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The older I get, the more I want to slow time down, reduce all the complications in my life, and get back to basics. In a world that feels like it's falling apart (does it always, when you become an adult, or is it just 2019?), it's easy to feel like you have no control over anything. And totally, in many ways we don't have control. We can't steer the giant being of environmental collapse by ourselves. Becoming president isn't really in any of our purview any time soon. Cancer isn't going to be taken down by me, personally. Reading these news articles day after day can lead to anxiety, helplessness, and depression, the kind you can't necessarily fix, unless you fix the world around you. But I've found that getting offline once in a while, taking action every day, controlling what I can, and commiserating with others can help. No, a few recipes and thoughts on a simpler life won't fix these overarching problems by themselves. But they're something I can control, and when I'm feeling hopeless, just having a comforting meal can help. Coming up with a reason to get together with my friends can help. Learning how to reduce my environmental impact can help. They help me create a world I want to live in, and if we all do that - if we all live a life that makes a small impact, maybe we can create a larger impact. So don't think of this issue as just recipes; look at them from a wider perspective of impacting the way you look at food, mindfulness, and the world at large. Let's get back to basics with SIMPLE.

Head of Content + Design chickpeamagazine.com serifandscript.co @serifandscript







You know when you're super lazy and tired and just want to order takeout or heat up some pre-made processed food in the microwave? Or maybe you don't have much of an appetite or don't really want to make a big production out of eating? These recipes are my absolute favorite for when I really just don't want to cook, but I still want something that feels special - maybe even something that'll brighten my spirits. My requirements for such a meal are that they take very little to no prep time, take just a few tools or less to create, and aren't too hard to clean up after. Almost always they rely on what's in season, because the best tasting food is seasonal. Here are my easiestmeals ever for each season.

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apple cider, one-pan roast dinners, baked apples Fall is my favorite season - it's filled with the best produce from summer, plus fall and winter crops, so you really get the best of all seasons here. It's when we start inviting more people over to our place for board games, big dinners, and generally cozy nights. I get more into baking and actually gettting to enjoy time together out on our porch, as the extreme heat from summer is gone. Long live autumn!

Topping Ingredients 2/3 cup flour 1 tsp pumpkin spice

1/2 a large head cauliflower

(Page 89)

2 tsp chilli seasoning (Page 89)

2/3 cup cold non-dairy butter, cubed 1/4 cup brown sugar 3/4 cup oats a pinch of salt

1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 tbsp corn starch 1/8 tsp baking powder 1/4 tsp salt 1 cup + 3 tbsp very cold carbonated water frying oil your fav dipping sauce 1. Heat the oil to 375°F, or until the oil is hot enough to make some test batter fry. 2. Break the cauliflower into bite-size pieces - the smaller the better. Coat in the chilli seasoning. Whisk together the flour, corn starch, baking powder, salt, and carbonated water. It should be pretty thick. 3. Coat each cauli piece with the batter and fry until crispy. Eat right away (perfect for a party) or keep in the fridge and use an air-fryer to reheat. Clean up by just straining the oil into a jar for reuse later.

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Filling Ingredients 4-5 cups seasonal fruit (we used blackberry & apple) 3 tsp corn starch 2 tbsp brown sugar 1 tsp pumpkin spice

(Page 89)

1/4 tsp salt

Instructions 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F and grease a pie dish or cast iron pan. 2. Add to a food processor the flour, spice, butter, and sugar. Pulse to combine until the butter starts to break into small pieces. Add in the oats and pulse just a couple of times to combine.

Pop it into the fridge. 3. Chop up your fruit and coat in the corn starch, then coat in the rest of the filling ingredients. Pour the fruit into your dish, followed by the topping pressed together and crumbled on top. Bake for 40 minutes, or until the topping is golden and the filling is bubbly. 4. Serve piping hot the day you make it, preferably with vanilla ice cream.

2 tbsp almond butter 1/4 cup pumpkin puree 1/4 tsp pumpkin spice (Page 89) 3 cups cold water Blend all the ingredients together for at least a few minutes, until it's thoroughly combined and smooth. Strain if desired. We love making milks from nut butters - it's a cheaper and

more

convenient

option than getting whole nuts, and it's helpful if you run out of store-bought milks last minute.




T H A N K S SO MUCH FOR CHECKING OUT OUR FREE PREVIEW! chickpea noodle soup, roasted butternut soup, simple cookies, lemon & ginger "tea" Winter is such a time of introspection for me. In a snowbound city like mine, we often don't leave the house for weeks at a time - just to get groceries and maybe try to get together with friends to cure the cabin fever. Instead, I'm reading, thinking, writing, and doing creative work during these bitterly cold months. All I want out of winter foods is comfort, warmth, and a little bit of nutrition to fight off any sickness that comes my way.

READ T H E R E S T O F THIS A R T I C LE IN OU R F U L L ISSU E H E R E 1 tsp black tea

1 medium sweet potato

15 medjool dates, pitted

1/2 cup cooked lentils

hot (not boiling) water

2 tbsp peanut butter

1/2 cup cooked quinoa*

almond or soy milk

1 tsp vanilla extract

1/2 an avocado

(optional) simple syrup of

2 tbsp - 1/4 cup maple syrup

a handful greens or herbs

3 tsp dutch-processed cocoa powder

salt & pepper

1 1/2 cups roasted unsalted peanuts

1. This makes enough for one person,

multiply if serving more. Heat your oven to

1 pinch flaky sea salt + more to garnish

choice (Page 24)

Make the tea. Get your

water hot, put the tea in

a tea strainer, and pour it into a cup to steep for 3

400°F. Rinse your potato(es) and sprinkle

Blend all the ingredients up in a

with salt. Poke some holes with a fork, and

minutes.

food processor, one ingredient at a

put the potato(es) in the oven.

Remove

time, starting with just 2 tbsp of the

and pour in the milk

DIGITAL ISSUES PRINT ISSUES SUBSCRIPTIONS AND MORE!

the

strainer,

2. I like having the lentils & quinoa prepped

maple syrup. Add the peanuts in

and simple syrup. Enjoy

beforehand, but you can cook them while

last and pulse to combine, to keep

warm!

the potato is baking. (Page 44) *We like

some of their texture in tact. Once

adding some bouillon/stock & a bay leaf to our

it's relatively consistent in texture,

quinoa. Prep the avocado & greens.

and it can be formed into balls, roll

3. When the potatoes can be easily poked through with a fork, take them out and

immediately slice them open. Add on your ingredients and top with salt & pepper.

them into balls, sprinkle with salt,

and keep them in the fridge. If it's

not sticky enough, add more of the maple syrup.

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Words + Photos by Loren Miche chickpeawellness.squarespace.com @loren.miche Loren Miche is a lover of all things health, wellness, food and natural living, who strives to live a low waste/ low tox lifestyle. Simplicity: It brings me so much joy. When

environment. Most people have a skin and

I started simplifying every aspect of my

hair care routine that is 100 pages long,

life things just got easier. From the food

using every product under the sun and most

I eat to what I put on my skin, I simplified

of these products have ingredients that we

everything. Two years ago I started on a

don’t even know how to pronounce, much less

low waste journey. I started by reducing my

know where the ingredients actually come

plastic usage, which lead me to eating less

from. My personal beauty routine is simple,

processed food, which then lead to me making

I only use a few products and I love to DIY

my own beauty products. I have had so much

most of them so I know exactly what is going

fun learning about all natural ingredients,

on my skin and hair. Everything from my

seeing where they come from and how to combine

conditioner to my facial products are made

certain items to make everyday products.

in my home with whole ingredients and it

I’m constantly learning more and more about

brings me ease and happiness knowing where

the importance of keeping things simple,

all of my products come from. I believe in

natural and non-toxic especially when it

using only non-processed ingredients because

comes to the environment. Simplifying my

I know at some point all of these products

beauty routine has opened my eyes - we don’t

will end up in our waters and on our land.

need 500 products for every single part of

We can all make a difference by switching

our routine. If we keep it minimal it's much

to eco-friendly swaps in our everyday lives:

easier for ourselves and our impact on the

let’s start with our beauty products.

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The

next

product

on

my

list

is dry shampoo - a product I use quite often considering I usually only wash my hair a few times a week. This dry shampoo is amazing because it actually works so much better than all the store bought products I used to buy. I was using the canned

2 tbsp corn starch 1-2 tbsp cocoa powder (this is for darker hair: omit if you have light blonde hair) OR

1-2

tbsp

cinnamon

powder

(for red toned hair)*

spray shampoo but it's honestly such a big waste and horrible for the environment by using propane and butane, nobody wants that on their scalp! What's really great is that I bet you have all the ingredients you need in your kitchen right now! Using a more natural dry shampoo means you know what is exactly going on your head and you can control how little or how much you use. By using cornstarch it soaks up any excess oil without totally drying out your scalp and hair. Okay, let’s get to it!

1. First, get a small glass container or jar and simply measure all your ingredients and place into jar. 2. Mix until well combined. Use your hands or a make up brush to brush onto your roots when you need a refresher. Work into roots until the shine is gone and the powder is all soaked in. *Cinnamon can be irritating to sensitive

skin,

so

test

your

mixture on a small patch of skin first before use.

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R EAD T H E R E S T O F THI S A R T I C L E IN O U R F U L L ISSU E H E R E DIGITAL ISSUES PRINT ISSUES SUBSCRIPTIONS AND MORE!






ending in me I

to care a lot

feeling so guilty and

used about

doing things the "right" way. And by "care" I mean "be super anxious about it, and if I messed up I'd guilt trip and

wasteful. I don't want to feel this way, and I don't want you to, either - if you want to buy canned beans, or quick-cooking rice, or if you're just better at managing your cooking, please don't feel any pressure to be "perfect" and do everything yourself.

shame myself." Never about veganism, but certainly

But there are so many reasons to do so, if you feel up

for creating less waste, and cooking from scratch.

to it. It's cheaper, it's less packaging, you have more

Nowhere was this more apparent than cooking staples

control over the salt and preservative content, and you

and buying entirely fresh food. I'd get a fridge full of

can make as much as you need. And, there's nothing

fresh vegetables, then order takeout because I was too

like hummus made from freshly cooked chickpeas.

tired to cook dinner, then the food would go bad and I'd kick myself for wasting so much food and money. Or, I'd feel guilty about buying canned beans when I COULD buy them in bulk with no packaging, and cook them myself in a big batch. But then I'd obsess over meal prepping, end up with a kitchen full of

The same thing with rice - perfectly cooked rice from scratch is far better (and less wasteful) than those plastic steam bags of instant rice. And it doesn't take much effort to make it. (Especially if you happen to own a rice cooker.)

prepped food to clean up after, and forget to put away

But you don't need special tools for either. Just a pot

the cooling colander of cooked chickpeas. So they'd

with a lid, and a simple colander will give you great

end up ruined, and I'd have to toss them out, again

rice & beans every time. Here's how we do it.

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Best used in soups and as thickeners. These cook super quickly and are meant to be cooked down to a "mush." The most commonly found variety, these are great in soups and burgers because they hold their shape but can be broken down easily.

These hold their shape beautifully, so they're perfect for use in salads, as meat replacements (like ground beef, or taco meat), and cook toward the longer end of the cooking recommendation.

Rinse thoroughly and remove any debris. Let come to a boil, Soak

then simmer 20-30 minutes or until tender.

overnight, discard the water. Cook on low for 4-6 hours, or until

Thoroughly rinse your legumes

tender. Add enough water to cover, plus two inches above. Soak for 8 hours, discard the water. In a heavy-bottomed pot, simmer the beans for 1 - 1 1/2 hours or until tender. Add enough water to cover, plus two inches above. Don't boil, or else they'll fall apart. Lightly salt the water to prevent tough skins. For smaller beans, err to the shorter side of the cooking time, for the larger, err to the longer side.

before cooking, to remove dirt and debris. Remove any discolored or "off" looking pieces during the rinsing. For either method, you can add in fresh herbs, onion, and a bay leaf for flavor. Add in a piece of kombu to quicksoaked beans to make them easier to digest. Save the cooking water, you can use it for a stock base. Store legumes in enough cooking water to cover, for up to

Instead of an overnight soak, you can boil the beans for 5 minutes, then turn the heat off and let sit, covered, for 1

five days in a sealed container in the fridge. You can freeze them (in their cooking liquid) but we haven't had the best experience with them like this.

1/2 hours before fully cooking. *Split peas can be cooked in about 40 minutes if they're soaked overnight, or 1 1/2 hours if unsoaked.

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white rice – 20 minutes

millet – 25 minutes

steel cut oats – 45 minutes

brown rice – 50 minutes

bulgur – 20 minutes

hulled barley – 60 minutes

wild rice – 45 minutes

amaranth – 30 minutes

farro – 60 minutes

forbidden rice – 30 minutes

freekeh – 40 minutes

red rice – 20 minutes

rolled oats – 5 minutes

sushi rice –15 minutes

quinoa – 15 minutes

Add a pinch of salt to your water and let it come to a boil. Pour in your rinsed grains and let cook, partially covered, until tender. Add in 1/4 cup extra water at a time if you find your water is evaporating too quickly. Drain any excess liquid (like with barley or other large grain) and let stand off heat, covered for five minutes. Fluff small grains with a fork.

Thoroughly rinse your legumes before cooking, to remove dirt and debris. Remove any discolored or "off" looking pieces during the rinsing. You can add in fresh herbs, onion, and a bay leaf for flavor, or use stock instead of water. Store in an airtight container for up to two days. Rice & grains do best when eaten quickly, but you can rehydrate them especially if you use them in soups, stir fries, casseroles, etc. r

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I'm a child of an overcrowded, cluttered house, with piles of uncleaned dishes and huge fights over where the TV remote ended up. I could never find the clothes I wanted to wear, or it was still sitting in the washer, washed but never put in the dryer. I pledged to myself that I would never let my living space get like that...until, it did. It's the curse of being an adult with responsibilities and too much on their plate, really. Boxes pile up in our office and entryway, bags are never put away from road trips, and the dishes. The dishes are never not piled high in our kitchen. The countertops just all of a sudden appear totally covered in debris, like in the Sims after a Sim cooks a meal. I didn't intend for it to happen, but it did. I've been focusing on not only cleaning our house, but keeping it clean on a daily basis without much work. I'm living in a much bigger house than I grew up in, so I'm not used to lugging boxes and bags up and down the stairs every day, or just vacuuming stairs in the first place. Cleaning the house top to bottom in one day just isn't possible where I live now, and I've tried many times. So I don't want to set aside whole weekends just to cleaning - I want to do the bare minimum and not end up like I did as a teen, overrun by stuff and frustration around that stuff. So here are my best tips on how to keep a clean house... without spending days doing it.

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MAKE T H E B E D

Even if it's just throwing the blanket

over top, just covering the sheets can be a huge help to the amount of times you have to change the sheets. Our cats will lay on the sheets, leaving hair and debris under the top blanket if we don't. Oh, and we've heard it's a good way to start your day in a clean mindset. We mostly don't want cat litter in our bed!

PUT D I S H E S I N TH E DI SH WA SH ER

PARE DOWN YOUR ITEMS/ LIVING SPACE TO REDUCE HOW MUCH YOU NEED TO CLEAN.

This is a hugely overlooked aspect to cleaning, but my mom told me best - the bigger the house, the more you have to clean. That's why she loves her small house! Even if you can't change your living situation, you can change how

After you're

much you have to clean, by reducing the

done with a meal, rinse off your dishes and if you have a

amount of stuff you have, or keeping

dishwasher, toss them in there. Then at the end of the day,

certain rooms closed. If you only have

you either have a load in the dishwasher to run, or a stack

enough clothes to last a few weeks, you

of mostly-cleaned dishes to finish off.

won't let it pile up because you have

PICK U P D I R T Y CL OT HE S & PU T TH EM IN A

to wash it.

HAMP E R

A super easy task that'll make a huge difference

in how your space looks and feels.

CLEA N W H I L E YO U CO OK

This is really easy if you

have another person living with you, but you can do it alone, too. While a soup is simmering, do some dishes. While you're waiting for the bagel to toast, wipe off the countertops.

SORT M A I L W H EN Y OU P IC K IT U P (T OUCH THIN G S O N C E )

This is a good general rule for anything

in your life if you feel overworked. Only touch things once! The rule is simple. When you pick up the mail, sort through it before setting it down. Does it need to be recycled, shredded, opened, or maybe set aside in a bin for you to later remove yourself from their mailing list? (We do the last one once or twice a year!) If it gets put down

HAVE A HOME FOR EVERYTHING IN YOUR SPACE.

The shopping bags

have a place in the car, and in our entranceway. The car has a basket with all of our emergency items. Our camping gear all lives in the same closet. My makeup sits in a drawer in our bedroom. If it doesn't have a home, it'll be clutter. Yes, even those clothes that you wore once but they're not dirty enough yet to go in the laundry basket - those need a place to live! So find a place for it, so you know where it'll go when you need to put it away.

KEEP CLEANING MATERIALS

on a table, and you go to make dinner, and then you forget

TOGETHER.

about it, it won't get gone through. So use the rule from

we keep our vacuum, recycling bins,

the SPACE category and have a home (recycling bin, tote,

cleaning sprays, soaps, and all the

shredder, etc.) for these pieces of mail.

other things we need to keep the house

"NEV E R L E A V E A R OO M EM PT Y- HA ND ED " TO

clean. We even have a bin to keep our

REDU C E C L U T T ER .

Going upstairs to go to the

bathroom, and the vacuum needs to go upstairs? Take it with you. Heading down for a shower, and the laundry needs to be done today? Take it down with you, since the laundry machine is there. Never leave a room empty handed.

Near our washer/dryer

most used cleaners together so that we can bring it around the house with us, reducing the amount of time it takes to find what we're looking for.


T H A N K S SO MUCH FOR CHECKING OUT OUR FREE PREVIEW!

PAIR LIKE TASKS

USE YOUR PHONE.

(litter/vacuum/garbages,

We set a shared reminder on

dishes/counters, porch/car/garage, laundry/beds)

Wednesdays at 6PM to take out the recycling, but we

When I clean the litter, I also often need to vacuum

also use that opportunity to put returnable bottles

up the area. So I turn the one small task into a

& thrift store donations in the car and oil our wood

group of them that need to get done anyway. When I

countertops. It's a good mid-week time for us to tidy

do the laundry, I also change the sheets on the bed

up a little.

& pillows, and it makes for cleaner skin and less

SET A TIMER & PUT ON HEADPHONES/A

allergens for us.

DO ONE TYPE OF TASK THROUGHOUT YOUR PLACE AT ONCE

I'll listen to podcasts or music, or if

I'm doing the dishes or folding laundry I'll bring out

READ T H E R E S T O F THIS A R T I C LE IN OU R F U L L ISSU E H E R E (windows/mirrors, vacuuming, etc.)

If you're pulling out the vacuum, you could relatively quickly just vacuum the whole place. Or if doing the dishes, grab all the dirty dishes from around the

house to make sure they're all done. Doing it all at once makes for more efficient use of time.

DON'T WORRY ABOUT THE BIGGER STUFF ON A DAILY BASIS.

Cleaning the toilet, shower,

laundry vents, or removing cobwebs only comes up when I have a free weekend day to work on it. I don't put pressure on myself to do that on a daily basis, at all.

SPEAKER.

my laptop to put on a Netflix show or Youtube playlist.

INVEST WHERE YOU CAN, WHEN YOU CAN. Nothing helped my sanity more than when we got a dishwasher, after years of saving up. We were gifted a robotic vacuum one year for Christmas, and it totally changed how much I had to mop/vacuum in the highest traffic areas in our house. (A.K.A., the kitchen.) The more it vacuumed, the less got stuck on the floor and I didn't need to mop constantly. It's especially satisfying to have the dishwasher, laundry, and vacuum going, and really motivates me to do at least a little bit of cleaning, because I know I have help!

DO THE BIGGER STUFF, JUST SEASONALLY.

ADDRESS PROBLEM AREAS WITH SIMPLE

Once the first warm day of the year comes, after I've

SOLUTIONS.

gone outside and taken in the sun, I'll open all the

clothes and tissues all over the floor, so I moved

windows to air out the house. When doing that, why not

the laundry basket and garbage can to his side of the

also take the opportunity to wash the windows? I do

bed and it's not an issue anymore. The front door was

it once a year and it makes a huge difference in the

super cluttered with winter clothing, where we'd spend

amount of light coming into the house, but doesn't

too much time searching for matching gloves, until we

take much effort. Or, when we know it's the last of

added a secondhand locker for all of them so they'd be

the snow for the year, we mop the floors and clean the

easy to find. A current problem I have is that I don't

car because so much salt, leaves and debris have built

like folding our sheets, because we have two different

up over the winter.

sized beds and I don't know which sheet goes to which

My partner used to leave his dirty

DIGITAL ISSUES PRINT ISSUES SUBSCRIPTIONS AND MORE!

HAVE A "THIS MUST BE DONE" POINT.

For

us, we know we need to do the laundry when our laundry basket in the bedroom gets about halfway full, because

bed, so they just end up unfolded in a tote for weeks. so I need to address it with maybe writing the size on the tag with marker instead.

it's been about a week. Or, when I see cat hair dust-

AS A LAST RESORT, HAVE PEOPLE OVER.

bunnies on the stairs, I vacuum the house from top to

Nothing makes me clean the entire place faster than

bottom. Whatever your limit is, know it and you'll get

having people over for a party, or even better -

stuff done.

staying overnight.

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Words + Photos by Emily Grandy

grandliterary.com

@figandblack

Emily is a writer of fiction, editor of science, and a lover of all things plants - from food and farming, to forests and fair-trade. She's personally experimented with a wide range of plant-based diets, and eventually found reciprocal happiness with her environment in locally grown, sustainably produced foods. When she's not writing, you can find her outdoors, embracing the beauty of the natural world.

What do jam, kimchi, miso, and

Middle East with more complex

Towards the end of the twentieth

space-food have in common? They’re

concoctions that used sugar instead of

century, the popularity of home

all preserved foods, historically used

honey, jam’s popularity grew. Joan of

preserving waned, with people won

to protect against periods of scarcity.

Arc was rumored to eat quince jam to

over by the choice and ease offered

These days, many long-preserved

give her courage before heading into

by supermarket shopping. This has

foods (think: aged wines) are prized

battle. During the era of seafaring

changed in recent years, however,

as delicacies, and the older they are,

exploration and trade, sailors would

and jam-making is now more popular

the more distinguished their taste is

stockpile jam for their voyages as a way

than ever, with cooks and foodies

thought to be.

to prevent scurvy. Alternatively, Mary,

once again discovering the simple

Queen of Scots ate marmalade as a

pleasures of creating their own fruit

cure for seasickness. Louis XIV was

preserves. Access to every imaginable

so passionate about jellies, jams, and

fruit year-round has spurred flavor

marmalades that he insisted that every

combinations as endless as humans

meal finish with such a treat, each one

are creative, meaning both artisans

made with fruit grown at the gardens

and home cooks alike can perfect their

at Versailles, which even boasted

own sweet vision.

Of all foods, though, fresh fruit probably rises to the top of most peoples’ favorites – sweet, colorful, ripe from the vine or stem and naturally sun-warmed, heavy with juice. What could be more enticing? Sadly, fruit is one of nature’s more ephemeral gifts, arriving and departing rapidly

tropical varieties like pineapple.

Personally, I prefer to celebrate the

with the changing seasons. In order

Canning is actually one of the newest

fruits that grow closest to my home, in

to make fruit’s vitamin-rich goodness

methods

preservation,

season, harvested at peak ripeness. This

last throughout the year, people found

predated by sun drying, freezing,

ensures superior flavor and nutrition,

clever ways of preserving it. One such

fermenting, salt curing, smoking,

and affords the benefit of reducing the

method was included in the earliest

and pickling. Thus, large-scale jam

distance a delicate fruit must travel to

known cookbook, De Re Coquinaria

production did not become possible

reach my kitchen. In this article, I’ve

(The Art of Cooking), which dates

until the discovery of pasteurization

described two jam-making methods

back to the first century AD. In it jam

in 1785, when Napoleon Bonaparte

I’ve returned to time and again, one

is described as soft fruit heated with

offered a reward to anyone who could

that preserves fruit for several months

honey, cooled, then stored.

find a way to preserve large quantities

without refrigeration, and one you’ll

of food for his soldiers.

want to make and eat right away.

When crusaders returned from the

of

food

Enjoy the fruits of the season!

33


To make delicious homemade jam, all you need are three basic ingredients: fruit, raw cane sugar, and lemon. Many use

store-bought commercial

pectin

jams or

thickeners, chemical or cornbased sweeteners, and other unnecessary additives to achieve sub-excellent results, but I say the simpler the better. In this recipe

10 cups fresh or

1. Put a small

frozen fruit

plate or two in

5 cups raw cane

the freezer (used to check gelling of

sugar 1 lemon, zest + juice

jam later). 2. In an 8 qt.

saucepan cook the fruit on medium-

8-10 8 oz. canning jars (with rubber sealing lids) 12 qt. stock pot (for heating jars) 8 qt. saucepan (for cooking fruit)

1 qt. saucepan (for heating lids) jar lifter metallic lid lifter wide neck funnel candy thermometer ladle

high heat, mashing and stirring as you go.

we’ll use lemon to give the jam

3. Once the fruit has liquefied, add sugar

1. Place glass canning jars in the 12 qt. pot, and lids

a zesty flavor and to lower the

and lemon zest and juice. Continue to

in the 1 qt. pot. Cover both with water and bring

pH. At pH 4.6 or below (high

cook until sugar dissolves.

to a boil. Allow pots to simmer while jam is being

acid foods), harmful bacteria will not grow, so these foods can be given a relatively mild canning treatment, such as the water canning method used in this recipe. This jam recipe is versatile and offers great results using all sorts of fruits. Summer berries, autumn’s concord grapes, and even fresh spring rhubarb each produce delicious jam. Frozen fruit works just as well as fresh, or experiment by mixing and matching your favorite combinations. Berries can be cooked whole, except strawberries which should be destemmed and diced. Stone fruit and concord grapes should be deseeded prior to cooking.

4. Bring mixture to a full rolling boil, stirring constantly to prevent

prepared. Remove one jar from hot water bath using the jar lifter.

scorching. Using a candy thermometer

2. Ladle hot jam into the jar using a wide necked funnel.

to monitor temperature, allow jam to

Leave 1/2 inch of headspace. Wipe any spillage off

reach 218°F.

the lip of the jar to ensure a clean seal.

5. Once temperature reaches 218°F,

3. Using the magnetized lid lifter, place a lid on the

remove pot from heat and test the gel

filled jar and then apply the screw top. DO NOT

by putting a spoonful of jam onto the

TIGHTEN COMPLETELY, only finger tight,

chilled plate and returning it to the

enough to hold the lid in place.

freezer for 2 minutes. 6. Check to see if jam has gelled by tilting the plate. If jam stays put or runs very slowly, it's ready. If it seems watery, continue cooking the jam at 218°F. Retest with a chilled plate every 5 minutes until the jam has gelled and doesn’t run on the plate. (This step may have to be repeated several times.)

4. Return filled jar to hot water bath. Repeat for all remaining jars until all jam has been used, then allow jars to sit in boiling water bath for 5 minutes. 5. Remove jars from water bath and rest on a wire rack at room temperature undisturbed for 12 hours. The difference in temperature between the jar and surrounding air will create a vacuum seal. 6. Once the lids seal and the top inverts, tighten the screw top and store jars in a cool, dark place up to 1 year. Refrigerate after opening.

https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/general/ensuring_safe_canned_foods.html

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A delicious way to showcase homemade jam is with these super simple-to-make bars. With just four ingredients, these soft, chewy date bars offer enough sweetness and mild nuttiness to serve as the perfect vehicle for fresh fruit jam. 1/2 cup rolled oats 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, or nut of choice 12-15 dates, pitted 2 tbsp coconut oil 1 tbsp water

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. 2. Blend oats and walnuts in a food processor to make a fine flour. Add dates, water and coconut oil and blend until well combined. 3. Grease an 8 x 8 baking pan and press mixture into base. Bake 7-10 minutes until edges start to darken. 4. Cut into small bars and serve with homemade jam.

To celebrate seasonal flavors at their peak, I love this ‘instant’ jam recipe, which is best eaten soon after it’s prepared. Unlike jam cooked at high heat or pressurized in a canner, this recipe does not preserve the fruit for long-term storage, but has the benefit of maintaining each fruity participant’s delicate essence. Use this recipe as a guide to experiment with combinations and flavors. 3 cups fruit (fresh or frozen) 1/4 cup pure maple syrup 1 tbsp lemon juice optional: chia seeds, vanilla extract to taste

1. Heat fruit in a sauce pan over medium-high heat until it begins to liquefy. 2. Add sweetener of choice and lemon juice and stir to combine. Continue to cook until liquid mostly evaporates and desired consistency is reached. 3. For a more jelly-like texture, add a spoonful or two of chia seeds and allow mixture to sit for 10 minutes before serving. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator up to 10 days. r

37


Here's the story of a lot of weeks

that you ended up never using, and

and thought of what you're putting

of my life: I start it with the best

it's a year past its best-by date.

into it in the first place. To break

intentions; I've got a grocery list

It really feels awful to not fully

the cycle of buying too much (or

and I get to the farmer's market

utilize

especially

not buying the right things) and

and I get overzealous and buy too

knowing how much food waste there

wasting food, you have to first be

much because something's got a great

is in the world.*

honest with yourself about what it

deal or MAYBE I can do something with that ingredient, how could I pass up a bushel of apples for a few dollars? I bring it home, exhausted from

my

amazing

decision-making,

and leave it on the counter. It gets moved to the fridge, but I'm all of a sudden overwhelmed at the possibility of cooking and cleaning and doing that big project I had dreamed up for those apples, and man, it's just so much easier to get takeout tonight. I overworked myself, anyway, during the day. A few days later, the food's gone bad and the guilt I feel is intense. This next time, I intend to do so much better. But the cycle starts over again. Even if you're not in my position of needing to create new food ideas all the time, I'm sure you've got something similar going on in your life. Maybe, instead, you've got a can of one weird ingredient because it was for a recipe or you thought you might try something new. Or a certain spice in your spice rack

your

pantry,

Conversely, for me at least, I feel like a ~real adult~ when I empty the fridge or use up a jar in my pantry before anything spoils. Not only does it prevent food waste, it also saves money, keeps my kitchen cleaner,

and

remember

what's

helps

me

there,

so

better making

meals is that much simpler.

on top of what I'm using up every single week. We definitely get busier on certain weeks than others, but I find that when I have my pantry in place it makes it more streamlined. Having a few prepped ingredients is a lifesaver. Having a list of simple meals for me to make quickly is incredibly helpful. But on the lessbusy weeks, I can have the chance to go through the pantry and really clear it out and be mindful of how I want it to look going forward - and that's what this piece is all about. It's not just the clearing out that's

38

but

also

your

that

you're

actually

eating,

and what you prefer. If you don't actually use the scary new-to-you ingredients each week, figure out if you just don't have the energy to be adventurous right now, or if you don't have the right tools or meal ideas in place for you to use them. If you never use the dried beans, use them up and buy canned for a

It's really hard for me to ALWAYS be

important,

is

mindset

while, and see the difference in how you feel about them. When

you've

really

real

sat

down

with

and

gotten

yourself,

then

it's time to clear your kitchen out and take stock. You don't have to *completely*

empty

the

room,

but

definitely go through your fridge and fresh food, and any sensitive pantry items like nuts and spices. Use up anything you can, and try out a few pantry-staple

recipes

to

really

clear your space out. Then, start building your ideal pantry back up, centered around how you actually eat and how you want to eat. Here's how. *fao.org/save-food/resources/keyfindings/



T H A N K S SO MUCH FOR CHECKING OUT OUR FREE PREVIEW!

Do this once every so often - maybe once a month. Put

up how you can combine them, incorporating anything

special emphasis on using the things that haven't

else from your pantry you want to use up.

been used at all over that month (or year!) - like

the soup you froze in the winter but never reheated for dinner, or the single can of pinto beans in the back of the cabinet.

Utilize pinterest if you're not sure what to do with certain ingredients.

Sometimes a cooking day can change your perspective.

Freeze anything that can be salvaged that you won't use right away. Especially fruit and bread.

Especially with new ingredients/techniques/meals, it can seem daunting to try it out, so you never end up actually trying. But when you go to finally

Toss any moldy/overdue foods. Take note of the

do it, the cooking of it seems more achievable when

ingredients that you end up having to toss - do

you're experiencing it. Dried beans, for example -

I really want to buy it again? How can I use it

you might never cook them because it seems like it

better? Or do I just not want to bother?

takes up too much time, but when you finally cooked

READ T H E R E S T O F THI S A R T I C LE IN O U R F U L L ISSUE H E R E

Create a "use it up" meal plan, using what's left

in the fridge. List out your ingredients and think

them (Page 44) it wasn't as hard as you thought, so you're more likely to use them in the future.

So here are a bunch of recipes that you can use to finish up the things you might've had lying around your pantry - please substitute as you see fit, with the things you have too much of. Then we can talk about building your space back up with the things you'll really eat!

We always end up with tons of different types of dried fruit, coconut, nut butters, and liquid sweeteners on our shelves. But good news - there's a single recipe to use up all of them. And they're the perfect easy breakfast food!

1 1/2 cups oats

1. Preheat your oven to 350°F. Stir together the oats, dried fruit/nuts,

up to 2 cups of dried fruit,

DIGITAL ISSUES PRINT ISSUES SUBSCRIPTIONS AND MORE!

seeds, chopped nuts, coconut (we like a mixture of 1/2 cups of 4 different ingredients) 1/2 tsp vanilla extract 1 cup peanut butter

3/4 cup liquid sweetener (maple

syrup, agave, brown rice syrup, honee (the vegan kind), etc.)

a heaping pinch flaky sea salt, to sprinkle on top

and vanilla extract and set aside. 2. In a double boiler (or just a tempered glass bowl on a pot with an inch of water in it), pour in your peanut butter and liquid sweetener. Heat on medium until everything's melted and easy to mix. Stir together gently until consistently creamy.

3. Pour into the dry mixture and stir until it comes together. Press into a lined baking sheet. The size will depend on how thick you want your bars to be - but err on the side of about 1/2 an inch thick.

4. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until the oats on top turn golden. You don't want to overbake, this step is just to set the bars. They should be soft still, or else you'll end up with rock hard bars. Let cool then cut into bars.

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