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Keep Growing WINTER 2012 – 2013

Member Magazine and Program Guide


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Robert F. Finke, Chair John L. Howard, Vice Chair & Secretary Thomas E. Lanctot, Vice Chair, Finance & Government Affairs Benjamin F. Lenhardt, Jr., Vice Chair, Garden William E. Moeller, Vice Chair, Science & Education Catherine M. Waddell, Vice Chair, Nominating & Governance Susan A. Willetts, Vice Chair & Immediate Past Chair Sophia Siskel, President & CEO

DIRECTORS Thomas F. Aichele Lindsey Axel, ex officio Sharon Brady Neville F. Bryan John H. Buehler Michael J. Busch Susan Keller Canmann David R. Casper Robin Colburn Peter R. Crane John V. Crowe Christopher A. Deveny James W. DeYoung Timothy A. Dugan Peter M. Ellis Anthony L. Farino Peter B. Foreman John D. Fornengo Steven L. Fradkin Thomas C. Freyman Dorothy H. Gardner Nancy Gidwitz Sue L. Gin James J. Glasser Ellis M. Goodman John K. Greene Joseph A. Gregoire William J. Hagenah Caryn L. Harris Elizabeth Hough, ex officio Thomas B. Hunter III Jane Irwin Gregory K. Jones Todd Kaplan Catherine C. Kirby, ex officio Donna La Pietra Eric C. Larson M. James Leider Laura M. Linger Daniel I. H. Linzer Alec Litowitz Josephine P. Louis Barbara A. Lumpkin Mary Ann S. MacLean Jeanne K. Mason Michelle McKenna Jeanine McNally Riley O’Neil, ex officio Homi B. Patel George A. Peinado Janet Meakin Poor Anne Pramaggiore Toni Preckwinkle, ex officio Arnold Randall, ex officio Susan L. Regenstein Maria Smithburg Harrison I. Steans Pam F. Szokol Richard L. Thomas Nicole S. Williams Arthur M. Wood, Jr. LIFE DIRECTORS Marilynn B. Alsdorf J. Melfort Campbell Barbara Whitney Carr Kent Chandler, Jr. Gary P. Coughlan Suzanne S. Dixon Thomas A. Donahoe Ralph F. Fujimoto Florence S. Hart Pamela K. Hull Posy L. Krehbiel Bill Kurtis Robert H. Malott Mary L. McCormack Mary Mix McDonald Peter H. Merlin Jane S. O’Neil William A. Osborn John E. Preschlack Anne O. Scott Dain Searle David Byron Smith Susan Stone William P. Sutter Howard J. Trienens Ernest P. Waud III

The mission of the Chicago Botanic Garden is to promote the enjoyment, understanding, and conservation of plants and the natural world.

Dear Member, Our 40th year is drawing to a close, and what a year it has been, full of celebrations and dedications, openings and new partnerships. Many of our members have enjoyed tracing the Garden’s history on our website’s timeline. It wonderfully highlights the many milestones achieved by the Garden since it opened in 1972, and I look forward to watching the timeline expand as our vibrant but still-young Garden keeps growing. Here are a few highlights from our 40th year: • In late spring, we celebrated the opening of the Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden, part of the new Learning Campus; in late summer, the Kleinman Family Cove, another part of the Campus, was dedicated. • Also in summer, the North Lake shoreline restoration project was completed, with 1.25 miles of shoreline revitalized, and 120,000 new native plants helping to stabilize shoreline soils. • The Plant Biology and Conservation graduate program with Northwestern University continued to thrive and attract new Ph.D. and master’s degree students, and our Science Career Continuum mentored future leaders in conservation science. • We honored Garden leaders and volunteers, continued to develop corporate partnerships, and expanded our community gardening programs. • We enhanced our visitor programs with Butterflies & Blooms, a new seasonal butterfly exhibition near the Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden. As always our member magazine, Keep Growing, contains articles about our many horticulture, education, science, and visitor programs. Topics in this issue include the Dixon Prairie, photography at the Garden, our Conservation and Land Management interns, and the new Chicago-based “Rodeo Farm” jobstraining program in urban agriculture. You’ll learn what’s new at Wonderland Express this holiday season and discover some intriguing new gift possibilities online and in our Garden Shop. The Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society has offered inspiration and support to the Garden since its inception in 1951, and we look at its history in this issue. You’ll also learn why some Garden members have chosen to include the Garden in their estate planning. I am honored to serve this beautiful living museum, where the vision we share is of a future where nature is revered by all, where healthy habitats are safeguarded, and where humans understand that all life— including our own—depends on plants. Wishing you a joyous holiday season,

Sophia Siskel President and CEO


Antiques & Garden Fair

Winter 2012 Features 2

Note from President and CEO Sophia Siskel What a year it’s been!

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Wonderland Express

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Three Friends of Winter

10 Winter Events 12 Calendar 16 Volunteer Awards 18 Focus on Photography 20 The Woman’s Board: A Tradition of Support 22 Ten Years Plus of CLM Interns 24 Science Awards 26 Then and Now: Dixon Prairie 28 New Gift Ideas for the Holidays 30 Ten Plants with Winter Presence 32 Leaving a Legacy 35 Field of Dreams at “Rodeo Farm” 80 This Season in the Garden

Programs 36 Adult Education 64 Youth and Family Programs 74 Teacher and Student Programs

For more information, please visit Keep Growing online. www.keepgrowing.com ON THE COVER

Wonderland Express enchants a young visitor. Cover photo by Garrett Baumer. INSIDE COVER SPREAD

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Exotic Star amaryllis and Brigitte begonias bloom over cascades of ivy in a Krehbiel Gallery flower display.

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Keep Growing The Chicago Botanic Garden is one of the treasures of the Forest Preserve District of Cook County. The Chicago Botanic Garden is smoke-free. Keep Growing is a registered trademark of the Chicago Botanic Garden and is a copyright of the Chicago Botanic Garden. No portion of this magazine can be used without written permission.

Keep Growing (USPS 130) is published four times per year by the Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe, IL 60022-1168. Volume 3, Issue 4, November 2012. Periodical Postage Paid at Glencoe, IL, and at an additional entry office in Pontiac, IL. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to Keep Growing, Chicago Botanic Garden, 1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe, IL 60022.

Director, Design and Production: Designers: Editors: Contributing Writers: Contributing Photographers:

Wonderland Express returns on November 23 for another joyful holiday season at the Garden. Page 6

Carol Abbate Wendy Griffiths, Will Haffner, and Kathe Stoepel Fran Sherman and Amy Spungen Nina Koziol, Tracy Marks, Helen K. Marshall, and Julianne Beck Bill Bishoff and Robin Carlson

Visit us: In Person Garden Website

Call us:

1000 Lake Cook Road, Glencoe, IL www.chicagobotanic.org

Information

(847) 835-5440

Group Tours

(847) 835-6949

Lenhardt Library

(847) 835-8201

Membership

(847) 835-8215

Plant Information Service

(847) 835-0972

Private, Corporate Events

(847) 835-8370

Regenstein School

(847) 835-8261

Supporting the Garden

(847) 835-8215

Volunteer Services

(847) 835-8392

Youth, Family, Teacher &

(847) 835-6801

Student Programs

Support us: Membership

www.chicagobotanic.org/member

Annual Fund

www.chicagobotanic.org/donate/

From certificate programs to contests and from instructional walks to exhibitions, photography is a Garden focus. Page 18

Photo by Carol Kay

annualfund

Follow us: eNewsletter

Est. 1991

Gail McGrath - Publisher & President Sheldon Levin - Publisher & Director of Finance

Lauren Kurtz - Art/Production Director Lory Richards - Graphic Designer

Account Managers Elyse Auslender, Associate Marketing Director Sheryl Fisher, Carla Gohde, Mike Hedge, Candice Kuhnen

A. J. Levin - Director of Operations Steve Dunn - Web and Internet Development

Harvey Stein, Associate Publisher CWPR East Coast - Sandra Ourusoff & Associates (212) 769-7079 Southwest - Betsy Gugick & Associates (972) 387-1347

The Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society supports the Garden’s Green Youth Farm and Windy City Harvest programs. Page 20

Sales & Marketing Consultant David L. Strouse, Ltd. (847) 835-5197

For advertising information contact Gail McGrath: (847) 770-4621 Published by Performance Media/Gail McGrath Associates, Inc. All contents are copyrighted ©2012. All rights reserved. Nothing can be reproduced in any manner, whole or part, without written permission from the publisher. To see our Terms and Conditions relating to advertising orders, visit our website at www.performancemedia.us.


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Wonderland Express November 23, 2012, through January 6, 2013, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Holiday traditions start at the Garden for young and old alike. Inside the Regenstein Center, ten miniature trains glide past glorious Chicago landmarks, including more than 80 mini-replicas of beloved sites all handcrafted with plant materials.

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Exclusive Wonderland Express events

Hot Chocolate with Mrs. Claus

Members have access to Wonderland Express and enjoy hot chocolate, cookies, and carolers, plus activities for children, on Wednesday, December 12, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children ages 3 to 12 and seniors ages 62 and up. Children 2 and under are free. Purchase timed tickets online at www.chicagobotanic.org/ wonderland or in person at the Visitor Center. Purchase your timed tickets early, as the quantity is limited.

Members-only Night

Warm up your holiday with Mrs. Claus! Enjoy cookies, cocoa, and a special holiday story in Burnstein Hall on Saturday, December 8, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Hanukkah Concert Bring your family to celebrate the Festival of Lights with the Maxwell Street Klezmer Band on Sunday, December 9, at 1 and 3 p.m. in Alsdorf Auditorium. Ticket for concert is $17 in advance and $20 day-of; Garden mem- Twinkling from bers receive $2 off. Children 2 and greenhouses, under are free.

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Breakfast with Santa Share your holiday wishes with Santa Claus himself! Buffet breakfasts are in Burnstein Hall on Saturday and Sunday, December 15 and 16, with seatings at 8:30 and 9:30 a.m.; Santa will meet families in Alsdorf Auditorium. Tickets are $33 for adults and $27 for children ages 3 to 12. Garden members receive $5 off. Children 2 and under are free.

than

trees, bridges, and courtyards,

750,000

energy-

efficient LED lights illuminate the Garden. Indoors, feast your eyes on the remarkable details of artistry and architecture dreamed up by Paul Busse and Applied Imagination exclusively for the Chicago Botanic Garden.

All Aboard! Wonderland Express Dinner The Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society presents its seventh annual dinner on Thursday, November 29. Cocktails begin at 6:30 p.m. followed by dinner at 7:30 p.m. Tickets and table packages are now available. For tickets and information, call (847) 835-6944. The Woman’s Board is in its first year of “Growing the Future,” a $1 million pledge to the Chicago Botanic Garden. Proceeds for 2012 will support the Garden’s Green Youth Farm and Windy City Harvest community gardening programs.

Christmas Concert

Hours and General Admission

Celebrate the holiday with Christmas music on Saturday, December 22, at 1 and 3 p.m. in Alsdorf Auditorium. Tickets for concert and hot chocolate event are $17 in advance and $20 day-of; Garden members receive $3 off. Children 2 and under are free.

Friday, November 23, through Monday, January 6, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Closes at 3 p.m. on November 29 and December 24; closed December 25. Purchase tickets online (with no ticketing fee) at www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland, or in person at the Visitor Center. Nonmember prices are $12 for adults and $10 for children ages 3 to 12 and seniors ages 62 and up. Members receive $2 off each ticket. Children 2 and under are free. All meal, tastings, and concert event tickets include admission to the Wonderland Express exhibition. Breakfast with Santa also includes parking; parking fees apply to all other events. Thanks to the support of Grainger, timed tickets are half-price on Tuesdays.

New—Holiday Cheers! Join us at the Garden to celebrate not only the holidays but also Repeal Day—the end of Prohibition (December 5, 1933). The Garden will do this Chicago-style as you participate in tastings of spirits, wine, and winter brews that are all local, while enjoying the Wonderland Express exhibition. This event is Wednesday, December 5, from 6 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance and $28 day-of; Garden members receive $5 off.

Wonderland Express visitors will enjoy a special two-for-one entry when the primary ticket is purchased at the Garden using a Discover card. The complimentary ticket will be of equal or lesser value. Maximum two free tickets per purchase; offer not available online.

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Wonderland ExpressFair Antiques & Garden

Unforgettable holiday meals and concerts


Antiques Three Friends & Garden of Winter Fair

Antiques & Garden Fair

Bonsai Silhouette Show

Three Friends of Winter In the chill of winter, the world of bonsai heats up. It is the only time of year when the dormant trees are absent of foliage and may be easily admired for their stunning branch structure, as living sculptures. Maples, hornbeams, a ginkgo, and more will be showcased at the Garden’s Three Friends of Winter bonsai silhouette show, running Friday, January 25, through Sunday, January 27, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Burnstein Hall. Families are invited to enjoy special hands-on activities on Saturday and Sunday. Visitors will see deciduous bonsai trees from the Garden’s renowned collection of more than 220 priceless bonsai, as well as specimens from distinguished collections in the Chicago area. Several Garden bonsai featured in the show are also profiled in Bonsai: A Patient Art, a new book by the Garden in association with Yale University Press (available in the Garden Shop). According to curator Ivan Watters, bonsai are revered for warming the souls of those around them. He works with more than 25 skilled volunteers to maintain the collection that began when the Garden opened 40 years ago. Each bonsai in the show is accented with a small companion piece, a display practice common in Japan but rare in the United States. The pairs are displayed atop benches of cottonwood crafted from Garden trees that once grew where the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center now stands. In the center of the exhibition, the Three Friends of Winter—pine, bamboo, and plum—are exhibited together in a Japanese garden (tsubo-niwa) setting. Three Friends of Winter is generously supported by the Astellas USA Foundation. 9

Bonsai Silhouette Show Preview Party January 25, 5:30 to 8 p.m. This magical evening, exclusively for members of the President’s Circle and Director’s Circle, showcases the Garden’s Three Friends of Winter bonsai silhouette show. Guests are treated to refreshments, hors d’oeuvres, Japanese music, and a presentation by Kris Jarantoski, executive vice president and director of the Chicago Botanic Garden. To register for this event, visit https://register.chicagobotanic. org or call (847) 835-6925. To join the President’s Circle or Director’s Circle, call (847) 835-8215. www.chicagobotanic.org/plantshows/three_friends 9


Winter Events

Winter Events Sowing seeds of spring and summer Camp CBG Registration for President’s Circle and Guild Early registration begins Monday, November 12, via telephone only at (847) 835-6801. General online registration begins Monday, December 3, at 9 a.m. Children ages 2 to 15 make the most of their summers at Camp CBG, which offers an outstanding staff and the unparalleled Chicago Botanic Garden campus, newly enhanced with the Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden and the Kleinman Family Cove. Programs include weeklong camps and two-week sessions, along with morning-only, afternoon-only, and full-day choices. New in 2013, Camp CBG will offer before- and after-camp care. For more information on camps being offered from June 17 through August 16, 2013, see pages 68 to 73 and visit www.chicagobotanic.org/camp.

Tu B’Shevat Sunday, January 27, 1 to 4 p.m. Tu B’Shevat celebrates the importance of trees for all living things. Celebrate at the Garden as the National Council of Jewish Women, Chicago North Shore Section, invites families to explore trees both indoors and outside. Create tree-related crafts, enjoy a reading corner, and see displays about the holiday. Plant a young parsley plant that will be fully grown in time for your Passover Seder. Craft and planting activities will take place in the Fairchild Room.

Green Youth Farm Facilitator Training Saturday, February 2, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Join staff from the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Green Youth Farm for a day focused on sustainable farming and food production. Learn about youth development in an urban agriculture or school garden setting. A $50 per-person fee includes all programming, lunch, and parking. The program takes place in the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center, and preregistration is required. For more information or to register, contact Eliza Fournier at efournier@ chicagobotanic.org. 10 www.chicagobotanic.org

Seed Swap Sunday, February 24, 3 to 5 p.m. Gardeners are invited to bring saved or leftover vegetable, flower, and herb seed packets to share and swap with other gardeners. Beginners are welcome to participate even without seeds. New this year, more experienced seed savers will enjoy swapping with others at the Connoisseur’s Corner. Ongoing demonstrations will feature starting seeds indoors, germination testing, and seed saving. Chicago Botanic Garden volunteers and staff will share their favorite and recommended varieties for Chicago gardens. Earlier in the day, workshops will be offered through the Joseph Regenstein, Jr. School of the Chicago Botanic Garden and Seed Savers Exchange (fee applies and registration is required). A beginning Seed-Saving Primer workshop will cover the basics of getting started with easy seed saving; a separate workshop, Planning Your Garden for Seed Saving, goes into more depth. At 2 p.m. a free lecture, “Seed Letters,” focuses on the human-interest stories behind the seeds donated to Seed Savers Exchange (preregistration required). See page 43 for more information; visit www.chicagobotanic.org to register.


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Calendar

CALENDAR NOVEMBER Ongoing Library Exhibition: Botanical Art: Expressions of Natural Beauty continuing through Nov. 11, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays.

Teacher Programs: Green Science for the Future 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Workshop continues Saturday, November 17, at the Peggy Notebart Nature Museum from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Monday, November 12

Friday – Sunday, November 2 – 4

Camp CBG Priority Registration for President’s Circle Members through Nov. 30; see page 10 for more information.

Monthly Photo Walk 9 a.m., meets in Annex 1. Members-only Double Discount Day 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Garden Shop; members receive 20 percent off most items with proof of membership. Weekend Family Class: Three Sisters 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Sunday, November 4 Winter Farmers’ Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Garden View Room. Thursday, November 8 40th Anniversary Lecture Join Kris Jarantoski, executive vice president and director, for a visual presentation on the history of the Chicago Botanic Garden. 1 p.m., Alsdorf Auditorium.

Library Exhibition: The Garden Turns 40: Documenting Our Past, Planning for the Future continuing through Feb. 10, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays; noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays.

Weekend Family Class: Beautiful Birds 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Fine Art of Fiber Opening Night 6:30 to 9 p.m.

Saturday, November 3

Ongoing

Sunday, November 11

Thursday, November 1

Fine Art of Fiber 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

DECEMBER

Saturday, November 10

Friday, November 16 – Sunday, February 10 Library Exhibition: The Garden Turns 40: Documenting Our Past, Planning for the Future 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays. Sunday, November 18 Winter Farmers’ Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Garden View Room. Tuesday, November 20 The Guild and President’s Circle Wonderland Express Preview Celebration 5 to 8:30 p.m.; fee applies; call (847) 835-6925 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/circle/circleevents to purchase tickets.

Saturday, December 1 Monthly Photo Walk 9 a.m.; meets in Annex 2. Teacher Programs: Exploring Desert Ecosystems 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Preregistration required; fee applies. Workshop continues Dec. 8 at the Brookfield Zoo, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. See page 75 for more information. Weekend Family Class: Joyful Gingerbread 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Sunday, December 2 Winter Farmers’ Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Garden View Room. Monday, December 3 Camp CBG online registration begins; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 10 for more information. Saturday, December 8 Free Library Talk: “The Garden Turns 40: Documenting Our Past, Planning for the Future” 2 p.m.

Wonderland Express

All Aboard! Wonderland Express Dinner Thursday, Nov. 29, 6:30 p.m.; call (847) 835-6944 to purchase tickets.

Friday, November 23 – Sunday, January 6 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; fee applies; closes at 3 p.m. on Nov. 29 and Dec. 24; closed Dec. 25.

Members-Only Night Wednesday, Dec. 12, 5 to 7:30 p.m.; ticket required. Hot Chocolate with Mrs. Claus Saturday, Dec. 8, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; ticket required; fee applies. Hanukkah Concert Sunday, Dec. 9, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.; ticket required; fee applies. Breakfast with Santa Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 15 and 16, 8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; ticket required; fee applies. Christmas Concert Saturday, Dec. 22, 1 and 3 p.m.; ticket required; fee applies. Family Drop-in Activities Open during exhibition hours: Friday through Sunday of Thanksgiving weekend; Tuesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays through Dec. 23; and daily, Dec. 24 through Jan. 6. Hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Nov. 27 and Dec. 4, 11, and 18. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland for more information and to purchase Wonderland Express tickets online—no fees applied to online orders!


Calendar

Saturday, December 15 Scout Seasonal Workshop: Winter Wonders 12:45 to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Sunday, December 16 Winter Farmers’ Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Garden View Room. Weekend Family Class: Joyful Gingerbread 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturday, December 24 Garden Grounds open 8 a.m. to sunset. The Garden Café, Garden Shop, and Wonderland Express exhibition close at 3 p.m. Sunday, December 25 Garden Grounds open 8 a.m. to sunset. The Garden Café, Garden Shop, and Wonderland Express exhibition are closed. Thursday & Friday, December 27 & 28 Winter Break Camp 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturday, January 19

Saturday, January 26

Weekend Family Class: Papermaking 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Sundays, January 20 February 3

Teacher Programs: Teas, Sweets, and Tropical Treats: Science and Culture of Edible Plants 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; workshop meets at the Garfield Park Conservatory; preregistration required; fee applies. Workshop continues Saturday, February 2, at the Chicago Botanic Garden, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. See page 75 for more information.

Wednesday – Friday, January 2 – 4

Drawing in the Greenhouse color pencil workshop, 3 Sundays, 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.; see page 60 for details; fee applies.

Winter Meditation Walk 10 a.m. to noon; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 62 for details.

Winter Break Camp 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Friday, January 25

Sunday, January 27

President’s Circle and Director’s Circle Three Friends of Winter Bonsai Silhouette Show Preview Party 5:30 to 8 p.m.; fee applies; call (847) 835-6925 to register or for more information on Circle-level memberships.

Tu B’Shevat Family Drop-In Activities 1 to 4 p.m.

JANUARY Ongoing Library Exhibition: The Garden Turns 40: Documenting Our Past, Planning for the Future continuing through Feb. 10, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays.

Saturday, January 5 Monthly Photo Walk 9 a.m.; meets in Alsdorf Auditorium. Thursday – Saturday, January 10 – 12 Little Diggers series begins; 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Workshop in Sustainable Vegetable Production: Crop Planning 9 a.m. to noon; classes held at the Arturo Velasquez Institute; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturdays, January 12 – March 2 Botanical Drawing 1 8 Saturdays, 9 a.m. to noon; see page 59 for details; fee applies. Monday, January 14 Story Time in the Lenhardt Library 10 to 11 a.m., Mondays continuing through May 20. Meets on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. No Story Time on April 22.

Exhibition: Woodcut: Bryan Nash Gill ongoing through April 14, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Joutras Gallery.

Weekend Family Class: Superballs & Gumballs 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Friday – Sunday, January 25 – 27 Three Friends of Winter Bonsai Silhouette Show 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; family activities on Saturday and Sunday.

Give to the Garden Year-end giving is tax deductible to the full extent of the law and directly supports the Garden’s mission to promote the understanding, enjoyment, and conservation of plants and the natural world. For information on making a gift, including appreciated securities, or for other questions, call (847) 835-8215. Any new or increased gift to the Annual Fund will be matched by the Circle of Service Foundation.Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/donate to make a year-end gift online.

www.chicagobotanic.org/calendar 13


Calendar

information and seminars by Garden staff. See Flower and Garden Show website for hours at Navy Pier; fee applies. Garden members enjoy discounted admission on-site with proof of membership. Thursday, March 14 Ginkgo: The Tree That Time Forgot 6:30 to 8 p.m.; engagement and book signing featuring Sir Peter Crane, dean, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Preregistration required; fee applies; see page 44 for details. Saturday, March 16

FEBRUARY Ongoing Library Exhibition: The Garden Turns 40: Documenting Our Past, Planning for the Future continuing through Feb. 10, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays. Exhibition: Woodcut: Bryan Nash Gill continuing through April 14, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Joutras Gallery. Saturday, February 2 Monthly Photo Walk 9 a.m.; meets in Alsdorf Auditorium. Green Youth Farm Facilitator Training 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Plant Science Center; preregistration required; fee applies; e-mail efournier@ chicagobotanic.org to register or for more information. Monday, February 4

Sunday, February 17 Weekend Family Class: Rainbow Garden 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Sunday, February 24 Seed Swap 3 to 5 p.m.; lecture, “Seed Letters,” 2 p.m.; free; preregistration required. See page 10 for details.

MARCH

Northern Illinois Gesneriad Society Show & Sale noon to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday.

Exhibition: Woodcut: Bryan Nash Gill continuing through April 14, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Joutras Gallery.

Sunday, March 3 Weekend Family Class: Homemade Ice Cream 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Monthly Photo Walk 9 a.m.; meets in Alsdorf Auditorium.

Sunday & Monday, March 3 & 4 Volunteer Opportunity Fair 1 to 3 p.m. Monday, March 4

Friday, February 15 – Sunday, May 12

Story Time in the Lenhardt Library 10 to 11 a.m., Mondays continuing through May 20. No Story Time on April 22.

Library Exhibition: Architectural Designs in Print 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, noon to 4 p.m. weekends.

Wednesday, March 6

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Malott Japanese Garden Spring Weekend 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday – Friday, March 25 – 29

Scout Seasonal Workshop: Valentine’s Day 12:45 to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Teacher Programs: School Gardening Basics 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Openlands; preregistration required; fee applies. Workshop continues Saturday, February 23, at the Chicago Botanic Garden, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. See page 75 for more information.

Weekend Family Class: Homemade Ice Cream 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Library Exhibition: Historic Landscapes: Architectural Designs in Print continuing through May 12, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, noon to 4 p.m. weekends.

Saturday, February 9

Saturday, February 16

Saturday, March 23

Saturday & Sunday, March 23 & 24

Saturday, March 2

Workshops in Sustainable Vegetable Production: Seed Starting 9 a.m. to noon; classes held at the Arturo Velasquez Institute; preregistration required; fee applies.

Teacher Programs: Fostering Early Childhood Inquiry 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Garden; preregistration required; fee applies. Continues Saturday, March 23, at the Peggy Notebart Nature Museum, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. See page 75.

Ongoing

Story Time in the Lenhardt Library 10 to 11 a.m., Mondays continuing through May 20. Meets on President’s Day. No Story Time on April 22.

Weekend Family Class: Hot Chocolate 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Workshop in Sustainable Vegetable Production: Season Extension 9 a.m. to noon; classes held at the Arturo Velasquez Institute; preregistration required; fee applies.

Spring Break Camp 9:30 to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Looking Ahead to 2013 Watch for details about these exciting events in the next issue of Keep Growing and on our website.

American Flower Show Series: Celebrating 40 Years! Select weekends, January 26 through October 20

ScreenBreak Family Activities 9 to 11 a.m.

Malott Japanese Garden Spring Weekend

Friday, March 8

Saturday and Sunday, March 23 and 24

ScreenBreak Family Activities 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday – Sunday, March 9 – 17 Chicago Flower and Garden Show features plant

Antiques & Garden Fair Preview Evening Thursday, April 18 Fair Friday, April 19, to Sunday, April 21


Antiquesand Awards & Garden Honors Fair

A Tribute to Time and Talent A talented and dedicated team of more than 1,300 volunteers provides exemplary service to Chicago Botanic Garden staff and visitors, helping the Garden maintain its status as one of the great public gardens of the world. In 2011, Garden volunteers contributed more than 112,000 hours of service. According to Volunteer Services director Judy Cashen, “While all volunteers are essential to the Garden’s work, this year, during our annual volunteer reception on June 13, we were proud to honor Elizabeth de la Baume, Marnee Kenny, Bob Sharp, and Ruth Schiff for their exceptional service.”

Volunteer of the Year

Five-Star Customer Service Award

Since she began volunteering in 1997, Elizabeth de la Baume has contributed an impressive 4,400 hours. She is respected for her dependability, energy, diligence, and enthusiasm. De la Baume’s service began in the Garden Shop, but her passion for protecting the environment led to her monitoring and documenting Garden waterfowl and bird populations, twice or more a week—rain, shine, or snow. Her efforts are providing scientists with important data about avian diversity and nutrient-loading in our lakes.

The Garden takes pride not only in its exquisite plants, but in its extraordinary customer service. Bob Sharp provides service that makes people smile and feel special. In the words of a delighted visitor, “Bob always greets us with a huge ‘Hello, how are you?’ and tells us what is currently blooming in the Garden. He is incredibly upbeat, friendly, and courteous.”

Barbara Whitney Carr Excellence in Leadership Award In 2007, a new volunteer award was named for former Garden CEO Barbara Carr. The award lauds volunteers who have demonstrated innovation and provided notable leadership. Marnee Kenny is honored for her exceptional service, passionate enthusiasm, and leadership in support of the English Walled Garden, Lakeside Gardens, McDonald Woods, specialty areas, special events, and in the Volunteer Services department. According to Cashen, “Marnee comes in early, stays late, and is reliable regardless of season or weather. She is an inspiring mentor to new volunteers and an exceptional Garden ambassador.” 16 www.chicagobotanic.org/volunteer

Super Senior Award Ruth Schiff began her volunteer service at the Garden in 1987, supporting youth education programs that teach students about the importance of protecting plants and the environment. She has volunteered in the Garden’s Plant Production department, maintaining the extensive topiary collection; assisted at special events; provided interpretive programming to visitors; and served as a walking tour guide. Schiff has warmly welcomed and taught hundreds of visitors and students at the Garden for the past 25 years. The Garden extends its deep and sincere thanks to all our volunteers, and offers heartfelt congratulations to our Volunteer Award honorees.


Focus on Photography

The Garden serves as studio, subject, inspiration, and teacher. All year round, it welcomes the full spectrum of photographers, from the casual stroller with a camera phone to the experienced image-maker. Walks, classes, a club, contests, and exhibitions are among ways anyone with a camera may learn to better see the beauty of the Garden and capture it in a photographic image. Focus on Photography Certificate Program In fall

2012, the Joseph Regenstein, Jr. School of the Chicago Botanic Garden added photography to its offering of certificate programs. Students follow a curriculum that includes core courses and electives that follow an artistic or technical track, with an emphasis on botanical and nature photography. “It’s really for personal enhancement,” said Jill Selinger, manager of continuing education for the Regenstein School, explaining that the program arose from student demand. “There’s a sense of accomplishment in having a body of classes that culminates in a certificate.”

18 www.chicagobotanic.org

Student Botanical Photography Exhibition Photog-

raphy students at the Regenstein School had the opportunity to showcase their work in the second annual juried exhibition of botanical images, Focusing on Nature, held in late September and early October in the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center. “It’s a great way for students to showcase the knowledge they’ve gained through the Garden’s photography classes,” said Selinger. “They demonstrate the techniques they’ve learned with artistic images centered on a botanical theme.” Digital Photography Contests Open to all amateur

photographers, this seasonal competition encourages participants to show the Garden’s beauty in winter, spring, summer, and fall. Entries are submitted online, and a gallery of the entries and winners is displayed on the Garden’s website. Grand prize winners receive a oneyear Garden membership. “The contest was developed to enhance our visitors’ experience,” said Cheri Van Deraa, director of online communications. “The photography experience itself, whether you win the contest or not, provides hours of outdoor enjoyment at the Garden.”


Photography

Antiques & Garden Fair

For the photographer, the Chicago Botanic Garden is paradise found. Monthly Photo Walks These free walks, which comple-

ment the digital photography contests and are led by a staff photographer, show participants what there is to see at the Garden and how better to see it before releasing the camera shutter. “My overarching philosophy is that the technical aspect of using your camera is the least of your worries,” said Garden photographer Robin Carlson, whose work is seen throughout this magazine and at www.chicagobotanic.org. “The photographer has to anticipate how the complex, three-dimensional world of the Garden will look in a flat picture, since the camera sees only a two-dimensional, flat record of everything in front of its lens. By closing one eye you can easily anticipate the compositional challenge.” Participants in Garden photo walks learn from the staff leader and each other how to find order and beauty in that chaos, with an emphasis on lighting and composition. Those principles apply equally to the veteran photographer with sophisticated equipment and the amateur taking pictures with a smartphone. Some walks take a theme, such as different values of the color green or how to adjust camera settings for a snowy winter landscape. “I look at the Garden as a 19 www.chicagobotanic.org

language in and of itself, like an alphabet,” said Carlson, musing on the qualities of strength, grace, and renewal. “All of those things, I believe, can be expressed by plants.” Garden Photographic Society There are scores of pho-

to clubs in the Chicago area, but only one has its home at the Chicago Botanic Garden. The Garden Photographic Society is a “pictorial” group, explained Bob Marin, who co-founded the society in 1979. Members turn their lenses to subjects both botanical and otherwise. “We embrace it all,” he said. Marin described a cooperative rapport within the club and a mentoring program that pairs senior members with novices. Meetings are open and free for newcomers to sample. Those who join the society pay dues, and there is an annual exhibition of members’ work at the Garden. The club and its members also boast an impressive record in regional photo competitions. Photo: Contest entry by Chris Smith; taken shortly after sunset on a windless night, looking toward the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Japanese Garden from the main island. www.chicagobotanic.org/photography 19


Woman’s Board

Woman’s Board Continues Tradition of Support During this year of celebration as the Chicago Botanic Garden turned 40, the Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society has continued to play a vital role that began even before the Garden opened to the public. Founded in 1951, the Woman’s Board and its members have been ambassadors for the Garden who are dedicated to horticulture, conservation, and education. The early members of the Woman’s Board were savvy gardeners, many with particular areas of expertise, and these women were formative in the Garden’s earliest development. Sixty years later, the board still attracts dedicated women, many of them expert gardeners. They are a group that produces results. “The Woman’s Board has raised more than $10 million for the Chicago Botanic Garden since its inception,” said Board President Catherine Kirby. “We embrace challenges and look for ways to support the needs of the Garden.”

further pledged to sponsor new programs, activities, and fundraising projects. The Woman’s Board developed the Fragrant Garden for the Blind, which opened in 1957 at the Chicago Lighthouse. In 1966, the first plant sale was held—six years before the Chicago Botanic Garden opened to the public in 1972. The board also introduced the Zimmerman lecture series, a successful and long-running project. Today, Woman’s Board events such as A Bloomin’ Festival, A Rare Affair, the All Aboard! gala, and the Fall Bulb Festival continue to draw people to the Garden, raising funds to support a myriad of programs. The Garden Shop and the Lenhardt Library also have their roots in work done by the Woman’s Board. In the 1970s the board established the Garden Shop, and its proceeds still provide needed funds. When the Chicago Horticultural Society moved into the early Garden buildings, the Woman’s Board had the first collection of library books installed there.

“The Woman’s Board is a very special part of the Garden family—a true strategic partner,” said Garden President and CEO Sophia Siskel. “The board’s commitment is a gift to all those who witness the Garden’s beauty and benefit from its education and community gardening programs, as well as its plant conservation science.”

“We haven’t looked back,” said Kirby. “From donating thousands of books to the new library to running the Garden’s popular plant sales, the Woman’s Board’s dedication to and affection for the Garden will continue to enhance the Garden’s mission for years to come.”

An early mission of the Chicago Horticultural Society was to find and develop a permanent headquarters and garden center to serve the Chicago area. The Woman’s Board was established to help build membership for the society, and it

The Woman’s Board is in its first year of “Growing the Future,” a $1 million pledge to the Chicago Botanic Garden. Proceeds for 2012 will support the Garden’s Green Youth Farm and Windy City Harvest community gardening programs.

20 www.chicagobotanic.org/chicagohorticulturalsociety


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Putting Science to Work CLM internship program has trained the next generation of biologists and land managers for more than a decade Biologist Stephanie Koontz is in her element—out in the field, monitoring rare, threatened, and endangered plant species at two National Park Service (NPS) sites. She’s also learning how the federal agency operates. “I’m gaining experience that will help me get a job in the future,” Koontz said recently. She is among the more than 700 college graduates who have taken part in the special Conservation and Land Management (CLM) internship program. The fivemonth paid internships provide a remarkable opportunity for graduates to test-drive their superb biological (botany and wildlife) skills by conducting on-site research with one of several federal agencies. The Chicago Botanic Garden launched the CLM internship program with the U.S. Department of Interior Bureau

of Land Management (BLM) in 2001, and has since partnered with the National Park Service (NPS), U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey. “These internships help them gain experience, network, and be aware of the scientific community they’re part of,” said Krissa Skogen, Ph.D., a Garden conservation scientist and the CLM internship program manager. She recruits between 75 and 100 interns each year. “The internship program draws an advanced pool of applicants. These men and women are looking for career opportunities in which they can apply their education and experience to on-the-ground conservation projects. They are the next generation of conservation biologists and land managers, and their internship experiences provide them with unique opportunities to help them reach their career goals. Getting newly trained people with on-the-ground experience will be important in replacing an existing older workforce.” Besides measuring the impact of white-tailed deer browsing on native plant populations, Koontz will do assessments to determine the impacts of climate change on specific species at her two work sites—the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park, in Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia, and the Catoctin Mountain National Park, in Thurmont, Maryland. “The assessments will aid in developing long-term management plans for a changing species composition over the next 50 to 100 years,” Koontz said. “The internship has provided me with some critical experience not just for conducting field work, but in how to work with NPS partners, park visitors, and in collaboration with other divisions of the NPS.”

“I’m gaining experience that will help me get a job in the future.” —Stephanie Koontz, intern

As an intern with the Bureau of Land Management in Lakewood, Colorado, Darnisha Coverson monitors rare plant species and collects seeds of native plants for the BLM’s Seeds of Success Program. “The internship program offers students the incredible opportunity to work in wildlife conservation all over the United States,” said Coverson. “It’s the best opportunity available to recent college graduates to get their foot in the door with federal agencies and study unique biodiversity. The internship also helps recent graduates expand their resumés as well as meet other


Plant Conservation Science

“I enjoy their enthusiasm and energy, and I feel privileged to participate in the CLM workshop.” —Dean Tonenna, BLM botanist

students, scientists, researchers, and federal agents who share the same interests in preserving biodiversity.” This year, 58 interns attended the weeklong training workshop at the Garden, where biologists from federal agencies, along with staff scientists, conducted a variety of lectures and hands-on activities. “The workshop includes sessions on field botany, monitoring and inventory methods, field navigation, conservation genetics, and other topics important to the success of their internship,” Skogen said. A botanist with the Bureau of Land Management in Carson City, Nevada, Dean Tonenna has mentored 55 of the interns since 2004. “I became a mentor because it’s important to share knowledge and experiences with interns who are interested in botany and natural resource management,” Tonenna said. “I enjoy their enthusiasm and energy, and I feel privileged to participate in the CLM workshop.” For more information on the Conservation and Land Management program and to apply for an internship, visit www.chicagobotanic.org/internship/ CLM.

“The internship program offers students the incredible opportunity to work in wildlife conservation all over the United States.” — Darnisha Coverson, intern

The Conservation and Land Management internship program is made possible with support from the U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management, the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Center for Plant Conservation, and the Greenbelt Native Plant Center. Conservation and Land Management (CLM) interns primarily are situated in 13 western states; at any of the CLM sites, they experience new landscapes and habitats while conducting research. www.chicagobotanic.org/internship/CLM 23


Plant Conservation Science

Young Scientists Honored with Fellowships and Grant Rebecca Tonietto knows a few things about bees. She has studied them down on the ground in city parks, in restored and pristine prairies, and up on urban “green” rooftops in and around Chicago. It’s all part of her studies in the Graduate Program in Plant Biology and Conservation, a joint program between Northwestern University and the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Research focuses on bees and green roofs

“I’m interested in the effect of prairie restoration on bee communities,” Tonietto said. “Are some of the techniques used to restore prairies in some way selecting some kinds of bees? And, what is the role of fire on native bees? Through restoration efforts we may be inadvertently selecting for bees with certain traits, or bees within certain genera of families.” The bee communities of individual sites will be compared to all bees collected in the study to help determine if certain bee species are missing or over-represented at sites with similar management regimes or similar landuse history. Her research has not gone without notice. Tonietto recently received Northwestern University’s most prestigious award, the Presidential Fellowship. She is one of a very small number of graduate students to receive the Fellowship and the Rebecca Tonietto sorts bees in the Plant Ecology Laboratory of the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center.

24

first from the Plant Biology and Conservation program. “I was so honored just to be nominated—it was incredible,” Tonietto said. “I’m absolutely thrilled.”

Shrinking habitat and changing climate are putting the squeeze on countless plants, animals, and insects. In many urban areas, green roofs mitigate heat and capture water, and now scientists are exploring whether they can preserve local diversity for threatened species. The issue is of great interest to Kelly Ksiazek, a doctoral student in the Plant Biology and Conservation Program. Ksiazek received a fellowship from the Germanistic Society of America and a Fulbright Travel Grant, allowing her to spend ten months in Germany studying green roofs, some of which were installed 50 years ago. “Germany has a longer history of planting green roofs compared to the U.S.,” Ksiazek said. “They let their green roofs evolve naturally.” Paired with a scientist from the University of Applied Sciences, she will assess plants and pollinators and how plant communities influence pollinators—bees and other insects—that visit green roofs in Neubrandenberg and Berlin. “Green roofs are great for cities, but if they’re left alone they could harbor weed species,” said Ksiazek. “My research aims to make predictions about how green roofs will look in the U.S. in ten, 20, or 50 years.”

Kelly Ksiazek conducts research atop the Chicago City Hall’s 20,000-square-foot green roof.


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Then and Now

Dixon Prairie Now

1993, after more than ten years of work on the site, the Dixon Prairie was dedicated. The Chicago Botanic Garden’s Dixon Prairie highlights six types of prairie native to this region: • Sand prairies flourish in sand deposited by glacial meltwater. Look for a rolling landscape with well-drained and saturated sandy soil.

Then

When explorers reached what is now Illinois in the late seventeenth century, miles of uninterrupted tallgrass prairie disappeared into the horizon. Most of that prairie is now gone, lost to agriculture, industry, and development. Today, less than one-tenth of one percent of the original tallgrass prairie remains. In 1980, the Chicago Botanic Garden began planning a 15-acre prairie designed to educate visitors about the unique beauty and history of this ecosystem and enable researchers to study the propagation of prairie plants. Initially the plan was to display prairie types from different U.S. regions, but ultimately a distinctly Illinois medley was chosen, featuring sand, mesic, wet, bur oak savanna, fen, and gravel hill prairies—all of them once common in the northeastern part of the state—for the southern part of the Garden. Designers from Environmental Planning and Design created the plan, and Suzanne S. Dixon, inspired by the rich remnant prairie on her and her husband’s property, endowed the development of the prairie. On September 21, 26 www.chicagobotanic.org/explore/prairie

• Mesic prairies are usually flat or slightly hilly and contain soil that is rich, dark, and moist. • Wet prairies are found in low areas. The dark soils stay damp throughout the year. • Fens are characteristically quite wet with ample groundwater and thick, peat-rich soil. • Savannas often are found between open prairies and woodlands. Typically, they include oak trees and plants that thrive in partial shade. • Gravel hill prairies grow in the mounds of gravel and sand left by glaciers. Soils are rocky and well-drained. The mesic prairie and bur oak savanna on the south portion of the site were the first areas to be created. Prior to establishment of the prairie, the land had been bulldozed, and even today, the heavily compacted, clay-rich soils make it difficult for plants to establish deep roots. “We’ve had opportunity to learn from successes and challenges in these two areas,” says Garden ecologist Dave Sollenberger. “Though native tallgrass prairies once dominated the midwestern landscape, many soils have been degraded by development. We continue to try new approaches to establish a functional prairie plant community despite less-thanideal soil conditions.”


Then & Now

Like the mesic prairie, the savanna has continuously changed over time. Where once sun-loving plants predominated, attentive visitors will notice more and more shadetolerant plants thriving on the savanna as the oaks mature. Marsh Island, the wet prairie, emerged next in the late 1980s—a grand four-acre site that took several years to complete. In the early 1990s, truckloads of new soils, sand, and gravel forged fen, gravel hill, and sand prairies. A coarser soil is required to support the plant communities in these three prairie habitats.

It provides scientists with samples and data for genetic and reproductive studies, with the goal of preserving and restoring plants here in the Prairie State and beyond. For more information about Dixon Prairie, including its plants and a map, visit www.chicagobotanic.org/explore/prairie. The Dixon Prairie was created with the generous support of Sue and Wes Dixon, who also have provided an endowment to ensure that the prairie will be enjoyed by future generations.

During its 32 years, Dixon Prairie has transformed from a weedy meadow rife with invasive species into a haven of prairie diversity and beauty, where 250 plant species thrive. Many insects, birds, and animals have made it their home. These include monarch butterflies and green darner dragonflies, differentiated grasshoppers, American goldfinches, and eastern kingbirds, to name just a few. A living history of our prairie state is only part of the Dixon Prairie’s story; the prairie also serves as a living laboratory.

Then Now

www.chicagobotanic.org 27


Holiday Shopping

Share the Garden Spirit this Season As fall turns to winter, the list of reasons to visit the Chicago Botanic Garden grows to add holiday shopping. The Garden Shop in the Visitor Center offers gardening tools, nature-inspired jewelry, clothing, prints, fine glass art, toys, puzzles, a custom greenhouse ornament, flowering bulbs and books on gardening, birding, and much more. Members enjoy a 10 percent discount, and a portion of each purchase supports the Garden. “You can buy things here you won’t find anywhere else, plus we give amazing service,” said Linda Elkind, assistant store director. Many items are available online, with a larger selection in the store. This year, the Shop offers a new book, Bonsai: A Patient Art, highlighting the Garden’s famed Bonsai Collection. Board member and bonsai enthusiast Robert H. Malott supported publication of this book. A Garden membership or tribute donation is a gift that long will be remembered.“The Garden is good for the spirit. It means something different to everyone,” said Anne Boynton, director of membership and annual giving. Tributes to celebrate, commemorate, and remember a person may be given in any amount. Call (847) 835-8215 for more information.

Never before has there been a fine fragrance made of ingredients grown in the Chicago area. Now there is—and it is available in the Garden Shop. Tru Blooms Chicago is a limited edition eau de parfum, a light floral composition of damask rose, lavender, and violet—flowers all grown locally at sites that include the Chicago Botanic Garden. The fragrance allows Garden visitors to leave with more than memories and photos, said Monte Henige, CEO of Willowbrook-based Tru Fragrance, the company behind the product. “That’s what’s so beautiful,” he said. “This is the marrying of those senses.” Just in time for the holidays (order now!) are the Garden’s new customized holiday greeting cards and note cards. Shoppers design a card online by selecting photos taken by staff photographers and previously featured in Garden publications. “These images haven’t been available to the public before,” said Cheri Van Deraa, director of online communications. “You can choose from dozens of Garden photos, close-ups and landscapes, in all four seasons.” The cards are printed with a personal greeting and shipped. Also new this year, with identical photo options, is a customized Garden calendar.

28 For all of your holiday shopping needs, visit the Garden Shop in person or online at www.chicagobotanic.org/shop.


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Noteworthy Plants

From Persian Parrotia to Flame Willow:

1

2

Persian Parrotia (Parrotia persica)

3

4

Flame Willow (Salix ‘Flame’)

Peking Lilac (Syringa pekinensis ‘Morton’, China Snow™)

Photo by Joe Bergeson

Little Bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium)

“This native ornamental grass has life even in winter, as it sways back and forth in our windy environs,” said Galen Gates, former curator of perennial herbaceous plants. At 2 feet wide and tall, this grass has remarkable resilience that allows it to bend to the ground from ice and snow and then bounce back upright when free. “Its value is enhanced when backlit by morning and late afternoon sunlight,” said Gates.

“I love the winter interest of the bark of this small ornamental tree, which is very smooth, but peels to reveal a pattern of brownish-pink patches,” said Jill Selinger, manager of continuing education. “It blooms in early spring with reddish flowers, and also has a very nice yellow-orange fall color.” See it here: Along the path between parking lots 3 and 5

There’s no lack of color during the winter months with Flame willow. Andrew Bell, Ph.D., curator of woody plants, likes this large shrub, which can reach 12 feet tall and wide, for its bright orange-red stems: “As the name implies, this shrub willow glows like a flame in the winter landscape!”

“This is a tree-form lilac with creamy white flowers in June, and excellent winter interest from its cinnamoncolored peeling and exfoliating bark,” said Jim Ault, Ph.D., director of ornamental plant research. “It’s especially notable where the tree can be backlit in the winter sun.”

See it here: The Garden Wall and Berm (west side, facing Eden’s Expressway), and along the West Road (in a bed west of the Serpentine Bridge)

See it here: Evening Island and Sensory Garden

See it here: Dixon Prairie and Native Plant, Landscape, and Heritage Gardens

9

10

Florist Cyclamen (Cyclamen persicum) Often referred to as “poor man’s orchids,” cyclamen are usually available in garden centers during winter. “They are wonderful indoor blooming houseplants with bright red, pink, white, or purple flowers on long stems,” said outdoor floriculturist Tim Pollak. Flowers appear to float above the heart-shaped leaves, which are often marbled with silver. “They prefer cooler temperatures, and a bright indirect location indoors.” See it here: Wonderland Express

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European Filbert (Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’) “This small shrub with its twisting, corkscrewlike branches makes a very attractive and interesting focal point for the winter garden,” says Jill Selinger, manager of continuing education. See it here: Regenstein Center, parking lots, and Sensory Garden


Noteworthy Plants

Our Top Ten Plants for Winter

5

Wintergreen Boxwood (Buxus microphylla var. koreana ‘Wintergreen’)

“Evergreens provide good structure for the winter landscape,” said Tim Johnson, director of horticulture. “Wintergreen boxwood is easy to grow and is not bothered by deer and rabbits.” Leave the glossy green foliage unpruned and this slow-growing shrub will develop a fine-textured, loose natural habit. See it here: English Walled and Elizabeth Hubert Malott Japanese Gardens

6

Snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis)

“In mild winters these can be found in bloom in late January, but more typically February and March in the Chicago area, well ahead of any other bulbs,” said Dr. Jim Ault, director of ornamental plant research. The white, bell-shaped flowers are a sure sign that spring is not far off. See it here: Bulb, Landscape, and English Walled Gardens, and many other locations

7

8

Paperbark Maple (Acer griseum)

A small ornamental tree with a stately habit, paperbark maple can be grown as a multi-trunked or low-branched specimen that fits into many home gardens. “One of this tree’s main attributes is its beautiful exfoliating cinnamon to reddish-brown bark that develops on young trees, providing a focal point in the winter landscape,” says Dr. Andrew Bell, curator of woody plants.

Cardinal Red-twig Dogwood (Cornus sericea ‘Cardinal’)

This fast-growing shrub with cherry-red stems is a great choice for brightening the winter garden, according to outdoor floriculturist Tim Pollak. Cardinal dogwood offers multiseason interest— white flowers in spring and red-purple foliage in autumn. Birds typically pick off the bluish-white berries long before the first snowflake falls. See it here: Landscape and Waterfall Gardens

See it here: Elizabeth Hubert Malott Japanese Garden

Throughout the year, we’ve featured ten plants in each issue of Keep Growing —40 in all—that were selected by Chicago Botanic Garden experts as some of their personal favorites. These staff picks for plants will brighten an otherwise quiet time of year in the winter landscape.

www.chicagobotanic.org/plantinfo 31


Supporting the Garden

Leaving a Garden Legacy with a Planned Gift Keeping the Garden Growing Here at the Chicago Botanic Garden, oak saplings are planted with the hope they will grow tall, cooling visitors and protecting shade-loving plants. The trees will reach their majestic 60-foot maturity long after those who planted them are gone, having endowed a gift for tomorrow. Similarly, making a planned gift to the Chicago Botanic Garden is an investment in our future—ensuring that for generations, people will connect with nature while delighting their senses; discover the joys of gardening; and continue important conservation work. Planned giving options are often easy to arrange, offering benefits to the donor and family. Gifts protect loved ones while supporting cherished cultural institutions and charities. And, for many donors and their families, planned gifts provide valuable tax incentives. Beverly and Ralph Behrens deeply appreciate how the Garden blends art and science. She is an accomplished botanical artist; he is a nature photographer and retired engineer. “We enjoy the art education program, learning about the Garden’s conservation work, and supporting the graduate program in plant biology and conservation,” said Ralph. “We want to support the Garden in these areas, and gradually moved up our membership level until reaching the President’s Circle. A planned gift was the right ‘next step’ for us and the Garden.” The Behrenses have supported the Garden with a living trust. “This is something anyone can do,” said Beverly. “People can choose a level of giving comfortable for them.”

Marilyn Bodine concurs. “A gift to the Garden is a gift that grows and grows,” she said. Her late husband, Earl C. Bodine, was one of the Garden’s original donors and is the inspiration for her continued support. Self-described as “frugal and a good planner,” Marilyn chose to establish a charitable gift annuity, which provides a current tax deduction and fixed payments for life. The remaining balance becomes a gift to the Garden’s endowment. Raised in a Chicago apartment abutting the expressway, Rich Peters didn’t see much beauty out his front door as a youth. Then, driving his first car, he came upon the Chicago Botanic Garden. “It was more trees than I had ever seen in my life!” he recalled. Rich became a regular visitor, and eventually a member. Corinne Peters, who shares her husband’s love of the Garden, completed master gardener certification and volunteers in the Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden. “When deciding which legacies we wanted to leave, we knew we wanted to support the Garden,” said Corinne. The Peters family has chosen to give an IRA. “It’s simple to designate beneficiaries, even allocating percentages to different organizations,” said Rich. “IRA gifts to family members often are heavily taxed, but when donated to a charitable organization, it is a tax-free gift.” He added, “This is an easy way to show support for the Garden’s future financial needs.” For more information, read the attached planned giving brochure or call Patty Shanahan, director of major gifts and planned giving, at (847) 835-6838.

(Left to right) Ralph and Beverly Behrens, Marilyn Bodine, and Corinne and Rich Peters have chosen different ways to make planned gifts to the Garden, helping to ensure its future.

32 www.chicagobotanic.org


Antiques & Garden Fair “In May when I visited the Garden with my daughter and

her

husband,

we

watched children learning to pollinate flowers. In a way, investing in the Chicago Botanic

Garden

is

like

pollination—providing the means necessary for the Garden to flourish and ensure the education of future generations.” – Marilyn Bodine, Garden member and donor

33 www.chicagobotanic.org

www.chicagobotanic.org/donate/plannedgiving 33


Windy City Harvest and Green Youth Farm provide fresh produce for Chicago sports venues Sox fans dining in the Stadium Club at U.S. Cellular Field A new Chicago Botanic Garden partnership brings togethbegan tasting fresh produce from this initiative last April; er fresh, locally grown produce, “green collar” jobs trainBulls fans at the Ketel One Club in the United Center are ing, gravel-to-garden urban development, and some happy enjoying produce from this new partnership during the sports fans. The Garden’s Windy City Harvest and Green season in progress. Youth Farm programs are working with Levy Restaurants and Midwest Foods to “This new partnership fosters Through its Farm to Fork program, Levy provide fresh produce for Levy Restaugrowth and sustainability so collaborates with local farmers, artisans, and rants at U.S. Cellular Field and the United many ways: transforming a purveyors to provide locally sourced proCenter. duce and products for its restaurants. gravel parking lot into a Through Midwest Foods, a local supplier, Piloted in 2007, Windy City Harvest is an innovative program that provides urban garden; providing people with Windy City Harvest is providing produce agricultural jobs training to adults eager to new skills and a better future; to Levy Restaurants at U.S. Cellular Field. Green Youth Farm is doing the same, on a gain career skills in urban growing and and supporting a beloved smaller scale, for the Levy Restaurants related food-hub skills. Since its inception in 2003, the Green Youth Farm youth Chicago venue with locally operation at the United Center. leadership program has offered high- grown food.”—Angela Mason, “We are honored to be working with the school students the chance to learn all director of community Garden and Levy to create jobs and opporaspects of organic farming. gardening for the Chicago tunities through agriculture and gardening,” said Mary Ann Fitzgerald, president and As part of the new partnership, Windy Botanic Garden CEO of Midwest Foods. City Harvest students, along with a crew from the Cook County Sheriff’s Vocational The Garden’s community gardening programs also support Rehabilitation Impact Center—an alternative sentence for the Garden Café. Sodexo, which supplies and manages the young, nonviolent offenders—farm a 1.5-acre site at 2606 Café, uses produce there that is grown in the Regenstein S. Rockwell Avenue in Chicago. During its inaugural 2012 Fruit & Vegetable Garden and harvested by Green Youth growing season, approximately 15,000 pounds of vegetables Farm and Windy City Harvest participants. including tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, carrots, and more were harvested from the “Rodeo Farm,” informally named Many dedicated supporters make Windy City Harvest and for the rodeo site located across the street. Green Youth Green Youth Farm possible. For a complete listing of Farm participation is centered on its North Lawndale site, donors and for more information on these community at 3555 West Ogden Avenue. gardening programs, see page 79.

35 www.chicagobotanic.org

www.chicagobotanic.org/windycityharvest/wch_ccbc 35

Community Gardening

Antiques & Garden Fair

Field of Dreams


Adult Education: Regenstein Botanical Arts School & Humanities

Joseph Regenstein, Jr. School Adult Education An extensive schedule provides a wealth of choices. Instruction by Garden staff and experts in their field ensures every class, workshop, or symposium is an exceptional learning experience.

Connecting with the Heart of Yoga: A Journey with Pat and Steve Nakon Husband and wife team Steve and Pat Nakon of Whole Journey Northwest Yoga bring more than 30 years of teaching experience to the Garden. Pat and Steve share the teaching responsibilities, so students have the opportunity to experience each of their unique talents. “Modern urban life can be stressful,” says Pat. “Our approach to practice helps people find balance and hopefully carry that peaceful, centered feeling with them into their daily lives.” “Regardless of the class, our approach focuses on strength, flexibility, deep release, breath, and peace. Our intention is for students to walk away feeling better than when they arrived. Students tell us they find the atmosphere of our classes to be welcoming, accepting, and encouraging,” says Steve. See pages 62 and 63 for a listing of classes taught by Steve and Pat. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/wellness for more information and to register for classes. 36

Yoga students of all ages and abilities are warmly received by instructors Steve and Pat Nakon.


Symposia & Professional Programs Adult Education: Highlights

Highlights Traditional Holiday Wreath Tuesday, November 27 See page 56 for details.

Garden Mosaic Tile Workshop

New! Ginkgo: The Tree That Time Forgot

Tuesday, December 4 See page 56 for details.

A special engagement and book signing with Sir Peter Crane Thursday, March 14 See page 44 for details.

Winter Meditation Walk Saturday, January 26 See page 62 for details.

Sustainable Gardener Series 6 Saturdays, February 2 – March 16 See page 48 for details.

Pop-Up Flowers of the Midwest: Beginners Friday, April 5 See page 59 for details.

Beginning Beekeeping Workshop Saturday, February 9 See page 43 for details.

Tulip Mania! Marilyn Garber Watercolor Workshop Friday – Sunday, April 12–14 See page 60 for details.

Expressive Watercolor 6 Saturdays, March 2 – April 6 See page 60 for details.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

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Adult Education: Overview of Programs

Overview of Courses and Programs General Interest Courses Courses cover myriad topics and provide high-quality learning opportunities for beginning and more advanced gardeners. For specific program questions, contact the registrar at school@chicagobotanic.org or (847) 835-8261.

Professional Programs

Professional programs are intensive studies in a particular area of interest for the advanced student. These courses routinely carry continuing education units for various professional organizations. Please direct comments or topic suggestions to Jill Selinger at school@chicagobotanic.org or (847) 835-6849.

Symposia

Symposia, offered throughout the year, provide an in-depth look at a variety of topics. Regional, national, and international speakers provide new perspectives for amateur gardeners, professional horticulturists, landscape designers and architects, scientists, conservationists, and other green-industry professionals. Please direct comments or topic suggestions to Beth Pinargote at school@chicagobotanic.org or (847) 835-8278.

Master Gardener Training Program

In conjunction with University of Illinois Extension, the Garden offers the Master Gardener Training Program. The program covers the basics of horticulture, including classes on woody and herbaceous ornamental plant materials, fruit and vegetable crops, entomology, and pathology. After completing the training program and 60 hours of volunteer service, participants become certified University of Illinois Extension Master Gardeners. The next on-site and online programs will begin in January 2013. Please visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ school/mastergardener or call Jill Selinger at (847) 835-6849.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies. Chicago Botanic Garden members receive a 20 percent discount on classes.

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Certificate Programs

Learn how a certificate of merit can help you fulfill a dream, start a new career, or delve more deeply into an area of interest. Look for these codes after a course listing, and find a course that may be a new beginning for you! Certificate programs are offered at many levels to give both beginners and professionals opportunities to improve their expertise and marketability. Details about all of the certificate programs are available at www.chicagobotanic.org/school/ certificate. Contact Amelia Simmons-Hurt at certificateprogram@chicagobotanic.org or (847) 835-8293 for further information. • Botanical Arts (ART) Engage your senses, discover hidden talents, and explore a more personal relationship with plants in this studio art program. • Garden Design (GDC) Create successful gardens with a solid foundation in plantsmanship and science-based gardening techniques. • Midwest Gardening (MGC) Discover practical, learner-friendly training on growing plants, plant propagation, and home garden design and you will become a more successful home gardener. • Ornamental Plant Materials (OPC) Avid amateur gardeners and aspiring horticulture professionals alike will learn identification, cultural requirements, and landscape use for more than 500 ornamental plants that are well suited for northeastern Illinois. • Professional Gardener Level 1 and 2 (PGL 1 and 2) Hands-on learning can lead to a new career or advancement in the industry, with science-based gardening techniques, plantsmanship, and training in sustainability and planning.

• Healthcare Garden Design (HGD) In this professional development program, attendees will discover the many ways gardens provide verifiable health benefits for the patients, staff, and visitors. • Horticultural Therapy (HTC) This 12-credit-hour accredited program combines online learning with hands-on training, allowing students to gain experience and skills in the use of plant, garden, and nature activities to achieve measurable physical and mental-health outcomes for clients. • New! Focus on Photography (FPC) The Regenstein School is pleased to announce the launch of a new certificate program, enabling photographers of all levels to experience the wonders of the natural world, develop and sharpen their powers of observation, and master their technical skills in the studio. This program is your unique opportunity to discover and enhance your creativity, learn from outstanding photography professionals, and enjoy the Garden as your studio. Contact Jill Selinger at certificateprogram@ chicagobotanic.org or (847) 835-6849 for more information about the photography certificate.

Adult Education Free Information Session, Monday, March 4, 6 – 8 p.m. Call (847) 835-8261 to register.

Master photography skills in the Garden’s newest certificate program.


Adult Education: Symposia Botanical Arts & Professional & Humanities Programs

Professional Development Programs Professional development opportunities and inspiration are yours here at the Garden. Landscape design, horticulture, and conservation professionals and others are welcome to attend these outstanding programs.

Pruning for Professionals November 28 Wednesday 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Annex 1 Tom Tiddens, plant healthcare supervisor and certified arborist; Thomas Fritz, plant healthcare specialist; and Mike Annes, plant healthcare specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount This course is designed as a comprehensive review of basic pruning practices for landscape professionals. There will be demonstrations in the field, and a review of pruning tools and equipment care. Please dress for the weather, as the afternoon will be spent outdoors. Lunch is on your own.

Podando para Professionales Pruning for Spanish-Speaking Professionals November 29 Thursday 9 a.m. – noon Annex 1 Manny Sanchez, grounds foreman, Chicago Botanic Garden $49 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Este repaso de prácticas de podar para jardineros professionales incluirá técnicas, tiempo, y como escoger las mejores herramientas. Debido a que parte de la clase estará afuera se requiere que traigan tijeras y serrucho para practicar. This review of pruning practices will be taught in Spanish. An English description is listed above.

See Your Landscape Through SketchUp!

Bonsai Workshops

January 14 – February 4 4 Mondays 7 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Maelo Maldanado, ASLA, principal, Latitude Land Design, LLC $162 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

All bonsai workshops are taught by Ivan Watters, bonsai artist and curator of the Chicago Botanic Garden bonsai collection. Workshops are held in the Production Headhouse.

Professionals in the landscape architecture, construction, and related industries choose SketchUp because it’s the most intuitive, most cost-effective tool of its kind. This course will help participants with SketchUp commands and with developing their own 3D models.

Tree Risk Assessment Update New ANSI A300 Standard, ISA Qualification, and BMP February 14 Thursday 9 a.m. – noon Alsdorf Auditorium E. Thomas Smiley, Ph.D., arboricultural researcher, Bartlett Tree Research Lab, and Erik Grossnickle, arborist representative, Bartlett Tree Experts $54 nonmember; members receive 20% discount E. Thomas Smiley will discuss recent developments in tree risk assessment. This will include information on the new ANSI A300 standard on risk assessment, the upcoming ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification, and the ISA Best Management Practice (BMP) on tree risk assessment. Erik Grossnickle will provide some local examples of tree risk assessments.

Garden Restoration: Research to Re-creation February 21 Thursday 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. Linnaeus Room Craig Bergmann, ASLA, proprietor, Craig Bergmann Landscape Design $49 nonmember; members receive 20% discount How do you take a much-loved, older garden and return it to its former glory—while incorporating the dreams of the current owner? Local landscape architect Craig Bergmann will take you through the restoration process, and give you the back story to some of his design projects, such as the House of the Four Winds in Lake Forest, an Iowa “Maytag” estate, and his own garden.

Bonsai: Beginner – Basics and Fundamentals April 7 – May 12 6 Sundays 1 – 4 p.m. $229 nonmember; members receive 20% discount During this six-week course, discover principles and techniques to appreciate and participate in the art of bonsai. Each session includes a detailed lecture and assistance with design, styling, and wiring.

Bonsai: Novice – Development Techniques April 10 – May 15 6 Wednesdays 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. $269 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Ideal for those with considerable familiarity and experience with the fundamentals of bonsai, each session in this six-week course includes a brief lecture, supervised work on trees, and a review and critique of work undertaken.

Bonsai: Intermediate – Refinement Techniques April 6 – May 11 6 Saturdays 9 a.m. – noon $287 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Appropriate for those with knowledge of bonsai concepts and experience with the art beyond the novice level, each session in this six-week course includes a brief lecture, supervised work on trees, and a review/critique of work undertaken.

Bonsai: Advanced – Presentation-Quality Efforts April 7 – May 12 6 Sundays 9 a.m. – noon $319 nonmember; members receive 20% discount For the student who has completed the beginner, novice, and intermediate courses, this six-week course focuses almost exclusively on supervised work on trees.

Craig Bergmann restored his own home and studio.


Houseplants – How to Green Up Your Home

Brambles and Berries for the Beginner

Are you a new homeowner baffled by your landscape? Are you a beginning gardener who wants to learn basic horticultural skills? This series answers gardening questions and introduces techniques for gardening success. Each course investigates a different topic related to your own lawn and garden.

January 26 Saturday 1 – 3:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab Jerry L. Garner, Ph.D., horticulturist, consultant, and retired professor of horticulture $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

February 23 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Annex 1 Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Basic Pruning for Homeowners December 1 Saturday 1 – 3:30 p.m. Annex 2 Tom Tiddens, plant healthcare supervisor and certified arborist, Chicago Botanic Garden $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount The best time to prune most trees and shrubs is quickly approaching. Learn the basic techniques for dormant winter pruning to maintain plant health and desired form. A portion of the class will consist of outdoor demonstrations, so please dress for the weather.

Preparing Roses for Winter December 8 Saturday 9 – 11 a.m. Annex 1 Tom Soulsby, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Now is the time to start putting your roses to bed for the winter. Join Tom Soulsby and learn about the degrees of cold tolerance and the proper way to protect various types of roses. A portion of the class will consist of outdoor demonstrations and hands-on practice, so dress for the weather and bring thorn-resistant gloves.

Botany for Beginners January 19 Saturday 1 – 3:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Rich Hyerczyk, botanist $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Why are most plants green? Why are chili peppers hot and watermelons sweet? Have you ever had questions such as these about the biology of your garden plants? Come and enjoy a brief introduction to botany, the science of plants.

Green up your home or turn it into a lush jungle of an indoor garden. Take a close look at the benefits and needs of houseplants, including light, temperature, humidity, watering, containers, and growing media. Participants are encouraged to bring in plants for questions and discussion. A short tour of the Garden conservatories will conclude the class.

Would you love to be able to harvest fresh berries from your own backyard? If so, this class will convince you how easy it is to successfully grow berry fruits. You will learn how to choose the best varieties, select and prepare a site, and use proper planting and pruning techniques, as well as understand other maintenance requirements. Dress for the weather, as part of the class will be outside.

Soils: Where Are Your Roots?

Success with Trees and Shrubs

February 2 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Garden View Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

March 16 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Garden View Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

One of the secrets to gardening success is an understanding of soils. Join Glenn Grosch for a detailed discussion of soils, including structure, fertilizers, understanding and managing pH, soil amendments, and water management. This course will also highlight proper horticultural techniques for a healthy soil ecosystem.

Learn all you need to know about growing trees and shrubs and how to be consistently successful in growing all types of woody plants (both deciduous and evergreen). Specific discussion includes matching plants to the site, planting practices, first-year maintenance, and long-term care. This session is of value to all skill levels.

Starting From Seed

Pruning Principles

February 9 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Garden View Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

March 17 Sunday 1 – 3 p.m. Linnaeus Room Tim Johnson, director of horticulture, Chicago Botanic Garden $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Starting plants from seed is both interesting and relatively easy! This course covers all elements of starting both annuals (flowers and vegetables) and perennials from seed. The discussion includes plant selection, containers, planting mixes, watering, heating, lighting and disease control. This is a must for beginners and a good review for the experienced gardener.

Learning the correct technique for pruning is key to maintaining healthy plants. Tim Johnson will introduce you to the principles of pruning, including proper tool use, techniques for pruning trees and shrubs, and the best time to prune both evergreen and deciduous plants. He will also display a variety of good tools for pruning.

Fruit Trees for the Beginner

Spring Lawn Care for Homeowners

February 16 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Garden View Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

March 23 Saturday 9 – 11 a.m. Seminar Room, Plant Science Center Tom Fritz, plant healthcare specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Tree fruits present a great opportunity to both enhance your landscape and add to your eating pleasure! The discussion will cover selecting varieties, site selection and preparation, and proper planting. Pruning techniques, ongoing maintenance, and pest management will also be discussed. Dress for the weather, as part of the class will be outside.

Adult Education: Weekend SymposiaGardener & Professional Series Programs

Weekend Gardener Series

Here’s your chance to learn the basics of lawn care. Using the Garden’s holistic turf management program as a model, Tom Fritz explains how to cultivate a thriving lawn while lessening pesticide use. He’ll cover turf culture, mowing, aerating, watering, fertilizing and weeding, and insect and disease control. Please dress for the weather.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.

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Adult Education: Horticulture

Horticulture Holiday Lighting Techniques November 8 Thursday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 1 Heather Sherwood, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Do you wish that your outdoor holiday lights could be as spectacular as the ones at the Garden? If so, join Heather Sherwood as she demonstrates the techniques used to decorate trees and shrubs with lights for the holiday season. Learn how to estimate equipment and time, install the lights, and maintain a beautiful show. Dress for the weather, as part of the class will be outdoors.

Backstage Pass: Winter Floral Wonders November 11 Sunday 1 – 3 p.m. Meet at Rice Plant Resource Center Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount In the fall, the Garden’s Greenhouses are brimming with poinsettias and other holiday plants of many hues. Join Tim Pollak to learn about propagation techniques, greenhouse environmental and computer systems, watering and fertilizing equipment, and how the growing space is managed throughout the year.

Hands-On Gardening: End-of-Season Pruning

Winter Containers at the Garden

November 17 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Annex 2 Dave Cantwell, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

December 6 Thursday 10 a.m. – noon or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 1 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

To cut or not to cut your woody plants? What you cut today affects what the plant will look like and how well it will grow for years to come. After a brief classroom discussion, you will have the opportunity to practice pruning small woody plants. Please dress for the weather and be prepared to get dirty, as most of the class will be spent outside, rain or shine.

Bulbs for Winter Indoor Color November 19 Monday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 William Moss, horticultural educator $62 nonmember; members receive 20% discount To add a breath of spring to your home this winter, join William Moss as he demonstrates the proper techniques for forcing bulbs such as tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, and minor bulbs. Learn how to choose varieties that are good performers as well as how to combine them in one pot for a mini-garden effect. You will then pot up some bulbs to take home. The fee includes all materials.

Explore the winter containers at the Garden and learn ways to extend your own containers into the winter season. Then prepare a container with fresh-cut evergreen boughs and berried or brightly colored branches. Please bring gloves and pruners.

Holiday Dish Gardens December 8 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Annex 2 Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Simplify your holidays with one centerpiece to adorn all of your holiday feasts! Dish gardens are miniature landscapes grown in shallow containers that may be used as living centerpieces throughout the year. Tim Pollak will show you different containers, materials needed to assemble them, and proper plant selection. Then create your own beautiful, functional dish garden. Please bring an apron, trowel, gloves, and hand pruners.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies.

Adult Education Free Information Session, Monday, March 4, 6 – 8 p.m. Call (847) 835-8261 to register.

The Glass Jar Terrarium Workshop brings creative plantings indoors.


Budget-Friendly Gardening Ideas

Growing Salads Indoors

February 7 Thursday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $75 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

February 21 Thursday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Linnaeus Room Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

March 2 Saturday 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. Linnaeus Room Bill Shores, professional grower and garden consultant $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Terrariums are back! Learn how to create a glass jar terrarium from start to finish. A glass jar, an assortment of small indoor plants for a variety of light conditions, and all other materials will be provided for you to create your own miniature oasis to enjoy this winter and all year long! Please bring gloves, an apron if desired, and pruning shears.

Join Tim Pollak for some interesting and timely tips for ways to save money in your garden. Save money by starting plants from seeds, dividing perennials, overwintering non-hardy plants, changing out your plants, choosing the right plants for certain situations, composting, and using rain barrels. Pollak will run down his Top Ten list of money-saving tips.

Learn to grow organic salad greens at home, whether you have garden space or not! Professional gardener Bill Shores, who has grown specialty greens for more than a decade and currently manages chef Rick Bayless’s market garden, will treat participants to a visual feast of microgreens. Then he will demonstrate how to plant the seeds in growing trays, and discuss maintenance and harvesting techniques.

Beginning Beekeeping Workshop

New! Seed-Saving Workshops

February 9 Saturday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Charles and Karen Lorence, owners, Lorence’s Honey Bee Haven $75 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Join us for this full-day program and learn about the history of beekeeping in North America, the anatomy and physiology of the bees including the caste system, and duties of the honey bees. We will also discuss the impending disaster of the honey bee—Colony Collapse Disorder—and what we can do about it. Lunch is on your own.

In conjunction with the Garden’s annual Seed Swap, join us for one or both of these workshops. The workshops are ideal for beginners and experienced gardeners alike. Register for both sessions at once and save 10 percent.

Seed-Saving Primer

Urban Composting

February 24 Sunday 9 – 10 a.m. Linnaeus Room Shannon Carmody, program manager, Seed Savers Exchange, Decorah, Iowa $19 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

February 16 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Linnaeus Room Bill Shores, professional grower and garden consultant $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Each spring, you dream about what to plant, select your bedding plants and seeds, then brace yourself for the total at the checkout counter. Reduce that investment while creating a perpetual garden, in which the seeds you collect from this season become the miracle of next year’s spring. Come learn the essentials to begin your own seed-saving journey.

Even with limited or no yard space, you can produce surprisingly large quantities of your own high-quality compost. Join Bill Shores as he explains the composting process. The class will cover various materials, ways to fit composting into small urban spaces, what containers you can build or purchase and how to use them effectively, harvesting and using compost, and indoor composting options.

Planning Your Garden for Seed Saving February 24 Sunday 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Linnaeus Room Shannon Carmody, program manager, Seed Savers Exchange, Decorah, Iowa $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount If you’re interested in seed saving, understanding some basic concepts before you get started will make the process easier. Learn the difference between openpollinated and hybrid seed and gain understanding of plant taxonomy, reproductive structures, and pollination methods.

Classes are subject to change. For the most current listings visit

Adult Education: Horticulture

Glass Jar Terrarium Workshop

New! Small Space Food Gardens March 2 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Linnaeus Room Bill Shores, professional grower and garden consultant $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Bill Shores will offer an overview of techniques to produce food organically in small urban/suburban spaces. Through photos and garden planting graphics, you will gain an understanding of the process of designing a successful food garden. Topics include efficient use of in-ground space, intensive and succession planting techniques, raised bed gardens, season extension, indoor gardens, and building and maintaining healthy soils.

Grow Orchids on Your Windowsill March 9 Saturday 1 – 3:30 p.m. Annex 2 Jerry L. Garner, Ph.D., horticulturist, consultant, and retired professor of horticulture $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Learn how easy it is to grow orchids right on your windowsill. Topics to be discussed include the easiest orchids to grow that are best suited to your conditions; avoiding some of the mistakes encountered by new growers; keeping plants healthy, and basic orchid-growing techniques. In addition, participants are encouraged to bring a few plants to class for questions and discussion. This is a class for beginners and those interested in improving their orchid-growing skills.

Please plan to attend the 2 p.m. lecture, “Seed Letters,” focusing on some of the wonderful stories that accompany the seeds donated to the Seed Savers Exchange. See page 10 for details.

www.chicagobotanic.org/school.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.

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Adult Education: Horticulture

Organic Gardening: A Fresh Approach March 12 Tuesday 6:30 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Are you interested in organic gardening? This fresh approach to organic gardening will focus on fundamental horticultural practices as they apply to a successful organic garden experience. The presentation will cover the “what and why” of organics followed by a detailed discussion of specific horticultural practices both in the area of plant nutrition and pest management. There will also be a brief discussion of organics from a retail consumer perspective.

New! Ginkgo: The Tree That Time Forgot A special engagement and book signing March 14 Thursday 6:30 – 8 p.m. Fairchild Room Sir Peter Crane, FRS, dean, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies $25 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Ginkgo is perhaps the world’s most distinctive and ancient tree. An arboreal oddity with one of the longest of all botanical pedigrees, ginkgo has a life story deeply intertwined with that of our planet. Ginkgo grew up with the dinosaurs, and has come down to us almost unchanged for two hundred and fifty million years. Follow the prehistory of ginkgo from its origin, proliferation, and spread across the planet, to its decline and near extinction before its dramatic reprieve. This lecture celebrates a beautiful book that tells the evolutionary and cultural life story of ginkgo.

New! Sustainable Gardens: Meadows and Gravel Gardens March 14 Thursday 7 – 8:30 p.m. Linnaeus Room Jeff Epping, director of horticulture, Olbrich Botanical Gardens, Madison, Wisconsin $27 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Green or sustainable gardens make sense for many reasons. They’re good for the environment and they’re good for us. Many people want beautiful gardens, but don’t have the time or don’t want to see precious resources like water and energy go into growing them. Jeff Epping has been researching and implementing a number of new gardens at Olbrich that are more environmentally sound and can be easily incorporated into home landscapes.

New! Sustainable Gardens: Today’s Rose Gardens…Beautiful and Practical March 15 Friday 10 – 11:30 a.m. Linnaeus Room Jeff Epping, director of horticulture, Olbrich Botanical Gardens, Madison, Wisconsin $27 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Join Jeff Epping to learn how to grow roses in your garden that are not only beautiful, but easy on the gardener and the environment. Epping presents an in-depth look at how he and his staff created a beautiful new rose garden at Olbrich. Their rose garden showcases hardy, disease-resistant shrub and climbing rose varieties that need much less care than the vast majority of the roses on the market today. Come see how you too can combine bulbs, annuals, perennials, vines, shrubs, and small-scale trees with a variety of gorgeous roses to create a truly unique and spectacular garden.

Gardening in Raised Beds March 16 Saturday 9 a.m. – noon Elawa Farm, Lake Forest, IL Rick Belding, director of the garden at Elawa Farm and Andy Swets, carpentry supervisor, Chicago Botanic Garden $54 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Discover the many advantages of raised bed gardening. We will begin with a demonstration covering construction and proper installation of a raised bed. Then you will learn what to grow, when to plant, and how to maximize yield using a raised bed. Extending the growing season will also be discussed. Each attendee will have the option of ordering a raised bed kit for April pickup.

New! Going Beyond the Phaelenopsis March 23 Saturday 1 – 4 p.m. Annex 2 Jerry L. Garner, Ph.D., horticulturist, consultant, and retired professor of horticulture $54 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Are you ready to get past the beginner’s level with your orchids? Take an in-depth look at orchid history, diversity, and nomenclature. In addition, suggestions for building your collection and some of the finer points of orchid cultivation are discussed. Ample time is reserved for questions and discussion, and for trouble-shooting problems. Participants are encouraged to bring a few of their plants. This is not a beginner’s class, but geared to anyone with some orchid-growing experience.

Backstage Pass: Flowering Spring Celebrities March 24 Sunday 1 – 3 p.m. Meet at Rice Plant Resource Center Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount The Garden’s production department grows nearly a half-million plants every year. Join Tim Pollak for a behind-the-scenes tour through the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Greenhouses and nursery. Be the first to see which spring annuals will appear in the 2013 annual display beds, hanging baskets, containers, and hanging hayracks. You will also get a preview of some of the indoor displays for the Antiques & Garden Fair and glimpse the start of fall mums.

Hydrangeas March 28 Thursday 6:30 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $45 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Learn all you ever wanted to know about hydrangeas! This program will cover all aspects of successfully growing hydrangeas. A detailed discussion will include hardiness issues and pruning techniques by species, as well as how to manage bloom color—plus you’ll see some great photos of each of the species in full bloom.

Growing a Cook’s Garden April 6 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Garden View Room Nina Koziol, garden writer $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount If you have a spot in your garden, balcony, or deck that receives more than six hours of direct sunlight, you can grow fresh herbs and vegetables. We’ll cover how to grow the best essential ingredients for your kitchen: tomatoes, onions, peppers, squash, garlic, and leafy greens. In this class, you’ll learn the basics of soil preparation, planting in pots, plant selection, protecting your harvest from pests, extending the crops from spring through fall, and ideas for food preparation.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies. Chicago Botanic Garden members receive a 20 percent discount on classes.

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Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.


This series of workshops and Garden walks features the diversity and creativity of four seasons of Chicago Botanic Garden container gardens. Each season you will explore the Garden grounds with Nancy Clifton and discover an array of striking plants, interesting color and texture combinations, and unique container arrangements. Clifton will then help you create a seasonal container for your sun or partial shade patio or porch. All workshops are taught by Nancy Clifton, program specialist at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Register for all four sessions at once and save 10 percent.

Autumn Containers at the Garden September 10 Tuesday 10 a.m. – noon or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Take a walk to view the Garden’s fall containers. Then create a cool-season mixed container with a variety of plants suitable for a full-sun or partialshade location. Your container may include annuals, perennials, herbs, decorative foliage, cool-season vegetables, ornamental grasses, a decorative vine, and gourds. Please bring gloves.

Winter Containers at the Garden Spring Containers at the Garden April 23 Tuesday 10 a.m. – noon or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Tour the Garden’s spring containers and collect ideas for your own. Then create a container with plants that can tolerate the varying spring temperatures and a full-sun to partial-shade location. Pansies, forced bulbs, and other spring treasures may be used. A spray of branches gives them a finishing touch. Please bring gloves.

Summer Containers at the Garden June 18 Tuesday 10 a.m. – noon or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Enjoy a tour featuring the summer containers at the Garden. Then prepare a warm-season mixed container suitable for a sun or partial shade location. Your container may include annuals, perennials, herbs, and decorative foliage. Please bring gloves.

December 3 Tuesday 10 a.m. – noon or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Explore the winter containers at the Garden and learn ways to extend your own containers into the winter season. Then prepare a container with fresh-cut evergreen boughs and berried or brightly colored branches. Please bring gloves and pruners.

Horticulture Certificate Programs

Adult Education: Horticulture Symposia & Professional Programs

Four Seasons of Beauty 2013: The Chicago Botanic Garden Container Series

Botany 2, Winter Session November 5 – December 12 Monday and Wednesday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Richard D. Hyerczyk, botanist $337 nonmember; members receive 20% discount PGL 2 and GDC requirement How do seeds germinate and develop into mature plants? How do plants move water up through their roots to their topmost branches? This course will explore subjects such as the plant cell, anatomy and growth of roots, stems, and leaves, photosynthesis, and the symbiotic association of plant roots with beneficial fungi and bacteria. Prerequisite: Botany 1

Gardening Techniques: Session B January 26 – March 2 6 Saturdays 7:30 – 10:30 a.m. Annex 2 Lynette Rodriguez, owner and horticulturist, A Finer Touch $312 nonmember; members receive 20% discount PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement Students will be introduced to professional gardening through a combination of lecture and hands-on activities. They will focus on acquiring solid gardening skills, learning about a variety of techniques, and developing the ability to determine best practices. Topics range from general grounds maintenance, winterization, plantings, and other horticultural practices. This is a pre-professional class designed for students entering the green industry.

Plant Propagation February 11 – March 4 and June 3 – 17 (no class February 18) 6 Mondays 6:30 – 9 p.m. Annex 2 and February 16, March 2, March 9, and June 8 – 22 (no class February 23) 6 Saturdays 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Production Headhouse Cathy Thomas, propagator, Chicago Botanic Garden $337 nonmember; members receive 20% discount MGC requirement Become familiar with common propagation techniques through lecture and lab exercises. Learn to propagate plants by seeds, cuttings, layering, division, and other methods. Discover equipment and structures to propagate plants successfully.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.

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Adult Education: Horticulture Botanical Arts & Humanities

Sustainable Gardener Series

February 2 – March 16 (no class February 9) 6 Saturdays 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center John Eskandari, arborist and plant acquisitions, Gethsemane Gardens Save and register for all six sessions at once! $312 nonmember; members receive 20% discount OPC elective Ever feel overwhelmed by all the information on sustainability? Get familiar with the mindset, background, science, and terminology as it relates to horticulture and beyond. This series includes discussion and information on sustainable features and concepts from rain gardens, composting, and materials re-use, to ways to minimize installation or maintenance impact, and incorporating sustainable elements into your garden and landscape.

Introduction to Sustainability February 2 Saturday 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Learn how environmental, economic, and social sustainability affect the green industry. Discussions will cover the concepts of sustainability and the role horticulture can play in enhancing the sustainable movement. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Water February 16 Saturday 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Explore water’s role in sustainable horticulture. Topics include drought-tolerant plants, drip irrigation/ xeriscaping, rain gardens, rain barrels, reduced lawn areas, and native plants. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Soil February 23 Saturday 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Soil is a building block of sustainable gardening. Topics include composting, recycling garden waste, earthworms, beneficial microbes, bioremediation, organic/local compost and soil amendments and container gardening. The School’s CEUs=0.3

See plants in a new way with Botany 1.

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Positive Economic Impacts for our Landscape March 2 Saturday 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Learn how sustainable practices can help your wallet with a reduced water bill, less equipment to own, green roofs to extend life of roofing materials and reduced heating/cooling costs with plants. The re-use of plants and materials on-site reduces unnecessary expenses. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Materials and Energy Usage in a Sustainable Landscape March 9 Saturday 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Learn how to incorporate manual equipment for good health and less environmental impact. Using fewer two-cycle engines (mowers, blowers, power shears) contributes to enhanced air quality. Discussions will focus on certified sustainably harvested wood, composite materials, recycled materials, solar and wind technology in the garden, supplemental energy sources, and more. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Social Impacts of Sustainability March 16 Saturday 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Simple ideas can change neighborhoods for the better. Communities have noticed reduced crime in tree-lined areas, cleaner air and reduced storm-water runoff where planting has increased. Planted areas filter waste entering the soil, reducing groundwater pollution. This class will examine community movements for green spaces and habitat development. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Botany 1 Spring Session March 11 – April 17 6 Mondays and 6 Wednesdays 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Richard D. Hyerczyk, botanist $337 nonmember; members receive 20% discount OPC, MGC, PGL 1, PGL 2 and GDC requirement Why, botanically speaking is a tomato a fruit? What is the difference between a fern and a moss? Come join us in Botany 1 to learn the answers to these questions and more! In this course we will explore subjects such as the importance of plants to our lives; plant taxonomy and classification; and the life cycles, distinguishing features, diversity, and identification of major groups of plants.

Deciduous Flowering Shrubs March 19 – May 7 (no class April 16 ) 7 Tuesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Garden Walks (select one) March 21 – May 2 (no class April 18) 6 Thursdays 9 – 11 a.m. or March 23 – May 4 (no class April 20) 6 Saturdays 9 – 11 a.m. Alsdorf Auditorium Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $287 nonmember; members receive 20% discount PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC and OPC requirement Study more than 60 different deciduous flowering shrubs (and their cultivars and related species) suitable for commercial landscape and home garden use in the Chicago region. During weekly slide lectures and Garden walks, the identification, cultural information, aesthetic qualities, and landscape uses of both common and more unusual shrubs will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Botany 1. The School’s CEUs=2.5


Botanical Arts & Humanities Adult Education: Horticulture

Soil Basics, Spring Session March 28 – May 9 (no session April 18) 6 Thursdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. and April 13 Saturday 1 – 4 p.m. Annex 2 Ellen Phillips, horticulture educator $337 nonmember; members receive 20% discount MGC, PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement Soil is an irreplaceable natural resource that affects plant selection and growth. Learn to maintain healthy soil; use compost, fertilizers, soilless and potting mixes and other amendments. Discover how water cycles through a garden and affects soils and plants. Course fee includes a professionally analyzed test of your garden soil. Prerequisite: Botany 1.

Clematis Up Close March 30 Saturday 9 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Richard Hawke, manager, plant evaluation, Chicago Botanic Garden $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount OPC elective A profusion of showy blossoms makes clematis the undisputed queen of the climbers and an essential vine for every garden. Recent breeding work has greatly increased the number of useful, appealing cultivars. In addition, there are many distinctive, less-commonly known small-flowered species and hybrids that extend the flowering season into autumn. Richard Hawke will discuss the identification, culture, and maintenance requirements of many large- and small-flowered clematis. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Introduction to Lichens April 4 and 11 2 Thursdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. Plant Science lab, Regenstein Center and April 20 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Site TBD Richard D. Hyerczyk, botanist $149 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

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Learn about clematis, queen of the climbers.

Gardening Techniques: Session C

Botany 2

April 6 – May 11 (April 20 off-site) 6 Saturdays 7:30 – 10:30 a.m. Annex 2 Lynette Rodriguez, owner and horticulturist, A Finer Touch $312 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Spring Session April 29 – June 10 (no class May 27) 6 Mondays and 6 Wednesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Richard D. Hyerczyk, botanist $337 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement

PGL 2 and GDC requirement

Students will be introduced to professional gardening through a combination of lecture and hands-on activities. Focus is on acquiring solid gardening skills, learning about a variety of techniques, and developing the ability to determine best practices. Topics range from plant selection to the identification and control of weeds and other horticultural practices. Prerequisite: Botany 1.

How do seeds germinate and develop into mature plants? How do plants move water up through their roots to their topmost branches? This course will explore subjects such as the plant cell; anatomy and growth of roots, stems, and leaves; photosynthesis; and the symbiotic association of plant roots with beneficial fungi and bacteria. Prerequisite: Botany 1.

Best New Annuals for 2013 April 6 Saturday 1 – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Greg Trabka, new product development manager, Ball Horticultural Company $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount OPC elective It’s going to be a banner year for annuals! This course presents many new cultivars, along with several wonderful yet underutilized species for both container and in-ground plantings in sun and shade. Focus on morphological characteristics and garden performance, cultural requirements, design and combinations, and sources. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Annuals and Biennials May 14 – July 9 (no class May 21 and July 2) 7 Tuesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Garden Walks (select one) May 16 – June 27 (no class May 23) 6 Thursdays 9 – 11 a.m. or May 18 – June 29 (no class May 25) 6 Saturdays 9 – 11 a.m. Alsdorf Auditorium Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $287 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

OPC elective

PGL1, PGL2, GDC and OPC requirement

Lichens are a symbiotic association of a fungus and an alga. Nearly 200 species can be found all over the Chicago area. Join Rich Hyerczyk, founder of the Chicago Lichenological Society, to explore the local lichen flora. Taxonomy, morphology, and ecology of lichenized fungi, with an emphasis on identification of the local species, will be featured. The School’s CEUs=0.7

Annuals and biennials have a rich tradition and exciting future. During this course, focus on the most popular cool- and warm-season species along with a selection of the new cultivars and unusual plants, all of which are well-suited to container and in-ground gardening in the Midwest. Learn plant identification and cultural information and see examples of refined plant combinations and intriguing planting styles. Prerequisite: Botany 1.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.


Adult Education: Nature Studies

Nature Studies Owl Prowl at Ryerson Woods February 8 Friday 7 – 9 p.m. Brushwood House, Ryerson Woods, Deerfield, IL. Steve Bailey, ornithologist, Illinois Natural History Survey $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Join Steve Bailey for a captivating night exploring the mystery of owls at the Ryerson Woods Conservation Area. He will discuss owl behavior and identification, as well as the places these fascinating birds are most likely to be seen. He may even demonstrate his world-famous barred owl call. After the discussion, Bailey will lead a walk in the woods to look and listen for these enigmatic birds. Please dress warmly, and bring along a flashlight and binoculars. A map will be sent.

Fall Bird Walk November 10 Saturday 7:30 – 9 a.m. Meet at Visitor Center Alan Anderson, research committee chairman, Chicago Audubon Society $19 each walk, nonmember; members receive 20% discount Take a walk in the Garden and learn to identify birds in their sometimes-confusing fall plumage. Earlier bird walks will highlight warblers, vireos, and flycatchers, while later ones will feature ducks, sparrows, and hawks. Dress for the weather and bring binoculars and a field guide if you have them.

Deciduous Trees in Winter February 21 Thursday 1 – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Andrew Bell, curator of woody plants, Chicago Botanic Garden $62 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Winter can be an ideal time to identify trees and shrubs in the landscape perspective of forms and shapes. Learn to identify a variety of native trees and shrubs by buds, twigs, bark, and shape. Botanical keys to identify trees will be supplemented by other sources of information and observation. Classroom discussion will use slides, cut twigs, and identification keying exercises. The class will also spend part of the afternoon identifying trees outdoors. Dress for the weather.

Landscapes for Nature and Wildlife March 9 Saturday 10 a.m. – noon Garden View Room John Raffetto, horticulture educator $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Garden Design With a variety of courses ranging from site analysis and construction to garden art and history, students learn the principles of garden design and how design relates to the environment.

New! Designing the “Know Maintenance” Perennial Garden February 27 Wednesday 1 – 3:30 p.m. Burnstein Hall Roy Diblik, plantsman and co-owner, Northwind Perennial Farm $49 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Roy Diblik connects well-performing perennials for our region to maintenance and planting style. His design concept includes stylized perennial garden grids placing plants that live well together. Diblik calls this style “Know Maintenance” gardening, allowing gardeners to understand the time commitment needed to maintain the gardens they plant. Diblik will discuss his concepts and share images of plants and gardens that illustrate this style, and then students will have a hands-on opportunity to lay out sample gardens using actual grid maps of sample garden beds.

Learn to attract wildlife with design ideas and plants selected for use as food, shelter, and water for birds, butterflies, and small mammals. Discussion will include specific plants that may be introduced into a traditional landscape to attract and support wildlife in your garden. A Garden walk will be included, so please dress for the weather.

New! Earth Words: Reading Nature January 15 – February 5 4 Tuesdays 6:15 – 8:15 p.m. Linnaeus Room Carol LaChapelle, writer, teacher, and author of Finding Your Voice, Telling Your Stories $149 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Earth Words introduces participants to those writers who take as their subject the mysteries and wonders of nature—including particular landscapes, places, and animals. The course packet will include poems, essays, and articles by, among others, Mary Oliver, Barry Lopez, and Diane Ackerman. In our meetings, we’ll review and discuss these readings, and consider how each informs and inspires our thinking about nature.

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Find birds in their fall plumage at the Fall Bird Walk.


Front Yard Design

If you have always wanted to improve the design of your home landscape, or if you are a new homeowner wondering where to start, this series is a great way to introduce yourself to the basic principles of landscape design. This lecture series, created for novice designers, will take you from basic design theories to site-planning techniques and finally to techniques for implementing a design plan.

February 19 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Jeffrey True, vice president of operations, Hursthouse, Inc. $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Register for all five sessions at once and save ten percent.

Introduction to Design Principles February 5 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Valerie Gerdes Lemme, landscape architect, ASLA $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount This workshop introduces and reviews the landscape design process of site analysis, conceptual design, and evaluations, based on such landscape-designprinciples as balance, symmetry, proportion, scale, and unity. Looking at plant combinations and landscape features, you will learn about color, texture, line, form, and methods of creating garden spaces.

Foundation Planting Design February 12 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Valerie Gerdes Lemme, landscape architect, ASLA $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Do you live in an older home with an outdated foundation planting of overgrown evergreens? Or in a newer home that needs help creating an identity and style? Whether old or new, many homes have foundation plantings that need revamping. Learn the principles of good foundation design and view examples of before-and-after landscapes to give you the boost you need to update your home’s landscape. Good design will improve the curb appeal of your home, increasing its value.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies.

This course will teach you the basics of front yard landscape design. Jeff True will demonstrate how proper planting design can change the way you use and view your property. Your front yard design should respond to your home’s architecture as well as be aesthetically pleasing. Topics will include proper plant types and spacing, focusing and screening views, and creating curb appeal.

Garden Design Certificate Program Graphics Winter Session January 17 – March 21 10 Thursdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. Design Studio and January 19 and 26 2 Saturdays 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Linnaeus Room R. Thomas Selinger, RLA, landscape architect, Martin and Associates $337 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Backyard Design

PGL 2 and GDC requirement

February 26 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Jeffrey True, vice president of operations, Hursthouse, Inc. $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Come learn the basic principles of landscape design illustration. This balanced and rewarding class provides an exciting introduction to the three basic areas of drawing communication: plans, elevations, and perspectives. Discover how to express your ideas using effective and enriched presentation techniques. Professional time-saving shortcuts, the importance of lettering, and the excitement of color are all also included. Recommended to take concurrently with Introduction to Professional Practice.

Learn how to create an enjoyable backyard space that is both functional and exciting. This course will focus on the design and development of functional and attractive spaces, including dining and entertaining areas, children’s play spaces, and outdoor storage and utility areas. Learn how to screen and focus views and create a sense of enclosure.

From the Drawing Board to the Border March 5 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Valerie Gerdes Lemme, landscape architect, ASLA $37 nonmember; members receive 20% discount How do you take your plans from the drawing board and create the garden without being overwhelmed by the amount of work and money? Learn how to develop a shopping list and timeline to phase the work over several seasons. You’ll also receive some useful tips on budgeting, purchasing plants, and working with landscape professionals

Adult Education Free Information Session, Monday, March 4, 6 – 8 p.m. Call (847) 835-8261 to register.

Adult Education: Garden Symposia Design & Professional Programs

Weekend Designer Series

Introduction to Professional Practice Winter session January 23 – March 20 9 Wednesdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. and February 2, 9, and March 9, 16 4 Saturdays 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Linnaeus Room Paul Laiblin, project manager and senior estimator, Scott Byron and Co. $337 nonmember; members receive 20% discount PGL 2 and GDC requirement Apply skills learned in Graphics toward a working understanding of the initial phases of a landscape design project. Lectures will focus on the preliminary steps necessary to begin a landscape design project and carry the project through the conceptual design phase, including site measurements, base maps, site analysis, programming, functional use diagrams, conceptual design plans, and preliminary cost estimates. Prerequisite: Graphics (courses can be taken concurrently).

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.

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Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Botanical Arts and Humanities Mosaic Workshop November 13 – December 4 4 Tuesdays 7 – 9 p.m. Annex 1 Bonnie Arkin, artist and designer $99 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Garden Design students work closely with expert faculty.

Principles of Garden Design

Garden Design Implementation

Winter Session January 30 – March 20 8 Wednesdays 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. Design Studio and February 2 (offsite) 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. March 16 (Annex 2) 9 a.m. – noon 2 Saturdays Tim Lally, ASLA, RLA, principal, Timothy Lally Design $337, members receive 20% discount

January 28 – April 8 (no session February 18, March 4) 9 Mondays 6:30 – 9 p.m. and March 23 Saturday 9 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Jodi Mariano, RLA, senior associate, Teska Associates, Inc. $337 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Spring Session March 27 – May 15 8 Wednesdays 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. Design Studio and March 30 and April 6 2 Saturdays 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Tony Wasemann, ASLA, senior landscape designer, Scott Byron & Co. $337 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

GDC requirement You have the design; you have the client; you have the funding—now what? Lectures will focus on the steps necessary to carry a project from a finished design through to a built landscape. Course projects will include the preparation of construction details and documents, technical specifications, and cost estimates. Prerequisites: Graphics, Introduction to Professional Practice, Hardscape Basics, Principles of Garden Design, Planting Design, Introduction to Grading and Drainage.

PGL 2 and GDC requirement

Discover the joy and beauty of mosaic art in the pique assiette tradition. Pique assiette, or “broken plates,” incorporates a wonderful blending of color, form, and texture. This mosaic folk art can be found in many cultures and is popular today as a way to recycle a favorite piece of china or broken heirloom. Work under the guidance of Bonnie Arkin to complete a unique mosaic from shards of china, ceramic, or glass. A supply list is given at the first class, but you can start collecting dishes now!

Watercolor: Painting the Natural World November 15 – December 20 (no class November 22) 5 Thursdays 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Design Studio Judith Joseph, artist and educator $254 nonmember; members receive 20% discount This course addresses ways to express the beauty of nature in watercolor. Each week will focus on a specific technique, such as ways to mix greens or show natural textures, with a goal of a more satisfying painting experience. The last two weeks will focus on landscape techniques: how to use composition, color, and focus to create the impression of a beautiful natural place. A supply list will be sent.

Classic Fall Cornucopia November 20 Tuesday 1 – 3 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $99 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Join Nancy Clifton for a contemporary twist on a fall classic; the cornucopia. Using the horn-shaped basket that is the signature of this arrangement, you will then add dried pods, grasses, preserved flowers and nuts along with some fresh flowers, fruits, berries, gourds, and greens of the season. All supplies are provided; please bring pruners, gloves, and a large shallow box to carry your completed project home.

Apply knowledge and skills developed in previous design courses toward an in-depth understanding about spatial properties of landscape materials and their application to design principles. Weekly discussions and projects will emphasize the components of three-dimensional spaces and their application to the development of refined concept design plans and construction level drawings. Prerequisites: Graphics, Introduction to Professional Practice.

Adult Education Free Information Session, Monday, March 4, 6 – 8 p.m. Call (847) 835-8261 to register.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.

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Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Traditional Holiday Wreath November 27 Tuesday 10 a.m. – noon Annex 1 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $79 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Make a traditional evergreen wreath to grace your home this holiday season! You will learn how to cut the greens and assemble them to create your own mixed evergreen wreath. Balsam, white pine, arborvitae, and boxwood will be the base greens, with a special evergreen accent. Please bring garden gloves, pruners, and a box to transport your finished project. All other materials are included in the fee.

Garden Mosaic Tile Stepping Stone December 4 Tuesday 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Annex 1 Janet Austin, artist $124 nonmember; members receive 20% discount In this one-day workshop, create a unique gift for your favorite gardener, a one-of-a-kind mosaic and ceramic tile stepping stone with handmade tiles of butterflies, leaves, and flowers by artist, Janet Austin. Mosaic techniques of design, adhesion, cutting, and grouting are covered in making this durable outdoor gem. Ready to take home at the end of the day. Lunch is on your own.

New! Holiday Fiber Arts Workshops Come learn how to felt while hearing stories of a knitter, shepherd, and small business owner! Natasha Lehrer, of Esther’s Place Fiber Arts Studio in Big Rock, Illinois, will be sharing her love of fiber arts and inspiring you to create! Register for both sessions at once and receive a 10 percent discount.

Father Christmas Ornament Workshop December 6 Thursday 10 a.m. - noon Linnaeus Room $49 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

New! Boxwood Kissing Ball December 12 Wednesday 10 a.m. – noon Annex 1 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $79 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Create your own hanging boxwood spheres like those that grace the halls for Wonderland Express! You will make a smaller home-sized version to display indoors or out. Ideas for enhancing the boxwood sphere will also be covered in class. Please bring garden gloves and a box to transport your finished project. All other supplies are included.

Holiday Centerpiece

Create a three-dimensional ornament that uses wool as a sculpting medium to create a realistically adorable Father Christmas! He’ll have jolly cheeks, a snow white curly beard, and a hat or a holly wreath. Use hand-dyed, locally grown wool roving and needle felting to shape this special little fellow. Great project for holiday gifts! Fee includes all supplies.

December 19 Wednesday 9:30 a.m. – noon or 6:30 – 9 p.m. Annex 2 Liz Rex, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $74 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Felted Pine Tree Workshop

Join us at the Garden and create a lovely, long-lasting holiday centerpiece, using fresh-cut evergreens and seasonal flowers. Bring gloves, pruners, and a box for your finished arrangement. The fee includes all other materials.

December 6 Thursday 1 – 2:30 p.m. Linnaeus Room $49 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Welcome the winter season as we create a woolly pine tree. We’ll be using hand dyed, locally grown wool locks to create the layers of branches. When we are finished, we’ll have a 10” tree that is perfect for decorating, gift giving, and table setting. The entire tree is created by using needle felting techniques that are easy, fun, and simple for anyone to enjoy! Fee includes all supplies.

Create a smaller version of the boxwood kissing ball displayed at Wonderland Express.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies. Chicago Botanic Garden members receive a 20 percent discount on classes. 56

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.


Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Rejuvenated Jewelry January 8 – February 12 6 Tuesdays 7 – 9 p.m. Annex 2 Bonnie Arkin, artist and designer $149 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Inspired by the little treasures you save and love, we will cleverly combine old and new elements to create spectacular jewelry. Bring your special and sentimental keepsakes, single earrings, buttons, charms, chains, family photos, and found objects and let Bonnie Arkin inspire your creativity. We can create wonderful new designs from vintage treasures. You will learn to solder, wire wrap, and string. Arkin has many examples to share and resources for treasure hunting. A supply list will be sent.

Calligraphy and Floral Decoration January 10 – February 14 6 Thursdays 12:30 – 3:30 p.m. Annex 2 Judith Joseph, artist and educator $287 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Learn the art of beautiful writing and the flourishes of botanical illustration: it’s a match made in heaven! Beginners, start with the basics of calligraphy and floral decoration for invitations and cards. More experienced students, polish your skills and complete a project. A supply list will be sent.

Watercolor: Painting the Natural World January 10 – February 14 6 Thursdays 1 – 4 p.m. Annex 2 Judith Joseph, artist and educator $302 nonmember; members receive 20% discount This course addresses ways to express the beauty of nature in watercolor. Each week will focus on a specific technique, such as ways to mix greens or show natural textures, with a goal of a more satisfying painting experience. The last two weeks will focus on how to use composition, color, and focus to create the impression of a beautiful landscape. A supply list will be sent.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies.

Students learn frame-loom weaving skills.

Beginning Frame-Loom Weaving

Behind-the-Scenes Tour: The Flower Market

January 15 – March 19 10 Tuesdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Design Studio Pamela Feldman, artist and educator $474 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

January 16 Wednesday 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Annex 1 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $112 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

In this beginning-level class, we examine the many possibilities of creating woven forms using a simple frame loom. Students will experiment with the basic techniques of tapestry and plain-weave, and then explore ways of creating surface, image, and text within a woven form. Each student will complete a finished piece. Visual presentations and demonstrations are included. Basic supplies are included in the class fee. Students are expected to purchase additional materials as needed for sample studies and the final project.

Frame-Loom Weaving January 16 – March 20 10 Wednesdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Design Studio Pamela Feldman, artist and educator $474 nonmember; members receive 20% discount This class will focus on students’ individual weaving projects and skill building. We will begin the class by assessing student levels, and then design a skill-building outline that will help students increase their ability to express themselves through the tapestry medium. Visual presentations and demonstrations are included. Basic supplies for the samples are included in the class fee. Students are expected to purchase additional materials for the final project. Requirements: Beginning Frame-Loom Weaving and consent of instructor.

Get a behind-the-scenes look at a local wholesale floral supplier. We will meet at the Garden for a floral design workshop on how to arrange a tabletop centerpiece. After lunch, we will caravan to the market for a unique tour, then shop for flowers and supplies that you can arrange at home, so bring your wallet! The program will conclude at the flower market in Northbrook. Please bring pruners and a box to transport your completed arrangement. All other materials for the workshop will be included in the fee. Please bring a sack lunch.

Garden Art Mosaic Workshop January 17 – February 21 6 Thursdays 7 – 9 p.m. Annex 1 Bonnie Arkin, artist and designer $149 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Brighten your garden with an eye-catching mosaic conversation piece. Mosaic the numbers for your address, a one-of-a-kind mailbox, a stepping stone, a funky folk-art masterpiece for the garden—even a bowling ball! Bonnie is bursting with exciting, motivating ideas for you to bring color and excitement to your outdoor living space.

Chicago Botanic Garden members receive a 20 percent discount on classes. Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

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Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Botanical Art: “Learning How” series This series of classes is for anyone who has an interest in learning how to draw and paint, but feels intimidated merely at the thought. Derek Norman’s step-by-step instruction and guidance will allow you to learn and have fun doing it! Register for both sessions at once and receive a 10 percent discount.

Botanical Art: Learning How to Draw January 18 – March 1 (no class February 22) 6 Fridays 9 a.m. – noon Design Studio Derek Norman, artist and director, Midwest Center for Botanical Documentation $312 nonmember; members receive 20% discount This class is designed for those who have a desire to draw and are convinced they can’t. Learn the fundamental principles of putting pencil to paper by developing a basic pencil-line technique. Understand how to establish shape, form, depth, and dimension, as well as proportions and perspective! This class is also recommended for beginning horticultural students.

New! Botanical Art: Learning How to Draw with Colored Pencil January 18 – March 1 (no class February 22) 6 Fridays 1 – 4 p.m. Design Studio Derek Norman, artist and director, Midwest Center for Botanical Documentation $312 nonmember; members receive 20% discount This class is a continuation of the “Learning to...” classes that are designed for all those who wish to further their drawing skills while gaining an understanding of color. Students will learn the basics of color application through a step-by-step approach designed to teach the rudiments of color along with sound drawing technique. The class will also cover how to create form, depth, and dimension, and a basic understanding of blending colors. Each student will learn how to draw live plants in full color. The results will surprise and delight you.

Adult Education Free Information Session, Monday, March 4, 6 – 8 p.m. Call (847) 835-8261 to register. 58

Botanical Arts classes allow students to explore and improve their techniques.

Beginning Flower-Arranging in Vases February 12– 26 3 Tuesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $180 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Learn some of the tricks of the trade for arranging fresh flowers in vases. You will start with a contemporary vase arrangement the first week, how to arrange a dozen roses on week two, and finish the series with a traditional mixed bouquet. Please bring a floral pruner and a tall, slim box for transporting your completed projects. All other materials are provided.

New! Stories from the Rare Book Collection February 16 Saturday 10 – 11 a.m. Linnaeus Room Ed Valauskas, rare book curator, Lenhardt Library, Chicago Botanic Garden $19 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Treewhispers: Handmade Paper Art Workshop March 8 Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Pamela Paulsrud, artist and creator of Treewhispers $125 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Spend the day exploring the artistic papermaking process used in the Treewhispers exhibition featured at the Garden last year. You will begin the workshop with an introduction to the stunning handmade paper rounds used in the Treewhispers project. Then, roll up your sleeves and create your own paper rounds under the guidance of the visionary for the exhibit, artist Pamela Paulsrud. This will be a fun and invigorating workshop suitable for all.

Tile Garden Marker Workshop March 14 Thursday 10 a.m. – noon Annex 1 Janet Austin, artist $124 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Did a book save California’s redwoods? Was there an orchid maniac more passionate than Nero Wolfe? Who was the Renaissance physician who discovered a supernova? And his mentor, an alchemist, who burned books? Learn more in this one-hour session, which will include many rare books and their stories from the Lenhardt Library.

Create six personalized garden markers embellished with identifying plant images and names. Janet Austin will guide you through an artistic process using high fire stoneware slabs, plant pressings, and lettering to make these unique and durable markers. Finished pieces will be glazed in a lovely verdigris finish then kiln fired and ready for you to pick up in several weeks.

Beginning Watercolor

Japanese Ink Painting

March 7 – April 11 6 Thursdays 1 – 3:30 p.m. Design Studio Patsy Welch, artist and educator $237 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

March 20 – April 24 6 Wednesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Kay Thomas, artist $187 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Watercolor is a delightfully fun medium! In this class, you’ll learn a variety of watercolor techniques, including washes and how to make a range of textures on paper, plus some color theory to get you started. No prior experience is necessary. A supply list will be sent.

Sumi-e, the ancient art of Japanese ink painting, required no previous painting experience. Individualized instruction will be provided for students of all levels. Beginners will learn to use Oriental painting equipment to paint classic nature subjects. A supply list will be sent.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.


Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Pop-Up Flowers of the Midwest: Beginners April 5 Friday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Shawn Sheehy, pop-up engineer and author $125 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Create pop-up cards featuring native flowers of the Midwest. Fundamental techniques of pop-up engineering will be demonstrated and practiced while building these flowers, using little more than a knife, glue, and card stock. Students will finish with a collection of four or five cards. No experience is necessary, but binding and/or sewing skills will speed your progress. A supply list will be sent. Artichoke, by Pepper Werner. From beginner to advanced, all levels are welcome in the Botanical Art certificate program.

Pop-Up Flowers of the Midwest: Intermediate April 12 Friday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Shawn Sheehy, pop-up engineer and author $125 nonmember; members receive 20% discount If you completed the simpler blooms in the beginner’s workshop, you’re ready to move on to the complex flowers of this intermediate pop-up flower workshop. Columbine, pasture rose, and blue flag iris are among the blooms included in this set of cards. A supply list will be sent.

Garden Mosaic Tile Stepping Stone April 11 Thursday 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Annex 1 Janet Austin, artist $124 nonmember; members receive 20% discount In this one-day workshop, create a one-of-a-kind mosaic and ceramic tile stepping stone with handmade tiles of butterflies, leaves, and insects by artist Janet Austin. Mosaic techniques of design, adhesion, cutting, and grouting are covered in making this durable outdoor gem for your garden path. Ready to take home at the end of the day! Lunch is on your own.

Classes are subject to change. For the most current listings visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school.

New! Botanical Art: Walk & Sketch Spring Wildflowers of Ryerson Woods May 4 – June 8 6 Saturdays 1 – 4 p.m. Brushwood House, Ryerson Woods, Deerfield, IL Derek Norman, artist and director, Midwest Center for Botanical Documentation $312 nonmember; members receive 20% discount There is nothing quite like taking a stroll in the woods, discovering a wildflower, then sitting down and sketching it. In this field study and sketching class, instruction will be given in capturing botanical detail and characteristics. Students will be encouraged to use various media from pencil, pen & ink, colored pencil, to watercolor. The workshop is designed for students of all levels who delight in identifying, drawing, and painting these botanical gems. A supply list will be sent.

Botanical Arts Certificate Program New! Drawing Skills 2 Through Dry and Wet Colored Pencil November 5 – 26 4 Mondays 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Priscilla Humay, artist and educator $174 nonmember; members receive 20% discount ART elective

New! Expressive Watercolor Workshop December 1 & 2 Saturday & Sunday 9 – 4 p.m. Design Studio Thomas Trausch, artist, TWSA master status $162 nonmember; members receive 20% discount ART elective In this two-day workshop, we will explore the fluid beauty of the watercolor medium. Following a demonstration each morning (in the classroom and Greenhouse), we will work from a looser to a tighter application; from a wet-into-wet beginning to a more controlled “found” finish. There will be a strong emphasis on values and design. The School’s CEU’s= 1.2

Botanical Drawing 1 January 12 – March 2 8 Saturdays 9 a.m. – noon Design Studio Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, The Field Museum $349 nonmember; members receive 20% discount ART requirement Strong drawing is the cornerstone of botanical art. In this class we will work in pencil covering the fundamentals of proportions, line, tone, dimensionality, and expression. We will work from live specimens, flowers, seeds, and fruit to learn to draw plants accurately and beautifully.

This workshop will help to further develop drawing skills. Focus is on perspective, proportion, line, and foreshortening through extensive color exploration of value, intensity and temperature. Draw from real life using the dry and wet colored pencil media. Learn grisaille, hatching, washes, layering, and color-mixing techniques while you strengthen your drawing proficiency. The School’s CEUs= 1.2

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.

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Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Botanical Drawing 3

New! Expressive Watercolor

January 15 – February 19 6 Tuesdays 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Field Museum $287 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

March 2 – April 6 6 Saturdays 1 – 4 p.m. Design Studio Thomas Trausch, artist, TWSA master status $287 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

ART requirement Learn to mix accurate, exciting color including the vivid, specific hues of flowers, the bright and subdued greens of leaves, and the deep, subtle colors in shadows. We’ll make charts for permanent reference and then apply this knowledge to paint flowers and leaves from live specimens. We will work in watercolor, but the exercises apply to all media.

Drawing in the Greenhouse Color Pencil Workshop January 20 – February 3 3 Sundays 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Priscilla Humay, artist and educator $174 nonmember; members receive 20% discount ART elective Each session includes classroom instruction in the class and drawing from observation in the Greenhouses. There will be an open Art Talk during lunch. Focus on color, composition, and perspective. Learn various methods of grisaille, layering, hatching, and strokes as you integrate line, value, temperature, contrast, modulation, and shadow. Reference material is provided. Demonstration of techniques and one-on-one guidance is given to each student. Discussions and critiques are given at the end of each session. The School’s CEUs= 1.35

Color Explorations in Nature February 7 – March 14 6 Thursdays 6 – 9 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Nina Weiss, artist and teacher $199 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

ART requirement, expressive track Explore the fluid beauty of the watercolor medium. Each session will progress to a more controlled “found” finish. There will be a strong emphasis on values and design.

Color Mixing March 5 – April 9 6 Tuesdays 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, The Field Museum $287 nonmember; members receive 20% discount ART requirement Learn to mix accurate, exciting color including the vivid, specific hues of flowers, the bright and subdued greens of leaves, and the deep, subtle colors in shadows. We’ll make charts for permanent reference and then apply this knowledge to paint flowers and leaves from live specimens. We will work in watercolor, but exercises apply to all media.

Botanical Drawing 2 March 10 – April 28 (no class March 31, April 21) 6 Sundays 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Design Studio Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, The Field Museum $287 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Visiting Artist April 12 – 14 Friday – Sunday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Design Studio Marilyn Garber, artist and educator, Minnesota School of Botanical Art at The Bakken Museum in Minneapolis $449 nonmember; members receive 20% discount ART elective Tulips, harbingers of spring, are the subjects of this class. Students will draw and paint in watercolor the entire plant from bulb to flower. This three-day workshop will focus on composition—creating translucent petals, foreshortened leaves, the texture of the bulbs, and roots. Bring your watercolor skills to the next level! The School’s CEUs= 1.8

Color Mixing 2 4 Tuesdays April 16 – May 7 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, The Field Museum $187 nonmember; members receive 20% discount ART elective Through exercises and demonstrations, this class will explore the more advanced aspects of color such as simultaneous contrast, color vibration, composing with color, mixing neutrals, and atmospheric perspective. Watercolor will be the primary medium but students may also work in hard pastel or colored pencil. The School’s CEUs=1.2

Photography

ART requirement

New! Capturing the Holiday Lights

Continue to build your drawing skills with advanced graphite techniques, light and dark media on toned paper, and carbon dust. We will work outside whenever the weather permits. Prerequisite: Botanical Drawing 1.

Evening Photography Workshop December 3 Monday 6:30 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $49 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

ART elective In this class a creative approach to studying and depicting color in nature will be explored. Elements of landscape, botanicals, close-up studies and vistas will be incorporated to teach students about color theory and technique. Blending, layering, washes, hatching, and optical mixing of color will be used to create dimensional and lush drawings. Students will work from both still-life materials and photographic reference. We will use wet and dry application of ink and colored pencils to create washes, under painting, and linear surfaces. A review of color and light will aid students in building effective drawings. The School’s CEUs= 1.8

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Tulip Mania! Marilyn Garber Watercolor Workshop

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

December nights are perfect for making the Garden’s outdoor holiday lights come alive. Learn how to use your camera to capture these magical displays in this exciting new workshop. We will begin with a review of camera settings and image framing concepts, then proceed outside to photograph all the festive color in the Heritage Garden, the Esplanade, and the Great Tree. Back in the studio, we will review and discuss those newly-captured images. Learn how to transform your perfect photo into holiday greeting cards. Class limited to digital cameras only. A tripod is very strongly recommended and shutter release most helpful.


Beginning Digital Photography November 6 – 27 4 Tuesdays 2 – 4 p.m. Design Studio Jenn Gaudreau, professional photographer or January 12 – February 2 4 Saturdays 1 – 3 p.m. Design Studio Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $150 nonmember; members receive 20% discount FPC requirement This course will help beginners and enthusiasts grasp the techniques and principles of photography. Participants will explore the basics of photography. By the end of class, participants will be confident in using their camera’s manual settings. Course requires a digital SLR camera. No previous experience is required.

Lighting Techniques 2

Basics of Editing – Lightroom I

February 13 – March 6 4 Wednesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Robin Carlson, staff photographer, Chicago Botanic Garden $150 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

January 16 – February 6 4 Wednesdays 9:30 a.m. – noon Design Studio Sarah Postma, professional photographer $187 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

FPC elective This continuation class explores the techniques of lighting with flash and strobe sources. Beginning with simple on-camera techniques, the class will cover capturing motion with flash, off-camera syncing, light painting, and much more. Prerequisite: Lighting Techniques 1. The School’s CEUs = 0.8

Winter Photography January 13 – 27 3 Sundays 1 – 4 p.m. Design Studio Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $162 nonmember; members receive 20% discount FPC elective

Abstracts in Nature —Winter November 12 – December 17 6 Mondays 10 a.m. – noon Design Studio Dianne Kittle, fine art photographer $212 nonmember; members receive 20% discount FPC elective In this advanced class, students will focus on winter abstracts, including water changes, to create fine art photographs. We will capture the Garden as the freeze of winter encroaches on the landscape. Students will learn the program Blurb to design a photography book for presentation of their winter portfolio. Class will include lecture, critique, water photography demonstrations, and practice time in the Garden. The School’s CEUs = 1.2

Lighting Techniques 1 January 16 – February 6 4 Wednesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Robin Carlson, staff photographer, Chicago Botanic Garden $150 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Winter is one of the best times to photograph gardens and nature. Learning to see the “bones” of a garden will improve your photographic skills in any season. Learn about exposure, lighting, and adjustments for color, as well as composition. A tripod is recommended. Dress for the weather. The School’s CEUs = 0.9

Basics of Editing – Photoshop I January 14 – February 4 4 Mondays 1 – 3:30 p.m. Design Studio Iris Allen, freelance photographer and instructor $187 nonmember; members receive 20% discount FPC requirement option The Chicago Botanic Garden is a spectacular place to take photographs. Make your photographs even better with Adobe Photoshop Elements—a user-friendly photo editor that uses the same concepts as the full version of Photoshop. Learn how to make your images better through the use of selection tools, layers, and smart brushes. Play with some artistic options that can inspire abstractions. Requirements for the course are a laptop computer with Adobe Photoshop Elements or Adobe Photoshop CS5 installed and a digital camera.

FPC elective This introduction to techniques for using and manipulating light begins with a study of color temperature. Through technical exercises and demonstrations, this class will explore working with a variety of light sources and filters, both indoors and out. It will cover how to work in studio with hot lights, and lighting setups for still lifes, botanical arrangements, and portraits. The School’s CEUs = 0.8

Adult Education Free Information Session, Monday, March 4, 6 – 8 p.m. Call (847) 835-8261 to register.

Adult Education: Photography

FOCUS ON PHOTOGRAPHY CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS (FPC)

FPC requirement option Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 is professional-grade processing software designed to help photographers manage and edit their images. In this course, you will learn Lightroom 4 setup, workflow, file management, processing, and image exporting. You’ll also learn to tag, name, size, and sharpen your images. A personal laptop with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 installed is required, or you may choose to download the 30-day free trial of Lightroom from Adobe’s website on the first day of class.

Basics of Editing – Lightroom 2 January 16 – February 6 4 Wednesdays 1 – 3:30 p.m. Design Studio Sarah Postma, professional photographer $187 nonmember; members receive 20% discount FPC elective In this course, you will polish your editing workflow, file management, and increase your processing skills in the Develop Module. You’ll also learn to create slideshows and publish your images to the internet directly from Lightroom. A personal laptop with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 installed is required. Prerequisite: Lightroom 1, or approval of instructor. The School’s CEUs = 1.0

Basics of Editing – Photoshop 2 January 17 – February 7 4 Thursdays 1 – 3:30 p.m. Design Studio Iris Allen, freelance photographer and instructor $187 nonmember; members receive 20% discount FPC elective Take the next step and learn even more about Abobe Photoshop. This more advanced class will further your knowledge of selections and layers, allowing you to do some serious photo enhancement and manipulation. We will tackle some interesting projects such as black and white with color accents, old photo restoration, and abstract art creation. Requirements for the course are a laptop computer with Adobe Photoshop Elements or Adobe Photoshop CS5 installed and a digital camera. Prerequisite: Photoshop 1, or approval of instructor. The School’s CEUs = 1.0

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.

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Adult Education: Wellness & Fitness

Wellness & Fitness

Treewhispers: Awakening Your Heartfelt Connection to Trees

Aromatherapy for Colds Workshop

March 7 Thursday 9 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Pamela Paulsrud, artist and creator of Treewhispers $59 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

November 17 Saturday 10 a.m. – noon Annex 2 Etsuko Kobira Rutz, IFA Aromatherapist, LMT, BSc $75 nonmember; members receive 20% discount Did you know that aromatherapy can help prevent colds or speed your recovery from a cold? We will learn about therapeutic essential oils that can be used as self-care to maintain your well-being this winter. We will also make two sample-sized take-home projects during the workshop: a perfume and mouthwash that both use appropriate and safe essential oils to help prevent catching a cold this winter! All materials are provided.

New! Practical Aromatherapy Level 1 January 12 – February 16 (no class February 2) 5 Saturdays 10 a.m. – noon Seminar Room, Plant Science Center Etsuko Kobira Rutz, IFA aromatherapist, LMT, B.S. $324 nonmember; members receive 20% discount This course is designed to provide an introduction to aromatherapy to maintain your own well-being and the well-being of your loved ones. Learn about the basics of aromatherapy theory, and about 15 different essential oils. Make an aromatherapy project in each class (bath salt, body cream, toner, etc.). Learn how to create your own personal blend of essential oils. Most importantly, this class will enable you to use the essential oils studied in class safely and effectively at home.

New! Winter Meditation Walk January 26 Saturday 10 a.m. – noon Meet at Visitor Center Mary Ann Spina, teacher, writer, and counselor $25 nonmember; members receive 20% discount In winter, the Garden is dormant and quiet. If there is snow, it can be beautiful and hushed. Walk and clear your mind in the cold, crisp air. We will meditate while we walk, striving to stay in the present moment in order to practice going with the flow of life, with its ups and downs. This mediation will begin at the Visitor Center and be led by Mary Ann Spina. Men and women welcome.

The Garden is an ideal place to practice tai chi.

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Today we will be inspired by hundreds of artists, poets, students, and tree lovers who have shared their stories and art with the Treewhispers project. Your morning will proceed with meditative visualizations and flute music played from the heart to awaken your connection to trees. Next, we will explore the Garden to find a tree that speaks to you— to study and to listen to during quiet meditative moments. Come prepared to learn, relax, and enjoy the morning. Please dress for the weather.

Fitness Walks Maximize the benefits of walking for exercise by learning about proper posture, muscle strengthening, and stretching. The Chicago Botanic Garden’s outdoor environment is a unique alternative to a health club, offering fresh air and a place where beautiful scenery changes weekly. All fitness levels are accommodated. Dress for the weather; wear comfortable clothing and walking shoes. The incremental multi-session pass allows the walker to choose which sessions to attend during the season. Sat., April. 6 – Nov., 16, 8 – 9 a.m. Meet in Visitor Center Esther Gutiérrez-Sloan, certified personal trainer and president, SALSArobics, Inc. # of Sessions Nonmember Fee 4 Sessions 8 Sessions 12 Sessions 16 Sessions 30 Sessions Drop-in Rate

$63 nonmember $119 nonmember $166 nonmember $199 nonmember $337 nonmember $15

Yoga Yoga is an ancient practice that unites body, mind and spirit. For all sessions, wear comfortable clothing (sweats, shorts or yoga pants) with socks or bare feet. Yoga mats are required. It is also suggested that you bring a towel with you, as well as a sweatshirt for cool-down. All yoga classes last approximately 75 minutes. One-time class trial fee: $20. On occasion, when weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Gentle Yoga Winter session: January 7 – March 11 Spring session: April 1 – June 10 (no class April 15) 10 Mondays 9 – 10:15 a.m. or 5:15 – 6:30 p.m. Garden View Room Steve Nakon, director, and Patricia Nakon, co-director, Whole Journey Northwest Yoga $170 nonmember; members receive 20% discount A series of yoga poses and breathing exercises designed and adapted for a tranquil, relaxing yoga experience. In this course, we will take a gentle, restorative approach to the practice. All students are welcome. Come and enjoy a sense of peace and balance.

Introductory Yoga Winter session: January 9 – March 13 Spring session: April 3 – June 12 (no class April 17) 10 Wednesdays 5:15 – 6:30 p.m. or 7 – 8:15 p.m. Garden View Room Steve Nakon, director, Whole Journey Northwest Yoga $170 nonmember; members receive 20% discount A course for the newer student focusing on yoga movement and breathing basics. We will investigate how the principles of yoga help support health and well-being. All are welcome. Join us as we explore the yoga basics.


Tai Chi

Tai Chi: Traditional Sun-Style Long Form

Winter session: January 8 – March 12 Spring session: April 2 – June 11 (no class April 16) 10 Tuesdays 9:15 – 10:30 a.m. or 6 – 7:15 p.m. Garden View Room Steve Nakon, director, Whole Journey Northwest Yoga $170 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Tai chi’s fluid movements make the Chicago Botanic Garden an ideal location for classes. People of all ages and physical conditions can learn these movements. Tai chi is best practiced in loose clothing and stocking feet or comfortable flat shoes. One-time class trial fee: $20. On occasion, when weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Winter mini-session: January 31 – February 28 5 Thursdays 8 – 9 a.m. $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount and/or Spring session: March 14 – May 23 (no class April 18) 10 Thursdays 8 – 9 a.m. Burnstein Hall Gordon Lock, instructor $165 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

The Yoga Flow series combines movement linked to the breath, working the body and engaging the mind. A moderately challenging course for students with some yoga experience.

Yoga Flow Intermediate Winter session: January 8 – March 12 Spring session: April 2 – June 11 (no class April 16) 10 Tuesdays 8 – 9:15 a.m. or Winter session: January 10 – March 14 Spring session: April 4 – June 13 (no class April 18) 10 Thursdays 9 – 10:15 a.m. or 6 – 7:15 p.m. Garden View Room Steve Nakon, director, Whole Journey Northwest Yoga $170 nonmember; members receive 20% discount The Yoga Flow series combines movement linked to the breath, working the body and engaging the mind. A more exhilarating, challenging Flow series. For students who have taken Beginner Flow or have comparable experience.

Tai Chi 101 Winter mini-session: January 30 – February 27 5 Wednesdays 8 – 9 a.m. $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount and/or Spring session: March 13 – May 22 (no class April 17) 10 Wednesdays 8 – 9 a.m. Burnstein Hall Gordon Lock, instructor $165 nonmember; members receive 20% discount This course will introduce students to Sun-style and Yang-style Tai Chi Chuan. We will focus on basic principles to improve your balance and relaxation, and also increase your range of motion and reduce stress. This class of gentle movements is recommended for beginners and provides you with a solid foundation for choosing future studies. No previous tai chi experience is required, and all are welcome.

Tai Chi: Traditional Yang-Style Long Form Gentle Yoga and Meditation Spring session: April 3 – June 12 (no class April 17) 10 Wednesdays 9:15 – 10:30 a.m. Linnaeus Room Steve Nakon, director, Whole Journey Northwest Yoga $170 nonmember; members receive 20% discount All levels of fitness and experience are welcome in this class, which will include meditative movement and contemplative stillness. We will focus on the breath and relieving stress.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies.

Winter mini-session: January 30 – February 27 5 Wednesdays 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount and/or Spring session: March 13 – May 22 (no class April 17) 10 Wednesdays 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. Burnstein Hall Gordon Lock, instructor $165 nonmember; members receive 20% discount

Adult Education: Wellness & Fitness

Yoga Flow Beginner

This course continues with in-depth study of the Sun style. Some qigong exercises will also be practiced (e.g. the Eight Pieces of Brocade). In session we will emphasize the ABCs—alignment, breathing, and concentration. Tai Chi 101 or some Tai Chi experience recommended.

Simplified Yang-Style Tai Chi Chuan (24) Winter mini session: January 31 – February 28 5 Thursdays 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. $87 nonmember; members receive 20% discount and/or Spring session: March 14 – May 23 (no class April 18) 10 Thursdays 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. Burnstein Hall Gordon Lock, instructor $165 nonmember; members receive 20% discount We will practice all 24 postures of Tai Chi Chuan and the technique for each movement will be discussed. The routine may be completed in less than ten minutes. Members will build a solid foundation for balance, and coordination. Qigong exercises will also be introduced to improve overall fitness.

This course continues with in-depth study of the Yang style. Some qigong exercises will also be practiced (e.g., Eight Pieces of Brocade). In session we will emphasize the ABCs—alignment, breathing, and concentration. Tai Chi 101 or some Tai Chi experience recommended.

Adult Education Free Information Session, Monday, March 4, 6 – 8 p.m. Call (847) 835-8261 to register.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.

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Youth & Family Programs

Youth and Family Programs Early positive experiences in nature or other plant-rich environments can foster a lifelong appreciation of the natural world. That is why, with the support of the Guild of the Chicago Botanic Garden, we are deeply committed to engaging families and children of all ages with a year-round schedule of professionally designed, age-appropriate programs held throughout the Garden.

One Day at a Time: New Winter Break Option for Families The twinkling lights, the promise of holiday gifts, hot cocoa, no school‌how could winter break possibly get better? Winter Break Camp at the Chicago Botanic Garden! Happy campers investigate weather, learn how plants and animals adapt to the cold, visit Wonderland Express (January 3), experience Japanese language and culture, study snow, and play outside. Each day offers a different adventure, and for the first time, parents have the flexibility to sign up by the day. Our Do North partner, Writers’ Theatre, will join the fun on January 3. Planning to attend the whole week? Be sure to register early to ensure a spot. Winter Break Camp is December 27 and 28 and January 2 through 4, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and is open to children ages 5 to 8. The daily fee is $69 per child. Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Registration can be completed online at www.chicagobotanic.org/winterbreakcamp no later than December 17. 64

www.chicagobotanic.org/forfamilies

Dress for the weather! Winter Break Camp gives campers a chance to explore the great outdoors.


Free Programs Discovery Backpacks Enliven your family’s Garden visit using tools to identify and observe plants and animals. Check out one of our free Discovery Backpacks, available on a first-come, first-served basis at the Information Desk in the Visitor Center.

Story Time Mondays, January 14 – May 20 10 – 11 a.m. Stop by the Lenhardt Library on Monday mornings for nature-themed stories and hands-on activities. Geared toward children ages 2 to 5 with a caregiver. No program April 22.

Weekend Family Classes 9:30 – 11 a.m. or 1 – 2:30 p.m. $22 nonmember per child Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Together, adults and children ages 4 to 10 can explore cool things about how plants connect to science, art, history, and culture. Each Saturday program includes a variety of hands-on activities and projects, as well as opportunities to bring the Garden home. New! Three Sisters Saturday, November 3 Hear the story of the Three Sisters (corn, bean, and squash), create a delicious dried bean soup jar to enjoy at home, investigate why popcorn pops and taste the results! Beautiful Birds Sunday, November 11

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/familyprograms/ dropin for more information.

Birds and plants share a habitat. Discover where different birds live, learn what they eat, and create different kinds of bird feeders using plants.

Tu B’Shevat Family Activities

Joyful Gingerbread Saturday, December 1, or Sunday, December 16

Sunday, January 27 1 – 4 p.m. Celebrate the Jewish festival of trees! Families can explore trees in the Greenhouses, enjoy a reading corner with books about trees, and take a plant home. These activities are provided by the National Council of Jewish Women, Chicago North Shore Section. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ familyprograms/dropin for more information.

Fee-based Programs Little Diggers Thursdays: 1/10, 2/14, 3/14, 4/11 Fridays: 1/11, 2/15, 3/15, 4/12 Saturdays: 1/12, 2/16, 3/16, 4/13 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. $70 nonmember per child Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Learn about flowers, discover animals, experience the changing seasons, and more! These four-class series for children ages 2 to 4 and caregivers meet mornings, once a month. Each program includes group activities, time for free play, and a planting project. Select Thursday, Friday, or Saturday mornings, September through December. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/littlediggers to register, or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Explore all the different plants and plant parts needed to make gingerbread. Take home a future ginger plant, decorate cookies, and mix up a batch of gingerbread to bake at home. Papermaking with Plants Saturday, January 19 Plants help make products we use every day—like paper. Learn the process of turning plants and old paper scraps into paper. Make sheets of textured, scented, and colored handmade paper.

Gumballs & Superballs Sunday, January 27 Find out how people use parts of rainforest trees to make chewing gum and rubber. Create your own bouncing ball and flavorful gum to take home. HOT Chocolate Saturday, February 9 Examine the cacao tree, learn how bitter beans make delicious desserts, mix up an ancient Aztec chocolate, and take home chocolate mint and chocolate pepper plants. New! Rainbow Garden Sunday, February 17 Rainbow gardens inspire artwork and attract colorful friends. Dissect a seed, design colorful seed art, and create two brightly hued pollinators to remind you that spring is just around the corner! Homemade Ice Cream Sunday, March 3, or Saturday, March 23 Get an up-close look at one of the world’s tiniest seeds from the vanilla orchid, make a batch of ice cream, and pot up a plant that can flavor ice cream. Insect Investigations Saturday, April 6, or Sunday, April 14 Explore tiny critters like bees, crickets, and butterflies. Create a scientific tool to help you study insects at home, find out how bugs see, and plant some flowers that pollinators love to visit. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/familyprograms or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Learn about animals and plants during hands-on activities in Little Diggers.

Youth & Family Programs

Youth & Family Programs

Family Programs


Youth & Family: Camp CBG

Birthday Parties Celebrate your child’s birthday with a garden-themed party! Choose from a variety of themes. All parties include educational, hands-on activities led by Garden staff. Every child takes home a plant plus additional items they’ve created. Parties can be scheduled yearround on Saturday or Sunday mornings or afternoons for children turning 4 and up. Garden Plus membership required. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/birthdays or call (847) 835-8275 for more information.

Youth Scouts Scout Badge Programs $10/student for 90-minute programs (ages 6 – 8) $15/student for 2-hour programs (ages 9 – 12) Scouts can work toward badges with challenging activities. Our wide range of scout programs take children throughout the Garden, and can be scheduled after school on Mondays through Fridays and on Saturdays between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/scout or call (847) 835-8239 for more information about these programs. Scout Seasonal Workshop: Winter Wonders Saturday, December 15 12:45 – 3 p.m. $12 per child Scouts can discover the magic of nature in winter through hands-on activities that combine art and science. Participants will take a winter wildlife hike through the Garden and make a fragrant evergreen swag and a beeswax candle. Adults should plan to stay with their Scouts for the duration of the program. At least one adult chaperone for every five Scouts is required. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/scout/seasonal or call (847) 835-6801 for more information. Scout Seasonal Workshop: Valentine’s Day Saturday, February 9 12:45 – 3 p.m. $12 per child Join fellow Scouts to celebrate Valentine’s Day. Scouts will make recycled valentines and check out the tree that provides cacao, the main ingredient in chocolate! Adults should plan to stay with their Scouts for the duration of the program. At least one adult chaperone for every five Scouts is required. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/scout/seasonal or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Children ages 5 to 8 have fun indoors and outside during Spring Break Camp.

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www.chicagobotanic.org/camp

Break Camps

Spring Break Camp

Winter Break Camp

March 25 – 29, 2013 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

December 27, 28, January 2, 3, 4 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

$69 nonmember per child per day Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

$69 nonmember per child per day Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

Children ages 5 to 8 will participate in high-quality learning activities with experienced teachers who use inquiry-based, hands-on activities. Programming connects nature to a range of themes including art, cuisine, and conservation. This spring, children will dissect and plant seeds, explore fragrant herbs and flowers, search for birds and early spring plants on nature hikes, take a trolley ride around the Garden, and create take-home science-themed projects. Each day, a Ravinia musician will provide instruction in creative expression.

Children ages 5 to 8 can engage in exciting hands-on indoor and outdoor activities while discovering the Garden in winter. They’ll investigate weather, explore seasonal adaptations of plants and animals, and enjoy a visit to our Wonderland Express holiday exhibition. December 27: Winter Weather & Animals December 28: A Visit to Japan January 2: Everything Snow! January 3: All Aboard! with Writers’ Theatre January 4: Plant Packages Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/winterbreakcamp to register or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/springbreakcamp to register or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.


Youth & Family Programs 63

www.chicagobotanic.org/camp


Ages 6 months – 2 years $25 nonmember per child per week Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. 9:45 – 11:15 a.m. Friday Caregivers are invited to join our new social play program. You’ll enjoy a brisk walk through the Garden, talk with a Garden expert, get behind-the-scenes information, and finish your morning with activities designed for our smallest visitors. Every week, we will explore a new Garden theme. Camp meets in the Visitor Center.

My First Camps New format and pricing for our youngest campers! Would you like to spend some time learning, exploring, and bonding with your child in an engaging environment? Welcome to My First Camp! Each camp is offered two different weeks each summer. Choose a 9 a.m. or 10:30 a.m. camp to attend with your child.

Born on or before September 1, 2011

2

Age

My First Camp Age 2

Your preschooler will create a garden and care for plants, from planting to watering to harvesting. Taste the bounty of the Garden and sell produce at our Farmers’ Market!

My First Garden June 18 & 20 or July 23 & 25

Small Scientists June 24, 26, 28 or July 29, 31, August 2

Your little gardener will dig, sow, and harvest with our child-sized tools! Grow those gardening skills by digging in the dirt and helping us create a garden!

Preschoolers will be introduced to the parts of a flower; learn about ants and their body parts; and explore wind, water, and worms through developmentally appropriate activities.

Small Scientists June 25 & 27 or July 30 & August 1 Toddlers will explore the world using magnets, water, sand, and the colors of the Garden. Discover textures and smells in nature, practice observation skills, and use scientific tools.

My First Camp Age 3 Born on or before September 1, 2010

3

Green Sprouts Most children are 4 or 5

Jk-K

$205 nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Green Sprouts information

$60 nonmember per child per week

Camps meet Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to noon or 12:30 to 3 p.m.

Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

• Dress for the weather. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily.

My First Camp Age 3 information

$40 nonmember per child per week

• Camp meets one Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 to 10 a.m. or 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

• An adult must accompany each registered child.

Bug Brigade June 24 – 28, 9:30 a.m. – noon or July 22 – 26, 9:30 a.m. – noon or August 5 – 9, 12:30 – 3 p.m.

My First Camp Age 2 information

• To make camp enjoyable and fair to all, do not bring unregistered children, including siblings, to camp. Nursing mothers may call (847) 835-8361 to make arrangements.

Is your child fascinated by bugs? Children will get up-close and personal with butterflies and bees, learn how their favorite insects see, and make a bug sucker to collect and study insects.

• Camp meets in the Grunsfeld Chidren’s Growing Garden, weather permitting. In the event of rain, camp will take place in the Learning Center.

Fun with Physics July 15 – 19, 9:30 a.m. – noon or August 12 – 16, 9:30 a.m. – noon

• Dress for the weather. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily.

Green Sprouts will perform basic physical science experiments and discover the laws that rule the natural world. They’ll explore why items sink or float, how magnets work, and what makes static electricity.

Art & Music July 15, 17, 19 or August 12, 14, 16

Garden Expedition July 8 – 12, 9:30 a.m. – noon or August 12 – 16, 12:30 – 3 p.m.

Preschoolers’ creativity will thrive with natureinspired art and music activities. Engage in clay work, movement, music, and interactive storytelling with your little one at the Garden.

Young ecologists will investigate trees, leaves, prairie plants, and aquatic creatures, discovering all that the natural world of Illinois has to offer. They’ll learn how to preserve these wonders for future generations.

Fantastic Foods July 8, 10, 12 or August 5, 7, 9

Habitat Hunters June 24 – 28, 9:30 a.m. – noon or July 22 – 26, 12:30 – 3 p.m.

You and your preschooler will discover the different foods that come from plants. Plant an herb garden, practice slicing, pouring, and chopstick skills, and make a fruit salad!

Habitat Hunters will explore the different habitats the Garden has to offer, learn how to track animals, and make a habitat for a creature that lives here.

• Camp meets one Tuesday and Thursday from 9 to 10 a.m. or 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. • An adult must accompany each registered child. • To make camp enjoyable and fair to all, do not bring unregistered children, including siblings, to camp. Nursing mothers may call (847) 835-8361 to make arrangements. • Camp meets in the Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden, weather permitting. In the event of rain, camp will take place in the Learning Center. • Dress for the weather. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily. Art & Music July 16 & 18 or August 13 & 15 Share the joy of creating garden-inspired art with your child. Have fun practicing fine and gross motor skills while developing your child’s appreciation of nature and the arts.

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Is your tot interested in helping out in the kitchen, setting the kitchen table, or eating new foods? Discover new foods, prepare a tasty snack, and work on kneading, mixing, grating, and spreading skills.

Grades

New! My First Camp Bloomin’ Garden Strollers

My First Garden June 17, 19, 21 or July 22, 24, 26

Age

Youth & Family: Camp CBG

Camp CBG

Fantastic Foods July 9 & 11 or August 6 & 8

www.chicagobotanic.org/camp


Campers will use a map to find their way, create a treasure chest, and dig up a treasure to keep. They’ll also bring home a plant with a hidden treasure to share. Mad Scientists June 17 – 21, 9:30 a.m. – noon or July 22 – 26, 9:30 a.m. – noon or July 29 – August 2, 12:30 – 3 p.m. For young explorers who have ever wondered how fireflies glow, why leaves change, whether fish sleep, or just WHY? They’ll find these answers and many more as they become not-so-mad scientists. Nature Art June 17 – 21, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or July 15 – 19, 9:30 a.m. – noon or August 5 – 9, 9:30 a.m. – noon Explore all the ways to make art from nature! Green Sprouts will use the sun’s power to make prints and dyes, use clay for sculpture, and become inspired by flowers with watercolor painting. Salad Science July 15 – 19, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or August 5 – 9, 9:30 a.m. – noon We eat parts of plants every day. Young food scientists will explore the Garden to discover how foods grow. We’ll discover how plants change the sun’s energy into energy for our bodies, prepare our own snacks, and plant a salad to take home! Sprouting Wizards June 24 – 28, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or July 29 – August 2, 9:30 a.m. – noon Kids become science wizards as they explore basic chemistry and the properties of solids, liquids, and gases through experimentation. No need to bring magic wands…we’ll make our own! Super Seedlings July 8 – 12, 9:30 a.m. – noon or July 29 – August 2, 9:30 a.m. – noon Campers will dig, plant, water, weed, and sow in the Garden. Working together, they’ll create a garden, practice seed dissection, and become true gardeners!

Most children are 6 or 7.

1-2

Grades

Green Thumbs

$205 nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Green Thumbs information Camps meet Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to noon or 12:30 to 3 p.m. • Dress for the weather.

Expert Wizardry June 24 – 28, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Young wizards will discover the magic of science as they create strange potions and perform unbelievable experiments while learning basic chemistry. No book of spells necessary—we’ll make our own. Explore Your World July 29 – August 2, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or August 12 – 16, 9:30 a.m. – noon

• Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily.

Curious campers will learn about the natural world through guided exploration and discovery by visiting the many habitats at the Garden. They’ll also learn how to help preserve these habitats.

Art in the Garden June 17 – 21, 9:30 a.m. – noon or August 5 – 9, 12:30 – 3 p.m.

Plant People July 8 – 12, 12:30 – 3 p.m.

Green Thumbs discover different natural artistic styles while they explore the Garden. They’ll sculpt with clay, make plant dyes, and create their own paper. Incredible Edibles July 15 – 19, 9:30 a.m. – noon Young chefs will explore the Garden with their taste buds and find out how plants turn the sun’s energy into fuel for out bodies! We’ll explore how we eat plant parts every day, harvest food grown in the Outdoor Classroom, make our own tasty snacks, and plant an herb garden to take home. Kinetic Kids July 15 – 19, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Budding physicists will discover cool science tricks, explore the laws of motion, and perform physical science experiments with toys. Treasure Hunt July 8 – 12, 9:30 a.m. – noon or August 12 – 16, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Campers will develop map-reading skills, use compasses, and discover how archeologists excavate sites. They will create a hidden treasure map and find secret plant treasures, too.

Young horticulturists will explore the fascinating life cycle of plants with plenty of opportunity for scientific discovery, hands-on experiments, and garden cultivation. Grossology June 17 – 21, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or July 29 – August 2, 9:30 a.m. – noon Campers will uncover the science behind “gross” things around and inside them as they explore slimy and smelly natural phenomena. They’ll use their observation skills along with scientific tools. Wildlife Wanderers June 24 – 28, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or July 22 – 26, 9:30 a.m. – noon Junior ecologists will study creatures on the ground, in the air, and in the water. Create a science kit, plant a terrarium, identify trees and animal tracks, and record everything in your journal. Insect Investigation July 22 – 26, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or August 5 – 9, 9:30 a.m. – noon Bug lovers, unite! Green Thumbs will search for insect homes, make insect display cases, and create insect-vision glasses to take home.

Youth & Family: Camp CBG

Hidden Treasures June 17 – 21, 9:30 a.m. – noon or July 8 – 12, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or August 12 – 16, 9:30 a.m. – noon


Most children are ages 10 to 12.

5-7

Grades

Youth & Family Programs

Adventurers

$420 nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount Adventurers information

Camps meet Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. • Dress for the weather. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily. • Campers must bring a peanut-free lunch that does not require refrigeration.

Most children are 8 or 9.

3-4

Grades

Explorers

$205 nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Explorers information

Camps meet Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to noon or 12:30 to 3 p.m. • Dress for the weather. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily. Alfresco Art July 15 – 19, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or August 5 – 9, 9:30 a.m. – noon Campers will become artistically inspired by the Garden and try their hand at botanical illustration, sculpture, printmaking, and painting. We’ll explore new techniques each day of this outdoor art program. Botany in the Kitchen July 8 – 12, 9:30 a.m. – noon or August 12 – 16, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Young chefs will discover how fruits, vegetables, herbs, and nutrients make cooking fascinating. They’ll harvest vegetables and plant an herb garden. Camera Craft June 17 – 21, 9:30 a.m. – noon or July 29 – August 2, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Campers will learn the elements of composition and framing snapshots, and practice shooting photos around the Garden. They’ll create a pinhole camera and rediscover the magic of nineteenth-century photography. Each camper must bring two disposable film cameras on the first day of camp.

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www.chicagobotanic.org/camp

Art July 8 – 12, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. or August 5 – 9, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Dirty Jobs July 22 – 26, 9:30 a.m. – noon or August 5 – 9, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Have you ever wondered how dirty, grimy, and grubby you can get working in a garden? Campers see what is in a day’s work at the Garden. Keep our worm bins healthy, learn about the importance of compost, design and plant a garden, and meet a Garden scientist! Forensic Investigators June 24 – 28, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or July 29 – August 2, 9:30 a.m. – noon This year’s all-new mystery will require young CSI team members to try investigative techniques used by the pros to help us get to the bottom of this summer’s hot case. Garden Caching June 17 – 21, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or July 15 – 19, 9:30 a.m. – noon A new Garden adventure awaits! Explorers will search for hidden caches using compasses, maps, and GPS as they learn the etiquette of geocaching. They’ll also create a cache for others to find. Konnichiwa Japan July 8 – 12, 12:30 – 3 p.m. or August 12 – 16, 9:30 a.m. – noon Time for immersion in Japanese culture as we explore Sansho-En, learn the art of bonsai, create sushi-inspired snacks, discover the art of calligraphy, and visit the Shoin House. Surviving Outdoors June 24 – 28, 9:30 a.m. – noon or July 22 – 26, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Explorers will discover the secrets pioneers used to find water, make a collection of safe and useful plants, create a shelter, and learn about how to predict weather and storms.

Artists will introduce Adventurers to the use of various media to create their own art. Using the Garden as a backdrop, students will develop their photography, sculpture, and drawing skills. They will explore the use of natural materials and learn various tricks of the trade used by professional artists. Chemistry July 15 – 19, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. or August 12 – 16, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Who knew chemistry could be so cool? Adventurers will explore the basics of chemistry and chemical reactions. By performing simple experiments, they will develop a basic understanding of acids and bases, fine-tune measurement skills, and understand the importance of accurate data observation and recording. Cuisine June 24 – 28, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. or July 29 – August 2, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Calling all aspiring chefs! Campers will discuss menu techniques and preparation, learn principles of cooking with fruits and vegetables, improve basic chopping skills, and learn the importance of kitchen safety. They will also learn about setting a table, plating dishes, and creating a healthy meal. We’ll use our harvest in simple summer recipes—ice cream, pasta, and more! Ecology June 17 – 21, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. or July 22 – 26, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. What does an ecologist do at the Garden? Adventurers will discover what scientists do as they explore the Garden’s native Illinois habitats. Campers will conduct studies in our prairie, wetland, and woodland habitats, becoming familiar with native species. They will perform their own surveys, identifications, and field observations.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ camp for complete program descriptions and information on availability.


New for 2013!

Before- and After-Care

It is a whole new adventure at Camp CBG in our two-week, full-day camps for Green Thumbs and Explorers! Campers will explore all the Garden has to offer, make new friends, and jump into a fun-filled, outdoor, and educational camp program. Remember to pack a water bottle and snack daily, along with a peanut-free lunch that does not require refrigeration.

Most children are 6 or 7.

1-2

Grades

Green Thumbs

$840 nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

Calling all creative kids! Campers will explore the Garden with art, music, cooking, yoga, and planting activities that encourage creative expression. Spend two weeks of your summer being inspired by the Garden. Science Trekkers July 8 – 19 or August 5 – 16 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Campers will dig deeper into the scientific process while discovering the crazy, fun science happening at the Garden. We will investigate plant, animal, and human adaptations, try our hand at chemistry, and dabble in some physics.

3-4

Grades

Most children are 8 or 9.

Grades preK to 7 June 17 – August 16 Morning Care: 8 – 9:30 a.m.; $45 per week per camper Afternoon Care: 3 – 5 p.m.; $60 per week per camper

Camp CBG offers a supervised lunch period for Green Sprouts, Green Thumbs, and Explorers campers for $10 per child per week. Pack a peanut-free lunch for your child that does not require refrigeration, and we will supervise your child during lunch (noon to 12:30 p.m.) and escort your child to his or her afternoon camp.

Leaders in Training Our Leaders in Training (LITs), ages 13 to 15, will help prepare for camps, assist teachers during the day, and learn life skills that benefit future job searches and college preparation in our two-week program. For an application and further information regarding the LIT program, please contact the camp manager at 847 (835) 8361.

Create & Grow June 17 – 28 or July 22 – August 2 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Explorers

We are happy to offer before- and after-camp care for your camper. The program will be supervised by Camp CBG staff. Activities will include games, art projects, and gardening. Pack an extra snack for your camper for after care. Fees are per week, and cannot be prorated for partial use; no discount for Garden Plus members is available. Comprehensive guidelines, including late fees, will be available on the Camp CBG webpage in December.

Lunch

$840 nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Artist-in-Residence June 17 – 28 or July 22 – August 2 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Does your child enjoy the arts? Explorers will discover all that the Garden has to offer an aspiring artist. We will create one-of-a-kind masterpieces of the visual, culinary, movement, and textile kinds. Spend two weeks of your summer being inspired by the Garden. Science Explorer July 8 – 19 or August 5 – 16 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Explorers will investigate plant, animal, and human adaptations, while utilizing the scientific process. Ecology, botany, physics, plus chemistry equal a whole lot of fun in this exciting two-week camp.

Campers can now learn as they have fun in the new Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden.

Youth & Family Programs

New! Two-Week, Full-Day Camps


Youth & Family Programs

Camp registration and cancellation policies Registration Deadline

Online Emergency Forms

Pick-Up/Drop-Off

Registration is open until camps fill or one week prior to the start date of camp. You will receive an automated reply immediately upon completion of your online registration.

Camp CBG does not require a medical examination to attend camp; however, we ask that you fill out our Online Emergency Form as soon as you complete your online registration. In order for your child to attend camp, we must have a completed health form on file by June 1, 2013. The form is available on our webpage at www.chicagobotanic.org/camp.

Camper drop-off and pick-up take place in our Learning Campus entry drive. You may park and walk your child to camp, or take advantage of our direct car drop-off/pick-up. Details will be communicated via e-mail to all registrants by June 1, 2013.

Membership Garden Plus and above members receive a 20 percent discount on all Camp CBG programs! Those holding individual Garden memberships will not receive this discount. Please call (847) 835-8215 if you would like to upgrade your membership in order to receive the discount. You will need to provide a member ID number at the time of camp registration. Please note that Garden membership is nontransferable.

Age Limits Please note the age groupings for each camp group. Campers must be entering the listed grade in fall 2013. We regret that we cannot make any exceptions to this policy. Campers in the Green Sprouts group and above must be toilet trained.

Extra-Special Attention Please let us know on your child’s Online Emergency Form if your child has special needs, including physical, emotional, educational, or medical. Advise us of any severe allergies or chronic illness. This includes information regarding food or airborne allergies. If your child will require special accommodations, please call (847) 835-8361 to discuss your situation before registering.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ camp for complete program descriptions and information on availability.

Morning drop-off is 9:15 to 9:30 a.m. Morning pick-up is at noon. Afternoon drop-off is 12:15 to 12:30 p.m. Afternoon pick-up is at 3 p.m.

Please Do Not Bring To Camp The Garden is NOT responsible for any item lost or broken during camp. Please leave the following items at home: personal video game players, cell phones, and MP3 players/iPods.

Camper Code Of Conduct You will be asked to review the CBG Camper Code of Conduct upon completion of the Online Emergency Form: • Campers will treat their fellow campers, instructors, and volunteers with respect. • Campers will follow directions and stay with their group. Please read and discuss these expectations with your child. In the event that a camper does not follow the Code of Conduct, or his or her behavior endangers other campers or interferes with an instructor’s ability to provide programming, the coordinator of Camp Programs or camp instructor will inform the parent at pick-up or through a phone call. If a second incident occurs, parents may be asked to withdraw their child from camp. Refunds will not be given for behaviorrelated withdrawals.

Cancellation Policy You may cancel your child’s Camp CBG registration up to two weeks before the first day of that camp. We are not able to give refunds for cancellations with less than two weeks’ notice. Transfers will be granted up to one week before the start of a camp. A ten percent administrative handling fee per child per camp will be assessed for all cancellations. To cancel, please call (847) 835-6801. If your child is unable to attend camp due to medical reasons, you may receive a refund (less a ten percent processing fee) at any time prior to the start of camp by providing a doctor’s note. We are unable to refund for missed days of camp. Camp CBG registration fees are nontransferable. Camps canceled by the Garden because of low enrollment or Garden closure will be automatically fully refunded. The Garden reserves the right to cancel a camp due to low enrollment.

In My First Garden, preschoolers water and care for plants—and taste the bounty of the Garden’s vegetables.


Camp CBG Schedule June 17-21

June 24-28

July 8-12

July 15-19

July 22-26

Friday Bloomin’ Stroller

Friday Bloomin’ Stroller

Friday Bloomin’ Stroller

Friday Bloomin’ Stroller

Friday Bloomin’ Stroller

9 – 10 a.m. T Th 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. T Th

My First Garden

Small Scientists

Fantastic Foods

Art & Music

My First Garden

Small Scientists

Fantastic Foods

Art & Music

9 – 10 a.m. M W F 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. M W F

My First Garden

Small Scientists

Fantastic Foods

Art & Music

My First Garden

Small Scientists

Fantastic Foods

Art & Music

9:30 a.m. – noon

Hidden Treasures

Bug Brigade

Garden Expedition

Nature Art

Mad Scientist

Super Seedling

Salad Science

Fun with Physics

9:30 a.m. – noon

Mad Scientists

Habitat Hunters

Super Seedlings

Fun with Physics

Bug Brigade

Sprouting Wizards

Nature Art

Hidden Treasures

12:30 – 3 p.m.

Nature Art

Sprouting Wizards

Hidden Treasures

Salad Science

Habitat Hunters

Mad Scientists

Bug Brigade

Garden Expedition

9:30 a.m. – noon

Art in the Garden

Expert Wizardry

Treasure Hunt

Incredible Edibles

Wildlife Wanderers

Grossology

Insect Investigation

Explore Your World

12:30 – 3 p.m.

Grossology

Wildlife Wanderers

Plant People

Kinetic Kids

Insect Investigation

Explore Your World

Art in the Garden

Treasure Hunt

Science Trekkers

Create and Grow

Explorers

9:30 a.m. – noon

Camera Craft

Surviving Outdoors

Botany in the Kitchen

Garden Caching

Dirty Jobs

Forensic Investigators

Alfresco Art

Konnichiwa Japan

12:30 – 3 p.m.

Garden Caching

Forensic Investigators

Konichiwa Japan

Alfresco Art

Surviving Outdoors

Camera Craft

Dirty Jobs

Botany in the Kitchen

Explorers

Green Thumbs

Create and Grow

Explorers

Green Sprouts

Green Sprouts

My First Camp

Friday Bloomin’ Stroller

My First Camp

Friday Bloomin’ Stroller

My First Camp

Friday Bloomin’ Stroller

Green Sprouts

August 12-16

Green Thumbs

August 5-9

Green Thumbs

July 29August 2

9:45 – 11:15 a.m.

Adventurers

6 mos to 2 yrs

5-7

Grades

Grades

3-4

3-4

Grades

1-2

Grades

Grades

1-2

Grades

Jk-K

Age

3 2

Age Age

Time

FULL-DAY TWO-WEEK 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

FULL-DAY TWO-WEEK 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Artist-in-Residence

Ecology

Cuisine

Science Explorers

Art

Chemistry

Science Trekkers

Artist-in-Residence

Ecology

Cuisine

Science Explorers

Art

Chemistry

www.chicagobotanic.org/camp

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Teacher & Student Programs 74

Teacher and Student Programs The Garden is a living laboratory, an ideal setting for learning about plants, ecology, conservation, and the natural world. From school field trips to teacher workshops and student internships, educators and students encounter fresh ideas, innovative teaching techniques, and meaningful science content that support Illinois learning standards.

Interest is growing in school gardens! Learn from experts and peers how to start a garden and make it a lively part of your curriculum. Looking for creative problem solving and solutions to establish, maintain, and fund a school garden? Want to discover great ideas on how to use your garden to meet new Common Core standards and get students excited about science? Join us on Saturday, June 29, 2013, for a day of inspiration and “best practice� as we showcase school garden projects that are beautiful, enriching, and grounded in education. Take home some great ideas for using the garden to teach students about science and nature. Enjoy garden tours. Uncover grant resources and learn from the experiences of seasoned school gardeners. A networking forum provides opportunity to talk to other educators who share a passion for and experience with school gardening. PreK through grade 12 educators can earn six CPDUs, graduate credit, and/or Chicago Public School Lane credit. Register now by calling (847) 835-8253, e-mailing rammann@chicagobotanic.org or visiting www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl/teacherprograms. 74 www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl

Think summer! Teachers get inspired at Garden classes and symposia.


School Gardening Basics

We invite you to expand your understanding of plants and nature, build your repertoire of teaching techniques, and enliven your grades PreK – 12 classrooms, while earning professional development and graduate credit. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ teacherprograms for more detailed program descriptions and to register for classes.

Grade level: PreK – 12 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1

Unless otherwise indicated, all programs are from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Garden. Become an Educator Member and receive a 20 percent discount on all professional development courses over $100.

Winter 2013 Exploring Desert Ecosystems December 1 at the Chicago Botanic Garden December 8 at Brookfield Zoo Saturday $150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members)

February 16 at Openlands February 23 at the Chicago Botanic Garden Saturday $150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members)

Gain the resources to successfully plan and implement a schoolyard garden. Learn the basics of building a garden team, choosing your garden theme, understanding garden design, soil tests, and base maps through this two-day workshop.

March 16 at the Chicago Botanic Garden March 23 at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum Saturday $150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members) Grade level: PreK – 2 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1 Children are naturally curious about the world. Learn how to encourage this curiosity through inquiry and help young students develop science process and critical thinking skills. Explore how to lead scienceand nature-based conversations, integrate natural objects and the outdoors into your teaching, and conduct simple experiments and more.

Spring 2013 New! Edible Science April 20 & 27 at the Chicago Botanic Garden Saturday

Why are deserts important? Why should we protect them? Explore the amazing adaptations of desert plants at the Garden’s Greenhouses and desert animals at the Brookfield Zoo. Learn about the ecology and importance of deserts through hands-on activities that support interdisciplinary instruction.

Grade level: K – 12 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee):1

January 26 at the Garfield Park Conservatory February 2 at the Chicago Botanic Garden Saturday $150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members) Grade level: K – 12 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1 Discover firsthand how flavorful plants like chocolate, vanilla, and ginger grow. Learn how people use them to enhance their lives and tickle their taste buds. Explore both institutions’ plant collections, enjoy hands-on activities, and make literary connections for the classroom.

Custom Workshops Education staff can develop custom workshops to be delivered at your site. Teachers, administrative staff, and parent or neighborhood volunteers can all participate through active learning that models grade-appropriate techniques for integrating plant-based learning into the curriculum. Please call Teacher Programs at (847) 835-8253 for more information about scheduling and pricing for custom workshops.

New! Fostering Early Childhood Inquiry

Grade level: PreK – 12 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1

Teas, Sweets, and Tropical Treats: Science and Culture of Edible Plants

Other Teacher Programs

$150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members)

Make science connections through one of your students’ favorite things: food! Conduct experiments using everyday foods to investigate concepts in biology and chemistry. Through simple hands-on activities we will explore such topics as plant parts, nutrition, freezing points, yeast, and much more.

Green Teacher Network The Chicago Botanic Garden, Garfield Park Conservatory Alliance, and Openlands have teamed up to form the Green Teacher Network. This collaboration encourages Chicago-area schools to adapt plant-based education activities, and supports teachers’ efforts to build and use school gardens as curricular tools. For more information or to become a member contact Kristin LoVerde at Openlands at (312) 863-6153.

Gardening Courses Windy City Harvest offers half-day and full-day workshops on growing plants indoors and outside. It’s a great way to improve your school gardening skills.

Free Classroom Resource Kits for Loan The Regenstein School offers a variety of resource kits of learning materials for educators to use in the classroom. Borrowing a kit requires a $50 deposit, which is refunded upon the return of the complete kit. For kit availability and/or to arrange for kit pickup call (847) 835-8253.

Prepare your students for a future engaged in science with the Garden’s professional development programs.

Form and Function May 11 at Brookfield Zoo May 18 at the Chicago Botanic Garden Saturday $150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members) Grade level: K – 12 CPDU credit: 1, Lane credit: 1, Science graduate credit (additional fee): 1 Meet some weird and wonderful examples of life in the plant and animal kingdoms that inhabit a variety of ecosystems. Hands-on investigations will center on animal dentition, the structure of cells, camouflage, attracting pollinators, and taxonomy. Attention will be paid to structural, physiological, and behavioral adaptations.

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Teacher & Student Programs

Teacher Professional Development


Teacher & Student Programs

Student Field Trips

Guided Programs for Children with Special Needs K – 12

Enrich your students’ lives with a visit to the Garden. Choose from a variety of programs that feature plant and nature topics appropriate for specific grade levels. Guided and self-guided options are available. Visit www. chicagobotanic.org/ctl/fieldtrips for complete program information and to schedule your visit.

Monday through Friday

New! The Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden, located on the Learning Campus, is now open and used for guided programs. Self-guided groups may visit the Children’s Growing Garden after all programs are finished using the space. Homeschool Groups We welcome you to register for field trips to the Garden. If your homeschool group includes a range of ages, please review our complete program descriptions online and select a program that best matches your group’s grade level and knowledge base.

$120 (includes all materials) Maximum number of children: 15 Bring your students to the Chicago Botanic Garden for a customized therapeutic program in the Buehler Enabling Garden outdoor classroom. These one-hour programs provide a guided, structured experience with nature and are designed for youth with special needs. If you find it difficult to travel with your students, please contact us to discuss possible programs delivered in your school. Call (847) 835-6801 to learn more about horticultural therapy for your students or to schedule a program.

Self-Guided Field Trips

Self-Guided Activity Backpacks Year-round Monday through Friday $10 per class Self-guided activity backpacks provide hands-on activities for teachers to lead while visiting the Sensory Garden, Malott Japanese Garden, and McDonald Woods. Each backpack includes all supplies for the activities for a group of 30 and can be checked out for either the morning (9 a.m. to noon) or the afternoon (12:30 to 3:30 p.m.). Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl/fieldtrips/selfguide for more information.

Outreach Programs November 26 – December 14, 2012 January 28 – April 5, 2013 Tuesday and Thursday

Year-round Monday through Friday

$120 per class (maximum 30 students) $100 for each additional class on the same day

9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Schools located more than 20 miles from the Chicago Botanic Garden will be charged a $50 mileage fee.

$30 per classroom (maximum 30 students); no additional parking fee required Self-guided field trips allow students to explore while you lead them through the Garden. Register in advance and Garden staff will be available to discuss areas suited for any curricular topic, and distance to gardens.

Enrich your curriculum and have the Chicago Botanic Garden come to you! Choose from a variety of programs that feature plant topics appropriate for specific grade levels. All programs support Illinois Science Standards. Each program includes a planting for each student and plants brought from the Garden to study. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl/outreach for more information.

Guided Field Trips Unless otherwise stated, programs cost $120 per class of 30 students. Available dates and times vary with the program. Guided programs are led by trained facilitators who will engage your students with hands-on activities to learn about plants and habitats found at the Garden. Field trips include outdoor exploration activities, so please dress for the weather. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl/fieldtrips for more detailed grade-specific program descriptions, applicable state standards, and to schedule your visit.

Guided Programs PreK $120 per class of up to 25 students Available 10 – 11 a.m. or 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. A 1:5 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Discovering Plants Early Fall, Late Fall, Winter, Spring Students will become junior botanists as they learn about the roles of plant parts. To experience plant parts in action, students will explore either the new Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden or the Greenhouses, then pot a plant to take home.

Field trips allow students to explore the Garden up close.


Age Group

Program

Early Fall 9/10-10/12/12

Late Fall 10/15-11/9/12

Holiday 11/26-12/14/12

Winter 1/28-4/5/13

Spring 4/23-6/7/13

PreK – K Discovering Plants PreK – 2 Trees and Trains K – 2 Garden Groceries Insect Investigations Sansho-En Spring Garden Explorers Surprising Seeds Woodland Habitat 3 – 5 Edible Botany Flower Lab Forest Fundamentals Plant Propagation Pondering the Prairie Spring Garden Explorers 6 – 8 Ecosystems and Plant Adaptations Green Buildings Water Quality 9 – 12 Green Buildings Photosynthesis Lab Water Quality

Guided Programs PreK – 2

Spring Garden Explorers

Plant Propagation

$120 per class of up to 25 PreK or 30 K – 2 students Available Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. – noon A 1:5 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Spring

Winter

Discovery stations around the Learning Campus make your visit an exciting outdoor experience involving plants and creatures living in the Garden and in our lakes. Design and plant a garden bed in the new Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden, explore shoreline ecosystems in the new Kleinman Family Cove, and pot a plant to take home.

Clone a new plant from part of another one! Compare and experiment with some different methods of propagating plants as you learn about various ways plants reproduce. Plant a stem cutting to take home and watch the roots grow.

Guided Programs 3 – 5

Spring

Trees and Trains Holiday Explore the enchanting Wonderland Express exhibition and learn more about evergreen tree families and their special adaptations to change in the seasons. Students will take home a special holiday craft.

Guided Programs K – 2 $120 per class of up to 30 students Available Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. – noon A 1:5 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Surprising Seeds Early Fall, Late Fall, Holiday, and Winter What is inside a seed? As junior botanists, students learn about seed parts and how they work together to produce a new plant. Students will pot a seed to take home and also look for seeds in the Garden.

$120 per class of up to 30 students Available Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. – noon A 1:7 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Flower Lab Early Fall, Late Fall, Holiday, and Winter

Discovery stations around the Learning Campus make your visit an exciting outdoor experience involving plants and creatures living in the Garden and in our lakes. Design and plant a garden bed in the new Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden, explore shoreline ecosystems in the new Kleinman Family Cove, and pot a plant to take home.

Why do plants make flowers? As junior botanists, students learn about flower parts and how flowers, with pollinators’ help, produce seeds. Students will pot a flower seed to take home and also look for flowers in the Garden.

Forest Fundamentals

Sansho-En

Early Fall and Late Fall

Winter

Students find evidence of food chains and food webs throughout the woodlands, and learn about common woodland trees. They record their observations in a field journal. Woodland programs take place outdoors in McDonald Woods. Available Monday through Friday, 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Your students will venture outside to tour Sansho-En, the Malott Japanese Garden, for an immersion experience in Japanese gardens. Students will return to the classroom to create a take-home meditation garden.

Spring Garden Explorers

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Teacher & Student Programs

School Field Trips at a Glance


Teacher & Student Programs Explore the Greenhouses and awaken the curiosity of an entire classroom.

Guided Programs 6 – 8 $120 per class of up to 30 students Unless otherwise stated, available Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. – noon A 1:10 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Ecosystem and Plant Adaptations Early Fall, Late Fall, Holiday, and Winter How do plants fit their place? Discover how plants have adapted to abiotic factors in an ecosystem. Student investigations include learning about the unique abiotic conditions that define many of the ecosystems of the world, including Illinois.

Green Buildings Spring, Tuesdays and Thursdays Visit the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center to learn about the remarkable conservation features of this building. Students will explore the Green Roof Garden and create their own roof design.

Guided Programs 9 – 12 $120 per class of up to 30 students Unless otherwise stated, available Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. – noon A 1:10 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Wonderland Express November 23 – January 6 $3 per person Visit an enchanting winter wonderland with twinkling lights and a magical indoor train. Model trains travel over bridges, under trestles, past waterfalls, and through more than 80 miniature versions of Chicago landmarks. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland for more information about Wonderland Express.

Guided Walking Tours Spring: April 23 through June 7 Tuesdays and Thursdays 30 minutes $80 classroom (maximum 30 students): A 1:7 ratio of chaperones to students is required. Explore the Garden with an expert. Tours allow students to explore one garden in more depth. Choose from one of the following: English Walled Garden, Greenhouse (select one), Malott Japanese Garden, or the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center (recommended for high-school students only).

School Tram Tours

Photosynthesis Lab

April 23 through October 27 $2.50 per person

Late Fall, Holiday, and Winter

Grades PreK, K – 2, or 3 – 6 30 minutes

Students will explore photosynthesis, investigating how and where it takes place, how plants obtain the materials necessary for it to occur, and its products. Students will use scientific equipment to measure gas exchange in plants.

Embark on a delightful journey around the Garden. Your tram tour guide will show you things you might not notice on your own and invite you to search for clues to nature’s secrets.

Green Buildings

Grades 7 – 12 35 minutes

Spring, Tuesdays and Thursdays

Climb aboard for a narrated tram tour around the 2.6-mile perimeter of the Garden. Your tour guide will present highlights and history of this living museum, and share information about our research projects and conservation efforts.

Visit the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center to learn about the remarkable conservation features of this building. Students will explore the Green Roof Garden and create their own roof design.

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Additional Field Trip Experiences

www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl

Model Railroad Garden May 12 through October 27 $3 per person Guide your students around our popular model railroad exhibition, where 7,500 square feet of miniature gardens and unique settings delight students and chaperones alike. Visit www. chicagobotanic.org/railroad for more information.

Butterflies & Blooms June – August, 2013 $3 per person Summer groups: visit our outdoor, screened butterfly exhibition, where students can encounter hundreds of live tropical butterflies from South America, Asia, North America, and Africa, as well as native species from Illinois. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/butterflies for more information about Butterflies & Blooms. Students can get their hands dirty on field trips.


Great Summer Science Experiences for Chicago Public School Students Science First

Science First is a free four-week summer program for CPS students currently in grades 7 through 9. While enjoying hands-on, nature-based science activities, indoor and outdoor investigations, and exposure to real scientists who work at the Garden, students improve their understanding of the scientific method and careers in science. Transportation and free lunch are provided. CPS teachers are encouraged to share registration materials with promising students. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/sciencefirst for more information. Applications for summer 2013 will be due in April.

College First

College First is an eight-week internship and field ecology course for CPS students entering their junior or senior year in fall. Students get paid and earn college credit while studying field ecology, conducting a research project, and working with scientists at the Garden. Students meet monthly during the school year to learn more about preparing for college. Transportation is provided. CPS teachers are encouraged to share registration materials with promising students. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/collegefirst for more information. Applications for summer 2013 will be due in April. Science First and College First are made possible by the generous support of Discover Financial Services, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, Leo S. Guthman Fund, Institute of Museum and Library Services, ITW, Bertha Lebus Charitable Trust, Harold M. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation, Sheridan Foundation, Trillium Foundation, and the W.P. & H.B. White Foundation. Student placements through the Corporate STEM Internship Program are provided by Baxter International Inc., Cardinal Health, and UL, partners in the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Corporate Roundtable on Sustainability.

Real World Science Investigations in the Classroom Project BudBurst

Join students and communities from across the country in collecting plant life-cycle data and entering it into our user-friendly database. Details, curriculum materials for grades K through 12, and data from past years are available at www.budburst.org. Project BudBurst is supported by an anonymous donor.

Organic Farming for Youth Green Youth Farm

Each year, 70 students ages 13 to 18 learn and practice organic gardening from mid-May through mid-October, while earning money for their efforts. Through the program, students also learn teamwork, gain valuable job skills, and discover a whole new way to look at food. Students from Waukegan High School, North Chicago Community High School, North Lawndale College Prep, Manley Career Academy, Farragut High School, and Dyett High School in Chicago are eligible to participate. Jr. Green Youth Farm serves middle-school students at Reavis Elementary School in collaboration with Elev8 and Quad Cities Development Corporation (QCDC). Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/greenyouthfarm for more information. Major support for Green Youth Farm is provided by an anonymous donor, After School Matters, The Bank of America Charitable Foundation, The Grainger Foundation, Leo S. Guthman Fund, JPMorgan Chase Foundation, McKenna Foundation, Midwest Foods, Sheridan Foundation, State Farm Youth Advisory Board, Steans Family Foundation, and the Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society. Additional support is provided by an anonymous donor, the J.R. Albert Foundation, Alvin H. Baum Family Fund, The Crown Family, Charter One Foundation, George and Amanda Hanley Foundation, ITW, Kaplan Foundation Fund/Carol and Ed Kaplan, Walter S. Mander Foundation, Northern Trust Charitable Trust, North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program, Service Club of Chicago, Spear Family Charitable Fund, Starbucks Foundation, United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Chicago Department of Family and Support Services. Also contributing to Green Youth Farm are the Albers/Kuhn Family Foundation, Laurance Armour Memorial Trust at The Chicago Community Trust, Baxter International Inc., Janice Becker, Benefit Magic, LLC in honor of Robert F. Finke, The Comcast Care Foundation, ComEd, Dr. Scholl Foundation, Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation, Erica C. Meyer Charitable Fund of the Merrill Lynch Community Charitable Fund of The Chicago Community Foundation, Mrs. Meyer’s Clean Day, Harold M. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation, North Shore Garden Club, NorthShore University HealthSystem, NeighborSpace, Kathy Richland Pick, Rotary Club of Deerfield, UnitedHealthcare of Illinois, and Madeleine P. Plonsker.

Cultivating Health and Well-being Horticultural Therapy

Since 1977, the Garden’s Horticultural Therapy Services Program has supported the establishment of horticultural therapy programs at healthcare and human service agencies serving schools, VA hospitals, people with disabilities, and older adults in the Chicago region. The program serves as a primary regional, national, and international resource for information while offering a full range of professional training opportunities. Also available are consulting services in barrier-free greenhouse and enabling garden design, sensory landscaping, and horticultural therapy program planning. Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/therapy for more information. Horticultural Therapy is supported by an endowment from the Buehler Family Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Albers/Kuhn Family Foundation, Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs, Edmond and Alice Opler Foundation, and Abra Prentice Foundation, Inc., as well as endowments established by the estate of Florence Rantz, the Kenilworth Garden Club, the Julien H. Collins and Bertha M. Collins Fund, and the Helen and Maurice Weigle Fund at The Chicago Community Trust.

Windy City Harvest Offers Positive Change, Future Careers Windy City Harvest

Windy City Harvest trains adults in sustainable horticulture and urban agriculture. Both are dimensions of the urban greening and healthy, affordable, local food movements to which the Chicago Botanic Garden has an institutional commitment. Certificate Training This nine-month college credit certificate in organic vegetable production enrolls 15 to 20 students annually. Delivered by Garden staff at the Arturo Velasquez Institute, a Daley College campus, Windy City Harvest trains students in best practices for year-round gardening and sales of fresh vegetables. Graduates are now working in a range of full-time and seasonal jobs in the local horticulture and urban agriculture industry. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ windycityharvest for more information. VRIC Windy City Harvest works with the Cook County Sheriff’s Vocational Rehabilitation Impact Center (VRIC), training about 70 inmates in organic vegetable production. Participants gain skills and potentially job opportunities after their release. Vegetables they grow are served in the camp’s mess hall and donated to local food pantries. Program graduates are now employed at a local compost operation and at the Chicago Botanic Garden as landscape crew. Native Seed Garden Windy City Harvest is growing prairie plants in the city to see if urban farming of native species can be of service to the environment and the gardeners alike. With the loss of natural habitat, seed production may be vital to preserving these increasingly rare plants. WCH participants learn about native plant gardening as career option. The first site in Chicago’s Bridgeport neighborhood resulted from a collaboration among Commissioner John P. Daley, Alderman James A. Balcer, the Chicago Botanic Garden, Cook County Sheriff’s Vocational Rehabilitation Impact Center, and Archeworks. This project is supported by the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA. Additional major support is provided by anonymous donors, the City of Chicago Department of Family and Support Services, Cook County Environmental Control Department, Kraft Foods, Inc., Institute of Museum and Library Services, Polk Bros. Foundation, North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program, and the Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society. Other support is provided by an anonymous donor, Alvin H. Baum Family Fund, The Crown Family, George and Amanda Hanley Foundation, Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Midwest Foods, Service Club of Chicago, and Steans Family Foundation. Also contributing to Windy City Harvest are Baxter International Inc., Janice Becker, ComEd, Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation, Andrea Hoke, ITW, Erica C. Meyer Charitable Fund of the Merrill Lynch Community Charitable Fund of The Chicago Community Foundation, NeighborSpace, NorthShore University HealthSystem, and Dr. Scholl Foundation. The following foundations and corporations support all education and community programs: The Helen V. Froehlich Foundation, The Brinson Foundation, HSBC – North America, Kemper Educational and Charitable Fund, and Sterling Partners.

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Teacher & Student Programs

Community Outreach


Antiques This Season & Garden in the Garden Fair

This season in the Garden Kris Jarantoski, executive vice president and director Winter doesn’t have to be that dull time in the garden where we turn our thoughts indoors. The winter garden can be gorgeous if evergreens, trees and shrubs with colorful bark, and plants with colorful, long-lasting fruit are included. The Chicago Botanic Garden has examples of plants with winter interest throughout its display gardens to show how to make a garden look great in winter. For large evergreens we often choose Norway spruce, which can handle the Garden’s alkaline, clay soils. Scots pine is our most successful pine here. Arborvitae—both eastern (Thuja occidentalis) and the deer-resistant western (Thuja plicata)—also thrive at the Garden, as do junipers and yews. One place known for its evergreens is the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Japanese Garden, which many visitors list as their favorite place in the winter. The large number of pines that have been thinned and shaped to look old create a stunning picture after a snowfall. Designed by the late Koichi Kawana and also known as Sansho-En, or Garden of Three Islands, the Malott Japanese Garden was one of our first display gardens. Although there was a conceptual drawing of the project, Koichi supervised the placement of each element of SanshoEn to ensure the boulders were composed properly and anchored in the ground, the pines were facing or tilted the proper way, and the walks were curving just right to reveal the best views. Koichi was a good friend of staff at the Garden, and the principles by which he lived his life—with simplicity, naturalness, refined elegance, and subtlety—are rare in our modern world. These principles, evident in Japanese gardens generally and integral to the Malott Japanese Garden, are what attract so many visitors to this serene and restful place. Since 2005 Benjamin Carroll, now senior horticulturist in charge of the Malott Japanese Garden (among other gardens), has skillfully supervised its care and evolution. He is also active in the North American Japanese Garden Association (NAJGA), serving on its board and representing the Central Region. Benjamin’s involvement with NAJGA has helped to raise awareness of the Malott Japanese Garden, leading to its place among the top five Japanese gardens in North America. American holly is probably my favorite plant in the world. I have successfully grown American hollies (Ilex opaca) in a southwest corner of a three-sided courtyard in Wisconsin. They are 10 feet tall, fruit profusely, and must be cut back yearly to keep them in bounds. American hollies aren’t easy to find in nurseries or garden centers, and I purchased mine through mail order. Cold-hardy varieties like ‘Jersey Knight’ (male) and ‘Jersey Princess’ (female), along with the female Pride hollies such as ‘Arlene Leach’, ‘Carnival’, ‘Mary Holman’, ‘Pride of Butler’, and ‘Red Flush’, and the males, ‘Arthur Pride’ and ‘David Leach’, are fine if protected from winter winds. Both holly sexes are needed to produce fruit. Holly brings to mind holidays, and to get ready for them this year, our plant production staff have grown 11 varieties of more than 1,700 poinsettias and 110 other plants for this season’s Wonderland Express exhibition. This winter, after a snowfall, make your way to the Malott Japanese Garden and our other display gardens to experience the pristine beauty of this season at the Garden.

A blanket of snow enhances the ethereal beauty of the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Japanese Garden—a favorite destination of Garden visitors in the winter. 80 www.chicagobotanic.org


www.chicagobotanic.org

For more information, please visit Keep Growing online. www.keepgrowing.com

The Chicago Botanic Garden is one of the treasures of the Forest Preserve District of Cook County.

Wonderland Express Members-only Night Wednesday, December 12 Enjoy hot chocolate and cookies, holiday songs presented by carolers, and activities for children at Wonderland Express from 5 to 7:30 p.m. This exclusive members-only event is a wonderful way to get into the holiday spirit! You may buy timed tickets online or in person at the Visitor Center. Purchase your tickets early, as the quantity is limited.

www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland


Keep Growing Winter 2012/2013