike Night 9:30pm. Sign-up at 8:30 p.m. Tess’ Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

SPOKEN WORD About Face Call for time. Reading and signing. Oblong Books, Rhinebeck. 876-0500. Business Luncheon 12pm-1:30pm. Presented by NPRCoC. $18/$25. Elsie’s Place, Wallkill. 895-8975. The Photos of Lindquist and Lundqvist 5pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

THEATER Drama-Rama Reader’s Theater 7pm. End-of-summer family theater program produced and performed by teen volunteers. Bethlehem Public Library, Delmar. (518) 439-9314. Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Don’t Step on the Cracks 8pm. 5 Flights Theater Company. Byrdcliffe Barn, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Piet & Ron 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595.

Open Mike 7:30pm-9:30pm. Joshua’s Java Lounge, Woodstock. 679-5533. Summertimes with David Grover 8pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-8418. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Bluegrass Clubhouse 8pm. $5. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Pitchfork Militia 8pm. Rock. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Repin Returns: 2001: A Space Odyssey 8pm. Philadelphia Orchestra. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Bearaoke 9pm. With Miss Angie. The Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

THEATER Drama-Rama Reader’s Theater 10:30am. End-of-summer family theater program produced and performed by teen volunteers. Bethlehem Public Library, Delmar. (518) 439-9314. Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. The Punishing Blow 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. Rock and Roll Broadway—A Musical Revue! 8pm. $18/$16 children and seniors. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife 8pm. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

FRIDAY 22 AUGUST BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Advanced Yoga 9:30am. Wen Barn and Gardens, Accord. jeffdavis@ centertopage.com.

CLASSES Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced. Beginner jazz and tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 663-7962.

DANCE Swing Dance 8pm. 7:30pm lesson. Live music. $15/$8 students.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

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Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571. GeraldCaselDance 6:30pm. Contemporary. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Trey McIntyre Project 8pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Keigwin and Company 8:15pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Olga Dunn Dance Company 9pm. $15. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Last Saturday Arts, Crafts, & Farmers’ Markets 10am-4pm. Hosted by Safe Harbors of the Hudson. Ritz Theater Parking Lot, Newburgh. 562-6940 ext. 107. The Pharaoh’s Daughter 5pm. Bolshoi In Cinema. GE Theater at Proctor’s, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Drop In For Some Fun 9:30am-11:30am. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Married Life Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

Robin Hood Call for times. Missoula Children’s Theatre. $7. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-4101.

Chatham Real Food Films 7pm. King Corn. Chatham Real Food Market Co-op, Chatham. (518) 392-3353.

Adventures in Science: Reptile Adventure 1pm-3pm. Schenectady Museum & Suits-Bueche Planetarium, Schenectady. (518) 382-7890.

MUSIC

Sudbury School Information Meeting 7pm-8pm. Overview of the school and our educational philosophy. Hudson Valley Sudbury School, Kingston. 679-1002.

Boston Pops Call for times. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. The Kurt Henry Band 5pm. Steelhouse, Kingston. 338-7847. Jack Fragomeni and Steve Laspina Duo 7pm-10pm. Stockade Inn, Schenectady. (518) 346-3400. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. The Planets Night 8pm. Philadelphia Orchestra. $18-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Two Dark Birds 9pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-3394. Four Guys in Disguise 9pm. SkyTop Steak House, Kingston. 340-4277. Sarah Perrotta & the Virginia Wolves 9pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. The “The Band” Band 9pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. Anthony Nisi 9pm. Acoustic. Quiet Man Pub, Wappingers Falls. 298-1724. Voodelic 9:30pm. Blues. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900.

SPOKEN WORD Swing Dance 7pm. Instruction by Olga Dunn, Olga Dunn Dance Company. $10/$8. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

THEATER

Wild Plants of the Mohonk Preserve 9:30am-12pm. Includes 2-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. Painting Glowing Still Lifes 10am-1pm. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

FILM

FILM

Wet Paint Call for times. Mariner’s Harbor, Kingston. 340-8051.

MUSIC Mountaintop Celebration of Song Call for times. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066. Indian Music Concert Call for times. Vocalist Raka Mukherjee with Ray Spiegeltabla. $20. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

SUNDAY 24 AUGUST Plein Air Painting Call for times. Phillies Bridge Farm, Gardiner. 457-2787.

Watercolor Intensive 1pm-1pm. $70. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

CLASSES

Green Building: Heritage and Future 5:30pm-8pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

Tango Argentino Classes Call for times. $6-$70. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 255-8212. Atelier-Figure Painting 9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

DANCE Trey McIntyre Project 2pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Keigwin and Company 5pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS Ellenville Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Market and Center Street, Ellenville. 647-5150. 2008 Rosendale Farmers’ Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467.

Riverbank Banjo Band 2pm-4pm. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786.

KIDS

The “The Band” Band 7pm. $15. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. A Little Bit In Love 7pm. Cocktail party and cabaret. $45/$18-25 performance only. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066. Jealousy in Opera 7:30pm-9:30pm. Young singers compete in the finals of the Altamura/Caruso study-grants auditions in dramatic love/jealousy scenes from well-know opera. Altamura Center for Arts and Cultures, Round Top. (518) 622-0070. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. A Perfect Gift: All That Is Jazz Dance & Music Revue 8pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-3880.

WORKSHOPS Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001.

Peaches & Wine Party 11am-4pm. Prospect Hill Orchard, Marlboro. 795-2383.

Zuill Bailey, Cello and Simone Dinnerstein, Piano 6pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217.

You Are Cordially Invited 8pm. 5 Flights Theater Company. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

ART

Young People’s Concert 11am. Zuill Bailey, cello. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217.

Mark Raisch 6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411.

8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

Afternoon Show for Kids 2pm-6pm. Music and other performances. Waterfront Park, Hudson.

MUSIC John Lennon Tribute 2pm. Rex Fowler of Aztec Two Step, Joey Eppard of 3, and Tom Benton. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Jealousy in Opera 2pm-4pm. Young singers compete in the finals of the Altamura/Caruso study-grants auditions in dramatic love/ jealousy scenes from well-know opera. Altamura Center for Arts and Cultures, Round Top. (518) 622-0070. Circus, The Ping Pongs, and the Wolfman Jason 2pm-6pm. Waterfront Park, Hudson. Time for Three 2:15pm. Saratoga Chamber Music Festival. $35.50-$41.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330. Mira Quartet 4pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. The Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200.

MONDAY 25 AUGUST BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Summer Yoga on the Lawn 6pm-7:15pm. Boscobel Restoration, Garrison-onHudson. 265-3638.

CLASSES Seeing Color and Light Call for times. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Movement Classes for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12 class/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Drawing and Painting 9am-12pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Moving Fundamentals for Adults 12pm-1:30pm. $15 class/$80 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Acting for the Camera 6pm-9pm. Casting director Jenny O’Haver teaches how to hone acting skills to the camera. $25/$100 for five classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 528-6728.

DANCE Swing Dance Classes Call for times. Various levels offered. $60/4 weeks. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

KIDS Movement Class for Kids and Teens Call for times. $12/$60 series. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

MUSIC Summer Sing 7:30pm. Mozart, Requiem with professional soloists. $10/$8 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Celtic Session 7:30pm. Traditional Irish music. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636.

The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

The Grande Finale 8pm. Philadelphia Orchestra. $18.00-$72.50. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs. (518) 584-9330.

You Are Cordially Invited 5pm. 5 Flights Theater Company. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Vince Gill 8pm. Country. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344.

Crumbs Night Out 7pm. W/Mark Frederick Band, Katie Haverly. Linda Norris Aud., Albany. (518) 465-5233 ext. 4.

Rock and Roll Broadway—A Musical Revue! 8pm. $18/$16 children and seniors. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Harmony Knights 8:30pm. A capella. Bodles Opera House, Chester. 469-4595.

Sgt. Dunbar & the Hobo Banned 7pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Milton With Guest Julia Joseph 9pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300.

Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636.

CLASSES

THE OUTDOORS

Flamenco Levels I & II 1pm-3:30pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611.

Menopause the Musical 8pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469.

Michael Powers and Frequency 9pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington. (413) 528-0248.

Steve Kaiser and Friends 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595.

Tales of the Middlesex Canal 8pm. $12. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Sonando 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

Stretch And Stride: Yoga And Hiking In The Catskills Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 205.

The Punishing Blow 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

South Slope String Band 10pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Family Camp Week Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 205.

The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife 8pm. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

THE OUTDOORS

Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables Hike—Lake Awosting 10am-3pm. Strenuous 7-mile hike. Meet at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve Upper Lot, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SATURDAY 23 AUGUST ART Story Lines 6pm-8pm. Jack Millard. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

DANCE East Durham Irish Feis Call for times. More than 600 Irish step dancers from the NE and Canada compete. Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, East Durham. (518) 634-2286. Introduction to Flamenco 12:15pm-1:15pm. Lecture, dance, and music workshops series. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611. Trey McIntyre Project 2pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Keigwin and Company 2:15pm/8:15pm. $29. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. Boston Tap Company 6:30pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29. A Perfect Gift: All That is Jazz Music and Dance Review 8pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-3880. Noise + Speed 8pm. $15. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893. Trey McIntyre Project 8pm. $58. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, Massachusetts. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

EVENTS

Fahnestock Loop 9:30am. Moderate hike. Call for location. 677-9995. Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables Hike— Compass Rock 9:30am-3pm. Meet at the Coxing Trailhead, New Paltz. 255-0919. How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SPOKEN WORD Peter (Minus Paul and Mary) 4pm. Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, MA. (413) 243-9919 ext. 29.

THEATER Menopause the Musical Call for times. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Willy Wonka 11am. Kids on Stage Performance 2. $6/$7 children; $8/$9 adults. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Don’t Step on the Cracks 2pm. 5 Flights Theater Company. Byrdcliffe Barn, Woodstock. 810-0123. The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. First Looks 5pm. Staged readings of new plays—Not Dead yet. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. Rock and Roll Broadway—A Musical Revue! 8pm. $18/$16 children and seniors. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Tales of the Middlesex Canal 8pm. $12. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

SPOKEN WORD Author Book Readings 3pm-5pm. Featuring John Darnton, Da Chen, and Hillary Jordan. Maple Grove Restoration, Poughkeepsie. 471-9651.

THEATER Teens on the Green Acting Classes 2pm-3:30pm. $12/$45. Woodstock Reformed Church, Woodstock. 679-4561. Famous by Their Birth 2pm. A potent, fast-moving theatrical collage, drawing upon the poetry and remarkable insight of Shakespeare. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Obituaries 2pm. Featuring Bob Balogh. Micro Theater, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 442-2223. The Punishing Blow 2pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. Menopause the Musical 2:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Rock and Roll Broadway—A Musical Revue! 3pm. $18/$16 children and seniors. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Poetry Open Mike 7pm. Featuring Michael Cartucci and CJ Kriege. $4. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

TUESDAY 26 AUGUST Rhythm Tap Dance Classes 5:30pm. Introduction to the art of sound and movement taught by Stefanie Weber. $50/ 5 classes. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, MA. (413) 281-6734.

EVENTS German Summerfest 1pm-7pm. German-American Club of Albany, Albany. (518) 265-6102. Chess for Adults 2pm-4pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

FILM Tuya’s Marriage Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Billy Elliot 8pm. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121. Zombie Film Feast 12-11pm. Brain eating film fiesta. Linda Norris Aud., Albany. (518) 465-5233 ext. 4.

KIDS Nature Strollers 10am. One-hour hike with the tykes. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwallon-Hudson. 534-5506 ext. 204. Clay Camp 1pm-3pm. Art camp for ages 6-11. $100. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

MUSIC Community Music Night 8pm-9:45pm. Six local singer-songwriters. Rosendale Cafe, Rosendale. 658-9048.

SPOKEN WORD Meeting of Kingston Chapter of PFLAG 6:30pm-8:30pm. Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center, Inc., Kingston. 331-5300.

WEDNESDAY 27 AUGUST

The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife 8pm. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

ART

Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

First Looks 5pm. Staged readings of new plays—Voices From the Fringe. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

WORKSHOPS

The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife 8pm. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

Pakatakan Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/08

How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SPOKEN WORD

The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

The Punishing Blow 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123.

Riverside Farmers’ and Artisans’ Market

Family Hiking Club 1pm-3pm. $8/$5 members. Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Outdoor Discovery Center, Cornwall-onHudson. 534-5506 ext. 204.

Open Mike and Vinyl Showcase 10pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342.

Tales of the Middlesex Canal 4pm. $12. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Kingston’s History Tour Call for times. 18th century cooking, crafts, and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing, with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786.

Shawangunk Mountain Wild Blueberry & Huckleberry Festival 9am-4pm. Downtown Ellenville, Ellenville. 647-4620.

130

10am-2pm. With live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400.

Preservation 101: Windows 9am-11am. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Under Milk Wood

Watercolor Painting 9am-12pm. $220/8 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Create Abundance, Peace, & Health 6:30pm-8:30pm. A class based on spiritual healing and Pathwork. Flowing Spirit Healing, Woodstock. 679-8989.


THEATER BLACK COMEDY IMAGE PROVIDED

Laurel Cassillo, Brian Louis Hoffman, and Joel Leffert perform in Peter Shaffer’s “Black Comedy” at the Shadowland Theater in Ellenville through August 10.

In the Dark The theatrical conceit of Peter Shaffer's one-act farce "Black Comedy" (originally performed in 1965) is one of the most clever of the modern theater. Set during an electrical outage, the play begins with the stage and house lights down, but the cast acting as if the lights were on. Almost immediately, a "fuse blows" offstage and the stage lights come up. The actors are now playing as if they were in the dark. They stumble and stagger into the furniture and each other for the remainder of the play as Brindsley (played by Brian Louis Hoffman), the ne'er-do-well everyman, does his level best to keep

his fiancee, mistress, would-be father-in-law, and various others from bringing to light his complex array of lies and schemes. "Black Comedy," by Peter Shaffer and directed by Brian Burke, will be performed at the Shadowland Theater, 157 Canal Street, Ellenville, through August 10. Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 8pm. Sundays at 2pm. (845) 647-5511; www.shadowlandtheatre.org. —Brian K. Mahoney 8/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

131


CLASSES Drawing for Painting 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Figurative Clay Sculpture 1pm-4pm. $166/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Drawing, Painting and Composition 6pm-9pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388.

DANCE Swing Dance Classes Call for times. Various levels offered. $60/4 weeks. Boughton Place, Highland. 236-3939.

EVENTS Woodstock Farm Festival 4pm-8pm. Farm products, children’s activities, live music, and gardening advice. Maple Lane, Woodstock. 679-7618. Columbia County Fair 5pm-11pm. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 392-2121. You Wanna Play? 7pm. Scrabble and other board games, food, and fun. Russ’s Country Cafe, Phoenicia. 688-2337.

FILM Tuya’s Marriage Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Mediterranea 2pm. Bolshoi In Cinema. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Storytelling & Art-Making 10am-11am. Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany. (518) 463-4478.

MUSIC Wet Paint Call for times. Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Piet & Ron 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595. Richard Pryor Jr. 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Asylum Street Spankers 8pm. Linda Norris Aud., Albany. (518) 465-5233x4. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Jennie Arnau 8pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Open Mike Night 9:30pm. Sign up at 8:30 p.m. Tess’ Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

THEATER Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife 8pm. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Don’t Step on the Cracks 8pm. 5 Flights Theater Company. Byrdcliffe Barn, Woodstock. 810-0123. Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

THURSDAY 28 AUGUST ART

THEATER You Are Cordially Invited 5pm. 5 Flights Theater Company. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. Menopause the Musical 7:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Boston Musical Theater: Thou Swell Thou Witty 8pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-0100. The Punishing Blow 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife 8pm. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

WORKSHOPS Wearable Works of Art 10:30am-12pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

FRIDAY 29 AUGUST BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Advanced Yoga 9:30am. Wen Barn and Gardens, Accord. jeffdavis@ centertopage.com.

CLASSES Printmaking 9am-12pm. $140/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Rhythm Songs in Rhythm Tap 5pm-6pm. Beginner to advanced beginner jazz tap taught by Sherry Hains-Salerno. $12. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 663-7962.

DANCE Swing Dance 7:30pm. Lesson at 7pm. $10/$8. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

EVENTS Columbia County Fair 10am-11pm. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 392-2121.

FILM

Artist Salon Featuring Kate McGloughlin 8pm. Muddy Cup, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550

Chris And Don Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT

MUSIC

Food for Thought 6:30pm-8:30pm. Meditation and a three-course meal. $15. Kadampa Meditation Center New York, Glen Spey. 856-9000.

Bill’s Toupee 6pm. Dance music covers. 26 Front Street, Newburgh. 569-8035. Bruce Ackerman & friends 7pm. $7. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Al Haugen Trio 7pm-10pm. Stockade Inn, Schenectady. (518) 346-3400. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, MA. (413) 881-1636. American Roots & Branches Concert Series 8pm. The Robert Cray Band. $35. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Benefit Concert for KTD Monastery and Family of Woodstock 8pm. Featuring Jack DeJohnette, Pat Metheny, and Larry Grenadier. $65/$50/$35. The Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Rags, Blues, and All That Jazz 8pm. The Diamond Jubilators Quartet. $18/$16 children and seniors. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Marc Peloquin: Piano 8pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. Frank Vignola Group With Guest Natalie Amendola 9pm. Towne Crier Cafe, Pawling. 855-1300. The Moonshiners 9pm. Swing, jump, big band. Hyde Park Brewing Company, Hyde Park. 229-8277. The Rhodes 9pm. Classic rock. Muddy Cup, New Paltz. 338-3881. Da411 9:30pm. Funk. New World Home Cooking, Saugerties. 246-0900.

CLASSES Flamenco Levels I & II 1pm-3:30pm. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 255-2611. Drawing, Painting and Composition 1pm-4pm. $130/4 classes. Woodstock School of Art, Woodstock. 679-2388. Acting Class 6:30pm-9:30pm. Scene study/technique. $90/month. Green Zen Salon, Kingston. 679-0154. Life Drawing 7pm. No materials or instructor provided, just a live model. $4 to $8. Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Pittsfield, MA. (413) 499-9348.

DANCE Muddy Lindy 8pm-10pm. Kingston’s Casual Swing Stomp. The Muddy Cup, Kingston. 338-3881.

EVENTS Columbia County Fair 10am-11pm. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 392-2121. Live Jazz 9pm. Suruchi Indian Resturant. $10 food/drink minimum. New Paltz. 225-2772.

FILM The Sound of Music Call for times. Main Stage at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Up The Yangtze Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Drop In For Some Fun 9:30am-11:30am. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

MUSIC Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877. Piet & Ron

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6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595. Saints of Swing 6:30pm-8:30pm. Newburgh Jazz Series 2008. Newburgh Landing, Newburgh. 568-0198. Bobby Massaro Trio 7pm-10pm. Stockade Inn, Schenectady. (518) 346-3400. Open Mike 7:30pm-9:30pm. Joshua’s Java Lounge, Woodstock. 679-5533. Summertimes with David Grover 8pm. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-8418. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, MA. (413) 881-1636. Bluegrass Clubhouse 8pm. $5. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Benefit Concert for KTD Monastery and Family of Woodstock 8pm. Featuring Jack DeJohnette, Pat Metheny, and Larry Grenadier. $65/$50/$35. The Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Bearaoke 9pm. With Miss Angie. The Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

FORECAST CHRONOGRAM 8/08

THE OUTDOORS Labor Day Family Camp Weekend Call for times. Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville. 985-2291 ext. 205.

SPOKEN WORD RIP’s Resurrected 7pm-9pm. Open poetry with Sharon Nichols & David Kime. $3. Mezzaluna Cafe, Saugerties. 246-5306. David Rabe Call for time. Reading and signing. Oblong Books, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

THEATER

(518) 465-3334.

The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Don’t Step on the Cracks 5pm. 5 Flights Theater Company. Byrdcliffe Barn, Woodstock. 810-0123. The Punishing Blow 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. Menopause the Musical 8pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife 8pm. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

THEATER

WORKSHOPS Wearable Works of Art 10:30am-12pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

SATURDAY 30 AUGUST ART Eclectic 5pm-7pm. Group exhibit by Robert Ashley, Paola Bari, Ana Laura Gonzalez, Scott Helland, Jurg Lanzrein, Scott Mayer, Vanessa Muro, and Samantha Stephenson. Le Petit Château, Hyde Park. 437-4688.

EVENTS Kingston’s History Tour Call for times. 18th-century cooking, crafts, and games demonstrated by interpreters in period clothing, with guided and self tours. Senate House State Historic Site, Kingston. 338-2786. Pakatakan Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. Riverside Farmers’ and Artisans’ Market 10am-2pm. With live music. Riverside Market, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. 3rd Ulster Militia Regiment Encampment 10am-3pm. Hurley Heritage Museum, Hurley. 338-5253. Columbia County Fair 10am-11pm. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 392-2121. The Remaking of an Icon: Behind the Scenes at the Jean House 10am-11:30am. Tour of the newly reopened Jean House. $5. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. Woodstock-New Paltz Craft Fair 10am-6pm. Juried crafts fair. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. 679-8087. Wickets and Wine 4pm-6pm. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. Poets at Pine Hill Live 6pm-9pm. Local poet and writer showcase and pot luck dinner. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Labor Day Weekend Party 8pm. Showcases artists new to Mount Tremper Arts and also old friends working on new endeavors. $15. Mount Tremper Arts, Mount Tremper. 688-9893.

FILM Chris and Don Call for times. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703. Mediterranea 5pm. Bolshoi in Cinema. GE Theater at Proctors, Schenectady. (518) 434-1703.

KIDS Drop In For Some Fun 9:30-11:30am. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

MUSIC Sugar Shack Burlesque Call for times. Club Helsinki, Great Barrington. (413) 528-0248. Journey, Heart, and Cheap Trick Call for times. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. The Maverick Chamber Players 6pm. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. Mark Raisch 6pm-9:30pm. Babycakes Cafe, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411. John Street Jam 7pm. Featuring Dorraine Scofield. John Street Jam at the Dutch Arms Chapel, Saugerties. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Chris Isaak 8pm. Singer/songwriter. Belleayre Mountain, Highmount. (800) 942-6904 ext. 344. Creation 8pm. Dance music. La Puerta Azul, Millbrook. 677-2985. Tom Pacheco 8pm. $15. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. The Rhodes 9:30pm. Mulligan’s Irish House, Poughkeepsie. 486-9044. Stone Devil Hill 10pm. The Firebird Lounge, Rhinebeck. 876-8686.

THE OUTDOORS Mohonk Preserve Singles and Sociables Hike—Mine Hole 9am-3:30pm. Strenuous 8-mile hike. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. Walking the Dogs 9:30am-12pm. Easy 4-mile hike, dogs welcome. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919. How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

SPOKEN WORD The Power of Animals 10am-12pm. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Jennifer Mackiewicz on Michael Heizer 1pm. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100. Mike Epps and Friends 8pm. Comedy. $39.95-$49.95. Palace Theater, Albany.

Menopause the Musical Call for times. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Willy Wonka 11am. Kids on Stage Performance 2. $6/$7 children; $8/$9 adults. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. You Are Cordially Invited 2pm. 5 Flights Theater Company. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. First Looks 5pm. Staged readings of new plays—Listening to Elizabeth. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. Highlights from the Footlights 8pm. Gilbert & Sullivan Musical Theater Company. $18/$16 children and seniors. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Punishing Blow 8pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife 8pm. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. Under Milk Wood 8pm. Walking the Dog Theater. $20/$15 members. PS21, Chatham. (518) 392-6121.

SUNDAY 31 AUGUST ART Plein Air Painting Call for times. Phillies Bridge Farm, Gardiner. 457-2787.

BODY / MIND / SPIRIT Eckhart Tolle Silent Meetings and Meditation Call for times. Call for location. 687-8687.

CLASSES Tango Argentino Classes Call for times. $6-$70. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 255-8212. Atelier-Figure Painting 9am-12pm. $120-$300. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 689-0613.

DANCE Dance Omi Open Day Show 3pm. Art Omi International Arts Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4568.

EVENTS Ellenville Farmers’ Market 9am-2pm. Market and Center Street, Ellenville. 647-5150. 2008 Rosendale Farmers’ Market 9am-3pm. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. 658-3467. Woodstock-New Paltz Craft Fair 10am-6pm. Juried crafts fair. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. 679-8087. Columbia County Fair 10am-11pm. Columbia County Fairgrounds, Chatham. (518) 392-2121. Olde Hurley Guided Walking Tour 2pm. $3. Hurley Heritage Museum, Hurley. 338-5253.

MUSIC Carlos Jimenez 12pm. Jazz. Taste Budd’s Chocolate and Coffee Cafe, Red Hook. 758-6500. Friends of Maverick Concert for Donors 4pm. Featuring the American String Quartet. Maverick Concert Hall, Woodstock. 679-8217. Bar Scott 5pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. The Summer Sunset Concert Series 5:30pm. Riverfront Bandstand, Cold Spring. 265-3200. Steve Kaiser and Friends 6pm. Maggie’s in the Alley, Chester. 469-4595. Soundpool, Old Toy Trains, Venture Lift 7pm. The Colony Cafe, Woodstock. 679-5342. Capitol Steps 8pm. Musical satire group. Olmsted Manor, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 881-1636. Maya Ensemble 8pm. Uniquely compelling combination of flute, harp, and percussion, performing classical, new music, and world music. $18. Doctorow Center for the Performing Arts and Film, Catskill. (518) 263-2066.

THE OUTDOORS Canoe Trip to Buckley Dunton Lake 9am-12pm. $20/$15 members. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, Lenox, Massachusetts. (413) 637-0320. How Did the Rope Get Up There? History and Practice of Gunks Rock Climbing 11am/1pm. Mohonk Preserve, New Paltz. 255-0919.

THEATER Teens on the Green Acting Classes 2pm-3:30pm. $12/$45. Woodstock Reformed Church, Woodstock. 679-4561. The Punishing Blow 2pm. Byrdcliffe Theater, Woodstock. 810-0123. Obituaries 2pm. Featuring Bob Balogh. Micro Theater, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (413) 442-2223. Menopause the Musical 2:30pm. $46/$41. Capital Repertory Theater, Albany. (518) 445-7469. Highlights from the Footlights 3pm. Gilbert & Sullivan Musical Theater Company. $18/$16 children and seniors. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Tempest 5pm. Woodstock Shakespeare Festival. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007. The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife 8pm. Comeau Property, Woodstock. 247-4007.

WORKSHOPS Plein Air Painting Workshops 9:30am-1pm. Call for location. 728-4001.


ART IMPASSIONED IMAGES

IMAGE PROVIDED

Mothers, Käthe Kollwitz, woodcut, 1922

The Bold and Die Brücke As Nosferatu crept his long-nailed fingers around the frame of the doorway in F. W. Murnau’s 1922 film of the same name, little did the vampire realize that he was ensconced in an influential artistic movement. German Expressionism sought to change society with the power of art—its surreal and exaggerated artistic forms were a rebellion against the constraints of a materialistic society. Though the early-20th-century movement is primarily associated with film, expressionism began with painting and emerged in many art forms: sculpture, literature, drama, stage design, dance, and woodcut. Woodcuts from the movement will be exhibited at Vassar College’s Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center from August 22 though October 26 in “Impassioned Images: German Expressionist Prints.” The exhibit begins chronologically, with images from the first expressionist community to emerge in Germany in 1905 Berlin, Die Brücke (The Bridge), a name that indicated the group’s faith in the art of the future, which their work would provide passage toward. The group of mostly self-taught artists—founded by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Erich Heckel, and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff—sought inspiration from primitive art, in particular, the woodcut. Their dramatic color contrasts and bold, simple forms often blended foreground figures with the backgrounds, defying academic standards of craftsmanship and traditional ideas of illustration. “So many of these artists did rebel and confront what they considered to be a stifling society, so they felt compelled to create worlds that were lively and vital and rebellious,” explains Patti Phagan, the Philip and Lynn Straus curator of prints and drawings at the Loeb. A prime example of the style of this group is the bold and abstract Head of a Woman (1916), Schmitt-Rotluff’s black-and-white woodcut on wove paper in which a woman’s face “has been reduced to a set of crude geometric shapes—a tribal mask rather than a portrait,” as described by critic John McDonald.

As the exhibit progresses, it features works from Die Brücke’s successor, Der Blaue Reiter (Blue Rider), which lasted until the beginning of World War I. Founded primarily by Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc, artists in the movement were not as united stylistically as a group than Die Brücke. Their art ranged from the colorful abstractions of Kandinsky (The Archer, 1908) to the romantic imagery of Marc. But all the artwork produced in this group maintained the focus of expressing spirituality through art. The exhibit concludes with works from two groups that merged after the war in 1919, the Arbeistrat fur Kunst (Working Council for Art) and Novembergruppe (November Group), as well as the group Neue Sachlichkeit (new objectivity). The artists in these movements, affected by their personal wartime experiences and societal upheaval, often depicted urban and industrial scenes. Images from these groups include workers shaking their fists (George Grosz, Life after World War I), and a huddled crowd of frightened mothers, produced after the artist’s son was killed in World War I (Käthe Kollwitz, Mothers, 1922). In response to these images, expressionism and almost all modern art was suppressed by Hitler’s Third Reich in the 1930s, as the “degenerate art” was seen as a propaganda tool of an inferior race. “Impassioned Images,” a traveling exhibit from Syracuse University, will be on display at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center August 22 until October 26. An opening reception will be held on Friday, September 5. Following the reception will be a lecture by Barbara C. Buenger, a specialist in 20th-century German art history. (845) 437-5632; http://fllac.vassar.edu. —Amy Lubinski 8/08 CHRONOGRAM FORECAST

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Planet Waves

EMIL ALZAMORA

BY ERIC FRANCIS COPPOLINO

Bucky Fuller: This Is the Future

L

ast month I was writing Daily Astrology & Adventure, describing the helpless feeling that I think most of us have when we’re considering how serious the world situation is. Some names came to mind of people who were not scared or paralyzed, but rather who viewed the future as an opportunity to do things better. Buckminster Fuller developed and refined the geodesic dome during the summers of 1948 and 1949, when he worked at Black Mountain College in North Carolina. One man who saw what was coming and was unfazed by the looming crisis of too-rapid growth, dwindling resources, and overcrowding was Buckminster Fuller. I linked to his Wiki page, and for a couple of days I mentioned his name around my neighborhood. I could only find one or two people who had even heard of him—and neither knew who he was or what he contributed. Imagine if a scientist from the late 21st century dropped in on our lives today, and could see our current ecological and economic problems clearly, with the wisdom and sense of perspective of the future. Imagine that he knew the solutions as if they had already been worked out, and had withstood the test of time. That was Bucky Fuller. He was born Friday, July 12, 1895, so his 113th birth anniversary just passed last month. He shares a birth year with Dane Rudhyar, Rudolph Valentino, Jeddu Krishnamurti, and Carl Orff. Oh, and J. Edgar Hoover, the eternal boss of the FBI. The year of his birth was also the year of the first prediscovery photograph

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of Chiron, which not surprisingly is one of the most interesting planets in his chart: a hint at the holistic consciousness to come, when Chiron was discovered in 1977 and the acceptance of Fuller’s ideas was at its peak. Fuller was a Cancer with the Sun conjunct Jupiter. His job, as he viewed it, was to be a pragmatic steward of the world. He had large ideas; he was the grandfather of the sustainability movement. But while he was at it, he reinvented the world, proposing and designing such concepts as tsunami-resistant floating cities. “I am not optimistic or pessimistic,” he wrote in 1983. “I feel that optimism and pessimism are very unbalanced. I am a very hard engineer. I am a mechanic. I am a sailor. I am an air pilot. I don’t tell people I can get you across the ocean with my ship unless I know what I’m talking about.” This, to me, is his Saturn in Scorpio talking: the sober recognition that engineers hold people’s lives in their hands, but also that mind is a malleable substance. “Bucky’s foremost concern was to find ways to ‘do more with less’ and to use resources most efficiently to serve humanity,” according to Black Mountain College, where he taught in the summers of 1948 and 1949. “He invented the term ‘Spaceship Earth’ to encourage people to see the entire world as one interdependent system. During his life and career, Fuller was awarded 25 US patents, wrote 28 books, received 47 honorary doctorate degrees, circled the Earth 57 times consulting and lecturing, and received dozens of major architectural and


design awards along with the prestigious Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in America.” He also had the Sun conjunct asteroid Kassandra, recalling the myth about the prophetess who told the truth but nobody believed her. While he received considerable attention and appreciation for his work toward the end of his life, and even the US government experimented with his ideas, his vision for the future—the sum total of his contribution to what he called Spaceship Earth— largely goes unnoticed, unappreciated, and unutilized. Lately, though, his ideas have been gaining attention once again. This is for one reason, as far as I can tell: We need him. And as the next decade unfolds, we will need him more every day, because he knew how to do more with less, such as less energy, less material resources, and less waste. Everyone has seen at least one example of his engineering—the geodesic dome. They are all over the place, even in cities, drawn into the architecture of sports arenas and amusement parks, for example. There’s a huge one at Disney World (really a sphere), and you might run into one at a botanical garden somewhere. We might be inclined to think that, like the wheel, these domes were invented too long ago to remember who created it, or they are a kitsch reference to some science fiction scenario. While the dome was not invented by Fuller (rather, an engineer named Walther Bauersfeld at Carl Zeiss Laboratories came up with it early in the 20th century), it was named, developed, and popularized by Fuller, who received a US patent for the concept. That patent was issued in 1954 at his second Saturn return, with a simultaneous Jupiter return and Mercury retrograde in Cancer—a positively strange replay of his birth astrology. Fuller was in kindergarten when he discovered that triangles were more stable than squares, tetrahedrons more stable than cubes. This is the basis of the geodesic dome. Fuller has the asteroid Child exactly conjunct Uranus, the planet of inventions, and apparently he started young. “The teacher brought in toothpicks and semi dried peas and told the class to build structures. With his bad eyesight, Bucky saw bulks and had no feeling for structural lines. The other children formed cubes because they were familiar with houses and barns. Fuller relied on different senses and he discovered that the triangle (or tetrahedron) held its shape the best. Tetrahedrons were far more stable than the fragile squares that the other children made. His teacher called everyone around to see the unexpected shape. Bucky was surprised that they were surprised,” according to the classic story, told by Fuller and here stated in the words of Doug Yurchey. Though Fuller is known mostly for the geodesic dome, his inventions reached into every area of life. He concerned himself with inventing comfortable, lightweight housing and with transportation. For example, in 1933 he invented a three-wheeled aerodynamic car that could carry 11 people, travel 130 miles per hour, and get 30 miles per gallon. An accident during a demonstration at the 1933 World’s Fair killed the driver, and the idea along with it (though banks and Chrysler were involved in nixing the idea as well). Today, an average of 41,000 people die each year in four-wheel cars in the United States alone, making this one accident seem statistically irrelevant. It’s an idea we might want to revisit, since soon we will be reminiscing about the quaint old days of $5 a gallon fuel and even the biggest, best SUV gets less than half the gas mileage and holds half the number of passengers. “There are over two million cars standing in front of red lights with their engines going,” Fuller wrote in 1981, shortly after the famous energy crisis of the Carter administration. “Then we have over two million times approximately 100 horsepower being generated as they are idling there, so that we have something like 200 million horses jumping up and down and going nowhere. Now, we have to count that in our economy when we begin to get down to what is the efficiency of the economy.” Let’s take a closer look at Fuller’s chart and see if we can find any clues about these ideas. To me, the first thing that really stands out—once you get past the Sun/ Jupiter/Kassandra conjunction in Cancer, and his friendly Pisces Moon, is that Bucky had Mercury retrograde. It was retrograde in Cancer, square Chiron, a setup that might make you wonder if the person can do anything other than feel; that is, whether they can even think at all. This is the image of someone who dances to the beat of his own drummer (a classical interpretation of Mercury

retrograde), but it’s also the picture of someone who intuits his ideas rather than thinks them. This is a little like Einstein (another strong watery type, with Cancer rising and a Pisces Sun). The retrograde and its position in Cancer gives us a clue as to Fuller’s wellknown need to be recognized as a genius by those around him. I called up my old friend and teacher Dave Roell at the Astrology Center of America and he commented, “It’s about looking for someone to say you’re okay.” However, it speaks volumes about how environmentally sensitive he was; and why he felt that we had to change the environment rather than change ourselves, or rather, as a means to changing ourselves. Mercury is in a close conjunction with the asteroid Niobe. In the Greek myths, Niobe is known as one who was proud of her 14 offspring, even considering herself superior to Leto, who had birthed the twins Apollo and Artemis (the Sun and Moon). Martha Lang-Wescott writes in The Orders of Light, “The essence of Niobe’s lesson can be found where there is pride and ego investment in fertility, virility, ancestry, creativity or creative products”—but she says it goes a lot further. In Cancer, with Mercury so prominent, this is emotionally motivated. Retrograde, Mercury amounts to a need for nurturing as a child, or a calling to master the lesson of self-nourishment. We might ask, “Well, what else is new on the planet?” but Bucky seems to have turned that around into a passionate drive to take care of the world. (Ceres in the first degree of Capricorn, square the Aries Point, is another illustration of this need to nourish others with his practical concepts.) His Mercury placement, which creates a kind of intellectual insecurity, served as a driving force, and appropriately enough, it is retrograding into a close square with Chiron. I think of Mercury-Chiron contacts as having a savant quality. You think you’re less intelligent than you are; you have an intense mind, but sometimes it feels broken, and you can’t always see past the pseudo intellectual performances of the world, or you feel like a fake. (I don’t think Fuller had quite that problem, but like many people who get a lot done and make a real contribution, he clearly doubted himself more than you would imagine.) Barbara Hand Clow observed Mercury-square-Chiron people tend to be highly intuitive, but also express a real degree of mental exactitude. She says some of them can basically manifest things with their minds. Fuller did plenty of that, working without a corporate-sponsored laboratory, a benefit enjoyed by many modern inventors. Opposite that, Mercury is opposite the asteroid Industria in Capricorn. He was not the darling of industry. His ideas were too efficient. Industry is about profit and waste. Fuller’s ideas centered on economy. “Pollution is nothing but the resources we are not harvesting. We allow them to disperse because we’ve been ignorant of their value.” He knew history. At one time, gasoline, benzene, and chlorine were all considered industrial waste products. Fuller was born in the late 19th century, at the tail end of the Pluto-Neptune conjunction. In our era of history, there have been three notable outer planet conjunctions: Neptune conjunct Pluto in the 1890s; Uranus conjunct Pluto in the 1960s; and Uranus conjunct Neptune in the early 1990s. It is very unusual to have so many outer planet conjunctions so close together (in this case, within one century), and it speaks of the bizarre, even insane acceleration of “progress” that humanity is making in these decades. Pluto takes the visionary and intuitive gift of Neptune and focuses it like a laser. Notably it is in Gemini, the sign of the mind. And along with Pluto, we have an extra message from the asteroid belt—Sphinx conjunct Pluto, exact to the degree. Pluto is an evolutionary driving force; indeed, the unstoppable force. Sphinx talks about a mystery that is too old to understand. Nobody even knows how old the Sphinx is, who put it there, what it means, or what it’s for. To me, the asteroid Sphinx points us to what we really cannot understand but which is standing three steps outside our door. So was Bucky a visitor from the past, or from the future? Or was he a sensitive guy with a great mind who, like other notable inventors (Ben Franklin comes to mind), was more interested in progress than in profits? “We are called to be architects of the future,” he once said, “not its victims.” Additional Research: Rachel Asher, Tracy Delaney, Nick Dagan Best, and the Buckminster Fuller Institute. 8/08 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 135


Horoscopes August brings a pair of eclipses; this happens twice a year, each year always a couple of weeks earlier than the prior one. Eclipses bring a break in continuity and they help us set patterns and cultivate the future in a direct, immediate, and dependable way. For starters, we have a total eclipse of the Sun in Leo on August 1, then a partial lunar eclipse in Aquarius on August. 16. The Leo total solar eclipse is pretty extraordinary, in part due to the fact that solar eclipses in this sign have been quite rare in recent decades. Also, a few hours after the Moon eclipses the Sun, it eclipses Mercury. So we have the image of the seed of a new idea in a new era of time, which is predicated on closing a chapter and forgetting an old idea. Often, we want to welcome the new without letting go of what is old, what no longer works or no longer has a purpose. Keep your eyes open for developments on both sides of that equation. By the time of the Aquarius Full Moon and lunar eclipse on the 16th, this idea can develop into a full-on vision for what is possible—and mind you, that may mean embracing the reality of something that seemed unlikely or impossible just yesterday.

ARIES (March 20-April 19) What we humans don’t quite get yet (as a group; some individuals get it) is that the way into the other is through the self. If this same quality seems to trap us, it’s only because we’re not going deep enough. All you have is yourself, that is, as your perceptual tool and experiential vehicle to journey through your life; through consciousness. You are being summoned to surrender to this truth. The paradox is that if you let go fully into yourself as the vessel through which you experience existence, you must acknowledge that at some point, sooner or later, this vessel will cease to be. And from one particularly potent angle, the experience of surrender to creativity, to love, or to erotic pleasure implies its opposite, which from our point of view in ego consciousness is “nonexistence.” What all these things have in common is surrender. Right below the surface of whatever you are doing is an invitation to yield to it fully. This means letting go of the blocks you hold to full self-awareness; and this, in turn, will put you in contact with the world and the people in it.

TAURUS (April 19-May 20) This month’s total solar eclipse in your fourth solar house (dwelling places, security, emotional well-being, father) will call you closer to your true home. You may also be met with the fear of uprooting, of losing your comfort zone, or of having your delicate sense of security challenged in some way. It is difficult to imagine on this side of a threshold that life will somehow be better as a result of it. Indeed, it may seem impossible to do so. Yet change is the one thing that we can count on. The reason you don’t have to worry about any one aspect of your stability is because your entire being rests on a greater certainty, something so vast you may not even be aware of it. This is a surety that transcends the normal fluctuations of the world, the rise and fall of fortunes, and the waves of belief or disbelief in ourselves. Events this month will go a long way toward connecting you to the deeper reality within yourself. The changes themselves will connect you with your more authentic sense of confidence and presence in the world; indeed, from where you stand now, there is no other way to get there.

GEMINI (May 20-June 21) You are fi nding the strength to focus, and it is fi nding you. Yet the odd quality of this is the lack of effort involved. You are going beyond your usual ideas of what constitutes success or good work. You are devoted to quality in much of what you do, yet there is the associated idea of glory that gets in your eyes like the Sun obscuring what would otherwise be a clear view of your objective. It is difficult for you to weed out your need to excel from your need to be the best; and since we can never really be the best in this world, it is a need that often has the quality of taking more than it gives in return. You now have the opportunity to get some relief from that particular quest and immerse yourself in ideas for their own sake, and their expression for its own sake. You have an unusual opportunity to draw yourself into the vortex of an idea that you resonate with entirely, so that you may express it with your full being. It has nothing to do with your sense of recognition, and this, in turn, may allow you access to an idea you’ve carried around for a very long time but did not express because you feared it was too different or too dangerous to be accepted.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) The planets may be beckoning you to focus on money, and I agree with this theory of the August 1 total solar eclipse in Leo. If astrology means anything, you are positioned to be one of the wealthiest people you know. Indeed, you may already be so. You may eschew material wealth, and you may shun being seen as materialistic, in exchange for what you know are far more important and overlooked values. Yet, at the least, you need to think of yourself as resourceful, and as one who has resources that are there for the benefit of, and to be made available to, others. Our society suffers from an obsession with money,

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Horoscopes which leads to an unnoticed secondary problem: the overshadowing of other resources we have but fail to use. The most important one is feeling good about ourselves. We typically fail to see how this is the soul quality that makes anything else we may possess into something meaningful; the quality that, above all else, draws the positive flow of energy toward us. You are now at a crux point in your relationship to yourself. You have the magnificent option of being able to go through an inner door of authentic self-acceptance, which will in turn allow you to feel and see the gift you have, and indeed are, to the world.

LEO (July 22-August 23) You have endured a long night which has tested your strength, your endurance, and, moreover, your faith in yourself. You have come through not only alive, but liberated of a sense of burden that you carried around for an unthinkably long time. I suggest you take not a moment but rather every moment you remember to thank yourself for having passed through this series of rather incredible trials. I’m sure that you sense your life has plenty of room for improvement, so you might not want to soak too deeply in gratitude. You may also fi nd yourself in a new state of crisis at this very moment, but it’s more like an aftershock than an earthquake. Having completely rearranged the landscape of your life during the past three years, the ground is taking some time to settle. The improvements you are seeking will arrive; not by accident, not by luck, but rather, as a result of your willingness to do what is so often considered the least desirable thing in the world: and that is change. One of the reasons for this reluctance, on a structural level, is that it can seem to threaten our relationships. But your relationships are also changing. Someone close to you is maturing, growing, and evolving in ways that you would not believe at first, if you could see them clearly. Soon enough, you will, though remember: Part of what is implied by growth is independence.

VIRGO (August 23-September 22) Having just passed through and recovered from your latest phase of wild uncertainty, you may not be particularly welcoming of another spell of dangling on the edge. Yet if nothing else, you seem poised to travel a path of radical independence for a while longer. Your agenda includes many ideas about yourself that you seem determined to let go of. You may have places that you need to let go of. You surely have people you are letting go of—and you can credit most of this to the miracle of Saturn in your birth sign. Unless, of course, you’re not experiencing it as a miracle; in which case you will need to depend on the determination of Mars. Yet both of these planets are saying you must be easier on yourself. In some respects they are saying you don’t have a choice. It is clear that from long years of being conditioned with the idea that “you are out of control,” you can go to some extreme measures to demonstrate that control. And you can, in turn, push people pretty hard to go along with that belief; and, sooner or later, they will yield to your will. But in the scheme of things, you might ask: Does this really improve your life? Does it improve the world? Control is never a remedy for fear.

LIBRA (September 22-October 23) You tend to look to the world outside you for your sense of identity more than you would care to admit. Everyone has read in self-help and psychology books that the locus of identity is within; that love comes from within first; you’ve only read it in this column about 111 times. Yet it is the placement of Leo in your chart that gives me a clue, and now we are under the effects of a profound eclipse in this sign, highlighting the theme. There are a number of possibilities for how you may respond to this. The most obvious, and superficial, is a sense of alienation. The next level would be a kind of wrestling match about whether you are ready to accept yourself enough not only to cease caring about what other people think, but also to completely transcend the issue. By the power of your own unconditional self-acceptance, you would in a sense compel people to accept you as you are. Deeper still is the revelation of what we all have in common: that the whole notion of “difference” as it is projected onto social (so-called) reality is a farce, the job of which is to perpetuate alienation (mainly to sell things). You don’t need that, and neither do the rest of us.

SCORPIO (October 23-November 22) Those who succeed in this world always have a story to tell, and usually it’s not the story you expect. If you’ve ever read a biography, you know what I am talking about. Making your way to excellence is never just wine and roses. Many people we respect have struggled so much, and worked so hard for so long, that you might ask yourself if it was even worth it all. The journey is different for everyone. You, in particular, cannot follow anyone else’s way right now; but that is good news, because the way that is unique to you is opening wide. Though it is clearly not the whole story, there is something in your chart about understanding your vision of what success means, and doing so in very specific ways. There is something distinctly personal

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Horoscopes speaking through your chart right now, and the more personal you get, the closer you will come to breaking through to experiencing the feeling tone of success. Here is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;lessonâ&#x20AC;? in a nutshell. Success is a feeling; it is the feeling of allowing yourself to be, without fighting the experience. It is the feeling of embracing your authority, and knowing that it consists mainly in making decisions rather than avoiding them.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 22)

*OWFTU$PO­EFOUMZ

These are ambitious days for you. It seems, though, that you have been grappling with an unusual struggleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;too narrow of a focus. I suggest you keep it up, even if you feel like you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite embrace the usual far-reaching quality of your life. You are, at this stage, doing crucial work to establish your knowledge base and reputation. Please trust me when I say that this is a genuinely rare opportunity, and it is one that you need. It is a missing experience: working through the day-to-day details of building your sense of presence in the world, and commanding a measure of self-respect. Events of this month will give you a glimpse of what is possible. You may be wondering how youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to get from here to there. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about that part: focus specifically on being here; focus on making sure that you are known for what you do, and that in those circles you focus on being known for doing it well. The overall message of the astrology is that if you focus on the task at hand, you will notice that a window to much greater potential opens up. If you take a clear look at that potential, it will keep its potency, and give you something to work toward.

CAPRICORN (December 22-January 20)

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Your instincts and intuition need to be on high alert. You need to see every opportunity with a sense of caution, and every potential danger as a sense of opportunity. The two have one thing in common, which is the necessity for change. The kinds of transactions that you encounter now will have the feelings of points of no return. There are more of these in life than we care to admit. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t usually see them for what they are, we tend to drag in a lot of fear, and in general we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t respect the passage of time. I suggest you put your focus on all of these things. I suggest you also take this opportunity to understand the nature of commitments and exchanges, each on an individual level. You may see that there are some people in your life who want to get out of commitments, or who do so quite successfully; you may decide there are things that you are fi nished with and want to move on from, and you will very likely have your opportunity. The questions to keep asking are, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is this really me? Does this circumstance reflect who I am?â&#x20AC;? If the answer is no, you have your passport to revise the situation radically, or to move on.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February 19) The world is opening for you. While you must be feeling this already, and are likely to be responding in significant ways, you may have no idea the extent or depth of what exists beyond the dimensional gateway that is swinging open to welcome you inside. Depending on your background, your ideas about life, and how you feel about this inevitable process called growth, you may be more or less scared; more or less consumed with a sense of adventure. I suggest you welcome all that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re experiencing: the light of it, the shadow, and the occasional gray area. When most people think of a spiritual path or a journey to healing, what comes to mind is love and light. This is perhaps an improvement over the hellfire and damnation we are so accustomed to taking as spirituality, though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the whole story. If we stay in relationship to our fear, we stay that much more firmly rooted on our soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calling. I am not saying that fear is the calling of the soul; rather, that fear needs a voice, and granted that, the voice of love can speak. The voice of encouragement can speak, and the guide toward some unusual, even oceanic potential can lead you to yourself, permitted by the light of your wide-open mind.

PISCES (February 19-March 20) Pisces are capable of getting a lot of work done. Yet the theme of your life is the pattern of your work, and fi nding the necessary balance between effort, achievement, and well-being. A truly brilliant solar eclipse in your sixth solar house comes with several messages. One is that your health is your greatest wealth. This is the time to value, embrace, and protect that form of cosmic wealth. Another relates to your habits. You have seen the benefits of improving your daily rituals relating to work, health, and making sure that your form of happiness is on your own agenda at all times. The prolonged visit of Uranus in your birth sign is pushing you to notice and, in turn, claim your existence in a greater way every day. I suggest you use the truly impressive eclipse of the Sun as a way to establish the patterns you want to set in your life, and these include what I will call patterns of nourishment. It is clear that you must do what you must do; that the time has come to devote yourself to what you dream of the most often, even if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fully believe in it. If astrology means anything, you will get a sign that it believes in you.

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cafe

@

MUDDY CUP KINGSTON SATURDAY AUG 16

8PM FREE

Enjoy great performances and art, with coffees, teas, pastries, and wines

MUSIC

VON ROBINSON & HIS OWN UNIVERSE

STEPHEN DODGE

Courtesy BCB Art Hudson

VISUAL ART

RODNEY ALAN GREENBLAT

SPOKEN WORD

in Kingston’s most comfortable cultural venue. Third Saturday monthly.

8/08 CHRONOGRAM PLANET WAVES 139


Parting Shot

Migrating Birds, Mary Lou Oliveira, 2007

On an early evening last fall, Mary Lou Oliveira was in her cottage in rural Columbia County when she heard an incredible noise outside in the trees. The architect grabbed her digital camera—a Canon Power Shot SD300—and took two shots of the thousands of birds that were huddled in her backyard trees. As suggested by her husband Paul Buckhurst, she entered the photo on the last day of submission for Scenic Hudson’s first annual online photo contest. Oliveira’s photo was one of over 2,500 photos submitted, with categories including “Scenic Hudson Parks,” “Valley Landscapes and Communities,” “Wildlife,” “People Connecting with Nature,” and “Farmland.” The exhibit “Capturing the Magic of the Hudson River” will showcase a collection of the top 100 photos at the Muddy Cup in Poughkeepsie on Friday, August 8 through August 31. An opening reception will be held on August 8, from 6 to 8pm. All photo entries can be viewed online on the Scenic Hudson website. The organization will also be sponsoring a Parks Festival to occur at five different parks on August 16. www.scenichudson.org. —Amy Lubinski

140 CHRONOGRAM 8/08


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Chronogram - August 2008  

A regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of New York's beautiful Hudson Valley. - August 2...

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