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Isla Lyndon 342 Swindon Rd Cheltenham GL51 9JZ

Showroom 7 Clerkenwell Rd London EC1M 5RN sales@lyndon.co.uk

bossdesign.com/lyndon


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esigning an interior scheme for a hotel is a difficult task. Creating a beautiful guest room alongside stunning shared spaces that appeal to the emotions of every single guest that enters the lobby while simultaneously anticipating their needs is no mean feat. In reality, it’s virtually impossible to please every hotel guest, but with over 30 years of scientific research into the physiological and psychological benefits of exposure to nature, biophilic design is taking a step towards improving people’s health, wellbeing and happiness.

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WELCOME TO

Biophilic design is a method of designing interiors with human needs in mind. The idea behind the theory is that humans have an innate attraction to nature which can reduce stress, perfect for hotel interiors. This month, industry-recognised Biophilic Design Expert, Oliver Heath, discusses how best to incorporate these design principles into hotel interiors on page 98. With hospitality design still in mind, on page 49, Studio Noor unveils the rejuvenation of a prestigious hotel, which was constructed in the early 20th century, on page 80, we explore an eco-hotel located in a fishing reserve in Avignon, France, and on page 13, located within the natural resort Azulik is a pioneering, eco-conscious art gallery, designed to foster creativity, awareness and vision in the Yucatan Peninsula by showcasing a roster of prominent international artists. I hope you enjoy this edition. Don’t forget, you can also access all of Inex’s features and product inspiration at your fingertips via the magazine’s state-of-the-art app. To download your version free of charge, simply search ‘Inex-online’ on the App Store or Google play.

ISSUE

58 Cover: 1.26 is a monumental floating form. It’s title refers to the length of time in microseconds that the earth’s day was shortened as a result of a single physical event.

Editorial: Paige Smith paige@mixedmediainfo.com Rebecca Kemp rebecca@mixedmediainfo.com Digital Advertising: Sam Ball sam@mixedmediainfo.com Grant Jeffs grant@mixedmediainfo.com Print Design Manager: Jack Witcomb jack@mixedmediainfo.com

Paige Paige Smith paige@mixedmediainfo.com

Download the INEX app for iPhone, iPad and Android. Search 'Inex-online'.

Follow us on Twitter: @INEXonline

Digital Design Manager: David Perry david@mixedmediainfo.com Production Assistant: Sofia Franchi sofia@mixedmediainfo.com Accounts: Jackie Dearman jackie@mixedmediainfo.com Managing Director: Sam Ball sam@mixedmediainfo.com

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Mixed Media Information Pear Platt, Woodfalls Farm, Gravelly Way, Laddingford, Kent. ME18 6DA Tel: 01622 873229

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C O N T E N T S

CONTENTS JUNE 2018

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EVENTS

EXPOSE

C O N T E N T S

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13 INSPIRE

Inex rounds up this month’s industry must-see events, trade shows, seminars and exciting exhibitions from all over the globe so you never miss a thing.

A look at the latest unique creation by Gianluca Paludi, Artistic Director and Designer at Olympia Ceramica.

Be inspired by a pioneering art gallery based in Tulum, designed to foster creativity, awareness and vision.

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EXRATED

HEATING

HOTEL DESIGN

Discover Montreal’s floating sculpture, 1.26.

Bisque discusses how to choose a radiator for the hub of a home, the kitchen.

Uncover the rejuvenation project of a prestigious hotel in Istanbul.

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DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES

ANTIQUES

WOOD

A detailed explanation on the symbolism in antique rugs.

An in-depth look at an ecohotel located in a fishing reserve in Avignon, France.

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CONSERVATORIES & ORANGERIES

BIOPHILIC DESIGN

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT

A discussion on how the right window dressing can make or break a room.

An informative guide on choosing the interior for a conservatory or orangery.

Biophilic Design Expert, Oliver Heath, discusses how best to incorporate these design principles into hotel interior design.

Inex rounds up the latest innovative products in the marketplace for the interior design world.

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E V E N T S

JUNE EVENTS Inex rounds up this month’s industry must-see events, trade shows, seminars and exciting exhibitions from all over the globe so you never miss a thing.

THE LONDON FESTIVAL OF ARCHITECTURE Citywide, London 1-30 June

The London Festival of Architecture is hosting nearly 500 events across the city exploring this year’s theme ‘identity’. From exhibitions to family events, walking tours, debates and stunning architectural installations; there’s something for everyone. londonfestivalofarchitecture.org

HOUSE & GARDEN FESTIVAL

Olympia, London 20-24 June

The festival brings together four leading lifestyle events, the Art & Antiques Fair Olympia, HOUSE, Spirit of Summer and GROW London, and presents an eclectic collection of products ranging from antiquity to contemporary – focused on craftsmanship and quality, design, interior and garden trends and luxury lifestyle. houseandgardenfestival.com

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THE ART & ANTIQUES FAIR OLYMPIA

Olympia, London 20-27 June

The Art & Antiques Fair Olympia is one of the UK’s largest and most established art and antiques fairs, taking place annually in June at London’s iconic Kensington Olympia Exhibition Centre. Celebrating its 46th year, the show is recognised as one of the most prestigious and established fairs in the UK, and an annual destination for over 30,000 discerning and sophisticated international visitors. olympia-art-antiques.com

RHS GARDEN HARLOW CARR FLOWER SHOW North Yorkshire 22-24 June

This three-day floral extravaganza is a great day out, packed with specialist nurseries and trade stands, gorgeous displays, expert advice, tempting food, entertainment and more. rhs.org.uk

AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL FURNITURE FAIR (AIFF) Melbourne Exhibition Centre 19-22 July

Australian International Furniture Fair (AIFF) is Australia’s longest running and largest furniture buying and networking destination for the nation’s leading retail chains and independent retailers. aiff.net.au

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VINYL

Futuristic but at the same time romantic and nostalgic, put simply Vinyl – the latest creation by Gianluca Paludi, Artistic Director and Designer at Olympia Ceramica – is unique.

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inyl looks like an authentic musical console from the 1980s. The recessed basin is like a DJ turntable on which sits a priceless vinyl, the mixer is like the arm for switching on the music on a record player and it consists of a stylus. The two handles for volume control become the regulators for water pressure and temperature. The furniture console, completed by the storage drawer, hosts a music amplifier linked by Bluetooth, with the small holes on the front indicating the speaker location. The total structure houses a tempered glass shelf, a towel rail and a comfortable leather bag. The LED mirror reveals lights both on the higher and lower side, with the latter replicating the music equaliser image. olympiaceramica.it

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I N S P I R E

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I N S P I R E

AN ECOCONSCIOUS GALLERY A pioneering art gallery has opened in Tulum, designed to foster creativity, awareness, and vision in the Yucatan Peninsula by showcasing a roster of prominent international artists.

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nder the direction of Santiago Rumney Guggenheim and with the unwavering support of its mastermind and creator, Jorge Eduardo Neira Sterkel, Owner and CEO of Azulik, IK LAB promises to introduce art to Tulum in the most remarkable of ways. IK LAB is pleased to present Alignments, the inaugural exhibition curated by Santiago Rumney Guggenheim featuring works by Tatiana TrouvÊ, Artur Lescher and Margo Trushina that explore the human journey through both physical and metaphysical realms. Redefining the spatial and conceptual parameters of the art experience, the organic shapes and meandering expanses of IK LAB’s unique exhibition spaces immerse the visitor in a meditative state, serving as a gateway to discovery and connectedness.

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Santiago Rumney Guggenheim, Director of IK LAB, commented: “My history with Tulum is deep-rooted, and this project is very close to my heart. IK LAB is more than a gallery, it aspires to provide a framework for the world’s finest creative minds to interact with the gallery’s visionary architecture and explore new ways of creation.” IK LAB was conceived as a place to create unprecedented cultural experiences for both Tulum’s expanding local community and international visitors by presenting groundbreaking contemporary art exhibitions. Located within the natural resort Azulik, IK LAB’s architecture draws inspiration from its natural surroundings and redefines the relationship between art and its physical environment. Through its environmentally-conscious design, a bespoke circle of artists, and avant-garde residency programme, IK LAB transcends the traditional confines of the art experience. The space captures the quintessence of the Yucatan Peninsula’s abundant nature and rich spiritual heritage, projecting it into the future as an inspiration and model for communities beyond.

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Entering through IK LAB’s wooden and glass doors, reaching 4m tall, visitors are elevated into another dimension. The perspective and uncanny scale of the space create a sense of vast infinity, while its curves foster a sensation of warmth and protection. Visitors are invited to walk barefoot through the gallery and to interact with the floor as a living organism, experiencing the transition from cool, polished cement to the warm, raw wooden floors in Bejuco wood, a vine-like plant native to the region. External sounds are muted, causing each step to reverberate and echo throughout the space making the visitors fully conscious of their own physical presence. Circular windows set into the impressive, geometrically patterned dome illuminate the gallery, serving as portals to the surrounding jungle and sky. Breaking with the traditional white-cube gallery experience, the space fortifies the organic relationship between art, the viewer and the environment.

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“IK LAB is more than a gallery, it aspires to provide a framework for the world’s finest creative minds to interact with the gallery’s visionary architecture and explore new ways of creation” – Santiago Rumney Guggenheim, Director of IK LAB

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Alignments comprises works by Artur Lescher, Margo Trushina and Tatiana Trouvé, which invite the viewer to explore and rediscover spatial coordinates and metaphysical sphere. Brazilian Artist Artur Lescher unveils invisible spatial structures through the verticality of his suspended sculptures. Within this redesigned space, the visitor’s perception of matter is disrupted by the apparent fluidity of floor-based marble and basalt pieces that unveil infinity. The relativity of perception is revealed in Margo Trushina’s works. The apparent solidity of rocks is transcended by undulating polished metal shapes projecting matter into movement, while the emanating neon light dissolves the illusion of permanence of the bright white human outline. 2 9

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A 12m-high adjacent dome built according to ancient principles of sacred geometry is reached through a passageway across a natural water flow. It houses Tatiana TrouvÊ’s 250 Points Towards Infinity, 250 pendulums descending from the heights of the dome in diagonal lines pointing towards an intricate constellation on the ground as if directed by invisible hands. Dialoguing with the uneven floor and meanders of the first space, the artworks operate as poetic gestures orchestrating an explorative journey, while the installation in the dome becomes an invitation to meditate in the presence of a metaphoric union of heaven and earth. iklab.art 3 1

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E X R A T E D

A FLOATING SCULPTURE 1.26 (One Point Two Six) hangs above us, a monumental floating form. In Montreal, its presence fills the Quartier des Spectacles’ Jardins Gamelin with vibrant colour and gentle movement.

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Its title, 1.26, refers to the length of time in microseconds that the earth’s day was shortened as a result of a single physical event

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omposed of layers of technical fibres braided and knotted together, the form of 1.26 responds to the light streaming above it and the wind through it, while at night; pulsing alive with projected coloured light. The twin effects of the unplanned breeze and programmed coloured light push against each other, resulting in an ever-changing choreography. The content of the sculpture – like its movements – is open-ended, and allowed to emerge within each viewer. Every person is encouraged to freely form associations and create their independent interpretation of the work. Its title, 1.26, refers to the length of time in microseconds that the earth’s day was shortened as a result of a single physical event (in this case, datasets derived from the 2010 Chilean earthquake). It is constructed from fibres 15 times stronger than steel by weight in custom colour blends that Janet Echelman combines with light to create the dynamic final sculpture.

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As a physical manifestation of interconnectedness, the whole of the net sculpture responds to the movement of any individual part. This interconnection reveals a dramatic contrast at play within the sculpture – that of the seemingly delicate fibres and tremendous scale – a contrast not dissimilar to the soft appearance of the sculpture against the hard verticality of the city. These contrasts beguile and engage the viewer, inviting a moment of contemplation amid the bustle and commotion of daily life. Lightweight and flexible, 1.26 is designed to travel to cities around the world where it’s an opportunity for individuals to reflect upon the interdependency that we all have with the larger cycles of the planet. First exhibited in the Quartier des Spectacles in 2015, the sculpture has returned every summer as a beloved icon, and has witnessed a profound regeneration of the Jardins Gamelin over the last four years. Originally commissioned for the Biennial of the Americas held in Denver in 2010, it has travelled to cities on five continents, including Amsterdam, Prague, Durham (UK), Singapore, Sydney, Santiago (Chile), Mexico City, Taiwan and Shanghai. echelman.com I N E X

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H E A T I N G

SELECTING RADIATORS FOR KITCHENS

Kitchens have become a focal point for the home – not only are they a space designed for families to cook together but a space for entertaining and bringing people together. It’s no wonder Bisque is regularly asked “which radiator is best for the kitchen?”. Of course, the answer will depend on the specifics of the kitchen.

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izing is an important factor to consider. Kitchens usually offer fewer options for radiator placement so available space will influence the model you choose. Tall and slim models are often popular for this space-saving reason. Kitchens are unusual spaces in that there can be a wide range of heat requirements, i.e. first thing in the morning you need a lot of heat but with the oven and other equipment going (plus lights and people), you will not want much at all. That is why it is vital to use thermostatic valves, as they will adjust the radiator output automatically. TRVs are also the environmentallyfriendly valve choice.

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Kitchens are unusual spaces in that there can be a wide range of heat requirements

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It is also worth thinking about hygiene when choosing appliances for the kitchen. Radiators that are easier to clean generally have a smooth finish as opposed to a textured finish. Pipework is generally better coming from the wall than up from the floor as this reduces dirt build-up and makes for easier cleaning of the floor. There are also certain considerations with different types of finish. Chrome radiators generally give a lower heat output and may not last as long as stronger finishes such as stainless steel but this, of course, depends on the quality and thickness of the chrome plating. Good quality should last a long time. Stainless steel is less prone to corrosion in moisture-heavy environments which is why it typically has a higher warranty. The variations in quality are smaller than chrome and that is why it has become popular over recent years. We also expect aluminium radiators to be used increasingly in kitchens as they respond faster to changes in temperature than other models. Last but not least, for kitchens it is also important to consider the overall look. A clever matching finish will set off the entire appearance. You can get radiators which complement the material of the worktops or a colour-matched radiator if a kitchen is painted; essentially, you can be as creative as you like. bisque.co.uk

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D E S I G N H O T E L

BRINGING BACK GRANDEUR

Studio Noor was tasked to rejuvenate the prestigious hotel, which was constructed in the early 20th century by Müşir Kazım Pasha, a prominent Ottoman Statesman and ancestor of the owners. 4 9

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nce the top summertime destination for holidaymakers in Istanbul, Studio Noor was taken on to refresh the ‘grand dame’ without losing the flair and atmosphere that hotel guests have come to know and love. The design brief included updating the public spaces and advising on the design of a selection of guestrooms of the famous hotel without denaturing it, to bring it back to a year-round hotel destination. To achieve an authentic yet impactful restoration, Studio Noor undertook an extensive research project studying the old building and examining photographs

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and references from the hotel’s archives. Interviews were held with senior members of the family that have owned the hotel since 1908 to collect their memories on how things were in the hotel’s glory years. Reference projects of the same era around the region were reviewed, with studies of other hotels in Istanbul, Cote d’Azur and the Italian Riviera. 5 4

The final design scheme was inspired by the hotel’s significant historical location and ancient references from the archive, Visconti movie sets and Agatha Christie novels. These references were blended with contemporary accents to make the hotel more relevant for guests today. Studio Noor introduced a distinctive design thread to run throughout the


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Splendid Palace Hotel, choosing a bold Basque red to accentuate several key design features throughout the building. The colourway was initially used on the French shutters on the facade of the hotel, an internal staircase and the inside of the public telephone booth in the lobby. A new customdesigned round ottoman sofa has been upholstered in a striking Jim Thompson

fabric for an arresting first impression when entering the hotel lobby, while red screens and lanterns in the winter garden are a modern twist on Ottoman flair. Studio Noor also redesigned the reception counter and created pigeonholes for room keys painted in a dramatic red. The lobby features a gilded Louis XV sofa, an easel sourced from an antiques market in Athens 5 5

and an antique gilded marble table. Studio Noor repolished and reconditioned the original lighting in the lobby as well as reupholstering a selection of original furniture pieces in light-coloured linens. Much of the furniture comprises original pieces found in the hotel, its storerooms and attics, originating from Establissement Austro-Ottoman d’Ameublements (est. 1867). These pieces were lovingly restored by Studio Noor’s team of artisans to peel away layers of lacquer applied throughout the years. They were then reupholstered in a range of contemporary fabrics to introduce a touch of modernity. I N E X

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A number of original rattan pieces dating back from the beginning of the 20th century and manufactured by Charlionais, Pourailly & Cie (ToulouseLyon) were too valuable and fragile to be restored so Studio Noor had them reproduced in Vietnam to stunning effect. Unique objects and decorative items including antique silver were sourced from antiques dealers in Istanbul and on Studio Noor buying trips to flea markets in Athens, Portobello Market in London and antique dealers in Vietnam. These include two dramatic oversized blue and white vases at the entrance to the bar I N E X

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sourced in Vietnam. The linen drapery is custom designed and was inspired by photographs of hotels in Greece. A large square table in the centre of the lounge features a collection of found objects, books and magazines. A new bar towards the back of the lounge area was also designed and the wall was repainted in a rich blue tone to 6 0

complement the colour palette of the furniture and accessories in the room. The space also includes a selection of rugs in faded blue, cream and grey tones. Many of the lighting features found in the hotel are original but the chandelier in the bar area was custom designed with resin beads containing Turkish tealeaves and manufactured in Vietnam.


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Throughout the hotel, considerable attention was paid to the display of the artwork. Most of the smaller oil paintings were commissioned in Vietnam and feature Ottoman artists such as Hoca Ali Riza and other seaside views from the region. The masterpiece is a huge reproduction of an 18th century Italianate Bosphorus and Golden Horn view now hanging above the reception of

the hotel. All painting reproductions were aged by hand using craft techniques. The historical portrait of the Pasha was restored and reframed and an oil reproduction was created and offered to the family with a bronze plaque as a thank-you gift. Many of the original materials in the building were maintained and refreshed; giving them a new lease of life. 6 1

The original floors were buried under more than a century of layers of dark brown varnish and these were stripped back and the floor retreated to restore it to its natural colour, which gives the entire hotel a light and airy feel. The biggest intervention in the space was removing the carpet wallcoverings from the reception, restaurant and public spaces, which ran up the wall to mid-height. Wood panelling was introduced into a selection of these rooms to give a more contemporary look and feel to the space. I N E X

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For the design of the hotel restaurant, the space was opened up by removing existing large cabinets and adding sleek new buffet counters. The chairs were re-stained in a blue and grey colour palette and reupholstered in a matching fabric reminiscent of Bayadere, which was fashionable in the Ottoman Empire at the time the hotel first opened. New curtains were added to the space as well as new tables

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with wrought iron feet, in keeping with the style of the hotel, while the tableware used in the restaurant is the hotel’s original silverware from Christofle. Studio Noor also repolished and reconditioned original chandeliers that feature in the space, while clusters of small reproduction paintings hang on the walls adding character to the hotel’s restaurant. noordesign.net

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A C C E S S O R I E S D E C O R A T I V E

CURTAIN CALL The right window dressing can make or break a room, as David Harris, MD at luxury fabric specialist Kobe UK, explains.

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urtains can make or break a room, so selecting the right style is essential. Whether an eyelet floats your boat, or a pencil pleat is more your thing, there are so many other aspects to consider – so where do you begin? Start by assessing your room. Is it a lovely light space or a darker area that could do with a little brightening up? This will help determine the type of fabric to choose – common sense maybe, but so many people make the mistake of selecting the wrong fabric and then later regret it. Curtains are a real investment piece, so be sure to choose a fabric that will stand the test of time and won’t prove boring after a few months. Consider what kind of lining the curtain fabric will require too – for example, the bedroom – particularly for younger ones – would benefit from a blackout lining to reduce the amount of light coming through when they’re closed. Alternatively, if you’re looking for something more whimsical, a voile or sheer fabric will add an extra layer to the curtain, providing privacy when it’s required but still allowing light through. This type of fabric works well in the commercial sector – particularly hotels. While lending a practical hand, sheer and voile fabrics can look incredibly chic and there’s more choice than ever before. We offer a selection of subtle finishes including metallics and pearlescents which add another dimension to the fabric.

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Pattern, whether it’s a damask, geometric or a floral, can transform an interior space. Be sure to work out what will work best with the existing furniture. For example, if the sofa features an ornate design, maybe steer towards something simple. Alternatively, if you have an unassuming sofa, try dressing it with paired curtains and soft furnishings in a pretty design. Summer is the optimum season for updating an interior, and curtains and soft furnishings can effect an instant transformation. Florals are particularly popular at this time of year and will brighten up a room once the seasons move towards the autumn. Properties with larger windows – particularly period and commercial – command a more domineering curtain to dress a space. Room-high ranges are developed especially for these super-sized windows.

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In terms of following trends, I’m a great believer in furnishing a property to one’s individual taste. Keeping relevant is great, but when someone is investing in expensive pieces such as sofas and curtains for a home it’s not something that anyone wants to continually update – do this with accessories instead. Choosing a timeless fabric that will last also pays dividends. Classic styles never go out of fashion and prints such as damask and florals always look the business. Or conversely, a beautiful textured curtain in a statement shade will add the wow factor to a room. Velvets can create a real focal point with colours ranging from subtle creams and taupes to flamboyant jewelled tones, which are still trending in 2018. For those looking for a more understated elegance, linen curtains can look absolutely beautiful. I love the idea of layering linen with a sheer of voile, it can pull together a room helping it look ‘finished’. Linens work well in a more naturally designed room, so one which features more wood or stone. Alternatively, a linen curtain will contrast beautifully with a polished interior design – particularly marble. When selecting fabric for curtains it’s important to identify key pieces of furniture that the curtains will pair or contrast with. There’s no point mixing a geometric curtain with a floral sofa, unless you want to, of course. kobe.eu

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UNDERSTANDING SYMBOLISM IN ANTIQUE RUGS For those working in the antique rug world, the differences among Persian and Oriental rugs are clear. For the average person, though, such differences aren’t so obvious. But the weavers who produced fine Persian and other antique rugs tell their stories in every stitch.

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hen you understand how to read the symbols and patterns in these rugs, you can connect with the weaver’s story, as well as that of his or her community and society. In fact, some rug experts can determine a rug’s city and country, or even the district of origin, and the symbols and patterns found reveal historical insights about those places. To help you understand the symbolism in antique

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rugs, Esmaili Rugs has put together this guide to the many symbols, motifs and designs found. When you can read and interpret an assortment of rugs, it’s likely that one of them will speak to you.

Rug design components

A rug design comprises several components, so let’s first define those: Borders – there are usually two borders on a rug; the main border is the widest section of design around the outside of the rug, while the guard border is usually narrow and lies inside the main border. Field – the field is the colourful background inside the borders. Medallion – often, rugs feature a medallion 7 2

in the centre of the field. This is a large shape – round, oval or polygonal – that sits prominently in the middle of the rug. Corner brackets, quarter panels or spandrels – these are designs that fill the corners of the field. Typically, rugs will consist of all-over patterns, known as motifs, or they will contain a central medallion around which the rest of the rug is designed.


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Oriental or Persian

Persian rugs – considered the standard by which other rugs are measured – are Oriental, though not all Oriental rugs are Persian. The term Oriental rugs applies to those rugs produced in Asia, in the region spanning from India through the Middle East and into China. Oriental carpets may hail from Pakistan, Tibet, Nepal, Turkey, China or Iran; however, no rug is considered Persian unless it was produced in Iran. Authentic Oriental rugs are hand-knotted.

Symbols in Oriental rugs

Colours play a major role in conveying the story of a rug. Green, for instance, is the colour of the Prophet Mohammed, and it is used sparingly, as it is least likely to be stepped on. It represents hope, renewal, spring and life. Others are as follows: Red – wealth, courage, beauty, luck, joy or faith White – purity and cleanliness Blue – the afterlife, solitude and truth Black – mourning or destruction Brown – fertility Yellow – power and glory, joy, the sun Orange – devotion, piety, humility. Symbols in Oriental rugs can be found in various iterations in rugs from many locations, including Persian, Turkish, Indian and others. The primary symbols include: Ram horns – a symbol of male fertility, strength, bravery Herati – mahi flower, fish, good luck Boteh (paisley) – seed of life, fertility, eternal life, pregnancy Elibelinde (hands on hips) – Anatolian symbol of the mother goddess, mother with child in womb, fertility, abundance Tree of Life – symbol common in many religions, reminds us of our desire to become divine, symbol of the afterlife and immortality, eternal paradise Dragon – wisdom, power, guardians of the Tree of Life, good fortune Stars and crosses – protective motifs, found in rugs of varying origins, offer protection against evil, catastrophes or ill will.

Connotes happiness

Mihrab – paradise gateway Camel – strength, endurance, blessing Peony – rank and wealth Lotus – immortality, rebirth Lily – spirituality, purity Gul (gol) – sun, moon, stars Ying Yang – balance, harmony Amulets – often (but not always) triangular in shape, sometimes in centre medallion, intended to rid the user of evil spirits Birds – whether it’s a phoenix, an eagle, a peacock or a dove, most birds symbolise good luck, power, happiness and love. Some birds, however, such as ravens and owls, mean bad luck and death. I N E X

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Persian – the finest of all rugs

What makes a Persian rug the finest of them all? Put simply, they are some of the most complex and labour-intensive handmade items in the world, and they have been made the same way dating back to ages BC. They are produced by nomads, shepherds from the Quashqai and Bakhtiari tribes, whose approximately 1.6 million sheep graze on the green slopes of Iran’s Fars Province, which is considered the homeland of Persia. Their wool, comprising long, tough fibres and shorn only once each year, is ideal for carpetmaking and makes these rugs exceedingly durable and long-lasting. The fibres are twisted into threads by the hands of tribal women, then they are coloured with dyes made from natural ingredients such as pomegranate, turmeric, acorn shells or green leaves, which are boiled in huge pots with the threads. Once I N E X

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dried, the threads are woven on looms using a trademark single looping knot. Symbolism in Persian rugs is passed down from generation to generation, and these designs are considered trademarks. They include dense, all-over patterns; rich, striking colours (especially red); and medallion motifs. Each style of Persian rug is named for the town or province in which it was made, and each has distinguishing features. The symbols often were believed to protect the rug’s owner from misfortune. The symbols in Persian rugs may represent historical monuments, scenes from daily life, Islamic buildings, weeping willows or other trees and religious imagery such as the Tree of Life or the Garden of Paradise. Persian rugs in particular tend to feature four distinct all-over patterns, or motifs. These are: Herati – this pattern comes from the town of Herat, now in Afghanistan. It consists of a diamond framework and a single floral head, surrounded by outwardly curling acanthus leaves. Sometimes it is referred to as mahi, the Persian word for fish, because the leaves have a fish-like shape. Herati may be used in medallion or all-over patterns. Herati motifs are thought to symbolise the small fishes that come up just beneath the surface of the water to swim in the full moon’s reflection. 7 6

Boteh – along with Herati, Boteh is one of the most commonly found Oriental carpet patterns. It is recognisable because of its resemblance to paisley or a tear drop, with its pear-shaped figure and extending arch of flowers, symbolising the garden of paradise. Some believe it represents fertility, pinecones, a cypress tree, a leaf, or a flame. Vase – this pattern name refers to rugs that incorporate a vase or group of vases in their design. Typically, the vase resembles a Grecian urn, with or without handles. Göl – uses a repeating octagonal pattern to represent an elephant’s foot. Seen especially in Turkish rugs. Gül – this floral motif takes its style from the French and usually features one large, dominant flower (often a henna plant) and four surrounding, smaller ones.


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Symbols in Persian rugs

Resting eagle – high-mindedness of the spirit Eagle in flight – good fortune Leopard – bravery Cypress tree – life after death Parrot – escaping from danger, protection Peony – power Peacock – immortality or divine protection Hunting dog – glory and honour Tree of Life – truth or understanding, a direct path from earth to heaven Lily – purity and spirituality Paradise bird – paradise or heaven Lotus – rebirth or immortality Lion – power Iris – religious freedom Blossom – youth, spring and newlyweds Tulip – prosperity Pomegranate – fertility Amulet – triangular shape thwarts the evil eye Hyacinth – regeneration Ewer or jug – purification Comb – cleanliness Diamond – women (two together represents a man and woman together) Cross – faith Hand – prayer rug Mihrab – gateway to paradise Sun – radiant light or lucidity Star – spirituality or good luck Numbers – used to signify dates and times.

As you can see, the symbols, motifs and arrangements of antique rugs can weave a rich tapestry of stories and the long-ago dreams of the people who made them. This, combined with the durability, quality and uniqueness of each rug means that it will continue to add value to a home for many years. esmailirugs.com I N E X

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A HIDDEN WORLD The eco-hotel is located in a fishing reserve in Avignon, France. The 10 suites evoke primitive buildings on the shore of the lake; floating on the water like rafts or on pilots like palafittes. The architectural work perfectly matches with the lacustrine tubes from which it resumes and rationalises the elegant vertical thrust. The different densities of the vertical wooden screens around the hut guarantees the privacy of its customers as well as repairing them from the sun and the wind. 8 1

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uilding on a lake surrounded by vineyards in the South of France is a challenge. In a magical and untouched place like the Mediterranean maquis, nature is the only protagonist of the scene. The imperative for the architect remains the absolute camouflage with the existing landscape. Clients have envisioned this eco-lodges project choosing as their site an incredible fishing reserve in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, a few kilometers away from Avignon. 10 suites, simple but sophisticated, evoke primitive constructions in lake reeds – floating on the water like rafts, on pilotis along the banks like real palafitte or underground, like a troglodyte dwelling, the eco-lodges of the Grands CÊpages rise along the lake of La Lionne, privileging the most particular and sought-after view for each one, always preserving the privacy of the inhabitants.

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The architecture of the lodges dialogues perfectly with the lake reeds, taking up the vertical and elegant upward momentum and then rationalising their arrangement, much more geometric, regular and repetitive. In this way, the hut remains hidden by a vegetation filter – like a light screen – that, in addition to being the same structure as the parapets and the pergola, filters the direct view on the terraces of each lodge. The texture of these vertical screens is of different densities and at the same time allows to shelter from the sun and the wind. The changes of the seasons and the hours of the day constantly transform the presence and the dynamics of the hut with the landscape. With leafy trees, the architecture integrates with the landscape in a perfect game of camouflage. In winter instead, with the earth and the lake gathered under a blanket of snow, the vertical I N E X

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lines of the battens are reflected on the water. During the day, the experience inside the suite is a play of light and shadow with the sun filtering through the screening, projecting motifs always moving on the floor. Random gaps provide abstract images of vegetation, lake and sky. After sunset, the effect is reversed, immersed in darkness and illuminated only by the moon, the hut evokes a lantern, radiating the internal golden light between the wooden slats. In order to simplify the unforeseen in a remote site, the project was largely prefabricated in a wood workshop in the Pyrenees. The components were numbered, dismantled and rebuilt on site in three months. Prefabrication reduced production costs and labour costs during installation, impacting the landscape as little as possible. atelier-lavit.com

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With leafy architecture in the landscape game of ca

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CHOOSING THE INTERIOR DESIGN FOR A KITCHEN, GARDEN ROOM OR ORANGERY The ultimate installation in space and light that allows you to break from interior norms, orangeries and garden rooms create amazing new open spaces with an abundance of light, opening the door to a myriad of design possibilities.

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hilst glazed open-plan living spaces, are gloriously contemporary, their interiors must still be planned with care, to avoid clutter and confusion. However, the wealth of choice in terms of colour palette afforded by the new lease of light and space will positively dazzle those who have previously been confined to space and light-saving neutral colours.

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Understanding open-plan

Creating dedicated areas is essential to maximise the sense of space and multifunctionality of an open-plan space. To achieve this, always consider the sightlines at eye level from key views and entrances. So often people underestimate the importance of proportion when it comes to layout planning for open-plan spaces. If the scale of the furniture is wrong, it will have a dramatic impact on the rest of the room. Apply this thinking to key zoning pieces such as kitchen islands, lighting pendants, rugs and sofas, in addition to the space designated for walking around these. 8 8

Bold new colour choices When decorating open spaces, it is important to avoid the mundane whilst at the same time evading the visual chaos associated with too much colour. A neutral backdrop allows you to connect the different areas that make up the openplan space whilst using different coloured furniture and pieces and contrasting finishes and textures to create interest and to demark different zones.


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So often people underestimate the importance of proportion when it comes to layout planning for openplan spaces

For those who don’t want a neutral backdrop, the tone-on-tone approach works well, transitioning from darker tones to lighter tones in the same colour, as you move from one section to another. Conversely, unifying sparks of colour peppered throughout the open-plan area, in the form of rugs and cushions, can add a sense of cohesion to the entire space. Open-plan spaces are also the perfect canvas for accent decor, wall art and statement accessories, with statement couches and pillows being used to bring drama in a way that negates the need to incorporate colour in the backdrop. Stay away from oil paintings and I N E X

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watercolours, however, as these will suffer under the greater exposure to UV rays that occur in orangeries and garden rooms. Acrylics are much better suited to this type of environment. For those wanting to blur the boundaries between the inside and the outside, matching window dressings and interior features to prominent shades in the garden is also an effective way of uniting the interior with the exterior. Window dressings should be kept to a minimum in order to ensure that the views you have been longing for, aren’t obstructed. Sailcloth is a sympathetic finish for ceiling blinds. 9 0


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Colour-led and designoriented options had once been out of the question for those with glazed extensions, particularly conservatories, since furniture choices were curbed by the threat of UV damage. However, this problem can now be moderated with the use of laminated glass or internal film on glazing, which lowers UV exposure by 98%, thus diminishing fading on rugs and curtains. Despite the dramatic reduction in UV exposure that this technology affords, fading still occurs to some extent, and in such settings, oak will turn orange over time. Thankfully, garden rooms and orangeries create natural shading through the use of perimeter margins around the roof lanterns and via tiled roofing areas, an advantage that they hold over the highly glazed conservatory alternative. This means that in conjunction with the use of fade-resistant fabrics, consumers can be confident that interiors will continue to look good for years to come. If the room does have a high level of glazing and a southerly orientation, but doesn’t have a reduced UV glazing, be aware that printed fabrics tend to fade less than woven ones, and those ranges which have been designed specifically for outdoor use are also more fade resistant. Look for the grading on fabric labels that will give an indication of its quality and durability.

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A far cry from the wicker days

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Lighting is key for zone demarcation

Lighting is of vital importance when creating larger rooms and will make a room that looks great in the day, look absolutely fabulous at night. There are two types of lighting – task lighting and ambient lighting, both of which must be used in conjunction with one another. Task lighting ensures that occupants can work, read and function in the right light, while the ambient lighting is there to create the mood and drama. Vintage industrial has been a major trend in the market in 2018, with Edison lightbulbs being widely used to add interest to the standard pendant light.

Hard choices in flooring

Flooring immediately sets the tone and perceived temperature of a orangery or garden room. Hard surfaces, and in particular stone flooring, cope well with the strains of temperature change and sunlight – in short, they won’t fade and work well with underfloor heating, so that your floor can be cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Stone also has the benefit of being able to connect the indoor world with that of the outdoor, creating a harmony between the two. Stone is also durable and stain resistant making it a practical choice, for what is bound to become a high traffic area, as family members and guests naturally gravitate toward this inside-outside area of light ambience. westburygardenrooms.com I N E X

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P R E V I E W S H O W

MEET THE DESIGNERS OF TOMORROW This summer, New Designers gathers more than 3000 of the brightest and most radical new creative minds under one roof to launch the next generation of thinkers, makers and disruptors onto the UK design scene.

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pening Wednesday 27th June, the exhibition is a two-week celebration of visionary design that sees students of 200+ creative courses unveiling their never-before-seen work to thousands of industry professionals and design lovers. It’s in this creative hotbed that the national design scene is fuelled, challenged and refreshed by ambitious emerging talents and where careermaking connections and commissions are made. For its participating graduates, New Designers acts as a vital bridge between design education and professional design success. In response to fresh ideas and innovation, this year’s show has launched a bold new visual identity, now showcased on the New Designers website. This updated branding is inspired by and reflective of the breadth and substance of the exhibitors’ creative thinking and original design talent.

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Over both weeks, New Designers 2018 presents an array of work by recent graduates from leading universities and design schools the length and breadth of the UK – ranging from Cambridge to Carmarthen, Glyndwr to Glasgow, and Dundee to De Montfort – making the event the first opportunity to discover the next generation of talent across the design spectrum, as well as the latest innovations in design education. Exhibitors come from every conceivable discipline, at both bachelor’s and master’s degree level, ensuring that New Designers serves as an immersive snapshot of the nation’s emergent creative talent.

One Year In

In addition to the graduate exhibitors, other key features of the show include the newly-named One Year In, a curated section showcasing work by 100 design entrepreneurs who have recently launched their businesses. Here, design-hungry visitors can browse and buy original pieces directly from their makers. Each One Year In exhibitor has been selected by Curator Rheanna Lingham for the originality of their thinking, the quality of their work and the viability of their business. The 2018 cohort is One Year In’s biggest to date, with a record number of applications received during the open call – a striking demonstration of New Designers’ importance as a professional launchpad in our increasingly uncertain economic climate. 9 6

Event programme

New Designers takes place in two, four-day exhibitions, each devoted to a different set of design disciplines:

Week 1 (27 to 30th June)

– textiles, fashion, costume design, jewellery, glass, ceramics and contemporary design crafts.

Week 2 (4 to 7th July) – product, furniture, industrial, automotive, interior design, graphic design, animation, illustration, gaming and motion arts.

Drawing on the wealth of expertise surrounding the event, a rich programme of talks, events and workshops runs alongside the exhibition. Guest speakers include leading figures from across the spectrum of the design industry, as well as renowned brands, the education sector and the media. newdesigners.com


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INCORPORATING BIOPHILIC DESIGN INTO THE HOSPITALITY SECTOR With over 30 years of scientific research into the physiological and psychological benefits of exposure to nature, biophilic design aims to improve people’s health and wellbeing. Here, industry-recognised biophilic Design Expert, Oliver Heath, discusses how best to incorporate these design principles into hotel interior design.

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iophilia regards human’s innate attraction to nature and natural processes. It’s a subject that has evolved with human evolution; it explains why we are attracted to nature. So biophilic designers had to design principles that we can use to improve the human connection to nature in buildings of all types.

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It comprises three different aspects. Firstly, it involves a direct connection with nature, so that’s about how we improve our connection with tangible, sensory forms of nature, elements like plants, trees, natural light, fresh air, water and subtle changes that we see throughout the seasons. Secondly, it’s about what we call the indirect references to nature or natural analogues. This is how we mimic nature in buildings using natural materials, colours, textures, patterns and technologies. Lastly, it’s about human spatial response and human’s reactions to direct and indirect references to nature as a means to create spaces that are aspirational, energising, exciting and stimulating. Or, by contrast, calming, restorative and recuperative; of course, we need both of these things to create successful buildings. It’s worth mentioning that the intention of biophilic design is about reducing stress and aiding recuperation, and through doing that and recognising the impact that stress has, we can cut cost in buildings – things like absenteeism and presenteeism – and also improve outcomes, such as productivity and creativity; but also a sense of community. So, I think it’s important to keep those ideas in mind. Of course, these ideas, the three core principles – the direct, indirect and human spatial response – have been broken down into what’s been called the 14 patterns of biophilic design, which are different features within biophilic design that can be used to create stimulating and energising spaces or recuperative spaces. The point is not to necessarily use all 14 patterns in any one space, but to understand what it is that you want to be creating in the mood and the atmosphere of the space and how you want people to relate to it.

Biophilic design in hotels

There are opportunities to bring in plants and nature and water features into spaces, particularly in hotel lobbies, to improve connections with natural light and fresh air, but, of course, in a hotel room, what you might want to do is to create something quite different. It may be that you want to create a much more recuperative sense of space within a hotel room, so that might be about having views out of windows, connecting people with natural light, using materials that are reflective of nature on the floors and the walls and incorporating plants and greenery, which is a rare thing in a hotel. I N E X

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Lighting plays a key role – both in the natural lighting and our exposure to it but also in artificial lighting. One thing we are seeing is the introduction of circadian lighting systems which are colour-changing LEDs that subtly change colour temperature throughout the day. They don’t necessarily turn off completely at night but what they do is remove the stimulating, energising blue spectrum of light that makes us feel so alert in the middle of the day. This blue spectrum of light is emitted from traditional lightbulbs. Hotels don’t tend to do it but in my home I have a colour-changing bulb next to my bed, so I get used to having dusk-like orange colours before I go to sleep – so when I stay in a hotel it really upsets me because all the bulbs are stimulating LED bulbs which are very bright and glaring in the colour spectrum. It really affects my ability to go to sleep and for me that’s a really big issue because I do a lot of travelling and I’m often in hotels for just one night and to be affected by the stimulating blue light, I end up sleeping very badly. The problem is, fundamentally, design is often used as a means to express a message and that message is often a sense of wealth, luxury, power, money or intelligence. I think what’s much more important as design professionals is that we use our knowledge, skills and experiences to turn that around to create a more intrinsic approach to say well, what would happen if everything we designed in a hotel room was designed, J U N E

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installed and specified to really make the guest feel as good as possible; to soothe their agitated state, to stop them feeling disorientated, to give them a good night’s rest and to provide them with sensory boundaries to create a more mindful set of spaces. It’s really about turning the whole profession around saying what is the point of design – should it be about telling people you are staying in the most expensive hotel or is it about making people feel good? For me and our design practice, we are very much focused on a human-centred approach that delivers greater wellbeing which makes total sense in the hospitality world. A lot of our work at the moment is about creating different design strategies on how you would implement biophilic design into different buildings. What we are doing at the moment is exploring how we can apply biophilic design in lots of different ways. You could say, you could do it for free. We all have a personal responsibility for our health and wellbeing, and making sure you get outside, you get natural light, you go to the park, you have a walk, is all an important part of reconnecting with nature. Of course, there are very simple things you can do, like adding plants to desks and flowers, making sure you’re conscious of the natural light in a building. Then there are mediumscale cost components you can incorporate – integrating natural materials on the floors and walls and introducing colours that we know impact on our wellbeing.

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Introducing artificial forms of nature has been proven to have some psychological benefits, whether that’s pictures on walls or artificial plants, there’s lots and lots you can do, even at a midscale. And then, of course, you’ve got the pricier aspects that people know about, things like green walls, water features, green planted spaces in reception areas, rooftop gardens and bars and circadian lighting systems. It’s really down to design approach for a whole space rather than thinking about money. And, the other thing to think about when you’re discussing budget is to question if you’re really talking about the short-term costs or about the longer-term costs because, actually, what is clear from research is when natural features are applied into buildings then it starts to attract more people and the room rates can increase receiving more exposure on social media. A really good example of this is the PARKROYAL on Pickering hotel in Singapore; it was designed as what we call a hotel in a garden, although, of course, it is the middle of a city. Now, what they found is the room rate is now more than double what they originally projected – because of demand, they kept raising the rate and people kept coming, so they just raised it more. There have been some studies in the hospitality world, one piece of research from Nashville, Tennessee, demonstrated that hotel guest reserve rooms with garden views more quickly and are prepared to pay 20% more than traditional rooms. A study undertaken by Interface showed that guests were prepared to pay 18% premium with a room with a view onto water. So, incorporating natural features is very important. One thing we are seeing is hotels starting to remove car parks at the back of the building and turning them into garden spaces, which if you think about it the cost structure of a hotel is already incorporated into a little bit of biophilic thinking – you know you’re going to pay more for a room overlooking the best possible view, whether that’s the beach, the forest or the mountains as to looking at the car park at the back. So if you can turn that parking space into a lush green space, you can raise the room rate. oliverheathdesign.com interface.com

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LEVATO MONO

Porcelain paver system and coordinating internal tiling The Deck Tile Co’s new website www.surface360.co.uk now has +150 colours and finishes in their Levato Mono 20mm porcelain ranges plus co-ordinating internal tiling – enabling seamless visual transition between internal and external spaces.

20mm porcelain pavers 40x80 45x90 60x60 75x75 80x80 30x120 40x120 60x120 ‘Floating floor’ – installation over single ply membranes Eternal product - zero maintenance required – offering massive overlife savings Highly abrasion and stain resistant Highly slip resistant ; R11 AB+C Lightweight – 45kgs per m2

INTRODUCING OUR NEW WEBSITE: WWW.SURFACE360.CO.UK

High load bearing and impact resistance Timber, stone & cementitious effects Completely non porous Ideal for balconies, roof terraces and piazzas, for both commercial and residential use Frost proof Height adjustable/slope correcting support system ranging from 9mm up to 550mm


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Desired Designs Here, Inex showcases a selection of bug-inspired interior accessories that are guaranteed to add a quirky finishing touch to any room.

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The collection ELEMENTAL explores the synergy between floral habitats and the creatures that reside in them. Representing the four key elements of earth, air, fire and water, and using pattern and shapes to blur the boundaries between flora and fauna, this new collection is a heady concoction of Art Nouveau and Hollywood Regency influences. £30 thecuriousdepartment.com

THE LOVE BUGS

Bright and bold, this limited edition bug print is bound to turn heads in any interior. £58 jessicarussellflint.co.uk

NOTEBOOK

Perfect for extraordinary ideas, musings and other fine thoughts, this notebook will look gorgeous left out on a coffee table – an impeccable accessory. £8 chaseandwonder.com

FREE TO FLY

This beautiful kaleidoscope of indigo blue and white butterflies is elegant and inviting. The swirling pattern creates a vintage feel with soft falling feathers hidden in the background. £65 hattielloyd.com

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D E S I G N S

Add some retro style to your walls with this amazing ready-to-hang French insects print. This vintage-inspired hanging wall art is a reproduction of a French antique learning tool for children. £79 limelace.co.uk

D E S I R E D

FRENCH INSECTS PRINT

BEETLE IN THE RAIN ART PRINT

This is a high-quality art print reproduction of ‘Beetle in the Rain’, an original watercolour painting by The Curious Department, which formed as one of the main inspirations for the Metamorphosis collection. £10 thecuriousdepartment.com

BOTANICAL BUTTERFLIES SET

This botanical butterfly print set includes four beautiful botanical butterfly pictures in striking black frames. Measuring 14 x 14", they depict four different butterflies mounted in clear glass. They look stunning hung as a group. The simple colouring of these monochrome butterfly prints gives this set a real modern country-style feel. £115 moderncountrystyleinteriors.co.uk

INSECT WALL CHART

This vintage-style insect wall chart shows an old school chart image of insects. Printed in muted colours on a natural canvas, the insect wall chart is supplied on its own black wooden hangers making it easy to hang anywhere. £39 abodeliving.co.uk 1 0 9

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D E S I G N S D E S I R E D

DRAGONFLY CUSHION

This green and yellow dragonfly print cushion will liven up any interior that it is added to. £13 diy.com

HOCK BUG PILLOW

This trendy pillow is pretty, unusual and will be an eye-catching addition on any sofa. £35 hock-dich-hin.de

SIR LADYBUG CUSHION

The eye-catching Sir Ladybug cushion by Wonderbold shows a blue ladybird printed on soft and smooth black polyester which makes the bold jewel tones of the design really stand out. The vibrant colours and intriguing subject matter are sure to bring the wow factor to any interior. £69 limelace.co.uk

MADAME DE LA SOIR SCATTER CUSHION

This magnificent Madame De La Soir scatter cushion features a majestic amber moth-like creature resting against a rich teal backdrop with an equally opulent reverse. A sophisticated accessory for any interior space. £135 limelace.co.uk

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D E S I G N S

The extraordinarily vivid silk cushions are a collision of the improbable created and the impossible imagined it is a place of exotic creatures, fragments of Victorian engravings, architectural oddities, menacing landscapes all bound by original illustration and colouring. £125 rume.co.uk

D E S I R E D

KALEIDOSCOPE BUTTERFLY CUSHION

TIMOROUS BEASTIES GRANDE COCCINELLE CUSHION

From the dense pile of the 100% cotton velvet to the arcane riot of the digitally-printed graffiti splatters, drips and blotches, this vivid confection is the closest thing a cushion gets to finding order in chaos. £130 rume.co.uk

WHITE BUTTERFLY KALEIDOSCOPE CUSHION

Playfully combining the Victorian fascination with entomology and the symmetrical patterns of the kaleidoscope, this design showcases The Curious Department’s favourite butterflies, from the electric blue Ulysses, to the subtle green tones of the Chinese Peacock. £40 thecuriousdepartment.com

ROSE CELESTIAL CUSHION

Renaissance rose blooms against a deep dramatic background make this velvet cushion a work of art. There is a glorious romance to this cushion, a celestial quality associated with Renaissance artwork. £45 frenchbedroomcompany.co.uk

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D E S I G N S

COMPLEX METAMORPHOSIS DETAIL

D E S I R E D

The Convex Metamorphosis mirror is more than just a simple piece of art. It represents a living tribute to the beauty of an uncompromised mindset and plays on the concept of evolution and challenging the notion of beauty. £POA bocadolobo.com/en

SOLID BRASS DRAGONFLY DOOR KNOCKER

Crafted from solid brass in a charming dragonfly shape, this unique door knocker will bring a smile to guests’ faces. With little wings and intricate etched details, it’s the perfect combination of fun and stylish. £60 coxandcox.co.uk

ODA TABLE LAMP

The ODA is a table lamp in the style of a tea caddy with a black finish and hand-decorated bee motif. Operated by an in-line rocker switch on a cable flex. £69 limelace.co.uk

MCQUEEN CHANDELIER

This amazing chandelier is made with goldplated hammered brass, handmade butterflies and majestic flowers ending with the touch of beautiful Swarovski crystals. Bold and feminine, this creation is a real lumen sculpture. £POA luxxu.net

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HANDPAINTED PLATE

D E S I R E D

This wall plate is a unique item handpainted with ants, every single one applied with a great love for detail. £POA laphilie.etsy.com

MCQUEEN RECTANGULAR WALL LIGHT MIRROR

This mirror is a meticulously designed object of beauty. The magnificent foliage is made of hammered brass, with a gold-plated finish and a rhythmic luminosity of the Swarovski crystals. £POA luxxu.net

INSECT MANDALA DINING SET

Discover the minute detail and the wider cosmos of the Insect Mandala set. Proudly embracing influences from Africa and Asia, this tribute represents the hidden beauty of the insect world, melding beetles, ants and flies into a dazzling pattern. £285 thecuriousdepartment.com

ORIENTAL DECORATED BLACK SIDEBOARD

The decorative sideboard would make an elegant addition to any living or dining room. The sideboard is a neat symmetrical shape and has plenty of storage with a set of double doors, with a single shelf inside the cupboard and two drawers running along the top. Inspired by traditional Chinese design, the sideboard has a beautiful decorative glossy black lacquer and is handfinished with a gold leaf butterfly and floral design. £389 wooden-furniture-store.co.uk

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Lux and Lumen by Kährs Ultra matt wood flooring collections Lux and Lumen by Kährs Lux and by collections Kährs Ultra mattLumen wood flooring Ultra matt wood flooring collections

““ “

Lux and Lumen have been developed for design-led interiors. Traditional Lux and finishes Lumen have been developed lacquer reflect light, which

Lux and Lumen have been developed for design-led interiors. Traditional distracts from the floor’s appearance. for design-led interiors. Traditional lacquer finishes reflect light, which lacquer reflect light, distracts from the floor’s appearance. Ourfinishes new, ultra-matt finishwhich minimizes distracts from the appearance. reflections, sofloor’s that the wood’s natural Our finish minimizes grainnew, andultra-matt tone can be appreciated to Our new, ultra-matt finish minimizes reflections, so that the wood’s natural the full.

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reflections, sotone thatcan the be wood’s natural to grain and appreciated

grainthe and tone canatbeour appreciated full. For more information about our new ultra matt designs or to book a specification consultation Clerkenwellto Design Studio in London, please email or call the Kährs team. the full. 02392 453 045 | sales@kahrs.com | www.kahrs.com

For more information about our new ultra matt designs or to book a specification consultation at our Clerkenwell Design Studio in London, please email or call the Kährs team. For more information about our new ultra matt designs or to book a specification consultation at our Clerkenwell Design 02392 453 045 | sales@kahrs.com | www.kahrs.com

Call us on 02392 453 045

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S P O T L I G H T P R O D U C T

Product Spotlight Image ©Kährs

This month’s selection of innovative new products not to be missed.

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OAK FRAMED GARAGE KITS BY ROUND WOOD OF MAYFIELD If you have a project requiring a traditional oak framed garage, you may want to consider the range of ‘Chippy’ kits offered by Round Wood of Mayfield.

K

it frames are particularly suited to tradespeople (as well as accomplished DIY-ers) as they are predesigned, available on short lead times and go together easily. All buildings are preassembled in a workshop, with posts being numbered, to ensure ease of fit once on site. They also represent excellent value, given the economies of scale Round Wood has been able to achieve by investing in significant machinery. The range of ‘Chippy’ kits comprises 47 standard designs, from one to four bays, in a variety of roof profiles. Additional options for half-bays, log stores and side aisles allow for most requirements to be catered for (although modifications are possible).

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As the ridge heights are below 4m on all designs, permitted development rights are granted for many projects (exempting them from planning). The smaller frames in the range are also exempt from Building Regulations (having an internal footprint of under 30m2), providing certain site criteria are met. Round Wood of Mayfield also offers groundwork, assembly and roofing services. Whilst, however, it already has nationwide teams, the company is looking for new contractors to aid its 1 1 6

ongoing expansion and will consider regional exclusivity arrangements. If you believe you could assist in this area, contact jason@roundwood. com in the first instance. Round Wood supplies nationwide from its base just outside of Mayfield. In addition to oak framed buildings, it offers hardwood decking, oak and walnut flooring, joinery products and garden features. oakframedgarages.co.uk 01435 860260 sales@roundwood.com


S P O T L I G H T

Kährs has introduced a new timeless ‘French Pattern’ hard flooring design, in two luxurious tones, to its range of sustainable wood floors. The classic design features a modern twist – an engineered plank format which improves install time and efficiency in comparison to a traditional ‘French Pattern’ floor. With a modern engineered format, the new designs can be installed more quickly than a traditional French patterned floor, ideal for efficient installation in both domestic and commercial projects. The stunning pattern can also be specified over underfloor heating, due to the environmentally-sound and long-lasting multi-layer construction of sustainable oak and poplar within the boards.

Joining Kährs’ design-led European Renaissance collection, a collection of unique and inspiring wooden floors based on the magnificent floor styles of bygone periods, the new design is available in two distinct colour tones – a golden natural brown ‘Castello Rovere’ and a rich, smokey tone ‘Castello Fumo’. Naturally-occurring wood colour variations and a scattering of medium-sized knots within the design, combined with a brushing effect, enhance the texture and embrace the natural beauty of the wood. With a four-sided bevel accentuating the edge of each plank, a classical patterned look and feel is created for a bold and show-stopping interior look.

P R O D U C T

KÄHRS LAUNCHES NEW TIMELESS, PREASSEMBLED ‘FRENCH PATTERN’ HARD WOOD FLOORING DESIGN

kahrs.com 0239 245 3045 sales@kahrs.com

BESPOKE ILLUMINATION FROM CHRISTOPHER HYDE LIGHTING

ARTHUR CITYSCAPE – MODULAR SEATING WITH DISTINCTION

Arthur CityScape from Lyndon by Boss Design has become extremely popular with specifiers looking for a modular solution that echoes the trend for informal and relaxed seating across both corporate and hospitality settings environments, without compromising on function or aesthetics. Fusing low- and high-back seating, Arthur CityScape is suitable for multiple habitats in the workplace. Whether it’s to provide the perfect breakout space for employees to rest and escape from a busy work environment, working in solitude, or making phone calls, it offers the intimacy and privacy vital for modern methods of working. Equally, it is at home within informal meeting areas, reception spaces and atriums, as well as hotel foyers.

Christopher Hyde Lighting is renowned for its traditional designs and has now started to develop more contemporary ranges. Providing lighting for a wide range of interiors is what Christopher Hyde excels in doing. Many architects and designers approach the company to produce bespoke designs. Using its artisan skills, the lighting specialist is able to manufacture almost anything a client desires. As an expert in manufacturing of cast fixtures including creations of low wax cast decorative details, Christopher Hyde produces exquisite designs. In keeping with changes within the lighting industry, Christopher Hyde offers advanced LED technology including integral and retrofit energy-saving light sources; emergency lighting and various dimming alternatives. christopherhyde.com 0207 351 0863

bossdesign.com/lyndon 01242 584897 1 1 7

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S P O T L I G H T P R O D U C T

LIGHTEN THE LOAD

Keller Kitchens is launching Dekker’s Greenpanel laminate worktops in a wide array of fashion-forward finishes. A new eco-friendly board material is taking the global worktop industry by storm and Keller Kitchens is leading the way in bringing it to the UK. Forming the core material for Dekker’s high-quality laminate worktops, Greenpanel is a revolutionary new material that is set to reduce a kitchen’s carbon footprint and, literally, lighten the load for installers. Constructed from an innovative grid of waterproof HDF (high-density fibreboard) strips, Greenpanel uses significantly fewer raw materials than traditional solid boards.

STEEL WINDOWS IN FASHION FOR CLAPHAM BREWERY BUILDING RENOVATION

A leading member of the Steel Window Association has manufactured and installed bespoke doubleglazed W20 frames for the refurbishment of a former brewery building in south London, with the replacement fenestration fulfilling various technical as well as planning requirements. Not only were the new W20 windows customised to respect the property’s heritage – including bespoke vents, hardware and glazing details – but they also offer much improved thermal and acoustic performance. In addition, West Leigh’s fitting of the windows had to be completed without disruption to the work of the Plough Brewery’s tenants, who are mainly involved in the fashion and creative industries.

kellerkitchens.com +31 0615 594450

steel-window-association.co.uk 0844 249 1355

BIID ANNUAL CONFERENCE RET URNS FOR 2018

The International Standardisation for Organisation (ISO) is committed to international standards to ensure quality, safety and efficiency amongst products and services. Now, BLANCO UK, the kitchen sink and tap specialist, has received ISO accreditation in the form of the ISO 9001:2015 Certificate. BLANCO passed a two-stage audit process, with the second stage completed 23rd March. This certification means that BLANCO’s quality management system meets the requirements of the ISO 9001:2015 standard, guaranteeing that BLANCO’s products and services are fit for their purpose.

The British Institute of Interior Design (BIID) is pleased to announce the launch of its 2018 annual conference; Inside Knowledge 2018: The BIID Business Success Conference. The institute’s flagship event will be taking place Thursday 8th November at 30 Euston Square, London, and will provide interior designers with invaluable knowledge and practical sessions to support them in their professional careers and help them grow their business. As the only conference specifically designed for and by interior designers in the UK, the Inside Knowledge 2018 conference will feature talks from a range of experts in the sector.

blanco.co.uk 01923 635200

biidconference.com 0207 628 0255

BLANCO GAINS ISO ACCREDITATION

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MarblehIll fIreplaces The MosT IMpressIve & exTensIve selecTIon of fIreplaces In The UK

WITh over 7 dIfferenT shoW areas and More Than 55 ManTels on dIsplay WITh 14 acTUally Under fIre, Marble hIll Is one of The leadIng london shoWrooMs for all yoUr fIreplace needs. We are consTanTly sTrIvIng To shoWcase InnovaTIve and neW desIgns.

70-72 Richmond Road, Twickenham TW1 3BE

Tel: 020 8892 1488 info@marblehill.co.uk www.marblehill.co.uk

Inex June 2018  
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