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Architecture Design Studio Summer Semester - Tongji University Prof. Wei Wei, Prof. Qu 17 Week Project

CHERYL GOURLEY CHRISTIAN WAGNER

Yu House

KTVacation


PROJECT STATEMENT BRIEF: The renovation and energy saving design of Yu-House in Pudong Yu-House was built in the early decade of 20th Century with a brick-wood mixed structure, belonging to the early Western-Chinese style in Pudong. The building land area is approximately 447 square meters; the building area is 375 square meters. The composition was ‘San He-Courtyard’ with Chinese style wood windows inside and western wall decoration outside. In 2002 the Yu-House was announced as a conservation building of Pudong. CHALLENGES: The challenge was to correctly handle the house with conservation strategies and a rational program, following the principles of authenticity, integrity, continuity, and sustainability. The house was to meet the requirements of comfort and energy saving. The future function needs to accommodate a salon or exhibition space, and a small accommodation function. The building design life is 30 years, fire resistance rating is three, and earth quake protection rate is seven. METHOD: - To fulfill the requirements of archliberal development design - To acknowledge basic principles and methods of energy saving design - To work out doable comprehensive renovation plan with energy saving target - To integrate sustainable strategies into a comprehensive renovation design of a traditional Chinese house (e.g., Natural Ventilation, Daylight design, insulation, electrical power saving, water saving, etc.) - Roof and wall material selection and their thermal value calculation


CONTENTS

THE FIELDWORK site visits THE PRECEDENTS uk, new orleans, LEED THE CLIMATE

shanghai

THE CONCEPT KTVacation THE DESIGN architecture THE SUSTAINABILITY summer and winter THE CONTEXT

neighborhood design


Yu House Site Visits

FIELDWORK


1.0 Field Research 1.1 The Shikumen Typology The traditional Shikumen typology of Shanghai has a few defining characteristics. Shikumen literally means Stone Gate (often mixed with Eastern and Western characteristics), a gate one needs to pass by in order to access the sites. The neighborhood blocks are organized in Lilongs, or parallel alleyways. Commercial small businesses are found on the exterior periphery of these neighborhoods, and relatively small primary access grant access into the public sphere of the housing blocks. These streets then partition off into alleyways, and the resulting houses are designed such that the kitchen is the most public space in the house. A typical house is comprised of an entrance (usually designed to be the kitchen, public space), a central room, and then a back room (perhaps the living quarters). These apartments are usually 3-4 meters wide and about 15 meters long, meaning that the central living space is rather dark, as the windows are only found in the short ends of the housing units. This morphology is then multiplied in the form of row-houses throughout the traditional neighborhood. Walls: Wood Crossmembers Stucco (confirm) between beams Interior Paint – White Roofs: Layered system - Cylindrical Structure, long, spaced 1.5-2 meters apart Short cross-members, spaced 15-20 cm Wooden Planks long White stucco (impermeabilization) above Black tiled roof shingles Interiors: Dark wood, engravings, detailed Chinese Work Imagery of traditional housing (“High Class”) Semi-private patitions between spaces Interior lighting adjusted, post-reconstruction HVAC painted dark, to recede into space


The Existing Yu House Plans and Elevations


1.2 Xintiandi Xintiandi is an exclusive commercial center in close proximity to Huaihai Lu, one of Shanghai’s designated shopping areas. The whole area was marked for reconstruction in 1996. The Luwan District Government, with the help of Shui on Group of Hong Kong, drew up a masterplan for Taipinqiao redevelopment in a desire to turn this rundown area into a modern commercial and residential district that keeps the features of old Shanghai. Today, Xintiandi covers 30,000 sq meters of land. Built in the 1930’s most of the Shikumen houses were in a state of disrepair. 2,800 families (or 8,000 people) lived originally in this neighborhood. The treatment of each Shikumen building in Xintiandi took into consideration its historical, aesthetic and commercial values. Most of the Shikumen buildings were residential premises. In order to make them fit for their intended purpose, some had to be rebuilt. The developer obtained original construction drawings from the archival files, then worked out the preservation and restoration. The old Shikumen houses had very little modern utilities - not even toilets. In some areas, the developer had to dig almost 9 meters below the ground in order to bring new utilities into the buildings. In other words, the “old” Shikumen buildings in Xintiandi are mostly “brand new.” Originally built in 1925, one Xintiandi is a classic example of nearly complete preservation. Every architectural detail was faithfully restored and the interior was modified to suit the needs of modern living. Today, the building serves as the clubhouse of the Shui On Group, the main investor of Xintiandi. We concluded that Xintiandi has more weaknesses than successes. On one hand one needs to take into consideration the challenges of rapid commercialization while simultaneously finding a happy balance to preserve the traditional lifestyle. Xintiandi does not preserve the lifestyle. One could therefore not feel the culture, as there was a lack of detail that actually is representative of Chinese people living in these neighborhoods. There is blatant replication, of which we thought was untrue to the identity of the space. On the other hand, Xintiandi is a new landmark neighborhood in Shanghai, and is truly a unique prototype in the Shanghai landscape. Its centrality in relation to the city is also a positive factor, which contributes to the capitalist economic model. The big question was: does Xintiandi fit in the Chinese context?


Design Concept for Xintiandi’s Preservation Total Preservation

European Style Exterior Preserved

Partial Preservation

Exterior Walls and Roofs maintain appearance

Complete Reconstruction

Exterior Walls and Roofs maintain appearance

Structure Reinforcement

Structure Reinforcement Replace wood with Steel

Completely new structure, interior finishes

New Flooring Foundation Reinforcement

New Flooring Foundation Reinforcement

New Flooring New Foundations

Atrium created to give flexible space for performance

New Functions

9 meters deep

Utilities (Gas Water Fiberoptics)

Courtyard covered in glass to allow for air-conditioning and all-season use


1.3 Sinan Mansions The “Sinan Mansions,” on is a new ‘adaptive reuse’ development in the heart of the French Concession. If Xintiandi is meant for Shanghai’s Elite, then Sinan Mansions is meant for Shanghai’s hyper-Elite. The complex consists of boutique “guesthouses” that rent for 40,000 RMB/day (about EUR4000/ day), and come with a butler service. Guards and gates were found at the entrance, where 49 4-storey traditional European-style mansions are scattered amid a landscape of greenery. As the first phase was completed in October 2010, we have yet to see the future successes and failures of this development. The Sinan Mansions were originally built in the 1930’s. This gated community today shares a space with a hotel, commercial and office retail space. It is a new symbol of luxury, with condominiums and corporate villas. Located at Sinan Lu, in the Luwan District, it was phasesd from 2010-2011, and the total area is 544,000 sq. ft. It took a while to satisfy the government planners, the relocated residents, and the architects who lifted each building off the ground, tore out the old foundation, and replaced it with a new one. They even deconstructed a building and rebuilt it, brick by brick, at a 90-degree angle to its original position.


Design Concept for Sinan Mansions: Relocation

http://www.smartshanghai.com/blog/1680/Big_Developments_Sinan_Mansions.html


1.4 Taikang Lu - Tianzifang Taikang Lu has historically been difficult to find and is still as of 2009 largely hidden from the neighbouring streets, as it grew from the inside of the block outward, although there are now shops on Taikang Lu itself. Historically Lane #248 was a key entrance that, in order to gain access to the commercially developed area, required walking about 50m through whilst be surrounded by local residents’ life, including bicycles, hanging laundry, etc. until finally emerging in the ‘new’ area. (en.wikipedia.org) Comparing Tianzifang to Xintiandi, for example, one can see that they are both recaptured residential spaces converted into commercial space. Xintiandi, on one hand, was developed by foreigners, and designed to cater for the “high elite” of Shanghai, starting in the mid 1990’s. Tianzifang, on the other hand, was not designed, but rather ‘recaptured’ by artists, small store owners, and mixed with middlepriced restaurants, essentially built from the inside outwards. The allure of Xintiandi is how pristine everything feels (aka Disneyfication), whereas Tianzifang’s charm lies in its disorganization. While walking through Tianzifang, I noticed that the area also bears host to some residential facilities in floors above the ground plane, suggesting that there is a limit imposed in terms of how much commerce is allowed into the space rather than simply evacuating the existing residents. For one to experience the ‘Local Culture’ of the region of Xintiandi, however, one merely needs to cross the street and approach one of the alleyways the lead into traditional residential quarters. Timeline: 2005 - Slated for Demolition 2005/06 - Protests (Including Artists) 2005/06 - Government rezones area 2007 - Media spreads the word Today - Over 200 stores, tourism


Design Concept for Taikang Lu - Material Reutilization, Modernization, Renovation


1.5 Conclusions The aging structures arguably will not last much longer in the Shanghai landscape. Although rich in Culture, it seems the notion of ‘culture’ is not a driver in the decision making process of those with capital. The attempt of preserving the ‘culture’ in Xintiandi created an environment that detracts the very people that used to occupy these dwellings (and they are planning to recreate Xintiandi in its image in Pudong, adding to the Disneyfication of ‘culture’). The Sinan Mansions are now situated behind a gate guarded by 3 guards, and therefore have lost the allure of being within the public sphere (is this the future of the Shanghai ‘culture’). Tianzifang, on the other hand, has been inspired by artists that have adopted the space and made it into a cultural space of its own, but have also lost some of the defining characteristics of the Lilong neighborhoods. Perhaps Shanghai’s future “culture” is one of creating regional and global connections.

Least Intrusive Do Nothing

Total Preservation

Most Intrusive Partial Preservation

Renovation

Relocation

Modernization

Deconstruction

Replication

Demolition


Least Intrusive Do Nothing

Total Preservation

Most Intrusive Partial Preservation

DISNEYFICATION COMMERCIALIZATION Private Investors (e.g., Xintiandi)

Renovation

Relocation

Modernization

SOMETHING NEW

Citizen Participation (e.g., Tianzifang) Cultural Heritage + Modern Identity of China

Deconstruction

Replication

Demolition

CULTURAL IDENTITY

HERITAGE CONSERVATION

Government Officials (e.g., Zhujiajiao)


Yu House Typology

PRECEDENTS


FLOOR PLAN

NORTH SIDE

FLOOR PLAN

2.1 Precedent Research - No. 9 House Make it Right - Kieran Timberlake Associated New Orleans, Louisiana Single-family residential, Community 1,520 ft2 (141 m2) Urban setting Completed September 2008 USBGC LEED for Homes v.1 --Level: Platinum

1 2 3 1 4 2 5 3 6 4 7 5 8 6 9 7 8 9

COVERED PORCH LIVING ROOM DINING ROOM COVERED PORCH KITCHEN LIVING ROOM HALF BATHROOM DINING ROOM FULL BATHROOM KITCHEN SINGLE BEDROOM HALF BATHROOM LAUNDRY / UTILTIY FULL BATHROOM DOUBLE BEDROOM SINGLE BEDROOM LAUNDRY / UTILTIY DOUBLE BEDROOM

LOT BOUNDARY

8

6

5

NORTH SIDE 4

8

6

5

4

How can a houseLOTdesigned in Lousiana help us in the design of the Yu House? BOUNDARY

9

7

3

2

1

9

7

3

2

1

GROUND PLAN

LOT BOUNDARY

Brief: “Storm Resistant, affordable, sustainable” were the key concepts GROUND PLAN to the design of this 141 m2 house. It was poised for mass production and shifts between on-site to off-site fabrication strategies with easily customizable features and inexpensive construction technologies. There are various floor plan and material options, and contains environmental 1 CAR PARKING RAINWATERtake to: controls and systems for seasonal change. Special considerations 2 HARVESTING TANKS CAR PARKING Insulation, efficient systems, non-toxic materials, rather 13than through the STORAGE RAINWATER POROUS PAVING 4 addition of complex and expensive environmental technologies. 2 HARVESTING TANKS

LOT BOUNDARY

5 PAVING 3 STORAGE 6 GRAVEL 4 POROUS PAVING Although the Chassis design differs from Yu House, the Yu 5 PAVING 6 GRAVELin learning be moved, and therefore there are opportunities

Conclusions: House will still from this strategy. Furthermore, the Climate conditions of New Orleans are similar to those of Shanghai. Prefabrication offers a unique perspective of construction technologies. The house divided into ‘wet’ and ‘dry’ modular zones is an interesting lesson for design. This house offers a modern interpretation of the traditional New Orleans housing vernacular.

2

3

5

6

5

2

3

5

6

5

6

1

4

6

1

4

SOUTH SIDE SOUTH SIDE

0

8’

16’

32’

0

8’

16’

32’


Vestibule Kitchen Half Bathroom Full Bathroom

Vestibule Open Porch Covered Porch Utility Room Laundry Room 7

Wet Core Component Layout 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

PORCH LIVING ROOM HALF BATHROOM SINGLE BATHROOM FULL BEDROOM HALLWAY AREA OF REFUGE

1

2

4

5


How can a house designed in the UK help us in the design of the Yu House?

2.2 Precedent Research - Great Bow Yard Great Bow Yard - Stride Treglown Architects Somerset, UK 12 Private homes, 8 townhouses, 4 flats 3 Bed 1,40 ft2 (135 m2) Brownfield Site Completed Autumn 2007 ‘Excellent’ Rating, Eco Homes, BREEAM Brief: ‘A healthy place with healthy materials’ was the key concept behind this development. The development provides an impressive mix of uses for such a small site. Special considerations take to: Insulation, efficient systems, non-toxic materials, rather than through the addition of complex and expensive environmental technologies Passive-solar thermally-massive design and lightweight timber frame construction, the use of a sustainable drainage system (SUDS), the creation of a wildlife habitat, materials specified to create a low toxic environment and ‘A’ rated appliances. Conclusions: The use of natural vernacular materials both enhances the aesthetic product and energy efficiency. Use of reclaimed brick and other local materials reminds us of the challenge of the Yu House. Hydraulic systems have been integrated with other systems – this proves to be a successful solution to enhance the surrounding landscape. Brownfield site has a similar relationship with the Yu House’s current location. Climate coinditions aid in the design for the wintertime. Due to the climate conditions, visual line of sight was enhanced by the need for solar infiltration - enhances views to nature


2.3 LEED RESEARCH LEED - Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is a USA-based system that looks at the possibilities of sustainable design in 7 key areas:

A project can be awarded 4 different awards based on the number of points the resulting building gets by using a LEED checklist. To the right you can see a variety of projects that highlight different LEED criteria.


Yu House Location

CLIMATE


LOW MET

HIGH MET Jan

Jan Dec

Oct

3.1 Heating and Cooling

Apr

Sep

Shanghai and New Orleans have a surprisingly similar climate. Many of the design principles of the New Orleans climate are applicable to the design of the Yu House. The climate information of Somerset, however, is helpful for our design, as Shanghai’s climate is colder during the winter months than New Orleans. New Orleans: humid subtropical climate (Cfa) Heating/Cooling Degree Days: HDD (18C): 2218 CDD (18C): 2967 Annual precipitation: 1612.9mm Annual sunshine hours: 2744 hr

Oct

Apr

Sep

May

Aug

Jun

Jan

Oct

Apr

Sep

COOLING

Oct

Apr

Sep

May

Aug

Mar

Nov

Mar

Nov

May

Aug

Jun

Jan

Jan

Oct

Apr

Sep

Mar

Nov

Mar

Nov

PASSIVE

Oct

Apr

Sep

May

May

Aug

Jun

Jan

Jan

Oct

Apr

May

Aug

Jun Jul

Possible months using passive strategy (Mass + Natural Ventilation)

Mar

Nov

Mar

Sep

Feb

Dec

Feb

Nov

Allow wind to ventilate and cool Protect from the sun Flatten day-to-night temperature swings Avoid creating additional humidity Let the sunlight in at selected times (BELOW 18 C) Allow ventilation but avoid infiltration

Jun Jul

Jul

Design priorities for this particular Climate:

Feb

Dec

Feb

Dec

Jun Jul

Jul

Aug

Feb

Dec

Feb

Dec

Dec

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Jun Jul

Jul

Shanghai: humid subtropical climate (Cfa) Heating/Cooling Degree Days: HDD (18C): 2943 CDD (18C): 2474 Annual precipitation: 1164.5mm Annual sunshine hours: 1894.5 hr In terms of conditioning systems, we need to consider the fact that metabolic rate and clothing levels play an important role in the design of the Yu House. Therefore, after using Autodesk Climate consultant with the Shanghai climate, we decided to tackle on the design priority 1: allow wind to ventilate and cool based on metabolic levels. Our findings were surprising. In areas of low MET, heating was the primary driver (below 18C), whereas conditioning was almost solved with natural ventilation and thermal massing. In areas of high MET, however, cooling system became the primary driver. When we look at passive systems, the areas of comfort were found in the summertime for low MET, whereas the areas of high met the comfort levels occurred in the areas of spring/autumn.

HEATING

May

Aug

Mar

Nov

Mar

Nov

Feb

Dec

Feb

TOTAL

Oct

Apr

Sep

May

Aug

Jun Jul

Possible months using passive strategy (Mass + Natural Ventilation)


3.2 Daylighting The second priority in this climate is to protect the house from the sun using appropriate overhangs and a rational choice of punctures. Therefore, in the summertime, when the days are long, hot, and humid, more consideration to overhangs needs to be placed in the east and west faces, as well as inside the courtyard. In the wintertime, however, the south-facing courtyard windows actually let sunlight in. However, due to the small window puncture size and the need to preserve the landscape, not much can be done to let more sunlight in to warm the spaces. However, with appropriate landscaping and additional thermal massing, more can be achieved to let sunlight warm the house during the day and lower diurnal swings.

Design priorities for this particular Climate: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Allow wind to ventilate and cool Protect from the sun Flatten day-to-night temperature swings Avoid creating additional humidity Let the sunlight in at selected times (BELOW 18 C) Allow ventilation but avoid infiltration


Summer

Winter


C

40

3.3 Natural Ventilation with Dehumidification Thirdly, natural ventilation has to play a key role in the design of the Yu House, as one could minimize (however not eliminate) the use of mechanical active systems to cool and heat the space. The trick is to maximize natural ventilation while simultaneously minimizing infiltration and minimizing any additional humidity. Therefore, a combination of natural ventilation with minimal use of fans, dehumidification systems and a tight envelope design are all necessary for the design of the Yu House.

30

July

July

26

August September November

June

20

October April

17

March

10

February

January

0

-12

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

22 Hours

http://www.bry-air.com/files/app_updates/ApplyingDHEquipment.pdf

Design priorities for this particular Climate: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Allow wind to ventilate and cool Protect from the sun Flatten day-to-night temperature swings Avoid creating additional humidity Let the sunlight in at selected times (BELOW 18 C) Allow ventilation but avoid infiltration


Strategy 1 - Raise it! VILLA ORMOY, JAJA ARCHITECTURE, OSLO - Located on a beautiful site, Villa Ormoy was designed to conform to local traditional building construction while providing niches that enjoy the view of the marina, and the snowy mountains in the horizon.

3.4 Conclusions

Based on these findings these are the following strategies we found best fit for the design development of our project: RAISE IT – to allow wind to ventilate and cool. Create a plinth to allow cool air from the ground (and integration with earth tubes) to condition the spaces above the ground. LANDSCAPE IT – to protect the spaces from the hot summer sun and to flatten day-to-night temperatures FACADE IT – to flatten day-to-night temperature swings. OPEN IT – to let sunlight in at selected times. PROTECT IT – In order to protect from the sun CUBE IT – to avoid additional humidity, and allow for acoustic separation.

Design priorities for this particular Climate: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Allow wind to ventilate and cool Protect from the sun Flatten day-to-night temperature swings Avoid creating additional humidity Let the sunlight in at selected times (BELOW 18 C) Allow ventilation but avoid infiltration

Strategy 2 - Landscape it!

LONGEMENTS ANGLET, OFF ARCHITECTURE, ANGLET, FRANCE - This precedent takes the natural landscape and uses it to condition the space. As a result, this flattens day-to-night temperature swings and allows for greater connection to nature.


Strategy 3 - Facade it!

Strategy 5 - Protect It! MUSEE DE QUAI, JEAN NOUVEL, PARIS, FRANCE Plants have found a home on walls for centuries, but are sometimes incongruous with architecture, often breaking down the structural integrity of a building’s facade. Patrick Blanc’s Vertical Garden System, known as Le Mur Vegetal in French, allows both plants and buildings to live in harmony with one another. The botanist cum vertical landscape designer is probably best know for his gorgeous living wall on the Musée du Quai Branly in Paris (shown above). But Blanc’s Vertical Garden System can be implemented anywhere: indoors or out and in any climatic environment.

Strategy 4 - Open it!

PAUL EDWARD CULTURE CENTRE, OFF ARCHITECTURE, CUGNAUX, FRANCE. The facade is both a protective mesh and a remarkable external sign; it is a woven skin that plays with different densities and scales for optimimal filtering effect based on thermal, visual and ambient qualities for each program of the design. It provides a strong aesthetic that destorys the traditional perception of the building in terms of scale and is more concerned with developing the idea of an abstract urban signal. This organized mass envelope blurs the traditional limits of the design and infrastructure.

Strategy 6 - Cube it! W HOTEL, L JEAN NOUVEL, DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES. The hotel is conceived as an extension of the corniche promenade. Like a dock, it is set into, and becomes a part of, Dubai creek according to a principle of horizontal platforms in relationship with the water. The architectural vocabulary is linked to boats, sails, and water, and carries an idea of luxury and preciousness that pervades the building inside and out, blurring the line between interior and exterior.

LES BAINES DES DOCKS, JEAN NOUVEL, HAVRE, FRANCE - Visitors can enjoy no less than 12 pools, a sauna, a hammam, a spa and fitness room. The entire interior is covered in white tiles, except for the children’s play area, which is formed by brightly-coloured foam blocks. One more subtle detail is in the signage: rather than hanging up signs, letters were drawn in the spaces between the tiles.


Yu House Formal

CONCEPT


4.1 General Concept While on one hand there is the desire to preserve as much as possible the existing structure, there is also the desire to modernize it to accomodate a new program. Therefore, while on one hand one wants to promote the old values of the house, on the other there is a desire to “rebrand” it into something never seen before. Young and Old; Landscape and Constructed Environments. Thermal protection against the Summer and Winter. All these threads have to weave into one space. Most of all, one needs to take into consideration human comfort as the primary driver of the design. Therefore, we concluded that a KTV-Hostel space would be a good challenge to weave these elements into a consistent harmony of spaces.

Concept: Yu House :: Design Foundation: Weaving the New with the Old with the Design

Weave Landscape “Environment”

Thermal Maintenance Visual + Acoustic “Weave KTV + Music” “Public” Platform Use earth as cooling / heating source “Weave the house with the earth”

Maintain Scale


Concept: Yu House :: Weaving Harmonies Opposing Functions Create a unique experience for a target audience Function 2

Function 1

Karaoke

Boutique Hostel

“Freedom within the constraints of a space”

22

23

24

1

2

3

4

time of high activity

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

time of low activity - e.g., sleeping

13

14

15 check-out time

21

lunch

dinner

20

Quiet resting space Relaxation Familiarity & Comfort

breakfast

Friends, Instruments, Alcohol “YOUR” music Control over the experience

“A place to crash after a long night”

16

17

turn-around time

Opposing Architectural Styles Promote old values with the rebranding of new concepts

Preservation

House of Historical Significance Facade Preseravation Interior materials and decor

18

Sustainability

Maintaining Human Comfort first Thermal Qualities (Winter and Summer) Visual Quality - Lighting, Materials, Contrasts Acoustic Qualities Cleanliness & Maintenance (Integrity)

17


4.2 KTV Programmatic Analysis Karaoke Television (KTV) is a common hobby in Chinese society. People tend to visit KTV from early in the afternoon, and in some cases, stay until the following morning. The basic program includes the following: 1. An entry area - registration bar - supermarket - restaurant - bar 2. Individual singing space booths 3. Bathrooms and auxiliary spaces (e.g., storage, kitchens) Usually there is only one way in and one way out, as the customer eventually has to pay according to the number of hours he/she spend inside the space. Usually, these spaces are smoke-filled, leading to a serious challenge of air quality (hence mechanical ventialation is needed; with continual filter changes), as well as acoustic integrity between the booths. As one finishes one’s evening at the KTV, it is common for everyone to part in different ways (each to their respective home) and sleep until wee hours of the afternoon. Our proposal, therefore, attempts at bridging together the KTV concept and the Hostel/Hotel concept into 1 space.


Typical Floor Plan Layouts

Circular

KTV Interiors

Irregular

Linear

Stacked

Circulated

Typical Furniture Layouts

Small

Medium

Large


4.3 Hostel Programmatic Analysis Hostelworld.com was the key area of analysis when understanding the amenities necessary to a hosteling experience. Not only did the website give us some insight as to what the physical characteristics of the hostel included (e.g., amenities), it also allowed us to compare and contrast the price values to see what our expected income would be like if we based our income exclusively through rental. Finally, we wrote out a blurb that would be included in the hostelworld website if our hostel actually existed: Ever wonder what it would be like to rent out your own Shikumen-style house? Now you can! You can either rent out one room (from a variety of options, from a master suite to an 8-bed hostel style room) or you could rent out the entire house for your enjoyment! How cool is that? What’s better, we’ve equipped the Yu House with the latest state-of-the-art KTV equipment so you could dance and sing the night away with the best of your friends, or simply meet new people whom are just as interested in singing as you are! Conveniently located in proximity to a supermarket, you will never run out of alcohol and snacks. What’s best, after a long night of partying in your exclusive KTV shell, you just walk a few steps to your bedrooms to sleep. Want to sleep early? The house has been designed with the latest acoustic isolation technologies, as well as environmentally designed to satisfy your needs. Enjoy!


Concept: Yu House :: Floor Arrangement Examples

4-8 People

14-16 People

Concept: Yu House :: Other Diagrams - Privacy, New Walls, Roof

Privacy

Additional Walls

Roof Structure

Function 2

Boutique Hostel

24 People


Function 2

Boutique Hostel

Concept: Yu House :: Bedroom Arrangements/Costs

Room 1

Master Suite Living Room Space 1 king-size bed

Room 2

Bedroom (Shared WC) 1 king-size bed

Room 3

Bedroom (Shared WC) 1 king-size bed

Room 4

Bedroom (Shared WC) 1 king-size bed

House

Small Committee 4 king-size bed Occupancy - 8 people

Occupancy - 1-2 people Cost: 3000 RMB/Room

Double Suite

Occupancy - 1-2 people

Occupancy - 1-2 people

Occupancy - 1-2 people

Cost: 2200 RMB/Room

Cost: 2000 RMB/Room

Cost: 2200 RMB/Room

6-Person Dorm (Sh. WC)

4-Person Dorm (Sh. WC)

6-Person Dorm (Sh. WC)

Cost: 1,250 RMB/Person Cost: 10,000 RMB/House

Medium Committee

2 queen-sized beds

3 bunked beds

2 bunked beds

3 bunked beds

Mixed-bed arrangments

Occupancy - 2-4 people

Occupancy - 6 People

Occupancy - 4 People

Occupancy - 6 People

Occupancy - 15 People

Cost: 2300 RMB/Room

Cost: 330/Person Cost: 2000/Room

Cost: 400/Person Cost: 1570/Room

Cost: 330/Person Cost: 2000/Room

Cost: 600/Person Cost: 9000/House

8-Bed Suite Dorm 4 bunked beds Occupancy - 8 people Cost: 250/Person Cost: 1900/Room

Large Committee Mixed-bed arrangments Occupancy - 24 People Cost: 460/Person Cost: 11,040 RMB/House


Concept: Yu House :: Cost Matrix - Highest Income vs. Lowest Income Maximum Occupancy (Large Committee) 0% of 365 days / year

10% of 365 days / year

20% of 365 days / year

30% of 365 days / year

40% of 365 days / year

50% of 365 days / year

60% of 365 days / year

70% of 365 days / year

80% of 365 days / year

90% of 365 days / year

100% of 365 days / year

= 0 RMB / Day = 0 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 420,960 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 805,920 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 1,208,880 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 1,611,840 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 2,014,800 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 2,417,760 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 2,820,720 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 3,223,680 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 3,626,640 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 4,029,600 RMB / Year

Lowest Cost Occupancy 100% of 365 days / year

90% of 365 days / year

80% of 365 days / year

70% of 365 days / year

60% of 365 days / year

50% of 365 days / year

40% of 365 days / year

30% of 365 days / year

20% of 365 days / year

10% of 365 days / year

0% of 365 days / year

= 7,470 RMB / Day = 2,726,550 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 2,453,895 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 2,181,240 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 1,908,585 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 1,635,930 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 1,363,275 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 1,090,620 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 817,695 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 545,310 RMB / Year

= 11,040 RMB / Day = 272,655 RMB / Year

= 0 RMB =0 RMB

= 3,247,770 RMB

= 3,378,075 RMB

= 3,638,415 RMB

= 3,768,990 RMB

= 3,899,295 RMB

= 2,726,550 RMB

= 2,874,855 RMB

= 2,987,160 RMB

= 3,117,465 RMB

= 3,508,380 RMB

= 4,029,600 RMB

e

Max+Min Total Incom

1,600,000 RMB is turnaround point

m

Maximu

Lowest Co

st Occupa n

ncy Occupa

Lowest Case Scenario (% of 365 days) 100%

1,600,000 RMB

90%

1,440,000 RMB

80%

1,280,000 RMB

70%

1,120,000 RMB

60%

960,000 RMB

50%

800,000 RMB

40%

640,000 RMB

30%

480,000 RMB

20%

320,000 RMB

10%

160,000 RMB

cy

Highest Case Scenario 4,029,600 RMB

100%


Yu House Final

DESIGN


Section BB

Section AA

KTV Plan 1:200

Plan: House as KTV Section C1 Section C2

Hostel Plan 1:200

Plan: Scale 1:200

Plan: House as Hotel


Perspective - Furniture Distribution


Elevation East


Elevation South


Elevation East


Section KTV

Section Hostel


Inside Bar


Courtyard


Yu House Formal

SYSTEMS


3d strucutral plan

floor underside plan

south structural explosion

east structural explosion Structure


corten steel extension traditional feature

east elevation

strucural integrity tertiary support

supporting roof structure

i beam connections

west elevation bridging trusses

aesthetic shell construction

strucutural core

south elevation corten cladding connections transfer structure

north elevation loadbearing foundations

uprgraded efficient windows


components a b c d

timber roof rafters secondary structure [roof joists] existing timber columns tertiary steel fittings

e f g d

polished concrete finish poured concrete floor timber beam floor joists pad foundations [in situ]


east elevation trombe wall detail

300mm air gap i beam supports corten steel panel cladding

existing facade concrete wall


Small Tube 2-4 People 1 Table 4 Chairs MediumTube 6-9 People 3 Table 9 Chairs

Air Handling Unit Moves hot air away from the pod

Hot air is removed from the top

Small Committee

Medium Committee

Large Committee

Small Pod

Medium Pod

Large Pod

LargeTube 25 - 30 People 8 Table 23 Chairs

Structure System holds pods

Acoustic Cavity

Suspended from Ceiling Creates Acoustic Isolation

Integrated Sound & Lighting

Infrared Camera Projects to Facade

High MET Rate Hot air rises

Jan Feb

Dec

Mar

Nov

Oct

Apr

Sep

Pod dividers

May

Aug

Jun Jul

Existing Columns hold new structure

Ground Plane Creates Acoustic Isolation

Fan system brings cool air from ground Jan

Nat Vent

Heating

Feb

Dec

Mar

Nov

Earth Tubes Oct

Apr

Sep

Cooling

May

Aug

Jun Jul

Nat Vent

Acoustics


11 Air is released to the outside of the house 10 Quiet fan system pushes air out of the pod 9 Hot Air Rises 8 Occupants with high MET rate 7 Dessicant dehumidiďŹ cation hardware, over 6 Natural Ventilation through windows 5 Cold air seeps from the ground 4 Active Fan Systems 3 Dessicant dehumidiďŹ cation hardware, under 2 Crawl space keeps air cool, but humid 1 Cold air from earth tubes

Acoustics


Inside the KTV Pod


Yu House Designed

CONTEXT


Concept: Yu House :: Public Amenities

possibility for more houses Back of the House

Back of the House

Back of the House

Back of the House

Snacks

PROMENADE

Market Bakery

Back of the House

ENTRY HOUSE

Back of the House

STREET

Back of the House

Bar

Back of the House

Restaurant Kitchen

Bar Cafe

Snacks Market

Replace one house to service other amenities Spa Common Room Library Games Room Laundry Business Center Security Luggage Storage Gym

24-hour security - Walled Compound, Protectable Dining areas exclusive to every house

Check-in Linens and Towels Storage KTV Equipment Storage Beverage and Food Storage Management OďŹƒces Changing Rooms for Employees Canteen for Employees


Concept: Yu House :: Green Public Space

possibility for more houses

STREET

ENTRY HOUSE

Public Furniture

N-S Boulevard

Benches Tables Gym Equipment Ping Pong Tables

Public Eating Spaces Porous Pavement reduces Runoff

Constructed Wetland Reduces Rainwater Runoff Aesthetic Park


Concept: Yu House :: Energy Systems Space

possibility for more houses

STREET

ENTRY HOUSE

LED-Solar Lamps

LED-Solar Lamps

Public Space is equipped with Solar PV lamps, for use only at nightfall

Solar Panels are placed on the south face of the houses

Energy Storage & Generator


Concept: Yu House :: Water Systems 4

5

Greywater and Blackwater Separation

Rather than mixing greywater and blackwater, our neighborhood design takes into consideration a grid-based system for greywater collection, retention, and disposal

Raingarden

Excess rain is taken to a raingarden where it can slowly infliltrate back to the ground Collection can become public garden

possibility for more houses

STREET

ENTRY HOUSE

1

Porous Pavement Propoer infiltration to reduce water runoff

2

Controlled Water Drainage Rainwater collection in the north East and West have proper drainage

3

Water Cisterns

Reduces Rainwater Runoff Reuse Water for Irrigation Reuse for Toilets


Concept: Yu House :: Lighting Systems

possibility for more houses

STREET

ENTRY HOUSE

Back of the House

Illumination Grid

KTV “Window�

Park Space

Illumination is held constant in the private location, separated by doors to eliminate strong light from the public sphere

Lighting at night uses solar power as primary energy source

Adds additional lighting to the public sphere

Has LED Technology and has a spectacular light show in the evening



Yu House Design