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June 2015

A fresh approach

Path to procurement

Strong business case

– hospice design suits a spectrum of needs

– encouraging more SMEs to tender for projects

– union helps boost revenue and reduces overheads


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Aberdeen Hospital’s Maggies Centre is a recent public sector project planned with the help of Asta Powerproject. See page 20.

Welcome... As the General Election draws even closer, party manifestos are being unveiled prompting much political analysis. The Conservatives’ key pledge surrounding social housing and the right to buy has been at the centre of the party’s manifesto. The pledge is the extension of right to buy – the flagship policy of Thatcher’s Government in the 1980s for tenants of housing associations. David Cameron will extend the policy to 1.3 million families, allowing those to take up a discount on buying a housing association property capped at £102,700 in London and £77,000 for the rest of England. There will also be a requirement that councils sell their most valuable 210,000 properties from their remaining housing stock. In the past, housing associations have opposed these proposals, yet according to sources, the Conservatives deny that the policy undermines housing associations since they will receive the full market value of the sold property. Meanwhile, Labour’s manifesto clearly recognises the economic and social importance of building more homes. Barry Berry, Chief Executive of FMB is pleased with Labour’s commitments: “The manifesto includes clear commitments on prioritising capital investment and reforming council house financing to enable the building of more social housing.” With two very different manifestos concerning the assets of social housing, the outcome of this month’s Election plays a critical role in the future of the nation’s housing stock. We would love to hear your thoughts on how the policies affect you and urge you to send in your views to the usual address. Meanwhile in this issue, we pay tribute to the latest innovations and applications in Renewable Energy, Interiors, Balustrades, Washrooms and Security, plus Roofing, Cladding & Insulation. You will also find a dedicated focus on the four key areas of the public sector build market – Healthcare, Leisure, Housing and Education.

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Public Sector Build Journal 3


Contents 14 08 06 News A round up of the latest industry news, including charity events, awarded contracts, partnerships and event announcements.

08 Upfront A new, revolutionary hospice building reevaluates the architecture of palliative care, addressing the needs of patients and staff.

14 Housing To avoid costly redesigns, Ashby Design says planners and developers must consider design standards at the very start of a project.

16 Technical Focus

20 Legal & Business

28 Healthcare

Armstrong demonstrates the technical use of Optima L white circle canopies at a new £1.2million sixth form centre at Hartsdown Academy in Margate, Kent.

Across the UK, SMEs face around £40b in unpaid invoices, but what can businesses do to speed up payment and ensure they get paid? Here are some helpful tips.

Two young patients have marked construction of a major new £150m healthcare facility in Edinburgh, delivering better services for all.

18 Talking Point

26 Education

30 Leisure

Jamie Barrett, Managing Director of building consultancy Evolution5 looks at some of the issues surrounding the existing procurement system.

Catton Grove Primary School, Norfolk, is a project that exemplifies the measures being taken by local councils to alleviate the demand for school places regionally.

A striking example of how a collaborative approach to improving facilities while driving down overheads can offer a win/win solution for public sector organisations and service users.

The all-new psbj.co.uk

Your revitalised and purpose-built portal for public sector building specification PSBJ unveils the new-look online resource for building products designed for the public sector built environment. Offering more content in an easy-to-navigate format, this refreshing, tailor-made new portal delivers the right content to the right audience in the shortest time possible.

Search ‘psbj’

4 Public Sector Build Journal

www.psbj.co.uk


18

26

30

32 Roofing, Cladding & Insulation

38 Landscaping

The beauty of the UK built environment is its varied use of external cladding, such as brick. Here, Aquarian Cladding Systems explains more.

Regeneration projects are trying to find ways to mitigate the impact of the motorcar and improve urban lifestyles and wellbeing, as LDA Design explains.

35 Play Equipment

40 CIH Housing 2015 Preview

When designing play areas, it is important to find out what impairments to cater for. PSBJ spoke with Gert Rijsdijk, Head of Product Development at Russell Play to find out more.

This month, the UK's housing industry will gather in Manchester for this year's Chartered Institute of Housing annual conference and exhibition.

37 Safety on Site

42 Product Showcase

Tony Sidwell at Shepherd Engineering Services explains why we must look further than CDM regulations 2015 to transform onsite health and safety behaviour.

A dedicated focus of industry news, products and case studies to help architects and specifiers make informed choices.

38

Read the latest issue online Gain insight from industry experts Source products and suppliers Keep up to date with industry news Discover new innovative technologies Browse the archive of features and issues Manage your subscriptions Download the PSBJ app for your iPad, iPhone or Android

Public Sector Build Journal 5


News

New pre-school facility for university campus Architectural and planning consultancy, Cassidy + Ashton, has secured planning permission for a new 80-place nursery building at the University of Cumbria’s Lancaster campus. Cassidy + Ashton designed the single storey, 325m2 timber-frame facility as a replacement for the existing 56-place nursery on the campus, which is currently operating out of a prefabricated building. The scheme will see the nursery create 30 new places for children aged between two and four years and move to a much more prominent location on campus in a purpose-built, permanent structure. It is being co-funded by Lancashire County Council and the existing childcare provider and nursery manager, Mrs Philippa Perks. It will offer a contemporary learning environment accommodating up to 40 children aged two years along with up to 40 children aged three/four. Facilities will include play/learning areas, sensory rooms and children’s toilet/change facilities along with secure outdoor play areas. The building will also include staff toilet and change facilities, admin areas, a kitchen and a staff room.

UK Construction Week unveils seminar programme Placing a firm emphasis on knowledge sharing, discussion and debate, UK Construction Week has revealed the seminar programme for the main stage of the event, which takes place at the Birmingham NEC in October. Kicking proceedings off on the Tuesday morning, the keynote presentation will feature the newly appointed minister for construction, who will set out parliamentary plans and policies for the construction industry over the next electoral period – giving the incoming government an

6 Public Sector Build Journal

opportunity to clarify how it intends to support construction while in power. The economy will also be under fire on day one, with sessions on protecting construction from economic weakness and improving the industry’s image among investors and policy makers. The sessions will feature high-level speakers from Glenigan, the Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists and the Federation of Master Builders. Skills will be the focus of the second day, with Marie-Clade Hemming from the Civil Engineering Contractors Association asking how construction can attract and retain the best talent, while Rupert Scott from TRADA will lead a thought provoking discussion on facing up to the construction industry skills shortage. The final day will look at procurement and the supply chain, asking how different construction disciplines can work smarter together. Paul Bogle from the National Federation of Builders will also explore how contractors can make the most of the public procurement platform, as well as giving useful insight into the 2014 EU Directive regarding procurement models for public projects.

Eric Wright wins £9m CAMHS centre scheme Eric Wright Construction, a division of the Eric Wright Group, has been awarded a £9m project to construct a new CAMHS (Children and Adolescent Mental Health Services) facility for Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (CWP). Construction of the new CAMHS unit is underway, with completion scheduled for May 2016. The contract has been awarded on behalf of the Trust by Villicare, Ryhurst’s joint venture with CWP, which was formed to assist the Trust with its capital investment programme, and will be managing the delivery of the project. The new unit will be a ‘Tier 4’ facility, providing in-patient and day-patient care for children and young people with severe and/ or complex mental health conditions that

are beyond the remit of community CAMH services and has been designed by mental health specialists, Gilling Dod Architects. The two-storey facility will be built within the grounds of the Countess of Chester Health Park on a site owned by CWP. It will provide 26 beds in two wards of 12 and 14 beds, each of which will be subdivided into two smaller areas with beds and day spaces, a central nurses’ station and a seclusion suite and a 4 bed PICU.

Northants project picks up national award win Leading independent management, design and construction consultancy Pick Everard is celebrating after winning a national award for its work at Rushden Pool in Northamptonshire. Pick Everard acted as project manager and supervisor on the £250,000 project on behalf of East Northamptonshire Council to improve facilities at the pool – work that was successful in the Small Project of the Year category at the NEC Awards. Pick Everard was appointed through the national Scape project and cost management framework. Adrian Ceney, Scape Framework Director, said: “This was a challenging project for us in terms of timescales as we had just a two week lead in time, a very tight timescale and budget to work with as well as political risks due to a potential penalty for East Northamptonshire Council should a delay have occurred. “We worked together with the council and empa framework contractor Jeakins Weir to ensure that a transparent and collaborative approach was adopted, providing excellent results on time.”

Nottingham hosts major offsite construction event Explore Offsite in the Education Sector was declared a huge success by over 150 construction clients, architects, engineers and contractors who attended the event. The professionals gathered to share their views on how offsite construction technology could play a vital role in the delivery of new schools, including those


News constructed through the Priority Schools Building Programme. Speaker Shaun Fitzgerald CEO of Breathing Buildings delivered a presentation on the ventilation impact upon heating in buildings with the message – ‘build tight, ventilate right’. The presentation covered building energy usage, the role of the built environment in carbon emissions and the positive impact of a ‘low energy’ building, as well as looking at the advantages and disadvantages of traditional natural ventilation and its effect on building comfort. Other high profile companies such as McAvoy Group, GF Tomlinson, Willmott Dixon and Portakabin Group delivered presentations providing technical insight gained from a range of innovative offsite projects. There were a number of key themes highlighted throughout the day, including; invisible standardisation, solid wood solutions and modular matters.

Extension to Gentofte School unveiled Kebony, the sustainable alternative to tropical hardwood, has announced its latest project, in collaboration with Arkitema Architects, at Gentofte School. The new addition to the school in Denmark creates a further 460m² of space, which can accommodate 100 children, spread across two floors. The extension houses three classrooms, a common room and a double height workshop as well as a large roof terrace. The designers, Arkitema Architects, worked in a close collaboration with the school’s management and teaching teams to ensure the space was practical and ergonomic for both the primary classes and the after school activities. The children at Gentofte school age from 5-9 years, as such the building has been completed with special features such as sliding walls that also function as writing boards and can be easily operated by the children. The new space can also be converted into either a single or double-height space and can be divided into compartments to host several classrooms dependent on the needs of the students and teachers. The large

south facing princess balconies will similarly afford further dynamic teaching methods by creating additional outdoor and recreational spaces.

developments our multidisciplinary teams are successfully delivering across the city, including MEPC’s Wellington Place and Leeds University library and multi-storey car park. We are delighted to be a major contributor to the evolving skyline of Leeds.” Edward Ziff, Chairman and Chief Executive of Town Centre Securities, says: “Shepherd was able to provide an insightful and deliverable preconstruction bid and we are looking forward to working collaboratively in order to move the project into the next phase of development.” Once complete, the newly refurbished and extended Merrion House will become one of Leeds City Council’s key buildings, where it will create a central base for all of its main services.

Council to meet demand for pupil places A demand for state-of-the-art teaching facilities in Scotland is being addressed in the Western Isles as Pick Everard helps to deliver a new school through the Scape framework. The £8.4m project, procured through the national Scape framework, will see leading independent design, construction and infrastructure consultancy Pick Everard provide project management and quantity surveying services for the scheme, which will see three existing primary schools combined into one. The Sgoil Uibhist a’ Tuath, in the Outer Hebrides, will see the creation of 100 pupil places. The scheme will see extra provision for early learning and childcare (0-5-yearsold), car and bus parking with drop off facilities, hard play areas including a multiuse games area and 3G synthetic pitch. An environmental garden with polytunnel and planting area is also being landscaped as part of the project. The project will see the demolition of the former secondary wing and head teacher’s house on the site.

School extension to meet growing demand Chester-based architectural and planning consultancy, Cassidy + Ashton, has been granted planning permission to extend Davenham C of E Primary School in Northwich. The £0.75m project is designed to address the increasing need for primary school places in the Davenham area of Northwich due to new housing and high demand at the Ofsted ‘Outstanding’ School. The scheme is expected to start on site in July for December 2015 completion. It comprises a two classroom extension, along with the addition of a group room into a classroom and increases to the hall space. Comments Susan McBain, associate architect at Cassidy + Ashton: “There has been a great deal of activity in the education sector over the past three years to address the shortage of school places and Cassidy + Ashton has considerable experience in the sector, including recent schemes such as Barnton Community Primary School and Legh Vale Primary School. “The Davenham C of E Primary School project has been designed to deliver a high calibre of classroom and communal accommodation that enhances the existing building. We have developed the scheme with buildability in mind to ensure it can be delivered within a fasttrack programme in time for occupation in January.”

Shepherd wins bid for pre-construction services Shepherd has been appointed to carry out the pre-construction services at Merrion House in Leeds City Centre. Selected by Town Centre Securities PLC after a competitive bid process, built environment specialist, Shepherd, will provide pre-construction services ahead of the complete refurbishment and extension of Merrion House. Neil Clarke, Construction Director for Shepherd, comments: “The Merrion House project is one of several key

Public Sector Build Journal 7


Upfront

On entering the building, a light and welcoming reception area immediately engages the building user

A fresh approach to palliative care It’s always a momentous occasion when a project which has been five years in the making reaches handover; but never more so than when that project serves to be a legacy for the county, making a meaningful difference to individuals and families requiring palliative care for generations. Here, Architype explains more about the expectations and challenges of the build.

8 Public Sector Build Journal

E

agerly anticipated by patients and staff, the Phase One completion of St. Michael’s gives the hospice real reason to celebrate. Revolutionising palliative care for the patients, the new development provides state-ofthe-art facilities for the dedicated and committed team, who have led a fundraising campaign of mass proportions to accrue the necessary £9.6m required for this groundbreaking project. St. Michael’s Hospice is an independent charity and has existed since the 1980s on a rural site, in Bartestree, a few miles east of Hereford and has provided free palliative care for the county for 30 years. Having outgrown their facilities, which were outdated for modern care  methods, the Hospice set about

Every entrance and connective space has been fluidly designed providing easy access


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Upfront

The private inpatient accommodation is accessed from the street in the form of five modular ‘clusters’

The floor plan is optimised to aid nurses in providing care effectively and efficiently

Natural materials such as timbers and textiles have been specified with unusual generosity for a hospice building

10 Public Sector Build Journal

appointing an architectural team for the redevelopment of the site, which comprises a new inpatient wing for up to 20 live in patients, as well as a complete refurbishment of the existing building, which will now house the hospice daycare unit. Being new to hospice care design really helped Architype to form an open-minded and unassuming approach to this special project. Reassessing the requirements and questioning current practice in palliative care design to deliver honed solutions, underpinned by mindful collaboration with this complex and sensitive, client and user group. The final outcome is a highly ambitious, bespoke arrangement, which is the result of in-depth consultation with patients, staff and infection control teams. This knowledge, confirmed by intensive research has culminated in a unique layout, that offers a variety of internal spaces, which are flexible to suit a spectrum of needs. The floor plan is optimised to aid nurses in providing care effectively and efficiently. The nurse stations are positioned strategically to improve visibility to all patient rooms, whilst being in close proximity to necessary resources and information. In line with Architype’s sustainable portfolio, the building has a simple and robust environmental strategy that focuses on passive principles such as rigorous insulation, exemplary airtightness, mechanical ventilation and heat recovery, breathing wall technology, optimised daylighting and solar gain. These integral sustainable features help to deliver a


Upfront

low-energy building that will require substantially less heating and artificial light; requirements of the upmost importance to the charitable client, who fundraise approximately £4m p.a to cover their running costs. The sustainable credentials deliver more than just financial benefits, providing a comfortable and healthy building for users, with a fresh supply of clean air, eliminating the stuffiness created by artificial heat and light that can attribute to fatigue, headaches and of course, the spread of bacteria. Architecturally, the building has been designed to maximise the connection to external spaces and uses a natural material palette where appropriate to create a variety of supportive, calming and uplifting environments. Developing a scheme that would deliver a non-clinical atmosphere whilst abiding to healthcare regulations, infection control and best practice guidance has challenged the design team to deliver a truly alternative response. One of the most interesting aspects that really characterises this project and the contemporary response to the brief, is that this building is as much about ‘lifecare’ as ‘end-of-life care’. The client was passionate that this building would enable users to become more independent. This is apparent in the integrated facilities such as physiotherapy suites that help regain strength with support; assessment kitchens and bathrooms where patients can practice daily activities, and even details such as the bespoke balustrades that indicate your location within the building. On entering the building, a light and

The building has a simple and robust environmental strategy that focuses on passive principles

welcoming reception area immediately engages the building user with the beautiful Herefordshire countryside through a fully glazed wall. Beyond the reception area is integrated services such as therapy suites and guest accommodation with the inpatient wing beyond. A central focus of the inpatient wing is the multifunctional ‘street’ – a central double height circulation space, flooded by light from the continuous roof glazing. It offers a variety of spaces from discreet seating areas, break-out areas and conveniently positioned nurse stations. The private inpatient accommodation is accessed from the street in the form of five modular ‘clusters’, comprising four

en-suite bedrooms that all open directly onto a communal living room. Moving through the building to the more private accommodation, the ceiling height gradually descends, creating a feeling of comfort, security and sense of a familiar, domestic environment. Every entrance and connective space has been fluidly designed providing easy access, with large glazed double doors that are fitted with integral blinds between the bedrooms and social space. This design feature allows for varying levels of social inclusion or total privacy. From the centre point of the lounge, each bed head is visible to a nurse allowing for better  communication and transparency.

Public Sector Build Journal 11


Upfront A strong connection to the surrounding landscape is proven to aid physical wellbeing and in response to this every room within the cluster offers every patient their own outdoor terrace. Each cluster is orientated to maximise on daylight, whilst a carefully chosen colour palette that distinguishes the cluster has been developed from the designers’ research into healing colours. The design of the bedrooms has also been carefully developed to provide a functional but non-clinical feel. Features such as hoists have been included so that patients can be moved with safety into the specially fitted bathrooms. Despite the necessity for potentially imposing equipment, a simple, high quality feel is maintained, with all aid stowed in the custom-made integral cupboards specified in every bedroom. Containing a drugs locker and preparation space, hoist storage and motor, wardrobe, fridge, clinical wash basin and ventilation, this cleverly designed unit is a piece of equipment in itself, providing a one-stop station for nurses and patients. Providing a non-clinical feel to the building has been a challenge; tackling the usual specifications of clinical plastics in exchange for natural materials. Although not possible in every instance when complying with hygiene regulations, natural materials such as timbers and textiles have been specified with unusual generosity for a hospice building. Where the direct use of

The design of the bedrooms and bathrooms has been carefully developed to provide a functional but non-clinical feel

Architecturally, the building has been designed to maximise the connection to external spaces

natural materials has not been appropriate for infection control and hygiene standards in key locations, they have at least been made visible, as seen in the timber slat ceilings, the terrace canopies or the timber skirting, producing a visually softer environment with vastly improved acoustics. The client and designers were ambitious to make this a building that was extremely functional but supportive, flexible and uplifting for the users, at times feeling more like a spa hotel than a hospice caring for patients with life-limiting conditions. Striking the right balance with a building

that felt highly professional, whilst maintaining comfort and a sustainable living space has called upon skills from many staff at Architype over the five years. The relationship forged between the practice and the Hospice team has been one of shared vision, mutual respect and commitment, with both parties taking a responsible, sensitive and human approach to creating this new pioneering facility for Herefordshire. Project architect Paul Neep described the experience: “St. Michael’s Hospice has touched the lives of so many people in Herefordshire and it has been a privilege to deliver this fantastic new facility that will enable them to continue with the highest possible healthcare standards in an uplifting, comfortable and relaxing environment whilst benefiting from significantly reduced running costs.” As patients settle into the new building, work has started with immediate effect on Phase Two; the refurbishment of the existing building. The complete strip-out and refit will aim to offer more services and opportunities to day-care patients and their families, modernising, rationalising and improving the sustainable infrastructure of the 1980s building. Facilities will include respite care, holistic treatment, training facilities, community and recreational spaces in an improved environment. These will support the hospices activities and outreach, complementing the in-patient building and providing a sustainable future for the Hospice’s inspirational and commendable work. 

 www.architype.co.uk

12 Public Sector Build Journal


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Housing

Social standards Design standards for affordable housing in London often clash with what has been approved during planning. To avoid costly redesigns, Simon Hansard of Ashby Design says planners and developers must consider these standards at the very start of a project.

A

ffordable housing can present some of the most challenging and yet rewarding work for a designer. Whether working on a Housing Association site or the affordable element of a private development, designing social housing usually means dealing with both budget and space constraints. However, that should never be an excuse for scrimping on quality of design. Just because it is a product that won’t be sold for profit doesn’t mean developers and their architectural advisers shouldn’t aspire to excellence in design. Indeed, very often quality design is even more necessary in affordable housing, especially when it comes to the living space: these units will often be occupied by people who are out of work and so spending the majority of their time in them; occupants may also have some form of disability, meaning it is crucial that we don’t discriminate through poor design and create spaces that are unlivable. In the country’s most cramped space of all – the capital – the London Housing Design Guide (LHDG) was introduced to ensure that both private and social housing

14 Public Sector Build Journal

delivered quality living space, and not the kind of cramped living conditions that London Mayor Boris Johnson referred to as “Hobbit Homes”. While the LHDG is not yet mandatory for housing developments in all London boroughs, some boroughs have adopted it as part of their planning criteria, and all Housing Associations developing sites in the capital must adhere to LHDG to meet their government funding requirements. However, because the LHDG is not yet enshrined in planning law, there is often a clash between the kind of sites that receive planning permission and the kind of sites that are required to meet LHDG standards. Typically, a landowner will obtain planning permission for a site and then sell it on to a Housing Association or private developer. The kind of basic design that makes it through planning rarely lives up to the standards in the design guide, and so the housebuilder will come to an architectural solutions company like Ashby Design to bring the project up to standard. The two areas where design standards are typically lacking are the outside amenity space and the inside living space.

Occupancy levels of units can go both up and down as designs are refined to meet the standards

For example, the LHDG requires a minimum of 5m2 of private outdoor space for dwellings of one to two people, with another 1m2 for each extra person after this. Typically in London on a block of flats this private space will be a balcony. With each balcony having to be a certain size relating to the occupancy, it is not only the space planning of the unit that is affected, but also the planning permission, as creating balconies of varying sizes will change the aesthetic of the building. Going back to the planners will add both time and cost to the project. Such problems can be multiplied once the impact of the LHDG on internal layouts


Housing The two areas where design standards are typically lacking are the outside amenity space and the inside living space

is considered. The LHDG sets out “Essential Gross Internal Area (GIA)” for each dwelling based on the number of bedrooms, occupants and storeys. For example, a single story flat with two bedrooms for three people has an Essential GIA of 61m2. In addition to this required total floorspace, there are criteria for every room and area within the property, such as minimum sizes of hallways and bedrooms. For many, the first instinct in tackling internal living spaces that fall short of the design guide – for example a second bedroom that is too small – is to start moving walls around. However, going down this road can mean increasing build costs, especially if the walls being moved are party walls and steels need to be installed. Rather than move walls around, another consideration may be to change the occupancy levels of a property. This will obviously carry a significant cost implication, although this need not always mean an increase in costs: in the work Ashby Design carries out for developers we find that occupancy levels of units can go both up and down as we refine the designs to meet the standards. If the occupancy level goes up, then the housing association is able to accommodate more tenants. Obviously if the occupancy goes down then the opposite is true, and this will have an impact on the housing association’s budget. One positive note in such a situation

Typically in London on a block of flats additional private space will be in the form of a balcony

The London Housing Design Guide was introduced to ensure that both private and social housing delivered quality living space

is that the association may be able to save costs in other areas that will help to mitigate this lower occupancy level, such as negotiating down the level of payments that need to be made towards local infrastructure under a project’s Section 106 Agreement. However, all of this reworking, redesigning, and multiple visits to planners is really just treating the symptoms of a failure to think about design standards at the start of a project. At Ashby Design we are typically called in by the main contractor after they have been hired by the housing association, and up to this point little thought has been given to the design standards, other than

that they will be something the project will have to meet. If the LHDG was rolled out across all London boroughs – indeed if a national design guide was handed to every council in the country for both private and social housing – and made a mandatory criteria for granting planning consent, then most, if not all of these clashes could be eradicated. If good design was considered at the very start of every affordable housing project, before a single boot has stepped onsite, then tenants would have even better living spaces and housing associations could see their build costs tumble. 

 www.ashbydesign.co.uk

Public Sector Build Journal 15


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for open areas, providing excellent sound absorption through their ability to absorb sound on both the front and the back of the system and so aid intelligibility and concentration. They are quick and easy to install under plasterboard ceilings, existing grid systems or exposed concrete soffits. The Dune dB tiles aid confidentiality due to their higher density which enables them to perform to 39dB. Hartsdown Executive Principal Andy Somers said: “It is a great place for sixth formers to work and enjoy their learning experience. It has a welcoming and friendly atmosphere and is a comfortable place to VIEW FROM REAR SIDE 280

in the student space specifically, with the Dune tiles in all other areas. Ian Titherington, Project Coordinator at Diocesan Architects who are frequent specifiers of Armstrong Ceilings, said: “The canopies provide a visual talking point to the social area and reveal ductwork, cables and equipment that would otherwise be covered over. “The existing building stock was very poor, with many temporary structures including mobiles inherited from other schools and commercial companies. As this was the first new build in the school for almost 20 years our brief was fairly simple. It had to be aesthetically pleasing and fit in the contractor’s budget.” Installed by specialist sub-contractor Bagley Plastering Contractors for main contractor BEC Construction, the two Armstrong systems are manufactured from up to 80% recycled content and provide light reflectance of up to 87%. The Optima L canopies were developed to provide a cost-effective designer solution

Ø1170

S

ome 22 Optima L white circle canopies and a total of 500m2 of Dune dB Tegular tiles on a Prelude 24mm grid, that was angled 45˚ in one area, were selected by Diocesan Architects for a new £1.2million sixth form centre at Hartsdown Academy in Margate, Kent. The two-storey building at the front of the campus next to the entrance replaces a mobile classroom block which was at least 20 years old with a steel- and timberframed structure comprising seven small classrooms, social and study space, and ICT suite. It also doubles as an adult education centre. Diocesan Architects had to design to strict guidelines in terms of the centre’s funding, with the building having to be delivered for £1500 per m2, this being signed off by the EFA (Education Funding Agency) prior to a successful grant award to the school. The Armstrong systems have been used throughout the 500m2, the circular Optima L canopies in the social space and the diagonal grid layout with Dune dB tiles

280

Mineral ceiling tiles and canopies from Armstrong were specified for a school’s first new-build for almost 20 years for their aesthetics, acoustics and cost.

ANOPY CIRCLE Ø1170 x 30 MM

OPTIMA CANOPY CIRCLE Ø 1170 x 30 MM:

PAINTED WHITE SCRIM, 3.85 KG/PC

Ø 1170

610 DETAIL B

SINGLE SUSPENSION 2 x 1/4” - 20 nut

DETAIL C

WALL

No Scrim Painted & Sprayed Edge

Min.70 / max.2400

A DETAIL B

280

VIEW FROM REAR SIDE

SINGLE SUSPENSION

25

Min . 70 / Max. 2400

BPCS5450

BPCS5451

BPCS5454

Fiberglass core

BPCS5454

BPCS5588 DETAIL E

DRYWALL

BPCS5588 34

16 Public Sector Build Journal

BPCS5451

BPCS5450

No scrim Painted & sprayed edge

Detail C: Wall

Armstrong claims proprietary rights in the information disclosed hereon. This drawing is furnished in confidence on the expre FRAMES DETAIL Dof theGROUPING or producement article or part shown hereon without the express consent in writing of Armstrong. All product specifica 19

Min.70 / max.2400

280

280

DETAIL C WALL BPCS5588 CANOPY DELIVERED WITH CARDBOARD POSITIONING DEVICE, FIXED TO REAR SI 19

118

A

610

Ø 1170

A

2 x Nut per side

Painted Scrim

Detail B: Single Suspension

25

A

Fibreglass core BPCS5450

67

610

280

280

280

30

19

30

20 nut

Detail A

Glass Wool, Painted white Scrim, 3.85 KG/PC

BPCS5455


Technical Focus

OPTIMA L CANOPY: The OPTIMA L Canopy range provides a cost effective design solution for WALL open areas providing excellent sound absorption and light reflectance. 19 OPTIMA L Canopies can be used in new spaces or to rejuvenate or renovate an existing area. OPTIMA L Canopies are very easy and quick to install under plasterboard ceilings, existing grid systems or exposed concrete soffits. OPTIMA L Canopy is a mineral panel available in various sizes. It is white on all surfaces giving a high quality appearance.

BPCS5588

67

900

900

300

300

BPCS5588  www.armstrong-ceilings.co.uk

300

600

40

300

300

300

Available Shapes:

WALL

Min.70 / max.2400

Min.70 / max.2400

study which is important for our young men and women who are preparing for the next step in their educational career including BPCS5450training, university, higher education, apprenticeships and employment.” The new sixth form block is part of DETAIL B SINGLE SUSPENSION DETAIL C ongoing expansion at the academy 19 which also includes a new music learning centre with digital recording facilities, a community radio station where students learn broadcast and production skills, a BPCS5450 3G floodlit all-weather soccer pitch and a  developing sports centre. DETAIL D GROUPING FRAMES

40

DETAIL C

SINGLE SUSPENSION

150 300 150

DETAIL B

Small rectangle

Large rectangle

1200 x 2400 x 40mm

25

600 x 1200 x 40mm

300

300

600

Medium rectangle B

40

300

Ø 1200

40

40 0

600

0 60

300

Ø 800

BPCS5455

60 0

40

600

300

300

1200 x 1800 x 40mm

0 40

DRYWALL DETAIL E Detail E: Drywall

34

600

300

Medium rectangle A

BPCS5454

900 x 1800 x 40mm

34

600

150

300

600

118 67

600

300

BPCS5454 BPCS5451

BPCS5454

600

150

67

BPCS5454 BPCS5451

300

BPCS5451

25

BPCS5451

118

25

40

25

40

Detail D: Grouping Frames

BPCS5455

400

Square

Small circle

Ø 800 x 40mm

1200 x 1200 x 40mm

Circle

600

Ø 1200 x 40mm

www.armstrong.eu

Public Sector Build Journal 17


Talking Point Public sector procurement lacks a strategic approach

Why public sector procurement is not supporting SMEs In this article, Jamie Barrett, Managing Director of building consultancy Evolution5 looks at some of the issues surrounding the existing procurement system and what could be done to encourage more SMEs to tender for public sector construction projects.

T

he Government stated its aim to improve localism and to support SMEs particularly on public sector projects. But there seems to be a complete dichotomy between this well intentioned ethos, which has to be good for the economy, and the current state of public sector procurement, which in our view, completely favours the biggest, multi-national construction consultancies over smaller practices – and the UK’s largest major contractors over regional building companies.

A flawed route to procurement At best, the current procurement methods for public sector building schemes are severely flawed. Long before any pre-qualification questionnaires (PQQs) or invitations to tender (ITTs) are issued, public sector projects have to go through protracted internal governance procedures. Then there are the budget setting cycles and complex sign off processes. Time-sensitive projects often run behind schedule before they have even been approved. Going through OJEU

18 Public Sector Build Journal

can then add up to six more months to the procurement process. As a result, many public sector organisations look to avoid going through OJEU every time by setting up frameworks – but the way these frameworks are procured too often rules out SMEs and definitely favours larger national or multinational companies – whether for contracting or building consultancy services. The biggest issue for SMEs is that no two public sector clients – whether NHS trusts, local authorities, schools or universities – use the same procurement approach. Each body will use their own format and this means we have to reinvent the wheel for every single tender opportunity. And the clients have unrealistic expectations for how long a PQQ takes to complete. They estimate no more than two hours – but the reality is at least half a day and we find a full day is most likely.

Two good but under-utilised solutions The Government has gone some way towards simplifying the process with

Jamie Barrett founded Evolution5 with Director, Chris Moss, in 2007 and holds the position of Managing Director. He is a Chartered Project Management Surveyor with over 15 years’ experience working in the construction industry. Constructionline (CL) registration and with the development of PAS91. Constructionline registration is a prequalification in itself. It is very thorough and offers a common sense approach – but PQQs still ask for all the same information that is available via CL which is just not efficient for the supplier to provide in a different format time and time again. Why do PQQs not simply ask if you are CL pre-qualified? And if yes, then only project-specific questions need answering. Why is there not more confidence in Constructionline? The introduction of PAS91 was another sensible development and an attempt to simplify procurement. This is a publicly available, best practice standardised document for supplier assessment. The time that could be saved for SMEs – or any member of the supply chain if PAS91 was used would be significant. But despite


Talking Point

The introduction of PAS91 was another sensible development and an attempt to simplify procurement

the availability of such a good document, the vast majority of public sector organisations still use their own forms – some of which were originally drafted as far back as the 1980s, making each PQQ submission a bespoke, time-intensive document to produce every time. How many public sector organisations even know PAS91 documentation actually exists? Why is this approach not widely used?

The challenge for SMEs The huge challenge for SMEs is that large multinational consultancies and the major contractors have whole departments dedicated to working on PQQs and tender submissions. The average SME simply does not have these resources so entering into public sector procurement takes senior staff away from fee-earning work and this puts significant pressure on these businesses. And whilst submissions from SMEs may be technically excellent, they will never be as polished as those produced by major companies with many more resources – when every document has to be bespoke. Another example is insurance. In both OJEU and non-OJEU PQQs, professional indemnity insurance is set so high that SMEs are completely eliminated at the outset. Why would you need £10m of professional indemnity insurance to be in place for project management or cost control services on a £1m building project – when the services being tendered for

How opportunities can be improved

do not involve design or engineering the building? But we see this requirement all the time and £10m of insurance is prohibitively costly for an SME.

Our recommendations for change include: Standardised PQQs using either Constructionline registration to pre-qualify or the PAS91 standardised documentation. Only evidence of project-specific skills and experience would then need to be provided, radically reducing the time spent on PQQs. A clearly defined set of accreditations, qualifications and professional memberships to ‘qualify’ SMEs for public sector tendering opportunities. Sensible cost banding of projects – clearly not all SMEs would have the resources to deliver a £100m project. There is no clear non-OJEU process for smaller work packages – for example, school projects up to £1.5m. There has to be a better way of communicating these opportunities to SMEs. A supply chain database would help address this. Currently even small packages go to the major supply chain partners on the frameworks – because it is just easier but this is leaving SMEs out in the cold. More public sector clients need to actively and genuinely demonstrate a commitment to localism and to supporting SMEs by making it possible for these fantastic, flexible, agile, customer-focused and innovative organisations to become part of the supply chain. Failing that, central Government needs to mandate a suitable process. 

The issues post-PQQ If the first stage of the tendering is successful, then there is a further lengthy and resource-intensive process to go through which again is a major challenge for SMEs. There is no doubt that frameworks for building services are largely populated by the biggest companies – but in our view, these frameworks do not necessarily offer a best value route to procurement.

A shocking statistic A shocking fact for Evolution5 is that despite working on over 100 PQQs, taking expert advice and professional input in the quality of our proposals, requesting feedback on every single one and ploughing that knowledge and experience back into the next opportunity, we have been successful on zero tenders to date. Yet in complete contrast, our customer satisfaction scores across the board are outstanding – 100% in the past year and 99.4% since Evolution5 was established in 2007. And 100% of our customers, which includes a high percentage of public sector organisations, would use our services again. This suggests something is radically wrong with the public sector procurement system.

 www.evolution5.co.uk

Public Sector Build Journal 19


Legal & Business

Shanti Shah is a lawyer with the Construction team at top 100 UK commercial law firm SGH Martineau LLP. With experience gained working in national and international firms, his work covers construction disputes and litigation; complex commercial disputes; contract disputes/breaches; professional negligence; High Court litigation; ADR (arbitration; adjudication & mediation).

You can discourage late payment with reminders and phone requests for payment

Set a valuable precedent Across the UK, SMEs face around £40b in unpaid invoices according to a recent study, but what can businesses do to speed up payment and ensure they get paid? Shanti Shah, a lawyer in the Construction team at law firm SGH Martineau explains.

T

he place to start is always your Terms & Conditions and although there is no definitive rule for what they should contain, you might consider: Your T&Cs are usually written to favour your business and wherever possible, you should ensure these terms govern the relationship between you and the client; Requiring money to be paid in advance; When providing goods, include an adequate ‘Retention of Title’ clause and mark the goods as belonging to you, so they can be easily identified in the event of an insolvency; Stipulate the buyer must keep the goods separate from other goods and/or must not use them without your written consent; Specify that although risk passes to the buyer, title does not, unless full payment is received – confirm in writing;

20 Public Sector Build Journal

Include a mixed goods clause in your T&Cs. Include a provision that allows debts owed on one contract to be off-set against other contracts between you and your client; Limit the buyer’s credit to an appropriate amount to control your exposure; Include clauses to ensure a quick turnaround, like giving the buyer a set period after delivery to inspect the goods before they will be deemed accepted and payment becomes due.

Asking to be paid In construction operations, “pay when paid” clauses are not permitted and you should avoid payment regimes linked to other contracts, as these were probably agreed to suit other parties. Asking for full or part payment in advance should become standard procedure, but as a minimum you should

ensure the initial payment covers the cost of the materials you used. Request payment (or the balance) on delivery when the goods/services can be inspected or agree a part payment on delivery, with the balance shortly afterwards. You can discourage late payment with reminders and phone requests for payment before the final payment date and remind the buyer of any interest to be charged, or late payment costs. Offer a re-payment plan for buyers who can’t pay, as opposed to won’t pay. Consider the various insurance products that exist, like ‘credit insurance’, which are designed to cover bad debts. Also, depending on the order size, undertake credit checks if possible and obtain guarantees from parent companies and/or directors. In a competitive market, striking the balance between good client relationships built on credit terms, against the shorter term gain of more restrictive credit terms is hard, but being tough from the start sets a valuable precedent – ensuring payments are made is cheaper than chasing outstanding payments. Hopefully these points will help you get what is due, on time, but the key to being paid is understanding who you are contracting with and if any doubts exist seek professional advice as early as possible. 

 www.sghmartineau.com


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Door & Wall Protection Washrooms The school specified Bushboard's ready plumbed module (RPM) washroom solution using SanCeram sanitaryware

Forest School chooses 'best on the market' washrooms The Forest School in Horsham is a high achieving secondary school for over 1100 boys aged between 11-16 years old. Over the past five years The Forest School has consistently been the highest-performing boy's school in West Sussex and amongst the highest-performing in Britain.

S

ite manager at the school, Gary Wait was in charge of updating the year 7 school washrooms. He says: “We needed toilets that are good quality and long lasting.” Gary chose to go with Bushboard Washrooms because Bushboard’s product was the “best on the market” and the quotation was competitive.

Quadro is a universal solution ideal for most washroom areas

Gary chose Bushboard’s Quadro range in SGL. Quadro is a universal solution ideal for most washroom areas. It has a distinctive quadrant foot and headrail delivering strength and style – ideal for a school washroom. For extra privacy Bushboard’s unique privacy skirting was added to the package. Made of durable aluminium, the skirting provides total privacy at floor level. Gary chose Bushboard’s ready plumbed module (RPM) washroom solution using SanCeram sanitaryware, Chartham wall hung WCs and urinals, factory fitted to the duct panels. Daniel Kearsey from D. Kearsey Plumbing and Decorating Services fitted the RPM systems at the school. He says: “The RPM ducting and vanities literally just slotted together, they were so easy to fit and saved us a lot of time on site.” The washrooms were designed in Bushboard’s Cobalt, Yellow Ochre, Fern and Chilli, fitting in with the school colours. Duct panels are in Bushboard’s Storm, partitions in Welsh Slate and

22 Public Sector Build Journal

flashgaps in Welsh Slate and Winter. Gary is very happy with the new toilet cubicles and with the service he received. He comments: “The Bushboard team were very helpful, everybody that has seen the new toilet block is very impressed with the quality and how it all looks. I would like to thank everybody at Bushboard for all the support during the refurbishment.” Gary has already been in touch with Bushboard for the next phase of refurbishment at the school. Bushboard has been developing cubicle and washroom systems for over 80 years and its reputation has been built on delivering high quality products at affordable prices for every sector. The company’s tried and trusted range of washrooms for education have been specified time and time again. Whether customers are looking for safe cubicles with anti-finger trap hinges to keep little fingers safe or full height options for additional privacy, Bushboard is renowned for delivering exceptional washrooms to nursery schools, schools, colleges and universities across the UK. Get in touch with Bushboard today to order brochures, samples and moodboards. Its experienced team are here to help through every step of the project.

 www.bushboard-washrooms.co.uk washrooms@bushboard-washrooms.co.uk  01264 364311


the ONLY mesh fencing solution designed specifically for tennis

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Public Sector Build Journal 23


Door & Wall Protection Rooflights

Stourbridge College, Birmingham.

Q-RAILING. QUALITY, SIMPLICITY & STYLE. Q-railing designs and develops innovative, high quality designer stainless steel railing systems and glass balustrades, for maximum transparency coupled with excellent fall protection. Pictured is part of the recently refurbished Stourbridge Campus, part of the the Birmingham Metropolitan College.

A total of more than 130 metres of Q-railing Easy Glass速 Slim and 3kN was installed throughout the college, including balustrade and staircases. Q-railing offers a comprehensive range of modular balustrade systems to suit the widest range of aesthetic and loading requirements.

For further further information informationabout aboutQ-railing Q-railingproducts productsorortotoorder order your brochure call: For your brochure call: 01782 711 676 / 0800 781 4245 or email: sales2@q-railing.co.uk 01782 711 676 / 0800 781 4245 or email: sales@q-railing.co.uk

24 Public Sector Build Journal


Cross Laminated Timber

CLT has proven to be an effective material for delivering schools by using standardisation to facilitate a faster, more effective roll out of construction programmes

Building for education

The critical need for new schools has been caused by overcrowding in the current school system, with many schools reaching a 'tipping point' in a lack of school places. These factors call for the fast, lean and cost effective methods of construction – making offsite manufactured timber structures, such as cross laminated timber (CLT), the ideal solution.

T

he X-LAM Alliance has a wealth of experience in creating CLT structures for education buildings – from nurseries and schools, to universities and academies. Building a successful school environment involves the integration of a range of different components. These include structuring the building around the needs of the curriculum – providing flexibility, adaptability and community use through break out areas and warm and inviting spaces that help to inspire learning. Cross laminated timber has become a valuable tool for enhancing education environments. Being a largely prefabricated offsite solution, CLT is factory manufactured to exceptional levels of accuracy, ensuring minimal defects. This improves procurement, construction and project delivery timescales as well as reducing costs, saving money and maximising efficiency on all levels. It is fast becoming the material of choice for specifiers due to its inherent structural qualities that include speed of construction as well as airtightness and carbon sequestration but most importantly, its effect on internal

Cross laminated timber has become a valuable tool for enhancing education environments

environments when left exposed. Cost plays a major part in the Government’s plans for the creation of new schools. In terms of overall programme costs, the Government has created a “more for less” strategy. This involves a substantial degree of standardisation across new build schools, particularly in reference to architecture and layout – providing a major opportunity for the benefits of offsite solutions to be exploited. CLT has proven to be an effective material for delivering schools by using standardisation to facilitate a faster, more effective roll out of construction programmes. Cost comparison in educational buildings has to be carried out at a ‘whole project’ level. Thermal, acoustic and airtightness contributions from the structural frame itself as well as programme savings and the cost benefits associated with offsite manufactured systems must all be taken into account when comparing the commercial benefit of one structural material against another. The impact of increasing demographics can be immense and in some cases, difficult to predict. This can have a direct

effect on the school intake – driving the rapid requirement for new educational establishments with an inherent adaptable design that can accommodate intake fluctuations. It is crucial then to design and create schools that incorporate a consideration for the cost and disruption associated with modifications to the building in the future. Removal or addition of the walls and floors can impact on the structural integrity which means that the building must be designed to provide structural adaptability from the outset. Cross laminated timber can help to create a structure that provides flexible properties for future changes to the building. Exposed CLT creates a natural, inviting and calming environment, it can also enhance acoustic properties and dampen sound. In educational environments CLT generates a peaceful space for effective teaching and delivers schools that are cost effective and adaptable for future adjustment.

 www.xlam-alliance.com 

info@xlam-alliance.com  01773 857512

Public Sector Build Journal 25


Education

A lasting legacy The school place race hit its peak in April, as thousands of parents across the UK waited to see whether their child would be able to attend their chosen school.

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orfolk was no exception, indeed, this was a record year for primary school admissions in the county with 302 more children due to start school in Norfolk this September, compared with last year. Catton Grove Primary School, Norfolk, is a project that exemplifies the measures being taken by local councils, in this instance Norfolk County Council, to alleviate the demand for school places regionally. Despite the increased demand for school places, 92% of children were given their first place school, with 56 extra families getting their first preference this year. In order to combat the growing need for school places, a trend that is forecast to continue, projects such as Catton Grove Primary School, delivered by construction and infrastructure company Morgan Sindall plc, are expanding upon existing facilities to meet the growing demand for places. This scheme, and those like it, reflect

the planning by Norfolk County Council for the years ahead and the county council has been working closely with schools to increase the number of school places available over the last few years. This has meant an investment from the county council in increasing the number of classes in some schools, including Catton Grove. The £1.6m Catton Grove Primary School project comprised the construction of six new classrooms and is part of a wider scheme by the council to provide more school places in the region. The spacious, modernised teaching spaces blend seamlessly with the existing buildings and enhance the space on offer to the local community. Additional classrooms were constructed alongside an extra nursery room and new office and reception spaces allowing for a cohesive extension that expanded and updated the school. New storage facilities were also constructed. The additional teaching spaces mean

The additional teaching spaces mean that Catton Grove Primary is now a three form entry with places for 630 pupils

26 Public Sector Build Journal

that Catton Grove Primary is now a three form entry with places for 630 pupils from the local catchment area, creating additional places. Arron Easter, Framework Manager of the Catton Grove Project, said: “Lack of school places is a growing issue regionally prompting calls for additional space and the development of new facilities, which can often be challenging both financially and spatially. “Projects such as Catton Grove demonstrate the measures being taken by local councils and the planning that will mean, as pupil numbers grow, places available grow concurrently with them meaning every effort is being made to match supply and demand in the community.” Community was an important factor for the Morgan Sindall project team during the project’s 38 week life span. The project team immersed themselves locally with pupils, staff and parents. As is often the case with education construction projects, the build took place in a live school environment, meaning communication between the project team, the school and parents was essential. Simple measures such as timing deliveries and regular written updates distributed to parents ensured all parties were fully informed about the project’s progress. The project was initially intended to span 56 weeks and would be completed over multiple phases. A review of this process allowed the project to be cut to 36 weeks – a time saving that translated into financial savings. School holidays were utilised to ensure the most disruptive work was timed around these and the project team worked closely with key subcontractors to plan the key phases to minimise disruption during


Education

The £1.6m Catton Grove Primary School project comprised the construction of six new classrooms

the project. Reuse of existing windows and roof lights saved additional funds as did ring fencing materials early on to secure the cost. Morgan Sindall’s project team also took precautions to ensure a seamless handover of the completed extension, holding training sessions ahead of the handover date to ensure the staff were comfortable with the new facilities. Arron Easter added: “From the start, and as with many of the projects Morgan Sindall is involved with, we wanted to ensure that we worked closely with the school and formed a good relationship with staff and pupils. We did this through a number of additional projects beyond the construction work. During a community day held during the summer holidays, the project team volunteered their time and resources to give the school’s playground a new lease of life. “The new play area has a pirate theme and to celebrate its completion we held a piratethemed fancy dress day. It was a great way to connect with the pupils, raise awareness of the project and ensure the message of on-site safety was delivered.” The revamp of the play area included new decking and play areas, a freshly painted shed and a new wave backdrop complete with wooden pirate characters. The project team also held regular safety assemblies and community days at the school. One such community day, ‘It’s a Knock Out!’, pitted the Morgan Sindall staff against the Catton Grove Primary School teachers. The event helped to build cooperation and trust between all parties and fostered a positive relationship between the school and project team. Safety was emphasised through Morgan Sindall’s safety mascot, Ivor Goodsite, visiting the school and involving and

The spacious, modernised teaching spaces blend seamlessly with the existing buildings

educating the children through the creation of safety posters. The involvement Morgan Sindall enjoyed with the school meant that the handover was marked with a special ceremony. Pupils were given a tour of the new facility and as part of the fun-filled event, balloons were suspended in a net before being released over the children to mark the occasion. A balloon modeller was present along with a children’s entertainer, hired by Morgan Sindall to provide entertainment at the ceremony. No celebration is complete without cake, and in keeping with the pirate theme, everyone enjoyed a celebratory slice of pirate-themed cake. Catton Grove Primary School headteacher, Tim Lawes said: “We are very pleased with the work that has been undertaken by Morgan Sindall. The team has acted with both professionalism and sensitivity during the time they have been part of our community – thanks for all your efforts.” The extension at Catton Grove Primary School is a great example of how important positive interaction between the project team and the local community is. It is also a great example of the work being done across the region to accommodate growing demand for school places and leave a lasting legacy for the local community. 

Catton Grove Primary School, Norfolk, is a project that exemplifies the measures being taken by local councils

 www.morgansindall.com

Public Sector Build Journal 27


Healthcare

Investment takes shape Construction of a major new healthcare facility in Edinburgh is set to start after the financial contracts were agreed.
The news follows the approval of the Full Business Case by the Scottish Government and Financial Close for the project. 


T

he new £150 million co-located building will see services from the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service brought together in a modern and high-quality setting at Little France.
The new building, which will adjoin the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, is anticipated to open in autumn 2017.

 The six storey building (including basement) will have a large atrium with a shop and cafe, a stunning skylight linking both hospital entrances, a helipad on the roof and a link building adjoining adult and paediatric emergency departments.
It will also bring with it an increase in single rooms with ensuite facilities and a range of new technology.

 The new hospital will have a total of 233 beds and 10 theatres. 11 neurology beds will be added to the critical care department within the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh as part of the project. Health Secretary, Shona Robison, said: “This is a momentous date for this project and I’m personally very pleased that work will soon be about to begin on the new colocated Royal Hospital for Sick Children and Department of Clinical Neurosciences. 
 “The new development brings paediatric

The six storey building (including basement) will have a large atrium with a shop and cafe

28 Public Sector Build Journal

care, specialist neonatal care, neurosciences and adult and children’s emergency departments all together in one place, making access to services much easier for patients and health professionals alike. “The Scottish Government is investing over £2 billion in Scotland’s health infrastructure over the spending review period, with this development being one of many that demonstrate the Scottish Government’s commitment to continually improving health services. The investment in this development will ensure the hospital campus at Little France can continue to develop as a modern hub of research and medical practice.”

 Susan Goldsmith, Finance Director, NHS Lothian said: “We are delighted to have reached this point and now look forward with anticipation to seeing the new facility taking shape over the coming years.

 “This is an extremely exciting time in the proud history of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, along with the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service and Department of Clinical Neurosciences, which will find a high-quality new home at Little France from 2017.

 “The building designs have been heavily influenced by staff, patients and families and, in addition to offering a modern, light

The building designs have been heavily influenced by staff, patients and families

and spacious environment, will also enhance the clinical services we deliver.”

 Mark Bradshaw, IHS Lothian and Macquarie Capital said: “We are excited that construction will soon start on The Royal Hospital for Sick Children and


Healthcare

The new development brings paediatric care, specialist neonatal care, neurosciences and adult and children's emergency departments all together in one place

Department of Clinical Neurosciences. This state of the art facility will allow the delivery of quality healthcare services to the people of the Lothian region and beyond for decades to come.
 “It has been a pleasure to partner with the NHS Lothian Board and the Scottish Futures Trust to develop an innovative and competitive financing structure that will ensure value for money over the next 25 years.” Peter Reekie, Scottish Future Trust, Deputy Chief Executive and Director of Investments added: “This is a fantastic deal for NHS Lothian and its partners, bringing investment into the Lothians and allowing construction to start on a great new building which will support many hundreds of jobs as it is built.” Two young patients recently marked the start of construction. Brother and sister,

Design features include a helipad on the roof

Beau Rendall (age 11) and Jos Rendall (age 9) from Edinburgh joined their mum, Tracy Rendall in cutting the first turf at the new Royal Hospital for Sick Children and Department of Clinical Neurosciences. Beau said: “The nurses and doctors at the hospital are great and I’m really excited to see what the new hospital will look like inside when it’s built. The pictures of it look really good.”
Jos added: “I’m very excited and can’t wait to see the new hospital being built. I think it looks brilliant and it will make a big difference to all the boys and girls who use it.” Brian Houston, Chair, NHS Lothian said: “The start of this work is the culmination of

many years of hard work and determination. We look forward with a great deal of excitement to seeing this new development taking shape over the coming years.
 “The new building will bring many benefits for our patients, their families and our staff, not least a purpose-built facility designed to meet their needs. “Throughout the extensive planning and design process we have taken into account what really matters to people, and with the invaluable input of patients and their families, our charity partners and staff we will have a building we can be proud of.” 

 www.nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk

Public Sector Build Journal 29


Leisure Education

A model facility The age of austerity may have brought many challenges for local authorities, but it has also engendered a solutionsdriven approach when it comes to making capital expenditure projects happen.

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new £13.5m project delivered by Eric Wright Construction, part of the Eric Wright Group, to build a new leisure centre in Blackburn provides a stunning example of how a collaborative approach to improving facilities while driving down overheads can offer a win/win solution for public sector organisations and service users.

The high efficiency building services specification at the leisure centre includes a zoned HVAC system

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Business case The existing swimming pool and leisure centre in Blackburn was a 26-year-old local authority operated facility called ‘Waves Water Fun Centre’. As the name suggests, the centre was heavily focused on the pool facilities and, with its lagoon-shaped pool, wave machines, water slide and ‘alien spaceship’ was very popular with families.

The scheme was delivered as a design & build contract by Eric Wright Construction

However, it offered very limited gym and studio facilities, which prevented it from competing commercially with private sector fitness and leisure providers and its maintenance and running costs meant that it was no longer viable. Mark Walker, Senior Project Manager at Eric Wright Construction, said: “Leisure centres offer a valuable source of revenue for local authorities but if they are to attract regular gym users they have to offer an environment on a par with the private sector. “Blackburn with Darwen Council was in the enviable position of having a proven business case for replacing the Waves Water Fun Centre because it was able to compare the running costs of the facility with a new leisure centre completed in Darwen in 2010. The annual operational costs for Darwen Leisure Centre were £500,000 less than those in Blackburn, demonstrating a sound financial argument for constructing a new facility that will both boost revenue generation and reduce overheads.” A survey of the Waves Centre also found that the facility was ‘dilapidated’ and ‘not sustainable’, which meant that capital expenditure would be required on a refurbishment programme as a minimum measure even if the decision was taken to retain the existing leisure facility rather than construct a new one. As a result, Blackburn with Darwen Council developed plans for a 41,960ft2 new leisure centre for that would halve the running costs of the Waves centre


Leisure holistically, incorporating maintenance requirements in the operational model to assess the benefits of key areas of the specification.” Maintenance and longevity were also factored into the concrete structure used for the pool hall. Eric Wright Construction included Xypex, a waterproof concrete additive in the specification. This crystalline matrix self-heals cracks up to 0.4mm and enables all construction joints to be sealed right up to the edge of the concrete for maximum durability and protection of the reinforcement steel. As a result, the company has been able to maximise the BBA certified design life of the pool for 25 years.

Maintenance and longevity were factored into the concrete structure used for the pool hall

Phased delivery while providing an increase in space and a considerable improvement in the range and quality of services provided. The total cost of the Blackburn Leisure Centre project was £13.5m and Blackburn with Darwen Council was able to further increase the scope of facilities and enhance the business case for the development by working with Blackburn College to design a facility that would incorporate a sports science performance and testing lab and two four-court sports hall for college use during the day. By combining a community leisure centre and college sports facility in a single development and sharing the cost as an £8.5m local authority/£5m college split, Blackburn with Darwen Council and Blackburn College has established an innovative capital expenditure model for others to follow.

Energy efficiency The scheme was delivered as a design & build contract by Eric Wright Construction, building on the company’s experience of leisure centre and education projects, which includes the Bolton One health, leisure and educational facility, Blackburn and Oldham Youth Zones and Furness College. The Eric Wright Construction team was clearly focused on delivering a scheme that would offer long-term value through robust construction, with operational efficiency built into every element of the specification aligned to the council and the college’s environmental goals. Mark continues: “We used thermal modelling to develop a specification that enabled the building to achieve an EPC A rating with low U-values delivered by a

The leisure centre opened to the public in March 2015, following a phased programme that saw Eric Wright Construction complete the college facilities in time for the new student intake last September and continue to work on site while those areas were occupied. Mark adds: “It was a very tight and challenging programme but we believe the completed scheme sets a benchmark for efficient leisure facilities and a progressive approach to shared public sector services.” 

heavily insulated external envelope, which is very difficult to achieve in a leisure centre scheme. “The building was also designed and constructed to deliver low air permeability of just 6.1 and this will ensure that the facility will gain maximum benefit from the low energy building services strategy that has been implemented.” The high efficiency building services specification at the leisure centre includes a zoned HVAC system that exploits passive pre-heating and pre-cooling of fresh air using exhaust heat recovery to reduce the required heating and cooling load. “A number of measures have been built into the specification to ensure that energy is used on an as-needed basis,” Mark continues, “such as the use of variable speed drives on fans and water-circulating pumps, for example. “This means that the flexibility to adjust to different occupancy levels and seasonal requirements has been built into the leisure centre reducing operational costs still further.” The flexibility of the building services is delivered through user-friendly intelligent controls including temperature and lighting controls with daylight harvesting. The lighting installation itself is a key element of the energy saving strategy and the Eric Wright Construction team developed the specification to enhance this still further. Mark continues: “LED lighting was specified for the Atrium to deliver a high performance, low cost and low maintenance solution, while the pool hall lights were chosen for their low maintenance and ease of cleaning. “Our approach was to consider costs

 www.ericwright.co.uk

Blackburn with Darwen Council and Blackburn College has established an innovative capital expenditure model for others to follow

Public Sector Build Journal 31


Roofing, Cladding & Insulation

Performance whatever the weather

Paul Richards, Managing Director of Aquarian Cladding Systems talks to PSBJ about the brick cladding system that offers cost-effective, aesthetic and performance benefits.

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ver four million UK homes are owned, managed and maintained by local authorities and housing associations, and there can be no doubt that when undertaking refurbishment programmes, they face the increasingly difficult challenge of delivering costeffective improvements to the building fabric which provide aesthetic, performance and sustainable improvements. As a consequence, to get the best value for money, it is essential they continue to identify innovative materials, systems and construction methods to help meet these demanding requirements. Many in the industry advocate ‘Fabric First’ – an approach associated with the Passivhaus principle to essentially ‘let the building do the work’, rather than relying on

‘bolt-on’ renewable energy devices. Proponents of these principles recognise that if they can super-insulate the property, design fenestration for natural solar gain and minimise air leakage, the heating requirements will naturally reduce – directly benefiting both the tenant in terms of reduced fuel costs, and, as importantly, the environment by burning fewer fossil fuels. This ‘Fabric First’ approach led to the recent growth in the external wall insulation (EWI) industry, which has seen a rapid increase in sales for a few specialist suppliers who predominantly focus on distributing insulation and acrylic or cement-based render top-coats. Render of course has its place and is a very costeffective solution; however the beauty of the UK built environment is its varied use of

Gebrik delivers an EWI solution with an authentic brick finish

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external cladding, such as brick, stone and timber; it would be a boring place if we were surrounded by white boxes! There are also recognisable long-term maintenance costs of render, which can be prone to accumulation of algae growth and dirt, cracking, vandalism and general wear and tear. Consequently, most EWI specialists now include a brick solution. Often used with a render finish, these brick options are either two-coat render solution or acrylic slips, and so whilst brick-shaped, they are no less prone to algae growth, cracking and potential colour fading. The good news is that a number of genuine alternative brick cladding solutions are now available, offering architects, contractors, building owners, occupiers and managers a range of advantages. One such system, Gebrik, has been sourced by a rapidly-growing, UK based specialist cladding solutions supplier. This factoryproduced, insulating brick cladding system from Europe consists of natural clay bricks which are encased in polyurethane before they arrive on site. The panellised system is supplied in approx. 60mm thick sheets, with each panel covering approx. 1m2. Pre-fabricated corners for external returns and window reveals are also included and social housing providers across the UK are beginning to recognise it as a long term, cost-effective and robust EWI solution. The system is supplied throughout the UK by Aquarian Cladding Systems, who since 2007, have supplied it to overclad and refurbish tower blocks, sheltered housing and other forms of social housing


Roofing, Cladding & Insulation Gebrik on a sheltered elderly housing scheme in the city, where Rateavon applied approx. 700m2 over six weeks. Due to its speed of build, cleanliness and robustness, the system was specified for installation on the ground floor of each tower block, minimising disruption to residents during construction and providing a robust, insulated facade at low-level, where it would be most exposed to the risk of high impact from communal wheelie bins, bicycles, and general multipleoccupancy wear and tear. As is typical of many tower blocks built post-war, the buildings were constructed using concrete frame with brick and block masonry infill, providing a U-value of approx. 1.5W/m2K. The programme saw the application of a 60mm layer of phenolic insulation, with Gebrik applied over it using longer fixings to obtain a 70mm anchorage. The overall additional 120mm external layer provided a U-value of 0.26W/m2K – an improvement of approx. 80%. Had the client required a lower target, up to 120mm additional insulation could have been used and by inclusion of isolation fixing washers within the Gebrik system the client could have achieved a U value of 0.15W/m2K, ie an improvement of 90%. One of the unique features of Gebrik is its robust performance and within BBA certificate 07/4403, section 7.9 states that it is suitable for use in all Use Categories as defined in ETAG 017 : 2005(1), hence its repeated use at low-level on tower blocks. In addition, considering it cannot be classed as non-combustible, Gebrik has an excellent fire performance, and Section 8.7 states that there is no restriction on height nor boundary and it has met the performance criteria in BRE Report BR 135 : 2013, Annex A. Consequently the system can be used on high-rise buildings provided there is sufficient pull-out resistance of the substrate and it can accommodate the additional weight of approx. 35-40kg/m2. Although the core drivers may be different for the client body, architect, contractor and building occupier, the Gebrik system delivers at every level. Combining the visual benefits of a very traditional material, with the performance and sustainability benefits of a modern building solution, the range, scale and scope of applications for the system continue to grow, with high-rise housing just one of many successful examples of achieving repeatedly positive results. 

Gebrik was applied on the Barton Hill estate in Bristol, where four tower blocks underwent a two-year programme of improvements

schemes, including those owned by Bristol City Council, Barnet Housing, Eastlands Homes, Glasgow Housing Association and Pennine Homes. They have all found that Gebrik delivers an EWI solution with an authentic brick finish, and which looks and performs like a brick wall – maturing and weathering over time – but with the benefit of no foundations and minimal long term maintenance costs. As well as colour consistency, panelised systems also offer significantly improved predictability and control during the build programme. For instance, Gebrik panels and corners can be directly applied to any substrate in most weather conditions and because it is lightweight, the system may be installed from mechanical access equipment, such as scissor lifts. Not only does this significantly reduce the need for, and cost of, scaffolding but it also means

potentially less impact and risk to tenants of multiple occupancy buildings. This potential for quicker installation inevitably provides cost benefits due to prelim savings, and when combined with reduced waste, vehicular access and storage requirements (with up to 700m² of Gebrik components delivered on one vehicle), Gebrik has provided measurable benefits to the housing providers and occupiers who have so far used the system. Gebrik has been used at low level to refurbish tower blocks from Glasgow to Gosport and Cwmbran to London. An example is in Bristol, where Bristol City Council employed CRL to project manage specialist cladding contractor Rateavon and apply Gebrik on the Barton Hill estate, where four tower blocks underwent a two-year programme of improvements. The council had already experienced the benefits of

The Gebrik system was specified for installation on the ground floor of each tower block

 www.aquariancladding.co.uk

Public Sector Build Journal 33


ed ed! lifi is ua gn t q co Ge et re g &

Interiors

The MCIAT Professional Assessment

– a new qualifying route What is the MCIAT Professional Assessment?

The MCIAT Professional Assessment is a flexible, rigorous, robust and quality assured qualifying process, based on performance and designed to recognise the diversity of Architectural Technology. Candidates must provide an in-depth critical analysis clearly summarising their professional experience. This should be a reflective report and should refer to challenges and successes encountered whilst working on projects and how any issues were resolved. Applicants should also undertake a self-evaluation highlighting their strengths and weaknesses in relation to their area(s) of practice. The Professional Assessment process is based on four core competencies: • Designing • Managing • Practising • Developing (self)

Who can apply for the MCIAT Professional Assessment? Any applicant working in or on, for example, academia, general practice, component design, refurbishment, small residential projects, large commercial projects etc within Architectural Technology, should be able to apply their own experience to the Professional Assessment process, but they must hold one of the following membership grades: ACIAT, TCIAT or profile candidate. Each application will be assessed on its merit. However, each applicant will need to demonstrate a sufficient level of knowledge and understanding and professional competence/experience in relation to their sphere/s of practice and demonstrate to the Institute they can meet the expectations of a Chartered Architectural Technologist, MCIAT.

How much does it cost? To apply for the Professional Assessment, applicants are required to pay £300 for the assessment of the application and the Professional Assessment Interview.

For further information email our Membership Director, James Banks via james@ciat.org.uk or call us on +44(0)20 7278 2206 34 Public Sector Build Journal


Play Equipment HVAC disabled children in the relevant area. Special schools near a site can also provide very useful information. PSBJ spoke with Gert Rijsdijk, Head of Product Development at Russell Play, who is happy to share some of the findings of the company’s recent research into impairments and play. To develop exciting and inclusive play products, Russell Play worked together with a group of experts including play workers, teachers at schools for visually impaired children, hearing impairment specialists and special needs physiotherapists. Local schools and hospitals were involved in testing the products. This co-operation has led to the development of the ‘fun4all’ range of inclusive stand-alone products and the ‘Amico’ range of modular play equipment. Gert comments: “We have learnt that playgrounds and play equipment can actually be non-inclusive in two ways: they can simply not be suitable for children with impairment or they are only suitable for children with a certain type of impairment. In that sense, wheelchair swings are not very inclusive since they do not promote children with different abilities playing together but they actually stigmatise the user. “Our research showed that focusing on disabilities leads to products that are not inclusive. Experts and children have taught us to focus on abilities rather than disabilities. From our research, we have found that children with certain impairments are sometimes even better at things than able-bodied children. Visually impaired children, for instance, can have an acute level of hearing and often have a well developed sense of touch. With our play equipment, we want to make use of this and help children develop these senses and skills. We also want to cater for children with behavioural problems. “Rather than only having areas where children can play together, we sometimes also create space for children that want to be on their own and watch what is going on from a distance. This will help children on the Autistic Spectrum to feel comfortable and enjoy the play equipment and area as well.” Since every child has a unique set of capabilities, it is important to use play equipment and create play areas that have challenges on various levels. This gives children of all abilities the opportunity to play at their own level and to find challenges to grow and it allows them to play together with children that have different abilities.

In this play area, the products were tested by a group of children of all abilities

Inclusive play Children love to play, but over recent decades it has become clear that it is also one of the main ways in which they learn. Play helps children's development in many ways. Playing gives space to their imagination and fuels creativity.

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hrough play, children get to know their physical possibilities and limitations. Challenges and risks teach them to evaluate situations and find ways to go further than before and playing together with other children helps to develop important social skills. Unfortunately, playing together with other children is not self evident for every child. Children that have impairment are often hindered by the fact that many play opportunities seem to be designed for able-bodied children only. This can make it difficult to play with other children, to have fun together and to develop important skills.

It is estimated that there are around 800,000 disabled children in the United Kingdom. When designing play areas, it is important to find out what impairments to cater for. Very often the mistake is made that when a play area is accessible for wheelchairs and has a wheelchair roundabout or a climbing frame with a ramp, the area can receive the ‘Inclusive’ stamp: less than 8% of disabled people use a wheelchair. Carrying out a consultation in the area around the play facility can be a good source of information regarding impairments of children that live locally and Local Authorities can provide figures regarding

In testing, children receive a paddle with a green and a red side to approve or disapprove of the product or area

 www.russell-play.com

Public Sector Build Journal 35


The all-new psbj.co.uk Your revitalised and purpose-built portal for public sector building specification PSBJ unveils the new-look online resource for building products designed for the public sector built environment. Offering more content in an easy-to-navigate format, this refreshing, tailor-made new portal delivers the right content to the right audience in the shortest time possible.

www.psbj.co.uk

Search ‘psbj’ 36 Public Sector Build Journal


Safety on Site ensure regulations are both simple to understand and meet EU standards. However, it is clear from the sterling work across the UK built environment sector that world-class health and safety provision stems from changing the very culture of active sites. A company culture, by the very nature of the word, is traditionally engrained in the collective mind of a group of workers over many years of experience, and any efforts to change this can of course be met with resistance. At Shepherd Engineering Services, we feel that we must aim for a “want to” rather than “have to” safety culture, as we believe that we will not achieve our goal until all of our employees contribute because they want to and not have to be involved in improving conditions. The goal of every employer should be to ensure that every worker of every discipline feels they have the personal understanding, responsibility and confidence to ‘do the right thing; even when no one is watching’. To achieve this, communicating clear, jargon and abbreviation-free health and safety advice to your staff while incentivising them to report any issues or observations must become an industrywide standard practice, and something certainly encouraged at Shepherd Engineering Services. In line with our determination to drive continual improvement, we recently surpassed six million hours without any direct employee suffering a RIDDOR reportable accident. We are also very keen to point out that along with good systems and senior management support this remarkable achievement is mostly due to the attitude and awareness of our site employees and the efforts made by all parties to work together to improve safety. The new CDM 2015 regulations represent a well-timed, comprehensive and invaluable set of health and safety guidelines for the entire built environment and construction sectors. However, if the UK is to continue its outstanding progress towards a safe future, we must aim higher than merely meeting regulatory standards and continue to set the global benchmark through widespread employee education,  engagement and empowerment.

world-class health and safety provision stems from changing the very culture of active sites.

Safety in numbers Tony Sidwell, Director of Safety, Health & Environment at Shepherd Engineering Services explains why we must look further than CDM regulations 2015 to transform onsite health and safety behaviour.

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ince the introduction of the Construction Design & Management (CDM) Regulations 1994 and 2007, the UK has cemented its place as a global leader in health and safety across the construction and building services sectors. Therefore, it is to the credit of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) that, in spite of CDM 2007’s obvious success and ongoing reduction in the number of fatal and serious injuries on UK sites, the decision was taken five years ago to launch a consultation process on proposals to revise the legislation. The result, CDM 2015, which came into force on 6th April this year, certainly achieves the clear priorities of simplifying the format, ensuring UK regulators fall in line with the European Temporary or Mobile Construction Sites Directive and outlining explicit requirements and responsibilities for all project partners. The realisation that the regulations apply to all construction and maintenance

projects, whether for commercial or public sector clients, including the replacement of the CDM Co-ordinator with a new role of ‘principal designer’, new duty holder roles as soon as there is more than one contractor, and the need for a written ‘construction phase plan’, certainly reflects the growing legal constraints placed on companies and public sector organisations of all disciplines. While some of the changes such as the introduction of the principal designer role are generally welcomed, the removal of the core criteria section and the Approved Code of Practice could be seen as a backwards step. The duty of all parties to ensure adequate training, instruction, information and supervision could also be viewed as unnecessary as it is already a basic duty of every employer under the Health & Safety at Work Act. Admittedly, the HSE seems to have been caught between a rock and a bureaucratic hard place in its need to

 www.shepherd-group.com

Public Sector Build Journal 37


Landscaping

Reconnecting the city There was a distinct period during the middle and late stages of the last century when, arguably, every town’s architecture, aesthetic and overall appeal were put to one side in favour of functionality. With much of that era’s fabric fading, regeneration projects up and down the country are trying to find ways to mitigate the impact of the motor car, improve urban lifestyles and wellbeing and be more sensitive to their locality.

The area has now become an uplifting public space that features an event square, lawns and a terraced garden

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DA Design’s impressive reimagining and transformation of a soulless blot on Leicester’s landscape is a great example of these efforts. From an oil-stained public car park fenced in by bus stops, a ring road and buildings masked by ill-planned tree-planting, the masterplanners have shaped a clean, open, green and multifunctional leisure space that cleverly directs passersby to the city’s most important places, historical and modern. Jubilee Square is more than just a visual transformation; it’s a feature that hundreds of thousands of people can now enjoy day to day. Leicester has long been associated with its manufacturing industry, but following several regeneration schemes and the discovery of the remains of the last of the Plantagenet kings, Richard III, this is starting to change. Leicester City Council is driving this forward with a number of initiatives including Connecting Leicester, a major programme of work across some 800 metres of streets and two open spaces, launched by city mayor Peter Soulsby to improve pedestrian links between Leicester’s historic buildings and heritage sites and the modern heart of the city. The Jubilee Square site sits at the western end of Leicester’s busiest shopping street, close to the Highcross retail and leisure development, as well as to the cathedral and the guildhall. In the early 1970s, St Nicholas Circle and the ringroad were introduced; a rude interruption to the pedestrian and visual flow of what had been a historic area. The area became


Landscaping

Jubilee Square creates a focal point to be enjoyed throughout the year, which encourages all forms of organised and casual activity

cut off from De Montfort University, the River Soar, the medieval Castle precinct, the Roman Jewry wall (Roman) and the 15th century Magazine Gateway. The new design for the area rectifies this disconnection, stitching together old and new to encourage movement between the old town, retail and heritage areas. This was a key element of the council’s brief.

Other considerations included: Enhancing the historic context, particularly focusing on Wygston’s House, the oldest dwelling in Leicester Creating a focal point to be enjoyed throughout the year, which encourages all forms of organised and casual activity Providing a space for events, ideally with informal seating A simple design, without clutter, that improves wayfinding and enhances sightlines in all directions.

The scale of the space, the level of anticipated footfall, and flexibility of use, pointed the design team towards a structured balance of hard and soft space: large areas of lawn for relaxation and recreation and a large paved area suited to anything from a ferris wheel in the summer to an ice-rink in the winter. The proportions were established by comparing the way similarly sized spaces have been used in other British cities. The design was shaped by mapping key pedestrian ‘desire lines’ across the space. These lines direct eyes and feet between key areas, buildings and amenities, all laid out as pedestrian routes, each addressing the previous sense of disconnection. The existing site had a natural slope amounting to a one-metre level change. Not only did this reduce usability for disabled visitors, it would limit the options available for setting up events. Building up the site levels at one end not only resolved this issue entirely, but created a partial screen to the unsightly traffic on St Nicholas Circle. Gentle grading across the lawned area returns the site to its natural level at the southern and western edges. The northern part of the square is paved in natural stone and features the relocated 16th century High Cross pillar, now much closer to where it was originally erected and which forms a visual focus from multiple directions. Vehicular access is hemmed in carefully with planters and other coordinated street furniture.

The four central lawns have been profiled so that they feature seating edges on their northern, sunny, south-facing sides, while the southernmost lawn is raised with a seating edge around it. To the south of the lawns Wygston House, previously hidden behind overgrown plants and trees, is opened up to the space with the existing wall replaced by a railing and low planting. Tree planting was an essential part of this urban transformation. While quite a number of trees stood here, their type and health were generally unsuited to the location, providing barriers rather than assets. Several prime examples were kept, but 23 trees were removed and replaced with the same number of new large species trees and 22 smaller trees in strategic locations. Each tree species was chosen for its exceptional form, its stunning autumn colour, and its suitability for planting in this particular environment. American sweetgum, fastigiate hornbeam, snowy mespilus, India bean trees and freeman maples offer beautiful architectural form, solar shading and an array of foliage from white blossom to reds, yellows, purples and greens long into the autumn months. The overall result is a space as welcoming for families with young children as it is for local shoppers and, of course, the increasing number of tourists on their way to visit Richard III’s final resting place in Leicester Cathedral. 

 www.lda-design.co.uk

The design was shaped by mapping key pedestrian ‘desire lines’ across the space

As with so many major projects, detailed and far-reaching consultation was vital. Local interest and user groups, traders and the general public were invited to view plans and comment, and a further round of consultation addressed some of the points raised. Now, an area of the city once dominated by a surface level car park has become an uplifting public space that features an event square, lawns, a terraced garden, and a new courtyard garden for the historic 15th century Wygston’s House. Named Jubilee Square to mark the Queen’s 2012 Jubilee visit to Leicester, it’s a celebration of old and new, natural and manmade.

Public Sector Build Journal 39


CIH Housing 2015 Preview

There are some great speakers lined to speak at this year’s conference

Debate the new reality From the 23rd-25th June, the UK’s housing industry will converge on Manchester for this year’s Chartered Institute of Housing annual conference and exhibition.

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alling just weeks after one of the closest election campaigns in decades, one which has seen housing become an extremely important issue, the event will provide housing professionals with the opportunity to explore what the new political landscape will mean for housing – a focus that will run throughout the conference programme. This will be the fourth year at Manchester Central and will feature innovative content and will see the launch of three new features, so there will be something for everyone. With ease of travel from all parts of the UK, with 2500 hotel rooms on the doorstep; being in Manchester has made a real difference to a value-conscious sector. There are some great speakers lined to speak at this year’s conference ranging from Duncan Weldon, Newsnight’s economics correspondent to William Butler Adams the Managing Director of Brompton Bicycles. Furthermore, its panel of experts: former comment editor for The Times, Tim Montgomerie; Miranda Green, former Liberal Democrat Advisor; and Andrew Harrop, General Secretary, Fabian Society will be discussing the new political reality and what it means for housing. In addition to the main housing

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conference there will be three new focus areas at Housing 2015 – all under one roof.

Health, housing & social care conference A new conference within a conference, aimed at professionals from social care, local authorities, extra care and housing, this new event will be focusing on solutions around the integration of health and housing. The conference will run alongside the main programme on Wednesday and Thursday and will be fully accessible to all delegates at Manchester.

Delegate of the Future To ensure younger housing professionals from all housing disciplines have the chance to explore new ideas and hone their thinking, a new initiative has been launched: Delegate of the Future. This ground breaking initiative is aimed at housing staff who haven’t attended the conference before. These delegates will be able to attend the conference for free on Thursday 25th June.

The official housing fringe at #thetreehouse15 The tree house will be a new key event for a mixture of debates, launches and

platforms for organisations to challenge views and perceptions. It will provide a platform for the housing leaders of tomorrow and with interactive state of the art sessions it will be where great ideas start to grow. The fringe will be located on the exhibition floor and will be free for all delegates and visitors to attend. Some of the sessions planned are “Innovation Lab”, Conversations and Cocktails and the World Café. As usual the week will be kicked off on the Monday evening with the welcome to Manchester dinner, incorporating the Housing Heroes’ awards. This year’s event will be hosted by Nick Hewer, TV presenter of Countdown and entrepreneur. In addition to programme content, the exhibition promises to be busier than ever with over 300 suppliers present and taking part in a series of informative seminars through the Ideas Exchange. Attending CIH Housing Conference in 2015 will be the most useful three days housing professionals will spend out of the office to listen and network with leading experts to help shape the housing conversation and debate a new reality. 

 www.cihhousing.com


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Public Sector Build Journal 41


HVAC/HVP

Its relatively small size and light weight helps to reduce installation time and any associated costs

LG launches compact new Multi V S LG Electronics (LG) has announced the release of its latest variable refrigerant flow (VRF) solution, the Multi V S. Designed specifically for small- to medium-sized spaces, and highly relevant to numerous public sector buildings, the compact, lightweight model offers effective heating and cooling as well as considerable installation flexibility.

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he Multi V S is exceptionally energy efficient and highly reliable, helping customers to cut operational costs and enjoy an excellent return on investment. In addition, LG’s new air conditioner is equipped with a number of advanced, proprietary technologies and a convenient feature called Smartphone Control, which allows users to monitor and adjust settings in their homes remotely. Multi V S neatly fits the gap between Multi Split systems and large VRF systems. “LG’s outstanding VRF solution is perfect for private residences and small offices,” says Jody Lees, Head of Air Conditioning and Energy Solutions at LG in the UK. “It offers superb energy efficiency,

42 Public Sector Build Journal

strong, quiet performance and unbeatable flexibility. We think that our customers will be excited about the comparatively low running costs and the low costs of maintaining this highly reliable system. The Multi V S is yet another great example of LG’s commitment to producing the most efficient, technologically advanced products possible.” The Multi V S can support impressive lengths of piping, giving building designers the freedom to implement a wide range of configurations. Its relatively small size and light weight (it’s 57% smaller and 40% lighter than a conventional 8-horsepower model) also helps to reduce installation time and any associated costs.

LG’s new VRF system boasts superior energy efficiency, as evidenced by a 3.95 energy efficiency ratio (EER) in cooling operation and a 4.25 coefficient of performance (COP) in heating operation. The Multi V S also features LG’s Variable Heat Exchanger Circuit, which automatically selects optimal flow paths for the hot and cold streams. This intelligent feature boosts integrated energy efficiency by a further 5%. Customers will also appreciate the exceptional quietness and enhanced airflow capabilities of LG’s new VRF solution. The Multi V S’s cannon fan cuts noise production by up to 4dB while helping to generate as much as 50cmm (m3 per minute) of airflow. External Static Pressure (ESP) technology further upgrades the system’s ability to maintain a high air volume and a low noise level. Meanwhile, the wide operational range of the Multi V S means maximum dependability in temperatures from -5 to 48 degrees Celsius. For greater convenience, LG has equipped the Multi V S with several handy functions, including Smartphone Monitoring and Control. This user-friendly system makes it possible to monitor performance and adjust system settings via the Mobile LG Monitoring View’s (LGMV) Bluetooth module or the LG SAC Control smartphone application.

Customers will also appreciate the exceptional quietness and enhanced airflow capabilities of LG’s new VRF solution

 partner.lge.com/uk 

uk.aircon@lge.com  01753 491500


HVAC/HVP

Commercial meets domestic with new Bosch boiler Bosch Commercial and Industrial Heating has enhanced its market-leading range of gas-fired boilers with the launch of a 50kW GB162 boiler. The new appliance has been introduced to offer even more installation flexibility for heating engineers and perfectly bridges the gap between domestic boilers and Bosch’s current light commercial GB162 range. The introduction of the GB162 50kW boiler allows heating engineers to benefit from a condensing wall-hung gas-fired appliance, which is just as suited to large-scale domestic installations as it is in light commercial applications. With net efficiencies of up to 110% and NOx emissions of less than 40mg/kWh, the GB162 range provides clean, low-carbon heating and hot water.  www.bosch-industrial.co.uk

bob.chapman@uk.bosch.com

 0330

Renewable heating advice on offer at CIH Housing Mitsubishi Electric is bringing its heat pump expertise to the CIH Housing 2015 exhibition to target social housing providers who need to hit renewable targets and find ways of combating fuel poverty amongst tenants. The company will be exhibiting (Stand F4) at the exhibition, held at Manchester Central, 23rd-25th June 2015 and showcasing its Ecodan range of heat pumps specifically designed for heating domestic buildings. Ecodan has already been installed in thousands of buildings across the UK and provides renewable heating to challenge traditional heating methods, whilst meeting stringent energy and carbon reduction demands.

123 3004

Housing association specifies renewable solution Housing association Golding Homes, which provides affordable homes to people living in mid Kent, has contracted Sussexbased central heating specialist BSW Building Services to fit air source heat pumps and solar thermal panels in 27 of its properties. Air source heat pumps provide clean and efficient heating by extracting solar energy from the air. Using the same amount of paid-for electricity, they generate up to four times more heat than the electric storage heaters currently used by Golden Homes’ tenants. This potentially slashes energy bills by up to 40%, resulting in huge savings. What’s more, air source heat pumps’ efficient use of electricity significantly reduces – by approximately 50% – a property’s carbon footprint.  www.bsw-bs.co.uk

admin@bsw-bs.co.uk

 heating.mitsubishielectric.co.uk 

heating@meuk.mee.com 282880

 01707

01444 831138

Public Sector Build Journal 43


Kitchens, Bathrooms & Washrooms Local authorities are putting in ceramic wet rooms because they are expecting a 25 year life from them

Lifetime Homes Bath with Premier Shower Deck installed for later use

The total bathroom package Most local authorities will be familiar with the N&C Phlexicare brand as offering the ultimate in adaptations for those with mobility issues. What some may not have appreciated, however, is the breadth of the company’s product range.

C

hief Executive Officer of Nicholls & Clarke, David Forbes commented: “The market has been squeezed and because our original foundations as a business were as builders merchants and glass supplier, we always dealt direct with the contractor, which is mainly what we do now. We get specified direct by the local authority or housing association and then supply the contractor who has been awarded the work.” With workmanship being so critical to the quality and durability of any fit out, Nicholls & Clarke has also long taken the trouble to offer top flight training for installers of its products. However, the approach the manufacturer advocates is to assist multi-skilling of operatives who will take the job through from shell to completion. David explained: “We can supply everything for bathrooms from the radiator, shower and taps down to the

44 Public Sector Build Journal

flooring, even the air extract; we supply every single thing and will train the operatives to fit them correctly. So you don’t get downtime on site with different trades coming in; which means properties can be turned around faster. We deliver the items as one pack, to the plot, and make sure the process is seamless for the housing association or other client. “We are currently carrying out a lot of training for wet rooms – both for the correct installation of vinyl where level access is required for someone who has mobility issues, or the client is doing ceramic wet rooms because that is what people want in their homes. Local authorities are putting in ceramic wet rooms because they are expecting a 25 year life from them, while other companies are laying ceramic tiles on the floor because they want to use underfloor heating systems; which are ideal for Lifetime Homes.

“It is significant that clients such as InCommunities, based in Leeds, have found that if they do up properties to a higher standard, then tenants look after them which reduces overall or lifetime costs. It translates into much reduced void periods. Instead of having to relay carpets or vinyl floorcovering before a place is re-let, simply cleaning will suffice; provided the client has specified our high performance, Nicobond Starlike Grout which will last – without losing its colour – for a minimum of 10 years. It might cost more in year one, but when a property comes void it is a simple matter to clean or bleach it and the grout comes back like new.” N&C’s tie up with InCommunities typifies the sort of service levels it offers to the affordable housing sector. InCommunities describes itself as an aids/adaptations business and asked the supplier to put together five different specifications of conceptual accessible bathrooms to suit a 55 room project in Bradford. In doing so InCommunities was seeking to move away from the normal clinical appearance and favoured N&C products for both their aesthetic and technical attributes, as well as the benefit of having a one-stop shop. N&C subsequently supplied its Premier Shower Deck floors for totally level access wet rooms, along with the Freedom 2 screens with chrome edge bar plus chrome square edge trim, chrome heated towel rails and blinds.

 www.nichollsandclarke.com

 info@nichollsandclarke.com  020 8586 4770


Kitchens, Bathrooms Washrooms Kitchens, Bathrooms && Washrooms

All the right curves Distributed exclusively in the UK by James Latham, HI-MACS solid surface stands out in every project for its elegance, functionality, technology and creative flexibility, allowing architects, interior designers and kitchen installers the freedom to develop projects that have no limits. The wide range of colours, its translucency, its thermoforming properties, its hard wearing nature, the ease with which it can be manipulated and cut and its uniformity are all features that allow this stone to be worked like wood. Thanks to its versatility, HI-MACS is essential for meeting the needs of functionality and design in a kitchen and it is the perfect material for creating outstanding worktops. Its smooth, non-porous surface means liquid penetration is practically

impossible, making it easy to clean and ensuring a high degree of resistance to heat and everyday disinfectants. In fact, HI-MACS has been granted a special LGA Hygiene certificate, an internationally recognised accreditation which guarantees that the product meets stringent criteria where specific aspects of it are assessed, including ease of cleaning and resistance to bacteria and fungi. In addition, the testing also rates the design from a hygiene point of view, distinguishing HI-MACS as a first-class product. One of the major attractions of HIMACS is the extensive choice of colours

on offer. There are almost 100 in the portfolio, with 62 of these being suitable for kitchen applications. Supplied in thicknesses of 12, 9 and 6mm, the range now also includes 22 designs of sinks – available in over 60 colours. Architects and interior designers will also be keen to know that the manufacturers of HI-MACS, LG Hausys, have developed BIM Objects for its full range of HI-MACS shapes and colours for the following software: Sketchup, ArchiCAD and Revit. 

 www.himacsuk.co.uk marketing@lathams.co.uk  0116 257 3415

Power-assisted baths specified for new care home

Complete service helps achieve hygiene solution Under latest Regulations, it is desirable that buildings to which the public have access feature a hygiene room, or Changing Places, assisted accessible toilet facility. As the concept is comparatively new, few building services companies fully appreciate the breadth of equipment and associated ancillaries required. This puts strain on timescales and budgets. Clos-o-Mat is the only disabled toilet provider than can, in-house, provide a value engineered solution. It can, through one source, provide design advice, supply, installation, project management and on-going service/ maintenance across all the equipment needed.  www.clos-o-mat.com  

info@clos-o-mat.com 0161 969 1199

Three Ascot hi-lo baths and three Windsor baths with powered seat have been installed at the new sixty-six bed Mistley Manor care home in Manningtree, Essex. Within the main building complex, the Ascot hi-lo baths provided a compact bathing solution, maximising bathroom space and allowing sufficient access for carers. With residents in the on-site bungalows being more independent, the Windsor bath was considered a more appropriate solution given the specific needs of those bathers. Designed to fit into the space of a traditional style bath, the fixed-height Windsor incorporates a powered transfer seat that can be operated simply with an easy-to-use, roaming handset.  www.gainsboroughbaths.com  info@gainsboroughbaths.com

0808 250 9305

Sanicubic XL provides the solution for Dublin Gym The Saniflo Sanicubic XL launched at the end of 2014, is proving successful at the Educo Gym in Pearse Street, Dublin. To replace its existing pump, the busy gym used a Sanicubic XL due to its capacity to pump of 40m³/hour of black wastewater from multiple appliances. The pump services two WCs, six showers and four basins from the basement car park. The Sanicubic XL has a 120-litre tank capacity ensuring it functions efficiently when connected to several wastewater sources at a time. It incorporates pioneering vortex technology, which powerfully discharges waste through 80 or 100mm discharge pipes with 2 x 2kW pumps.  www.saniflo.ie

sales@saniflo.co.uk

 046

97 33077

Public Sector Build Journal 45


Roofing, Cladding & Insulation

Improving social housing The aesthetics of residential buildings can improve the quality of life of their tenants and the surrounding community. For the past couple of years European social housing owners have been renovating their properties to provide comfortable and energy efficient homes.

B

uilt in the mid 1960s, the Bolsward Housing Complex in The Netherlands was in need of a makeover. Its four residential buildings, with 112 apartments, had low ranking energy certificates and old brick facades, the interiors were outdated and in bad shape. Dutch Housing Corporation Elkien decided on a programme to improve the life quality of the tenants while offering affordable, future-proof and sustainable accommodation to low income residents. A key requirement was to provide a building envelope and external insulation that would improve the energy performance of the complex from band G, the lowest in the scale to band B, while remaining respectful of the original architecture. Architects SIPMA BNA proposed a ventilated facade that would combine a modern, polished material with the old rough appearance given by the bricks. “Since the old design was outdated we decided to take a bold approach by creating vertical blocks through the use of contrasting colours,” explains Sipma. “The whole complex is now clad in Trespa Meteon.” The decision to use Trespa panels was made by Elkien’s project renovation team. “We chose Trespa Meteon because of its wide colour possibilities, its quality and the reputation and reliability of both the product and the company,” says Elkien’s project supervisor.

46 Public Sector Build Journal

Dutch Housing Corporation Elkien chose Trespa Meteon because of its wide colour possibilities, its quality and the reputation and reliability

The ventilated facade, in combination with insulated balconies and roofs and the replacement of the old windows helped the building to achieve the desired B energy performance certification. The demand for the apartments has also increased as the complex has become a more popular place to live. The refurbishment programme was well

received not only by the residents but by local authorities and community. For further information and samples of Trespa Meteon products, contact Mark Baillie, Country Manager UK & Ireland.

 www.trespa.com

 m.baillie@trespa.com  0808 234 0268

Trespa Meteon Metallics panels in Azurite Blue and Aluminium Grey together with Uni Colours in Anthracite Grey were specified by Harrow Council for the Francis Road project. Says Mark Crodden, Project Manager: “Because typical facade render is too maintenanceheavy, we chose a Trespa ventilated facade, giving us a very long life expectancy with minimum maintenance.”


Roofing, Cladding & Insulation

Sotech pushes industry boundaries The newest addition to BSkyB’s head office campus was clad in Sotech’s signature Optima FC Secret Fix rainscreen system.

with the SIPS panels used on the Believe in Better Building, and within an extremely limited cladzone. The Believe in Better Building is to be used as an office and training facility, with a focus on community and creativity. The building was designed around the idea of flexibility, and the spaces are able to be converted into interactive classrooms or corporate event space as required. Sotech has invested heavily in sophisticated design and manufacturing technology and remains the only rainscreen manufacturer to offer a system that is both independently tested to CWCT standards and achieves LPCB Red Book accreditation. The training facility and showroom are open to specifiers and contractors, where all Sotech’s Optima Rainscreen Systems are on display alongside the widest selection of materials and finishes, including pre and post coat aluminium, ACM, copper, zinc, stainless steel, digital print and anodised.

Sotech, a leading rainscreen manufacturer based in the North East, utilised new manufacturing techniques to provide ACM panels of up to 5.2 metres long which is above the industry standard length, for BSkyB’s Believe in Better Building in London. A total of 2500m2 of Optima FC, secret fix rainscreen panels was provided in sunrise silver metallic Alucobond along with 700m2 fascias, soffits and window pods anodised in Sky Blue UA160-0. Working with Arup Associates, Mace Contracts and Glass Solutions, Sotech used over 30 years of experience to develop a specialised carrier rail for their FC system in order for it work effectively

 www.sotech-optima.co.uk  technical@sotech-optima.co.uk 

0191 587 9213

Wakaflex lead-free flashing to combat metal theft

Product manufacturers to face scrutiny As part of its SIG Assured scheme, a set of quality guarantees, compliance and legislation monitoring designed to provide customers with complete peace of mind when buying products from the company, SIG Distribution (SIG) is utilising Emma Dixon-Child, a key member of the SIG Assured Team. Emma will be on the front line of customer protection after undertaking the position of Construction Industry Detective (or CID). In the newlycreated CID role, Emma will be responsible for stringently investigating manufacturers’ claims into areas like product provenance and ensuring that all relevant legislation is adhered to – ensuring SIG’s customers only ever receive fully approved products.  www.sigassured.co.uk  

sigassured@sigplc.com 01274 696974

Haus Profi Wakaflex from Klober is a BBAcertified lightweight, lead-free flashing for all roofing abutment work. With similar malleability to lead it offers the ideal solution to metal theft and, being stretchable, it has become an established means of sealing gas, oil and wood burner flue penetrations through the roof. Unlike some lead-free flashings, its facing is largely unaffected by stretching while a self-adhesive butylon backing provides immediate weatherproofing and high bond strength, even with overlaps. Wakaflex is not susceptible to thermal movement so can be laid in long lengths without fixing clips.  www.roof-flashing.info

 info@haus-profi.co.uk

 0845

600 4427

VMZINC re-roof on Liverpool Central Library project As part of Austin Smith Lord’s design for the £50m renovation of Liverpool Central Library, the Picton Reading Room’s original zinc roof, built in 1879, had to be replaced. Its colonnaded rotunda has 800m2 of VMZINC QUARTZ-ZINC PLUS installed over much of the 135-year old Victorian boarding, a combination of batten cap and standing seam panels being used to satisfy English Heritage requirements for the Unesco World Heritage Site. Conservation and restoration of historic elements of the building fabric were essential, particularly in relation to the Grade II-listed neo-classical facade so roofing details were recreated authentically with the help of VMZINC’s heritage service.  www.vmzinc.co.uk

vmzinc.uk@umicore.com

 01992

822288

Public Sector Build Journal 47


Floors, Walls & Ceilings

Tile Association Awards recognise top achievers This year the city of Solihull hosted the Crystal 15th anniversary celebration of The Tile Awards. The event celebrates all that is best in tiling - people, products and projects. The day was once again hosted by TV celebrity Emma Jesson and was attended by most of the leading companies in the industry – manufacturers, contractors, distributors. The Gold Sponsors were: Mapei, Shackerley, Fila, Norcros Adhesives, Schluter Systems, Bellota, Lithofin and Tilemaster Adhesives.

In all, there were 74 finalists in 18 categories. The category winners included Dave Rowley of Building Adhesives Ltd., who won Outstanding Contribution to Industry; Paddy Plunkett of P Plunkett Tiling Contractors who won The Lifetime Achievement Award; Harry Foster of Johnson Tiles, head of specialist products

at Johnson Tiles, who won Employee of the Year; and Andrew Oates of Stortford Tiling and Marble, who won Tile Fixer of the Year. Retail and distribution category winners included TileStyle, Tile Choice and Minoli. Product awards were won by BAL RapidMat, Craven Dunnill’s Fusion Porcelain Tile Collection and Johnson Tiles Prismatics. Manufacturing and marketing categories were won by ARDEX, Mapei and Norcros. Projects recognised for excellence included Shoe Heaven in Harrods, the Commonweath Games Swimming Pool, and Kemtile won the Tile Contracting Award. This year three categories of award benefited from a widening of the voting – the Tile Fixer of the Year category was open to votes from both the public and TTA members, while Wall Tile of the Year and Floor Tile of the Year were opened up to TTA members. These innovations secured a great response from the industry, with over 400 online votes received and a 48% increase in Award nominations, compared to last year.  www.ttaawards.com 

awards@tile.org.uk  0300 265 8453

Interface helps bring university to life

Industrial food processing floor solution by Remmers A new industrial flooring system has been installed to the 2000m2 extension at C&D Foods manufacturing plant in Longford, Ireland. Remmers Crete SL was applied in combination with Remmers PUR Color Top 2KM seal coat to provide a colour stable finish and a subsequent seal coat of Remmers PUR Aqua Top 2KM SG, with the inclusion of a polymer bead to provide an R11 level of slip resistance with a silk gloss floor finish. The system was installed by Larsen Contracts who worked closely with main contractor, Gem Construction to allow the installation of the floor whilst other fitting out activities were also being carried out, optimising the overall program.  www.remmers.co.uk  

sales@remmers.co.uk 0845 373 0103

48 Public Sector Build Journal

Human Nature, the latest global collection from modular flooring manufacturer, Interface, has been used in the refurbishment of the University of Leeds Language Zone to help create a unique and inspiring area for students to learn. Working alongside Interface’s interior design team, Kay Tuke Swithenbank, Interior Designer at the University of Leeds, chose the Human Nature collection, which takes inspiration from biophilic design – human’s innate connection to the natural world. Interface’s HN810 tile in Limestone was selected to provide a multi-tonal texture, and combined with HN840 and HN850 in Nickel which has the appearance of a pebbly surface design.  www.interface.com

interface.uk@interfaceflor.eu

0161 817 6600

Yeoman Shield leads the way in hospital A variety of Polyflor’s vinyl flooring has been installed extensively across a major redevelopment and conservation project at the Acre Mills Outpatient facility, in Huddersfield. Over 3300m² of Polyflor sheet vinyl flooring from the Forest fx, Pearlazzo, Verona, Hydro Evolve and Finesse SD collections was installed by flooring contractors CMC Flooring of St Helens throughout Acre Mill, providing efficient and attractive floorcoverings for various interior environments with different demands and requirements. Chris Race, Architect at Jefferson Sheard Architects commented: “Polyflor’s flooring had the ideal combination of performance and high design appeal to create a fresh and ambient space that didn’t have that clinical, institutional look.”  www.polyflor.com

info@polyflor.com

0161 767 1111


Floors, Walls & Ceilings

Polyflor flooring features in affordable new homes A range of Polyflor’s high design and high performance vinyl flooring was recently installed at Rhondda Housing Association’s brand new Llys Graig Y Wion social housing development in Pontypridd, Wales. Polyflor’s Acoustix Forest fx, Colonia and Polysafe Verona flooring was installed by Artisan Flooring of Swansea in approximately 29 apartments within Llys Graig Y Wion’s three main blocks and three bungalows. Members of Rhondda Housing Association Board of Management recently visited the new development and commented: “The quality and overall finish of the flooring is really impressive and ensures the new homes are ready for tenants to move in.”  www.polyflor.com

info@polyflor.com

 0161

When time and energy are of the essence The first five homes of a substantial development for Mid-Wales Housing Association have been built at a rapid pace, with the inner leaf construction going up in just five weeks, thanks to the H+H Rå Build method and ThinJoint System. The housing association wanted to achieve a high level of thermal performance. The Rå Build method helped to achieve this delivering a U-Value of 0.18W/mK. Rå Build is an inclusive package which comprises aircrete blockwork and quick-setting Thin-Joint Celfix mortar. It creates the ground floors, exterior walls, upper floors and partitions, creating a weather-tight masonry shell, for a timeefficient, cost-effective solution.

767 1111

Safeguard’s response to damp gets BBA approval After a rigorous series of tests, the BBA has certified the Safeguard Europe’s Dryzone Express Replastering System which enables a skilled operative to treat rising damp, re-plaster and complete re-decoration in 24 hours. The system developed by Safeguard – specialist in damp- and waterproofing, and masonry repair solutions – condenses the process of treatment and room reinstatement to a fraction of the time required by traditional methods. The BBA issued its Agrément Certificate to Dryzone Express Replastering System for use on existing internal walls as an effective barrier against salt and moisture transfer following injection/insertion of a chemical damp-proof course system as well as for damp and/or salt-contaminated chimney breast walls.  wwww.safeguardeurope.com

info@safeguardeurope.com

 www.hhcelcon.co.uk 

marketing@hhcelcon.co.uk 880520

 01732

01403 220130

X edge helps create calm learning environment

Expona Flow flooring adds impact to school dining hall Expona Flow PUR sheet vinyl flooring from Polyflor was chosen by Broad Oak Primary School in Didsbury, Manchester as a hard wearing flooring option that would smarten up their dining area and give years of performance in this high traffic area. The eye catching Reclaimed Chevron 9830 design from the Expona Flow PUR range was installed by Manchester based Barratt & Hughes flooring contractors in the school’s canteen area. Launched earlier this year, the Expona Flow collection of heavy commercial sheet vinyl flooring features 50 wood, stone and abstract designs in a 2 metre wide sheet format with a 2mm gauge and a 0.7mm wear layer.  www.polyflor.com  

info@polyflor.com 0161 767 1111

The Queensmill School in London is an award-winning education provider for children with autistic spectrum disorders. The school has a new purpose-built building which can now cater for 130 pupils on one site. ROCKFON Sonar X edge ceiling tiles were chosen to satisfy the school’s specific acoustic and aesthetic requirements. ROCKFON Sonar X edge tiles create a near-monolithic ceiling design thanks to the reduced seam between the tiles. Unlike other concealed grid systems which require special consideration and measuring for the placement and cutting of tiles, the Sonar X edge tile has a symmetrical design which are quick and easy to install in any order.  www.rockfon.co.uk

info@rockfon.co.uk

 0800

389 0314

Surface solutions – for all treatment stages – from Fila Fila offers a complete surface solution regime, for materials including stone, porcelain, ceramic, concrete, marble, granite, terracotta and wood. The range spans from cleaning and sealing products, to protective barriers and solutions for extraordinary maintenance. All products protect original characteristics – without altering appearance or forming a surface seal – and provide fast, safe application. Production is supported by Fila’s new ISO 14001:2014 certification and its extensive range is recommended by 200 leading flooring brands. New protectors include solvent-free, stain-proofing sealant – FILAMP90 ECO PLUS, and protective dirt barrier, FILASTOP DIRT.  www.filasolutions.com/en  01584 877286  filauk@filasolutions.com

Public Sector Build Journal 49


Doors & Windows

Academy access improved with TORMAX Vastly improving student access and ensuring the smooth flow of foot traffic at all times, TORMAX has retrofitted seven sets of its ground-breaking iMotion 1301 automatic operators to existing swing doors throughout Thomas Deacon Academy, Peterborough. Contributing to DDA-compliance, TORMAX low-energy door drives are cost-effective in the long term, combining outstanding reliability with minimal maintenance. The largest sponsored Academy in the UK, Thomas Deacon opened its doors in 2007. Designed to accommodate children from the ages of 7-18 years, it is located on a purpose built 43-acre campus and delivers a modern, forward-thinking approach to education. TORMAX secured the contract to automate a number of key internal swing doors located throughout the school buildings. “The entire facility has been carefully designed to ensure clear access for all staff and pupils,” confirms Mick Crossley, Deputy Facilities Manager at the Academy. “The decision to further

automate these internal entrances reflects our continuing drive to improve our environment.” Designed in-house at the head offices in Switzerland, TORMAX iMotion motors have been cleverly engineered without the elements that generally wear out over time, such as gears and brushes. This ensures outstanding reliability, low maintenance requirements and also one of the best life expectancies on the market today. Given the busy environment with large numbers of children moving around the school, safety is a key priority. TORMAX iMotion operators incorporate a hi-tech system of up to four monitored sensors to ensure user safety and compliance with the strictest legislative requirements. The doors are also tried and tested for fire protection.

 www.tormax.co.uk 

sales@tormax.co.uk  01932 238040

Total Glass supplies to award-winning GGHT project

Senior’s Hybrid system is just the ticket Window and curtain walling solutions from Senior Architectural System’s innovative Hybrid range were recently specified for use on a new Park & Ride scheme in York. Installed by Aire Valley Architectural Systems for main contractor Balfour Beatty, Senior’s Hybrid Series 3 curtain walling and Hybrid Series 1 windows have been used as part of the creation of the two new terminal buildings at Poppleton Bar and Askham Bar. The innovative construction of Senior’s Hybrid range, which combines the durability of aluminium externally with the environmental benefits of timber internally, made it the ideal choice for use on the striking timber clad buildings.  www.seniorarchitectural.co.uk  

enquiries@seniorarchitectural.co.uk 01709 772600

50 Public Sector Build Journal

Total Glass has supplied energy-efficient ‘A’-rated PVC-U windows, high-security communal entrance doors and FD30s fire composite internal doors for Golden Gates Housing Trust’s (GGHT) award-winning regeneration scheme in Alder Lane, Warrington. Working with main contractor Willmott Dixon and John McCall Architects, the Liverpool-based fenestration specialist manufactured 373 Secured by Design-accredited windows in Grey on White profile for the five blocks of flats. The project won the Most Innovative Refurbishment/ Regeneration Project at the 2015 Housing Innovation Awards, which celebrate transformative large-scale regeneration schemes using pioneering techniques and products. 20 Total Glass high-security aluminium communal entrance doors, specially-developed for multiple occupancy residential properties, were also fitted.  www.totalglass.com

sales@totalglass.com

0151 549 2339

Aluminium: the trusted building material Aluminium is the ubiquitous construction material, constantly evolving with design. Aluminium naturally has high strength to weight ratios so large glazed spans and multistorey applications can be achieved with slim sight-lines. The opportunity to polyester powder coat or anodise means that a multitude of shades can provide contrast or minimal visibility to the project. In essence aluminium has developed to provide function, form and solutions for even the most demanding projects. Systems houses, such as Comar Architectural Aluminium Systems, continually develop and refine their profile catalogues to meet the demands of cutting edge designers, providing support and calculation at any stage of the tender process.  www.comar-alu.co.uk

projects@parksidegroup.co.uk

020 8685 9685


Doors & Windows

Gilgen swing door operator now fire door approved An automatic swing door operator from Gilgen Door Systems has become one of first of its kind to be independently tested and approved for use on fire doors. The Swiss designed Gilgen FD 20 swing door operator with safety sensors recently passed stringent fire safety tests through Exova Warringtonfire, one of the world’s leading fire safety and resistance testing specialists. The tests examined the resistance of the operator when installed to fire doors exposed to fire and extreme temperatures up to 1000°c. Following successful tests the FD 20 was approved for use on timber fire door sets providing up to two hours protection and metal fire door sets providing up to 1 hour protection, thereby meeting the requirements of BS EN1634-1:2014 regulations. Approval for the FD 20 covers installation to a number of passive door sets including EI120 timber door / timber frame with intumescent protection, EI60

metal door/ metal frame and EI60 timber door / metal frame with intumescent protection. Since its launch in 2013 the highly versatile Gilgen FD 20 has proven an ideal solution for many public sector building including hospitals, universities, government buildings and transport hubs that experience high levels of pedestrian footfall and require easy, hygienic access. With many public buildings having to specify fire doors whilst also considering DDA guidelines, the FD 20 is the perfect choice. Its powerful electro-mechanical drive can automate doors up to 250kg and even externally facing doors. Gilgen supplies a complete range of automatic swing, sliding and folding door systems, industrial doors and sliding wall systems to suit any building.

 www.gilgendoorsystems.co.uk  info@gilgendoorsystems.co.uk  0800

316 6994

The auTomaTic way To save energy Gilgen PSW ‘green wings’ automatic door system delivers high levels of insulation, retains more energy and reduces building utility costs:

• Low u-values of 1.5-1.9w/(m2K), double glazing to 1.0 • sound insulation to 30dB • highly resistant to wind and driving rain • Powerful door operator • stylish appearance to suit different facades • wide range of configurations and options Contact us today for further information: 0800 316 6994 info@gilgendoorsystems.co.uk www.gilgendoorsystems.co.uk with gilgen Psw

• automatic Doors • industrial Doors • security Doors • service & Parts

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Public Sector Build Journal 51


Roofing, Focus & Innovation Cladding & Insulation

Off-site builds finished with Eurobrick For many years now, housing associations and local authorities have embraced modern methods of construction as a fast track way to improve their housing stock. With the focus firmly fixed on speed and budgetary demands, extension pods are a popular way to upgrade existing properties. The pods are constructed off-site in factories before being transported to site to be bolted onto the buildings. The advantages are clear; the impact of the weather, time on site and disruption to occupiers are all reduced. These adaption pods often require a brick exterior, to achieve a consistent finish with the original houses. Traditional brickwork is not suitable

in this situation, so brick slip cladding provides an ideal alternative. Eurobrick Systems specialises in this and supplies X-Clad, a lightweight cladding system, to companies constructing the pods. Eurobrick’s cladding is faced with kiln fired clay brick slips, so that the finished walls are indistinguishable from traditional brickwork. Not only is the cladding robust, it can easily withstand transportation and being craned into position. It is extremely low maintenance, has a guaranteed lifespan of at least 25 years and has third party certification from the British Board of Agrément (BBA). These

benefits, together with the fact that X-Clad doesn’t require skilled labour for installation, are making it a popular choice within the industry. John Mayes, Managing Director of Eurobrick says: “The need for innovative building solutions, like X-Clad, has never been greater. Shortages in housing, skilled labour and standard bricks, has meant that to keep building programmes on track, non-traditional construction methods are being actively sought and adopted.”  www.eurobrick.co.uk 

info@eurobrick.co.uk  0117 971 7117

Swift off-site construction for new sixth form

BM TRADA showcases best practice in fire protection BM TRADA will be highlighting the benefits of effective passive fire protection through a range of interactive exhibits, live demonstrations and free seminars at this year’s Firex International at London Excel 16-18th June. Among the highlights, BM TRADA will be offering regular tours of its 80m² passive fire protection demonstration zone (C165) which will feature a full-size corridor and suspended ceiling simulation. The exhibits will demonstrate best practice specification and installation of passive fire protection measures including fire doors, service pipes, cables, light switches and downlighters.  www.bmtrada.com  

cakar@bmtrada.com 01494 569800

52 Public Sector Build Journal

The Portakabin Group has constructed a new sixth form centre in Wakefield using a Yorkon off-site solution to reduce the programme to just 13 weeks on site. Crofton Sixth Form is a pioneering partnership between Wakefield College and Crofton Academy which has opened to meet the increasing demand for post-16 places in the region. The 528m2 building on the site of Crofton Academy was handed over after 13 weeks on site and the cranage phase was carried out during school holidays to minimise disruption to teaching. Its distinctive external envelope features a bold green and black vinyl wrap which contrasts with the building’s dark grey external finish.  www.yorkon.info

info@yorkon.co.uk

0845 2000 123

Yeoman Shield leads the way in hospital Yeoman Shield has supplied Guardian Handrail, incorporating signage, to a pioneering scheme by Bradford Teaching Hospitals to provide a dementia friendly environment in their hospitals. The Guardian Handrail, installed by Yeoman Shield’s directly employed fixing operatives was supplied in a Dusty Grey colour with contrasting accessories in Mid Grey to highlight the corridor openings to doorways and lifts. Signage was incorporated flush to the face of the rail in White offering directional information to hospital visitors and patients. Ultra Corner Protection Angles were also fitted to vulnerable corners of walls to prevent damage which is easily caused by passing people, trolleys and equipment.  www.yeomanshield.com

sallyann@yeomanshield.com

0113 279 5854


Focus & Innovation available with a self-dim facility or Dimmable Via Analogue 1-10V and DALI. Beam reflector options include 14°, 27° and 52° and a special Wall Wash Reflector allows the ArtLED to be used for a range of different lighting tasks and applications. The advent of a Glare Guard Baffle for both narrow and medium reflectors eliminates the large quantity of glare traditionally associated with LED fittings. In addition, a unique forward throw heat sink, also designed by Light Projects, ensures the cool running of the module while maximising the reflector depth. A proprietary ‘Easy Clip’ cassette facilitates quick change of reflectors and easy addition of accessories. The ArtLED is fully compatible for use on many existing single and 3 circuit tracks including Eutrac, Erco, Staff, Concord, Global, IGuzzini and Hoffmeister. It is also suitable for both ceiling and wall mounting.

New spotlight on Media Space Gallery art The newly-launched ArtLED has been specified by Kevan Shaw Lighting Design and installed by DHA Designs for ‘Only in England: Photographs by Tony Ray-Jones and Martin Parr’, the opening exhibition in the new Media Space Gallery at the Science Museum. It has also been shortlisted as ‘Interior Luminaire of the year’ at the Lighting Design Awards 2014. Manufactured from extruded and diecast aluminium with an epoxy polyester powder-coated finish, the ArtLED uses the latest Xicato XSM

1,300lm Artist series LED and combines a highly crafted and designed lighting fitting with high CRI (Ra ≥ 95) and colour consistency. The fitting is

 www.lightprojects.co.uk 

info@lightprojects.co.uk  020 7231 8282

Simpson Strong Tie connects with customers 60 years following the release of its first joint hanger, Simpson Strong Tie has launched an innovative new marketing campaign, taking its customers back to the core of its company ethos – offering genuine quality, service and innovation for the construction industry. Built on premium service and product, the new ‘Genuine’ campaign puts the customer at the heart of the business, reaffirming Simpson’s position as a market leader in manufacturing connectors for the construction trade. Simpson’s versatile connectors, which are available to buy from selected DIY retailers, guarantee speed, flexible order quantities and technical and merchandising support for its end users – both builder’s merchants and distributors alike.

Portakabin Group apprenticeship scheme recognised The Portakabin Group, a leading UK modular building specialist, has won the Large Employer of the Year category at the York Apprenticeship Awards. These awards celebrate employers’ outstanding commitment to apprenticeships and demonstrate the real benefits the scheme can bring both to young people and to businesses. In the past three years, the Portakabin Group has increased its recruitment of apprentices from one to more than 30 and has plans in place to significantly expand the initiative over the next two years with a view to creating a ‘Portakabin Group Academy’.

 www.strongtie.co.uk/simpson/genuine  csanders@strongtie.com  01827 255600

New approach ensures safety of electrical equipment A new concept test instrumentation enables those responsible for ensuring the electrical safety of appliances used in schools, colleges, universities and other education centres to meet their electrical safety obligations in a safe, simple and effective manner – and in line with the latest official guidance. Seaward’s latest generation Apollo portable appliance testers establish a new approach to electrical safety testing. The Apollo 500 and Apollo 600 are designed to comply with the latest best practice advice on maintaining a risk based approach to maintaining workplace safety. The Apollo series testers include all of the electrical safety tests required by the IET Code of Practice.  www.seaward.co.uk

sales@seaward.co.uk

 www.portanews.co.uk  

0191 586 3511

information@portakabin.co.uk 0845 401 0010

Public Sector Build Journal 53


Focus & Innovation

The quiet children’s home achieves fame This dramatic ‘Children’s Home of the Future’ in Denmark has been nominated for the prestigious Mies van der Rohe Award. Designed by CEBRA, the renowned Aarhus-based Danish architects, it is a new type of 24-hour care centre for disadvantaged children. The architects’ focus on natural building materials has contributed greatly to its success, attraction and user satisfaction. For example, the exterior is entirely clad in wood while internally the floors are all wood and Troldtekt acoustic panels have been used on all the ceilings. All this has created an attractive environment, pleasant acoustics and a feeling of wellbeing throughout the complex. The building comprises four interconnected houses which form varied, self-contained units that together feel more like a home and less like an institution. The shape is

AICO launches new technology for its CO alarms Aico has announced the launch of AudioLINK, a new data extraction technology integrated into all of its Carbon Monoxide (CO) Alarms. AudioLINK allows for invaluable real time data to be extracted via the Alarm’s sounder – all you need is an AudioLINK enabled CO Alarm, a tablet or smartphone and most importantly the free AudioLINK App. This data is converted into an Alarm Status Report. The Report is created for the life of the Alarm, and is colour coded to identify the urgency of any issue. The Report displays useful information about the Alarm, such as battery life, alarm sensor status, number of times tested and removed; and detection levels of CO.

emphasised by the striking pitched roofs, window piercings and extensions which grow in and out of the individual sections. The resulting spaces are very flexible in terms of their layout, furnishings and use, depending on the needs and activities of the children. Danish manufactured Troldtekt acoustic tiles are specified in the UK and Europe. Made from 100% natural wood fibres, their benefits are high sound absorption, high durability, natural breathability, low cost life cycle performance and sustainability. They are used to improve acoustics in many different buildings, such

enquiries@aico.co.uk 01691 664100

54 Public Sector Build Journal

 www@troldtekt.co.uk 

info@troldtekt.co.uk  01978 664255

Two Hauraton systems installed at Maltby Academy Early in 2012 it was decided to refurbish the older building at Maltby Academy and build a new open plan business/ enterprise centre and sport science block. In addition, the old gymnasium was to be converted into a performing and creative arts facility. With the site being quite flat, and the old and new buildings surrounded by paved and asphalted surfaces, it was essential rainwater is drained effectively. Two Hauraton channel systems were chosen to drain surface water: RECYFIX PRO 100 with FIBRETEC C250 gratings for the asphalted yards and car park and RECYFIX SLOTTED channels for the paved walkways, these providing an unobtrusive, narrow line of slots in the paved surfaces.  www.drainage-projects.co.uk

janine.kennedy@hauraton.co.uk

01582 501380

Golden Gates Housing specifies Aico Multi-Sensor Golden Gates Housing, in Warrington, a registered provider of social housing, has chosen to install Aico’s unique MultiSensor mains powered fire alarms as standard across its entire housing stock of 8658 properties. Golden Gates Housing has been specifying Aico smoke alarms exclusively for many years. As part of its 10-year alarm replacement cycle, the organisation undertook a review of the alarms they had already installed. They used quality and value for money to help determine the decision to switch to Aico’s Multi-Sensor as the alarm of choice, because it is strong on both measures.

 www.aico.co.uk/audiolink 

as schools, swimming pools, commercial and public. Available in various sizes and in three grades from ultrafine to coarse, they can be left unpainted or painted in virtually any RAL colour. Troldtekt sustainability has also been recognised with certification at Silver level within the Cradle to Cradle concept. This international certification has been achieved because the panels do not contain hazardous substances and can be recycled.

 www.aico.co.uk

enquiries@aico.co.uk

01691 664100


Focus & Innovation

Lighting up European design The new sports facility at Maldegem in Belgium is another example of how the Kalwall daylight diffusing system is being specified for many different kinds of applications across Europe. It is particularly popular in sports and leisure buildings, swimming pools and schools. Designed by Van Acker & Partners in collaboration with Arcadis, as the result of a limited competition, this is a remarkable building of perfect synergy and sustainability where modern building technology is used to create the ideal playing conditions. The building’s north south orientation was specifically designed to exploit in full the use of renewable energy such as solar and daylighting. To combat glare in the 48

x 34m main sports hall, Kalwall was chosen because of its unique light transmission as well as its high levels of impact resistance, good insulation and low maintenance. Consequently, say the users, the sports hall generates a very happy and pleasant atmosphere. The Kalwall translucent cladding not only diffuses natural daylight deep into the sports hall, which can be divided into three playing areas, but creates perfect playing conditions by eliminating glare and shadows. The even distribution of light allows players to distinguish markings on the floor as well as to easily spot balls and shuttlecocks.

This solution also means that there is no need for blinds, curtains or external shading. With increased natural daylight and resistance to solar gain, energyconsuming artificial lighting and airconditioning costs are dramatically reduced. Technically, the translucent panels are highly insulating, with U-values as low as 0.56W/m2K or further increasing to 0.28W/m2K when an aerogel is added within the panels.  www.structura-uk.com/kalwall 

kalwall@structura.co.uk  01233 501504

Top marks for Metalline at academy Metalline has received top marks for the external facade of the Kensington Aldridge Academy in North Kensington, officially opened in January 2015 by the Duchess of Cambridge. Designed by architects Studio E, the BREEAM Excellent rated building features over 2000 panels in varying lengths and depths up to 4500mm and 800mm respectively, finished in four different RAL colours. The company also supplied a range of ventilated Bird’s Beak style panels, pressings, copings and cills that further added to the overall aesthetic of the building’s facade. Metalline’s Ultima insulated panels are extremely versatile and possess excellent acoustic, thermal and fire performance ratings.  www.metalline.co.uk

sales@metalline.co.uk

Levolux leads the way at the UEA  01543

As part of a £58m investment in its residential campus, the University of East Anglia has unveiled its new Crome Court development, featuring a striking solar shading solution from Levolux. The solution comprised a colourful array of Glass Fins, along with Aerofoil Fins and Ventilation Louvres to screen a roof plant area. All aluminium components, including the Aerofoil Fins and Louvre blades have been given a highly durable and attractive dark grey powder coating, while the complete solution is backed by Levolux’s design, manufacture and installation package, along with a three year warranty.

456930

Healthcare high on the agenda with Gerflor The evolution of flooring at medical facilities is progressing at a phenomenal rate as the number of acute-care and specialty hospitals has increased in the UK and Ireland. When Circle Partnership wanted its new Reading Hospital to look like a hotel it needed stylish flooring with the highest hygienic standards. Specifiers chose Gerflor’s Mipolam Symbioz, which offers unparalleled stain resistance to blood and chemicals, including iodine; the best slip resistance in its field, astonishingly low maintenance and has unique environmental credentials. By combining the renowned hard-wearing Cosmo range with its revolutionary, patented Evercare surface treatment, Gerflor has redefined the standards for smooth homogeneous calendared flooring.  www.gerflor.co.uk

contractuk@gerflor.com

 www.levolux.com  

01926 622600

info@levolux.com 020 8863 9111

Public Sector Build Journal 65


Roofing, Health Focus &&Innovation Cladding Safety & Insulation

London Borough of Hounslow required paving materials which reflected the history of Brentford

Marshalls mix helps retain cultural heritage For over 100 years Brentford Market Place was home to a market where high-quality, locally-sourced produce was sold. The market was moved which prompted protests from the local community and as a result it was brought back to the area in 2013.

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ondon Borough of Hounslow sought to bring the public realm space to life by improving the hard landscaping, carrying out lighting improvements, introducing art and hosting cultural events to improve this vital community space in historic Brentford. There were two main challenges – the recycling of materials and the timeframe in which the project had to be completed. London Borough of Hounslow required paving materials which reflected the history of Brentford, including using as much of the existing Yorkstone as possible. However, the existing materials were weathered and differed slightly in

56 Public Sector Build Journal

colour to the new materials. There was a 12 week lead-in period for the Yorkstone supply with 16 weeks until the grand opening of the Market Place scheduled in September 2014. In light of this, London Borough of Hounslow issued a letter of intent to allow early procurement of the stone to meet the required deadline which was accommodated by Marshalls. Marshalls’ Scoutmoor and Moselden Yorkstones, renowned for their durability and aesthetics, were selected in different colours and finishes by architects Kinnear. Their vision was to create interesting linear design effects by blending the original and new materials to achieve the desired mix and colour variation. This was the first scheme of its kind to mix Yorkstones in this way. Different surface finishes can enhance the colour differences and add to the overall aesthetic appeal. The tumbled-finished stone provides an antiqued, distressed look, reminiscent of old Yorkstone cobbles and perfectly complements the look of the existing stone. The diamond sawn finish brings the scheme up-to-date, with sleek contemporary lines.

Both finishes have excellent slip-resistant properties. It was initially estimated that only a small amount of the existing Yorkstone could be reused, but on inspection of the up-lifted stone it was revealed that approximately 70% could be suitable for reuse in the scheme, highlighting the inherent durability of this material. Marshalls provided sample areas on site to allow the client to give final approval on the colour mix percentages and design layout and delivered the scheme on time. Marshalls’ Dave Stanger, National Commercial Manager for Natural Stone said: “Kinnear produced an exceptional design which has never been seen before in natural stone paving. The bold decision to mix materials has worked beautifully, while also sympathetically reflecting the historic signs of Brentford and creating a distinctive space where local residents and shoppers can feel a sense of pride. “Yorkstone has been selected for use in many public realm schemes in London and can bring prestige to any project.” Scoutmoor and Moselden Yorkstones are available as paving, setts, kerbs, steps, water management solutions, geometric bespoke designs and seating to complete your project. Tunji Oladejo, Town Centre Project Manager at London Borough of Hounslow described Brentford as a ‘forgotten High Street’ and said the regeneration of the market place has created a vibrant, open space, not normally seen in cities, where children can play and communities can come together. He also stated that the project had been extremely worthwhile and ran smoothly due to the strong relationship Marshalls had with the contractor.

 www.marshalls.co.uk/commercial 

info@marshalls.co.uk  0370 442 7702

The bold decision to mix materials has worked beautifully, while also sympathetically reflecting the historic signs of Brentford


Focus & Innovation light, both in terms of the colour and visual weight, sitting well alongside the timber cladding. Double lock, standing seam joints were used to give structure to the pitched roofs but the Nordic Royal wall cladding is installed with a reverse coulisseau joint, avoiding projections that children might catch themselves on at low level. Nordic Royal is produced by Aurubis, part of the world’s leading integrated copper group and largest copper recycler. Other copper alloys include Nordic Bronze and Nordic Brass – now also available pre-weathered. In addition to Nordic Standard copper, other Aurubis Architectural surfaces include Nordic Green and Nordic Blue factory-applied patinas – developed with properties and colours based on the same brochantite mineralogy found in natural patinas all over the world. Nordic Brown preoxidised copper gives either light or dark brown oxidisation that otherwise takes time to develop in the environment.

Royal welcome Trapezoidal pavilion roofs and facades, clad in Aurubis’ Nordic Royal golden copper alloy, define the welcoming character of a new children’s nursery building. Arcadia Nursery brings together two existing University of Edinburgh nursery facilities, into a single, purpose-built complex. Although conceived as a free-flowing series of interconnected spaces internally, externally each age group’s playroom is clearly expressed as an inviting and domestic – but also contemporary – form, creating a sense of belonging and ownership for each

age group. The resulting three pavilion roofs are clad in Nordic Royal golden copper alloy, as well as some facades complementing adjacent timber cladding. Malcolm Fraser Architects selected Nordic Royal for its warm and friendly persona, so crucial to a nursery setting. Having used bronze on other projects, the designers felt that this would become too dark, whereas Nordic Royal will stay

 www.aurubis.com/finland/architectural 

g.bell@aurubis.com  01875 812144

AmbiRad raises £1200 for OPA cancer charity

School top of the fire safety class English Martyrs School and Sixth Form College in Hartlepool, County Durham, is benefiting from a streamlined low maintenance and an innovative highperformance fire alarm system, provided by Hochiki Europe. It was decided that the school would benefit from the use of ACC-EN multi-sensors. Installed in the rooms most at risk from alerts caused by class work, these detectors could be programmed to detect just heat by day and heat and smoke by night, ensuring optimum safety for students. FB-1 Reflective beam smoke detectors were installed in the ornate main halls and sports hall, due to the breadth of coverage they offered.  www.hochikieurope.com  

marketing@hochikieurope.com 01634 266569

Employees at AmbiRad and Reznor UK pulled on their favourite festive jumpers last December for a Christmas-themed charity event in support of colleague Howard Marfleet, who was suffering from oesophageal cancer. Christmas ties, Santa hats, reindeer antlers, novelty earrings and tinsel were much in evidence, while mince pies and cakes were also on sale during ‘Christmas Jumper Day’. The event raised £1200 and the proceeds will go to the Oesophageal Patients Association in memory of Reznor sales manager Howard, who died in January.  www.ambirad.co.uk

ambiradsales@tnb.com

 01384

489700

First new council houses in a decade Robert Woodhead, a construction company based in Nottinghamshire and operating throughout the East Midlands and Yorkshire, has completed the first new council houses in a decade with the construction of 10 sustainable homes on three separate disused garage sites in Grantham and Stamford, in Lincolnshire. The project used Russell Roof Tiles’ Grampian tiles – a standard flat interlocking roof tile, combining the traditional appearance of slate with the security of an interlocking design and the economy of concrete. Concrete roof tiles are a long life, durable product and require minimal maintenance once installed. The versatility of concrete allows for an authentic slate effect roof tile with the benefits of offering greater strength.  www.russellrooftiles.com

salesenquiries@russellrooftiles.com

01283 517070

Public Sector Build Journal 57


London Build 2015 Preview

The event is an ideal opportunity to access major developers, contractors and clients procuring work in London and the South of England

Construction boom spurs new event London Build 2015 is the leading new construction exhibition to focus on the construction boom in London and the South of England. The event will take place at the O2 London, accommodating in excess of 200 international exhibitors and thousands of quality attendees showcasing the latest projects, developments, and investment opportunities.

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oth days of the show will see over 50 top level speakers from across the industry and local government, discussing the latest strategies and project forecasts through presentations and interactive panel discussions, as well as 36 hours of CPD accredited training workshops. The first day of London Build is shaping up to be a truly spectacular affair. The conference venue will be opened by Jamie Ratcliff from the Greater London Authority who will be speaking about the construction boom and opportunities that are coming up and ongoing in the Capital. Following on from that Peter Shipley will be speaking about the need for the Thames Tideway Tunnel as part of the programme which will also see Nigel Hardy from TfL speak about the Road Modernisation Plan, and some outstanding panel discussions which will be announced closer to the time. As day one of London Build 2015 draws to a close, attention switches towards the London Construction Awards, hosted at Indigo at the O2. The Awards will be recognising achievements by those that have played a defining role in delivering

58 Public Sector Build Journal

exceptional quality, innovation and service; and in driving the London construction industry forwards. The evening also features a Gala Dinner, exclusive presentations from industry leaders, a wide-array of live entertainment, and comedy-sets from celebrity acts, including the superb Jimmy Carr. Not all things are made equal, but day two of London Build will be just as good as the first. As our exhibitors and many attendees return from a sparkling evening of awards and entertainment, the London Build conference kicks into overdrive. Simon Wright from Crossrail will be speaking about building Crossrail, Balfour Beatty’s Head of Sustainability, Dr Paul Toyne, will then be speaking about the role of construction in delivering legacy projects. The final afternoon of London Build will see conference sessions continuing with a presentation from Richard Griffiths, the director of policy and communications at the UK Green Building Council. The conference sessions will be complemented over the two days by

a number of CPD accredited training workshops, situated across three workshop venues within the exhibition. These workshops will be presented by special guests and regulars of the CPD roadshow circuit, including RIBA, BRE Global, Tata Steel, CompeteFor, BSRIA, Supply Chain Academy and many more. The event is officially supported by the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI). As part of this partnership the LCCI will be moderating two panel discussions at London Build 2015 on the topics of skills shortages and regeneration. LCCI Chief Executive, Colin Stanbridge will be moderating both sessions, which will feature Richard Threlfall, KPMG, and Debbie Akehurst, Land Securities as panellists with several more to be announced. In addition to the LCCI, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and Chartered Association of Building Engineers (CABE) are supporting London Build 2015 as lead event partners, providing fantastic support as well as getting involved in the conference, workshops and awards.

î˜ą www.londonbuildexpo.com


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Improving your vision with our solutions. Working with you to deliver safe, secure and sustainable projects. At the forefront of design innovation, we’ve been providing safety and security for homes, education, commercial and industrial developments for almost 70 years.

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