__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CHILLED RAISE YOUR SPIRITS

MIXING WITH

SMOKE WE LOVE MEZCAL IN OUR MARGARITAS

HEY BARTENDERS #EARNYOURBOOZE

THE BEST

SCOTCHTAILS FOR SUMMER LISTEN UP WHISKEY FANS!

*WALTON GOGGINS HAS A STORY TO TELL MULHOLLAND AMERICAN WHISKEY


LIVE PASSIONATELY. DRINK RESPONSIBLY. ©2019. BACARDÍ, ITS TRADE DRESS AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED. BACARDI U.S.A., INC., CORAL GABLES, FL. RUM – 40% ALC. BY VOL.


CONTENTS

VOLUME 12 - ISSUE 2

features

74

80

86

Walton Goggins of Mulholland Distilling Has a Story to Tell

Introducing Svedka Rosé

Scotchtails

Listen Up Whiskey Fans …

A New Iteration of Pink

Beyond the Dram

76

82

88

Sweetened Rums Spark Bitter Debate

A Time for Craft Mixers

The Classic Scotch Highball

A Case for Truth in Labeling

Trending Now

Get To Know

78

84

90

Experiential, Immersive and Multisensory

J. García Carrión

Chilled 100 Member Eric Hobbie's New Signature Cocktails

Beyond Taste

Meet the Masters of Cava

Recipes

94

Hotspot Spotlight

Pint + Jigger & Harry’s Hardware Emporium

4

CHILLED MAGAZINE


CONTENTS

VOLUME 12 - ISSUE 2

departments

14

Editor’s Note

10 A Message from Tony Abou-Ganim

Bottoms Up! 12 14 16 18

Cool Products - Stuff You Need to Know About Cool Bottles - Radical Rum How to Use Decoctions in Cocktails Anatomy of the Bottle - Espolòn Blanco Tequila

The Locals

22 Bartender Submission - Amir Babayoff, Ophelia Lounge, NYC 24 Bartender Submission - Amy DeLee, Jalisco Cantina, California 26 Ask A Bartender - Hey, Bartenders … #Earnyourbooze 30 Distillery Profile - Iron Smoke Distillery 34 Do Good Brand - Bärenjäger & Brothers in Bees 36 Distillery Profile - Rebecca Creek 38 Distillery Profile - Broken Shed Vodka 40 Distillery Profile - Tamworth Distilling 42 Brand Owner - Tom Maas, RumChata

Special Section

22

47 Margarita Madness 52 A Dynamite Dose of Mandarine Napoléon 54 Mixing with Mezcal

Advanced Mixology

60 Drink In History - The Margarita 62 Food Know How - Mushrooms 64 Brew Review - Radeberger Pilsner 66 Brand Spotlight - Glen Moray Cabernet Cask Finish 68 Spotlight Launch - Balcones Texas Pot Still Bourbon

18

Mix It Up

20 Behind the Mezcal Bar 44 Celebrity Sips - Rum-Loving Celebrities 70 Shaking & Stirring - Launches 96 Last Call - Chillin’ with Scottie Thompson

30

62 POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO CHILLED MAGAZINE PO BOX 15445 NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CA 91615. CHILLED VOLUME 12 ISSUE 2 APR/MAY 2019 IS PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY CHILLED MEDIA: 321 STEEPLE WAY, ROTTERDAM, NY 12306. APPLICATION TO MAIL AT PERIODICALS POSTAGE PRICES IS PENDING AT ALBANY, NY AND OTHER ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. USPS MAILING PERMIT NUMBER 580.

6

CHILLED MAGAZINE


Thank you for all your help getting us where we are today!

TOP ON-PREMISE

PROFIT GENERATOR

+30.7%

1

Tito’s Lemonade A refreshing summertime cocktail classic that’s easy to make and easy to sip. Mix with fresh squeezed lemonade and garnish with mint if your customers are feelin’ fancy, or keep it simple with your favorite store-bought brand.

Source: (1) Nielsen CGA on premise data - market total, US total spirits top 25 spirit brands by $ value, volume 9L EQ, value $, Avg Price 1.5OZ EQ, rolling 52 w/e 08/11/2018 vs YA


VOLUME 12 - ISSUE 2 PUBLISHER Jeff Greif ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, EDITOR AT LARGE Thom Meintel EDITOR IN CHIEF Gina Farrell SENIOR EDITOR Lesley Jacobs Solmonson EXECUTIVE EDITORS Vicki Cruz, Anita Smith ADVERTISING & MARKETING MANAGER, CHILLED 100 NATIONAL DIRECTOR Max Ferro DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER Amanda Gabriele MARKETING ASSISTANTS Joy Sinacore ART DEPARTMENT Daniel Batlle, Rick Jensen, Jessica Bartlett, Danny West, Angie Packer, Alyssa Walker, Jackson Ryan PROMOTION ART ASSISTANT Michael Scarso EDITORIAL STAFF Nicole DiGiose, Monique Farah, Bryen Dunn, Mike Gerard, Ariana Fekett, Judi Laing, Frankie Corrado, Michael Tulipan, Francine Cohen, Cydnee Murray, Ruth Tobias, Mathew Powers, Lanee Lee, David Perry, Bob Curley, Colleen Thompson, Richard Thomas CONTRIBUTORS Walton Goggins, Tony Abou-Ganim, Liz Farrell, Tyler Zielinski, Michael Thacker, Jose Martinez, Richard Fri, travelsquire.com PHOTOGRAPHY Cover Photo Courtesy of Mulholland Distilling Images: Shutterstock.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscribe to our FREE print edition at chilledmagazine.com. Digital edition is available for all desktop and mobile devices. Visit chilledmagazine.com/digital-issue to see our complete library. HOW TO REACH US info@chilledmagazine.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Free Agent Media: 212-213-1155 CHILLED MEDIA PRESIDENT Anthony Graziano LEGAL REPRESENTATION Ferro, Kuba, Mangano, Sklyar, P.C. CHILLED MAGAZINE Volume 12 - Issue 2 ©2019 Chilled Media. Chilled® magazine and the Chilled® magazine logo are registered trademarks owned by Chilled Media. All rights reserved. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Curtis Circulation Company, LLC.

Chilled magazine is Printreleaf™ certified and is involved with reforestation around the globe. For more information, visit printreleaf.com.

8

CHILLED MAGAZINE


EDITOR’S LETTER

VOLUME 12 - ISSUE 2

GUEST EDITOR TONY ABOU-GANIM I first met Ron Cooper shortly after we opened the Bellagio in 1998, where I had the great privilege of developing the spirits and cocktail program. Up to that point, all I knew about mezcal was Monte Alban, which we’d buy at the border town of Los Algodones. This was the mezcal we drank at my brother’s bachelor party, and staying true to the legend, he swallowed the worm with the last shot. It’s safe to say that my memories of mezcal until then were not very, shall we say, memorable. Fast forward to when my friend, Steve Olson, called and wanted to introduce me to Ron from Del Maguey. Ron was an artist who, while working in Oaxaca, discovered real, traditional mezcal, not what’s sold to tourists at the border. He was working with these amazing small producers from little villages in the area and importing their mezcals. We tasted Chichicapa, Minero, and San Luis Del Rio, and I was blown away! We brought in all three expressions, thinking that if I loved this spirit, others would too, and they were sure to be the next big thing. Well, obviously I was wrong, at least then, as those same bottles of Del Maguey sat on our back bars year after year without anyone ever drinking them. Ron and Steve were persistent, and even more important, passionate about mezcal in general—its culture, traditions, and the people who made it. They continued to endorse, promote, and educate the bartending community on its virtues and the heritage associated with each village and Palenque. Ultimately, they built a following of disciples who loved mezcal as much as they did (or almost), and today it’s one of the fastestgrowing spirit categories in America. What have I learned? To put love and passion into everything you do, whether it’s a category, a brand, or a cocktail. So, who and what are next? Stigibeu!

anim Tony Abou-G By themodernmixologist.com

The Modern Mixologist Tony Abou-Ganim is widely regarded as one of the leading bar professionals in the world. He has made dozens of national TV appearances on shows including TODAY and Good Morning America. He is the author of two books, The Modern Mixologist: Contemporary Classic Cocktails and Vodka Distilled, and has a DVD to his credit, Modern Mixology: Making Great Cocktails at Home. He has also won three Iron Chef America competitions. Tony continues to educate about the history and lore of cocktails and operates his own beverage consulting firm specializing in bar staff training, product education, and cocktail development. His signature branded line of Modern Mixologist bar tools is available now at www.modernmixologist.com. @MdrnMixologist.

10

CHILLED MAGAZINE


BOTTOMS UP!

COOL PRODUCTS

STUFF YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT HEX X TILIT BARTENDER BACKPACK

Award-winning fashion accessory brand HEX has teamed up with hospitality workwear designer brand Tilit and Eamon Rockey, New York City spirits professional, mixologist, and founder of Rockey’s Milk Punch, to create a one-of-a-kind backpack for bartenders. Developed to carry all the vital tools of the trade with ease, the water-resistant backpack offers two parts: a main outer bag and an internal bag that can be detached and carried over the shoulder. With enough space for shakers, strainers, jiggers, spoons, knives, stirrers, and even bottles, HEX’s backpack is here to make life easier for the on-the-go bartender. hexbrand.com

GROWLERWERKS UKEG

The Growlerwerks uKeg arrives just in time for summer. Available in 64 and 128 ounces, the uKeg comes in modern tones: stainless, copper, matte black, matte white and black chrome. Growlerwerks’ innovative system keeps beer cold and preserves carbonation. The ergonomic handle, dispensing tap, and easy-to-clean design make this an ideal warm weather companion at home or on the go. growlerwerks.com

HOST WINE FREEZE COOLING CUPS

With its proprietary cooling gel, the Wine FREEZE Cooling Cup ensures that every glass of vino you drink will be the perfect temperature. For white wine, store the cup in the freezer to chill; for red wine, put the cup in the fridge to offer ideal cellar temperature. While the name might suggest it’s for wine, these cups will keep any liquid cool and look stylish as well. Choose from a variety of colors and twoor four-packs. hoststudios.com

12

CHILLED MAGAZINE


BOTTOMS UP!

COOL BOTTLES

RADICAL RUM

DOS RON RUM

Enjoy Dos Ron’s golden hues; rich, exotic aromas; and flavor notes of vanilla, cherry, and dried fruit with a caramelized sweetness. Crafted from Don Colina’s authentic Cuban family recipe and aged in special oak casks, each bottle of Dos Ron has its own unique character, depth, and balance of flavor.

KIRK AND SWEENEY RUM

The round bottle and raised cork of Kirk and Sweeney echo the spherical bottles used in the 18th century. The company is named after a wooden schooner that smuggled rum from the Caribbean to the Northeast during Prohibition. In 1924, it was seized off the coast of New York with a massive amount of rum aboard. The bottle and raised cork were inspired by the elegantly squat 18th-century onion bottles, which typically contained rum. An antique nautical map of the main rumsmuggling route is silkscreened around the bottle, while the neck features an old-styled citation. The design serves as a reminder of the risk so many were willing to take for a good taste of rum during the 1920s.

FACUNDO EXQUISITO DARK RUM

A toast to Cuba’s golden age of cocktails, Facundo Exquisito’s ornate bottle captures the energy, style, and culture of Havana during Prohibition. During this period, wealthy Americans found delightful refuge in Havana’s glittering nightlife and free-flowing, legal alcohol. The deep color of this dark rum highlights the glowing design images of boozy revelry on the bottle.

14

CHILLED MAGAZINE


BOTTOMS UP!

HOW TO

HOW TO USE DECOCTIONS IN COCKTAILS By Lesley Jacobs Solmonson Photos courtesy of BANKERS HILL

For quite some time, the concept of fresh, pure flavors in cocktails has been the norm. One of the many ways to concentrate these flavors is to use decoctions, which intensify the distinct characteristics of roots and herbs (especially bitter ones) by boiling an infusion until reduced. The process condenses the flavor, as well as extracts the plant’s medicinal properties. Elizabeth Farrell, bar lead at BANKERS HILL Bar + Restaurant, finds decoctions to be “a fantastic way to take the balance of a cocktail to the next level. You really get to experience the full flavor of the plant used. Instead of having subtle flavors, decoctions allow you to combine any flavors and maximize the true taste.”

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

CREATE AN INFUSION. Your base can start with a root, fresh, or dry herb. Research the plants you want to use thoroughly in order to decide whether they are appropriate for decoctions. Bittering roots and fresh and dry herbs tend to produce the best flavors. Choose only one plant to use until more familiar with the blending process.

CREATE YOUR DECOCTION. Combine roots or herbs in a Mason jar and fill with boiling water; then let sit for eight hours to infuse. After infusing, strain the herbs out and add the infusion liquid to a pot. Heat the strained infusion on the lowest temperature on the stove so that it reduces to half very slowly.

ADD A SPIRIT TO YOUR DECOCTION. Once the infusion is reduced to the desired strength, you can leave it as is, add sugar for a more flavor-concentrated syrup, or add alcohol to further intensify the flavor. Dried herbs and roots shine when alcohol is added; it heightens the bitter flavors and preserves it better.

16

CHILLED MAGAZINE


LIZ FARRELL bankershillsd.com/team Liz Farrell’s experience as a certified herbalist and garden designer is reflected in the bar program at BANKERS HILL. Her belief in organic product methods and sustainability shape the flavor profiles and recipes she creates for our cocktail list. Her “mother earth” sensibilities are a perfect complement to Chef Jason Gethin’s farm-driven rustic fare. Liz finds combining her love for horticulture and mixology a natural pairing; many of the syrups and infusions used in the restaurant’s cocktails are made with herbs and produce grown by Liz in the restaurant’s Mission Hills garden. Prior to joining the team BANKERS HILL, Liz lived in San Francisco, where she most recently served as lead bartender at Bond Bar and Wish Bar & Lounge.

ROOTED TERRAIN INGREDIENTS

1 /2 oz. rye whiskey 1 oz. dandelion root decoction* 1 /2 oz. Lustau Red Vermouth 3 dashes coffee bitters 1

PREPARATION

Combine all of the ingredients in a stirring glass. Strain into a rocks glass over ice.

*Dandelion Root Decoction INGREDIENTS

40 grams dried dandelion root Boiling water (enough to fill a 500 ml Mason jar) 1 oz. cognac for every 4 oz. liquid PREPARATION

Add dandelion root to a 500 ml dry Mason jar. Fill jar with boiling water all the way to the top; close and let sit for eight hours to infuse. Take your infusion and strain the herbs out. Over low heat, reduce two times the amount of liquid for the strongest decoction. Once it is decocted, let cool until it reaches room temperature and then add one ounce of cognac for every four ounces of dandelion root decoction.

TIP For herbs, try a double decoction to get the most flavor and medicinal properties.

GO PRO Fresh herbs work better in a decocted syrup. Be sure to use the syrup within a week.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

17


BOTTOMS UP!

ANATOMY OF THE BOTTLE

ESPOLÒN

TEQUILA

ESPOLÒN, THE AWARD-WINNING PREMIUM TEQUILAS CREATED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF MASTER DISTILLER CIRILO OROPEZA, CELEBRATES MEXICO’S RICH HISTORY AND CULTURE WITH ITS LABELING AND BOTTLE. THE ARTWORK IS INSPIRED BY JOSÉ GUADALUPE POSADA (1852–1913), A 19TH CENTURY ARTIST, PRINTMAKER, PIONEER ... AND A BIT OF A REBEL. HIS MOST FAMOUS WORK, THE CALAVERA (SKULLS), MADE POWERFUL COMMENTARY ON THE SOCIAL INJUSTICES OF HIS TIME. WITH HIS SHARP WIT AND CLEVER HAND, HE GAVE HIS PEOPLE A VOICE, AND GAVE THE ART WORLD A STYLE THAT CONTINUES TO INFLUENCE POP CULTURE TODAY.

18

CHILLED MAGAZINE


Espolòn Espolòn, named for the spur of the rooster, is a fitting tribute to the true, proud, and storied culture of Mexico.

Battle Scene Each year Mexico marks September 16 to celebrate its Independence. This day is chosen to commemorate the 1810 uprising which saw Father Miguel Hildalgo lead the people in the first stand against the injustices of Spanish rule. The Blanco label is a fitting tribute to that occasion. Here, we see Guadalupe and Rosarita fight alongside Father Hidalgo, known from this eventful day forward as the father of his country. Espolòn’s Ramón the Rooster leads the charge, setting the stage for Mexico’s revolution.

Blue Agave Plant Espolòn tequilas are handcrafted with 100% pure Blue Weber agave at Destiladora San Nicolas, an artisan distillery owned by Campari Group and located in the Los Altos (Highlands) region of Jalisco, Mexico. The tequila’s taste: a bold, round palate; and medium-to-full bodied velvety mouthfeel with a rich roasted agave; sweet tropical fruit, vanilla and brown spices, and a long, spicy finish.

Tequila Blanco The base for all Espolòn tequilas, Blanco is created in the famed hills of Los Altos. Blanco is double distilled using column and pot stills, resulting in an exceptionally smooth and balanced flavor that’s great on the rocks or in a tequila cocktail.

Ramón the rooster Ramón, the rooster (a powerful symbol of Mexican pride), is the brand’s icon and spirit animal. He leads the charge. He’s not afraid to stir things up. And he can be counted on anytime you need a little spur to get things going.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

19


MIX IT UP

BEHIND THE BAR

BEHIND THE

Mezc al BAR

BOZAL MEZCAL TEPEZTATE SINGLE MAGUEY

This single maguey mezcal is made from Marmorata agave sourced in Oaxaca. Bozal uses a traditional 200-year-old technique of cooking the agave hearts in an earthen pit oven, then crushing them with a stone tahona wheel turned by a horse. After being purified in a double distillation process, the mezcal is placed in a ceramic bottle reminiscent of the traditional terracotta cups used for drinking tequila. Herbaceous and peppery, Bozal Mezcal is both wild and refined.

KOCH EL MEZCAL

Koch offers a varied portfolio of mezcals that are categorized as either “artisanal” or “ancestral.” The brand’s initial focus will encompass a number of distinct agave species, including Espadín, Arroqueño, Tepeztate, Tobalá, and Barril. Other agave species will be added as the line expands. Each expression is hand-produced in Oaxaca, and uses sustainable ingredients and traditional production practices.

MONTELOBOS MEZCAL TOBALÁ

Montelobos Tobalá strives to capture the true flavor of the Tobalá agave plant. The agave is cultivated from seed in Puebla, Mexico, and sustainably produced. This mezcal starts with a noticeable green agave profile and eases into a mild smoke, wood, and cooked agave character.

MEZCAL VAGO ESPADIN

The terroir shines through in this mezcal and you can really get a sense of place when tasting it. Its well-balanced smokiness is contrasted against notes of mineral and salinity derived from layers of caliche—a flavor profile indicative of the region. Mezcal Vago Espadin is a magnificent sipping mezcal, but serves particularly well with fresh fish dishes as well as fresh oysters. Mezcal Vago Espadin won the coveted best in category “Best Mezcal” at this year’s San Francisco World Spirits Competition.

20

CHILLED MAGAZINE


THE NINTH. A SYMPHONY IN ORANGE

THE HISTORY OF LOVERS

COPPER POT-DISTILLED • NO NEUTRAL SPIRITS ORANGE BLOSSOM HONEY

COPPER POT-DISTILLED • NO NEUTRAL SPIRITS NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS OR FLAVORS

SUN SOAKED WARM ORANGE. SMOOTH, CREAMY WITH BOLD, JUICY TROPICAL CITRUS. A DELUXE SUPER-PREMIUM AMERICAN GIN.

THE MOST ROMANTIC GIN. FRESH CUT ROSES WITH SUBTLE RED FRUIT SWEETNESS. HIBISCUS & STRAWBERRY FOR COLOR. A SUPER-PREMIUM LUXURY AMERICAN GIN.

DESIGNED TO MAKE A SUN-KISSED GIN & TONIC, A DROP DEAD GORGEOUS NEGRONI, A BEAUTIFUL MARTINI, AND TO TAKE YOU AS FAR AS YOUR IMAGINATION LEADS. IT WILL ALWAYS PROVIDE DELICIOUS REFRESHMENT.

DESIGNED TO MAKE A FRAGRANT GIN & TONIC, A PERFUMED & REFRESHING SPARKLING ROSÉ SPRITZ, A SUBTLY ELEGANT NEGRONI, A DELIGHTFUL SMASH. AND IT WILL ALWAYS PROVIDE DELICIOUS REFRESHMENT.

COPPERANDKINGS.COM/AMERICAN-GIN

COPPERANDKINGS.COM/AMERICAN-GIN


ADVANCED THE LOCALSMIXOLOGY BARTENDER DRINK SUBMISSION IN HISTORY

Amir Babayoff

Ophelia Lounge NYC New York City Photos courtesy Ophelia Lounge For Amir Babayoff, bartending for guests is like preparing for a theatrical performance where the bartender is actor, director, and set designer all in one. “Setting up the bar and maintaining it throughout service is like setting up the stage for performance,” he says. “I learned that, come showtime, every prop has to be placed consistently in a very specific spot, every tool behind the bar, and practically everything we use has to be placed in the same place in order to keep efficiency and speed. Freshness of fruits and herbs and being fully stocked will prevent you from spending unnecessary energy during service.” Beyond setting the stage of the bar, Babayoff also recognizes importance of the ability to reach people. “Communication and interaction with your peers and crowd are a must,” he notes. Having been in the bar business for over ten years, he’s has had plenty of time to hone his craft. After jobs at Five Nine and Barley & Grain whiskey bar on the Upper West Side (where he was bar manager and beverage director), he settled in at Ophelia Lounge NYC. Open year-round, Ophelia offers 360-degree views of the city and East River. Babayoff developed the bar’s menu, which reinvents classic cocktails and pays tribute to the building’s history, with cocktails inspired by the 1920s and 1930s. Last year, his Purple Tuxedo recipe was nominated at the Time Out New York Bar Awards for Sexiest Cocktail, in the company of drinks from The NoMad Bar and The Aviary NYC. Eager to introduce his guests to new experiences, Babayoff experiments with flavors and textures. He’s used everything from Ras el Hanout spice to chili threads to cream infused with Lotus Biscoff cookies. Infusing milk and cream is another one of Babayoff’s current tricks. The milk adds a silky texture to the drink, releasing its infusion to blend with the cocktail’s other ingredients. This technique reflects just one of the ways Babayoff introduces unique ingredients through familiar flavors like milk. Even when Babayoff experiments with recipes, he seeks straightforwardness. “In certain places,” he says, “there is a growing consensus and a return toward the classics, with a twist. Spirit-forward drinks with barely any garnish … I believe we’re on the right track in going toward simplicity and neatness.”

22

CHILLED MAGAZINE

HONEY & SMOKE INGREDIENTS

1 oz. Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Honey Liqueur 1 oz. Monkey Shoulder Whiskey ½ oz. lemon juice ½ oz. thyme simple syrup ¼ oz. Benedictine Ardbeg (to top) 1 egg white Sprig of thyme (for garnish) PREPARATION

Dry shake, add ice, and shake; double strain into a rocks glass with big rock. Add 2 spray mists of Ardbeg on top of glass. Garnish with sprig of thyme.


BY 1893 INSPIRED

F E W H A S T H E S P I C E . H A N D - M A D E I N S M A L L B ATC H E S, U S I N G A M A S H-B I L L INSPIRED BY WHISKEY ’S PRE-PROHIBITION GOLDEN ERA. F E W COMBINES A HIGH RYE CONTENT & PEPPERY YE A ST TO MAKE A UNIQUELY SPIC Y BOURBON.


ADVANCED THE LOCALSMIXOLOGY BARTENDER DRINK SUBMISSION IN HISTORY

Amy DeLee

Jalisco Cantina Oceanside, California Photos courtesy Jalisco Cantina Bartenders come from many walks of life. In Amy DeLee’s case, she started as a self-taught cook and recipe developer. While doing menu development for several retreats in Bali, DeLee jumped into true recipe creation. “I loved the trial and error and tweaking this or that until the recipe was perfectly balanced,” she says. “I also love the idea of coming into a space, assessing the story of the space as well as the customer, and crafting an offering that was perfectly tailored to satisfy that guest and that environment.” While creating cocktails requires a very specific skillset, it also complements a background in cooking. Indeed, DeLee recognizes the similarities, saying, “Once you get the hang of the world of balancing flavors, it really isn’t too much of a transition.” To hone her skills, DeLee read many cocktail books and started experimenting with recipes. Nine months ago, she stepped in as the beverage manager at Jalisco Cantina, where she redeveloped the entire bar program. She prides herself on the fresh, craft Margaritas and other cocktails that use housemade syrups, infusions, juices, and purees. Amy DeLee is living proof that you don’t need a professional bartending education to become a bartender. “Read. Read menus when you are out and see what other bar programs are creating,” she advises. “Read cocktail books, read articles online, get a magazine subscription ... really just be a sponge and absorb as much as you can! It’s a learning process, so try new ingredients, experiment, and tweak as you go.” When DeLee goes about creating a new cocktail, she draws on all of her cooking and spirits knowledge. With seasonality as a starting point, she often finds that an ingredient or concept will jump out at her. “I look at the entire menu as a whole and try to spot gaps in flavor profiles and liquor array to make sure the menu is well-balanced,” she says. Balance is key to DeLee’s recipes, but she also sees the benefit of a drink that looks beautiful. “I think cocktails are going to get more picture-worthy. The use of vibrant fruits and vegetables (roasted, blended), varieties of salt, thoughtful garnishes … the ‘who’s who’ of cocktails will be the ones that are not only deliciously balanced, but worthy of repost after repost.”

24

CHILLED MAGAZINE

OCEANSIDE REFRESCA INGREDIENTS

2 oz. Finlandia Grapefruit Vodka 1 oz. fresh lemon juice ¾ oz. fresh strawberry puree ½ oz. simple syrup Whole strawberry (for garnish) PREPARATION

Add all ingredients to a shaker tin with ice and shake for 10–15 seconds. Strain into a coupe glass and garnish with a whole strawberry on the rim.


®

IS HERE! CONTACT YOUR RUMCHATA DISTRIBUTOR TO ORDER THESE DOUBLE SIDED SHOT GLASSES TODAY! TRY A PIE HARD: ONE HALF RUMCHATA, ONE HALF APPLE WHISKEY.

KEEP RUMCHATA ON THE BACK BAR AND IN THE COOLER. IF PEOPLE SEE RUMCHATA, THEY WILL BUY IT. RumChata®. Caribbean Rum with Real Dairy Cream, Natural & Artificial Flavors, 13.75% alc/vol. Agave Loco Brands, Pewaukee, WI. Please Enjoy Responsibly. RUMCHATA and CHATA are Registered Trademarks of Agave Loco, LLC.


LOCALS

ASK A BARTENDER

E

lliott Clark and Justin Cross started Earn Your Booze roughly two years ago, from a mantra Clark used to say at the gym. “It was a slogan I'd use to remind myself to maintain balance between my health and my developing job in the spirits industry,” explains Clark. “But it was Justin who really brought the event aspect of who we are as a company to fruition.”

HEY, BARTENDERS… #EARNYOURBOOZE The goal of Earn Your Booze events is to bring people together, to sweat together, in an engaging and fun atmosphere. “Earn Your Booze is catchy, and if bartenders and others in the liquor industry can get the thought ‘Earn Your Booze’ into their mindset, then we believe it will influence their actions and habits for the better,” says Clark. We spoke with Elliott about this lifechanging movement for bartenders and how we can all learn to earn our booze. What was the inspiration for your company? For me, the inspiration behind the company came very organically. Earn Your Booze was a saying I’d say over and over again and post on my social channels— and it stuck.

26

CHILLED MAGAZINE


MEX I CO AU T É N T I CO

ENJOY RESPONSIBLY. ©2019 Palm Bay International, Boca Raton, FL

THE BRIBÓN

2 Parts Bribón 1 Part Dedication To Craft 1 Dash Of Bad Ass

From the orendain family, distilling blue agave tequila since 1840, comes the most enticing tequila you’ve ever known. PalmBay.com


LOCALS

28

ASK A BARTENDER

CHILLED MAGAZINE

For Justin, he had been working on different ideas to merge the world of fitness and booze together. When we met, we combined inspirations and ideas and it grew from there. It’s been a lot of figuring it out as we go, but I’m really happy how things have progressed, and the impact we’ve had on people in the industry so far.

just a few realities prevalent in the industry, and I feel it’s a very important topic to speak about and be a voice of positivity for. I also consider myself to be part of the industry, so it’s also as much of a reminder and pursuit of my own to stay on top of my own well-being, because it’s easy to let bad habits creep in.

Why focus on physical and mental wellness of bartenders and people in the industry? As much as I love the industry, it has a dark side—late nights, overaccess to alcohol, addiction. These are

What does it mean to “earn your booze”? Earning your booze is intentional time you take to care for your mind or body—any activity, including yoga, hiking, running, CrossFit, martial arts, etc.


What are your goals for Earn Your Booze? We recently brought on our first EYB ambassadors in Phoenix, and are looking to extend that out to other parts of the country. Ultimately, our goal with Earn Your Booze is to expand and inspire as many people as we can to put their health as a priority so they can enjoy more of life’s experiences with family and friends. Whether that’s through our events or educational platforms, we just want to elevate the overall health and wellness of those in the industry.

ELLIOTT CLARK

JUSTIN CROSS

I’VE ALWAYS BELIEVED THAT IF YOU SAY YOU DON’T HAVE TIME TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR MIND AND BODY, THEN WHEN WILL YOU HAVE THE TIME TO BE SICK?

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

29


LOCALS

DISTILLERY PROFILE

A tribe of

B ad-Ass

y e k Whis

ls e dr n u o c S soaked

30

CHILLED MAGAZINE

Photo courtesy Tre Gallery


ls

By Mathew Powers

WHILE SIPPING WHISKEY AND SMOKING RIBS IN 2011, MUSICIAN TOMMY BRUNETT HAD A FLASH OF INSPIRATION. “I CAME UP WITH AN IDEA COMBINING THOSE TWO GREAT AMERICAN PASTTIMES: GREAT BOURBON/ WHISKEY MAKING WITH AN ADDED SUBTLE HINT OF APPLEWOOD BARBECUE’S SMOKED GOODNESS.” FROM THAT IDEA CAME IRON SMOKE DISTILLERY, WHICH BRUNETT, COFOUNDER STEVE BROWN AND ENTREPRENEUR TOM RIGGIO HAVE MOLDED INTO A HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL AND AWARD WINNING BRAND. After many trial batches, Tommy and his partners took their winning recipe to distiller Drew Wescott and produced a few batches of Iron Smoke Applewood Smoked Bourbon Whiskey, which quickly sold out. After opening their doors in 2013, Brunett and Riggio have expanded the distillery multiple times and are operating a 20,000-square-foot facility (with Wescott as master distiller), earning high grades for their whiskeys and winning an abundance of medals including Double Gold at the North American Bourbon & Whiskey Competition and a 95.5 rating from Jim Murray’s Whiskey Bible.

“We believe to call yourself a craft distiller you have to hold yourself to a higher standard. Slapping a label on someone else’s product is not handcrafted,” explained Riggio.

Part of what makes Iron Smoke’s bourbon whiskey so good is that Brunett and Riggio refuse to cut corners.

Iron Smoke Distillery is a certified small-batch, New York State farm distillery located along the historic Erie Canal in Fairport. Everything

Photo by Amy Bradoc

is accomplished on-site including crushing grains obtained from the nearby farms, aging whiskey in triple-charred-virgin American white oak barrels, and refusing to use liquid from other sources. Moreover, to achieve the subtle applewoodsmoked taste, Iron Smoke relies on a giant smoker that Wescott and one of the farmers built. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

31


LOCALS

DISTILLERY PROFILE

such as an Old Fashioned, or something more imaginative. “Try a little Rattlesnake Rosie’s Maple Bacon in your Bloody Mary or some Apple Pie in your Margarita— we call it the Rosarita, my go to is the Peacemaker which is two parts Iron Smoke Bourbon to one part Rosie’s Apple Pie and some bitters over ice” Brunett suggests. “It’ll change your life!” But no matter how much the brand grows, Brunett and Riggio

Tommy Brunett and Tom Riggio, owners, Iron Smoke Distillery. Photo by Kurt Brownwell

Iron Smoke’s success has created a push to release new products and labels: “In 2014, we introduced our line of premium-flavored whiskeys with the release of Rattlesnake Rosie’s Apple Pie Whiskey, which uses our very own unaged corn whiskey and fresh New York apple cider,” says Brunett. “It tastes just like Grandma’s apple pie and is truly unique, delicious and artisancrafted, so it certainly is not a moonshine, but more of a small-

32

CHILLED MAGAZINE

batch, premium product.” Iron Smoke’s current line-up includes Straight Bourbon Whiskey, CASKet Strength Straight Bourbon and Single Barrel Reserve. Under the Rattlesnake Rosie’s brand they produce Apple Pie Whiskey and Maple Bacon Whiskey. The pureness of Iron Smoke’s ingredients and variety of flavors make the whiskeys perfect for enjoying neat, in a classic cocktail

remain grounded. “Keeping the integrity of who we are and why we started this; being honest personally and professionally; creating jobs; supporting our community; staying on the path of controlled, sustainable growth, and keeping cereal in the bowls for our kids means everything to us,” says Brunett. “It takes a village to make a bottle of whiskey, and we have a tribe of the baddest-ass, whiskeysoaked scoundrels in the land.”


THE LOCALS

DO GOOD BRAND

A Spirited Match Bärenjäger & Brothers in Bees

B

ärenjäger’s partnership with Brothers in Bees seems like a match made in heaven. Bärenjäger Honey Liqueur has always benefited from a recipe that calls for an abundance of high-quality, natural honey. The liqueur recipe, which includes 225 grams of honey in each bottle, was developed by 18th-century hunters who sought to lure bears from their caves (Bärenjäger translates to “bear hunter”). So supporting beekeepers and honey producers is a natural fit. Jenny Manger, marketing director of Niche Import Co. (the company that imports Bärenjäger), explained, “We decided this year to align with a good cause and give back to our bee community. While searching for a charity that helps save the bees, I came across Brothers in Bees and reached out to them. I love their story and their mission. Being the fiancé of a Navy veteran, I love that we can not only help save the bees, but also help our vets.” The Brothers in Bees organizers have dedicated themselves to establishing a beekeeping program just for U.S. veterans. “When a veteran joins us, we provide them tools, equipment, and bees to get started, at no cost to them,” said a representative from Brothers in Bees. “From day one, we provide them education, materials, and hands-on hive side mentoring to

34

CHILLED MAGAZINE

By Mathew Powers help them get the best start as a beekeeper.” Furthermore, if a veteran does not desire to own a hive, they can help manage one of Brothers in Bees’ apiaries— the organization provides all the necessary gear. Additionally, supporting bee programs is beneficial to everyone, and Brothers in Bees aims to raise awareness that bees are an integral part of our everyday life. Manger quoted Greenpeace to explain why bees are so crucial: “‘Honey bees—wild and domestic—perform about 80 percent of all pollination worldwide. A single bee colony can pollinate 300 million flowers each day ... Seventy out of the top 100 human food crops, which supply about 90 percent of the world’s nutrition, are pollinated by bees.’” Everything from pesticides and habitat destruction to pollution and climate change severely damage bee populations. “The bottom line is that we know humans are largely responsible for the two most prominent causes: pesticides and habitat loss,” said Manger. “So we need to do our part to save them, as we are the reason they are losing their population.”

Thus, Bärenjäger will donate proceeds from every 750ml and 1-liter bottle sold of Bärenjäger Honey Liqueur or Bärenjäger Honey + Bourbon to Brothers in Bees for an entire year. Furthermore, Bärenjäger will create awareness by communicating the cause on its website, the back of its gift sets, and all point-of-sale materials. Bärenjäger’s expanded awareness will hopefully lead to even more growth for Brothers in Bees, which in 2017 and 2018 increased its apiary from 2 hives to 12; harvested more than 170 pounds of honey; expanded operations to Denver, Colorado; placed honey at Worker B stores in Minnesota, and collaborated with local chefs and restaurants … to name just a few achievements.


CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

35


THE LOCALS

DISTILLERY PROFILE

By Mike Gerrard

W

hen Steve Ison traveled to Europe for business as CEO of an insurance and risk management company, he had no idea it would both change his life and career. “The history around some of London’s gins was fascinating,” Ison says. “In particular, Beefeater Gin and Plymouth stood out to me. In some ways, these were the original flavored vodkas. It got me thinking, ‘What could Texas bring to the table?’ Texas didn’t have a whiskey at the time, so I went to Kentucky and visited many of the bourbon distilleries there to see how it was done. All of this combined laid the foundation for me starting Rebecca Creek.” Although the distillery was founded in 2009, it still focuses on just four core spirits: Rebecca Creek Fine Texas Whiskey, Texas Ranger Whiskey, Enchanted Rock Vodka, and Enchanted Rock Peach Vodka. So why stick to only four? “We wanted to allow each of our core four brands to grow their

36

CHILLED MAGAZINE

brand trademark independently, and we did not want to dilute any brand equity with new flavors or additional line extensions,” explains Ison. “We may have a limited edition occasionally, such as Rebecca Creek Single Malt, but currently we plan to stay focused on growing our two vodkas and two whiskies as the only permanent offerings.” It’s been a recipe for success, as those four spirits have collectively won a barrelful of awards. Rebecca Creek’s head distiller, Brad Baldwin, joined Ison from, interestingly, a wine background. He graduated from Washington State University with a degree in Viticulture and Enology, and went on to work at vineyards all over the United States and New Zealand. He only started experimenting with distilling in 2014 while at the Edgefield Winery in Oregon, but went on to study with a cognac maker, and from there, a passion for spirits was born. In a market saturated with 1,001 flavored vodkas, Ison decided to limit Rebecca Creek to just

one. Why? It’s a Texas thing. “Enchanted Rock Vodka is named after a beautiful and mysterious rock in the Texas Hill Country near Fredericksburg,” he says. “Fredericksburg is a charming little town known for its Hill Country peaches that can be purchased on the roadside. It was a perfect fit for our first flavor offering. Enchanted Rock Peach Vodka is built to mimic the fresh taste of biting into a Hill Country peach for the very first time.” Although Ison plans to still focus on his four core products, he does have plans for other limited editions, too. “We have some new partnerships on the horizon, and I’m very excited about collaborating with Lucchese boots,” he says. “We may have a special edition offering in 2018, possibly a small-batch bourbon. We’re also working on a 12-year-old bourbon selection, as well as a small-batch offering using a 10-year-old whiskey. We’re still planning to expand our distillery and looking at every opportunity for that, because we look forward to being around for many years to come!”


THE

MISCHIEVOUS SPIRIT

100% de Agave

ENJOY RESPONSIBLY. ©2019 Palm Bay International, Boca Raton, FL

Hecho en México

TequilaChamucos.com


THE LOCALS

DISTILLERY PROFILE

“Whey”

Broken Shed’s

By Colleen Thompson

To Make Vodka

KIWI UNEARTHED INGREDIENTS

2 parts Broken Shed Vodka 1 part cold-press kiwi cocktail juice* Cardamom Himalayan pink salt Fresh mint Sparkling sauvignon blanc PREPARATION

Slap mint, muddle lightly. Add vodka, juice and ice; shake vigorously. Double strain and serve up in a glass. Top with sauvignon blanc. Garnish with fresh kiwi slice. *Kiwi cocktail juice: mix the juice of 5 kiwis and ginger with 2 hand-squeezed limes. Add cardamom and a pinch of Himalayan pink sea salt to taste.

38

CHILLED MAGAZINE


Lake Wanaka in the Otago region of New Zealand is a special place. It has the kingly Southern Alps in the backdrop and is flanked by rainforests and 26 miles of pristine lake waters. It’s no wonder that two expat American friends wanted to capture some of this magic and bottle it. Sitting on the banks of Lake Wanaka, in a broken shed (hence the name), the two expats started musing about creating a craft vodka using the crystal waters that surrounded them. They enlisted a local Kiwi expert, Mark Simmonds, and started blending different distillates and waters to create their vodka recipe. When the trio heard about creating a distillate from whey—a by product of the dairy industry—it caught their attention and they crafted the final Broken Shed recipe using a blend of whey distillate and two New Zealand waters. The locals loved it, and they released the first bottles of Broken Shed Vodka in 2011. In 2016, two new owners joined the company and started expanding distribution in the United States. The whey distillate is incredibly pure and allows Broken Shed to create a vodka without any additives. The vodka is naturally gluten free without added sugars and is also non-GMO. It relies completely on the waters and the distillate to create the balance and the incredibly smooth finish. “It involved a lot of trial and error and many evenings conducting

“Broken Shed has a clean flavor with a distinct rich mouthfeel. It’s whey better than the competition!” Sam Treadway, Owner, backbar, Somerville, MA. blind tastings with friends in the old shed on the banks of Lake Wanaka,” recalls Simmonds. “We basically crowdsourced the taste profile. While it was a lot of fun, it was also a key part in deriving a universally appreciated smooth taste profile, and clearly exposed how important it is to use the right water that is suited to your spirit base.” The result of all of that trial and error is a smooth and clean vodka with a unique flavor profile. The blend of the two waters was a critical component of the final taste. The natural mineral water from a 15,000-year-old aquifer deep in the Southern alps is complemented by the pure spring water from the North Island. “To know Broken Shed is to become aware of the subtleties in flavor that can be appreciated in good vodkas,” said Simmonds. “Broken Shed raises the bar from the massvolume products and provides a taste platform from which good bartenders can create even better cocktails by cleverly creating additional flavor profiles that do not over-power, but enhance.”

Bartender Taylor Holmes, of Karma Lounge in Everett, Massachusetts, uses Broken Shed on her speed rack, meaning she mixes it with everything, (and can offer it to guests with gluten intolerances). “We use it for specialty shared cocktails like our Fish Bowls and pitchers which blend vodka with fruit juices and a splash of curaçao for a colorful, fruity cocktail,” she said. “The softness of Broken Shed allows you more creativity when mixing. It blends nicely, and you don’t have to worry as much about rounding out that sharp vodka finish. It also makes a great classic Kamikaze without having to rely on added simple syrup to make it go down smoothly.” Gregory Meeks, head bartender at Toscanova in California added, “I can taste the minerals, which is so unusual in a vodka. Broken Shed is the smoothest vodka I’ve tasted in a very long time—it’s just pure, clean elegance.”

URBAN SHED INGREDIENTS

3 parts Broken Shed Vodka 1 ½ parts orange liqueur 1 ½ parts cranberry juice Lime (for garnish) Cherries (for garnish)

PREPARATION

Add ice, shake and pour into a cocktail glass. Garnish with lime wedge and cherries.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

39


THE LOCALS

DISTILLERY PROFILE

Nothing is Off the Table T a mw o r t h

D i s t i l l i n g

When you’ve created legendary brands like Hendrick’s Gin and Sailor Jerry Rum, where do you go from there? In the case of Steven Grasse, you go to Tamworth, New Hampshire (population: less than 3,000), to open a craft distillery. It might seem an unlikely move, but not to Grasse. “As a child, I spent each summer in the Lakes Region, and my fondest memories are from my summers in New Hampshire,” he recalls. “My family has history in the area, and I’ve always wanted my children to have those same memories, too. “After launching Hendrick’s and Sailor Jerry, my next career goal was to open my own distillery, one that remained small in scale and focused on using locally sourced ingredients. I essentially wanted to build an experimental test

40

CHILLED MAGAZINE

By Mike Gerrard

kitchen where we could produce top-quality spirits from scratch, and bring that idea to a rural community as a way of creating jobs. Then I discovered Tamworth.”

blueberries from the forest near our distillery and foraged black trumpet mushrooms. It’s the only spirit produced that uses mushrooms, too.”

Sitting between the Lakes Region and the White Mountains, Tamworth Distilling is surrounded by tasty ingredients and pristine water. And nothing is off-limits to an innovator like Grasse.

Mushrooms in a spirit? It doesn’t stop there. “We are always experimenting with unique ingredients out of the distillery,” Grasse notes. “Recently,

I essentially wanted to build an experimental test kitchen where we could produce top-quality spirits from scratch, and bring that idea to a rural community as a way of creating jobs. “One of the more popular releases has been our Black Trumpet Blueberry Cordial,” he says. “It’s our most widely distributed spirit, and it’s developed a cult following among top-tier mixologists in New York. It’s made with handpicked

we tested a goat milk liqueur that’s still being refined. Our production style is wilderness-to-bottle, and since we forage for most of our own ingredients, almost nothing is off the table in terms what we can do.”


In a mission to reverse the declining bee population, Bärenjäger is joining forces with Brothers in Bees to increase the number of bee communities in the United States. Brothers in Bees is a cause-based organization with a mission to provide a reflective and rewarding experience for U.S. Veterans through beekeeping and to spread awareness of the impact of honey bees on local communities and the world. To learn more or donate, go to: barenjagerhoney.com

225 GRAMS OF HONEY (per 750ml btl)

Kyle Maio Founder of Brothers in Bees USMC Veteran of the Iraq War

Bärenjäger Honey

Carefully crafted with all-natural ingredients and the highest concentration of premium honey, Bärenjäger is in a class of its own. Additionally, at 70 proof, it is the perfect addition to any cocktail in need of an all-natural sweetener with a little kick.

BEES KNEES 1.5 oz Bärenjäger Honey Liqueur 1 oz Gin .75 oz lemon juice Top with club soda @barenjagerhoney Imported by Niche Import Co. | A Marussia Beverages Company | Cedar Knolls, NJ | ourniche.com | Please Drink Responsibly


LOCALS

BRAND OWNER

Every successful brand has a great back story By Mathew Powers

TOM MAAS SHARES HIS ON THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF RUMCHATA Tom Maas did what many people do during retirement: He found something to occupy his time. But, unlike most retirees, his pet project turned into an entirely new business. RumChata, now ten years old, has evolved into an increasingly popular cream liqueur. “The flavor is based on Mexican horchata,” explains Maas. “I didn’t know what it was until I had worked with focus groups at Jim Beam as director of bourbon worldwide.” While engaging with the focus groups, those from south of the border joked they would drink bourbon if it was mixed with horchata. And then, one year later, after Maas retired from his position at Jim Beam, he happened across a taco

stand with his son, who suggested he try horchata. He did, and—he loved it. Maas went to work in his kitchen mixing horchata flavors into spirits, but rum proved superior to bourbon and all the rest. Although he first considered selling the recipe to a large liquor company, its popularity among his friends and family led his wife to encourage him to sell it on his own. (Of course, Maas jokingly remarks that his wife might have been just trying to get him out of the house.) A short while later, Maas bumped into a friend who mentioned he had just trademarked the RumChata name for no other reason than because it sounded cool. Maas

naturally responded, “Well, that’s a great name for a product I just invented.” He then went to his father, a retired production engineer who convinced him that operating his own plant would make it easier to guarantee cleanliness, which is necessary for a cream liqueur. “My dad, who was 80 at the time, wanted to run it. He said, “I have nothing to do, and I’m going crazy.” So in 2009, the idea sparked by a taco lunch with his son turned into a RumChata production at the hands of Maas’ retired father. Maas initially figured he could sell RumChata to Mexican restaurants, but they only wanted authentic horchata. Instead, Maas was told by most who tasted it, that RumChata reminded them of the leftover milk in the bottom of the bowl after eating Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal. He agreed. Maas proceeded to purchase single servings of Cinnamon Toast Crunch and asked bartenders to give the cereal away with the shot. Bartenders took that idea and, to boost the proof, added Fireball. And with that shot, RumChata was a hit. Next, Maas wanted to appeal to the over-35 crowd, so he created FrappaChata, a blend of coffee and RumChata, making it the first (and only) premium alcoholic iced coffee. RumChata has one-third less butterfat than popular cream liqueurs, which prevents it from weighing heavy on a drinker, and one of the reasons it works so well as a shot, in coffee, neat, or a cocktail.

Tom Maas, Founder, RumChata

42

CHILLED MAGAZINE

In the end, Maas explained: “If you look at the creams that have come out since we came out, RumChata really brought vibrancy to the category.”


G N I R I A P to

e t a r b e cel y l e c r e i f El Tigre 1 oz. Pasote Blanco Tequila 1 oz. Bozal Ensamble Mezcal .25 oz. Aperitivo Liqueur .75 oz. Passionfruit Syrup .5 oz. Lime Juice 1 oz. WTRMLN Juice

BOZALMEZCAL.COM

/

PA S OT E T E Q U I L A .C O M


MIX IT UP

CELEBRITY SIPS

WITH THE TIKI COCKTAIL MOVEMENT IN FULL FORCE, RUM HAS BEEN RIDING ON THE CREST OF A WAVE FOR QUITE SOME TIME. HERE ARE SOME RUM-LOVING CELEBRITIES WHO LIKE TO PARTAKE IN THE RUM FUN.

WILL SMITH Eva Mendes spilled the beans that Will Smith can’t hold his liquor. “Will literally takes three sips and he’s buzzed,” divulged the actress. “It’s not even, like, three sips of whiskey; it’s literally a Piña Colada or a Daiquiri—he loves girly drinks—and he’s down.”

SAMMY HAGAR Along with his Cabo Wabo Tequila empire, Sammy Hagar also founded Sammy’s Beach Bar Rum. After selling 80 percent of Cabo Wabo to Campari The Red Rocker swore he’d never do anything again for money—only things that made him happy. Of his Beach Bar Rum, Hagar says, “This is fun. I’m happy.”

MINDY KALING Mindy Kaling told People Magazine that the Dark ‘n’ Stormy made with ginger beer and Gosling’s Rum is her favorite drink.

JENNIFER LAWRENCE Jennifer Lawrence’s love for Piña Coladas comes from filming The Hunger Games: Catching Fire in Hawaii. The star told David Letterman, “During filming, I was drinking Piña Coladas, and I’m like, ‘Get out of here,’” because she wanted to enjoy Hawaii with a tropical drink in hand instead of being on set.

44

CHILLED MAGAZINE

BEYONCÉ & KELLY ROWLAND Beyoncé and buddy Kelly Rowland have been spotted knocking back a few Long Island Iced Teas in a Miami karaoke bar.


@BrockmansGin

/brockmans.gin

@brockmansgin


HERE’S TO NEW BEGINNINGS

This blended Scotch Whisky commemorates the moment in 1786 when a group of Scottish merchants gathered with some sticks and balls at Harleston Green, America’s first golf club, and introduced America to one of Scotland’s two greatest exports.


SPECIAL SECTION

MARGARITA MADNESS

Great Memories Experiences

O

ften the most ordered cocktail in the country, the Margarita thrives year-round. Sure, its popularity soars come Cinco de Mayo, but its simplicity and versatility assures its place in the hearts of revelers.

The classic Margarita calls for tequila, orange liqueur, and lime juice, served on the rocks, blended, or straight up. However, several handcraft cocktail bars opt for the Tommy’s Margarita recipe, which opts for tequila, freshly squeezed lime juice, and agave nectar. “A Margarita is a great vehicle in which to showcase some light flavors and utilize a variety of agave-based spirits,” notes Diana Novak, national director of Craft Spirits Education for Palm Bay International. And with its boozy, satisfying flavor, good times follow. “The Margarita is also a staple of casual social occasions,” says Jose “Pepe” Hermosillo,

in a Glass By Jose Martinez

founder of Casa Noble Tequila. “Margaritas take us to good moments. They remind us of summers, weekends at the pool, hanging out with friends after work. A Margarita is more than a cocktail. It’s great memories and experiences in a glass.” A great modern riff on the classic cocktail is the Mezcal Margarita. “Mezcal’s unique smokiness provides a bold and robust alternative to your traditional Margarita,” explains Natalia Garcia-Bourke, brand director for Mezcal El Silencio. “By substituting tequila with mezcal, you are creating a beautifully rounded cocktail with a layer of earthy, smoky base notes that celebrates a savory depth of flavor.” As for home bartenders looking to get in on the action, it’s best to keep it simple. “Use a decent 100 percent agave tequila,” recommends Scott Eton of L.A.’s Melrose Umbrella Co. “And make sure to use light agave syrup. No dark brown.” CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

47


SPECIAL SECTION

MARGARITA MADNESS

GOLDEN HOUR MARGARITA

Natalie Jacob, bartender, New York City INGREDIENTS 1 1/2 oz. Patrรณn Reposado 1 /2 oz. Patrรณn Citrรณnge Orange 1 oz. fresh pineapple juice 1 /2 oz. fresh lime juice 1 /4 oz. turmeric agave syrup Salt/turmeric/chili pepper (for rim) Pineapple wedge (for garnish) PREPARATION Combine ingredients in a shaker, add ice; shake and strain into a rocks glass with a salt/turmeric/ chili pepper rim. Garnish with a pineapple wedge.

SIESTA

Scott Eton of Melrose Umbrella Co., Los Angeles INGREDIENTS 1 1/2 oz. tequila 3 /4 oz. lime juice 1 /2 oz. grapefruit juice 3 /4 oz. simple syrup 1 /4 oz. Campari Dash of Angostura bitters Orange twist (for garnish) PREPARATION Combine ingredients; serve up in a coupe glass with an orange twist.

48

CHILLED MAGAZINE


Margaritas take us to good moments. They remind us of summers, weekends at the pool, hanging out with friends after work. A Margarita is more than a cocktail.

It’s great memories and experiences in a glass.

SMOKY TOMMY’S STYLE INGREDIENTS 2 oz. Mezcal El Silencio Espadin 1 oz. fresh lime juice 3 /4 oz. agave nectar Orange twist (for garnish)

«

PREPARATION Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice, shake and strain into a rocks glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

MARGARITA CALIENTE

Recipe courtesy of Adrian Rosales, Guadalajara INGREDIENTS 1 1/2 oz. Patrón Silver 1 oz. Patrón Citrónge Orange 1 oz. fresh lime juice 1 /2 oz. passion fruit syrup 2 bar spoons orange marmalade 4 dashes chipotle tabasco Orange twist (for garnish) PREPARATION Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice; shake to chill, strain into a double Old Fashioned glass with a large cube. Garnish with an orange twist. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

49


SPECIAL SECTION

MARGARITA MADNESS

SMOKY CASA MARGARITA

TEQUILA REVOLUCION CADILLAC MARGARITA

«

INGREDIENTS 2 oz. Tequila Revolución Silver 1 1/2 oz. fresh lime juice 1 /2 oz. Cointreau 1 /2 oz. Grand Marnier 1 /4 oz. agave nectar Lime wheel (for garnish) PREPARATION Combine ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice; shake and strain into Margarita glass with salted rim. Garnish with a lime wheel.

SUMMER IN JALISCO INGREDIENTS 2 1/2 oz. Bribón Blanco Tequila 3 /4 oz. fresh grapefruit juice 1 /2 oz. Sriracha honey Simple syrup (1:1) 3 drops mole bitters PREPARATION Combine ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a rocks glass.

50

CHILLED MAGAZINE

INGREDIENTS 2 oz. Casamigos Mezcal 1 oz. fresh lime juice 1 /2 oz. agave nectar 2 dashes orange bitters Flamed orange peel PREPARATION Combine all ingredients into a tin shaker; add ice and shake well. Strain into a rocks glass and add fresh ice. Garnish with a flamed orange peel.


/MEZANRUM WWW.MEZANRUM.COM/ Imported by Niche Import Co. | A Marussia Beverages Company | Cedar Knolls, NJ | ourniche.com | Please Drink Responsibly


SPECIAL SECTION

MARGARITA MADNESS

A Dynamite Dose of

A R D I N N A M NAPOLÉON E By Cydnee Murray

A

s the story goes, during the 18th century rule of Napoléon Bonaparte, French chemist AntoineFrancois de Fourcroy created a blend of liqueur. Fourcroy messed around with mandarins and produced a drink complex enough for a guy like Bonaparte. The blend of cognac, dried mandarin peel, essential oil made from fresh Sicilian mandarins, and a secret combination of botanicals including green and black teas, nutmeg, cinnamon, clove and angelica remains the only mandarin-infused cognac based liqueur. Today, Mandarine Napoléon orange liqueur still sources its citrus from Sicily and Corsica, Bonaparte’s birthplace. And while the French emperor might have enjoyed sipping his cognac in all its full-bodied glory, he died long before getting the chance to experience it on Margarita Monday. Those of us still alive and kicking would be remiss if we didn’t follow chemists’ orders and take down a few Napoléon Margaritas—

52

CHILLED MAGAZINE

the brand’s signature cocktail— on his behalf. In keeping with historical accuracy, it’s probably best to switch out the sombrero for a bicorn hat.

The blend of cognac, dried mandarin peel, essential oil made from fresh Sicilian mandarins, and a secret combination of botanicals including green and black teas, nutmeg, cinnamon, clove and angelica remains the only mandarin-infused cognac based liqueur. Jared Bailey, NYC-based spirits expert and bartender at SoHo Cigar Bar, shared his thoughts on Mandarine Napoléon and how to make a Napoléon Margarita: “Mandarine Napoléon can be enjoyed neat, on the rocks or in a refreshing Napoléon

Margarita. When combined with tequila and lime juice, it tames the acidity, and the partaker is left with a much more pleasant drinking experience. It has quite a good amount of ABV (38%), and therefore delivers a lot of flavor. Using classic triple sec sometimes produces a sharp flavor that adds very little citrus notes to the drink. The mandarin flavor really comes out and harmonizes with the tequila, while the cognac gives it depth and body. “It’s important to find the right balance between the choice of tequila and Mandarine Napoléon. Some blancos bring a super-intense agave flavor and can easily take up with Mandarine Napoléon. Some are a bit more delicate, so use a tad less and balance the sweetness with a little agave syrup. “In my opinion, while Mandarine Napoléon works very well in a standard Margarita, the essential flavors easily lend themselves to making an excellent Cadillac Margarita, too. Its cognac undertones help it to blend seamlessly with aged tequilas.”


JARED BAILEY’S MARGARITA INGREDIENTS 3 /4 oz. Madarine Napoléon 2 oz. blanco tequila 1-4 oz. honey syrup (2:1) 1 oz. fresh-squeezed lime juice Ginger liqueur (for spritz) Lemon peel (for garnish) PREPARATION Add all ingredients (except ginger liqueur) and ice in shaker and shake until well-chilled. Take a chilled Martini glass and spritz the inside with ginger liqueur. Double-strain the contents of the shaker into a rocks glass and garnish with lemon peel.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

53


SPECIAL SECTION

MIXING WITH MEZCAL

Mezcal 1 01

Mixing wi th Mezcal

Tequila visionary and Del Maguey founder Ron Cooper, along with business partner Steve Olson, share their insights into mixing with the fastest growing spirit in the world. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MIXING WITH MEZCAL VERSUS TEQUILA?

Although they are both agave spirits and closely related, mezcal and tequila are completely different animals, especially when mixing in a cocktail. In general terms, mezcal will usually be more earthy and rustic—perhaps with a more smoky flavor—plus it is, at least by definition and tradition, higher in alcohol, making it richer and often more texturally complex. This does not, however, make mezcal more difficult to

54

CHILLED MAGAZINE

work with, but on the contrary, perhaps even more versatile. Tequila, however, may run the risk of being overpowered by stronger or more potent ingredients if the bartender is

not cautious. Mezcal will stand up to almost all mixers and retain its intrinsic qualities regardless of the power or potency of its accompaniments. While mezcal often is mixed with fruit or juice


L E S S , B U T B E T T E R . D R I N K R E S P O N S I B LY.

COFFEE CHANGED. COFFEE LIQUEURS DID NOT. That’s why we made Mr Black: craft coffee for the night. Mr Black is a bittersweet blend of top-grade Arabica coffees and Australian wheat vodka. Our roasters source specialty beans from the best growing region and use a ‘slow and low’ cold brew process to create a complex liqueur that is bold, balanced and unapologetically coffee.

Now available in: NY, CA, TX (SGSW) AZ, IL (BBG) NJ (Fedway)

Get in touch: sales@mrblack.co Learn more at mrblack.co @mrblackspirits


SPECIAL SECTION

MIXING WITH MEZCAL

and tropical ingredients with great success, it might fare even better with amaro and vermouth and various other spirits and bitters in boozier, stirred cocktails.

Let’s face it: Mezcal is smoking hot right now. So we got some expert opinions on the ins and outs of mixing with this savory and complex ingredient.

When describing the difference between mezcal and tequila to a guest—which is perhaps the question the bartender is most often asked—we usually say the main differences are the regions of production and the types of agave used, which is essentially the correct answer. However, what the guest really wants to know is the difference in taste. That could be defined better by describing the difference in production, with the main flavor difference being this: Mezcal is produced by roasting the magueys (agave) in an earthen horno (oven) underground. In tequila production, the agave hearts are usually steamed in large, aboveground ovens or even in huge autoclaves. Think of mezcal as roasted and tequila as steamed, as in the difference between the flavor and texture and complexity of roasted potatoes versus boiled potatoes. All of this understood, mezcal and tequila are often mixed together as a way to introduce guests to mezcal in cocktails such as Phil Ward’s now infamous Oaxacan Old Fashioned, or the very first successful cocktail for mezcal in 1996, shortly after Chichicapa was introduced to the United States, when Mark Miller’s Coyote Cafe created the original Smokin’ Margarita, with a float of Chichicapa on a perfect El Tesoro Margarita (which not only changed the cocktail’s flavor and added to its complexity, but may have completely revolutionized the “floater story!”).

56

CHILLED MAGAZINE

DAVID RAVANDI, FOUNDER OF 123 SPIRITS AND WELLKNOWN AGAVE WHISPERER, OFFERS THESE TIPS WHEN MIXING WITH MEZCAL:

“Constant tasting is essential to adapt and balance cocktails, because the piñas are smoked, steamed, and caramelized in wood-fired pits that are lined with volcanic rock. Mezcal varies due to this artisanal production method, so expect both bottle and batch variations.

“Mezcal has a significantly heightened flavor profile that’s smoky and vaguely bitter with a complex saline quality. This stands in

contrast to tequila’s oftenfloral, herbaceous, citrusy, and if oak-aged, vanilla and

caramel flavors. Mezcal is often paired with sweeter, floral flavors like honey and liqueurs. On the flip side, complex bitter notes can be amplified with an amaro and tempered by sweet vermouth, as in the Mezcal Negroni. Approach mixing with mezcal like you would an assertive gin. If your customer is a scotch, bourbon, or whiskey drinker—someone who is used to bold spirits—they’ll resonate to the smoky flavors, so don’t hide them. Experiment with combining tequila and mezcal to introduce the style to the uninitiated. “Begin the educational process with a beguiling sensory experience, and only then offer details about the nuances that differentiate mezcal. There are several tried-and-true mezcal cocktails that use honey, simple syrup, or liqueurs (like elderflower) to counterbalance the inherent bitterness of mezcal. Soon your guests will be eager to learn more about the history, culture, and production methods of mezcal.”

Mixing wi th

Mezcal


SPECIAL SECTION

MIXING WITH MEZCAL

WHAT ARE THREE FACTS BARTENDERS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT MEZCAL?

Mezcal is the mother of tequila and the best mezcals are handcrafted, artisanal spirits designated for ritual consumption by the indigenous artisans who craft them. There is a limited amount of mezcal that can be produced because of the fact that the magueys used in the production take from 7 to 30 years to mature, depending upon species, and because of its traditional and artisanal methods of roasting (in earthen ovens underground), milling (by hand or by horse), fermentation (ambient yeasts in open-top wooden tanks), and distillation (in small clay or copper stills). The more inexpensive mezcal is, the less likely it is authentic and artisanally produced. It takes many years to grow the magueys, and several weeks of back-breaking labor to produce authentic mezcal using traditional methods, so unless the family and the village are being cheated, or the mezcal is industrially produced at large volumes not embracing the traditional methods, it is not possible to produce for low prices.

LOS ANGELES’ OFFICIAL MEZCALERA BRICIA LOPEZ TELLS THE STORY OF OAXACA WITH HER NEW MEZCAL-AND-TEQUILA DESTINATION, MAMA RABBIT BAR, OPENING AT PARK MGM IN LAS VEGAS THIS SUMMER. THE NAME WAS INSPIRED BY THE GODDESS OF AGAVE, WHO HAD 400 RABBIT CHILDREN NOURISHED WITH MEZCAL AND TEQUILA. THE “OAXACAN PRINCESS” GAVE US THESE TIPS FOR MIXING WITH MEZCAL:

“Mezcal has a deeper depth of flavor with hints of smoke that adds an extra layer of creative opportunity for bartenders. A great bartender will most definitely be able to balance the smoke without an overwhelming use of citrus and sugar. You never want to hide the smoke, but you do want to tame it and round it out. “One of the biggest misconceptions about mezcal is that it’s only

smokier tequila—it’s not that simple. It’s actually the beverage that existed before tequila. Before tequila, there was mezcal. Bartenders should get to know the flavor profiles of each agave. Mezcal today is very much like wine—it is made with an array of different agaves, all with different flavor profiles. There are the agaves that are bit more floral and others that have hints of citrus and others that really bring out the earthiness and terroir of Oaxaca. “There’s a popular saying in the mezcal world that encourages people to ‘kiss’ the mezcal as they sip it because of its smoke profile. So, it’s best to take it slow the first night. Allow your palate to adjust to the new flavors. Kiss it,

enjoy it, discover the layers inside of it, and you’ll taste firsthand why so many people have fallen in love with it. Don’t ever shoot it! Treat it with respect and love.

I always recommend people enjoy mezcal in a cocktail if it’s the first time. It will allow for their palate to adjust and venture into a path they may not otherwise explore. Take the journey and notice how your body will warm up to it instantly.”

Mixing wi th

Mezcal 58

CHILLED MAGAZINE


11 BEST BUYS WINE ENTHUSIAST

W O L L FO THE O TE. S N A I GREAT T M CAPATH TO THE

LEESEFITCHWINES.COM

@LEESEFITCHWINES


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

60

CHILLED MAGAZINE

DRINK IN HISTORY


a t i ar g ar M

Yes, it’s more than a girl’s name. And yes, we have a woman to thank for America’s most popular drink. By Lanee Lee

185,000. That’s how many Margaritas Americans drink per hour every day, according to the mega spirits and wine corporation Brown-Forman. In a recent Nielsen study, it’s also their go-to cocktail, with 60 percent claiming it as their favorite tipple. And let’s face it—although it might not be the most exotic choice on the menu, the Margarita’s perfect sour, salty, bitter, and sweet ratio (four of the five tastes we can identify) is extremely satisfying. More important, a Margarita—no matter in what form, be it on the rocks or frozen—says, “Good times are in my future.” Margaritas also cross social and economic divides. For example, you can serve them at almost any occasion, be it at the beach or a black-tie affair—they’re instant crowd-pleasers. Perhaps that’s why there are 5.2 million #margarita tags on Instagram: People love to love their Margaritas. And hey, what other cocktail has its own song (Jimmy Buffett’s “Margaritaville”) touting its ability to induce blissed-out vacation vibes? MARGARITA MYTHS So who’s responsible for inventing it? Welcome to the tequila-laced rabbit hole of Margarita myths and legends. In mainstream media, the Margarita first appeared in Jose Cuervo ads as early as 1945 with the tagline, “The Margarita: It’s more than just a girl’s name.” And then in 1965, it debuted in print when the Oxford English Dictionary defined the Margarita as “a cocktail made with tequila and citrus fruit juice.” However, the drink itself was probably invented in the 1930s. We’ll start with the creation story that’s most widely accepted. In 1938, Carlos “Danny” Herrera, a bartender and restaurant owner in Tijuana, Mexico, went the extra mile for a beautiful, booze-allergic Ziegfeld girl named Marjorie King. Tequila was the only spirit she could drink without getting sick, but she didn’t like it straight up. So Herrera added lime and salt for the first Margarita. The other legend, also female-centric, is credited to Margaret “Margarita” Sames, a Dallas socialite who

claimed she mixed up the drink for friends at her villa in Acapulco in 1948. She served tequila and Cointreau. The drink’s popularity, known as “Margarita’s drink,” spread among her socialite friends, including Joseph Drown, owner of the Hotel Bel-Air, and Conrad Hilton, Jr., son of Hilton Hotel chain founder Condrad Hilton. Both began serving it in their hotel bars, and as they say, the rest is history. MARGARITA MANIA Another simplified explanation is the Margarita was simply a tequila riff on the Brandy Daisy cocktail, which was popular in the 19th century. The Brandy Daisy cocktail, which translates to “Brandy Margarita” in Spanish, is a basic sour recipe (spirit, citrus, and sweetener) with a splash of soda water. Whoever actually invented the Margarita, thank you. Today, we reap the benefits of living in a Margaritamanic era with thousands of iterations on craft cocktail menus around the world: Blackberry Sage Margaritas, Mezcal Margaritas, Mojito Margaritas, Watermelon Popsicle Margaritas, Vanilla Pear Margaritas, BaconInfused Margaritas, Jalapeño Margaritas, and many, many more. Try your hand at making America’s most beloved “fiesta in a glass” with this recipe:

Margarita INGREDIENTS

1 ½ oz. blanco tequila 1 oz. Triple Sec ½ oz. freshly squeezed lime juice Kosher salt (for glass; optional) Lemon wedge (for garnish; optional) PREPARATION

Salt your glass (optional). Combine ingredients in shaker filled with ice. Shake for 10 seconds and strain into cocktail glass with ice (skip the ice if you like your Margarita straight up). Garnish with lemon wedge if desired. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

61


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

FOOD KNOW HOW

LE FETTE COW Recipe courtesy of Jeremy Allen INGREDIENTS

2 oz. Black Cow Pure Milk Vodka ½ oz. dry vermouth 4 bar spoons pickle juice Pickled mushroom (for garnish) LE FETTE COW UMAMI SOUR

PREPARATION

Stir pickle juice, vermouth, and vodka until chilled. Serve up in a coupe-style glass. Garnish with a pickled mushroom.

UMAMI SOUR Recipe courtesy of Momofuku INGREDIENTS

Mushrooms L

1 ½ oz. cremini mushroominfused Fords Gin* ¾ oz. lemon juice ¾ oz. simple syrup ½ oz. Velvet Falernum ½ oz. egg white 1 gram shaved black truffles (for garnish) PREPARATION

ove them or hate them, mushrooms appear in cuisines worldwide. Each variety offers a distinctive flavor and texture. Shiitake mushrooms show up in many Asian dishes, while the earthy porcini shines in pasta recipes. Non-meat eaters revel in the meaty character of portabellos, while Beef Wellington wouldn’t be the same without duxelles, finely diced mushrooms sautéed with shallots, onions, garlic, and herbs. Any way you slice them, mushrooms have umami, that amorphous flavor characteristic that adds depth and complexity to foods.

Combine all ingredients, except shaved black truffle, in a cocktail shaker and shake without ice for 10 seconds. Add ice to the shaker and shake for ten additional seconds. Strain over ice in a rocks glass. Shave one gram of black truffle on top as garnish.

In the bar world, the earthy quality of mushrooms inspires bartenders in a variety of ways. At Birds & Bees in downtown Los Angeles, bar manager Jake Larowe uses lactobacillusfermented mushroom juice in concert with whiskey and a side of chocolate-dipped dried mushrooms. Momofuku’s bartenders steam-infuse gin with cremini mushrooms. And at MiniBar, Jeremy Allen garnishes a Martini riff with a pickled mushroom.

*Cremini mushroominfused Fords gin: Combine 1 bottle of Fords Gin with half a quart of cremini mushrooms. Let infuse for 48 hours. Strain out mushrooms and store gin.

62

CHILLED MAGAZINE


INTRODUCING

spiked S T I L L water

90 calories

1 gram of sugar

0 bubbles

Š2019 Pura Beverage Company, Rochester, NY. Contains alcohol. Premium malt beverage. Please enjoy responsibly and say no to bubbles. Per 11.2oz – Average Analysis: Calories 90, Carbs 2.0g, Protein 0g, Fat 0g


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

BREW REVIEW

BUILT ON THE DREAM TO

BREW THE BEST

RADEBERGER PILSNER By Michael Thacker

TL BEER CO

M

2 019

P IO

NEW

YO

IN

IT ar

N Ye he

Pi

of

lsn

er Brewery

IN

TL BEER CO

RK

2 019

M

t

P IO

NEW

IT

YO

y

ET

N

WINNER: GOLD MEDAL German-Style Pilsner, Radeberger Pilsner

RK

ET

ADAM LEVY, FOUNDER AT INTERNATIONAL BEVERAGE COMPETITIONS AND CEO AND FOUNDER OF THE ALCOHOL PROFESSOR

WINNER: Germany Pilsner Brewery of the Year, Radeberger Brewery

an

CHILLED MAGAZINE

“Thrilled and not surprised at the same time to see Radeberger Pilsner do so well in the New York International Beer Competition”

Radeberger Pilsner is a goldenhued delight, with a nice, mediumsized head that dissipates fairly quickly. Each whiff provides aromas reminiscent of a bowl of Honey Nut Cheerios complemented by floral hops and a hint of orange peel. The initial sip is smooth and soft, with a slight touch of hop bitterness at the end, supplying flavors of lightly toasted grains and balanced by a touch of honey sweetness and a bit of a citrus back end that is refreshing and easy to drink.

rm

64

Radeberger Pilsner was, and still is, brewed by purist standards of the Reinheitsgebot (also known as the “German Beer Purity Law”), which Duke Wilhelm IV of Barvia issued in 1516. The regulation stated that only barley, hops, and water could be used to brew beer. These natural ingredients are still in the pilsner today, with “only a few updates and additions to the Radeberger’s recipe.”

Ge

Located just a little over 100 miles south of Berlin, Germany, lies the Radeberger Brewery, where in 1872, five men with a united dream of brewing better beer came to life and the Radeberger Pilsner was born. While several decades have since passed, the Radeberger Pilsner is still admired and savored around the world by craft beer enthusiasts and newcomers alike. This brewing dream laid the foundations for the German pilsner culture that is still being celebrated today. Over time, the brewery expanded throughout Germany and ultimately landed “on U.S. shores, making its way to key cities like New York and Chicago in 1903,” explains Christian Arfert, Velvet Nation, agency lead behind The Tastemaker Collective. (Radeberger Pilsner launched the Tastemaker Collective in 2015 as a way of giving back to New York City’s diverse community of entrepreneurs and creators).

G

OL

D WINNE

R


Š 2019 123 Spirits, LLC. Photo Š Michael Elins

The Man Behind the Brands

123spirits.com EU Organic


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

BRAND SPOTLIGHT

A Great Introduction to Whisky Glen Moray Cabernet Cask Finish By Michael Tulipan

W

hile whisky producers have long finished their spirits in ex-sherry and port wood casks, they are increasingly turning to other wine barrels to add layers of fruit and spice. One of the most innovative companies using these techniques today, Glen Moray, produces a line of wine cask-finished whiskies in the historic town of Elgin in Scotland’s Speyside region. Glen Moray’s new Cabernet Cask Finish is the latest in its “Classic Range,” a line that eschews age statements and Master Distiller Graham Coull has called “a great introduction to whisky.” The Classic Range now encompasses six expressions: Classic Single Malt, Port Cask Finish, Sherry Cask Finish, Chardonnay Cask Finish, Peated Single Malt Whisky, and the newly released Cabernet Cask Finish.

66

CHILLED MAGAZINE

Coull explains, “Glen Moray has a long tradition of maturing in wine casks (for example, red Burgundy), so the Cabernet Sauvignon Finish was a natural progression.” For this new release, he sourced barrels from Bordeaux, France. The window for using a wine barrel is quite short, and speed is of the essence. “I work closely with the vineyards and transport companies to pick up the casks as soon as they are freshly emptied,” Coull says. “Once the casks arrive in Scotland, I fill them immediately to capture all the residual wine character.” The whisky is first aged in ex-bourbon barrels for generally six (or more) years, and then rests for a minimum of 12 months in the Cabernet barrels.


The resulting rich, fruity whisky has notes of black currant and sweet cherry. “In effect, the spirit is benefiting from the flavor of two first casks (bourbon and wine), and the result is a rich whisky that is full of character,” Coull says. “The wine character (dark fruits) combines beautifully with the vanilla character from the bourbon cask. The result is a multilayered whisky that is well-balanced and full-bodied.” Bringing together the best of two worlds, this surprisingly affordable new entry is sure to please whisky lovers who also favor bold red wines. And industry recognition has been swift: The Cabernet Cask Finish recently took home a Gold Medal at the New York World Spirits Competition. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

67


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

SPOTLIGHT LAUNCH

A SPIRIT TO BUILD ON BALCONES

TEXAS POT STILL BOURBON By Mathew Powers

E

verything may be bigger in Texas, but it’s been the small-batch mentality of Waco’s Balcones Distilling that has earned the spirits maker more than 350 awards, including Brand Innovator of the Year and Master Distiller of the Year at the 2019 Icons of Whisky America Awards. So, what inspired Balcones to release its new, year-round, 92 proof Texas Pot Still Bourbon whisky?

“We wanted to create something that both longtime Balcones enthusiasts and people who are experiencing us for the first time can appreciate,” explained Jared Himstedt, head distiller. “By delivering flavor complexity within an approachable profile and proof, we can introduce more people to the nuance of what we do.”

which were well-received. All of these bourbons are bottled at cask strength,” said Himstedt. “Building on what we learned with those expressions, Texas Pot Still Bourbon offers a more accessible entry point. It is layered with flavor and offers uncommon quality, complexity, and character with a familiar bourbon taste profile while remaining undeniably Balcones.”

The release of Texas Pot Still Bourbon adds to the distillery’s already impressive portfolio and demonstrates what’s possible outside America’s traditional bourbon-making regions.

It all starts with a unique mash bill consisting of roasted Texas blue corn, Texas wheat, Texas rye, and Scottish malted barley. While most bourbons on the market are made in column stills, Balcones uses pot stills. Himstedt commented, “This really helps give the liquid viscosity for a great mouthfeel as well as some lighter fruit notes.”

“There’s still so much to be discovered about making bourbon in Texas. We have been producing it for a while in small batches. We release about 500 cases of our Blue Corn Bourbon every year, and that goes pretty quickly. Last year, we also released really limited batches of our Wheated and High Rye Bourbons,

68

CHILLED MAGAZINE

Finally, the Central Texas climate and its sometimes rapid temperature fluctuations lead to enhanced “breathing” of the barrels, which imparts unique wood


The outcome is a bourbon that’s quintessentially Texas and wouldn’t be easily confused with a Kentucky Bourbon. characteristics into the liquid. The Texas Pot Still Bourbon rests in charred oak barrels for 24 months.

offer a soft, soothing finish that makes the Texas Pot Still a bourbon that’s easy to drink straight.

The outcome is a bourbon “that’s quintessentially Texas and wouldn’t be easily confused with a Kentucky Bourbon,” explained Himstedt.

However, it also works extraordinarily well in classic cocktails because “it provides a little bit more character and complexity than some standard bourbons out there,” noted Himstedt. “But the really exciting thing for us is seeing how people create new things using this expression. We’re really looking forward to seeing how talented mixologists are going to build upon this spirit to create beautiful cocktails.”

What that means for the drinker is a bourbon that presents an aroma reminiscent of Honeycrisp apples, kettle corn, and graham cracker, and flavor notes comprised of honey, sweet cream, and candied pecans. Finally, a tannic fade and lingering spice

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

69


SHAKING AND STIRRING

BACARDÍ LIME RUM Using BACARDÍ’s familiar white rum as a base, BACARDÍ Lime is infused with natural lime flavors. This entry is the ninth flavored rum in the BACARDÍ portfolio. With a bracing lime aroma and fresh citrus character, BACARDÍ Lime offers a refreshing answer to hot weather cocktails.

SPARKLING HIBISCUS LIMEADE INGREDIENTS

6 parts BACARDÍ Lime Rum 2 parts St-Germain 4 parts lime juice 4 parts Monin Hibiscus Syrup 8 parts lemon-lime soda 4 lime wheels (for garnish) PREPARATION

Add all ingredients into a punch bowl or carafe with ice and stir. Garnish with lime wheels.

70

CHILLED MAGAZINE

LAUNCHES

COPPER & KINGS THE NINTH. A SYMPHONY IN ORANGE CURAÇAO-RESTED GIN Named for Beethoven’s great symphony, The Ninth. A Symphony in Orange is double distilled and finished in Copper & Kings’ Destillaré orange curaçao barrels.

SEVILLA GIN GIN MULE

Ingredients 1 ½ oz. Copper & Kings The Ninth. A Symphony in Orange Gin ¾ oz. lime juice ¾ oz. simple syrup Ginger beer Expressed orange peel 6 mint leaves Sprig of mint (for garnish) Grapefruit (for garnish)

GARNISH ISLAND GIN Ireland’s only female Master Distiller, Deirdre Bohane, has crafted this gin at West Cork Distillers in a handmade, custom copper pot still reserved exclusively for distilling Garnish Island Gin. The gin draws inspiration from the Italian Garden of Garnish Island, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Gentle floral notes of hibiscus, iris, and rose balance the herbal qualities of rosemary and thyme. Hints of dark chocolate and strawberries come through as well, leading to a soft finish.

GARNISH ISLAND GIN AND TONIC INGREDIENTS

2 oz. Garnish Island Gin 4 oz. Fever-Tree Tonic Water Lime or other citrus fruit (for garnish) PREPARATION

Build ingredients in ice-filled glass. Stir to combine. Garnish with lime or other citrus fruit.


PEONY VODKA Inspired by the lush landscape of the Hudson Valley in New York, a former lawyer-turned-spirits-owner launched Three Meadows Spirits. Peony Vodka celebrates the antique peonies that grow on the 200-acre farm where the company is based. On the sweeter side, the flavored vodka employs nine botanicals, two of which are secret. The others include geranium, jasmine, white pepper, gardenia, green tea, vanilla, and tincture of peony.

STILLHOUSE CLASSIC VODKA Having made a splash with its eyecatching stainless steel can design, Stillhouse launches a portfolio expansion with its Classic Vodka. Gluten-free and filtered through sugar maple charcoal, the Classic Vodka is distilled from 100% estate-grown corn and limestone water. A bone-white rendition of Stillhouse’s iconic, unbreakable can featuring royal blue lettering encases this new vodka, staying true to the company’s style and philosophy.

DRINK YOUR FLOWERS

STILLHOUSE CUCUMBER COOLER

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS

2 oz. Peony Vodka ¼ oz. violet syrup ¼ oz. fresh lime juice Club soda (to top) 1–2 drops lavender bitters (optional) 2–3 mint leaves (for garnish)

2 oz. Stillhouse Classic Vodka 1 oz. lime juice ½ oz. simple syrup 3–5 mint leaves Cucumber slice (for garnish) Mint sprig (for garnish)

PREPARATION

PREPARATION

Shake all ingredients with ice and strain into glass. Top with 1–2 oz. club soda and 1–2 drops lavender bitters (optional). Garnish with torn mint.

Build ingredients in a shaker; add ice. Shake hard; strain over glass of ice. Garnish with cucumber slice and mint sprig.

BLUMENPFLÜCKER Blumenpflücker (German for “flower picker”) is a newly released herbal liqueur that offers a taste profile with less licorice and sugar than other herbal liquors and provides a nice citrus finish. This versatile liqueur can be enjoyed straight up or in a variety of cocktails.

TIKI SPICE INGREDIENTS

1 ½ oz. Blumenpflücker 1 ½ oz. coconut rum 1 oz. pineapple juice ½ oz. lime juice ½ oz. simple syrup Cherry (for garnish) Roasted coconut (for garnish) PREPARATION

Shake ingredients over ice and pour into rocks or tiki glass. Garnish with cherry and roasted coconut.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

71


Bartenders are a dynamic bunch and with the cocktails they create, they’re often great storytellers, too. And who doesn’t love a good story, especially a liquid one? It’s the bartenders who mix cocktails that are extensions of themselves—their pasts, their present and even possibly their future—that are the best though. These are cocktails that transcend moments in time and become memories on their own. And here at Chilled, that moves us. In this issue we look at trending cocktails both old and new and how bartenders are making them memorable. We pay special homage to an old favorite, the Margarita, and explore riffs on it incorporating mezcal, while also providing tips on what else to mix with the smoky sensation. We discover cocktails mixed with scotch,

cocktails mixed with summer libations like cava and rosé, and the latest cocktails mixed for a cause. Spirited stories throughout anchor the issue and keep us enlightened and educated. Talk about having a great story to tell … cover guy Walton Goggins has more than a few along with some tricks up his sleeve. His tales of blood, sweat, and whiskey wowed us. It’ll come as no surprise to hear that his Mulholland American Whiskey makes a perfect Highball that’s a refreshing sip for any good story.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

73


Edited by Mathew Powers | Photos Courtesy of Mulholland Distilling

Pull Up A Bar Stool

Wa lt o n G o g g i n s o f M u l h o l l a n d D i s t i l l i n g h a s a s t o r y t o t e l l

74

CHILLED MAGAZINE


We make spirits for our friends … the ones we know and the ones we haven’t made yet.”

HI, FRIEND. MY NAME IS WALTON GOGGINS, A PARTNER AT MULHOLLAND DISTILLING. IT’S NICE TO MEET YOU. Many of you might recognize me as Boyd Crowder from Justified, a show set in the heart of America’s Bourbon Country. While I don’t share Boyd’s penchant for outlaw behavior, we both enjoy a good drink. My favorite thing to do at the end of a long week is saddle up to a bar in some out-of-the-way locale and get into a conversation with a stranger. Those exchanges are so illuminating to me. So when my good friend Matt Alper asked me to join him in his quest to not only open a distillery, but fashion a space for which people could share drinks and stories, I jumped at the opportunity. First, bartenders should know that we created our gin, vodka and whiskey for them. Matt committed himself to find a bottle that’s comfortable pouring or pulling from the rail, and they clock in at a higher proof so they hold up no matter what a mixologist throws at them. We are honored to give them a brand that won a unanimous Double Gold Medal at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition for our New World Gin and Silver medals for both our American Whiskey and Vodka. But at the core, Mulholland is about Matt’s and my friendship, about our relationship to our city and sharing our story with anyone who’ll listen. Matt and I have been friends for two decades, and I’ve always enjoyed sharing a glass of whiskey with him.

We possess a similar outlook on life, friendship, and fatherhood. I know him. I trust him. I DIG him. We also enjoy a similar sense of design, a passion of mine—my home has been featured in Architectural Digest and the L.A Times. So, together with Matt and our good friend Tatum Kendrick of Studio Hus, we created the Mulholland Room in the heart of L.A.’s Arts District. We created an environment where people— be they bartenders, artists, or entrepreneurs—can share a drink and lovely conversation. For Elmore Leonard’s Justified, so much of the story revolved around the characters’ consumption of whiskey, around which bottle was opened and consumed with whom, and what that meant—a compliment or an insult. Similarly, in the Mulholland Room, we can show who we are without having to utter a word. You know, I think Boyd would enjoy the Mulholland Room. Boyd likes to experience the B-side of life. Some of my favorite scenes were when Boyd was drinking alone, his state of mind when no one was watching. It was in those moments I understood him most. I think he would very much enjoy a walk on the L.A. side. And that’s what it’s all about. Experiences. Stories. Companions. It doesn’t matter where you live or where you are from. We make spirits for our friends … the ones we know and the ones we haven’t made yet. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

75


A Case for Truth in Labeling: Sweetened Rums Spark Bitter Debate By Bob Curley

76

CHILLED MAGAZINE


Rum is a spirit distilled from sugar cane juice or molasses, but should cane spirits that are dosed with sugar after distillation still be considered rum? It may sound like an arcane debate, but it’s a question that can have a direct impact on the ability of bartenders to craft well-balanced cocktails. Just as Bourbon County, Kentucky, has strict rules about what can be labeled bourbon and the Cognac region of France closely regulates production of that particular iteration of brandy, traditional producers of rum— Barbados, Jamaica, and the islands of the French Caribbean—prohibit most adulteration of rum, including the addition of sugar. The same, however, is not true for rums produced in other countries. “Visit Jamaica, and you will see a pot still at your favorite brand on a site that might have been making spirits there since the late 1600s,” says Richard Seale, master distiller and blender at R. L. Seale and Foursquare Distillery in Barbados. “Visit Central America and you will find a modern large-scale industrial plant that makes neutral alcohol for sale for a myriad of purposes. A product labeled ‘rum’ from this kind of producer is no more a rum by our standards than their product labeled ‘whisky’ is a whisky by American standards.”

complete with its premium package and misleading age claim, we are convinced we have acquired good taste. No one is adding sugar to a low-end product because there is no illusion to sell.” Seale is currently fighting attempts to loosen the rum regulations in his home country while simultaneously calling for greater disclosure in other parts of the world. In fact, he contends that dosed rum isn’t actually rum at all. “A sweetened spirit has been known for over 100 years as a liqueur,” he says. “It is against the Jamaica law to adulterate Jamaican rum, yet you can sell adulterated Jamaica rum in the United States with impunity.” Bailey Pryor, founder and CEO of The Real McCoy Rum company, says he is unconcerned about his premium, undosed product competing with sweetened rums. “The real

“It is against the Jamaica law to adulterate Jamaican rum, yet you can sell adulterated Jamaica rum in the United States with impunity.”

Adam Kanter, former owner of Philadelphia’s Rum Bar and currently a chef instructor at the JNA Institute of Culinary Arts, says it’s important for good bartenders to know what’s in the rums they pour. “Sadly, most brands don’t divulge added sugars,” he says. “Knowing if a product has been sweetened is critical in making cocktails. Since some drinks require a delicate balance of sweet, sour, bitter, and strong, precise measurements will fail if the rum is sweeter than expected.” Adding sugar to rum is one of several factors that can alter the ABV of spirits. While not definitive, hydrometer testing of various rum brands—which measures the difference in the ABV listed on the bottle and what’s actually inside—suggests that many popular, premiumlevel rums have been dosed with sugar. “The covertly sweetened rum creates the illusion of drinking a straight spirit,” says Seale. “When we drink that sweetened spirit,

rum producers should not be valued similarly to the candy rum producers, just as the single malt producers are not valued on the same scale as flavored moonshine,” he says. Even rum advocates like Seale and Kanter acknowledge that dosed rums have their place in the market. “I have always considered sweeter rums a gateway to new (younger) rum drinkers,” says Kanter. “That’s how I fell in love with rum. While my palate has evolved, I will still drink those sweet rums today.” “Truth in labeling is the only real issue,” says Rob Burr, founder of the annual Miami Rum Renaissance Festival and author of Rob’s Rum Guide, who says that in some countries, like Cuba, it is just as traditional to add sugar to rum as it is to leave rum untouched in Jamaica and Barbados. “The market decides. Give out good information: let the public decide.” “Of course, you only should drink what you like,” says Seale. “But what you pay for it is not subjective. If you are paying a top price for a product that is flavored neutral alcohol with a bogus age statement, you are being duped, and I think you should care.” “Drink what you like; know what you are drinking,” he advises. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

77


BEYOND TASTE

Experiential, Immersive, and Multisensory By Colleen Thompson

We are gaining insight into how drinking is a multisensory experience that goes far beyond sensations on the tongue. Sight, sound, touch, and smell are just as important to engage our emotions and influence our purchasing behavior. Enter the multisensory experience. The experience economy has been tipped to be the next trend in drinks marketing. With an almost endless stream of new products and brand information, it’s little wonder consumers are left feeling a bit overwhelmed. In an effort to break through the marketing clutter and connect with consumers in a meaningful way, the increasingly high-tech world of sensory marketing is becoming big business. From virtual reality goggles and interactive tours to aroma labs and gin suites, brands are creating entire immersive experiences designed to appeal to all the senses.

78

CHILLED MAGAZINE

Technology has kicked open the doors for brands to deliver previously impossible experiences to consumers. The Macallan Distillery, one of Scotland’s purveyors of fine whisky since 1824, has launched a reality experience at its state-of-the-art $186 million distillery. An interactive tour takes visitors through the six pillars of the whisky-making process, from field to bottle. Visitors enter a cube-like room containing a glass wall of 840 archived Macallan bottles from Victorian times to the present. Each bottle has its own digital file (accessible via a touchscreen) with 360-degree photos, in-depth specs, and video content. The experience includes cutting-edge wind and scent diffusion technology matched to the footage. There’s also a barrel room, where guests can whiff various cask types from American bourbon-seasoned to Spanish sherry, to understand the flavors each imparts. There’s also a taste component, where visitors get a quarter-


When I hear, I forget. When I see, I remember. When I do, I understand. consisting of a series of chambers. The duo worked with master brewer Fergal Murray and flavor scientists to define which factors enhanced taste perception, and then created flavor fountains that produced vapors of beer, malt, roasted barley, and hops—all key tastes in Guinness. For a pop-up event for Singleton Whisky, Bompas & Parr combined science with a sensual experience to highlight how environment can bring out the best in a spirit—in this case, The Singleton of Glendullan 12 year old single malt Scotch whisky. Bringing a 3D map of Scotland to life, the team put together a spectacular show of atmospheric sounds, smells, and visuals that took participants through the Scottish Highlands.

ounce glass of either The Macallan’s newly released Edition No. 4 or Double Cask 12 Years Old. Looking for new experiences, consumers are showing a greater desire to try and test products that connect with their individuality and tell their story in a more meaningful way. Patrón Tequila has tapped into this desire, pushing the marketing envelope and using a combination of mobile, virtual reality, and multisensory concepts to educate and engage its consumers. The Art of Patrón Virtual Reality Experience, featuring Oculus technology, takes consumers through an immersive Hacienda tour. Participants take the viewpoint of a bee (Patrón’s logo) and witness the tequila-making process at Patrón’s distillery in Mexico that begins in the agave fields and showcases the sights and sounds of production, aging, and bottling. London-based food architects Bompas & Parr have blurred the boundaries between flavor and culinary research and art installation. They brought a theatrical dimension to Johnnie Walker Blue Label in the form of a church organ, dubbed The Flavour Conductor, where notes and melodies corresponded with smells, tastes, and flavors. For Diageo’s Guinness Storehouse, which has attracted more than 12 million visitors since opening in 2000, they designed a multisensory tasting room

This past summer, Schiphol and Auckland airports not only greeted passengers with scented vapor bubbles, they immersed them into the English countryside with bird songs and the sound of gentle streams, all courtesy of Bombay Sapphire Gin. People were invited to create their own perfect Bombay Sapphire cocktail in the glass dome pop-up, using tonic twists and atomized spritz options, including citrus, spice, and floral flavors. Slingsby Gin partnered with Hotel du Vin to create gininspired hotel suites. Each suite contained a grapefruit tree, one of the main botanicals in Slingsby’s gin, along with hanging sky planters and vintage suitcases filled with herbs and copper details. The spectacle of all gin spectacles, however, belonged to Hendrick’s Gin with its E.L.E.V.A.T.U.M., a fully integrated multisensory experience. The event was launched at the 2018 Festival International de Jazz de Montreal and consisted of a cucumber jazz organ, teacup Gin & Tonic tastings, and to top it off, energy readings from renowned intuitive specialist Terri-Lynn Decker. As the venerable Chinese philosopher Confucius reminds us, “When I hear, I forget. When I see, I remember. When I do, I understand.” It’s why the experience economy and multisensory marketing is here to stay, and will only continue to grow bigger and more spectacular as brands seek to stand out from the crowd and we continue to crave memorable experiences. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

79


A NEW ITERATION OF

Pink

By Colleen Thompson

Once dismissed by wine buffs as an overly sweet afterthought made from leftover grapes, rosé’s tide started to turn sometime around 2013, and its growth shows no signs of slowing down.

Millennial wine drinkers in particular have embraced the pink drink as a symbol of summer and the good life. The crisp delicacy has its own festival, La Nuit en Rosé and has even inspired an entire rosé mansion. Instagram has been flooded with pink-hued cocktails and the hashtag #roséallday. It also happens to be Beyoncé’s favorite tipple. Sugarfina, a popular confectionery store, launched an entire line of rosé gummy bears, and Bar Primi in New York created the now-famous and copied frosé, a slushy consisting of rosé, vermouth, and fresh strawberries. Last year, the concept of rosé expanded into sparkling water, ciders, pink gins, seltzers, and vodka. It’s safe to say that pink drinks are now firmly entrenched in pop culture. This summer we’ll be embracing a new innovative iteration of rosé. Swedish brand SVEDKA Vodka—the number one imported vodka in the United States, recently launched SVEDKA Rosé, a crisp, easy-drinking vodka intended to be sipped chilled, on ice, or smoothly blending into cocktails. With catchy taglines like “Vodka with a Wine Fetish” and “Not Wine, Not Sorry,” SVEDKA Rosé brings its daring, bold personality to rosé enthusiasts everywhere in a way that complements the brand’s new ‘Bring Your Own Spirit’ platform. The 60-proof spirit blended with 5% rosé wine, resulting in a unique combination of vibrant fruity aromas with flavors of strawberry and pineapple and notes of hibiscus. The pale-pink spirit is showcased in a clear glass bottle with hints of rose gold in the label and bottle cap.

80

CHILLED MAGAZINE


SVEDKA is synonymous with breaking the mold in the vodka category and spearheading bold flavors that spark trends. Approaching the spring and summer months, we’re excited to launch SVEDKA Rosé, which aims to give both vodka and rosé fans a fresh take on their favorite drink.

— Carl Evans, SVEDKA Vodka’s vice president of brand marketing

ROSÉ CLOVER INGREDIENTS

2 oz. SVEDKA Rosé ¾ oz. Lillet Rose ¾ oz. lemon juice ¾ oz. simple syrup (1:1) 4 raspberries 2 dashes orange bitters Triangular lemon twist (for garnish) 2 skewered raspberries (for garnish) PREPARATION

Add all ingredients to a mixing tin and shake vigorously with ice. Strain into a chilled coupe glass. Garnish with a triangular lemon twist and two skewered raspberries.

LITTLE PINK MARTINI INGREDIENTS

2 oz. SVEDKA Rosé 1 oz. rosé wine ½ oz. peach schnapps 2 dashes orange bitters PREPARATION

Add all ingredients to a stirring vessel and stir until cold. Pour into a chilled Martini glass. Garnish with a pink rose petal. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

81


TRENDING NOW

CRAFT MIXERS

a time for

MAKE IT INTERESTING WITH REGATTA In the early 2000s, industry veteran Stanley Rottell saw an opportunity to bring a more versatile ginger beer to the market than was currently available. The product he envisioned would go beyond the iconic Dark ‘n’ Stormy cocktail and mix creatively with a wider range of spirits. In 2006, Rottell’s vision became a reality when he launched Regatta Ginger Beer. This new brew soon became a favorite among bartenders and bar owners and was instrumental in bringing the iconic Moscow Mule back into fashion. Upon his retirement, Rottell sold Regatta to current owner Affinity Beverages LLC, and the company has aggressively invested capital, infusing new resources and energy into product development, sales expansion, and marketing. We spoke to Sam Zarou, CEO of Affinity Beverages LLC, about this new wave of craft mixers and what bartenders can expect to see from this category.

Tell us about Regatta’s success with its Ginger Beer and what inspired the company to expand its offerings in the craft mixers category. Regatta Ginger Beer was an instant hit with on-premise decision-makers and, in turn, their patrons. This has been reinforced over the years with multiple awards, including our unique position as a multiyear winner of the SIP Platinum Award as well as the SIP Consumer Choice Awards for taste and packaging.

82

CHILLED MAGAZINE


With the recent explosion of premium craft spirits and cocktails, we knew the time was right to offer other high-quality products to mix with today’s preferred spirits. Our new Royal Oak Ginger Ale is superb in trendy bourbon drinks. Our new Dry Citrus Sparkling Tonic elevates the gin cocktail experience, and our Light Ginger Beer, sweetened with organic blue agave, mixes with vodka for a tasty, slim version of this cocktail favorite. What makes Regatta a line of “craft” mixers, and why is that important to bar owners and bartenders? Our mixers are made with only the best natural ingredients, curated from around the world and then crafted in small batches—just as our award-winning Bermuda Stone Ginger Beer has been made since 2006. Generally speaking, consumers today are more informed, educated, and health-conscious. They want to know what is in the products they consume, and we are listening. Our mixers are made with natural flavors, have no artificial ingredients, contain no high fructose corn syrup, are non-GMO, BPA-free, and glutenfree, and are all made here in the United States. For the bar owner and bartender, our breadth of offerings not only meet consumer demand for healthier, more authentic mixers, but they also cater to the spectrum of mixing more interesting cocktails. We have something for every drinking occasion, whether consumers are looking to unwind in refined relaxation or quench their thirst with a refreshing indulgence. Tell us about Regatta’s success in the on-premise market, and why bartenders embrace the brand. From the beginning, we have worked closely with the bartending community to provide the flavor profiles and pack formats that work for them. We were the first to offer ginger beer as a mixer in an 8 oz.

squat can, perfect for behind the bar. We were also among the first to offer a smaller, 8.45 oz. bottle for higher-end premium accounts. Bartenders understand that their patrons’ experience is paramount to their success. When customers ask for top-shelf spirits in their cocktails, they should expect only the best quality mixers to accompany them. Bartenders choose Regatta because our mixers are more flavorful, citrusy, sparkly, and refreshing, and lift everyday spirits into top-notch cocktails. Tell us about Regatta’s “Make It Interesting” tagline and how it impacts brand strategy. At Regatta, we seek bolder, bigger, and better adventures. We relish the chance to make every aspect of our brand more stimulating and pride ourselves in pushing our limits. “Make It Interesting” was born out of our desire to make cocktails more interesting, but it has become so much more than a tagline. It is in our DNA and guides everything we do, from our product formulation and package development to our sponsorships, activations, and communications strategy. Tell us about the name and packaging. How has the brand’s identity/marketing directive evolved? Regatta is unique in the category. In addition to being a mixer, we are

also a lifestyle brand that appeals to consumers who are active, social, and like to get outside. It is both approachable and aspirational, and the perfect choice for those who seek products that share their values and enhance their lifestyle. Our packaging is a reflection of this lifestyle and incorporates colors, tone, and packaging formats— including our new 250ml slim can 4-pack—that align with our active consumer who is more likely to be socializing outdoors, near the water on the patio or boat deck. We also have a long history of sponsoring local and national sailing regattas, and are thrilled to announce we have just signed on as the Official Craft Mixer of US Sailing. Is there anything else you would like Chilled readers to know about the brand? New ownership and the debut of our expanded line of premium craft mixers mark the beginning of a new era of innovation for Regatta Craft Mixers. We are committed to “Making It Interesting” by building on our expertise and further expanding our presence in the dynamic craft mixer space with exciting innovations planned for 2020. Stay tuned …

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

83


To the Next Generation of Wine Drinkers …

Masters of Cava MEET THE

By Michael Tulipan

84

CHILLED MAGAZINE


T

hough it’s the fourth-largest wine producer in the world, and the largest in Europe, you’ve probably never heard the name J. García Carrión. Instead, the company lets its labels speak for themselves, especially in the Cava category, where it is poised to make Cava the “new Prosecco.” While J. García Carrión wines are distributed in 155 countries around the world, its fourth-generation owner, José Garcia Carrión, has maintained close ties to the company’s humble beginnings. A family of grape growers for generations, the Garcia Carrións opened a modern winery in 1890 that was far ahead of its time. “We have come a long way since the founding of the winery by my grandfather, and for over 125 years we have stayed true to our values of quality, which have now been passed down through five generations,” José says. Today, J. García Carrión produces wine in ten DOs (denominations of origin) across Spain. Cava remains at the core of Garcia Carrión’s success, thanks to wellknown brands like Jaume Serra and Pata Negra. The Cavas are made in the Champagne style and even use yeast from France. Jaume Serra Cristalino Brut Cava is aged for 12 months, while

Pata Negra Cava Brut is aged for 18 months and vintage-dated Reservas and Gran Reservas can be aged up to 60 months. “We feel our Cavas are the best sparkling value in the business,” says Tom Bernth, national sales manager for J. Garcia CarriónCIV USA. Bernth also points out the closest competing category, Prosecco, typically involves aging wine for just three to six months and that the price point is higher. The company is also vertically integrated in packaging with a range of offerings from glass to Tetra Pak to Bag-in-Box to cans. “We feel that alternative packaging will continue to be the driver in the wine category growth trends,” Bernth explains. “Millennials don’t care about the wine snob era we experienced in the past—they want great wine in packaging that provides portability and convenience.” Bernth also points out that the company’s technology is the best in the business and has even impressed visiting executives from consumer packaged goods companies. Tetra is especially important to the company’s growth, including a Tetra version of the Don Simón Sangria, which is the top-selling Sangria in the world.

Jaume Serra Ice “We have an awesome package and a taste profile that will be a great entry point to help us promote the Cava quality story,” Bernth says of the new Jaume Serra Ice. “From a production standpoint, the dosage is slightly sweeter, so this helps reduce some of the acidity.” Jaume Serra Ice is targeted for the next generation of wine drinkers who may not be familiar with Cava. “Look for some fun mixology programs and two additional platforms we are going to attack that will build brand loyalty with millennials,” Bernth says.


BEYOND THE DRAM

scotch -Tails By Tyler Zielinski

Scotch-based cocktails are popping up all over the place, so how are brands and consumers adapting to this evolution?

Scotch is a spirit that, because of its complexity in flavor, can prove to be a challenge when mixing in cocktails. Each distillery has its own character and each expression has its own flavor profile, so it’s not always as simple as swapping out one Scotch for another, especially if the flavors within an expression were specifically chosen to pair

86

CHILLED MAGAZINE

with other ingredients in a cocktail’s mix. That said, the cocktail culture is currently seeing a rise in the use of Scotch in contemporary cocktails in the form of vibrant and revivifying Scotch Highballs, thoughtfully structured sours like tropical riffs on the Penicillin, and more. Bartenders and enthusiasts alike have come to realize that this


Macallan. “With that, we’re now seeing more whiskies incorporated into cocktail recipes.”

As a testament to this cultural shift, Glenfiddich, one of the most successful global Scotch whisky brands, has released four new expressions as part of its experimental series. The series has embraced new production techniques, such as finishing the whisky in IPA casks to garner light, zesty citrus aromas. Glenfiddich’s latest release, Fire & Cane, is a partially peated whisky finished in Latin rum casks. Although these expressions were not produced with the intention of strictly being used in cocktails, they possess flavors that are unique within the Scotch category. This is an exciting prospect for bartenders who are looking to add Scotch-based drinks to their menus for the modern-day imbiber.

complex spirit, if properly balanced, has the potential to create some truly exceptional “Scotchtails.” Through the inclusion of these Scotch-based drinks on more and more cocktail lists around the country, consumer perspectives have begun to shift, breaking the notion that Scotch should only be sipped neat.

“Consumers are more adventurous than ever before,” says Allan Roth, brand ambassador for Glenfiddich, “and [they] are open to a variety of base spirits and flavors across the cocktail landscape. As a result, we’re seeing bartenders bending and breaking old rules to the point where it’s no longer surprising to find a single malt Scotch like Glenfiddich being featured on cocktail menus.” This sentiment is also shared by other Scotch whisky brands. “The misleading notion that Scotch must be consumed on its own is starting to wither away as imbibers look for new twists on the classics,” says Raquel Raies, national brand ambassador for The

Both Roth and Raies have noticed an increase in the popularity of the Whisky Soda Highball, an ode to the cocktail culture’s return to simplicity. With this new age of Scotch consumption, brands have made sure to include cocktailrelated education when speaking with consumers. “As the trend toward craft cocktails forges forward, this includes mixology,” says Raies. “The Macallan is known for putting together consumer experiences outside of the standard tastings, and we often serve cocktails alongside drams.” Glenfiddich takes a similar approach to education. “Educating on cocktails opens up an even more robust view of the different ways Scotch can be enjoyed,” says Roth. Roth, on behalf of Glenfiddich, also took an innovative approach to familiarizing imbibers with new forms of Scotch-based cocktails by teaming up with local influencers and bartenders to create an informative and engaging cocktail class—an excellent way to drive awareness of Scotch’s versatility. While Scotch will always be a great dram, you can be sure to see Scotch cocktails popping up much more frequently at your local cocktail bars … so when you do, make sure to give one a try.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

87


GET TO KNOW

THE CLASSIC

Scotch Highball

88

CHILLED MAGAZINE


T

he whisky trade has attracted a full, if not overflowing, cup of outsized personalities, and Tommy Dewar was certainly one of them. Charming, bold, and a little eccentric, his salesmanship and marketing savvy coupled with years of tireless travel helped build Dewar’s into what is still one of America’s most popular Scotch whiskies today. During the 1890s, Dewar erected what was the biggest animated sign in Europe at the time by London’s Waterloo Bridge, as well as put the first motion picture ad on a New York rooftop. He might also have been the inventor of the classic Highball.

Tommy Dewar would take his own whisky in this way: as an easy-drinking, effervescent mixer that suits almost any occasion. Insofar as whether Dewar invented the Highball or not, he at least played a major part in popularizing it. A man of Dewar’s verve would have agreed with John Ford’s line, “When legend becomes fact, print the legend.”

As one of the simplest and most refreshing cocktails, the Highball calls for mixing a base spirit with twice or more as much soda, perhaps some ice, and a garnish, and then served in a tall glass. Dewar’s, with its trademark honey sweetness and crisper citrus and pear notes, is a natural choice for a Scotch and Soda Highball. Just as bourbon-maker Colonel James E. Pepper is credited as the creator of the Old Fashioned, Tommy Dewar is often credited as the creator of the Highball. While out on one of his many sales travels in 1892, Dewar ordered a “ball” (“drink”) of his whisky. When it was brought to him, he asked for a taller glass, along with some soda and ice. Although the first printed reference to the Highball was in 1895 in C.F. Lawlor’s The Mixicologist, the book doesn’t conflict with the tale naming Tommy Dewar as the Highball’s creator. John Dewar & Sons trademarked the drink in the UK in 1902, and newspaper stories attributing its creation to Tommy Dewar began appearing in 1905. Others claimed to have invented the Highball. Patrick Duffy, an esteemed bartender in New York in the 1890’s, claimed English actor E.J. Ratcliffe brought the mixer to America in 1894. Likewise, Highballs aren’t always made with Dewar’s. The Highball craze in Japan is centered firmly on its own national spirits, and Winston Churchill, famous consumer of Highballs, preferred other blended whiskies. Yet Dewar’s Scotch whisky has a character well-suited to a simple Highball: flavorful enough to withstand dilution in twice its volume of soda water, while light, sweet, and fruity enough to belie the reputation that Scotch sometimes has for being heavy, smoky and moody. It’s easy to imagine why

THE CLASSIC DEWAR’S HIGHBALL INGREDIENTS

1 part Dewar’s White Label Blended Scotch Whisky
 3 parts soda water
 Lemon twist (for garnish) PREPARATION

Combine ingredients in a Highball glass over ice. Garnish with a lemon twist.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

89


RECIPES CHECK OUT CHILLED 100 MEMBER ERIC HOBBIE’S NEW SIGNATURE COCKTAILS CREATED FOR CLIQUE HOSPITALITY’S NEWLY OPENED APEX SOCIAL CLUB AND CAMDEN COCKTAIL LOUNGE AT THE PALMS CASINO RESORT IN LAS VEGAS. Photos courtesy of Palms Casino Resort

FIRE & ICE INGREDIENTS 2 oz. Hendrick’s Gin (infused with jalapeno and sage) 1 oz. Meyer lemon juice  1 oz. amarena cherry juice  Fire-roasted jalapeno (for garnish) Jalapeno cotton candy (for garnish) PREPARATION Combine all ingredients; shake and strain into coupe glass. Garnish with fire-roasted jalapeno  and jalapeno cotton candy. 

90

CHILLED MAGAZINE


SORBETTO & BUBBLES INGREDIENTS 1 oz. Don Julio Tequila 3 /4 oz. St-Germain 1 oz. lemon sorbet 1 oz. raspberry sorbet 3 oz. Chandon Rosé champagne (to top) Edible gold glitter raspberries (for garnish) Edible gold stars, and pearl dust (for garnish) Edible “red moon” (dehydrated lemon and blood orange wheel; for garnish)

PREPARATION Shake all ingredients except champagne; strain into flute, top with champagne. Garnish with edible gold glitter raspberries, gold stars with a red moon (dehydrated lemon and blood orange wheel) and gold pearl dust.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

91


GREEN GOBLIN INGREDIENTS 2 oz. Cruzan Aged Light Rum 1 oz. lime juice 1 oz. sugar syrup 10 fresh mint leaves 8 fresh basil leaves Herb bouquet wrapped in lemon (for garnish) PREPARATION Nitro muddle mint and basil leaves in a shaker; add lime, sugar, and rum, and shake with ice. Triple strain into a white rocks glass with ice sphere.

92

CHILLED MAGAZINE


VENICE GIRL INGREDIENTS 1 1/2 oz. Belvedere Citrus 1 oz. strawberry gomme 1 oz. vanilla syrup 1 /2 oz. lime juice 2 fresh basil leaves Basil leaves with powdered sugar (for garnish)

PREPARATION Nitro-muddle 2 basil leaves in mixing glass; add vodka, strawberry gomme, and vanilla syrup, lime juice and ice; shake and double strain over octagon block. Garnish with basil leaves with powdered sugar.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

93


HOT SPOT

SPOTLIGHT

Hawaii’s By Bryen Dunn Photos courtesy of Pint + Jigger

Pint + Jigger & Harry’s Hardware Emporium

Happening Hot Spots

PINT + JIGGER SERVES UP LOCALLY SOURCED COCKTAILS AND SEVERAL CRAFTED BREWS FROM ITS MORE THAN 20 VARIATIONS ON TAP, WHICH MAKES FOR A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE AT THIS MODERN PUBLIC HOUSE. OWNER AND OPERATOR DAVE NEWMAN MOVED TO HAWAII A LITTLE OVER A DECADE AGO, AND SINCE THEN HAS SEEN REPUTABLE CRAFT COCKTAILS MADE WITH FRESH ISLAND INGREDIENTS SLOWLY GAIN TRACTION IN THE TRADITIONAL SWEET DRINKS MARKET (WHICH IS TYPICALLY AIMED TOWARD TOURISTS).

94

CHILLED MAGAZINE


“The hotels still cater to the old ways and haven’t embraced craft, but those in the know or those willing to venture outside of Waikiki can find some incredible bars, amazing bartenders, and some of the best cocktails in the world,” he states. Pint + Jigger has been open for more than six years now, and was at the forefront of the movement toward crafty booze offerings in Honolulu. Combining craft beers with a creative offering of cocktails has helped the bar get to where it is today. “Having roughly 30% of our guests drinking craft beer allowed our staff much more time to spend pumping out craft cocktails,” explains Newman. Offerings include bottled cocktails, cocktails on tap, sous vide Old Fashioneds, cheater bottles, punches, and meticulous mise en place. “In the time since we first opened, our guests have become much more educated on what they drink. They are seeking out better spirits and looking more for an experience than a drink,” he continues. Bartenders take advantage of the abundance of fresh island fruits, such as lilikoi (passion fruit), lychee, mango, and fresh guava, with many putting local spins on the typical classics that make them truly Hawaiian. A Collins becomes

a Lilikoi Collins, and a Daiquiri becomes a Hibiscus Daiquiri. The bar has also become somewhat of an industry hangout, something Newman had interest in creating from the initial start-up. “I ran an industry night at Nobu for five years prior to opening Pint. Making this an industry bar was something that we wanted from the getgo,” he says. The atmosphere is conducive, whether saddling up

to the bar for a drink or hitting the bustling beer garden for a game of shuffleboard. Adjacent to Pint + Jigger is Harry’s Hardware Emporium, a newer addition that offers a more intimate, speakeasy vibe. The only entrance is through a door inside Pint + Jigger labeled, “Closed for Renovations.” The hallway has been purposely decorated to be a transition between the two bars. “When that door opens and you step inside Harry’s, you feel transported to a place far from Hawaii,” Newman claims. Harry’s is incredibly intimate, with only 38 seats, and no standing allowed. Inviting and comfy couches, relaxing chairs, and spacious bar stools are interspersed beneath the dim lighting, while low music discreetly streams jazz, the Rat Pack, or blues. “We hid all the electronics as best we could. The air conditioners are boxed out to look like vintage speakers, the POS is housed inside reused Booker’s Bourbon boxes, the speakers are hidden, and the stereo unseen,” Newman reveals. Not hidden is the bar’s wall full of 30 liter barrels that showcase its barrel-aged cocktail program.

Photo by Rae Huo

Discover the craftier side Hawaii’s bar scene. Kealoha! CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

of

95


LAST CALL

CHILLIN’ WITH

SCOTTIE THOMPSON STARRING OPPOSITE THOMAS JANE IN THE FUTURISTIC COP THRILLER CROWN VIC, PRODUCED BY ALEC BALDWIN, SCOTTIE THOMPSON CAN ALSO BE SEEN IN TWO OTHER BUZZWORTHY FEATURE FILMS, LIMBO AND EPIPHANY.

MIXING AT HOME.

I am not the best bartender, but my latest creation is kombucha and tequila with a splash of lime. Very L.A. healthy (laughs).

DOWNTIME.

I am an adventurer, so I do my best to do that through international aid work, or travel, or creative exploration through writing. I am focusing more on writing these days—I wish to create and bring to life my own films and TV shows, ultimately.

DRINKS.

Lately, I’ve been very into mezcal … just sipping it. I went on a trip to Oaxaca and saw the preparation process and learned how to slowly enjoy the flavor without other mixers, so I am currently exploring that from a cultural and culinary perspective.

96

CHILLED MAGAZINE


R

Signature Serve –1.5 oz. Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin –Top-off with chilled premium tonic water –Fresh Ruby Red Grapefruit

gunpowdergin.com ENJOY RESPONSIBLY.

PALMBAY.COM

©2019 Palm Bay International, Boca Raton, FL

Profile for Chilled Magazine

Chilled Magazine - Volume 12 Issue 2