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CHRISTOPHER BRESSLER

P O R T F O L I O / / university at buffalo 2010|2013 e: cbressle@buffalo.edu // t: 845.544.4114


*** the design work in this portfolio was developed for:

The University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning Fall 2010 - Fall3013

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S


03

CORPORATE

07

INSTITUTION

11

CULTURAL

15

LANDSCAPE

17

CONSTRUCTED

19

RESIDENTIAL

ECO OFFICE

instructor Brad Wales term Spring 2013 // arc. 302 site Washington/Mohawk Street, Buffalo, NY

[PRI]SCHOOL

instructor Nicholas Bruscia term Fall 2012 // arc. 301 site Lovejoy, Buffalo NY

LABYRINTH

instructor Mathew Zinski term Spring 2012 // arc. 202 site Fort Niagara, Niagara Falls, NY

ZONAS VERDE

instructor Martha Bohm term Summer 2013 // arc. 405 site Monteverde, Costa Rica

THE HINGE

instructor Christopher Romano term Spring 2011 // arc. 102 site Griffis Sculpture Park, Buffalo, NY

LIGHTBOX

instructor Annette Lecuyer term Fall 2013 // arc. 403 site Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY

01|02


HEALTH

AIR QUALITY

HARMONEY

1 plant for every 3 people improves air quality

Absenteeism 50%

O² Dust 20%

CO²

Bacteria 50%

Moulds 60%

Sick building syndrome 25%

CO² 50%

Minor illness 30% Stress symptoms normalised

PRODUCTIVITY

GREEN Computer related 12%

Awareness 70%

Reduced need for air conditioning

Reduced noise pollution

Creativity 15%

GROWING TYPOLOGIES

*planters[ferns]

*mesh[moss]

*trellis[vines]


E C O

O F F I C E

Architecture Office_ spring 2013

Eco office establishes a symbiotic relationship with nature within the work space. Flat slab, concrete construction and bent fin columns allow for minimal disturbance for the organization of the works desks and the running of systems, as well as allowing for the building to be immersed in a blanket of vegetation. Each workstation has direct access to its own terrace imbedded within the double skin of the building, which allows for a direct connection with the natural environment. This double skinned area assists in passively regulating the building’s interior conditions as well as the physical and mental well being of its occupants. There is a variety of planting environments which populate the column walls along the perimeter. Not only is this plant life beneficial to the employees, but they also represent a living portfolio of design options from which clients can choose from.

*extrusion

*cut

*blanket of vegetation

Each station is comprised of two workers, each with an individual outdoor space for them to work/relax. The “wall fins” allow for a controlled privacy while also maintaining visual connection with the office. OPEN WORKSTATIONS

p gr lant ou p A

p gr lant ou p B

p gr lant ou p C

p gr lant ou p D

*segment site

The walls, opposite of each workstation’s opening, are able to slide across the walkway and align with the other walls, thus creating a singular finned wall for the workers in order for them to have more privacy. INFORMAL MEETING ROOMS

When presentations for clients and/or reviews between the workers commence, the fins rotate clockwise, interlocking into one another, creating a singular solid wall. The shelving units are also able to rotate and close. A projector is then lowered down from a recess in the ceiling, creating a complete enclosure as well as a display area for presentations. SMALL CONFERENCE ROOMS

03|04


amic envelope louvers closed

lding utilizes a self regulating skin allowing for thermal ty for the office environment.

EAST WINTER SUN [9AM DEC. 25] 10°

75°

the COOLING MONTHS, ding door is closed and the fan ed on pushing the hot air from erior towards the exterior hen escapes through the vents

the HEATING months, ir is brought into the space hen trapped by closing the vents the air is then heated by n. it is then brought into the space reducing the amount of needed for mechanical heat-

15°

80°

[am]-fan on [pm]-fan off

charging pv panel

level 4 [with atrium]

62° 70° louvers open

hydronic radiant heat 68°

louvers closed

55°

55°

louvers closed

air from basement

level 3 [with bridge]

WINTER [HEATING]

level 2 [typical floor]

During the COOLING months, the sliding door is closed and the fan is turned on pushing the hot air from the interior towards the exterior which then escapes through the vents above. During the HEATING months, al frame fresh air is brought into the space and then trapped by sparent double closing the vents above, the glass panel air is then heated by the sun. it is then brought into the office tovoltaic glass panel space reducing the amount of energy needed for ble glazed glass mechanical heating.

louvers open

72°

C- photovoltaic glass panel D- double glazed glass E- thermal break, aluminum threshold F- concrete pavers G- concrete planters H- drain I- vapor barrier/ insulation J- custom c-channel bolted to weld plate K- sun shade device

fan on

C B

A

EAST SUMMER SUN [9AM JUN. 25] 35°

k D

70°

55°

hydronic geothermal cooling

68°

80° F HG

louvers closed

E

air from basement

r barrier/ insulation

I

om c-channel bolted plate

shade device

80° charging pv panel

crete pavers

crete planters

82°

louvers open

A- metal frame mal break, aluminum B- transparent double glazed glass old panel

n

78°

louvers open

SUMMER [COOLING] Summer [COOLING]

J

louvers open


*structural axonometric

*exploded window diagram

*exploded facade diagram

amic envelope louvers closed

lding utilizes a self regulating e skin allowing for thermal ty for the office environment.

EAST WINTER SUN [9AM DEC. 25] 10°

75°

the COOLING MONTHS, ding door is closed and the fan ed on pushing the hot air from erior towards the exterior then escapes through the vents

the HEATING months, ir is brought into the space hen trapped by closing the vents the air is then heated by n. it is then brought into the space reducing the amount of needed for mechanical heat-

louvers open

78°

80°

[am]-fan on [pm]-fan off

15° charging pv panel

62° 70°

louvers closed

hydronic radiant heat 68°

louvers open

55°

55° louvers closed

air from basement

WINTER [HEATING]

Winter [HEATING]

05|06


PHASE 4

COMMUNAL HOUSING

6 months-1yr

DINING AREA ADV. CONSTRUCTION SHOP PLUMBING SHOP

VISITING ROOM

DINING AREA LOW

AUTO SHOP

INDOOR RECREATION

OUTDOOR RECREATION

HIGH

WELDING SHOP

GYMNASIUM

WOODWORKING SHOP

CLASSROOMS

COMMISSARY

COMPUTER ROOM

LIBRARY

1yr-2yr

PHASE 2 6 months-1yr

RELIGIOUS SERVICES/CHAPEL AGRICULTURAL FIELD

LOW

SOCIAL INTERACTION

PHASE 3

PHASE 1 6 months-1yr

CELL TRANSFORMATION

*prisoner program interaction

*program relationship

*cut into ground

*skew program


[PRI]SCHOOL Gated Community_ fall 2012

The prison complex looks to address the outflow of prisoners and combat the challenges of recidivism. This will be accomplished through symbiotically merging the program of incarceration and education. The prison would house individuals from the ages of 20-30, and enact strict educational and skill building tasks. The inmates will gain new practical skills and intellectual capacities that will facilitate their transition back into society. The prison will also act as a community garden and recreation area, allowing for locals to partake in workshops, as well as, utilize the garden spaces. Inmates will provide substance for the community through working the agriculture fields and selling the crops, and the prison will provide the community with a social and educational interaction zone. The prison will implement a system consisting of different “Phases”, similar to that of a school system; in which each prisoner will gradually progress through and eventually gain their freedom. Once they successfully complete tests, educational and psychological, and demonstrate their capability to interact passively, they will be able to “graduate” to the next phase and gain access to numerous amenities withheld from them previously. This creates the motivation and drive for them to progress instead of just accepting their fate. In order for inmates to progress through the system, the prisoners must be enticed by amenities. Therefore, Phase 4 program is placed at the front of the complex while Phase 1, 2, and 3 are placed sequentially behind it. In order for the prisoners to reach the designated program, they must travel through or past programs they cannot access, only able to look through the window. The idea mimics the civilized working world, in which an individual desires an item they cannot have and therefore must work and prove himself worthy. The agricultural fields are utilized in segmenting the program and phases, and act as circulation to each destination. The prison is located tangent to the preexisting hill, creating a natural barrier to prevent _manufacturing\computers _plumbing _construction _health _auto repair prisoners from escaping. The services building’s roofs become a threshold between the public and foxtire bryant manufacturing matt kandefer plumbing co. star st. vincent’s geiter done romar mechanical services elite custom painting tailred coatings eastside health center imperial textile counseling & treatment services ideal concrete, inc. the prisoners; they act asmid-erie interactive park for the public socialize, rodgard ivyan house suretyto construction co.relax, and view into the precision concrete construction agricultural fields, while also providing prisoners with visual connections to the public. Manufacturing/computers Bryant Manufacturing Tailred Coatings Imperial Textile Rodgard

Plumbing

Matt Kandefer Plumbing Co.

Health services

Star St. Vincent’s Eastside Health Center Ivy House

Construction

Geiter Done Elite Custom Painting Ideal Concrete, INC. Surety Construction Co. Precision Concrete Construction

Auto repair

Foxtire Romar Mechanical Services *areas of potential work

*visual connection

*fold, uplift, sink

*enhance public interface

07|08


The prisoners circulate through the exterior only, maneuvering around the agriculture fields; this helps to increase security and maintain control of the inmates. By having the program that each phase desires in front of them, there is never a reason to “backtrack� in the prison. This attempts to instill the idea of constantly moving forward towards society, leaving the prison in the past. The addition of cafes, vocational training shops, and communal gardens attract the public to visit, thus blurring the stark renditions of a prison being a cold, fearful abyss.

REIMAN STREET

1

2

3

*upper floor

*upper floor *ground floor *basement 1 *basement 2 *basement 3

*ground floor


2

3

PHASE 4 cafe workshops mailroom reception visting room library medical center dining area parking

2

PHASE 3 indoor recreation area gymnasium

PHASE 2 showers guard recreation area classrooms

PHASE 1 storage guard security post

3

3

2

3

*basement 1

3

*basement 2

3

*basement 3

09|10


*original bundle

*graphite rendering


L A B Y R I N T H Fort Niagara Visitor Center_ spring 2012

A multitude of objects, each with unique and interesting physical properties, were gathered and assimilated into one mass called “the bundle.� This bundle was then dissected, exposing interesting moments of interaction between the items, which were then subjected to linear, planar, solid, and three dimensional analyses. Through these operations, the idea of the poche was defined which assisted in the development of the visitor center. The structure is an artifact of motions through space, leaving behind an architectural form which can be reused. The form is sculpted by movement through space and the interactions with the site. The poche acts as a dividing agent becoming a barrier, impenetrable and dense, forcing its inhabitants to conform to its nature. When entering these condensed, labyrinthine areas, the visitor’s movement and senses are restricted and disoriented. The aggregation of walls separates individuals from one another as well as the objects they seek. Vision, sound, and light are reflected, compressed, and refracted off these walls, thus creating an atmosphere of disarray. Light acts as a tool to guide individuals through these spaces, transitioning between the porous, spacious areas into the dense, impermeable spaces; creating a procession throughout the structure. The bundle focuses on the layering of materials and how each object encases one another. This creates a paradox; the objects which are being restricted are actually acting as the connecting agents which support the barriers. Each object relies on one another for stability.

*linear model

*planar model

*3D print

*linear collage drawing

11|12


Continuing with this notion of “the restriction of movement defines the barriers,� sonar became a prime example of this idea; sound waves are deflected off surfaces through the use of the Law of Reflection, illuminating the space. The method for which sonar works was utlilized to map out the placement and interactions of the building with the site. Similar to the linear drawing of the bundle, the density defines the space. In the case of this structure, densities will also define programming, circulation, height, and the porosity of the spaces.

N

physical barrier -earthworks -fortress walls invisible barrier -water line -property line

original site plan

*graphite sectional render

defining sacred areas

deflection of movement

densities define spaces


beneath the theatre

observation deck

entrance

*plan

*collage sectional render

13|14


SITIO

Anรกlisis del Sitio

SITIO

Anรกlisis del Sitio

5m 2.5m

10m

5m 2.5m

N

N

10m *ground floor

SITIO

10m

Anรกlisis del Sitio

5m

*second floor

20m

N

SITIO

Anรกlisis del Sitio


ZONAS VERDE Study Abroad: Costa Rica_ summer 2013

The Guides and Scouts of Costa Rica are affiliated with the World Organization of the Scout Movement. The project aimed towards designing a headquarters for the Guides and Scouts that met full handicap accessibility standards, as well as, being able to host larger events for national and global members. The design of the project was based on input from the client and the research done in relation to materials, areas, spaces, and many other considerations. The major goals of the project were to provide gathering, interactive and varied green spaces, as well as fun and flexibility for the Guides and Scouts of Costa Rica. The site is thirty meters wide by fifty meters long, providing the Scouts with 1500 meters to create their new troop home. The site has four main zones of outdoor program which layer from west to east. Within these zones there are four main planting zones: foundation, educational, bioswale, and reforestation plantings. Each zone contains unique plantings indigenous to Costa Rica which define the spaces and attract wildlife. VISTAS DEL SITIO DESDE EL ÁRBOL Análisis del Sitio

SITIO SITIO

10m

Análisis del Sitio

5m

20m

10m

Análisis del Sitio

5m *manipulation of topographic lines

*surveying of site

N

20m

N

wale

Bios

Fire Pit Small Field Garden Zone

SITIO

Análisis del Sitio

Large Field Services

10m 5m

20m

N

Large Field

Persea americana- “Aguacate”

Justicia aurea

Tower

Garden

Casuarina equisetifolia- “Australia Pine”

ld

r Fie

e Tow

Parking

SITIO

Análisis del Sitio

*reforestation plantings 10m 5m

20m

N

SITIO

Análisis del Sitio

10m 5m

20m

N

SITIO

Análisis del Sitio

Malvaviscus palmanus- “Clavelón ”

Eleocharis elegans

Stachytarpheta frantzii

Lantana camara- “Cinco negritos”

Ludwigia octovalvis

Justicia aurea

Rubus

Heteranthera reniformis

Ageratum

10m 5m

20m

“Guayaba”

Persea americana- “Aguacate”

Lobelia laxiflora- “Caragallo”

15|16

Acnistus arborescens- “Güitite”

*educational plantings

*bioswale plantings

*foundation plantings

N


T H E

H I N G E

The Living Wall: full scale build_ spring 2011

Given a 6’x6’x8’ box, the goal was to create a micro dwelling unit that would accomodate an entrance, internal circulation, and sleeping areas for a minimum of three individuals. Assorted into groups of six to seven students, only one move was permitted to enlarge the initial volume which had to address critical issues of shelter, drainage, and foundation in the process. The full scale project consists of a 2x4 wooden framed structure with bolting as well as wooden cladding. Emphasis was placed on the ability for the structure to return to the shape of the original uncut volume for transportation purposes. It was assembled on site at Griffis Sculpture Park and remained as a public art installation for two years. Known as the Hinge project, the initial volume was divided into three equal sections and then rotated to a specific degree. In doing so, it created an external and internal step system of circulation. Placed as the focal point of the wall, it enabled a bend in the overall arrangement of the structures. The hinge project is a structure of social interaction, freedom, and unity. Group Members: Chris Bressler, Jelani Lowe, Kaidong Pei; Dylan Stefanko, Phoebe Sumulong, Luchang Wang

6’

8’

*original mass

*rotation

6’

*level 3

*level 2

*level 1

17 |18


*lightwells *angled roof

*segment

*penetration of north/diffused light

*permeable public ground floor

*manipulation of skin


L I G H T B O X

Urban Housing_ fall 2013

The incorporation of an art infrastructure within a community can lead to both economic and civic benefits, as well as cognitive benefits for individuals. “Lightbox” houses a community of artists and provide a range of work environments suited for different types of artist. The project seeks to intermingle and blur the threshold between public and private space through transformable apartment modules with “thick walls” where residents’ belongings can be stored away, thus allowing the room to fluctuate between living and gallery space throughout the day. Studios on all floors receive natural north light via glazed light wells, which contain stairs connecting living spaces to studios. The gallery at the center of each floor, which is naturally lit through a sawtooth roof, is an additional display area for the artist. In contrast, the residences experience east, west, and south light. A vertical gallery system pulls the public though the building onto each artist floor. They circulate through the central gallery spaces, interacting with the artist and their work. During large events, the doors slide open expanding the gallery space into the residential units. The transformable residential units can accommodate a private and intimate setting as well as dinner gatherings and display space for their work. A perforated metal veil shades the east and west facades, acting as a shading device, as well as a transforming the building into a sculptural element that interacts with the city. The pattern of the façade represents the hand strokes of an artist, with the spacing of the cuts varying to admit different amounts of daylight.

living

studio

*thick wall diagram

*unit a_ double living with studio above or below

*unit b_ single living with adj. studio

*unit c_ single living with adj. studio

*unit d_ single living with studio above or below

19|20


LIVING|GALLERY

LIVING|SOCIAL

LIVING|PRIVATE

*transformation of unit e_ single living with studio above or below

*level 3

*level 2

*level 1

*level 3

*level 2

*level 1

*atrium space

*ground floor

*basement *section through atrium

*section through lightwells

*circulation diagram


N

STUDIO|PRIVATE

*groundfloor

*exterior model with full skin Exterior Wall Condition:

Facade Slot Pattern:

Facade Skin Conditions for Daylight:

Glass solid wall

Solid Wall Solid Wall

*exterior model with partial skin Facade Slot Pattern:

Facade Skin Conditions for Daylight:

Exterior Wall Condition:

Glass

glass

*exterior wall condition

least sunlight

Least Sunlight Least Sunlight

medium sunlight

Medium MediumSunlight Sunlight

most sunlight

Most Sunlight Most Sunlight

*facade daylight condition

*facade slot pattern

*exploded facade with lightwells

21|22

Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio_ University at Buffalo School of Architecture  

condensed version sent to graduate schools

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