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SNACK ON THE RAINBOW! Custom One-Bowl Meals Grow Your Own Sprouts BANANA CREAM PIE SMOOTHIES MARVELOUS MANGOES URBAN LACROSSE


SALLY SAMPSON VIC DEROBERTIS BARRY ZUCKERMAN CATHERINE NEWMAN KERRY MICHAELS CARL TREMBLAY CATRINE KELTY GINA HAHN SUE DENNY CATHY CHUTE

OUR MISSION

ChopChop’s mission is to inspire and teach kids to cook and eat real food with their families.

OUR PHILOSOPHY

We believe that cooking and eating together as a family is a vital step in resolving the obesity and hunger epidemics.

SUBSCRIBE!

Subscribe now, and you’ll never miss an issue of our award-winning magazine. Get a Pay-it-Forward subscription: 2 years for just $24.95 or 1 year for $14.95. Your subscription will automatically help pay for a year of ChopChop for a family or community in need.

DONATE!

Want to help? Here’s how: We are a small nonprofit with a huge mission. When you donate, you help get ChopChop to those who need it most. Your donation will help get copies to an entire classroom ($25), a pediatrician’s office ($50), or a neighborhood health center ($100). A larger donation will support our mission in more ways than we can count. Subscribe or donate at www.chopchopmag.org, or write to us at info@chopchopmag.org or 32 Calvin Road, Watertown, MA 02472.

All recipes by Sally Sampson and Catherine Newman, unless otherwise attributed. Published by ChopChop Kids, a 501(c)(3) Corporation 617.924.3993 info@chopchopmag.org 12th printing, printed by R.R. Donnelley in Strasburg, Virginia, March 2013. Printed in the U.S.A

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Founder/President Creative Director Medical Director Editor Gardening Editor Photographer Food Stylist Copy Editor Circulation Publishing Director

Contributors: ADAM RIED, ANDRES TREVINO

TECHNICAL REVIEW AND ENDORSEMENT PROVIDED BY

The American Academy of Pediatrics does not endorse specific products or brands that may be included in this magazine.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Christine Madigan, VP Responsible Leadership, New Balance, Boston, MA Peter Nirenberg, CEO Image Architects, Short Hills, NJ Jill Ryan, CPA Braver PC, Needham, MA Sally Sampson ChopChop Magazine, Watertown, MA Lisa Simpson, MD, MPH President and CEO, Academy Health, Washington, DC Andrew Steinberg President, CEO and Chairman, Modern Publishing, New York, NY Shale Wong, MD, MSPH University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO Barry Zuckerman, MD Chief of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA ADVISORY BOARD Jose Alberto Betances, MD Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA David Cutler, PhD Kennedy School of Government, Cambridge, MA David Eisenberg, MD Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Mollie Katzen Cookbook author, Berkeley, CA Ann Marchetti AWMarchetti Consulting, Fort Lauderdale, FL Vivien Morris, MS, RD, MPH Chairperson, Mattapan Food and Fitness Coalition, Mattapan, MA Tina Peel Creator, producer, kids’ TV & media, Naples, FL Jane Pemberton Founder & CEO, Carefree Foodies, New York, NY Ellen Rome, MD, MPH Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH William C. Taylor Cofounder and Founding Editor, Fast Company Helen Veit Historian, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI John Willoughby Writer, editor, and cookbook author, Cambridge, MA Fiona Wilson University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH NUTRITION ADVISORY BOARD Christina D. Economos, PhD Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA Shirley Huang, MD The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA David Ludwig, MD, MPH Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA Walter Willett, MD, MPH Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA KIDS ADVISORY BOARD Julien Alam, Orren Fox, Zach Levin, Ethan Pierce, Maya Pierce, Nora Ripley-Grant, Haile Thomas


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Issue 12, Spring 2013

Departments 4 Adventures in the Kitchen Creating Possibility By Sally Sampson 8 Superfood How to cut and eat a mango 9 Think Again! Meet the sweet side of onions.

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14 Kitchen Skills How to cook whole grains 20 What’s Different? Can you tell what’s been changed in these two pictures? 25 Farm to Table Can you find your way out of this maze?

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28 Scrumptious Word Search 29 Quick Bites Instant snacking

CUSTOM ONE-BOWL MEALS

30 Taste Test Understanding salt

15 Everything Tuna The classic gets a makeover.

31 DigDig Grow your own sprouts. 32 Contest! New Balance Eat the Rainbow / Run the Rainbow 34 New Balance Foundation presents Lacrosse City kids pick up sticks—and play! 38 Solutions Puzzled? We’ve got answers.

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16 Chicken Your Way Our recipe, your flavors

Awesome Recipes

5 Layered Yogurt Parfait Breakfast in stripes 6 Banana Cream Pie Smoothie A healthy shake that tastes like dessert 10 Beet-and-Carrot Slaw Wraps The winning recipe from our American Grown contest

17 Garlicky Dressing Shake up a jar of vinaigrette! 18 Avocado and Mango Salsa Beautiful, colorful, flavorful 22 Basic Tofu Try this easy, versatile staple. 26 Strawberry-Rhubarb Spritzer What’s zippy, pink, and quenching? This is. 32 Rainbow Kabobs Colorful snacking on a stick 36 Jiggling Juice Gelatin dessert gets healthy.

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LEARN THE KEY! At the top of each recipe, you’ll find a key code. Here’s how to read it: ❚ ADULT: YES

❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 30 MINUTES

❚ TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR

❚ MAKES: 6

ADULT

“Yes” means you need an adult to help you. “No” means you can do it by yourself. Always get help from your adult when a recipe calls for using a knife, food processor, blender, or stove.

TOTAL TIME

This is how long it takes to make the recipe from start to finish, including the time for cooking and baking when you may be able to do something else–like clean up! In recipes that do not involve cooking, this may be the same as HANDS-ON TIME.

HANDS-ON TIME

This is how long it takes to work on the recipe, including gathering your kitchen gear and preparing the food. During handson time, you can’t do anything other than work on the recipe.

MAKES

This number will usually tell you how many people the recipe serves. But sometimes we’ll tell you how much the recipe makes.

My Plate, our plate To help us keep an eye on healthy eating, the USDA’s MyPlate illustrates how much of each food group we should eat. Keep this picture in mind when you’re serving yourself food, so you end up with a balanced meal. We list the food groups at the top of the page and show you which groups the recipe gives you a significant serving of. We also color-code the ingredients to show which food groups they belong to. Sometimes it’s a bit tricky: If there’s just a little lemon juice, for example, we mark it as a fruit (because it is), but it won’t really count as a serving.

• PROTEIN• VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

FRUITS: Oranges, grapefruit, • apples, grapes, berries, bananas, melons, tomatoes VEGETABLES: Lettuce, broccoli, kale, carrots, green beans, peas, plantains, squash GRAINS (half should be whole grains): Pasta, rice, breads, tortillas, cereals, oatmeal, bulgar, cornmeal DAIRY: Milk, cheese, yogurt PROTEIN: Eggs, nuts, seeds, beans, tofu, meat, fish

• •

Dear Parents,

W

hen my children were young they would often swing open the refrigerator door, peer in, scan the contents, and then exclaim with displeasure (and frankly, attitude): “We have nothing to eat.” And then I would make dinner.   When they got older they continued to stand in front of the refrigerator and wonder, but when we sat down to dinner, they had the perspective (or perhaps the wisdom) to congratulate me on creating a meal out of nothing. ObviSally Sampson ously I had no magic is the author of 20 wand, but I had decookbooks and the veloped the ability to founder and president of ChopChop magazine. see which ingredients could be matched with other ingredients. In a sense, I had the experience to know how to make all the pieces come together.   This is what we want this issue of ChopChop to teach: how to start with a blank canvas of rice, pasta, or greens—and then mix and match a little of this with a little of that and end up with a   meal. So instead of standing in front of an open fridge and seeing nothing, we want your children to see the endless possibilities that make up a meal. And even if the combinations don’t make sense to you, let them experiment anyway. You never know.  Warmly,

• •

Sally Sampson 4

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•GRAINS HEALTHY START •PROTEIN •VEGETABLES •FRUITS •DAIRY

Layered Yogurt Parfait

Parfait usually refers to an ice-cream concoction layered in a fancy glass— but it’s really a French word that means “perfect.” When you try our healthy breakfast version, we think you’ll see why!

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them.

❚ ADULT: NO ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 10 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 10 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 4 PARFAITS

CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter.

KITCHEN GEAR

4 short glasses Measuring cup

SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry.

INGREDIENTS

2 cups plain low-fat yogurt 2 cups fresh berries or chopped fruit ½ cup homemade or store-bought granola, or a combination of mixed nuts and dried fruit

PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Put ¼ cup yogurt in each glass and top with ¼ cup fruit. Repeat once. 2. Top each glass with 2 tablespoons granola and serve right away.

LOVELY LAYERS Tristin starts his day with a smile.

Safety Tip

Get an adult’s permission and help with all sharp knives, appliances (blender and food processor), the stove or oven, and hot ingredients. www.chopchopmag.org

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• • SMASHING SMOOTHIE VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

PROTEIN

Banana Cream Pie Smoothie

Cinnamon and vanilla make this wholesome shake taste like dessert —but then it’s loaded with energy-boosting nutrients from the bananas, almonds, and yogurt. Pie in a glass. Yes, please! ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 5 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 5 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 2 SERVINGS

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry.

KITCHEN GEAR

INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

Measuring cup Measuring spoons Dinner knife Cutting board Blender (adult needed)

1 very ripe banana, peeled and sliced ½ cup low-fat milk ½ cup plain low-fat yogurt 2 tablespoons unsalted almonds (raw or roasted) ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 ice cubes

1. Put all the ingredients in the blender. 2. Put the top on tightly. Turn the blender to a medium setting and blend until the ice is chopped and the mixture is smooth, about 1 minute. 3. Serve right away—or store in a thermos or covered in the refrigerator, up to 4 hours.

PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

Think Ahead: Freeze the banana ahead of time for a thicker, slushier smoothie! GOOD AND LOUD! Tom and Bela whirl up their drinkable pie.

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•GRAINS •PROTEIN •VEGETABLES •FRUITS •DAIRY

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• • SUPERFOOD VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

Mangoes

PROTEIN

WHAT MAKES THEM SO SUPER? One serving of tropically grown mango (about 1 cup) gives you all of your daily vitamin C, more than a third of your vitamin A, and 12% of your daily fiber! Plus, they contain more than 20 different vitamins and minerals. All that nutrition comes in a pretty amazing package: ripe, juicy mangoes have a lush, velvety texture and a unique flavor that’s like a cross between peach and coconut. Now all you have to do is free them from their natural packaging . . .

How to cut (and eat) a mango Some people call these mangoes “hedgehogs”; it’s a great way to prepare a mango for eating, whether you want to enjoy it on its own or use it in a recipe, like our Avocado and Mango Salsa (page 18). ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 5 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 5 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 2 SERVINGS

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

KITCHEN GEAR

Cutting board Sharp knife (adult needed) INGREDIENTS

1 mango INSTRUCTIONS

1. The mango has a flat, ovalshaped pit in its middle, and you want to slice downward on either side of the pit to free the flesh. Hold the mango with one hand and stand it on its stem end. Slice from the top of the mango, down 1 side of the pit, then repeat with the other side (this is a job for an adult). You will end up with 3 pieces: 2 halves and a middle section with the pit in it. 2. Take a mango half and cut a “crosshatch” pattern in it, making cuts lengthwise and crosswise through the flesh, but stopping at the peel. 3. If you’re eating the mango on its own, go for it! Peel the cubes off with your fingers— or, better yet, bite them right off the peel. If you’re using the mango in a recipe, then cut the cubes away from the peel with the knife. 4. Peel the strips of skin off the middle section and nibble as much fruit as you can from the pit. 8

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MANGO MAGIC Cutting the mango is a job for an adult.

DID YOU KNOW?

You will likely see the larger red-and-green-skinned variety of mango at your supermarket—but spring is also the season for golden champagne mangoes (also called Ataulfo mangoes), and if you see one, snap it up! It’s smaller than a regular mango, and incredibly sweet, creamy, and fragrant.

Safety Tip

Get an adult’s permission and help with all sharp knives,


•GRAINS THINK AGAIN! •PROTEIN •VEGETABLES •FRUITS •DAIRY

Think you hate onions? Think again. They’re strong tasting and strong smelling, and they make you cry. No wonder onions have a bad reputation! Oh, but they’ve also got a sweet side, and if you get to know them, we

think you’ll grow to love them. Think of this recipe as an easy introduction—then, maybe a little later, you’ll be willing to taste an onion in other preparations too.

Caramelized Onions

This recipe really brings out the sweetness of the onion. Caramelized onions are great on pasta, hamburgers, sandwiches, pizzas, or in omelets—or substitute them for raw onions in a salad. ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 1 HOUR AND 5 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR AND 5 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 1 CUP

PATIENCE PAYS OFF. Sylvie, Lila, and Audrey stir up some oniony sweetness.

KITCHEN GEAR

Cutting board Sharp knife (adult needed) Large skillet Measuring spoons Wooden spoon INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons olive oil 2 large red onions, thinly sliced ½ teaspoon salt Water, about 4 tablespoons INSTRUCTIONS

Really?

Does chopping onions make you cry? Onions don’t actually make you sad, but they can produce a stinging sensation that makes your eyes tear. The stinging is caused by molecules stored within the cells of the onion. When you cut an onion, you’re breaking its cells apart, allowing these molecules to escape and float up as a gas; your eyes tear to try to wash off the gas. To lessen the stinging, try chilling onions in the fridge before you cut them. appliances (blender and food processor), the stove or oven, and hot ingredients.

Or Else

Add 1 teaspoon of chopped fresh rosemary or thyme (less, if you’re using dried) when you add the onions, to give them an herby flavor. Stir in 1 teaspoon of balsamic vinegar, right at the end of cooking, to give the onions a sweet-andsour flavor.

1. Put the skillet on the stove and turn the heat to medium. When the skillet is hot, add the oil. 2. Add the onions and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. 3. Turn the heat down to low and cook until the onions are lightly browned and almost syrupy, about 35 minutes, stirring occasionally at first and then frequently as they start to brown. If the pan starts to seem too dry, add water, 1 tablespoon at a time. (You might be surprised by how much the onions shrink!) 4. Use right away or cover and refrigerate up to 2 days. www.chopchopmag.org

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• • WINNING RECIPE! VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

PROTEIN

Beet-and-Carrot Slaw Wraps

Rachel Morningstar, from Las Cruces, New Mexico, won our American Grown Recipe Challenge (and a signed copy of First Lady Michelle Obama’s cookbook, American Grown) with this crunchy, colorful wrap. Rachel writes, “I work for a nonprofit called La Semilla Food Center in southern New Mexico. We work with youth and families in the region to build a healthy, self-reliant, sustainable, and fair food system. I created this recipe to use with students at our school garden at Sierra Middle School. We used beets and carrots the students grew in the garden and local apples, cheddar, and whole-wheat tortillas. After some practice, older youth can prepare this as an afterschool snack on their own.”

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 20 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 5 SERVINGS

KITCHEN GEAR

INSTRUCTIONS

Citrus squeezer (if you have one) Measuring spoons Jar with tight-fitting lid Sharp knife (adult needed) Cutting board Grater (adult needed) Large bowl 5 toothpicks

1. To make the dressing: Put the orange juice, oil, vinegar, mustard, salt, and pepper in the jar, screw the lid on tightly, and shake well. 2. Cut the greens off the beets and pull the leaves from the stems (discard or compost the stems). Wash the leaves, then stack them and roll them. Slice the roll crosswise into thin (¼-inch) ribbons. 3. Peel the beets and the carrots and shred them using the grater. 4. Put the beet leaves and the shredded beets and carrots in the bowl, and toss them with the dressing. 5. For each wrap, put ¹⁄ 5 of the slaw, ¹⁄ 5 of the sliced apples, and 1 slice of cheddar cheese inside a tortilla. Roll the tortilla from the bottom up, tucking in the sides as you go. Secure the wrap with a toothpick, if you like, and serve right away.

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons fresh orange juice (from about ½ orange) 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper 5 raw beets (about 2 ½ –3 cups grated), with greens still attached “Cored” 2 carrots means with 2 apples, cored and sliced the stem and hard 5 slices cheddar cheese center part removed. 5 (8-inch) whole-wheat tortillas

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“Toss” means to mix together lightly.

Beet greens (the leafy part of the beet plant) are often discarded, but they’re actually a delicious vegetable, and they add to the nutritional power of this recipe.

Safety Tip

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WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter.

Start with a bowl of healthy grains or whole-grain pasta, and build your own meal from there. For one thing, if you put out plenty of different veggies and toppings, it’s bound to be beautifully balanced, nutritionwise. For another, it’s a great way to use the food you already have in the pantry and fridge. But do you want to know something else? People just seem to like putting together their own bowl of food—and, once they do, they’re pretty likely to eat it. Even if it’s filled with super-healthy stuff they didn’t know they loved! We’re sharing some recipes, along with lots of ideas for toppings that you can use in your rice bowls or put together for other meals. But you’ll have ideas too! See what you’ve got: corn in the freezer, some scallions, a leftover pork chop. Can you put it all together into a meal? (We think you can!)

SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

PLEASE PASS THE… Lila and Sylvie assemble their rice bowls.

Ideas for Toppings: Raw veggies (washed well and then chopped, sliced, or shredded): shredded carrots, sliced cucumbers or radishes, diced avocado, cherry tomatoes, sliced scallions, cabbage slaw, sprouts (see page 31) Leafy greens (raw or cooked): raw baby spinach, arugula, steamed chard, or sautéed kale Fruit (fresh or dried): raisins, dried cherries, diced mangos, berries, or orange sections Cooked veggies (roasted, grilled, or steamed): roasted broccoli, steamed sugar snap peas, cooked corn, grilled eggplant or asparagus, or marinated beets Cooked beans (rinsed and drained if using canned): black, white, pinto, kidney, lima, lentils, edamame, blackeyed peas, or chickpeas.

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Cheese (shredded or crumbled): feta, Parmesan, cheddar, Monterey Jack, blue, or cottage Eggs (hard-boiled, fried, or poached) Nuts or seeds (raw or toasted): pecans, walnuts, peanuts, almonds, cashews, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, or sunflower seeds (To toast sesame seeds, shake them in a small, dry pan over medium heat until golden, 2 to 3 minutes.)

Safety Tip

Chicken, salmon, shrimp, steak, or tofu (roasted, sautéed, grilled, or leftover) Canned fish: tuna or sardines Fresh herbs: basil, parsley, cilantro, mint, or chives Leftovers: chili, bean soup, stew, or stir-fry Toppings: vinaigrette, pesto, peanut sauce, salsa, or plain low-fat yogurt

Get an adult’s permission and help with all sharp knives,


appliances (blender and food processor), the stove or oven, and hot ingredients.

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• • VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

PROTEIN

How to Cook Whole Grains

Whole grains, such as brown rice and barley, are fantastic: they’re delicious and nutty-tasting, super-versatile, and better for you than white rice, since they’re full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber. We boil them in lots of water and then drain them—the way you’d cook pasta. Once you get the hang of making them, you’ll find that it’s really pretty easy. Use them in the custom bowls that follow, or as a base for stew, soup, or chili. ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 5 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 20–75 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 2 CUPS

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

KITCHEN GEAR

Measuring cup Large pot with lid Large spoon Mesh strainer

GRAIN-TASTIC! Tom and Bela fill the rice bowls.

INGREDIENTS

1 cup short-grain brown rice INSTRUCTIONS

1. Fill the pot half full of water, then cover it and set it on the stove. Turn the heat to high and bring the water to a boil. (You’ll know the water is boiling when you see bubbles breaking all over the surface.) Meanwhile put the rice in the strainer and rinse it under running water. 2. Add the rice, stir it, then cover the pot again and boil the rice for 30 minutes. 3. Pour the rice into the strainer in the sink (this is a job for an adult) and drain it really well. 4. Return the rice to the pot, cover it, and leave it to steam, off the heat, for 10 minutes. 5. Fluff the rice with a fork and serve. 14

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For other grains, follow the instructions above for rice, including the draining and steaming, but just change the boiling time as suggested below; taste the grain after the suggested time to make sure it’s just about done (the steaming will cook it a bit more): Cracked Wheat (also called “Bulgur Wheat”): Boil for 5 minutes. Quinoa: Rinse really well in the strainer (it’s got a bitter coating) then boil for 20 minutes. Barley: Boil for 50 minutes. Spelt, Farro, or Kamut (all are types of wheat): Boil for 1 hour.

Think Ahead: Freeze 1-cup portions of cooked grains in labeled zipper-lock bags, then you can thaw whatever you need whenever you like.

Safety Tip

Get an adult’s permission and help with all sharp knives,


•GRAINS •PROTEIN •VEGETABLES •FRUITS •DAIRY

Everything Tuna Crunchy, chewy, tangy, sweet—this tuna’s got everything going for it. It’s a great topping for a grain bowl, but it’s also great on a salad, in a sandwich or wrap, or scooped up with whole-grain crackers. ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 10 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 10 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 4 SERVINGS

TUNA WITH THE WORKS Sylvie, Lila, and Audrey spoon some on sandwiches.

KITCHEN GEAR

INGREDIENTS

Can opener Colander Medium-sized bowl Fork Measuring spoons Measuring cup Sharp knife (adult needed) Cutting board Vegetable peeler Grater

2 (5-ounce) cans tuna packed in water 3 tablespoons low-fat plain yogurt 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 celery stalk, chopped 1 apple, washed, cored, and chopped ¼ cup raisins ¼ cup chopped toasted walnuts, pecans, or almonds 1 carrot, well scrubbed or peeled, grated

To toast the nuts, put them on a small baking sheet in a 350-degree oven until they are fragrant and look a shade darker, about 5–10 minutes.

appliances (blender and food processor), the stove or oven, and hot ingredients.

INSTRUCTIONS

“Cored” means with the stem and hard center part removed.

1. Drain the tuna: Set the colander in the sink, then use the can opener to open each can and carefully empty the tuna into the colander. Using the fork, press down on the tuna to squeeze the liquid out. Allow it to drain away. 2. Put the drained tuna in the bowl and break up any clumps with the fork. 3. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix well. 4. Cover and, if you can, refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to overnight to let the flavors mingle.

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• • VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

PROTEIN

Chicken Your Way

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

SAUTÉ AWAY! Sylvie, Audrey, and Lila make chicken for everyone.

This is a nice, easy chicken recipe that’s very versatile. Depending on your mood or the flavors of your meal, you can season the chicken any way you like by adding different ingredients to the dressing. We suggest a few different options, but you can really experiment with your own flavors. This chicken is good alone, as part of a grain bowl, or on top of a salad. 16

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❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 35 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 4 SERVINGS

KITCHEN GEAR

INGREDIENTS

Sharp knife (adult needed) Cutting board Large bowl Vegetable peeler Measuring cup Measuring spoons Grater or zester Small bowl Whisk Tongs or salad servers

1–2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced or put through a garlic press “Minced” 2 tablespoons balsamic or red wine vinegar means 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons olive oil finely chopped. ¼ teaspoon salt Black pepper 2 whole boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut in half, trimmed of fat, and patted dry with a paper towel

Safety Tip

Get an

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•GRAINS •PROTEIN •VEGETABLES •FRUITS •DAIRY

INSTRUCTIONS

1. To make the dressing: Put the garlic, vinegar, 2 tablespoons oil, salt, and pepper (and any of the Try This ingredients) in the bowl and mix well. Now taste it. Does it need more salt or pepper? More seasoning? If so, add it and taste again, then set the dressing aside. 2. Put the skillet on the stove and turn the heat to medium-high. When the skillet is hot, add the remaining 2 teaspoons oil. Add the chicken breasts, one at a time, and cook until lightly browned and cooked through, 5 to 8 minutes per side, depending on the thickness of the chicken. (To check that the chicken is cooked thoroughly, cut a piece in half: it should look white all the way through.) 3. Put the chicken on the cutting board and cut it into thin slices. Put the slices in the bowl with the dressing and mix gently. Serve right away.

Try This:

Curry: Add 1 teaspoon sweet or hot curry powder to the dressing. Spicy: Add 1 teaspoon chili powder and 1 teaspoon ground cumin to the dressing. Ginger: Add 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger and 1 tablespoon soy sauce to the dressing (leave out the salt). Herby: Add 2 tablespoons chopped fresh herbs (such as basil, cilantro, mint, or parsley) to the dressing.

Garlicky Dressing A good, flavorful vinaigrette like this really ties together the ingredients in a grain bowl. And, of course, it’s delicious on a salad! This recipe makes a lot of dressing, which is great because then you’ll have some on hand whenever you want it. ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 5 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 5 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 1¼ CUPS

KITCHEN GEAR

Sharp knife (adult needed) or garlic press Small mixing bowl Measuring spoons Measuring cup Whisk or fork Jar with tight-fitting lid INGREDIENTS

1–2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced or put through a garlic press ½ teaspoon dried oregano ½ cup red wine vinegar ¾ cup olive oil Salt and pepper

DRESS FOR SUCCESS! Tristin shakes up the vinaigrette.

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Put all the ingredients in the bowl. 2. Using the whisk or a fork, mix until everything is well combined, about 30 seconds. (If you prefer, put all the ingredients in a jar with a tight-fitting lid and shake, shake, shake!) 3. Cover and refrigerate up to 3 weeks.

“Minced” means finely chopped.

Or Else

Don’t love oregano? Try basil, dill, marjoram, or thyme instead. rocessor), the stove od p or o kni o f ves ven and ts. , app , and r e d hot ingredien liances (blen

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• • VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

PROTEIN

Avocado and Mango Salsa This beautiful, surprising salsa mixes the vibrant juiciness of mango with the green creaminess of avocado and a little bit of tangy citrus. Use it as a topping on a grain bowl or a quesadilla, scoop it up with whole-grain chips, or top greens with it for a delicious salad. ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 20 MINUtTES ❚ MAKES: 4 SERVINGS

LUNCH IS SERVED. Tom tastes his chicken-andsalsa combo.

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

KITCHEN GEAR

Sharp knife (adult needed) Cutting board Medium-sized bowl Measuring spoons Large spoon INGREDIENTS

“Pitted” means with the pit taken out.

1 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted, and cubed 1 ripe mango, peeled, pitted, and cubed (see page 8) 12 cherry tomatoes, cut in half ¼ cup crumbled feta cheese (if you like) 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper INSTRUCTIONS

1. Put the avocado, mango and tomatoes, and feta cheese, if using, in the bowl and gently stir with the large spoon. 2. Drizzle with the oil, lemon or lime juice, salt, and pepper. Now taste it. Does it need more lemon or lime juice? More salt or pepper? If so, add it and taste again. 3. Cover and refrigerate up to 4 hours or serve right away, over grains or greens.

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Safety Tip

Get an adult’s permission and help with all sharp knives,


appliances (blender and food processor), the stove or oven, and hot ingredients.

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WHAT’S DIFFERENT? We found 9 changes in the picture on the right.

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Can you find them all? Solution on page 38.

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• • VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

PROTEIN

Basic Tofu

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge.

Here’s an easy recipe for tofu that’s good hot or cold. Tofu is made from soybeans and packed with protein, which makes it a great addition to a grain bowl or salad. Plus, this version will add a lot of delicious flavor to your meal. ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 10 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR ❚ MAKES: 1¼ CUPS

GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

KITCHEN GEAR

Paper towels Cutting board Sharp knife (adult needed) Measuring spoons Large nonstick skillet Tongs or heatproof spatula

DID YOU KNOW?

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 (14–16-ounce) container of firm or extra-firm tofu 2 tablespoons lowsodium soy sauce 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

TOFU GETS SAUCY! Sylvie and Audrey flavor a panful.

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Pull the plastic off the tofu container (you may need to cut it with a knife) and pour the liquid out of it into the sink. Put the block of tofu on the cutting board, gently press it with paper towels to dry it a bit, then cut it into 12 thin slices. (Approach it like a math problem: Cut the block in half; then cut each half in half; then cut each quarter into 3 slices.) 2. Put the skillet on the stove, add the oil, and turn the heat to medium. 3. When the oil is hot (add a crumb of tofu and see if it sizzles right away), carefully add the tofu slices in a single layer (they might splash and steam a bit—making this a good job for an adult. Fry the tofu until it’s brown and crispy on the bottom, about 5 minutes. Use the spatula or tongs to flip each piece over and cook until the other side is brown and crispy, about 5 minutes. 4. Add the soy sauce and vinegar to the skillet and continue cooking, gently shaking the pan back and forth and turning the tofu over with the spatula or tongs, until the liquid has evaporated and the tofu is shiny and looks coated with sauce. 5. Put the tofu on the cutting board and cut it into thin strips. Use right away or cover and refrigerate up to 2 days.

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Tofu is also called “bean curd,” because it’s made from soybeans in a process similar to making cheese: first the beans are soaked, ground, and strained to make soy milk. This soy milk is curdled, just like you would for cheese, to get all the protein to stick together in curds (this is called “coagulation”). Afterwards the curds are pressed into blocks of tofu.

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GIVE THE GIFT THAT GIVES BACK!

Give a ChopChop subscription to the people you care about—your kids, grandkids, nieces, nephews, friends and relatives, classrooms or clubs—and you’ll be giving the gift of real food and real fun!

Plus, you’ll be supporting our nonprofit mission to inspire kids to cook real food with their families —and our vision of preventing childhood obesity. To give the gift of ChopChop all year long, go to www.chopchopmag.org/subscribe Special rates for group distribution! Write to us at info@chopchopmag.org for more information. 24

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FARM TO TABLE Can you help these mangoes turn into cubes?

INSTANT ACTIVITY Challenge yourself: Do as many push-ups and sit-ups as you can, then do them every day and see how many you can add to that number before summer starts.

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• • QUENCH VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

PROTEIN

Strawberry-Rhubarb Spritzer

Here’s a zippy pink cool-off that will refresh you completely! Rhubarb is a late-springtime vegetable that many people use more like a fruit. The flavor is quite tart, so it’s always sweetened and often paired with other fruits, especially strawberries, to make desserts like pies and crisps. If you can’t find fresh rhubarb at your store, look for it in the freezer section near the frozen berries. By Adam Ried ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 1½ HOURS INCLUDING CHILLING TIME ❚ MAKES: 6 SERVINGS

KITCHEN GEAR

Sharp knife (adult needed) Cutting board Vegetable peeler Measuring cup Medium-sized pot Wooden spoon Medium mesh strainer Small bowl Measuring spoons 6 tall glasses

SWEET BUT NOT TOO SWEET Tyler and Tristin sip spritzers.

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

INGREDIENTS

1 strip of zest from 1 orange (if you like) ½ cinnamon stick (if you like) ¼ pound rhubarb (about 2 small stalks), trimmed, leaves discarded, and thinly sliced (about 1 cup) 1 cup sliced fresh or thawed frozen strawberries (about ½ pint) ¼ cup honey Pinch salt (A "pinch" is the small amount you can pinch between your finger and thumb.) ²⁄³ cup water Sparkling water (also called “seltzer”), chilled Ice cubes 26

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INSTRUCTIONS

1. If you’re going to use the orange zest, wash the orange well and use a vegetable peeler to remove a long strip of the orange part of the peel. 2. Put the rhubarb, strawberries, honey, salt, water, and orange zest and/or cinnamon stick, if you’re using it, in the pot. 3. Put the pot on the stove and turn the heat to medium-high. Bring the mixture to a boil (you’ll see lots of bubbles around the inside edges of the pot) and stir to dissolve the honey.  4. Turn the heat down to low and simmer ("Simmer" means to cook at a very gentle boil ), stirring occasionally, until the rhubarb

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and berries become totally mushy, about 8 minutes. Set the mixture aside and let it cool to room temperature. Throw away the orange peel and/or cinnamon stick. 5. Set the strainer over the bowl and pour the rhubarb mixture into the strainer. Stir the rhubarb with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula to help it go through the holes. (You should end up with ¾ cup of rhubarb puree; the leftover pulp in the strainer is delicious mixed with some yogurt, or you can compost it.)  6. Divide the puree evenly among the 6 glasses. Top each with 1 cup sparkling water and stir gently. Add ice cubes and serve.

Safety Tip

Get an adult’s permission and help with all sharp knives,


appliances (blender and food processor), the stove or oven, and hot ingredients.

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SCRUMPTIOUS WORD SEARCH

WORDS HIDDEN ABOVE

AVOCADO BEETS BROWN RICE

Solution on page 38

CARAMELIZED GARLIC GELATIN KABOB

KIWI MANGO ONION QUINOA

TABLE TALK Dinner’s a great time to catch up on conversation. How does everyone at your table answer these questions? • If you could design your own room, what would it be like? • If you were a salad, what would you have in you? • What do you know how to do well enough to teach other people? 28

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RAISIN RHUBARB SPROUTS STRAWBERRY

TOFU TORTILLA VINAIGRETTE YOGURT

GREAT MANNERS Putting your knife and fork (or spoon) down between bites isn’t just corny, old-fashioned good manners—it actually encourages you to eat more slowly and to really enjoy your food, rather than gobbling it down without thinking!


QUICK BITES Mango cubes

Dried figs

Hard-boiled egg

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TASTE TEST is one of the oldest and most widely used seasonings on the planet—and saltiness is one of the very few basic human tastes. While it’s true that salt is an important ingredient in good-tasting food, too much salt has been associated with health problems, especially in people prone to high blood pressure. We’d like you to experiment with different kinds of salt to see how they taste, with a goal of learning to use less salt. When the food you’re cooking tastes good, you’ll enjoy other flavors (besides salt) so much more.

LIKE GOLDILOCKS. . . Tom, Bela, and Theo taste salt until it seems just right.

Table salt, like the kind you find in a salt shaker, is mined from the earth. It’s fine-grained and may have added ingredients such as iodine (which is added because it’s a nutrient people need). Kosher salt has larger crystals so it’s easier to control the amount you use. (It’s our favorite salt, here at ChopChop.) Sea salt is made from evaporated ocean water and tends to have large crystals and a lot of flavor. Use just a little—it’s really salty! Soy sauce is a salty condiment made from fermented soybeans and is most often found in Asian foods. It adds flavors other than salt to a dish. Similarly, fish sauce is a salty condiment made from fermented fish that adds a particular taste in addition to saltiness. 30

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TRY THIS

• Cut up a plain baked or boiled potato or a peeled hard-boiled egg, or put out a bowl of cooked (unsalted) pasta. • Now put out shakers or small dishes of whatever salt and salty condiments you have: table salt, kosher salt, sea salt, soy sauce, and/or fish sauce. (If you’ve got only one kind, just try that one.) • Take a piece of potato, egg, or pasta and eat it plain. How does it taste? • Now, try one of the salts: sprinkle a little on and taste it (or, in the case of soy sauce, dip a piece into it). Now how does it taste? Try it again with half the amount. • Try the other salts. Do the salts taste different from each other? Is one salt saltier than another? • Try adding another seasoning with the salt: a squeeze of lemon or a tiny pinch of sugar. Does that change the way you experience the saltiness? • Which one do you like best? What’s the perfect amount of salt for you?

DID YOU KNOW? Long ago, salt was so valuable that Roman soldiers were paid with it. That’s where the expression “worth your salt” comes from, and it also might explain the root of the word “salary.”


DIGDIG

Grow Your Own Sprouts Sprouts are packed with nutrients and add crunch and flavor to sandwiches, salads, and more. Luckily, growing them is easy! For more detailed instructions, tips, and mail-order supplies, visit the Sprout People website at www.sproutpeople.com.

WHAT YOU NEED:

Sprout This

1 tablespoon organic whole grains or dried beans, or seeds for sprouting (get these from a natural-foods store) Very clean jar Water, at room temperature 8-inch square of cheesecloth Rubber band

• For leafy sprouts, try alfalfa or clover seeds. These are mild and grow quickly. • Bean sprouts, such as mung beans, lentils, or peas, are crunchy and sturdy. • The brassica genus includes broccoli and radish. These sprouts are tasty and spicy. • You can even sprout grains! You might like the sweet taste of wheat or barley. Experiment!

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Put the grains, beans, or seeds in the jar and add enough water to cover the level of the seeds by about 2 inches. Cover the top of the jar with cheesecloth (so that air can still circulate), and secure the cheesecloth with the rubber band. 2. Let the seeds soak overnight, away from heat or direct sunlight. Drain the jar by pouring the water out through the cheesecloth. Rinse the seeds and drain them again, very well, pouring water in and out through the cheesecloth. 3. Repeat this process twice a day until the seeds have sprouted and the sprouts are about ½ inch long. This will take 1 to 6 days, depending on what kind of seed you started with. 4. Rinse the sprouts thoroughly and use them right away. Or drain them very well, transfer them to an airtight container, refrigerate, and use within 3 days.

Photos by Catherine Newman

SAFETY TIP!

Old sprouts, sprouts grown in dirty jars, or sprouts that aren’t grown from organic or specially prepared seeds can make you sick. Use healthy seeds, keep all your supplies clean, and eat your sprouts while they’re fresh! www.chopchopmag.org

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• • EAT THE RAINBOW VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

PROTEIN

Rainbow Kabobs RUN THE RAINBOW, EAT THE RAINBOW In celebration of healthy kids and New Balance’s brandnew 890 Rainbow shoe, ChopChop and New Balance invite your family to enter our “Run the Rainbow, Eat the Rainbow” contest. Enter your email for your chance to win a monthly prize pack, including a pair of Rainbow shoes, a one-year subscription to ChopChop, and a grand prize of a $400 gift card to a local grocery store; go to newbalance. com/rainbow. Contest runs in March, April, and May. Must be 18 years or older to enter.

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“Eating the rainbow” helps get you in the habit of eating a full spectrum of fruits and vegetables— and, because different colors are associated with different nutrients, that’s a great way to color your world healthy. What better way to get all your healthy hues than in a snackable rainbow of fruit? Start with a container of fruit salad, if you like, or vary the ingredients to suit your taste (and enter our contest!).

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 5 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 5 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 1 KABOB PER PERSON

RAINBOW ON A STICK Tyler and Tristin design a healthy snack.

KITCHEN GEAR

INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

Sharp knife (adult needed) Cutting board Bamboo skewers

Purple grapes Blueberries Kiwis, peeled and cut into chunks Pineapple chunks Cantaloupe chunks Raspberries

1. For each kabob, thread the fruit onto a skewer in rainbow order. Eat right away.

Safety Tip

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sor), the sto proces ve o kni food r ov d ves n en, a s. a , app r nd hot ingredient liances (blende

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New Balance Foundation Presents

Lacrosse

Lacrosse is a team sport of Native American origin played using a small rubber ball and a long-handled stick. But for the kids at Boston’s MetroLacrosse, it’s so much more, given the organization’s mission “to address the social and economic disparities that exist in urban settings by inspiring personal, educational, and athletic success among urban youth and teens.” In other words, everyone can play lacrosse.

TAKING AIM Kevin gets ready to shoot on goal.

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GETTING DEFENSIVE Deyscha, Kevin, Dodson, and Jahmel practice a defensive drill with coach (and MetroLacrosse president) Mike Levin.

STICKING TOGETHER Jahmel, Adamarys, Nataliee, Kevin, Deyscha, Dodson, and Mike give a cheer.

M

etroLacrosse is a free program that New Balance and New Balance Foundation has supported for 11 of the program’s 13 years. Because of its success there are now similar sports-based character development programs across the country. Lacrosse provides great exercise and is a fantastic team sport. MetroLacrosse uses the acronym RESPECT to describe the program’s core values and skills: Responsibility, Effort, Sportsmanship, Participation, Enthusiasm, Communication, and Teamwork. And, of course, it’s a whole lot of fun. As the organization’s president, Mike Levin, puts it: “Put a stick in someone’s hands, and it’s like a toy—it’s really easy for kids to get into it.” Or, as player Melisa Garcia puts it, “I can’t wait for spring season!”

Want more?

For more information go to www.metrolacrosse.com Find other free or low-cost urban lacrosse programs in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Baltimore, and Dallas. www.chopchopmag.org

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• • SWEET TREAT VEGETABLES• FRUITS• DAIRY• GRAINS

PROTEIN

Jiggling Juice

This is like the just-add-water gelatin dessert that comes in a box—only it’s yummier and healthier because you’re making it yourself with real fruit juice! We promise your body won’t miss all that extra sugar and those artificial flavors and colors. For an extra-pretty dessert, use white grape juice so that the colorful fruit can shine through. ❚ ADULT: YES ❚ HANDS-ON TIME: 10 MINUTES ❚ TOTAL TIME: 4 HOURS 10 MINUTES ❚ MAKES: 4SERVINGS

WASH your hands with soap and water and dry them. CLEAN the counter top with a sponge. GATHER all your kitchen gear and ingredients and put them on the counter. SCRUB all the fruits and vegetables and lay them out on a dishtowel to dry. PREPARE your ingredients, which means you may have to do something before you get started with the instructions.

DID YOU KNOW? JIGGLING JUICE Tom, Bela, and Theo enjoy some wobbly dessert.

KITCHEN GEAR

INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

Measuring cup Heatproof bowl or large heatproof measuring cup Spoon Small pot 4 short glasses or small bowls

2 cups real (100%) fruit juice (NOT mango, papaya, kiwi, or fresh pineapple) 1 (¼-ounce) envelope unflavored gelatin (such as the brand Knox, which you can find at the supermarket, near the other gelatin desserts) 1 cup berries or cut-up fruit (NOT mango, papaya, kiwi, or fresh pineapple)

1. Put ½ cup fruit juice in the bowl and sprinkle the gelatin over it. (This is called “blooming” the gelatin, and it makes it easier to dissolve later.) 2. Put the rest of the juice (do you know how much that is?) in the pot and put the pot on the stove. Turn the heat to medium and bring the juice just to a boil. (You’ll know the juice is boiling when you see bubbles breaking at the surface.) 3. Carefully pour the boiling juice (this is a job for an adult) over the gelatin mixture and stir until the gelatin dissolves, about 2 minutes. 4. Put ¼ cup fruit in each glass or bowl, then add ½ cup of the gelatin mixture. 5. Refrigerate until firm, about 4 hours.

Safety Tip 36

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Get an adult’s permission and help with all sharp knives, appliances (blender and food processor), the stove or oven, and hot ingredients.

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Gelatin is made of a protein called collagen, and it works by creating tangles of protein strands that turn a liquid, like juice, into a wiggly solid. But some fruits, such as mango, papaya, kiwi, and fresh pineapple, contain a substance called protease that works like scissors to cut up the protein strands so they can’t form a solid. If you use those fruits, your gelatin won’t set properly!


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FROM PAGE 20

SOLUTIONS

NUMBERS BELOW SHOW CHANGES IN THE PICTURE. CHANGED ITEMS ARE LISTED BELOW.

FROM PAGE 28

INSTANT ACTIVITY What do you know how to do that your parents don’t?

Teach them a tae kwon do sequence, a ballet routine, or some soccer moves.

EDIBLE VOCABULARY

1. 2. 3. 4.

Tofu and beans switched Black olives added to tofu Forks Mango, avocado, and tomato instead of egg 5. Different bowl

6. Cilantro added to beans 7. Almonds added to chicken 8. Bean sprouts instead of sunflower sprouts 9. Tomatoes added to tuna salad

BY BIRDY NEWMAN

Can you guess what these words mean? 1. soursop

A. A Japanese spice mixture containing chili pepper and sesame seeds, among other ingredients.

2. anardana

B. A tangy Indian seasoning made from the ground dried seeds of pomegranates.

3. breadfruit

C. A juicy, creamy tropical fruit that tastes a little like pineapple.

4. shichimi

D. A Southeast Asian fruit that tastes like a potato when you cook it.

5. warqa

E. A paper-thin Moroccan pastry similar to spring-roll wrappers. ANSWERS: 1C, 2B, 3D, 4A, 5E

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CHOPCHOP WOULD LIKE TO THANK OUR SPONSORS AND PARTNERS

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COMING IN OUR SUMMER ISSUE! WARM-WEATHER RECIPES TO MAKE, EAT, AND SHARE FARM-TO-TABLE EATING FRESH RECIPES FOR DELICIOUS, SEASONAL DISHES

PLUS MEXICAN CORN ON THE COB KIWI “POPSICLES" PINK-BERRY SMOOTHIES AND ALWAYS: GAMES PUZZLES FUN!

NEVER MISS AN ISSUE! Subscribe to ChopChop

The Fun Cooking Magazine for Families 4 Great Issues—just $14.95! To pay with a credit card, go to chopchopmag.org

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ChopChop Spring 2013  

ChopChop Magazine Spring Issue featuring Rainbow Kebobs, Custom One-Bowl Meals, Mangoes and more!

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