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2017

OVC

APPLIED RESEARCH

& BEST PRACTICE

SYMPOSIUM

A Researcher-Practitioner Collaborative

May 3, 2017 Nashville, TN

RESEARCH RESOURCE

GUIDE


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GUIDE

DR. JOHANNA GREESON

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • Prioritize strengthening relationships, supportive networks, and interdependence over individual skill building and independence.

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What sources do you suggest for further learning? • http://www.cebc4cw.org/ • http://chronicle.umbmentoring.org/author/jean-rhodes/

What are the top 3 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • Greeson, J.K.P. & Thompson, A.E. (2015). Aging out of foster care in emerging adulthood. In J.J. Arnett (Ed.), Oxford handbook of emerging adulthood. (pp. 559 – 577). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. • Greeson, J.K.P. & Thompson, A.E. (2017). Foster care, then where? Why independent living is getting it all wrong. In J. Jackson (Ed.), Social policy andsocial justice. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press. • Thompson, A.E., Greeson, J.K.P., & Brunsink, A.M. (2016). Natural mentoring among older youth aging out of foster care: A systematic review. Children and Youth Services Review, 61, 40-50.

Do you know of any helpful visuals, video, or other media that would be useful in illustrating your topic? • Struggling and Alone: The Life of Young Adults Aged Out of Foster Care: http://www.penntopten.com/essays/struggling-alone-lifeyoung-adults-aged-foster-care/ • C.A.R.E Overview: https://vimeo.com/115837436

What do you want us listeners to remember most? • All children and youth need enduring connections with caring, supportive adults, and these adult connections can offset the risk that these vulnerable young people face.

What are 5 key points on this topic? • The presence of a natural mentor is protective for youth aging out of foster care, meaning that foster youth with at least one supportive nonparental adult fare far better than foster youth without supportive adults. • Our society and child welfare legislation have erroneously prioritized independent living skills over interdependence among youth aging out of foster care. • You can engage your local child welfare jurisdictions to reconceptualize independence to interdependence for older foster youth. • You can encourage policy makers to pass legislation that mandates interdependent living services. • If you know a young person in foster care, reach out to him/her as a caring adult in his/her life.

Other than yourself, who are 2 other experts in this area that we could learn from? + Michelle Munson, Silver School of Social Work New York University + Renee Spencer, School of Social Work Boston University

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? • As practitioners, seek out relationships with scholars from local universities that are committed to partnering with you and your agency to improve practice for the children and youth you serve. • Prior to implementing new interventions for children and youth, search the literature for relevant systematic reviews or published literature reviews that synthesize relevant evidence. • Prior to implementing new interventions, search the California Clearinghouse for Evidence Based Practice (http://www.cebc4cw.org/).

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DR. AMANDA HOWARD

GUIDE

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • If we want our caregivers to be emotionally present for our children, then we, as leadership, need to be emotionally present to our caregivers.

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What sources do you suggest for further learning? • The Trauma Center at Justice Resource Institute • The Karyn Purvis Institute of Child Development • Rudd Adoption Research Program

What do you want us listeners to remember most? • It only takes one meaningful relationship to move someone towards secure attachment.

What are 5 key points on this topic? • Trauma is developmental and we process it differently at each stage of our life. • In order to have meaningful relationships, we need to be able to give care, receive care, negotiate our needs, and be autonomous. • Secure attachment is a journey, not a destination. • Everyone has leftover issues that affect the way they interact with others. The important thing is knowing what yours are and how they affect you. • You cannot lead a child on the path to healing if you do not know the way.

What are the top 3 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolk • Anatomy of the Soul by Curt Thompson • Parenting from the Inside Out by Dan Siegel

Other than yourself, who are 2 other experts in this area that we could learn from? + Mary Dozier + Dan Siegel Do you know of any helpful visuals, video, or other media that would be useful in illustrating your topic? • Karyn Purvis Institute of Child Development has a series of DVDs • Close Relationship Questionnaire (Fraley) can be completed for free online and gives feedback.

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? • The duty of a researcher is to assure that the findings of her work are disseminated to practitioners and NGOs in an understandable and meaningful way. However, dissemination needs to be a two way street. Sometimes I wish there was a better avenue for us, as researchers, to understand the topics that the practitioners and NGOs truly need insight into. We have a set of skills and a passion for working with vulnerable populations, but at the end of the day most of us are not in the field. We are not living it day in and day out. To my knowledge there is no formal mechanism to help researchers better understand the needs of this community.

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DR. ESEARCH RESOURCE GUIDE KAREN HUTCHESON 2017

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • Intentionally caring for your personal spiritual, emotional, psychological, and physical health will create a foundation for overarching personal, ministry, organization, and network health.

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What do you want us listeners to remember most? • One of the most important aspects of intentional self care is the ability to model and teach children how to have a healthy relationship. When we model and practice excellent boundaries in all aspects of our lives, we model healthiness to children and teens. Our most important relationship with is Jesus. Everything else pales in comparison, but without a healthy, active relationship with Christ, all other relationships with be hindered.

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What sources do you suggest for further learning? • Global Member Care Volume 1 (Dr. Kelly O’Donnell) • Trauma Stewardship (Laura van Dernoot Lipsky) • Parenting from the Inside Out (Dr. Dan Siegel) • Trauma and Resilience, A Handbook (Dr. Charles A Schaefer)

What are 5 key points on this topic? 1. Children need safe, stable, nurturing environments to form healthy attachments. 2. Children know the temperature of your house. 3. Parenting children from histories of harm is different that parenting children who do not come from histories of harm. 4. Self care must be intentional and it must be active and ongoing. 5. Parental self-care sets the tone for the family environment and models healthy emotional regulation for children.

What are the top 3 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • Parenting from the Inside Out (Dr. Dan Siegel) • The Whole Brain Child (Dr. Dan Siegel) • Positive Discipline Parenting Tools: The 49 Most Effective Methods to Stop Power Struggles, Build Communication, and Raise Empowered, Capable Kids (Dr. Jane Nelson)

Other than yourself, who are 2 other experts in this area that we could learn from? + Dr. Karyn Purvis + Dr. Dan Siegel + Dr. Jane Nelson + Dr. Laura Markham

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? + I suggest creating a network of sorts allowing for increased contact with practicing professionals.

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DR. DANA JOHNSON

GUIDE

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • The well-being (physical and mental health) of caregivers is directly related to the well-being of vulnerable children.

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What do you want us listeners to remember most? • Care of the caregiver as diligently as you care for a vulnerable child.

MPOSIUM

Other than yourself, who are 2 other experts in this area that we could learn from? • Janice Cotton, PhD, OneSky Foundation • Meghan Lopez, MSN, FNP-BC, Whole Child International

What are 5 key points on this topic? • Normal development, particularly early in life, is dependent on a limited number of contingent, interactive caregivers who are fully present in the life of a child. • Knowledgeable caregiving is the most important component in child well-being. • The stress of caring for vulnerable children exacts a significant toll on physical and mental health limiting caregiver effectiveness. • Valuing caregivers involves two components. o Professionalization of caregiving through education in child development o Personalizing your concern by improving salary, scheduling, work environment, support services, positive feedback and personal and family medical and mental health assistance.

Do you know of any helpful visuals, video, or other media that would be useful in illustrating your topic? • https://www.zerotothree.org • http://developingchild.harvard.edu

What sources do you suggest for further learning? • Hermenau K, Kaltenbach E, Mkinga G, Hecker T. Improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care - a feasibility study with caregivers. Front Psychol. 2015 Jul 14;6:937. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg. 2015.00937. eCollection 2015 • Rahman A, Fisher J, Bower P, Luchters S, Tran T, Yasamy MT, Saxena S, Waheed W. Interventions for common perinatal mental disorders in women in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Bull World Health Organ. 2013 Aug 1;91(8):593-601I. doi: 10.2471/BLT.12.109819. Epub 2013 Apr 18. • Atif N, Lovell K, Rahman A. Maternal mental health: The missing "m" in the global maternal and child health agenda. Semin Perinatol. 2015 Aug;39(5):345-52. doi: 10.1053/j.semperi.2015.06.007. Epub 2015 Jul 9. • Chan CM. Health-related quality of life of preschool caregivers in Hong Kong. Health Promot Int. 2014 Jun;29(2):287-95. doi:10.1093/heapro/ das058. Epub 2012 Nov 5.

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? • Focus interventions, e.g. mission trips, focused on the well-being of caregivers, and not just vulnerable children.

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RUBY GUIDE JOHNSTON

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What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • BUILD A REALTIONSHIP WITH THEM! Children do not care what you know until they know that you care!

2017

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What do you want us listeners to remember most? • Life Skills are JUST a vehicle to helping a youth build Resilience.

MPOSIUM

What sources do you suggest for further learning? • Any study that involves resilience, protective factors for youth or for studies related to life skills. — The Power of Resilience by Sam Goldstein — Raising Resilient Children: Fostering Strength, Hope and Optimism in Your Child by Sam Goldstein and Robert Brooks — Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Giving Kids Roots and Wings by Kenneth Ginsburg

What are the top 3 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • Covenant House Pennsylvania • ARISE • Jacob Foundation – Monitoring and Evaluating Life Skills for Youth Development

Do you know of any helpful visuals, video, or other media that would be useful in illustrating your topic? • Richard Cardinal: Cry from the Diary of Metis Child — This book is good to consider errors and how this youth was NOT given a chance to learn and develop resilience to his own stressors and pain.

What are 5 key points on this topic? 1. Resilience is our main goal. 2. Protective factors help a youth gain resilience. 3. Promotive factors are what the adult brings to the table and helps the youth gain the protective factors. 4. If an adult does not have protective factors in their own life, it is unlikely they will be able to teach them to a youth. 5. Life Skills are ONLY a vehicle for greater outcomes — and they are related to resilience and intangible skills.

Other than yourself, who are 2 other experts in this area that we could learn from? + Mary Dozier + Dan Siegel

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? • The duty of a researcher is to assure that the findings of her work are disseminated to practitioners and NGOs in an understandable and meaningful way. However, dissemination needs to be a two way street. Sometimes I wish there was a better avenue for us, as researchers, to understand the topics that the practitioners and NGOs truly need insight into. We have a set of skills and a passion for working with vulnerable populations, but at the end of the day most of us are not in the field. We are not living it day in and day out. To my knowledge there is no formal mechanism to help researchers better understand the needs of this community.


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MEGHAN LOPEZ

GUIDE

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • Be self-critical of your own work. You are giving an incredible gift of service, so seek out the resources, recommendations or support to give the very best that is possible. Continue to learn from colleagues and fellow servants; continue to grow in your practice.

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What do you want us listeners to remember most? • The quality is more important than where. Sadly we will not solve all of the world’s ills today, though we are all working towards that perfection.

MPOSIUM

What sources do you suggest for further learning? • Child development: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/ • Duke Unviersity’s POFO study: — https://globalhealth.duke.edu/projects/pofo-positive-out comes-orphans-0 — http://www.ovcwellbeing.org/positive-outcomes-for-orp hans-2/

What are the top 3 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • UNDP monitoring & evaluation: — https://goo.gl/YXJUJB • Online courses (edX): — https://www.edx.org/course/evaluating-social-programs-mitx jpal101x-5 • Program toolkit (Millenium Challenge Coorporation): — http://www.mca.gov.md/en/Monitoring-and-Evaluating-.html

What are 5 key points on this topic? • M&E is essential to every project, every program, no matter how big or small. • M&E is not just an obligation, it’s a great opportunity show what is working that you are doing and learn what you can do to make things work even more. • By Evaluating you can learn what you should be Monitoring and where you have questions and may need Research; all three work in coordination. • It’s okay to start small; M&E does not need to be huge to be useful • M&E needs will change over the life of your project and program; you may have periods of intense evaluation and other periods of light monitoring.

Other than yourself, who are 2 other experts in this area that we could learn from? + Bev and Delia! :)

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? + It is very useful for researchers to try to connect their research to practical application. Practitioners can help with this in making contact with researchers and opening the conversation about what questions they have or would like to explore.

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DR. BEVERLY NYBERG

GUIDE

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • Because each child and family we serve is important they deserve that we use programs that have been proven to be effective. We have the capabilities now via technology to find the most effective programs out there. We must search for them, use them, monitor their progress, evaluate their effectiveness, and continue to strive for high quality programs..

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What do you want us listeners to remember most? • You can do this. You can find the resources to do this. Just take the next step and get started.

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What sources do you suggest for further learning? • Check out the CAFO sponsored webinar last August on monitoring and evaluation. What are 5 key points on this topic? 1. Make sure your organization has a solid logic model on which to build their monitoring, evaluating and reporting plan. 2. Create a monitoring, evaluating and reporting plan. This is essential to delivering effective programs. 3. Only collect data you can use and use the data you collect. 4. Use evidence-based programs to ensure that what you’re doing will achieve your desired results. 5. The open and willing to change. Having an MER plan will only be worthwhile if you actually use the knowledge/data you have gained through it to improve your programs.

What are the top 3 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plan template: — http://www.tools4dev.org/resources/monitoring-evalua tion-plan-template/ • Developing a Monitoring & Evaluation Plan: — http://evaluationtoolbox.net.au/index.php?option=com_con tent&view=article&id=20&Itemid=159 • MEASURE Evaluation: — http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/resources/training/on line-courses-and-resources

Other than yourself, who are 3 other experts in this area that we could learn from? + Dr. Susan Hillis + Meghan López ml@wholechild.org + Delia Pop delia.pop@hopeandhomes.org

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? • Get involved with the work that CAFO is doing.

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DR. ALFRED PEREZ

GUIDE

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • Foster youth have been responsible for transforming child welfare practice through developing curriculum, training on positive youth development, policy reform, and youth-adult partnerships. OVC partners must be open to the notion of viewing their youth clients as resources and equal partners. To this end, OVC can infuse young people’s voices, ideas, and experiences into the decision-making process and design and delivery of services. This would require embracing tenets of positive youth development that allows for young people to be involved in crafting, enacting, and implementing change from their perspective. OVC partners can incorporate foster youth voices by including youth on advisory boards, commissions, and boards of directors.

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What sources do you suggest for further learning? • California Youth Connection • Foster Youth in Action • Foster Care Alumni of America • Foster Club

What are the top 3 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • The National Youth in Transition Database • Chapin Hall for Children at the University of Chicago • CalYouth Study

What do you want us listeners to remember most? • It is important for families who adopt or assume guardianship from the child welfare system to understand that children and youth may experience “cumulative disadvantages” resulting from poverty, child abuse and neglect, and foster care instability that may pose difficulties. Thus, it is imperative that newly formed legal families receive post-adoption or guardian supports and services, from child welfare agencies and organizations such as OVC, necessary to attend to the well-being of their children, so these legal relationships endure after adoption or guardianship.

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What are 5 key points on this topic? • Research has consistently shown that older youth who age out of foster care fare poorly on a range of key well-being indicators, such as housing insecurity, underemployment, lack of access to mental health services and health care, likelihood of relying on public assistance, and experience of incarceration. • To promote successful transitions to adulthood, foster youth who are likely to age out, on the verge or aging out, or who have aged out of foster care, and older youth who exited foster care through adoption or guardianship, are eligible for a diverse array of independent living skills services offered through the federal Chafee Foster Care Independence Program to prepare them for and aid them in the transition to adulthood. • A handful of investigators have helped in understanding who uses individual services, but no one has yet sought to identify underlying patterns of use. • Using latent class analysis, this presentation identifies profiles of independent living services users, and examines demographic and functional characteristics of youth defining each service use type. The aim is to reduce a diverse array of service use profiles to a handful of underlying patterns and to begin to describe individual youth characteristics differentiating the profiles of use. • While youth are eligible for independent living services through the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program, it is crucial for OVC foster and adoptive parents and legal guardians to appreciate that they play an essential role in supporting foster youth in their transitions to adulthood and promoting their well-being.

Do you know of any helpful visuals, video, or other media that would be useful in illustrating your topic? • LA Times, April 30, 2014: Aging out: Voices from those in the foster care system

Other than yourself, who are 2 other experts in this area that we could learn from? + Drs. Mark Courtney (mcourtney@uchicago.edu) + Amy Dworsky (adworsky@chapinhall.org) + Clark Peters (peterscm@missouri.edu) + Judy Havlicek (jhavlice@illinois.edu).

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Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? • It is important for researchers and practitioners to have forums, similar to the OVC conference, to have opportunities to consider the interplay between practice and research. Through such forums, researchers and practitioners can explore how they can answer emergent questions about the effectiveness of services provided to vulnerable children and their families and forge partnerships that honor practitioner inform research questions to build evidence-based practice knowledge.


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DR. CLARK PETERS

GUIDE

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • Working with youths and young adults requires patience. Professionals must recognize that it is developmentally appropriate for youths to resist authority, take risks, and engage in trial and error as they develop the skills needed for a successful transition to adulthood.

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What do you want us listeners to remember most? • You cannot spend your way out of poverty; we need to encourage saving money and building assets for young people who lack stable families.

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What sources do you suggest for further learning? • The Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative is the lead organization paying mind to youths in foster care in the US. • The Dartington Social Research Unit in the UK does important work examining systems of care.

What are 5 key points on this topic? • Those caring for young people need to help them become financial capable so that they can successfully transition to adulthood. • Financial capability comes from applied knowledge and experience, that is, a combination of financial literacy, the opportunity to apply skills, and trial and error. • In the US and most other countries, the financial sector is often inhospitable to young people, so professionals must consider ways for alternative financial tools. • Professionals themselves are often uncomfortable and underprepared to address financial capability. • Emergency savings (or similar resources) are essential for ensuring that a young person’s progress toward financial capability does not get derailed when unforeseen problems arise. (And unforeseen problems always arise.)

Other than yourself, who are 2 other experts in this area that we could learn from? + Mark Courtney at the University of Chicago is the top child welfare scholar for older youths. + William Elliot at the University of Michigan is a top researcher on asset building.

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? • In this field (of financial capability and asset building for youths in care), localities often have ready partners and available resources needed for making progress, but they do not recognize the importance of the topic and do not collaborate. Pulling these stakeholders together can often galvanize activity and generate momentum toward finding solutions.

What are the top 3 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • Center for Social Development at Washington University in St. Louis for resources on financial capability and asset building. • Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative for information on how that learning has been applied across the US to youths in foster care. • Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for tools on addressing identity theft and

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DR. DELIA POP

GUIDE

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • I would say there are 5 key strategies which form the foundation for serving the best interests of the children: 1. Listen and talk to children, parents, relatives, and communities in order to understand their needs and circumstances, but also to learn about solutions and strategies to supporting children. 2. Document those needs and circumstances so you can develop plans, monitor how they work and if they work and develop the evidence you need to scale your support. 3. Plan ahead and try to secure enough resources to be able to deliver your planned interventions and support. It isn’t so much about how quickly you can intervene; it is more about delivering real change. 4. Plan and support transitions. All changes are difficult: changing environments, carers, and circumstances pose risks and challenges. No one should be left behind because the transition is tough or requires more support. 5. When children are returned to families and communities, the work doesn’t stop; it only begins. The good news is that, by supporting one child’s return home to parents or relatives, you can start supporting an entire community to give their children a safe and loving environment. + One additional reflection: do not forget that in many situations supporting vulnerable children entails working with their parents, relatives, and communities, and not working directly with children.

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What do you want us listeners to remember most? • Children for the full and harmonious development of his or her personality should grow up in a family environment, in an atmosphere of happiness, love and understanding.

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What sources do you suggest for further learning? • http://www.faithtoaction.org • http://hopeandhomes.org • http://www.bettercarenetwork.org • http://www.alternativecareguidelines.org/Home/tabid/ 2372/language/en-GB/Default.aspx

What are the top 3 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • http://www.theoryofchange.org/what-is-theory-of-change/ • http://www.thinknpc.org

Other than yourself, who are 2 other experts in this area that we could learn from? + Radya Ebrahim - https://www.linkedin.com/in/radyaebrahim/ + Timea Volosin – timi.volosin@hopeandhomes.org

What are 5 key points on this topic? • Why M,E&R is important? — It supports project/program implementation and communicates all project aspects through accurate, evidence-based reporting that informs management and decisionmaking to guide and improve project/program performance. — It improves and maximizes a program’s effectiveness and impact. — It contributes to organizational learning and knowledge sharing by reflecting upon and sharing experiences and lessons so that we can gain the full benefit from what we do and how we do it. — It upholds accountability and compliance by demonstrating whether or not our work has been carried out as agreed and is in compliance with established standards. — It provides opportunities for stakeholder feedback, especially beneficiaries, to provide input into the perceptions of our work, modelling openness to criticism, and willingness to learn from experiences and to adapt to changing needs. — It promotes and celebrates our work by highlighting our accomplishments and achievements, building morale and contributing to resource mobilization.

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? • Continue to bring researchers and practitioners to share, don’t exclude qualitative research, and create space for the voice of children, parents and practitioners to share with the audience .


DR. ESEARCH RESOURCE GUIDE DAVID & JANE SCHOOLER 2017

What is the most important piece of advice you would give to those serving vulnerable children? • All who care for vulnerable children need to be self aware in terms of their own history, place of acceptance, healing, and growth.

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What do you want us listeners to remember most? • What we all have under “the iceberg” in terms of life experiences will impact our care of children and actually all relationships.

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What sources do you suggest for further learning? • The Cure by John Lynch • Childhood Disrupted by Donna Jackson Nakazawa

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What are the top 2 resources we can look to for further information on this topic? • CAFO SELF-CARE WEBINAR. — This contains self-care assessments that are a part of the Back2Back Ministries Trauma Competent Caregiving training series. Contact: Jayne Schooler@back2back.org. • Visualizing Principles: 20 Principles for Trauma Competent Care

Do you know of any helpful visuals, video, or other media that would be useful in illustrating your topic? • Simply searching YouTube for John Lynch, Curt Thompson, Donna Jackson Nakazawa, Gordon Neufeld, and Brene Brown, to cite just a few, will provide a wealth of information.

What are five six key points on this topic? • Our biography often determines our health, relationships, our job performance and even our relationship with God. • Unprocessed events, issues, traumas will remain unless there is intervention. • Coming from an environment of CUTS can create a whole host of negative and destructive emotions and cause all manner of behavioral responses. • Emotional health is about self-awareness. Spiritual maturity is about God-awareness. • We must be attuned to the needs of those whom we work; there is meaning behind behavior. • We must intentionally create safe environments where caregivers feel free to express, needs, challenges and struggles and are met with encouragement, support and grace.

Other than yourself, who is another expert in this area that we could learn from? + Beth Guckenberger

Do you have any suggestions or advice for bridging research and practice? • This requires an intentional identification of a middle circle type of person/focus within any organization. This person is one who is able to know the research and translate it from the research to practice or know how to locate what has already been done in terms of training and support.

OVC Research Resource Guide  

This resource guide accompanies the 2017 OVC Applied Research & Best Practice Symposium that took place in Brentwood, TN. It includes key s...

OVC Research Resource Guide  

This resource guide accompanies the 2017 OVC Applied Research & Best Practice Symposium that took place in Brentwood, TN. It includes key s...