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THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE CHICAGO WOLVES

VOL. 6 ISSUE 3

LOCKED I N C H I C AG O


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IN THIS ISSUE

1

LOCKED IN CHICAGO Corey Locke has traveled the world through hockey. Now he’s finally arrived at his destination.

EXCLUSIVE: BEHIND THE SCENES WITH COREY LOCKE CHICAGOWOLVES.COM/BREAKAWAY

03 05 08 11 13 15

LEAGUE WELCOME WOLVES HISTORY OWNERSHIP HOCKEY OPERATIONS BEHIND THE BENCH MAP THE LEAGUE

FRONT OFFICE

Seth Gold Irwin Jann Mike Gordon Wayne Messmer Dana Wildman

OPERATIONS

Courtney Mahoney Bryan Campion Dan Harris John Sherlock Becky Jarosch

HOCKEY OPERATIONS Norine Gillner Mike Nardella

PARTNERSHIPS Jon Sata Greg Sprott Kendele Carney Kristen Keane Mark Iralson Mike Short Dan Zarzynski

Director Director President Senior Executive Vice President Executive Assistant Senior Vice President of Operations Director of Operations Operations Manager Game Operations Coordinator Community Relations Coordinator Hockey Operations Assistant Hockey Operations Vice President of Partnerships Manager of Partnerships Partnerships Client Services Manager Partnerships Client Services Coord. Partnerships Sales Executive Partnerships Sales Executive Partnerships Sales Executive

17 23 31 35 36

MEET THE WOLVES FAST FOUR DARING GREATLY RECORD BREAKERS HOCKEY 101

TICKET SALES & SERVICES Kevin Dooley Eric Zavilla Dave Pawelek Jackie Schroeder Stefanie Starck Aaron Holz Rob Newburg Steve Winner Mike Elliott John Golz Janel James Matt Agase Anthony Krzyzak Cori Giblichman Kevin Nathan Ricky Campione Mike Czopek Pawel Sienko Emily Durfey

Senior Executive Dir. of Ticket Sales Exec. Dir. of Ticket Sales & Services Senior Director of Strategic Alliances Director of Ticket Sales & Services Director of Program Development Ticket Sales & Services Coordinator Youth Hockey Coordinator E-Business Specialist Manager of Inside Sales Senior Account Executive Senior Account Executive Account Executive Account Executive Account Representative Account Representative Inside Sales Representative Inside Sales Representative Inside Sales Representative Ticket Services Intern

1-800-THE-WOLVES | CHICAGOWOLVES.COM | THEAHL.COM

COMMUNICATIONS Lindsey Willhite Justin Skelnik Elise Butler

CREATIVE SERVICES Imran Javed Kristen Shilton Troy Mueller Cindy Navarro Kara Konicki Ross Dettman

TV

Ron Storto Sarah Draheim Stephen Fabro Cameron Gibson

TV BROADCAST Jason Shaver Bill Gardner

41 43 45 48

Director of Public Relations Asst. Director of Media Relations Communications Intern Digital Content Manager Digital Media Coordinator Graphic Designer Junior Graphic Designer Creative Services Assistant Team Photographer Executive TV Producer TV Production Manager TV Producer TV Intern Play-by-Play Announcer Color Analyst

STRAIGHT OUTTA SALMON ARM BY THE NUMBERS GAME TIME AUTOGRAPH PHOTO

MEDICAL STAFF

Dr. Scott Logue, MD Dr. Rob Dugan, MD Dr. Jack Morgan, MD Dr. Alan Acierno, DDS Jim Buskirk, PT Jolie Holschen, MD

GAME-DAY STAFF Gordon Scott Jason Svejda

Team Physician/Orthopedics Orthopedics Internist Team Dentist Physical Therapist Emergency Medicine Public Address Announcer In-Arena Host

Deanna Angelini, Jennifer Bachelder, Alida Banh, Kimberly Bart, Emily Boxer, Bianca Bruno, Joe Capozzi, Kelly Carlson, Anthony Chicalace, Sydney Cosentino, Nick Daniels, Nick DiFalco, Dana Goldstein, Heather Hansen, Brittney Hillebrand, Jena Karkos, Samantha Krasinski, Steve Laures, Nikki Lennarson, Ashley Leverenz, Bridgette McGinley, Jenn Myzia, Danielle Nasshan, Seth Novoselsky, Rob Nowak, Geoff Post, Jacqueline Povitsky, Jessica Schubert, Miranda Scott, Brittany Sloat, Lauren Stoeck, Amanda Thomsen, Rene Twardowski, James Wilberschied Breakaway Magazine Editorial Producer: Courtney Mahoney Publication Writer: Kristen Shilton Publication Designer: Christina Moritz Publication Photographer: Ross Dettman Creative Support: Imran Javed and Cindy Navarro

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


LEAGUE WELCOME

3

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


WOLVES HISTORY

5

FOUR-TIME CHAMPIONS THE CHICAGO WOLVES FRANCHISE IS DEFINED BY EXCELLENCE. During an 11-year span from 1997-2008, the Wolves reached the league Finals six times and came away with the championship trophy four times. In 1998 and 2000, the Wolves skated away with the International Hockey League’s Turner Cup. In 2002 and 2008, the team hoisted the American Hockey League’s big prize, the Calder Cup. Regardless of which league they’ve played, the Wolves organization has become synonymous with winning. It’s a tradition they carry into their 20th season of competition. Here, we look back at the four most momentous days in Wolves history, all of which have added to the franchise’s illustrious fabric.

JUNE 15, 1998 Backed by 16,701 fans, the second-largest crowd in Turner Cup Finals history, the Wolves shut out the Detroit Vipers 3-0 to capture their first Turner Cup Championship, 4-games-to-3. It was the first sevengame series for the IHL Championship in 13 years, while the shutout set a then-franchise record with two in one postseason. Chicago won the last two games of the series to become only the sixth team in the IHL’s 53-year history to rebound from a 3-games-to-2 deficit in the Finals. Wolves center Alexander Semak walked away with the N.R. ”Bud“ Poile Trophy as the postseason’s most valuable player.

JUNE 5, 2000

JUNE 3, 2002

JUNE 10, 2008

After a scoreless first period, center Derek Plante notched two goals just 26 seconds apart in the second period to eliminate the Grand Rapids Griffins at Van Andel Arena and capture the Wolves’ second Turner Cup Championship in three years. With the victory, Chicago became the 16th team in league history to capture multiple IHL championships (1998 and 2000). Wolves goaltender Andrei Trefilov was awarded the N.R. ”Bud“ Poile Trophy as the Turner Cup Playoffs Most Valuable Player, having led the league during the postseason in both goals-against average (1.35) and save percentage (.950).

The Wolves clinched their third championship in five years when center Yuri Butsayev scored 2:05 into the second overtime to defeat the Bridgeport Sound Tigers 4-3 and capture the Calder Cup Championship, 4-games-to-1, at the Allstate Arena. The Wolves, who played a league-high 105 games, including an all-time American Hockey Leaguehigh 25 playoff games, became the sixth team in AHL history to win the championship in their inaugural season. Goaltender Pasi Nurminen was awarded the Jack A. Butterfield Trophy as the playoff MVP, posting a league-leading and then franchise-high 15 wins. Right wing Rob Brown, who notched three assists in the victory, led the league during the postseason with a then-franchise record 33 points and tied an AHL and team record with 26 assists.

The Wolves clinched their fourth league title in 11 years and second Calder Cup Championship with a 5-2 victory and a 4-games-to-2 series win over the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins at Allstate Arena. Center Jason Krog capped a four-point night with a hat trick and an assist, which earned him the Jack A. Butterfield Trophy as the MVP of the 2008 Calder Cup Playoffs. He matched franchise marks with 12 goals and 26 assists in the postseason and established a new club record with 38 points. Rookie goaltender Ondrej Pavelec collected his 16th postseason win, the most in club history.

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


6

WO LV ES H I STO RY

BEHIND THE LENS FOR 19 SEASONS, CHICAGO WOLVES PHOTOGRAPHER ROSS DETTMAN has been dedicated to chronicling the team’s improbable goals, wild celebrations and memorable fights. Just like a favorite player, certain photos and events stand out among the rest. Here, he shares the images that stick with him season after season.

TIME LAPSE (2011) This wasn’t about a photo I took, but it was a new experience for Christina (Moritz), Matthew (Young) and I. Going from concrete to ice and seeing the logo come together, it was extremely cool and definitely a visual departure for us, going in directions we hadn’t before.

WATCH IT:

CHICAGOWOLVES.COM/PAINTINGTHEICE20

CHRIS CHELIOS HI-DEF HEADSHOT (2009) I thought he had a better

WENDELL YOUNG, RARE LOOK COVER (1998)

headshot than anyone. It went beyond a headshot to a whole

There was real serendipity here. I had

other creative idea. He has an

thought about the idea of doing a photo

amazingly textured face. Other

where the person’s face wasn’t totally

than coming from his age, it

in focus, with the face as just a design

comes from scars. It struck me

element so the audience is looking at

as “wow.” When we lit his face

something else. Then our fifth season

a certain way you could really

comes along and we needed a Rare

see a road map of where he’s

Look cover. Wendell had just won his

been. He ended his career with

fifth ring, and his first Turner Cup, and

us and so his face is as scarred

visually a lot of things came together.

up as it’s going to be.

It was our fifth year, he just got his fifth ring, he achieved a goal no one else ever had in hockey. All those things came together in one photo.

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8

OW N E R S H I P

DONALD R. LEVIN (luh-VIN) founded DRL Enterprises, Inc., in 1969. The

DON LEVIN CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD / GOVERNOR

Chicago-based company has holdings in many industries including tobacco processing, aircraft and medical equipment leasing, licensed sports product manufacturing and distribution, and motion picture production and distribution. Levin’s film company has made nearly 20 motion pictures distributed in the U.S. and overseas. His films have featured such stars as Emilio Estevez, Charlie Sheen, Sharon Stone, Rodney Dangerfield, and Chuck Norris. Levin founded the Chicago Wolves with William Buddy Meyers and Grant Mulvey in January 1994 and has served as the team’s chairman of the board throughout. Levin donates his time and serves on the board of directors for several charitable organizations. Levin also supports Chicago’s Department of Animal Care and Control (ACC). The Wolves host the ACC’s Adopt-a-Dog program at several home games each season and encourage fans to bring home an adopted dog after the game. The Adopt-A-Dog program has found homes for 1,080 dogs in its first 13 seasons. Ten years ago, Levin purchased and donated the Animobile -- a mobile adoption unit and a modern clinic staffed by veterinarians and adoption specialists. The Chicago native was recognized at the Boy Scouts of America’s Northwest Suburban Council’s Distinguished Citizens Banquet as its 2005 Honoree. Under Levin’s direction, the Wolves organization has held a scout night for the Northwest Suburban Council at a home game for the last 16 seasons. Levin was inducted into the Illinois Hockey Hall of Fame on Jan. 27, 2013. He was honored as the International Hockey League’s Executive of the Year for the 19992000 season, which concluded with the franchise’s second of four championships. Before beginning his business career, Levin served in the United States Marine Corps, from which he was honorably discharged. Levin and his wife, Kathleen Ann, have a son, Robert, and they live in the northern suburbs. ”I LIKE ALL OF THE CHARITIES WE’RE INVOLVED WITH. IT’S GREAT TO BE ABLE TO HELP SO MANY PEOPLE AND ANIMALS IN NEED.”

WE ASKED

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE CHARITY WITH WHICH TO WORK? WHAT INSPIRED YOUR INVOLVEMENT?

WILLIAM BUDDY MEYERS, a principal owner of the Wolves who founded

WILLIAM BUDDY MEYERS VICE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

the team with Don Levin and Grant Mulvey in January 1994, has been involved in the world of hockey for more than 35 years. He is a former certified agent of the National Hockey League Players’ Association and is past attorney for the Soviet Red Army Hockey Team (CSKA). He is a practicing attorney and the principal in the law firm of William Buddy Meyers, Ltd. His concentration is in the areas of worker’s compensation and personal injury litigation. Additionally, he is a member of the Illinois Bar Association, Illinois Trial Lawyers Association, and Illinois Workers Compensation Lawyers Association; a former director of the Better Boys Foundation and River North Association; and a recipient of the Shomrim Society of Illinois’ Man of the Year Award in 2006. He also supports numerous charitable and environmental organizations. Meyers is a graduate of the University of “THERE ARE SO MANY WORTHY Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and holds a juris CAUSES THAT WE WORK WITH. DON doctor degree from the Illinois Institute of AND I EACH HAVE SOME FAVORITES. Technology/Chicago Kent. He and Jill live in MINE INCLUDE CHALLENGE ASPEN the River North area of Chicago and have five (INJURED SOLDIERS FROM THE children between them: Justin, Lindsey, Zak, UNITED STATES AND ISRAEL LEARN Brad, and Leslie. TO SKI), LITTLE HEROES PEDIATRIC CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION, AND AS MANY OTHER CHARITIES AS I CAN INVOLVING CHILDREN.”

B R E A K A W AY M A G A Z I N E


HOCKEY OPERATIONS

WENDELL YOUNG GENERAL MANAGER

11

WENDELL YOUNG enters his fifth season at the helm of the Wolves hockey operations department. The team has compiled a .590 winning percentage (167-111-15-19) during his tenure as general manager, which includes capturing the regular-season West Division title in 2009-10 and the regular-season Midwest Division title in 2011-12. The 50-year-old is the Wolves’ all-time leader among goaltenders in games played (322), wins (169), saves (8,467), minutes (17,912) and shutouts (16), and was a member of Chicago’s 1998 and 2000 Turner Cup championship squads. His jersey number “1” was the first number retired by the Wolves on Dec. 1, 2001. The Halifax, Nova Scotia, native, who was inducted into the Nova Scotia Sport Hall of Fame in 2007, is the only man in hockey history to have won all four North American championships: the Stanley Cup, Turner Cup, Calder Cup and Memorial Cup. He captured the Stanley Cup in 1991 and 1992 as a member of the Pittsburgh Penguins, the 1988 Calder Cup with the Hershey Bears, the 1982 Memorial Cup with the Kitchener Rangers and the 1998 and 2000 Turner Cups with the Wolves. He also was behind the bench as a coach for the Wolves 2008 Calder Cup victory. Young played 18 seasons of professional hockey, including 10 in the National Hockey League. He compiled a 59-86-12 record in 187 games with the Vancouver Canucks, Philadelphia Flyers, Tampa Bay Lightning and Penguins. He also served as goaltending coach for the Calgary Flames from 2001-2003.

BILL BENTLEY enters his fifth season as assistant general manager and 20th season with the Wolves organization. One of a handful of people who has been with the organization since the team’s inception in 1994, Bentley has been instrumental in the hockey operations department for more than 17 years, which includes all four championship campaigns. The Chicago native joined the organization as a statistician in 1994 and was promoted to team services manager a year later. The 43-year-old spent 12 seasons as the director of hockey administration, handling team travel, immigration and accounting for the hockey operations department, before assuming the assistant general manager role in August 2009. A graduate of Quincy College, Bentley served as the Director of Media Relations for the Chicago Cheetahs of the now defunct Roller Hockey International during the 1993-94 season.

BILL BENTLEY ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER

GENE UBRIACO DIRECTOR OF HOCKEY OPERATIONS

GENE UBRIACO returns for his 17th term as the Wolves director of hockey operations and fifth as senior advisor following a 10-year professional playing career and 26 seasons as a professional coach. Ubriaco has been with the Wolves since the 1994-95 inaugural season when he was the team’s first head coach. That year, he guided the Wolves to a 34-33-14 record and a berth in the Turner Cup Playoffs. He compiled a 61-61-20 head coaching record with the Wolves during a three-year span, including a two-game interim stint during the 1996-97 season. Ubriaco began his coaching career at Lake Superior State University in 1972-73. Four years later, he led the Milwaukee Admirals to the Turner Cup Playoffs, becoming the first International Hockey League coach to lead an expansion team into the postseason. In 1988-89, Ubriaco moved on to the National Hockey League to coach the Pittsburgh Penguins. Under his tutelage, the Penguins shattered several team records that season and advanced to the Stanley Cup Playoffs after a seven-year absence. The Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, native recorded 162 goals, 258 assists and 420 points in 456 AHL games spanning nine seasons, which includes a career-high 42 goals and 86 points during the 1965-66 season with the Hershey Bears. Ubriaco spent his final three years as a player in the NHL with the Penguins (1967-68), the Oakland Seals (1968-69) and the Chicago Blackhawks (1969-70).

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BEHIND THE BENCH

JOHN ANDERSON HEAD COACH

DAVE ALLISON ASSISTANT COACH

SCOTT ALLEN ASSISTANT COACH

13

JOHN ANDERSON enters his 12th season as Wolves head coach after being re-hired to the position on July 16, 2013. Anderson returns to the Wolves with four years of National Hockey League experience, which includes two years as head coach of the Atlanta Thrashers from 2008-10. He served most recently as an assistant coach with the Phoenix Coyotes from 2011-13. The 56-year-old Anderson guided the Wolves to four championships during his first tenure with the Wolves: the Calder Cup in 2002 and 2008 and the Turner Cup in 1998 and 2000. He is the team’s all-time leader in wins (506) and postseason victories (105). Prior to joining the Wolves, Anderson captured the Colonial Cup as head coach of the Quad City Mallards of the Colonial Hockey League. He began his coaching career with the Winston-Salem Mammoths in 1995-96, leading them to the Southern Hockey League Finals and a 30-23-1 regular-season record. Toronto’s first pick (11th overall) in the 1977 amateur draft, Anderson played 12 seasons in the National Hockey League with the Maple Leafs (1977-85), Quebec Nordiques (1985-86), and Hartford Whalers (1986-89). The Toronto native registered five 30-goal campaigns in the NHL, including four straight from 1981-85. Anderson’s most productive offensive season came in 1982-83, when he paced Toronto with 80 points (31G, 49A) in 80 games. Anderson ranks 14th in Maple Leafs history with 189 goals and 20th with 393 points. Overall, he amassed 282 goals and 631 points in 814 career NHL games, along with 9 goals and 27 points in 37 career Stanley Cup Playoff contests. DAVE ALLISON enters his first season with the Wolves after being named assistant coach on July 16, 2013. He brings 18 years of professional coaching experience to Chicago. Allison served most recently as head coach of the American Hockey League’s Peoria Rivermen, where he led the team to a 33-35-5-3 record in 2012-13. Prior to joining the Rivermen, the 54-year-old Allison spent time as a scout with the Pittsburgh Penguins and worked as a part of the player development team with the Colorado Avalanche. Allison has accumulated a 232-214-25-28 mark during his seven seasons and 499 games as an AHL head coach with Peoria (2012-13), Iowa (2005-08), Milwaukee (200102), and Prince Edward Island (1994-96). The Fort Francis, Ontario, native also had a 25-game stint as the interim head coach of the NHL’s Ottawa Senators during the 1995-96 season. Allison enjoyed a 10-year professional career as a defenseman in the AHL, IHL, and NHL. He amassed 119 assists, 144 points, and 1,473 penalty minutes in 452 career AHL games with Nova Scotia, Sherbrooke, Newmarket, and Halifax spanning eight seasons from 1979 to 1985 and 1987-89. He skated in three NHL games with Montreal during the 1983-84 campaign.

SCOTT ALLEN enters his first season with the Wolves after being named assistant coach on July 16, 2013. He brings 17 years of professional coaching experience to Chicago. Allen served most recently as Dave Allison’s assistant with the Peoria Rivermen during the 2012-13 campaign. Prior to joining Peoria, he spent three seasons in the National Hockey League as an assistant coach with the New York Islanders. The 47-year-old Allen entered the coaching ranks as an assistant coach with the ECHL’s Johnstown Chiefs in 1996 and was promoted to head coach of the franchise halfway through the 1997-98 season. He would serve as the Chiefs head coach for four more years before moving to the American Hockey League in 2002. Allen spent two seasons with the San Antonio Rampage (2002-04), where he split time as an assistant coach and then a head coach. He then served as an assistant coach in Lowell, Omaha, and Quad City from 2004-09. The New Bedford, Mass., native spent 10 years as a player in professional hockey as the former center competed in the All American Hockey League, Atlantic Coast Hockey League, Colonial Hockey League, Central Hockey League and the ECHL.

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


MAP THE LEAGUE

WESTERN CONFERENCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

MIDWEST DIVISION Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Louis Grand Rapids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detroit Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville Rockford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicago

ATLANTIC DIVISION Manchester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Los Angeles Portland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phoenix Providence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boston St. John’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winnipeg Worcester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . San Jose

NORTH DIVISION Hamilton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montreal Lake Erie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado Rochester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Buffalo Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Toronto Utica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vancouver

NORTHEAST DIVISION Adirondack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Philadelphia Albany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey Bridgeport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NY Islanders Hartford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NY Rangers Springfield. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Columbus

WEST DIVISION Abbotsford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calgary Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carolina Oklahoma City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edmonton San Antonio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dallas

EAST DIVISION Binghamton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ottawa Hershey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington Norfolk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anaheim Syracuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tampa Bay W-B/Scranton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pittsburgh

15

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


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MEET THE WO LV ES

JAKE ALLEN, #35

G | H 6-2 | W 203 Aug. 7, 1990 Fredericton, New Brunswick @34jallen

SERGEY ANDRONOV, #17 LW | H 6-2 | W 208 July 19, 1989 Moscow, Russia @andronovsa

ALEXANDRE BOLDUC, #49 PAT CANNONE, #12 C | H 6-1 | W 199 June 26, 1985 Montreal, Quebec @ADuke49

C | H 5-11 | W 193 Aug. 9, 1986 Bayport, New York @PistolPat20

JOEL EDMUNDSON, #3

CADE FAIRCHILD, #2

D | H 6-4 | W 210 June 28, 1993 Brandon, Manitoba @jedmundson3

D | H 5-10 | W 178 Jan. 15, 1989 Duluth, Minnesota @Caderade0

KEITH AUCOIN, #29

CODY BEACH, #20

17

JORDAN BINNINGTON, #30

RW | H 6-5 | W 195 Aug. 8, 1992 Kelowna, British Columbia @CodyBeach16

G | H 6-1 | W 169 July 11, 1993 Richmond Hill, Ontario

TAYLOR CHORNEY, #4

MATT CLIMIE, #33 G | H 6-4 | W 215 Feb. 11, 1983 Leduc, Alberta

MICHAEL DAVIES, #13

D | H 6-0 | W 201 April 27, 1987 Thunder Bay, Ontario

JANI HAKANPAA, #6

CHRISTIAN HANSON, #32

SHANE HARPER, #9

C | H 5-8 | W 167 Nov. 6, 1978 Waltham, Massachusetts @coiner11

D | H 6-6 | W 227 March 31, 1992 Kirkkonummi, Finland @JHakanpaa

C | H 6-4 | W 216 March 10, 1986 Glens Falls, New York @Hanson20er

@binnnasty

RW | H 5-9 | W 175 Dec. 10, 1986 Chesterfield, Missouri @MikeGDavies

RW | H 5-10 | W 194 Feb. 1, 1989 Valencia, California @Cali_Sharp C H I C A G O W O LV E S


18

M E E T T H E WO LV ES

DMITRIJ JASKIN, #22

ERIC KATTELUS, #18

COREY LOCKE, #84

NATHAN LONGPRE, #26

MARK MANCARI, #24

EVAN OBERG, #27

HENRIK ODEGAARD, #36

BRETT PONICH, #5

CHRIS PORTER, #10

TY RATTIE, #8

LW | H 6-3 | W 204 March 23, 1993 Omsk, Russia @ DmitrijJaskin

D | H 6-0 | W 191 Feb. 16, 1988 Forestburg, Alberta @Evan_Oberg

LW | H 6-1 | W 203 June 22, 1987 Traverse City, Michigan

D | H 5-10 | W 186 Feb. 12, 1988 Oslo, Norway

B R E A K A W AY M A G A Z I N E

C | H 5-9 | W 174 May 8, 1984 Toronto, Ontario @LockeItDown84

D | H 6-7 | W 217 Feb. 22, 1991 Beaumont, Alberta @BrettPonich

F | H 6-1 | W 194 June 16, 1988 Peterborough, Ontario @Longpre9

LW | H 6-1 | W 205 May 29, 1984 Toronto, Ontario @32porterhouse

RW | H 6-4 | W 219 July 11, 1985 London, Ontario @Mancari325

RW | H 6-0 | W 183 Feb. 5, 1993 Airdrie, Alberta @TyRattie8


SAVE LIVES

WATCH FOR DETAILS AND DON’T MISS UPCOMING BLOOD DRIVE INFORMATION! STAY UP-TO-DATE WITH THE LATEST NEWS BY VISITING LIFESOURCE.ORG OR CALLING 1.877.543.3768.

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MEET THE WO LV ES

BRENT REGNER, #28

TYLER SHATTOCK, #21

YANNICK VEILLEUX, #25

SEBASTIAN WANNSTROM, #38

D | H 6-0 | W 190 May 17, 1989 Westlock, Alberta

RW | H 6-3 | W 200 Feb. 3, 1990 Vernon, British Columbia

LW | H 6-2 | W 202 Feb. 22, 1993 St. Hipolytte, Quebec @YannVeilleux9

21

DAVID SHIELDS, #7

D | H 6-3 | W 205 Jan. 27, 1991 Rochester, New York

RW | H 6-2 | W 198 March 3, 1991 Gavle, Sweden

HOCKEY OPERATIONS

STAN DUBICKI

GOALTENDING COACH

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STRENGTH & CONDITIONING COACH

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HEAD ATHLETIC TRAINER

CRAIG KOGUT

HEAD EQUIPMENT MANAGER

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ASSISTANT EQUIPMENT MANAGER

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


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23

TITLE FAST FOUR HERE

WHAT TV MARATHON COULD YOU WATCH ALL DAY? WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE CEREAL? WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE DESSERT? WHAT IS THE BEST MEAL YOU CAN COOK?

JAKE ALLEN

CODY BEACH

MATT CLIMIE

BRENT REGNER

GOALTENDER

RIGHT WING

GOALTENDER

DEFENSEMAN

“Duck Dynasty”

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Fruit Loops

Strawberry Mini-Wheats

Oatmeal

Honey-Comb

Apple Pie

Cheesecake

Cheesecake

Cheesecake

Steak

Chicken and Frank’s Redhot

Omelette

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COME VISIT US AT SOCIAL CENTRAL BEHIND SECTION 104

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WHEN YOU’RE TWEETING

CHICAgO WOLVES PROfESSIONAL HOCkEy | @CHICAgO_WOLVES | #CHICAgOWOLVES

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TWITTER HALL OF FAME Jake Allen

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INFOGRAPHIC BY CINDY NAVARRO

“If you leave your house in Chicago today...toss a brick or two in your back pockets. #liftoff”

“Finding Bigfoot marathon, they come so close every time! They will find him next episode for sure #whereishe? #jointhehunt”

“Thanks to all who serve our country, and let us never forget the ones who passed who allow us to live peacefully today.”

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AFTERNOONS

EVENINGS

FACEBOOK HALL OF FAME CHICAGO WOLVES PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY The boys are back in town! After spending two weeks on the road, the #ChicagoWolves return home to the Allstate Arena on Saturday to face the Grand Rapids Griffins.

C H I C A G O W O LV E S SCinfographic_December(halfpage)_nonumbers.indd 1

11/18/13 10:36 AM


LOCKED I N C H I C AG O

COREY LOCKE HAS TRAVELED THE WORLD THROUGH HOCKEY; NOW HE'S FINALLY ARRIVED AT HIS DESTINATION.

BY KRISTEN SHILTON | PHOTOS BY ROSS DETTMAN | DESIGN BY CHRISTINA MORITZ


PHOTO SXC.HU

orey Locke has won two Calder Cups, earned Most Valuable Player honors at the junior and pro levels and received an actual gold medal for winning the German Elite League. But all those accomplishments became a blur as soon as he embarked on the most challenging and rewarding adventure of all. “I’m married now, and my wife, Chantal, and I have a 15-month-old daughter, Kendersyn. Away from the rink, that’s my life,” Locke said. “It is life-changing having a kid. You don’t know what you did with your time before you had them. But it’s wonderful. I wouldn’t change any day for it. It’s amazing.” Amazing could describe a few of the stops along the way for the 29-year-old Locke. A highly recruited junior prospect out of Newmarket, Ontario, Locke chose to forgo college to put up big numbers with the Ontario Hockey League’s Ottawa 67’s (132 goals and 312 points in three seasons). His career in Canada’s capital gave the Montreal Canadiens the confidence to draft him 113th overall in the National Hockey League’s 2003 entry draft. He started his pro career in 2004 with a two-way contract that sent him to the American Hockey League’s Hamilton Bulldogs. That move not only brought Locke

closer to his family, but paved the way for him to start building his own. “Chantal and I actually met because of hockey. When I played with the Hamilton Bulldogs, she worked for the team,” Locke said. “I enjoyed playing in Hamilton because I was so close to home. Ottawa was about five hours away (from Newmarket) and Hamilton was just 90 minutes away from my parents. Hamilton is a great organization. Michael Andlauer is the owner and ran everything first class and really took care of the players.” The Bulldogs were mediocre during Locke’s first two seasons, but in 2006 the club – and Locke – exploded, powering their way to the first (and only) Calder Cup Hamilton has won. Locke contributed 10 goals and 22 points during the playoff run, but learning what it takes to win as a professional, especially having known defeat in the past, was the bigger takeaway. “I was fortunate to win a Calder Cup with them. They’re a strong organization with a lot of good people working for them,” he said. “It was definitely eye-opening, though, seeing what it took to win. I came close to winning a championship with the 67’s but we lost in the Finals to the Kitchener Rangers. You get that far and to lose, that really stings. You kick yourself and wonder if there was something


BERLIN HAMILTON OUSTON TURKEY BINGHAMTON ONTARIO CHICAG

more you could have done or if you hadn’t have missed a chance somewhere along the line, would things have been different?” Locke remained in Hamilton for one more season following the Cup victory, and still holds team records for most career goals (85), assists (144), and points (229). He was called up by the Canadiens for one game late in 2008 and fully expected to return to the organization the following year. Montreal had another plan in mind, though, trading him to the Minnesota Wild in the offseason for defenseman Shawn Belle. Right off the bat, Locke was in the hunt for another Cup, but the relationship with Minnesota ended up being much more short-lived than he anticipated. “After the Bulldogs traded me, I ended up played a year in Minnesota’s organization for the (AHL’s) Houston Aeros, and we went all the way to the Conference Finals, but we lost,” Locke said. “I thought I would be re-signed because of the year we had and July 1 came and it didn’t happen, so I went to free agency.” The New York Rangers ended up scooping Locke up and signing him to a two-way deal. That season he put up 31 goals and 85 points with the Connecticut Wolf Pack and appeared in three games with the Rangers, but it was another short stint and the center was on the move again; this time hooking up with the Ottawa Senators organization. “I had a good year with Connecticut, but then I ended up signing a two-year deal with the Ottawa Senators and playing in Binghamton,” Locke said. “I had a couple options coming out that year, but the connection to Ottawa and the potential to play there again made me think it was the right choice.” It was a decision that ended up paying more dividends than Locke dared to predict. The Binghamton Senators went on the second Calder Cup run of his career during the 2010-11 season, with Locke tallying 21 goals and 86 points in the regular season and earning AHL MVP honors. While he had experienced the honor before in juniors, being recognized as a pro, and on the heels of another championship, was something different entirely. “It was a bigger deal than the junior awards,” Locke said. “Winning the Canadian Hockey League player of the year was pretty cool, and I was runner-up the next year to Sidney Crosby and Cam Ward. At the pro level though, it’s quite an honor. I played with great linemates. We had a good team, and coach Kurt Kleinendorst put me in a good situation. It just worked out and I had a good year.” Another difference the second time around with the Calder Cup? Having already seen one championship go by in the blink of an eye, Locke’s memory of the win is a little more intact. “Getting the second Cup with Binghamton, I think I remember more of it,” he said. “You don’t really get to enjoy your run toward a championship most of the time, which is honestly kind of disappointing. YOU’RE REALLY JUST TRYING TO FOCUS ON THE NEXT GAME. When I’ve gone through it, the motto is to just ‘enjoy the game.’ When you’re younger, you think it’s cool that you won, but it didn’t seem like as much of a grind as the second one. YOU’RE REALLY FORTUNATE TO WIN A SECOND ONE. The fans (in Binghamton) were great and it was very exciting to win.” Having achieved a number of his professional goals by the end of the 2011 season, including notching his first NHL point during a one-game assignment in Ottawa, Locke and his wife made the decision to head overseas. Getting on with TPS Turka of the Turkish Hockey League and then the Berlin Polar Bears of the German Elite League, Locke found winning it all is just as sweet, as well as less stressful, across the pond. “I had spent eight years in North America. The lockout was coming at the time and I got a good offer (in Europe),” Locke said.


CHICAGO IS THE BEST AND IT’S A FIRST-CLASS ORGANIZATION

“I had just gotten married and had a kid and I thought maybe it was a good time to go over. I’m glad I did it; it was a great experience. We won a championship in Germany, and winning one is always great, but it’s a lot different over there. It’s not like here where you play four series. We won in only 13 games. It’s different, but it’s all the same feeling. You’re preparing the same. It’s just not the same grind that it is here.” The hardware also proved to be a departure from what Locke was expecting. “I got a ring when we won, and I got an actual gold medal,” he said. “It’s huge. I don’t actually have part of it yet. A friend of mine is bringing the ring back with him soon.” Locke couldn’t grab it himself because, after just one season away, he and Chantal were ready to come home. So when he heard Chicago Wolves general manager Wendell Young was interested, Locke jumped at the chance to get back to the league where he’d enjoyed so much success.

“I WAS READY TO BE BACK, FOR CAREER AND FAMILY REASONS. I bounced around a lot before, whether from getting traded or transferred, and even though I’m glad I went to Europe, I’m glad to be here,” he said. “I’m familiar with this league, so it was the smart move to come back. And Chantal wanted to be in North America. It was better for Kendersyn to be here for now. When I started talking to Chicago I felt very lucky. I’ve been in this league for a long time. Chicago is the best, it’s a first-class organization and they treat you so well.” “Corey was high on the (offseason) wish list,” Young said. “He brings skill, and he brings points. When you look at guys and go through their careers and see that they are consistently scoring points, you know those are the guys you want to have on your side. It’s rare you have a guy who, through his whole career in juniors and college, doesn’t score and then all of a sudden they get to the pros and they’re scoring. If you’re a consistent scorer at every level, that’s when you know the guy is going to bring it out there on the ice for you.” Locke also brings to mind another big-time scorer in the Wolves annals – Darren Haydar. Both smaller players who enjoyed prolific success in the AHL without finding a foothold in the NHL, Locke sees the similarities, but doesn’t let the knocks on his game become too distracting. “Darren and I, our stories are similar. Small guys that were never the greatest skaters or fastest skaters but did well at this level,” he said. “We’ve won awards and championships,

but it just hasn’t happened (at the next level). It’s out of your control. In both of our careers we’ve done what we’ve been asked to and what’s expected of us. If I’m going to be playing in the AHL, this is the spot to be. I’m very happy.” Beyond just bringing him back closer to home, joining the Wolves meant being reunited with a familiar face from Locke’s junior days. He and Wolves right wing Mark Mancari shared the ice in Ottawa from 2001-04 to great returns. When Mancari heard his former teammate was jumping on board with the Wolves, it was music to his ears. “I had signed first with the Wolves. I signed with St. Louis right on July 4, but I had an inkling about Corey,” Mancari said. “You kind of know the hockey world, and you hear things, so I thought there was a good chance. When it happened, I thought it was good for him and good for the organization to have him in this system. And it has been really good for me to have a chance to play with him again. We’ve kept in touch as best we can and it’s good to be back at it here.” So as the Wolves settle into the season, Locke and his young family are settling into a new home. Just like on the ice, Locke feels fortunate to have a good teammate in his corner, and looks forward to a few more new milestones on the horizon. “Chantal does a lot of the work with Kendersyn. I’m very lucky to have her,” he said. “She takes a lot of those late-night shifts and a lot of the time she’s by herself. So when I’m home from road trips and I’m in town, I try to do as much as possible. I do the morning shifts. We have a good relationship and we work well off each other. That helps so much. Kendersyn is just on the move, so I’m always trying to keep up. She wants to be moving and doesn’t want to sit still for too long and wants to be doing something at all time. It’ll be interesting to see if she likes the snow, which I’m sure she will, because we’ll be out in our backyard in the winter.” “My daughter was born in Burlington, Ontario, but she has been in six countries. We’re going to show her her passport one day because she’ll never believe she has been to all these places with us. I cherish this time I get with them. It’s important.”

COREY, WHAT’S WITH THE ‘STACHE? I’ve done Movember for the last couple years. It’s a good bonding thing with the guys, and hopefully you’re able to raise some awareness and money for a great cause.

FAMILY PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHANTAL LOCKE

EVEN THOUGH I’M GLAD I WENT TO EUROPE, I’M GLAD TO BE HERE. [...]


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DARING GREATLY

WOLVES ORAL HISTORY

A SEVEN-PART SERIES

31

BY SARAH DRAHEIM

IT WAS SOMETHING THAT DIDN’T HAPPEN THAT COMPLETELY CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY FOR THIS FRANCHISE. IN 1997, THE WOLVES HIRED ALPO SUHONEN TO TAKE OVER BEHIND THE BENCH FOR GENE UBRIACO, WHO HAD COACHED THE TEAM FOR THE FIRST TWO SEASONS.

But in August of that year, Alpo was thousands of miles away, and it looked like his tenure as bench boss was going to be a short one.

GENE UBRIACO: I remember when we brought Alpo in to end the 1996-1997 season. He came in and then at the start of the next season we were getting ready. I was interim general manager and over the summer Alpo went to Europe and I kept calling him, asking when was he coming back (laughs). He was coming back! But then he called us back around September and said he wasn’t coming back. We had to hustle. I think that started the “figuring it out” era.

JOHN ANDERSON: I was on my way to the Quad Cities (to coach the Mallards) with a trailer on my car when the Wolves called. DON LEVIN: Buddy Meyers was the hockey guy and so I asked him who we should hire to coach. He had a good friend, Mike Smith, who had been the general manager in Winnipeg and he ended up being the general manager in Chicago and Toronto. So we asked him. He looked around and came back and said the best coach you can get is John Anderson. He just won the Southern League. Just like that, John Anderson was in and Alpo Suhonen was out.

ANDERSON: I had never met Alpo, but I could have kissed him. JUDD SIROTT: I remember meeting Johnny for the first time and seeing that mustache wandering around the office. He was very different than most coaches. Especially then. Johnny was about having fun. He was about offense. He loved having the puck, he loved scoring goals, and he loved winning games. Anderson’s sensibilities went over really well with Don Levin.

SIROTT: Don was a guy who wanted to win every single game. The amount of games in the schedule changed, I think it was 81 or 82. Don wanted to go 82-0. If you went 81-1, he’d ask you about the 1, not the 81. But before he even put a foot on the ice, John still needed to find a place to live in Chicago, and a familiar face was renting.

BILLY GARDNER: When John got the head coaching job with the Wolves, I had plans to move to another city and we were renting our house. We wanted to rent it for two years. We were packing and there was a knock on the door and my wife comes down and I hear some talking and I think, “Geez, that’s a Canadian,” and I look at the legs coming down the stairs and lo and behold it’s John Anderson! ANDERSON: Billy says he’d love to rent me the house but I have this deal in Carolina and I want to rent it for two years. I go, “Well, I’m always one year away from being fired, buddy, I can only rent it for one year.” He said he was sorry and he couldn’t do that, but then he ended up coming back to Chicago from Carolina only a few months later. He should have rented it to me. I would have given him his house back, but the people who had rented it wouldn’t. He didn’t get his house back for a whole year! With John in place and prepared to coach the team, Levin and Meyers still had to hire a general manager. Again they took Smith’s advice, and hired Kevin Cheveldayoff.

KEVIN CHEVELDAYOFF: My initial impression of Don dates even further back than when I was hired. I was with the Grizzlies and we were playing in Manitoba and had a flight delay, so we were very late getting into Chicago for the Wolves game. But we got to the rink and literally had bagels for the pregame meal. We were trying to get out for warm ups and things were getting pushed back. I remember seeing this guy walking around and pacing and all anxious and angry, asking what we were doing. He finally said we were not going to have warm ups and I’m like, “Yeah, we are

having warm ups.” He wanted the Zamboni to drive out there. I had to stand in front of it for our team to get their warm ups in. I came back in the room and asked, “Who was that guy?” Someone said he was the owner. A few years later, when I got hired, I reminded Don of the first time we met and he says, “That was you?” I said “Yes,” and he said, “You’re fired!” It was the start of what would become a tremendous relationship.

UBRIACO: When he came here he might have been the youngest manager to come into the league at the time. I remember sitting down with him - he had been a first-round pick in the National League - and I knew how desperately he wanted to make the NHL, but he hurt his knee and didn’t get the opportunity. So he dived right into the operations side. You always know how smart a person is by the kind of questions they ask, and Chevy asked a lot of questions. The Wolves held a joint press conference announcing the pair as new additions to the hockey operations side of the franchise, and heralding a new era for the team. And what a pair they would become.

BILL BENTLEY: These two guys came in and it was a learning curve right off the bat because it was the beginning of the season and Chevy had to teach us how he wanted to run things and we had to teach Chevy how things had gone up to that point. Then it was a matter of the two coming together.

LEVIN: Having Chevy and Johnny together was great, because they were opposites. Chevy is stone-serious all the time. Smiling is a misdemeanor. Laughing is a felony. Chevy might be the best general manager in hockey but he is so serious all the time and if you have a serious coach, too, it would have never worked out. Personalities are important. They fought - it was terrible when they would fight. But we won four championships because of that.

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


32

WO LV ES O RA L H I STO RY

CHEVELDAYOFF: Johnny and I had a great relationship over the years. It was like a marriage in a sense, in that we fought freely – we freely argued our points – but that opened the door and after that everybody was on the same page.

BENTLEY: Johnny is more laid-back and personoriented and Chevy’s very focused and driven. There was a lot of screaming and yelling, but at the end of the day they were still best friends. ANDERSON: It didn’t matter what we argued about, our hearts were in one direction and that was to win. I don’t think organizations excel if everybody agrees with each other.

KEVIN KACER: It was the Johnny and Chevy package. And they came and it was like, “Wow. We’re legit now.” I knew when Johnny and Chevy started that things were going to get good around here. And they did. The Wolves won their first International Hockey League championship that year, and their first Turner Cup. The Wolves roster was also happy with the new management.

YOUNG: When Chevy came into the organization, I was at a point where I had played hockey a long time and it started not being fun. I caught myself not coming to the rink. I’d go to the dry cleaners and the post office instead. Then, when Chevy and Johnny took over, they made the game fun again.

STEVE MARTINS: I’m sure every player that’s ever played for Johnny wants to play for him their whole career. People say he’s kind of loosey-goosey a little bit, but I think he’s great. He taught us the game. Practices were fun, up tempo. BOB NARDELLA: John was great to play for. You just had to be a man. I remember the first skate when they announced him as coach – it was at one of the youth rinks, a summer skate – and he’s out there skating with us and he’s going at it. He liked to do the drills with the players. For me, it was like, what do I do here? Do I just let him go around me or do I try to stop him? If I try to stop him, is he not going to play me?

B R E A K A W AY M A G A Z I N E

But the referees didn’t find John so endearing.

STEVE MALTAIS: There was a time where he was taking more penalties than half the team! That was early on, and he wanted to make a presence and have a change of mindset. It wasn’t good enough any more to just be there.

NARDELLA: Gene Ubriaco liked the old Italian nicknames, like the Mafia guy nicknames. So he called him Johnny Tomatoes because his face would turn so red when he was talking to the refs. It made you be extra-nice to the ref because he wasn’t liking our coach at the moment. Chevy, too, got right to work changing things and ideas, and built an oversized reputation for himself on the backs of some early trades. He operated on a finely tuned instinct and, sometimes, incredible stubbornness and tenacity.

CHEVELDAYOFF: I remember one game. We had lost badly at home and Ubie and I were sitting in the office – and we did that a lot – talking about the game. I said, “You know what, Ubie? We need a Gord Dineen.” I clicked on the computer and saw he was playing in Utah at the time and their game was just ending and I think they were losing. They were struggling at the time, so I picked up the phone right after the game and started laying the groundwork for Dineen. I wanted him. He was the captain of their team at the time, but I remember – from that point on – we had set our sights and we were going to get him. MALTAIS: How do you find out that there is a struggling franchise that is hurting financially and then get a steal for those players, but you’re unloading salary here? That’s phenomenal. He always knew what we needed. He brought in Gordie Dineen.

DARING GREATLY over that I had on a shelf in my office. He pushed them all over and I go, “Ubie, what are you doing?” He said, “Chevy, I’m just making room for one more.” I went home that night and I told my wife, “We got him. We got Gordie.” A couple of hours later I get the tap on the shoulder, and sure enough my daughter was born that night. Don Levin wasn’t so sure about the new addition to the Wolves roster.

CHEVELDAYOFF: Gordie comes and plays his first game and he’s just awful. He was bad. I remember Don Levin looking at me like, ‘You did what?’ I told him to relax, that it would be OK and you know what? Every clinching game of the series that year, Gordie was one of the best players on the ice at the time. The “figuring it out” era had begun. And it was going to be a good one. Just months later they were hoisting the first of four Cups they would win with John Anderson and Kevin Cheveldayoff at the helm of this franchise.

SEE THE NEXT EDITION OF BREAKAWAY FOR MORE ON THE 20-YEAR HISTORY

COMING SOON TO WOLVES TV: DARING GREATLY, THE DOCU-SERIES

CHEVELDAYOFF: During this time my wife was pregnant with my daughter. She was getting closer to her due date and we were getting closer to the trade deadline, and here I am following Dineen all over the country, trying to make this trade. I’d call my wife and say, “You can’t have this baby yet, you just can’t!” We finally got the deal done and when I finished with the call, Ubie walked over and pushed these miniature replica Turner Cups


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GO WOLVES HOCKEY!


35

RECORD BREAKERS

SINGLE-SEASON FRANCHISE RECORDS GOALS ASSISTS POINTS PENALTY MIN. PLUS/MINUS WINS SHUTOUTS

Steve Maltais

60

ALL-TIME POINTS LEADERS 1996-97

PLAYER Steve Maltais

GP

G

A

PTS

PIM

839

454

497

951

1,061

Rob Brown

91

1995-96

Rob Brown

369

157

326

483

483

Rob Brown

143

1995-96

Darren Haydar

342

128

240

368

257

Kevin MacDonald 336

1994-95

Jason Krog

282

98

244

342

106

Brett Sterling

302

167

141

308

384

Arturs Kulda

+47

2009-10

Kari Lehtonen

38

2004-05

Wendell Young Matt Climie

6 6

1999-2000 2012-13

PACK FACTS

Bob Nardella

476

59

239

298

331

Steve Larouche

203

84

144

228

168

Chris Marinucci

240

99

121

220

77

Steve Martins

262

64

129

193

307

Derek MacKenzie

377

83

101

184

441

ALL-TIME WINNING RECORD The Wolves have delivered a winning record in each of the franchise’s first 19 seasons. They have qualified for the playoffs 15 times, appeared in six league finals and captured four championships.

Rob Brown, who donned a Wolves jersey for five seasons between 1994 and 2003, set the franchise’s single-season record for points (143) in 1995-96.

Goaltender Matt Climie set two franchise records during the 2012-13 season: Most road shutouts (5) in a single season and longest scoreless streak (173 minutes, 57 seconds).

During John Anderson’s first stint as Wolves head coach (19972008), his teams set singleSeven-time all-star Steve Maltais holds the Wolves career records for games (839), goals (454), assists (497), points (951) and penalty minutes (1,061). He played with

season franchise records for wins (55 in 1997-98), points (114 in 1999-2000), goals (331 in 200607) and power-play goals (112 in 2006-07).

the team from 1994-2005.

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


36

H O C K EY 1 0 1

BOARDING

CHARGING

CROSS-CHECKING

DELAYED PENALTY

ELBOWING

HIGH-STICKING

HOLDING

Called for any action which causes opponent to be thrown violently into the boards.

Called for taking three or more strides before checking opponent.

Called for hitting opponent with both hands on the stick and no part of the stick on the ice.

Call is made when the penalized team gains control of the puck or upon a stop in play.

Called when using the elbow to impede an opponent.

Called for making contact with an opponent when carrying the stick above the shoulder.

Called for using the hands, arms or legs to hold an opponent.

HOOKING

ICING

INTERFERENCE

MISCONDUCT

ROUGHING

SLASHING

Called for using stick or blade to hook opponent.

Called when a player on his team’s side of the red center line shoots the puck down the ice, it crosses the red goal line at any point (other than the goal) and is touched first by an opposing player other than the goalie.*

Called for having contact with an opponent not in possession of the puck.

Called for an infraction that warrants a more serious penalty than a standard minor or major penalty.

Called for engaging in fisticuffs or shoving of a level that is not worthy of a major penalty.

Called for swinging the stick at an opponent.

SPEARING

TRIPPING

Called for using the stick like a spear.

Called for using the stick, arm or leg to cause an opponent to trip or fall.

UNSPORTSMANLIKE CONDUCT Called for the abuse of an official or other such misconduct.

*Under hybrid icing rules, it’s called when an opposing player (other than the goalie) is the first to reach the face-off dot closest to the goal line.

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HOCKEY 101

HOCKEY RULES

WOLVES FACTS

ICING THE PUCK

AVERAGES & RATINGS (2012-13)

Icing is when a player on his team’s side of the red center line shoots the puck all the way down the ice and it crosses the red goal line at any point (other than the goal). Icing is not permitted when teams are at equal strength or on the power play. When this occurs, play is stopped and the puck is returned to the other end of the ice for a faceoff in the offending team’s zone. Icing the puck is not called: > If the goalie leaves the crease to play the puck, even if he does not touch the puck. > If an official rules an opposing player could have played the puck before it crossed the red goal line. > An official may wave off the icing call if he deems it was an attempted pass.

SHOT ON GOAL

A shot on goal is a shot that would enter the goal if it is not stopped by the goaltender. A shot on goal must result in either a goal or a save.

PENALTIES

Penalties are classified into three categories: minor, major and misconduct. For a minor penalty, players are required to serve two minutes in the penalty box while their team plays short-handed. A minor penalty will expire if the opposing team scores while on the power play. Major penalties require a player to serve five minutes in the penalty box and only expire at the end of that time. Misconduct penalties vary in length.

POWER PLAYS / PENALTY KILL

A team is on the power play when one team has more players on the ice than the other team because a player is serving a penalty. Conversely, the team with fewer players is on the penalty kill.

2.68

AVG. GOALS AGAINST PER GAME

2.72

POWER PLAY GOALS SCORED

51

POWER PLAY RATING

OFFSIDES

A team is offside when any member of the attacking team precedes the puck over the defending team’s blueline. The position of the player’s skate — and not that of his stick — is the determining factor. If both skates are over the blueline before the puck, the player is offside. If he has only one skate over the blueline and one on it, he is onside.

17.1%

PENALTY KILL RATING

80.3%

OVERTIME GAMES PLAYED

17

LEADING AFTER THE SECOND PERIOD Last season, the Wolves won 80 percent of games in which they were leading after two periods.

PENALTY KILL

OVERTIME

Any regular-season game that ends regulation play with a tie score will go into a five-minute sudden-death overtime period. If at the end of that overtime period the game remains tied, the game will then go into a shootout. During the playoffs, there will not be a shootout and overtime periods will be 20 minutes in length.

SHOOTOUT

AVG. GOALS PER GAME

Last season, the Wolves won 61 percent of games in which they did not allow the opposing team to score a powerplay goal.

POWER PLAY Last season, the Wolves won 48 percent of games in which they scored at least one power-play goal and 40 percent of games when they scored two or more.

SCORING FIRST

Any regular-season game that ends overtime play with a tie score will go into a shootout. A shootout is a series of penalty shots in which each team is allowed five attempts to score in alternating fashion. If after five attempts the teams remain tied, the shootout will continue to alternate shots until one team fails to match the attempt of the other. The winner of the shootout will be awarded one goal.

Last season, the Wolves won 62 percent of games in which they scored the first goal.

SHOTS ON GOAL Last season, the Wolves outshot their opponents in 32 of their 76 regularseason games, and won 16 of those games (16-11-4-1).

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C H I C A G O W O LV E S


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41

BY KRISTEN SHILTON | PHOTO BY ROSS DETTMAN

RIGHT WING TYLER SHATTOCK HAS HAD A FEW SURPRISES COME HIS WAY OVER THE COURSE OF HIS CAREER, BUT NOW HE’S POISED TO BE THE ONE DOING THE SURPRISING. Lots of hockey players can pinpoint the season that was most transformative for them, the year that was an important stepping-stone on the way to their pro career. For Chicago Wolves right wing Tyler Shattock, his standout junior season was precipitated by a couple of attitude-adjusting incidents. “My second year playing for the (Western Hockey League’s) Kamloops Blazers, I broke my ankle and had to sit out the whole second half of the season. And then I didn’t get drafted,” Shattock said. “Having to sit back like that, it really gave me a new appreciation for the game and showed me what I would have to do to be successful.” Adversity proved to be an effective motivator. The Salmon Arm, British Columbia native (population: 17,000) bounced back in the 2008-09 season with the strongest showing of his young career, recording 30 goals and 69 points in 68 games with the Blazers. “That was a good season. I got the responsibility of being assistant captain on that team. They put a lot of trust in me,” he said. “I always knew I could play at that level, it was just about getting the opportunity. They gave me a chance to show what I could do that season and it changed a lot for me, I think.” While Shattock had been disappointed by not being drafted the season before, his play gave the St. Louis Blues enough confidence to draft him in the fourth round of the 2009 National Hockey League draft. Given that, and how well he had performed with the Blazers, Shattock was not prepared for what would happen the following season. Kamloops’ general manager sat him down to share surprising news: he was being traded to the WHL’s Calgary Hitmen. “It was definitely difficult to hear about the trade,” Shattock said. “I was a captain of the Blazers at the time, I had played all my four (junior) years in Kamloops and I wanted to stay there. But I understood where they were coming from. I was going to be done after that year, and they sent me to a great organization in Calgary. At the time I was definitely shocked, and a little hurt, but I understood where they were coming from.” While he may have originally had his doubts about being moved, the Hitmen ended up finishing the year strong, winning the WHL’s Ed Chynoweth Cup and advancing to the Memorial Cup tournament. Shattock contributed five goals and 17 points during the playoff run and, despite the rocky beginnings, was ultimately glad the trade came down. “I could tell the decision was tough for the team to make at the time,” he said. “But those guys was trying to do the best thing for my career, and for me, and I appreciated that. In the end, you only get four years to win a WHL championship. It’s a rare thing and I was very lucky to do it in a place like Calgary. I’m so appreciative of the time I spent in Kamloops, though. I go there in the summer all the time; it’s kind of like my second home.” But once the Hitmen were bounced from the Memorial Cup

tournament, it was time for Shattock to turn his attention to really leaving home, and making the jump to the American Hockey League’s Peoria Rivermen. The transition from juniors to the professional ranks required a few more adjustments. “It’s a lot bigger step than I think people think, going into the AHL,” Shattock said. “I played my first year there and had my struggles. I was trying to understand what it means to be a pro beyond just what happens on the ice. You’re living on your own; you’re cooking for yourself. It was definitely a different ballgame. But after the first season, I feel I came into my own a little more. You’re on your own, you’re not answering to anyone, and you’re on your own schedule. It’s all up to you.” That was exactly the mentality Dave Allison, who took over as head coach of the Rivermen in 2012, felt Shattock was lacking. While acknowledging the forward’s talent and upside, Allison’s first impression of Shattock was that he needed to take more responsibility. “Both (assistant coach) Scotty (Allen) and I worked with him and the first thing we realized about him is that, in his mind, good was good enough,” Allison said. “Our expectations for him were higher than even he expected. We sent him down to the ECHL to start that season and it became an invitation for him to realize there were higher expectations for him and he took it the right way. He went down there, improved and got called back. He really became an integral part of the team and the organization made a great decision to bring him back. He took it upon himself to make himself better.” When it comes to making improvements, Shattock, 23, who has traditionally been a strong defensive forward, is focused on stepping up his offensive game. He called the move from Peoria to Chicago “easy” and praised general manager Wendell Young for helping him settle in. And under offense-minded Wolves head coach John Anderson, this is as good a spot as Shattock could hope to find himself. “The offensive part is important to me, and could definitely be better,” he said. “For the last few years I have had a lot of defensive responsibilities, I’ve been on the penalty kill a lot. I think any time you have the chance to work on a new facet of your game, you should definitely do that.” “Tyler can skate, he hounds the puck, and he can be physical on the forecheck,” Allison said. “He just has to be capitalizing more on his opportunities around the net. Around here, we believe this is a guy that can score 15-20 goals a season and still play with that physicality and defensive consciousness you need each shift. “He’s an excellent teammate too. He has turned himself into a real solid pro with a future that he holds in his hands. Which is exactly as it should be.”

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


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BY THE NUMBERS

43

#4 TAYLOR CHORNEY DEFENSEMAN | THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO

FAVORITE NUMBER: 4

5

PRO TEAMS

2

5

DIFFERENT JERSEY NUMBERS

YEARS PRO

CHORNEY’S CAREER

3

NUMBER OF SPORTS PLAYED GROWING UP

HATS

BROKEN/LOST APPLE PRODUCTS TEXTS PER DAY

TECH

VIDEO GAMES

PREVIOUS NON-HOCKEY JOBS

CUSTOM-TAILORED SUITS

COUNTLESS 3 50 0

WARDROBE

TRAVEL

1 LANGUAGE SPOKEN

COUNTRIES VISITED

4

CITIES LIVED

TRAFFIC TICKETS RECEIVED

HEALTH & FAMILY 4 BONES BROKEN

4 SIBLINGS

1 PET

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


GAME TIME

WHAT'STHE THEDIFF? DIFF? WHAT'S

HERE’SJOHNNY! JOHNNY! HERE’S

Can youthefind the 110indifferences in the Can you find 10 differences the two photos below?

How well knowJohn head coach How well do you do knowyou head coach Anderson?

BAMES BY IMRAN JAVED

In What 1989-90, Anderson played was John Anderson’s careera nine-game stint in what high for goals during hisEuropean NHL Country? career? a) a) Russia 31 b) b) Sweden 37 c) c) Italy 40 d) d) Finland 42

45

two photos below?

John Anderson?

How did John Who didmany Johntimes Anderson beatAnderson on record 302008 or more goals during his March 22, to earn his 500th NHL career? victory as Wolves head coach? a) a) Milwaukee 1 b) b) Houston 3 c) c) Lake 5 Erie d) d) San 7 Antonio

LITTLE DEBBIE® HOCKEY MOM OF THE MONTH

JENN MUNAO HOMETOWN: PARK RIDGE, IL | CLUB TEAM: NORTHERN EXPRESS To nominate a mom for the Little Debbie® Hockey Mom of the Month, visit ChicagoWolves.com/HockeyMom or the Customer Service Booth.

C H I C A G O W O LV E S


46

GA M E T I M E

WOLVES CROSSWORD TWENTY IN TWENTY

Search for all the players below by looking in the grid forward, backward, up, down, and diagonally. When you find one, circle it and cross it off the list! Bonus points if you can finish in under twenty minutes!

ACROSS 2. Wolves new divisional opponent L D Bcalled W for E D E R the E K 4. Penalty swinging stick opponent I T atZan B E B C N A L 7. The Wolves Toy Drive benefits this J R N R D N G A R E military organization A A C E Aof “holiday” I D R B E 8. Wolves spelling 9. The 14,000 S Wolves I A Thave L over A M E V E “followers” on this popular social O R E T L T A A L L network

M B L E T E N E S S A A P N I L S DOWN K D name Y Tof the S Wolves J L N E G Y 1. Team

1 4A

E S E I S E D L

E R6 E J E O N R

S O I L E H C S

S T R A W E T S

L E L L E O D N

NHL R Ypartner E E E A C S K L B O A M 8E O C A N S S 3. The only Wolves player to have a O N R R A T M A E B K E U D A R R E N H A birthday this month S D Hanson’s L K Ifather Z Lstars R inC G A R N E T E X E L B 5. G Christian this S Nfamous D Ihockey I N movie N O R I O R H E G A E N I V E 6. Number of years the Wolves have O A inOexistence N N R W N C T R R N S C S E T I R D been 9 7. Holds I D the L Wolves G S franchise N E E record N R forK D D Y T D H E N S N most goals in a single-season Al Secord Rob Brown Kari Lehtonen Chris Chelios Tim Breslin Ondrej Pavelec Find and circle the two matching snowmen. Bob Nardella Derek MacKenzie Steve Maltais Dallas Eakins Jason Krog Wendell Young Garnet Exelby Kevin Doell Brett Sterling

N Y Y Y W E

L D M I E B

I A L N Z T

I R H C G D

L R A K R A

I V E K A E

CONFERENCE ROOM

E A Z R V N M I

5 N R M A E B I O

B A S E N R E L

SNOWMEN MADNESS

K Y A R E A B Y

Z E T S M O T N

I A N Z A B H K

E Y H O R O 7 E J

L E B L T D O Y

3

L L E K I H A T

E I E S D E O

C L R A T R R U

2

Dan Snyder Darren Haydar Karl Stewart Ray LeBlanc Steve Martins

One of these logos is not like the other! Circle the team that is NOT in the same conference as the Wolves.

DO YOU KNOW A SPECIAL HOCKEY MOM? To nominate a mom for the Little Debbie® Hockey Mom of the Month, visit ChicagoWolves.com/HockeyMom or the Customer Service Booth.

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Breakway Magazine Vol. 6 Issue 3  

December 2013 edition of Breakaway, the Chicago Wolves official game day magazine.

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