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Keep Growing WINTER 2011 – 2012

Member Magazine and Program Guide


Antiques & Garden Fair


Susan A. Willetts, Chairman Robert F. Finke, Vice Chairman Thomas E. Lanctot, Vice Chairman Benjamin F. Lenhardt, Jr., Vice Chairman William E. Moeller, Vice Chairman John L. Howard, Vice Chairman Sophia Siskel, President & CEO DIRECTORS Thomas F. Aichele Andrew Armishaw Sharon Brady Neville F. Bryan John H. Buehler Michael J. Busch Susan Keller Canmann Timothy C. Coleman Peter R. Crane John F. Cregan John V. Crowe Christopher A. Deveny James W. DeYoung Suzanne S. Dixon Timothy A. Dugan Peter M. Ellis Anthony L. Farino Peter B. Foreman John D. Fornengo Thomas C. Freyman Dorothy H. Gardner Nancy Gidwitz Sue L. Gin James J. Glasser Ellis M. Goodman John K. Greene Joseph A. Gregoire William J. Hagenah Caryn L. Harris Edward Hines Thomas B. Hunter III Jane Irwin Joan M. Johnson Gregory K. Jones Robert H. Jordan, Jr. Catherine C. Kirby, ex officio Posy L. Krehbiel Donna La Pietra Eric C. Larson M. James Leider Laura M. Linger Alec Litowitz Josephine P. Louis Barbara A. Lumpkin Mary Ann S. MacLean Jeanne K. Mason Gloria Masterson, ex officio Michelle McKenna Jeanine McNally Edward Minor Jane S. O’Neil Riley O’Neil, ex officio Homi B. Patel George A. Peinado Janet Meakin Poor Anne Pramaggiore Toni Preckwinkle, ex officio Arnold Randall, ex officio Susan L. Regenstein Harrison I. Steans Susan Stone Pam F. Szokol Richard L. Thomas Howard J. Trienens Catherine M. Waddell Nicole S. Williams Arthur M. Wood, Jr. LIFE DIRECTORS Marilynn B. Alsdorf William T. Bacon, Jr. J. Melfort Campbell Barbara Whitney Carr Kent Chandler, Jr. Gary P. Coughlan Thomas A. Donahoe Ralph F. Fujimoto Florence S. Hart Pamela K. Hull Bill Kurtis Robert H. Malott Mary L. McCormack Mary Mix McDonald Peter H. Merlin William A. Osborn John E. Preschlack Anne O. Scott Dain Searle David Byron Smith William P. Sutter Ernest P. Waud III

The mission of the Chicago Botanic Garden is to promote the enjoyment, understanding, and conservation of plants and the natural world.

Dear Members, Winter! Before I began working at the Chicago Botanic Garden almost six years ago, the very word evoked in me a sense of dread. Now, thanks to the Garden, I face Chicago’s most infamous season with a pleasant sense of anticipation. I look forward to taking long, quiet walks through fresh-fallen snow, and to studying the gradual changes in light as the days decrease in length and then reverse course, leading us into a new year. At the Chicago Botanic Garden, winter brings Wonderland Express, a magical experience that is now a cherished tradition. Outdoors, discover a magnificent landscape twinkling with nearly a million lights and a three-story holiday tree. Indoors, enter a world where miniature trains glide past handcrafted Chicago landmarks, and where tropical and desert plants, enjoying the protection of heated greenhouses, fragrantly bloom despite the temperature outside. I hope you will save December 14 for an exclusive members-only evening at Wonderland Express. Reserve your tickets now and enjoy friends old and new, as well as steaming cups of hot chocolate, holiday treats, and the festive sounds of strolling carolers. If we open our minds to it, winter gives us an exceptional season in which to enjoy the Garden. While plants might be slumbering, I find a winter walk always energizes my body and my spirit. A walk also is a perfect opportunity to discover the shapes, structures, and fruits of those plants that add muchappreciated color and texture to the well-designed winter landscape. As our gift, the Garden is available to all free of charge on Christmas Day, when the grounds (but not the Garden Café or Shop) will be open from 8 a.m. to sunset. No matter your faith, let a walk in nature inspire you. While 2012—the year of the Garden’s 40th anniversary—is still weeks away, it is never too early for families with children to plan for Camp CBG. Popular spring break and summer Camp CBG sessions fill quickly, so I encourage you to register as soon as possible. Many of next year’s camps will take advantage of the new Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden, which is almost complete and will be planted in the spring and dedicated next June. In addition to offering a complete schedule of camps, this issue of Keep Growing explores ways in which the Garden’s reach and impact are expanding nationally and internationally. There is an article on our Conservation Land Management internship program, which hires college graduates from across the country for paid internships providing training and work experience in the western United States. In another article, you will read about a plant-collecting expedition led by Galen Gates, the Garden’s curator of herbaceous plants, to the Republic of Georgia in Eastern Europe. Winter is an exceptional season at the Chicago Botanic Garden. I hope you will visit soon and return often. I believe the awe-inspiring beauty of the Garden (especially when it is covered with snow!) will add pleasure and meaning to your season of celebration. Happy holidays!

Sophia Siskel President & CEO


Keep Growing WINTER 2012

Features

6 Wonderland Express

President’s Letter

2

Wonderland Express

6

Three Friends of Winter

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Winter Events

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Calendar

12

Looking Ahead

15

Garden News

16

Awards and Honors

18

Plant Conservation Science

20

Leaders in Training

25

Plant Tips

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This Season in the Garden 80

Programs Adult Education

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Classes through early spring

64 Registration begins for Camp CBG

Youth and Family Programs

60

Includes 2012 Camp CBG

Teacher and Student Programs 72

For more information, please visit Keep Growing online. www.keepgrowing.com

ON THE COVER

10 Three Friends of Winter

From November 25 to January 1, Wonderland Express adds joy to the holiday season.


20 Conservation Land Management Intern Program

22 Republic of Georgia Plant Collection Expedition

follow us: eNewsletter

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A Holiday Tradition Returns

Wonderland Express

November 25, 2011, through January 1, 2012, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Chicagoland’s most magical holiday experience is back. Inside the Regenstein Center, ten miniature trains glide along tracks that pass through a city of small shoulders, including more than 80 mini-replicas of beloved Chicago landmarks all handcrafted with plant materials. Twinkling from trees, bridges, greenhouses, and courtyards, more than 750,000 energy-efficient LED lights illuminate every corner of the Garden. Indoors, a celebration of artistry, architecture, horticulture, scrupulous detail, and bold imagination awaits. Wonderland Express was created by designer Paul Busse exclusively for the Chicago Botanic Garden. New—no fees when purchasing tickets online! Purchase tickets at www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland or at the Visitor Center.

68 www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland

Nonmember prices are $10 for adults, $8 for children ages 3 to 12 and seniors over age 62. Members receive a $2 per ticket discount. Children 2 and under are free. Thanks to the support of Grainger, timed tickets are free on Tuesdays (maximum of six free tickets per customer). Wonderland Express visitors will enjoy a special two-for-one entry when the primary ticket is purchased at the Garden using a Discover Card. The complimentary ticket will be of equal or lesser value. Maximum two free tickets per purchase; offer not available online.


Wonderland Express

Antiques & Garden Fair Enjoy a flurry of fun-filled family drop-in activities. See the calendar for more information.

Special meals make special memories

Exclusive Wonderland Express events

Breakfast or Supper with Santa Share your holiday wishes with Kris Kringle himself! Buffet breakfasts are in Burnstein Hall, Saturday and Sunday, December 17 and 18; seatings are at 8:30 and 9:30 a.m. Buffet suppers are on Sunday and Monday, December 18 and 19, at 6:30 p.m.

Members-only Night Don’t miss an exclusive visit to Wonderland Express, with cookies, hot chocolate, and carolers, on Wednesday, December 14, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for children ages 3 to 12 and seniors over age 62. Children 2 and under are free. Purchase timed tickets online at www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland or in person at the Visitor Center. Purchase your timed tickets early, as the quantity is limited.

Hot Chocolate with Mrs. Claus The lady of the house is eager to welcome visitors, too! Enjoy cookies, cocoa, and a special holiday story in Burnstein Hall on Monday, December 19, at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Hanukkah Dinner and Concert Celebrate the holiday of lights with a festive buffet meal in Burnstein Hall followed by a concert by the Maxwell Street Klezmer Band in Alsdorf Auditorium, Wednesday, December 21. Dinner at 5:30 p.m. is followed by a 7 p.m. concert. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www. chicagobotanic.org/wonderland. Tickets are also available at the Visitor Center. All meal-event tickets include parking and admission to the Wonderland Express exhibition.

All Aboard! Wonderland Express Dinner The Woman’s Board of the Chicago Horticultural Society presents its sixth annual dinner on Thursday, December 1. Cocktails begin at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 7:30 p.m. Tickets and table packages are now available. For tickets and information call (847) 835-6944. Proceeds from the event go toward Green Youth Farm and Windy City Harvest Garden programs.

Wonderland Express Hours Friday, November 25 – Monday, January 1, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Closes at 3 p.m. on December 1 and 24; closed December 25. Tuesdays are free throughout the exhibition.

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Three Friends of Winter


Three Friends of Winter

Antiques & Garden Fair

In Japan, pine, plum, and bamboo trees endure challenging winter weather. These “three friends” symbolize the ability to thrive under the most difficult conditions, and represent longevity, perseverance, and integrity. Simplicity and Grace: Bonsai Silhouette Show Friday, January 27, through Sunday, January 29, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Without foliage, bonsai are especially exquisite, revealing the structure of elegant branches. In Burnstein Hall, see deciduous bonsai trees from the Chicago Botanic Garden’s renowned collection and specimens from distinguished collectors in the Chicago area. Each bonsai is displayed with an accent plant atop benches made from fallen Garden trees. The three friends of winter are incorporated into a small Japanese garden within the exhibit. Families create art inspired by the three friends of winter, using black ink in the sumi-e tradition to create scrolls featuring bonsai silhouette shapes and pine, plum, and bamboo trees. Activities take place in Nichols Hall, Saturday and Sunday, January 28 and 29, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy lectures by Chicago Botanic Garden course instructors Tim Priest and Ivan Watters. Saturday, January 28, Priest explores his passion for suiseki (the art of stone appreciation). Sunday, January 29, Watters the curator of the Garden’s bonsai collection, shares his practical insights on working with bonsai. Both lectures take place in the Alsdorf Auditorium at 2 p.m.

Bonsai Silhouette Show Preview Party Thursday, January 26, 5 to 7 p.m. This magical evening, exclusively for President’s Circle members, includes an informal tour of the Bonsai Silhouette Show, hors d’oeuvres, Japanese music, and a presentation by Kris Jarantoski, executive vice president and director of the Chicago Botanic Garden. Tickets for the event are $50 per person. For information on joining the President’s Circle or registering for this exclusive event, please call the President’s Circle hotline at (847) 835-6925.

Further Your Learning: Register for Bonsai and Suiseki Courses Throughout the year, the Joseph Regenstein, Jr. School of the Botanic Garden offers adult education classes that will enhance your understanding and appreciation of Japanese art and culture. Upcoming courses: Suiseki Diaza Carving Workshop Sunday, November 20 12:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Bonsai: Beginner – Basics and Fundamentals Sundays, April 15 – May 20 1 – 4 p.m.

Bonsai: Novice – Development Techniques Wednesdays, April 11 – May 16 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Bonsai: Intermediate – Refinement Techniques Saturdays, April 14 – May 19 9 a.m. – noon

Bonsai: Advanced – Presentation-Quality Efforts Sundays, April 15 – May 20 9 a.m. – noon

See page 34 for complete class descriptions on these courses and visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register and for instructor information.

Three Friends of Winter is generously supported by the Astellas USA Foundation. 11 www.chicagobotanic.org/antiques

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Camp CBG Registration President’s Circle early registration is Monday, November 7, through Friday, December 2. General registration begins Monday, December 5, at 9 a.m. Each summer, Camp CBG children enjoy a wide variety of activities supported by the expertise and facilities at the Chicago Botanic Garden, which next year will include the new Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden. Programs are offered for children ages 2 to 15 with options that include weeklong camps and new two-week sessions, along with morning-only, afternoon-only, and full-day choices. For more information on camps being offered from June 18 through August 17, 2012, visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ camp. See page 64 for more information including descriptions of four new camp themes. New! Green Youth Farm Facilitator Training Saturday, January 28, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Learn how to start a youth development program focused on sustainable farming and food production in an urban agriculture or school garden setting. Join staff of the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Green Youth Farm for a day of discovery. A $50 per-person fee includes all programming, lunch, and parking. The program takes place in the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center and participation is limited to 25 people. For more information or to register, contact Eliza Fournier at efournier@chicagobotanic.org.

Tu B’Shevat Sunday, January 29, 1 to 4 p.m. The Jewish Festival of Trees is the chance to enjoy the winter season and celebrate nature. Offered in partnership with the National Council of Jewish Women, Chicago North Shore Section, families may explore trees indoors and out, participate in art activities in the Fairchild Room, and take home a young parsley plant that will be full-grown in time to take its place at the Passover seder.

New! Demystifying Heirloom Gardening: Lecture Seed Swap, and More Sunday, February 26, 2 to 5 p.m. Lecture and book signing, 2 to 3 p.m.; seed swap and demonstrations, 3 to 5 p.m. In this free winter program Diane Ott Whealy, expert gardener and co-founder of Seed Savers Exchange, shares her experience designing and planting heirloom flowers, vegetables, and herbs. Copies of her new book, Gathering, Memoir of a Seed Saver, will be available for purchase and signing. Gardeners are invited to bring saved or leftover seed packets to share and swap with other gardeners. Chicago Botanic Garden volunteers and staff will display varieties recommended for Chicago gardens and demonstrate how to save and start seeds.

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www.chicagobotanic.org/calendar 11

Winter Events

Antiques & Garden Fair

Wintertime beauty inspires spring planning


Calendar

Calendar NOVEMBER Ongoing Library Exhibition: Genus Rosa continuing through Nov. 13; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays; noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays. Thursday, November 3

Teacher Programs: Cycles of Life: A Workshop for Preschool Teachers off-site at the Erikson Institute, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Workshop continues at the Garden on Saturday, November 12. See page 73 for more information. Weekend Family Classes: Bathtub Botany 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Sunday, November 6 Winter Farmers’ Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Garden View Room.

Fine Art of Fiber Opening Night 6:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, November 7 Friday – Sunday, November 4 – 6 Fine Art of Fiber 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, November 5 Members-only Double Discount Day Garden Shop; members receive 20 percent off regular-priced merchandise. Monthly Photo Walk 9 a.m.; meets in the Alsdorf Auditorium.

Camp CBG Priority Registration for President’s Circle Members through Dec. 2; see page 64 for more camp information.

Saturday, November 19 Windy City Harvest Short Courses in Gardening: Fruit Tree Pruning off-site; 9 a.m. to noon; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 58 for more information. Weekend Family Classes: Play with Plants 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Sunday, November 20 Winter Farmers’ Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Garden View Room. Regenstein School: Suiseki Diaza Carving Workshop 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 34 for more information. Free Library Talk: “Highgrove Florilegium” 2 p.m.

Saturday, November 12 Regenstein School: Hardy Dwarf Plants 1 to 4 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 42 for more information. Friday, November 18 Library Exhibition: Highgrove Florilegium continuing through Feb. 12; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays; noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays.

Wonderland Express Friday, November 25, 2011 – Monday, January 1, 2012 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; fee applies; closes at 3 p.m. on Dec. 1 and Dec. 24; closed Dec. 25; Tuesdays are free throughout the exhibition.

Monday, November 21 Regenstein School: Bulbs for Winter Indoor Color 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 37 for more information. Tuesday, November 22 The Guild and President’s Circle Wonderland Express Preview Celebration 4:30 to 7 p.m.; fee applies; call (847) 835-6925 to register or for more information on the President’s Circle.

Members-only Night Wednesday, Dec. 14, 5 to 7:30 p.m.; ticket required. Family Drop-In Activities: Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday through Sunday of Thanksgiving weekend; Saturdays and Sundays through Dec. 18; daily Dec. 19 through Jan. 1. Hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Nov. 29, Dec. 6, 10, and 13. All Aboard! Wonderland Express Dinner Thursday, Dec. 1, 6:30 to 10 p.m.; call (847) 835-6944 to purchase tickets. Christmas Breakfast with Santa Dec. 17 and 18, seatings at 8:30 and 9:30 a.m.; ticket required; fee applies. Christmas Supper with Santa Dec. 18 and 19, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; ticket required; fee applies. Hot Chocolate with Mrs. Claus Monday, Dec. 19, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.; ticket required; fee applies. Hanukkah Dinner and Concert Wednesday, Dec. 21, 5:30 p.m. dinner; 7 p.m. concert; ticket required; fee applies. These special events generously supported by NorthShore University HealthSystem. Please note: Due to the Garden’s shoreline restoration project, there will be no snowshoeing this winter. Look for it in late 2012! Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland for more information and to purchase Wonderland Express tickets online—now without a fee.


Calendar

DECEMBER Ongoing Library Exhibition: Highgrove Florilegium continuing through Feb. 12; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays; noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays. Saturday, December 3

Thursday, December 15 Regenstein School: Holiday Dish Gardens 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 37 for more information. Saturday, December 17 Weekend Family Classes: Joyful Gingerbread 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Teacher Programs: Island Life: Evolution of Island Plants and Animals 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Workshop continues at the Brookfield Zoo on Saturday, December 10. See page 73 for more information.

Sunday, December 18

Monthly Photo Walk 9 a.m.; meets in the Alsdorf Auditorium.

Winter Break Camp 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., continuing through Dec. 22; preregistration required; fee applies.

Weekend Family Classes: Joyful Gingerbread 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Regenstein School: Get Started with Orchids 1 to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 35 for more information.

Winter Farmers’ Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Garden View Room. Monday, December 19

Sunday, December 25 Garden Grounds open 8 a.m. to sunset. Wonderland Express, Garden Café, and Garden Shop are closed.

Sunday, December 4 Winter Farmers’ Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Garden View Room. Monday, December 5 Camp CBG registration begins; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 64 for more information. Saturday, December 10 Scout Seasonal Workshop: Winter Wonders 12:45 to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Tuesday, December 13 Regenstein School: Merry, Berry Wreath 9 a.m. to noon or 6 to 9 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 51 for more information.

Give to the Garden Year-end giving is tax deductible to the full extent of the law and directly supports the Garden’s mission to promote the understanding, enjoyment, and conservation of plants and the natural world. For information on making a cash gift, a gift of appreciated securities, a gift from your IRA, or other details, call (847) 835-8215. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/donate to make a year-end gift online.

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Calendar

JANUARY

Thursday, January 26

Saturday, February 11

Library Exhibition: Highgrove Florilegium continuing through Feb. 12; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays; noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays.

The President’s Circle Three Friends of Winter Bonsai Silhouette Show Preview Party 5 to 7 p.m.; fee applies; call (847) 835-6925 to register or for more information on the President’s Circle.

Scout Seasonal Workshop: Valentine’s Day 12:45 to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Saturday, January 7

Friday – Sunday, January 27 – 29

Monthly Photo Walk 9 a.m.; Meets in the Alsdorf Auditorium.

Three Friends of Winter: Bonsai Silhouette Show 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Weekend Family Classes: Pizza Gardens 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

Saturday, January 28

Ongoing

Monday, January 9 Story Time in the Lenhardt Library 10 to 11 a.m., Mondays continuing through May 21 (no Story Time April 23). Thursday, January 12 Little Diggers begins; select Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturday, January 14 Exhibition: Treewhispers continuing through April 8; Joutras Gallery. For exhibition programing and classes please see www.chicagobotanic.org/ exhibitions. Regenstein School: Photography for Beginners 9 a.m. to noon, Saturdays continuing through Feb. 4; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 52 for more information. Wednesday, January 18 Regenstein School: Botany: Special Topics 6:30 to 9 p.m.; Wednesdays through Feb. 22; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 42 for more information. Saturday, January 21 Teacher Programs: Natural History & Cultural Connections 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Workshop continues Saturday, January 28, at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum. See page 73 for more information. Weekend Family Classes: Gumballs & Superballs 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies.

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Green Youth Farm Facilitator Training 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Plant Science Center; preregistration required; fee applies; e-mail Eliza Fournier at efournier@chicagobotanic.org to register or for more information. Windy City Harvest Short Courses in Gardening: Crop Planning off-site, 9 a.m. to noon; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 58 for more information. Weekend Family Classes: Gumballs & Superballs 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Sunday, January 29 Tu B’Shevat Family Drop-In Activities 1 to 4 p.m.

FEBRUARY Ongoing Library Exhibition: Highgrove Florilegium continuing through Feb. 12; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays; noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays. Story Time in the Lenhardt Library 10 to 11 a.m., Mondays continuing through May 21 (no Story Time April 23). Exhibition: Treewhispers continuing through April 8; Joutras Gallery. Saturday, February 4 Weekend Family Classes: HOT Chocolate 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Regenstein School: Starting From Seed 9:30 a.m. to noon; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 35 for more information.

Regenstein School: From the Nursery Yard to Your Yard 1 to 4 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 42 for more information. Friday, February 17 Library Exhibition: Renaissance Artists: Illustrations of Science and Art continuing through May 13; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays; noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays. Saturday, February 18 Teacher Programs: Art and Science with Found Objects: A Workshop for Preschool Teachers 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Workshop continues Saturday, February 25, at the Kohl Children’s Museum; see page 73 for more information. Regenstein School: Beginning Beekeeping Workshop 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 38 for more information. Windy City Harvest Short Courses in Gardening: Seed Starting off-site, 9 a.m. to noon; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 58 for more information. Weekend Family Classes: HOT Chocolate 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Saturday, February 25 Weekend Family Classes: Deserts & Dinosaurs 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Regenstein School: Urban Composting 1 to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 38 for more information. Sunday, February 26 Demystifying Heirloom Gardening: Lecture and Seed Swap 2 to 3 p.m., lecture and book signing; 3 to 5 p.m., seed swap and free demonstrations.


MARCH Ongoing

Looking ahead

Library Exhibition: Renaissance Artists: Illustrations of Science and Art continuing through May 13; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays; noon to 4 p.m. weekends; closed holidays. Story Time in the Lenhardt Library 10 to 11 a.m., Mondays continuing through May 21 (no Story Time April 23). Saturday, March 3 Weekend Family Classes: Japanese Dry Gardens 9:30 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2:30 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies. Regenstein School: Growing a Cook’s Garden 1 to 3 p.m.; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 38 for more information. Sunday & Monday, March 4 & 5 Volunteer Opportunity Fair 1 to 3 p.m., Burnstein Hall. Monday, March 5 Regenstein School: Free Certificate Programs Information Session 7 to 8 p.m.; see page 42 for more information. Saturday, March 10 Regenstein School: Healthy Gardens 9 a.m. to noon; preregistration required; fee applies; see page 44 for more information. Saturday – Sunday, March 10 – 18 Chicago Flower & Garden Show Navy Pier; Garden members enjoy discounted entry with membership card at Navy Pier box office; not available online.

American Flower Show Series Select weekends, January 28 through October 21

Discover the unique beauty of each featured plant, explore the best varieties to try at home, and ask questions of the Midwest’s foremost plant experts. The 2012 series includes shows, sales, lectures, workshops, and demonstrations, and celebrates the return of the Ikenobo/Ikebana Society Chicago Chapter, the Orchid Society’s 60th Anniversary, and the Mid-America Bonsai Show and Sale’s 40th Anniversary. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/plantshows for a complete schedule and details.

The American Flower Show Series is supported in part by the Mead Flower Show Endowment.

Malott Japanese Garden Spring Weekend Saturday and Sunday, March 24 and 25

Welcome spring with an exploration of Japanese art and culture. Try your hand at suminagashi, the Japanese art of marbleizing paper and craft a hanging scroll. Enjoy storytelling and koto harp performances. Activities take place in the Fairchild Room and Alsdorf Auditorium. A special program Saturday afternoon explores the resilience of the Japanese people and how we can all learn from their example during and after the 2011 natural disasters.

Antiques & Garden Fair Preview Evening Thursday, April 19, 2012 Fair Friday, April 20, to Sunday, April 22

Celebrating its 12th year, the Fair offers the finest classical and contemporary garden furnishings, botanical art, and home and garden design from premier exhibitors from the United States and Europe. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.chicagobotanic.org/antiques or the Visitor Center. Special thanks to 2012 Antiques & Garden Fair Co-producers Donna LaPietra, Jane O’Neil, and Susan Canmann, and Preview Party Co-chairs Cathy Busch, Jen Kasten, and Peggy Swartchild.

www.chicagobotanic.org/calendar 15


Garden News

Meeting the future—at home and around the world Shoreline restoration, Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden underway Two important projects are under way at the Chicago Botanic Garden. The first, a project to rejuvenate the eroding shorelines of the Garden’s North Lake, requires the lake to be drained through the project’s completion in 2012. As a result of construction activity, snowshoeing is on hiatus this year. Look for it to resume late in 2012. Construction of the 10,000-square-foot Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden is nearing completion, setting the stage for landscaping next spring. An early component of a larger initiative to plan, fund, and build a new Learning Campus, the Children’s Growing Garden will officially be dedicated on June 2, 2012, during the Garden’s annual celebration of World Environment Day. The shoreline project is made possible by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Ecosystem Restoration Program, the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and John and Mary Helen Slater. The Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden is made possible through the generosity of Esther Grunsfeld Klatz and Ernest A. Grunsfeld III and the support of the Guild of the Chicago Botanic Garden, the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, Lorraine Ipsen-Stotler, Make It Better magazine, the Colonel Stanley R. McNeil Foundation, and other donors.

Preparing students for science careers In July, Greg Mueller, Ph.D., the Garden’s vice president of science and academic programs, presented a paper on the Science Career Continuum (SCC) at the Global Partnership for Plant Conservation meeting. The SCC is a Garden program offering Chicago Public School students a sequence of science education and internship opportunities 16 www.chicagobotanic.org

The Science First summer enrichment program begins the Science Career Continuum.

that begin in middle school and can extend through graduate school. In addition to increasing these students’ knowledge of plant biology in a time of climate change, the program helps them prepare for future careers as plant scientists. The Missouri Botanical Garden and Botanic Garden Conservation International (BGCI) jointly sponsored the conservation meeting at which Dr. Mueller spoke. BGCI, which the Garden joined in 1995, unites the resources and research capabilities of 700 botanic gardens in 118 countries behind the goal of protecting plant diversity. The Chicago Botanic Garden has hosted the BGCI American office since 2008.

New relationship with the Jerusalem Botanical Garden The Chicago Botanic Garden and the Jerusalem Botanical Garden at Hebrew University’s Givat Ram Campus have announced a new reciprocal relationship. In addition to granting members of each garden special admission privileges, scientists at both institutions are finalizing plans to collaborate on plant research. The first project will look at the population genetics of a rare and endangered iris species that lives in the wild only in Israel.

Scientists join Garden Two highly respected scientists, Norm Wickett, Ph.D., and Eric Lonsdorf, Ph.D., joined the Garden in September. Dr. Wickett uses genomics and other tools to address questions about plant evolution and ecology. His work on the dramatic increases in genetic diversity millions of years ago was published in the May 5, 2011, issue of Nature, a prestigious international science journal. Dr. Lonsdorf, a conservation biologist who directed urban wildlife projects at the Lincoln Park Zoo, is continuing his work on ecological modeling.


Awards and Honors

Volunteers honored Each June, the Chicago Botanic Garden shows its appreciation for the more than 2,100 volunteers whose diverse talents, hard work, and devotion help the Garden maintain its status as one of the great public gardens of the world. All volunteers are commended for the essential support they collectively provide, which in 2010 was a record-setting 106,000 hours of service. Those who have volunteered for five, ten, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 years are specially acknowledged. During the June 13, 2011, volunteer reception, five volunteers were recognized for exceptional service:

Volunteer of the Year Peter Dogiakos was named Volunteer of the Year. Dogiakos began volunteering more than 14 years ago after suffering a stroke. Since then, he has contributed 4,400 hours of service to the Buehler Enabling Garden. Consistent with his motto “Whatever you need from me, I’ll be there,” his many contributions have included tending plants, educating visitors, mentoring new volunteers, filling birdfeeders, and assisting with events. Dogiakos believes volunteering aided his recovery, and he plans to continue volunteering for as long as his health permits.

Super Senior Award Jane Oliphant and Nancy Giardina, co-chairs of the Roadside Flower Sale since 2006, jointly accepted the Garden’s Super Senior award. Together they have contributed 3,000 hours of service to the annual sale of dried floral arrangements that each year provides vital financial support to a variety of Garden programs. 18 www.chicagobotanic.org/volunteer

Excellence in Leadership Award Damian Neuberger received the Barbara Whitney Carr Excellence in Leadership Award. In 2004, Damian began volunteering in the Living Plant Documentation Department as the slide-scanning volunteer. Since then, he has provided 1,300 hours of service. He also volunteers in the Garden’s Lenhardt Library on a project to digitize 3,000 rare books and periodicals.

Longest-Serving Volunteer Tricia Hagenah is the first volunteer in Garden history to have served for 40 years. To honor her record-setting commitment, Kris Jarantoski, the Garden’s executive vice president and director, presented her with a framed photograph of the June 4 dedication of the new Trellis Bridge, which she and her husband Will Hagenah, former board chairman, helped to make possible.


Antiques & Garden Fair In June, 51 Conservation Land Management (CLM) interns from around the country attended a weeklong training session at the Chicago Botanic Garden. The annual workshop gives recently hired interns the opportunity to refresh or expand their education, to further their training, and to connect with the instructors and fellow interns who could become their professional colleagues. The Garden, in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), launched the CLM internship program in 2001. Since then, the National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and other federal agencies have become program partners. Each year, Krissa Skogen, Ph.D., a Garden conservation scientist and the CLM Internship Program manager, recruits between 75 and 100 college graduates with degrees in science for fivemonth paid internships. During the first ten years of the program, hundreds of interns have enjoyed a valuable experience from which to launch their careers. To maximize the value of their training, Dr. Skogen and the federal biologists who serve as program mentors planned coursework that ensured the interns took full advantage of the Garden’s many resources. They attended classes in the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center and a lecture in the Green Roof Garden. The interns used the Dixon Prairie and Heritage Garden—one of the few public gardens in the world to display plant species by taxonomic family—to complete 20


Plant Conservation Science

assignments designed to enhance their fieldwork skills. Following a farewell reception, the interns reported to field offices in 12 western states to complete their assignments with the BLM, NPS, USFS, and other federal agencies. Most CLM internships focus on projects in botany or wildlife-related fields, or on combined projects assessing or monitoring threatened or endangered plant and animal species. Others help restore land that is damaged or degraded by invasive species, over-grazing, and wildfires. Most recently, up to half of all internships have involved collecting or cleaning native seeds for the Seeds of Success (SOS) program. The BLM and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, established SOS in 2001. The Chicago Botanic Garden, a partner since 2002, stores native seeds collected by BLM interns in its Dixon National Tallgrass Prairie Seed Bank.

Working to conserve, restore, protect Since beginning his CLM internship in February, Chris Hoffman, a December 2010 graduate of the University of Wisconsin Green Bay, has acquired firsthand experience in the wide range of conservation projects that keep public lands healthy and diverse, or restore them following natural disasters. One of eight CLM interns working at a BLM field office in Carson City, Nevada, Hoffman has planted Kearney’s buckwheat (Eriogonum nummulare) to expand habitat for the Sand Mountain Blue Butterfly, known to exist only at Nevada’s Sand Mountain. He has worked in challenging conditions on fire-damaged lands to help plant more than 20,000 bitterbrush plants (Purshia tridentata) so mule deer have restored habitat, particularly during their winter migration. Putting his interest in science writing to work, he has also created videos about native seeds that were collected, cleaned, and sent to the Smithsonian.

Photos by Nelson Stauffer

Hoffman credits Dean Tonnena, his BLM mentor, for ensuring that he and his fellow interns have enjoyed a wide range of experiences. “Being a CLM intern has given me a tremendous sense of accomplishment,” Hoffman said. “It is an incredibly valuable opportunity that I know will serve me well.” After completing his internship in December, Hoffman hopes to attend graduate school. For more information on the Conservation Land Management program and to apply for an internship, visit www.chicagobotanic.org/internship/CLM. The Conservation Land Management intern program is made possible with support from the Bureau of Land Management, the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 21 www.chicagobotanic.org/antiques

Top: CLM interns examine grasses, wildflowers, soil, and plant debris along a transect, estimating ground cover for the field. Center: A federal wildlife biologist explains the finer points of tracking cougars and studying their hunting habits using an elk carcass. Bottom: 2011 CLM interns at the Chicago Botanic Garden. www.chicagobotanic.org/antiques www.chicagobotanic.org/clm 21


International expedition increases plant collections

Photos: this page and following page top left and right by Galen Gates. Top center by Jason Delaney. 34


The foundation established by Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice plays a vital role in enabling the Chicago Botanic Garden to achieve its mission to promote the enjoyment, understanding, and conservation of plants and the natural world. In addition to providing the lead gift to build the Plant Conservation Science Center, the Rice Foundation supports international plant-collecting expeditions led by Galen Gates, the Garden’s curator of herbaceous plants. Expeditions are conducted under the auspices of the Plant Collecting Collaborative (PCC). In addition to the Garden, members include the Missouri Botanical Garden, The Morton Arboretum, The New York Botanical Garden, and the University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. Members share the plant material collected, which ensures larger curated collections and greater biodiversity at multiple institutions. In some cases, extra seeds are also sent to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The most recent PCC trip in 2010 was to the Republic of Georgia in Eastern Europe. Georgia, selected because its latitude is similar to those of member institutions, is a biologically rich area with a significant number of plant species found nowhere else in the world. Additionally, the Caucasus Mountains are an endangered ecosystem where some plant species are on the brink of extinction. Representatives of the Georgian Institute of Botany and the Tbilisi Botanical Garden joined their American colleagues. The PCC team achieved record-setting results during its 26-day expedition. In addition to collecting herbarium specimens, they made 300 seed collections from 60 sites representing a variety of habitats. Collections were documented with plant descriptions, site specifics, and latitude and longitude measurements made by handheld GPS devices. Seed cleaning consumed most nights, with each collection requiring four hours of attention. Later, a lengthy process—including rigorous screening to eliminate potentially invasive species—reduced the number of viable collections to 231. Of these, a remarkable 53 plant varieties were new to U.S. cultivation, with six bulb varieties listed

by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) as internationally endangered. Growing plants of documented wild origin in professionally curated collections is a priority supported by public gardens and the PCC, as well as the federal government. Another important goal for the PCC is to identify plants well suited for landscapes in the northeastern quadrant of the United States. Expedition plants are used in the Garden’s breeding program and are now being evaluated by Garden scientists in the Bernice E. Lavin Plant Evaluation Garden. These treasures could one day be offered by the Chicagoland Grows® plant introduction program. Since 1992, plant-collecting expeditions have contributed 3,300 plants to the Garden’s display gardens and important additions to its herbarium of pressed, dried plants. These contributions have enhanced the Garden’s stature, particularly by increasing the depth and breadth of its living collections, the historical basis of all botanic gardens. Gates, who has been at the Chicago Botanic Garden for 28 years, explains, “Plant collecting trips are a valuable tool for protecting biodiversity, knowledge transfer, and institutional impact. The expeditions made possible by the Rice Foundation have enhanced the Garden’s stature and influence— both here in the United States and around the world.”

The 2010 plant collection trip to the Republic of Georgia was a joint international effort led by the Garden’s Galen Gates.

www.chicagobotanic.org/collections 23

Plant Conservation Science

The Caucasus Mountains in the Republic of Georgia provided a biologically rich but endangered ecosystem for the Plant Collecting Collaborative expedition.


Will Adamski, 13, began attending Camp CBG at the Chicago Botanic Garden when he was in first grade. Adamski recalls that for him, Camp CBG seemed like the perfect opportunity. He knew he enjoyed spending time at the Garden because his parents were members. He also knew he loved studying science in school. It took only one hands-on activity in his very first camp for Adamski to discover that he wanted a career in science. He says Camp CBG gave him the best feeling ever, like he had when he was a “kid getting his favorite toy, only better.”

Will Adamski works to inspire younger campers through the Garden’s Leaders in Training program.

When Adamski became too old to attend Camp CBG as a camper at age 13, he applied to the Leaders in Training (LIT) program, a summer mentorship program for teens ages 13 to 15 who are interested in science and education. LIT participants help with camp preparations, assist teachers, and most importantly, learn the skills necessary to work with children. The training the LIT program offers and the experiences it provides are designed to benefit participants in their future

Students enrolled in Leaders in Training receive daily mentoring from a variety of teachers.

job searches and college preparation. Interested students must submit an application with an essay on why they want to be accepted and what makes them good role models for young campers. Amy Wells, manager of camp programs, then interviews each applicant and explains the goal of the mentorship experience, as well as the commitment to a Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3:15 p.m., two-week program. Those selected receive training before Camp CBG begins, daily mentoring and training, and an exit interview.

After assisting a variety of teachers in different camp sessions, Adamski reported that he especially enjoyed the opportunity to share what he knows about science with the students who were enrolled in Camp CBG. “I wanted to make sure it was the best science camp ever for them,” he said, “just like it had been for me.” For more information on the many Camp CBG programs being offered in 2012, including the Leaders in Training program, see page 64 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/camp.

Leaders in Training

The “best science camp ever”


Summer Events

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Gardening Tips

Fall chores help to prepare plants for winter While October often brings a season-ending freeze, the growing season often extends into November. No matter what date the season officially ends, important gardening projects remain. Because healthy plants are better able to withstand the challenges of our midwestern winter, continuing to invest time and energy now on projects that promote plant health will pay beautiful rewards in the spring.

Watering Despite record rainfall this summer, a drought can occur at any time of year. While hoses should be disconnected and stored, all trees and shrubs planted within the last three years should be watered deeply when natural rainfall is less than one inch a week. It is particularly important that newly planted broadleaved and needled evergreens enter the challenging winter season well watered, as they lose moisture through their leaves throughout the year. Continue watering as needed until the ground freezes.

Fertilizing Early November is the recommended time to give lawns a final application of fertilizer. Use a complete fertilizer with fast-release nitrogen to promote root growth and prepare grass for an early green-up next spring.

Mulching Spreading a fresh, 2- to 3-inch layer of compost, wood chips, or shredded bark over the entire root zone of the trees and shrubs helps to insulate roots, protect them from physical damage, retain soil moisture, and improve soil fertility and structure over time. Avoid disease and rodent problems by pulling mulch 4 inches away from trunks

Pruning Pruning can begin as soon as trees and shrubs become dormant. From mid-November to mid-March, homeowners can shape and thin deciduous plants. Pruning can continue until buds begin to plump up. Prune evergreen trees and shrubs immediately before plants resume growing in the spring.

Protecting roses Roses should not be fertilized but homeowners do need to protect their hybrid roses once there have been two nights of temperatures in the teens, or Thanksgiving—whichever comes first. Prune rose canes to knee height and mound 12 inches of lightweight compost over the base of each plant.

Thwarting wildlife Homeowners with known problems with browsing deer should consider installing garden netting or snow fencing to protect the plants deer favor. While repellants offer relief, barriers are the most effective approach to preventing problems.

For more information on preparing your home landscape for the challenges of winter, visit the Plant Information Service in the Visitor Center or online at www.chicagobotanic.org/plantinfo. 27 www.chicagobotanic.org/antiques

www.chicagobotanic.org/plantinfo 27


Adult Education: Regenstein School

Joseph Regenstein, Jr. School Adult Education An extensive schedule provides a wealth of choices. Instruction by Garden staff and other experts ensures that every class, workshop, or symposium is an exceptional learning experience.

Knowledge of Japanese Cultures Blossoms under the Tutelage of Watters and Priest Ivan Watters, curator of the Chicago Botanic Garden’s renowned bonsai collection, has studied the art of bonsai for more than five decades, and has worked for more than 20 years with revered bonsai master Susumu Nakamura in Japan. A sought-after instructor, Watters has taught classes at the Joseph Regenstein, Jr. School of the Chicago Botanic Garden and nationwide for more than 30 years. Tim Priest, known as the “stone guru,” has been collecting suiseki (naturally formed stones that depict the natural world) for eight years and carving custom diazas (bonsai stands) for five. Crafting these pieces is a labor of love, much as is caring for bonsai themselves. Priest has taught at the Garden and throughout the Midwest for several years. See pages 9 and 34 for a listing of workshops taught by Watters and Priest; for more information and to register, visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school.

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Study with the master! Ivan Watters teaches all levels of bonsai classes to Garden students.


Adult Education: Highlights

Highlights Certificate Programs Information Session FREE Information Session Monday, March 5 See page 42.

Garden instructors such as Tom Selinger, Graphics, bring real-world experience to their classes.

Simon Winchester Book Signing & Lecture

“Know Maintenance” Perennial Gardens with Roy Diblik

Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms, and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories Thursday, November 10 See page 33.

New! Pop-Up Flowers of the Midwest: Intermediate

Wednesday, February 8 See page 47.

Merry, Berry Wreath

Friday, February 10 See page 53.

Tuesday, December 13 See page 51.

New! From the Nursery Yard to Your Yard

Graphics

Saturday, February 11 See page 42.

10 Thursdays, January 12 – March 15 See page 50.

New! Aromatherapy for Colds Workshop Friday, January 13 See page 56.

Beginning Beekeeping Workshop Saturday, February 18 See page 38.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

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Botanical Arts & Humanities Adult Education: Overview

Overview of Courses and Programs General Interest Courses

Courses cover myriad topics and provide high-quality learning opportunities for beginning and more advanced gardeners. For specific program questions, contact the registrar at school@chicagobotanic.org or (847) 835-8261.

Professional Programs

Professional programs are intensive studies in a particular area of interest for the advanced student These courses routinely carry continuing education units for various professional organizations. Please direct comments or topic suggestions to Jill Selinger at school@chicagobotanic.org or (847) 835-6849.

Symposia

Symposia, offered throughout the year, provide an in-depth look at a variety of topics. Regional, national, and international speakers provide new perspectives for amateur gardeners, professional horticulturists, landscape designers and architects, scientists, conservationists, and other green-industry professionals. Please direct comments or topic suggestions to Beth Pinargote at school@chicagobotanic.org or (847) 835-8278.

Certificate Programs

Learn how a certificate of merit can help you fulfill a dream, start a new career, or delve more deeply into an area of interest. Look for these codes after a course listing, and find a course that may be a new beginning for you! • Botanical Arts (ART) Engage your senses, discover hidden talents, and explore a more personal relationship with plants in this studio art program. • Garden Design (GDC) Create successful gardens with a solid foundation in plantsmanship and science-based gardening techniques. • Midwest Gardening (MGC) Discover practical, learner-friendly training on growing plants, plant propagation, and home garden design and you will become a more successful home gardener. • Ornamental Plant Materials (OPC) Avid amateur gardeners and aspiring horticulture professionals alike will learn identification, cultural requirements, and landscape use for more than 500 ornamental plants that are well suited for northeastern Illinois.

• Healthcare Garden Design (HGD) In this professional development program in 2012, attendees will discover the many ways gardens provide verifiable health benefits for the patients, staff, and visitors. • Horticultural Therapy (HTC) This 12-credit-hour accredited program combines with hands-on training, allowing students to gain experience and skills in the use of plant, garden, and nature activities to achieve measurable physical and mental-health outcomes for clients. Certificate programs are offered at many levels to give both beginners and professionals opportunities to improve their expertise and marketability. Prepare yourself for a rewarding career in landscape maintenance or garden design, discover the world of botanical art, or receive hands-on training from a Chicago Botanic Garden horticulturist. Details about all of the certificate programs are available at www.chicagobotanic.org/school/ certificate. Contact Amelia Simmons-Hurt at certificateprograms@chicagobotanic.org, or at (847) 835-8293 for further information. For more information on Certificate Programs:

• Professional Gardener Level 1 and 2 (PGL 1 and 2) Hands-on learning can lead to a new career or advancement in the industry, with science-based gardening techniques, plantsmanship, and training in sustainability and planning.

Master Gardener Training Program

In conjunction with University of Illinois Extension, the Garden offers the Master Gardener Training Program. The program covers the basics of horticulture, including classes on woody and herbaceous ornamental plant materials, fruit and vegetable crops, entomology, and pathology.

Botany students are inspired by the Garden’s engaging faculty.

After completing the training program and 60 hours of volunteer service, participants become certified University of Illinois Extension Master Gardeners. In January 2012, an online training is available. The next on-site program will begin in January 2013. Please visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/ mastergardener or call Jill Selinger at (847) 835-6849.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies. Chicago Botanic Garden members pay the lower of the two fees listed.

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Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.


general interest subjects to technical topics suited for practitioners and academicians.

New! Writing the Garden: A Literary Conversation across Two Centuries

Professional development opportunities and inspiration are yours here at the Garden. Landscape design, horticulture, and conservation professionals and others are welcome to attend these outstanding programs.

A Lecture and Book-Signing Event

Introduction to Vertical Gardening

November 5 Saturday 4 – 5 p.m. Fairchild Room Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, award-winning writer and landscape preservationist $10

November 12 Saturday 10 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Claire Kettelkamp, principal, Kettelkamp & Kettelkamp Landscape Architects Scott Mehaffey, executive vice president, Sage Botanic Media/Biotile Vertical Garden Systems $29/$37

Gardening, more than most outdoor activities, has always attracted a cult of devotedly literate practitioners; people who like to dig, it would appear, also like to write. What makes Writing the Garden such a joy to read is that it is not simply a collection of extracts, but real discussions and examinations of the personalities who made their mark on how we design, how we plant, and how we think about one of life’s lasting pleasures. Starting with “Women in the Garden” (Jane Loudon, Frances Garnet Wolseley, and Gertrude Jekyll) and concluding with “Philosophers in the Garden” (Henry David Thoreau, Michael Pollan, and Allen Lacy), this is a book that encompasses the full sweep of the best garden writing in the English language. The lecture will be followed by a book signing. This program is presented through partnership with The Book Stall in Winnetka, Illinois.

Vertical gardening has existed in many forms throughout history, primarily in warmer climates. Recent technological advances in growing systems, coupled with an increased desire for energy-efficient eco-conscious buildings, allow green walls to exist in northern climates. This survey of vertical gardening will inspire broader thinking about the benefits and opportunities of vertical gardening on large and small scales. Product and material samples will be available so participants can see how various systems work, and both set and variable costs will be discussed. A list of suggested plants will be provided, as well as a resource list for ongoing study.

Pruning for Professionals New! Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms, and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories A Lecture and Book-Signing Event November 10 Thursday 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Linnaeus Room Simon Winchester, OBE, British writer, journalist, and broadcaster $10 In this lecture, Simon Winchester scrutinizes the early explorations from the Vikings and Norsemen through Columbus, detailing the perils of the open sea. With his excellent research and engrossing anecdotes about the ocean as “a living thing,” Winchester spotlights its inspiration on poets, painters, and writers in its majestic beauty. Winchester’s sea saga is helpful for those who want to understand the planet better, even as our waters are rapidly changing from pollution, overfishing, and climate change. The lecture will be followed by a book signing. This program is presented through partnership with The Book Stall in Winnetka, Illinois.

November 16 Wednesday 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Annex 1 Tom Tiddens, plant healthcare supervisor and certified arborist; Chris Henning, plant healthcare specialist; and Thomas Fritz, plant healthcare specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $69/$87 This course is designed as a comprehensive review of basic pruning practices for landscape professionals. The afternoon session consists of demonstrations in the field that illustrate the techniques discussed during the morning session. There will also be a review of pruning tools and equipment care. Please dress for the weather, as the afternoon will be spent outdoors. Lunch is on your own.

Podando para Professionales

Adult Education: Symposia & Professional Programs

Symposia & Special Professional Programs Development Symposia allow participants to attend a single or Programs multi-day program on specific topics, ranging from

Pruning for Spanish-Speaking Professionals November 17 Thursday 9 a.m. – noon Annex 2 Manny Sanchez, grounds foreman, Chicago Botanic Garden $39/$49 Este repaso de prácticas de podar para jardineros professionales incluirá técnicas, tiempo, y como escoger las mejores herramientas. Debido a que parte de la clase estará afuera se requiere que traigan tijeras y serrucho para practicar. Una discusión de cómo tartar con sus clientes y que información debe compartir con ellos antes de empezar un trabajo también sera incluido. This review of pruning practices will be taught in Spanish. An English description is listed above.

New! Perspective Drawing for Landscape Design December 3 Saturday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Design Studio R. Thomas Selinger, RLA $79/$99 Express your design ideas three dimensionally using perspective drawings. You will learn quick and practical methods for sketching one- and two-point perspectives in the field or in the office and how to create focal point design drawings in perspective. Applications will be taught for use by designers to analyze their working drawings and for client presentation to enhance your sales. Methods will be taught for adding color to your drawings for presentation and appeal. Join Tom Selinger for a casual and fun day as he takes the mystery out of perspective drawing. A supply list will be sent. Lunch is on your own.

New! Landscape Design Studio January 27 Friday 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Linnaeus Room Greg Pierceall, professor emeritus, Purdue University $79/$99 Join Greg Pierceall for a daylong design studio experience. The first half of the day, students will participate in a landscape project. The remainder of the studio time will include design dialogue, vocabulary, and direction in site and landscape design production and products. Lunch is on your own.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

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BotanicalWorkshops Arts & Humanities Adult Education: Bonsai

Professional Bonsai & Suiseki Workshops Ivan Watters has been a bonsai practitioner for 45 years, and has studied with bonsai master Susumu Development Nakamura of the Shonan School of Bonsai in Yokohama, Japan, as well as prominent bonsai teachers in Programs continued the United States. He is curator of the Chicago Botanic Garden bonsai collection. New! Structures for the Residential Garden

Suiseki Diaza Carving Workshop

Bonsai: Novice – Development Techniques

February 16 Thursday 10 – 11:30 a.m. Linnaeus Room Deb Samyn, RLA, ASLA, The Garden Consultants, Inc. $24/$30

November 20 Sunday 12:30 – 4:30 p.m. Annex 2 Tim Priest, suiseki and diaza artist and instructor $99/$124

April 11 – May 16 6 Wednesdays 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. $209/$262

Explore structures suited to the residential garden and the design considerations that contribute to an exceptionally designed and sited garden structure. This class will discuss arbors, arches, and pergolas, as well as design considerations including function, style, materials, and plant selection.

This course will cover the collection and classification of stones used for suiseki, as well as types of wood and tools suitable for diaza carving. Students will be taught with hands-on traditional and modern Japanese diaza carving techniques, starting from a raw piece of wood and taking it to completion. Each student will receive a suiseki and wood to carve their first diaza. A supply list will be sent.

Bonsai Workshops All bonsai workshops are taught by Ivan Watters, bonsai artist and curator of the Chicago Botanic Garden bonsai collection. Workshops are held in the Production Headhouse.

Bonsai: Beginner – Basics and Fundamentals April 15 – May 20 6 Sundays 1 – 4 p.m. $179/$224 During this six-week course, discover principles and techniques to appreciate and participate in the art of bonsai. Each session includes a detailed lecture and assistance with design, styling, and wiring.

Learn about arbors, arches, pergolas, and more in Structures for the Residental Garden.

Every bonsai workshop gives students the opportunity to work on trees.

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Ideal for those with considerable familiarity and experience with the fundamentals of bonsai, each session in this six-week course includes a brief lecture, supervised work on trees, and a review and critique of work undertaken.

Bonsai: Intermediate – Refinement Techniques April 14 – May 19 6 Saturdays 9 a.m. – noon $229/$287 Appropriate for those with knowledge of bonsai concepts and experience with the art beyond the novice level, each session in this six-week course includes a brief lecture, supervised work on trees, and a review/critique of work undertaken.

Bonsai: Advanced – Presentation-Quality Efforts April 15 – May 20 6 Sundays 9 a.m. – noon $249/$312 For the student who has completed the beginner, novice, and intermediate courses, this six-week course focuses almost exclusively on supervised work on trees.


Botany for Beginners

Starting From Seed

Are you a new homeowner baffled by your landscape? Are you a beginning gardener who wants to learn basic horticultural skills? This series answers gardening questions and introduces techniques for gardening success. Each course investigates a different topic related to your own lawn and garden.

January 21 Saturday 1:30 – 4 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Rich Hyerczyk, botanist $36/$45

February 4 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Annex 1 Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $36/$45

Why are most plants green? Why do some make tubers and bulbs? Why are chili peppers hot and watermelons sweet? Have you ever had questions such as these about the biology of your garden plants? Come and enjoy a brief introduction to botany, the science of plants. Learn how plants make and store food, get pollinated, and protect and disperse their seeds.

Starting plants from seed is both interesting and relatively easy! This course covers all elements of starting both annuals (flowers and vegetables) and perennials from seed. The discussion includes plant selection, containers, planting mixes, watering, heating, lighting, and disease control. The primary focus is on starting seeds indoors, but some time is also spent on successful transplanting and starting seeds directly in the garden. This is a must for beginners and a good review for the experienced gardener.

Basic Pruning for Homeowners November 19 Saturday 1 – 3:30 p.m. Annex 2 Tom Tiddens, plant healthcare supervisor and certified arborist, Chicago Botanic Garden $36/$45 The best time to prune most trees and shrubs is quickly approaching. Proper pruning is the key to maintaining plant health and the desired form. Learn the basic techniques for dormant winter pruning. Basic pruning principles for trees and shrubs will be reviewed, as well as the application of various pruning tools. A portion of the class will consist of outdoor demonstrations, so please dress for the weather.

Get Started with Orchids December 3 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Annex 2 Jerry L. Garner, Ph.D., horticulturalist and professor of horticulture, Harold Washington College $29/$37 Don’t be afraid to grow orchids! This beginner’s course will put to rest the myth that all orchids are hard to grow. You will learn how to select orchids suitable for your home, as well as the basics of orchid care, including light, temperature, humidity, and media requirements. You’ll watch a potting and propagation demonstration and review the most popular orchid species and cultivars. Sources for orchids and supplies will be provided.

Soils: Where Are Your Roots? January 28 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $36/$45 One of the secrets to gardening success is an understanding of soils. Join Glenn Grosch for a detailed discussion of soils, including structure, fertilizers, understanding and managing pH, soil amendments, and water management. This course will also highlight proper horticultural techniques for a healthy soil ecosystem. If you are serious about gardening, this course is a must!

SymposiaGardener & Professional Adult Education: Weekend Series Programs

Weekend Gardener Series

Fruit Trees for the Beginner February 11 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $36/$45 Tree fruits present a great opportunity to both enhance your landscape and add to your eating pleasure! Many can be grown successfully in the Chicago area. The discussion will cover selecting varieties, choosing a suitable location, site preparation, and proper planting. Pruning techniques, ongoing maintenance, and pest management will also be discussed. Fruits to be covered include apples, peaches, pears, apricots, cherries, and plums. Dress for the weather, as part of the class will be outside.

Learn the basics of orchid care in Get Started with Orchids.

Preparing Roses for Winter December 10 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Annex 2 Heather Sherwood, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $29/$37 Now is the time to start putting your roses to bed for the winter. Join Heather Sherwood and learn about the degrees of cold tolerance and the proper way to protect various types of roses. Grandiflora, floribunda, hybrid tea, shrub, miniature, and climbing roses will be discussed. A portion of the class will consist of outdoor demonstrations and hands-on practice, so dress for the weather and bring thorn-resistant gloves.

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BotanicalGardener Arts & Humanities Adult Education: Weekend Series

Plants From Cuttings

Pruning Principles

Spring Lawn Care for Homeowners

February 18 Saturday 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. Production Headhouse Cathy Thomas, propagator, Chicago Botanic Garden $29/$37

March 11 Sunday 1 – 3 p.m. Annex 2 Tim Johnson, director of horticulture, Chicago Botanic Garden $29/$37

March 24 Saturday 9 – 11 a.m. Seminar Room, Plant Science Center Tom Fritz, plant healthcare specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $29/$37

Learning the correct technique for pruning is key to maintaining healthy plants. Tim Johnson, the Garden’s horticulture director, will introduce you to the principles of pruning, including proper tool use, techniques for pruning trees and shrubs, and the best time to prune both evergreen and deciduous plants. He will also display a variety of good tools for pruning.

Here’s your chance to learn the basics of lawn care. Using the Garden’s holistic turf management program as a model, expert Tom Fritz explains how to cultivate a thriving lawn while lessening pesticide use. He’ll cover a lot of ground, including turf culture, mowing, aerating, watering, fertilizing and weeding, and insect and disease control. Please dress for the weather.

New! Vegetable Gardening Basics

Get Started with Perennials

March 17 Saturday 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. Annex 1 Rick Belding, horticulturist $36/$45

March 31 Saturday 1 – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Rachael Williams, horticulturist, Heynssens & Grassman, Inc. $36/$45

Propagating plants by using cuttings is an economical and exciting way to supply plants for your garden. Join Cathy Thomas as she shows how to propagate annuals, perennials, and even woody plants from cuttings. She will discuss timing, supplies, and the environment needed, and demonstrate techniques to help you achieve success.

Brambles and Berries for the Beginner February 25 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $36/$45 Would you love to be able to harvest fresh berries from your own backyard? If so, this class will convince you how easy it is to successfully grow berry fruits. You will learn how to choose the best varieties, select and prepare a site, and use proper planting and pruning techniques, as well as understand other maintenance requirements. Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, grapes, and currants will be featured. Dress for the weather, as part of the class will be outside.

Success with Trees and Shrubs March 3 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $36/$45 Learn all you need to know about growing trees and shrubs! Glenn Grosch, experienced horticulturist, presents a practical, thorough discussion about how to be consistently successful in growing all types of woody plants (both deciduous and evergreen). Specific discussion includes matching plants to the site, plant selection, planting practices, first-year maintenance, and long-term care. Find out some of the myths about traditional woody plant care and discuss some of the current trends. This session is of value to all skill levels, from beginner to professional.

Even beginners can grow berries! Learn how in Brambles and Berries for the Beginner.

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Join horticulturist Rick Belding to learn the basic techniques and tools required to grow your own vegetables. Seed sowing, bed and soil preparation, and harvesting techniques are just part of what will be covered in this class. This introductory vegetable growing class is best suited for those with little or no vegetable growing experience. Each student will receive a packet of seeds to grow at home.

Learn about choosing the right perennial for the right garden location, and how to combine different perennials to create a lovely and interesting garden that blooms throughout the growing season. Rachael Williams discusses pruning and pinching techniques, deadheading and dividing, and other cultural methods to help you keep your garden growing healthy and strong. Come with your questions, because there will be time to discuss any unique situations you have encountered in your perennial garden.


Horticulture Horticulture courses help students acquire the information and techniques needed to grow ornamental plants and maintain a healthy garden or lawn.

Hands-On Gardening: End-of-Season Pruning Learn to garden with confidence from a Garden horticulturist November 12 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Annex 2 Dave Cantwell, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $49/$62 To cut or not to cut your woody plants? What you cut today affects what the plant will look like and how well it will grow for years to come. After a brief classroom discussion, you will have the opportunity to practice pruning small woody plants. Please dress for the weather and be prepared to get dirty, as most of the class will be spent outside, rain or shine.

Backstage Pass: Winter Floral Wonders November 20 Sunday 1 – 3 p.m. Meet at Rice Plant Resource Center Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $29/$37 The Chicago Botanic Garden’s production department produces nearly half a million plants a year. In the fall, the Greenhouses are brimming with poinsettias and other holiday plants of many hues. Join Tim Pollak to see how it’s all done. You’ll learn about propagation techniques, greenhouse environmental and computer systems, watering and fertilizing equipment, and how the growing space is managed throughout the year. In addition, you’ll be dazzled by the colors and beauty of all the plants, and get a sneak preview of the plants that will be on display at Wonderland Express in the coming weeks.

Bulbs for Winter Indoor Color November 21 Monday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 William Moss, horticultural educator $49/$62 To add a breath of spring to your home this winter, join William Moss as he demonstrates the proper techniques for forcing bulbs such as tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, and minor bulbs. Learn how to choose varieties that are good performers as well as how to combine them in one pot for a mini-garden effect. You will then pot up some bulbs to take home. The fee includes all materials.

Symposia & Professional Programs Adult Education: Horticulture

Grow Orchids on Your Windowsill February 4 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Annex 2 Jerry L. Garner, Ph.D., horticulturalist and professor of horticulture, Harold Washington College $29/$37 Do you want to learn how to grow orchids on your windowsills, or add something different to your collection, or do you just need some helpful hints for caring for that orchid you picked up in the grocery store or received as a gift? Basic orchid growing techniques, choosing some of the easiest-to-grow orchids best suited to your conditions; keeping those plants healthy, growing, and flowering; and avoiding some of the pitfalls encountered by new growers are among the topics to be discussed. Participants are encouraged to bring a few of their orchids to class.

New! Glass Jar Terrarium Workshop Winter Containers at the Garden December 7 Wednesday 10 a.m. – noon or December 8 Thursday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 1 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $59/$74 Explore the winter containers at the Garden and learn ways to extend your own containers into the winter season. Then prepare a container with fresh-cut evergreen boughs and berried or brightly colored branches. Please bring gloves and pruners.

February 9 Thursday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $49/$62 Terrariums are easy ways to introduce more “green” into your life, and now you will come away with the know-how and resources to create your own miniature oasis. You will learn the steps for building a glass jar terrarium from start to finish, the plants that grow well together, and maintenance tips. A glass jar, an assortment of plants for a variety of light conditions, and all other materials will be provided for you to create your own terrarium to enjoy this winter and all year long! Please bring gloves, an apron if desired, and pruning shears.

Holiday Dish Gardens December 15 Thursday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $59/$74 Simplify your holidays with one centerpiece to adorn all of your holiday feasts! Dish gardens are miniature landscapes grown in shallow containers that may be used as living centerpieces throughout the year. Learn about different containers, materials needed to assemble them, and proper plant selection. Then create your own beautiful, functional dish garden. Tim Pollak demonstrates how to use them for seasonal color and shows you how to incorporate different themes. Please bring an apron, trowel, gloves, and hand pruners.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies. Chicago Botanic Garden members pay the lower of the two fees listed.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

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Botanical Arts & Humanities Adult Education: Horticulture

New! Raised Bed Gardening

Register for both sessions at once and save 10 percent. The refund policy for the series is available at www. chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_methods. $48/$60

Building a Raised Bed February 11 Saturday 1 – 2:30 p.m. Annex 1 Rick Belding, horticulturist, and Andy Swets, carpentry supervisor, Chicago Botanic Garden $24/$30 Learn how to construct the ideal raised bed. Chicago Botanic Garden carpentry supervisor Andy Swets and horticulturist Rick Belding will demonstrate how to construct a raised bed made from untreated cedar. Each attendee will have the option of ordering a raised bed kit that will include everything needed to replicate what they see during the first session. Choosing the proper location and installation will also be discussed.

Gardening in Raised Beds March 10 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Annex 1 Rick Belding, horticulturist, and Andy Swets, carpentry supervisor, Chicago Botanic Garden $29/$37 Learn what to grow, when to plant, and how to maximize yield using a raised bed. Extending the growing season will also be discussed. Pick-up of pre-ordered kits will begin at the end of this class.

Beginning Beekeeping Workshop

Growing Salads Indoors

February 18 Saturday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Charles and Karen Lorence, owners, Lorence’s Honey Bee Haven $59/$74

March 10 Saturday 9 – 11 a.m. Linnaeus Room Bill Shores, professional grower and garden consultant $29/$37

Join us for this full-day program and learn about the history of beekeeping in North America, the anatomy and physiology of the bees including the caste system, and duties of the honeybees. Management of honeybees by season, plants and forage for honeybees in your location, and restrictions of communities will also be covered. Finally, we will discuss the impending disaster of the honeybee—Colony Collapse Disorder—and what we can do about it. Lunch is on your own.

Learn to grow organic salad greens at home, whether you have garden space or not! Professional gardener Bill Shores, who has grown specialty greens for more than a decade and currently manages chef Rick Bayless’s market garden, will treat participants to a visual feast of microgreens. Then he will demonstrate how to plant the seeds in growing trays, and discuss maintenance and harvesting techniques.

Urban Composting

March 13 Tuesday 6:30 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $36/$45

February 25 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Linnaeus Room Bill Shores, professional grower and garden consultant $29/$37 Compost is a valuable soil amendment, and making it provides a great way to recycle abundant yard and food wastes. Even with limited or no yard space, you can produce surprisingly large quantities of your own high-quality compost. Join Bill Shores as he explains the composting process, how to choose and handle materials, ways to fit composting into small urban spaces, what containers you can build or purchase and how to use them effectively, harvesting and using compost, and indoor composting options.

Organic Gardening—A Fresh Approach

Are you interested in organic gardening? This fresh approach to organic gardening will focus on fundamental horticultural practices as they apply to a successful organic garden experience. The presentation will cover the “what and why” of organics followed by a detailed discussion of specific horticultural practices both in the area of plant nutrition and pest management. There will also be a brief discussion of organics from a retail consumer perspective.

Winter Tree and Shrub Trimming Two-session class

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New! The Mystique of Landscape Lighting

New! Growing a Cook’s Garden

February 17 Friday 10 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Darin Ayres, lighting consultant, FX Luminaire $29/$37

March 3 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Annex 2 Nina Koziol, garden writer $29/$37

Join Darin Ayres and learn about garden lighting designs and mechanics for residential homeowners. Ayres will discuss specifics such as the main components of low-voltage systems, the basics and cost comparison of energy-efficient LED lighting systems versus more traditional incandescent systems, the difference between professional lighting components and do-it-yourself kits, and creative, yet functional, design concepts. Come and be enlightened!

If you have a spot in your garden, balcony, or deck that receives more than six hours of direct sunlight, you can grow fresh herbs and vegetables. We’ll cover how to grow the best essential ingredients for your kitchen: tomatoes—heirloom and new cultivars—onions, peppers, squash, garlic, and leafy greens. In this class, you’ll learn the basics of soil preparation, planting in pots, plant selection, protecting your harvest from pests, extending the crops from spring through fall, and ideas for food preparation.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

March 15 Thursday 7 – 8:30 p.m. and March 17 Saturday 9 – 11 a.m. Annex 2 Gilbert Smith and Lesley Bruce Smith, ISA certified arborists, owners, Arborsmith Ltd. $49/$62 Learn the secret that only certified arborists know— that it is fun and simple to trim your trees and shrubs when their leaves are absent! Through demonstrations and discussions, you will learn the basics of tree physiology and how it is affected by trimming, proper practices of trimming during the winter months, and the advantages of winter trimming of certain species for maximum health and plant performance.


March 18 Sunday 1 – 3 p.m. Meet at Rice Plant Resource Center Tim Pollak, outdoor floriculturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $29/$37 The Garden’s production department grows nearly a half-million plants every year. Join Tim Pollak for a behind-the-scenes tour through the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Greenhouses and nursery. Be the first to see which spring annuals will appear in the 2012 annual display beds, hanging baskets, containers, and hanging hayracks. You will also get a preview of some of the indoor displays for the Antiques & Garden Fair and glimpse the start of fall mums.

Hydrangeas March 29 Thursday 6:30 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Glenn Grosch, horticulturist and agronomist $36/$45 Learn all you ever wanted to know about hydrangeas! This program will cover all aspects of successfully growing hydrangeas. A detailed discussion will include hardiness issues and pruning techniques by species, as well as how to manage bloom color—plus you’ll see some great photos of each of the species in full bloom. Whether you currently have hydrangeas in your gardens, are planning to add them in the future, or simply want to know more about them, this session will be worth attending.

New! Front Door Container Duo Workshop April 12 Thursday 10 a.m. – noon Annex 2 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $129/$162 Create a matching set of containers to display together or apart. One container may not be enough! Assemble two containers for sun/part shade for an immediate effect. You will take a short Garden walk to see Garden containers and then create your own duo of pots to take home. Dress for the weather and bring gloves. All other materials are provided.

Four Seasons of Beauty: The Chicago Botanic Garden Container Series This series of workshops and Garden walks features the diversity and creativity of four seasons of Chicago Botanic Garden container gardens. Each season you will explore the Garden grounds with Nancy Clifton and discover an array of striking plants, interesting color and texture combinations, and unique container arrangements. Nancy will then help you create a seasonal container for your sun or partial shade patio or porch. All workshops are taught by Nancy Clifton, program specialist at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Register for all four sessions at once and save 10 percent. The refund policy for the series is available at www. chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_methods. $249/$312

Spring Containers at the Garden April 25 Wednesday 10 a.m. – noon or April 25 Wednesday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 1 $69/$87 Tour the Garden’s spring containers and collect ideas for your own. Then create a container with plants that can tolerate the varying spring temperatures and a full-sun to partial-shade location. Pansies, forced bulbs, and other spring treasures may be used. A spray of branches gives them a finishing touch. Please bring gloves.

Autumn Containers at the Garden

Adult Education: Horticulture

Backstage Pass: Flowering Spring Celebrities

September 12 Wednesday 10 a.m. – noon or September 12 Wednesday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 1 $69/$87 Take a Garden walk to view the Garden’s fall containers. Then create a cool-season mixed container with a variety of plants suitable for a full-sun or partial-shade location. Your container may include annuals, perennials, herbs, decorative foliage, cool-season vegetables, ornamental grasses, a decorative vine, and gourds. Please bring gloves.

Winter Containers at the Garden December 5 Wednesday 10 a.m. – noon or December 5 Wednesday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 1 $69/$87 Explore the winter containers at the Garden and learn ways to extend your own containers into the winter season. Then prepare a container with fresh-cut evergreen boughs and berried or brightly colored branches. Please bring gloves and pruners.

Summer Containers at the Garden June 20 Wednesday 10 a.m. – noon or June 20 Wednesday 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 1 $69/$87 Enjoy a tour featuring the summer containers at the Garden. Then prepare a warm-season mixed container suitable for a full-sun or partial-shade location. Your container may include annuals, perennials, herbs, and decorative foliage. Please bring gloves.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.

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Botanical Arts & Humanities Adult Education: Horticulture

Horticulture Certificate of Merit Programs Hardy Dwarf Plants November 12 Saturday 1 – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room John Eskandari, arborist and plant acquisitions, Gethsemane Gardens $59/$74 OPC elective Discover the evolution of evergreens from simple foundation plantings of yews and boxwoods to new collections found in a variety of colors and sizes that can be used as living art in the garden. Learn the art of mixing evergreens to create a specimen collection; how to add a few interesting conifers for specialty interest; growing techniques for ornamental conifers in containers on terraces, front porches, or roof decks; and the ideal candidates for urban microclimates. The School’s CEUs= 0.3

Botany: Special Topics

New! From the Nursery Yard to Your Yard

January 18 – February 22 6 Wednesdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Richard D. Hyerczyk, botanist $119/$149

February 11 Saturday 1 – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room John Eskandari, arborist and plant acquisitions, Gethsemane Gardens $59/$74

OPC elective Delve deeper into the wide world of botany. Join Rich Hyerczyk as he explores algae, mushroom and molds, wetland vegetation, local flora of the woodlands, and the unique plants of arid habitats. The School’s CEUs=1.5

Gardening Techniques: Session B January 28 – March 3 6 Saturdays 7:30 – 10:30 a.m. Annex 2 Dave Cantwell, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $249/$312 PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement

New! The Art of Graphics November 14, 21, and December 5 3 Mondays (no class November 28) 6:30 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Timothy Lally, ASLA, RLA, principal, Timothy Lally Design $179/$224 OPC elective This workshop serves to complement the required Graphics course in the Garden Design Certificate. Continuing to build upon skills, this workshop will present additional techniques used for rendering design plans as well as landscape elevations and perspectives. Media such as pastels and watercolors will be explored to further broaden the design pallet. Prerequisite: Graphics or commensurate experience. The School’s CEUs= 0.75

Plant Health 1 . Winter Session January 17 – February 23 6 Tuesdays & 6 Thursdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Tom Tiddens, plant healthcare supervisor & certified arborist, Chicago Botanic Garden, and Chris Henning, plant healthcare specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $269/$337 MGC, PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement

Students will be introduced to professional gardening through a combination of lecture and hands-on activities. They will focus on acquiring solid gardening skills, learning about a variety of techniques, and developing the ability to determine best practices. Topics range from general grounds maintenance, winterization, plantings, and other horticultural practices. This is a pre-professional class designed for students entering the green industry.

Woody Plants for the Eco-Garden February 4 Saturday 9 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room John Eskandari, arborist and plant acquisitions, Gethsemane Gardens $59/$74 OPC elective When selecting plants for your garden space, consider expanding your woody plant selections to help make your garden more eco-friendly. Woody plants are generally more deeply rooted than most herbaceous plants. They provide winter structure and can take up more square footage so there is less need to buy herbaceous plants that need frequent watering. Plant them in the ground or in containers and increase your carbon storage with a woody plant. The School’s CEUs=0.3

OPC elective Buying plant material is a rite of spring for any gardener, from the novice to the professional. With so many choices, how do you know what to pick? Learn tricks to spot a good plant at any nursery, despite its sometimes haggard appearance, and how to avoid getting those beautiful plants that might not really work. Learn about everything from proper transportation, dealing with balled and burlapped, container or bare root plants, to the methods that will ensure that your new plant will successfully adapt to your space. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Certificate Programs Information Session FREE Information Session March 5 Monday 7 – 8 p.m. Linnaeus Room Curious about our certificate programs? Want to learn how our programs can help you fulfill a dream, start a new career, or simply enjoy a new interest? Bring your questions to this FREE session. First-time students attending this session will receive $20 off their first Certificate core course (restrictions apply). Please register in advance to save your space.

The Best New Annuals for 2012 March 10 Saturday 1 – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Greg Trabka, new product development manager, Ball Horticultural Company $59/$74 OPC elective It’s going to be a banner year for annuals! This course presents many new cultivars, along with several wonderful yet underutilized species for both container and in-ground plantings in sun and shade. Focus on what makes each unique and ideal, including morphological characteristics and garden performance. Other topics include cultural requirements, design and combinations, and sources. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Learn to identify, diagnose, treat, and prevent some of the most important diseases, insects, animal pests, and environmental problems commonly encountered by our region’s landscape industry. Topics include Integrated Pest Management (IPM), cultural care, basic entomology and pathology, pesticides and alternatives, and animal management.

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Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.


Adult Education: Horticulture

Healthy Gardens

Growing Ornamental Plant Materials

Gardening Techniques: Session C

March 10 Saturday 9 a.m. – noon Design Studio Lynn Bement, the organic garden coach $59/$74

March 20 – May 1 7 Tuesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Annex 2 and March 24 & April 28 2 Saturdays 9 a.m. – noon Annex 1 Tim Johnson, director of horticulture, Chicago Botanic Garden $249/$312

April 14 – May 19 (April 21 off-site) 6 Saturdays 7:30 – 10:30 a.m. Annex 1 Lynette Rodriguez, owner and horticulturist, A Finer Touch $249/$312

OPC elective Would you like to create a landscape that is more resistant to insect and disease challenges? Come learn how to build up your soil organically. Regardless of whether you are starting from scratch with new construction or working with an older, existing landscape, come explore a guaranteed approach to building your soils in a healthy, environmentally friendly, and sustainable way! The School’s CEUs=0.3

Botany 1 Spring Session March 12 – April 23 7 Mondays and 5 Wednesdays (no class April 18) 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Richard D. Hyerczyk, botanist $269/$337 OPC, MGC, PGL 1, PGL 2 and GDC requirement Why, botanically speaking, is a tomato a fruit? What is the difference between a fern and a moss? Come join us in Botany 1 to learn the answers to these questions and more! In this course we will explore subjects such as the importance of plants to our lives; plant taxonomy and classification; and the life cycles, distinguishing features, diversity, and identification of major groups of plants.

Organic Pest Control March 17 Saturday 9 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Lynn Bement, the organic garden coach $59/$74 OPC elective Are you looking for an environmentally friendly and sustainable way to treat pest and disease challenges in your garden? Come learn about handling common pest and disease issues that you may encounter in your ornamental plantings and vegetable garden. You will come away with new ways to observe and identify what might be bugging your landscape and corrective steps that you can take to minimize or eliminate the issues. The School’s CEUs=0.3

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MGC requirement Learn the basic techniques and some special tips needed for establishing and maintaining a healthy garden in the Midwest. Some of the many topics to be covered include planting, pruning, water and turf management, weed and pest control, maintenance of new landscapes, and specific methods for growing herbaceous and woody plant groups such as bulbs, ericaceous plants, container plants, and others. Gain hands-on experience in the Garden.

Hardy Bulbs March 27 – May 15 (no class April 17) 7 Tuesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Garden Walks (select one) March 29 – May 10 (no class April 19) 6 Thursdays 9 – 11 a.m. or March 31 – May 12 (no class April 21) 6 Saturdays 9 – 11 a.m. Alsdorf Auditorium Jill Selinger, manager, continuing education, Chicago Botanic Garden $229/$287 Optional Study CD $20 OPC, PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement Explore the many bulbs that brighten the spring, summer, and fall garden. You will learn to identify more than 60 hardy bulbs, corms, and tubers. Bloom sequences, cultural requirements, and bulb selection will also be discussed. After completing this course, you will have the confidence and knowledge to use a wide variety of bulbs to enhance your clients’ gardens or your own.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement Students will be introduced to professional gardening through a combination of lecture and hands-on activities. Focus is on acquiring solid gardening skills, learning about a variety of techniques, and developing the ability to determine best practices. Topics range from plant selection to the identification and control of weeds and other horticultural practices. Prerequisite: Botany 1.

Soil Basics Intensive Spring Session April 28, May 5 & 12 3 Saturdays 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Annex 2 Ellen Phillips, educator, University of Illinois Extension $269/$337 MGC, PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement Soil is an irreplaceable natural resource that affects plant selection and growth. Learn to maintain healthy soil; use compost, fertilizers, soilless and potting mixes and other amendments. Discover how water cycles through a garden and affects soils and plants. Begin to appreciate the circle of life within our soils that helps create a productive soil. Course fee includes a professionally analyzed test of your garden soil. Prerequisite: Botany 1.

Magnolias April 30 Monday 9 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $59/$74 OPC elective The genus Magnolia is a complex group of plants with a large native range. Several of the species readily hybridize, producing new and interesting selections. The newest group of hybrids is the hardy yellow magnolia. New hybrids pop onto the market each year, creating an increasing palette of beautiful flowering trees for the Midwest. Learn more about the genus Magnolia and the best choices for the Midwest garden. The School’s CEUs=0.3


Adult Education: Nature Studies

Lilacs May 5 Saturday 1 – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator $59/$74 OPC elective Learn more about the genus Syringa. The species ranges from small shrubs to medium-sized trees. The beautiful flowers are generally fragrant and plants are hardy and easy to grow. Lilacs are tolerant of a wide range of soil types including alkaline soils. A walk around the Garden to view lilacs in bloom is included. The School’s CEUs=0.3

Botany 2 Spring Session May 7 – June 20 (no class May 28 and 30) 6 Mondays and 6 Wednesdays 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. or 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Richard D. Hyerczyk, botanist $269/$337 PGL 2 and GDC requirement How do seeds germinate and develop into mature plants? How do plants move water up through their roots to their topmost branches ground? This course will explore subjects such as the plant cell; anatomy and growth of roots, stems, and leaves; photosynthesis; and the symbiotic association of plant roots with beneficial fungi and bacteria. Prerequisite: Botany 1.

Small Flowering Trees May 29 – July 10 7 Tuesdays 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Garden Walks (select one) May 31 – July 5 6 Thursdays 9 – 11 a.m. or June 2 – July 7 6 Saturdays 9 – 11 a.m. Mark Zampardo, Ph.D., horticulture educator Alsdorf Auditorium $229/$287 Optional Study CD $20 OPC, PGL 1, PGL 2, GDC requirement Small flowering trees are a critical component of nearly every garden and landscape. This course covers approximately 40 genera and many more species and cultivars that thrive in our region. Identification, cultural information, aesthetic qualities, and landscape uses will be emphasized. After completing this course, you will be able to select appropriate trees to add interest and depth to your garden and landscape projects.

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Nature Studies The Chicago region contains a wide range of plants and animals living in different types of natural communities, from woodlands to wetlands, from prairies to savannas.

New! Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms, and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories A Lecture and Book-Signing Event November 10 See page 33 for details.

Fall Bird Walk November 12 Saturday 7:30 – 9 a.m. Meet at Visitor Center Alan Anderson, research committee chairman, Chicago Audubon Society $15/$19 Take a walk in the Garden and learn to identify birds in their sometimes-confusing fall plumage. Earlier bird walks will highlight warblers, vireos, and flycatchers, while later ones will feature ducks, sparrows, and hawks. Dress for the weather and bring binoculars and a field guide if you have them.

Owl Prowl at Ryerson Woods November 18 Friday 7 – 9 p.m. or February 10 Friday 7 – 9 p.m. Brushwood House, Ryerson Woods, Deerfield, IL. Steve Bailey, ornithologist, Illinois Natural History Survey $29/$37 Join Steve Bailey for a captivating night exploring the mystery of owls at the Ryerson Woods Conservation Area. He will discuss owl behavior and identification, as well as the places these fascinating birds are most likely to be seen. He may even demonstrate his world-famous Barred Owl call. After the discussion, Steve will lead a walk in the woods to look and listen for these enigmatic birds. Please dress warmly, and bring along a flashlight and binoculars. A map will be sent.

Beginning Beekeeping Workshop

Deciduous Trees in Winter February 22 Wednesday 1 – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Andrew Bell, curator of woody plants, Chicago Botanic Garden $49/$62 Most deciduous trees and shrubs are easy to identify when leaves are present, but many important characteristics remain on the plant year-round. Winter can be an ideal time to identify trees and shrubs as well as gain a landscape perspective of overall forms and shapes these plants can add to the landscape. In this interactive course, you will learn to identify a variety of native trees and shrubs by buds, twigs, bark, and shape. Botanical keys to identify trees will be supplemented by other sources of information and observation. Classroom discussion using slides, cut twigs, and identification keying exercises will be supplemented by spending part of the course identifying trees outdoors. Dress for the weather.

Harry Potter’s Herbology: Medieval and Renaissance Botany at Hogwarts February 25 Saturday 11 a.m. – noon Meet at Lenhardt Library, Chicago Botanic Garden Ed Valauskas, rare book curator, Lenhardt Library, Chicago Botanic Garden $15/$19 Classes at Hogwarts included studies on a variety of plants, zoophytes, and potions. These intellectual exercises reflected a real battle between medieval and Renaissance notions about the natural world. This lecture will examine the foundations of Hogwarts in classical, medieval, and Renaissance scientific literature, with actual examples of rare books dating from the fifteenth through seventeenth centuries.

Spring Bird Walk April 7 Saturday 7:30 – 9 a.m. Meet at Visitor Center Alan Anderson, research committee chairman, Chicago Audubon Society $15/$19 Join local bird experts to explore the best spots in the Garden for locating late-winter bird residents and the early migrants of spring. Each walk is approximately one to two hours long. Dress for the weather, and bring binoculars and a field guide, if you have one.

February 18 See page 38 for details.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.


With a variety of courses ranging from site analysis and construction to garden art and history, students learn the principles of garden design and how design relates to the environment.

Introduction to Vertical Gardening November 12 See page 33 for details.

White City/Green City February 2 – 23 4 Thursdays 1 – 3 p.m. Linnaeus Room Barbara Geiger, MALA, landscape historian and adjunct professor, Illinois Institute of Technology $99/$124 Can enough green space and beautifully designed buildings and landscapes solve all our problems? Architect Daniel H. Burnham and his colleagues thought they just might as they planned the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893. And they believed the same as Burnham created a master plan for the Chicago region in 1909 with Edward Bennett. Some of their hopes were borne out and some were dashed by devils like Henry Holmes and the sinners in the Levee District. Explore the story of the greatest fair ever, the architects and landscape architects who brought it into being, how the fair led to the Plan of Chicago, and the counter-forces that challenged the dream of a white and green city. Recommended background reading (not required to follow the course material and discussions): The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson, and The Plan of Chicago by Carl Smith.

Structures for the Residential Garden

The American Cottage Garden

February 16 See page 34 for details.

March 24 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Linnaeus Room Nina Koziol, garden writer $29/$37

New! Landscaping for Privacy: Innovative Ways to Turn Your Outdoor Space into a Peaceful Retreat A Lecture and Book-Signing Event March 9 Friday 1 - 2 p.m. Linnaeus Room Marty Wingate, author $10 More than 35 million single-family homes sit on lots between one-eighth and one-half an acre—meaning neighbors on both sides and in back, with little or no scenery and a decided lack of privacy. Luckily, it’s possible to create a peaceful retreat—even in the most urban environment—with thoughtful garden design. Includes information on plant choices, hedges, buying and building different types of screens, tips on the most efficient and visually satisfying use of space, and much more. Lecture will be followed by an opportunity to purchase Wingate’s book and have it signed.

Symposia & Professional Programs Adult Education: Garden Design

Garden Design

Exuberant gardens overflowing with old-fashioned flowers—that is the vision that comes to mind when we think of cottage gardens. Discover bed and border designs and plant combinations that can help you get the look of an English cottage garden.

New! The Shady Landscape March 27 Tuesday 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Linnaeus Room Marcy Stewart-Pyziak, horticulturist, The Gardener’s Tutor $49/$62 The deciduous forest consists of a layering of plants, providing stunning visual interest and diversity. This sharing of space allows for diverse species to live harmoniously in shared ecology, including ephemerals, herbaceous plants, and woody shrubs and trees, not to mention the animals, birds, and insects. As noted by Rick Darke in his book The American Woodland Garden, “adapting a layered framework within the shady landscape is a sure way to capture one of the most unique visual motifs of the deciduous forest.” Discussion will include native and nonnative species, varied cultural conditions, and the progression of plants from early spring to autumn. Lunch is on your own.

“Know Maintenance” Perennial Gardens February 8 Wednesday 1 – 3 p.m. Linnaeus Room Roy Diblik, plantsman and co-owner, Northwind Perennial Farm $29/$37 The use of perennials in gardens has taken on many themes, styles, and random plantings. Yearly, new plants are introduced and gardens become collections. Roy Diblik has put together a design concept connecting perennials for our region to maintenance and planting style. This concept includes stylized perennial garden grids placing plants that live well together. Roy calls this style “Know Maintenance” gardening, allowing the gardener to understand the time commitment needed to maintain the gardens they plant. Roy will discuss his concepts and share images of plants and gardens that illustrate this style, including those he designed at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Shedd Aquarium.

Learn from author Marty Wingate how to create a peaceful retreat.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies. Chicago Botanic Garden members pay the lower of the two fees listed.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

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Adult Education: Weekend BotanicalDesigner Arts & Humanities Series

Painting Your Garden with Plants: Sun and Shade

Register for both sessions at once and save ten percent. The refund policy for the series is available at www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_methods. $52/$65

Designing the Sunny Border April 14 Saturday 10 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Nina Koziol, garden writer $29/$37 The well-designed border wears a combination of perennials, annuals, and shrubs that provide three seasons of color and winter interest. This class will discuss how to artfully combine plants with an emphasis on the use of color, texture, and form. Whether you are a new gardener or have an established border that could use updating, this class is for you.

Painting Your Garden with Plants: Designing the Shade Garden April 14 Saturday 1 – 3 p.m. Linnaeus Room Nina Koziol, garden writer $29/$37 A garden shaded by trees or buildings is often a challenge for the gardener who is faced with low light levels, tree roots, and soil that is often dry. This class provides solutions and ideas for artful plantings that can help you create effective combinations that consider color, texture, and form. Ideal for those who want to enhance an existing shade garden or plan a new one.

In Painting Your Garden with Plants, learn to choose the right combination of perennials, annuals, and shrubs to create visually exciting gardens.

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Weekend Designer Series

Front Yard Design

If you have always wanted to improve the design of your home landscape, or if you are a new homeowner wondering where to start, this series is a great way to introduce yourself to the basic principles of landscape design. This lecture series, created for novice designers, will take you from basic design theories to site-planning techniques and finally to techniques for implementing a design plan. Register for all five sessions at once and save ten percent. Please note the refund policy for the series, which is available at www.chicagobotanic. org/school/registration_methods. $131/$166

February 21 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Jeffrey True, vice president of operations, Hursthouse, Inc. $29/$37

Introduction to Design Principles February 7 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Valerie Gerdes Lemme, landscape architect, ASLA $29/$37 This workshop introduces and reviews the landscape design process of site analysis, conceptual design, and evaluations, based on such landscape-design principles as balance, symmetry, proportion, scale, and unity. Looking at plant combinations and landscape features, you will learn about color, texture, line, form, and methods of creating garden spaces.

Foundation Planting Design February 14 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Valerie Gerdes Lemme, landscape architect, ASLA $29/$37 Do you live in an older home with an outdated foundation planting of overgrown evergreens? Or in a newer home that needs help creating an identity and style? Whether old or new, many homes have foundation plantings that need revamping. Learn the principles of good foundation design and view examples of before-and-after landscapes to give you the boost you need to update your home’s landscape. Good design will improve the curb appeal of your home, increasing its value.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

This course will teach you the basics of front yard landscape design. A lecture and slides will demonstrate how proper planting design can change the way you use and view your property. Your front yard design should respond to your home’s architecture as well as be aesthetically pleasing. Topics will include proper plant types and spacing, focusing and screening views, and creating curb appeal.

Backyard Design February 28 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Jeffrey True, vice president of operations, Hursthouse, Inc. $29/$37 Learn how to create an enjoyable backyard space that is both functional and exciting. This course will focus on the design and development of functional and attractive spaces, including dining and entertaining areas (such as decks and patios), children’s play spaces, and outdoor storage and utility areas. Learn how to screen and focus views and create a sense of enclosure for areas where you desire a private space for comfort and security.

From the Drawing Board to the Border March 6 Tuesday 7 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room Valerie Gerdes Lemme, landscape architect, ASLA $29/$37 How do you take your plans from the drawing board and create the garden without being overwhelmed by the amount of work and money? Learn how to develop a shopping list and timeline to phase the work over several seasons. You’ll also receive some useful tips on budgeting, purchasing plants, and working with landscape professionals.


Adult Education: Garden Design

Garden Design Certificate of Merit Programs New! The Art of Graphics November 14, 21, and December 5 See page 42 for details.

Graphics Winter Session January 12 – March 15 10 Thursdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. Design Studio R. Thomas Selinger, RLA $269/$337 PGL 2 and GDC requirement Come learn the basic principles of landscape design illustration. This balanced and rewarding class provides an exciting introduction to the three basic areas of drawing communication: plans, elevations, and perspectives. Discover how to express your ideas using effective and enriched presentation techniques. Professional time-saving shortcuts, the importance of lettering, and the excitement of color are all also included. Recommended to take concurrently with Introduction to Professional Practice.

Introduction to Professional Practice Winter session January 18 – March 14 9 Wednesdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room and January 21, 28, March 3, 10 4 Saturdays 1 – 4 p.m. Design Studio Paul Laiblin, project manager and senior estimator, Scott Byron and Co. $269/$337 PGL 2 and GDC requirement Apply skills learned in Graphics toward a working understanding of the initial phases of a landscape design project. Lectures will focus on the preliminary steps necessary to begin a landscape design project and carry the project through the conceptual design phase, including site measurements, base maps, site analysis, programming, functional use diagrams, conceptual design plans, and preliminary cost estimates. Prerequisite: Graphics (courses can be taken concurrently).

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Principles of Garden Design

Garden Design Implementation

Winter Session January 18 – March 7 8 Wednesdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. Design Studio and January 21 & March 3 2 Saturdays Linnaeus Room 1 – 4 p.m. Tim Lally, ASLA, RLA, principal, Timothy Lally Design $269/$337

January 23 – March 26 (no class February 20 or March 5) 8 Mondays 6:30 – 9 p.m. Linnaeus Room and February 25 (Design Studio) & March 3 (Plant Science Lab) 2 Saturdays 1 – 4 p.m. Jodi Mariano, RLA, senior associate, Teska Associates, Inc. $269/$337

Spring Session March 21 – May 16 (no class April 18) 8 Wednesdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. Design Studio and March 24 & 31 2 Saturdays 9 a.m. – noon Linnaeus Room Tony Wasemann, ASLA, senior landscape designer, Scott Byron & Co. $269/$337 PGL 2 and GDC requirement Apply knowledge and skills developed in previous design courses toward an in-depth understanding about spatial properties of landscape materials and their application to design principles. Weekly discussions and individual projects will emphasize the components of three-dimensional spaces and their application to the development of refined concept design plans and construction level drawings. Prerequisites: Graphics, Introduction to Professional Practice.

Early Garden History January 22 – March 25 10 Sundays 1 – 3:30 p.m. Design Studio Barbara Geiger, MALA, landscape historian $269/$337 GDC requirement As a garden designer, you are part of a great custom at the heart of every culture. Study the garden traditions of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East as they evolved from the earliest civilizations through the early 1900s. Learn why certain design elements have endured the test of time, and how you can adapt them for use in your own projects. Learn how the critical element of design takes good graphics and a knowledge of plants and turns them into masterful and cohesive gardens.

GDC requirement You have the design; you have the client; you have the funding—now what?  Lectures will focus on the steps necessary to carry a project from a finished design through to a built landscape. Course projects will include the preparation of construction details and documents, technical specifications, and cost estimates. Prerequisites: Graphics, Introduction to Professional Practice, Hardscape Basics, Principles of Landscape Design, Planting Design.

Certificate Programs Information Session FREE Information Session March 5 Monday 7 – 8 p.m. Linnaeus Room Curious about our certificate programs? Want to learn how our programs can help you fulfill a dream, start a new career, or simply enjoy a new interest? Bring your questions to this FREE session. First-time students attending this session will receive $20 off their first Certificate core course (restrictions apply). Please register in advance to save your space.

Hardscape Basics May 17 – July 26 (no session June 14 and July 5) 9 Thursdays 6:30 – 9 p.m. and June 16 and 30 2 Saturdays 9 a.m. – noon Design Studio $269/$337 Shawn Weidner, ASLA, director of design, EcoGardens PGL 2, GDC requirement Apply knowledge and skills toward a working understanding of hardscape elements as they relate to garden design. Weekly discussions and individual projects will focus on basic elements of hardscape structures, including paving, landscape lighting, garden walls and structures, and site furnishings and their application to the residential landscapes. Saturday sessions will be spent off-site for hands-on materials workshop when possible. Prerequisites: Graphics, Introduction to Professional Practice, Principles of Garden Design.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.


Throughout history, plants and images of plants have been woven into the arts—painting, literature, and photography. The beauty of botanical arts courses is that they encompass a wide variety of topics, from photography to calligraphy, botanical illustration to paper making. In introductory and higher-level courses, students have the opportunity to express their creative flair while sharing time with others in an enjoyable setting.

New! See the World from the Windows of Ryerson November 12 Saturday 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Brushwood House, Ryerson Woods, Deerfield, IL. Derek Norman, artist and director, Midwest Center for Botanical Documentation $89/$112 See it now, from the windows of Brushwood House, in this one-day seminar of watercolor painting, drawing, and sketching at Ryerson Woods. Capture the many facets of this natural, ecologically balanced landscape and find inspiration in the historical charm of an earlier age as you comfortably sit, draw, and paint in the cozy ambience of Brushwood House. Learn the basics and principles of English watercolor painting and further your own technique by knowing how best to define the colors, forms, shapes, textures, and structures of the autumn landscape. Individual instruction will be given to all students. Bring a sack lunch. Materials list and a map will be sent. A reception and an exhibit will be held at the end of the day for students and their guests.

New! Rustic Urn Arrangement November 15 Tuesday 10 a.m. – noon Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $79/$99 Join Nancy Clifton for what will be a fall favorite; a rustic urn of fresh materials of the season. Using a small tabletop size, rustic-looking urn, you will add fresh flowers, berries, nuts, and foliage of the season in hues of autumn orange, red, brown, burgundy, and deep yellow. All supplies are provided; please bring pruners, gloves, and a sturdy box to carry your completed project home.

Mosaic Workshop

Merry, Berry Wreath

November 15 – December 20 6 Tuesdays 7 – 9 p.m. or February 15 – March 21 6 Wednesdays Annex 1 Bonnie Arkin, artist and designer $119/$149

December 13 Tuesday 9 a.m. – noon or December 13 Tuesday 6 – 9 p.m. Annex 2 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $95/$119

Discover the joy and beauty of mosaic art in the pique assiette tradition. Pique assiette, or “broken plates,” incorporates a wonderful blending of color, form, and texture. This mosaic folk art can be found in many cultures and is popular today as a way to recycle a favorite piece of china or broken heirloom. Work under the guidance of Bonnie Arkin to complete a unique mosaic from shards of china, ceramic, or glass. A supply list is given at the first class, but you can start collecting dishes now!

New! Holiday Card Design Workshop November 20 Sunday 1 – 4 p.m. Design Studio Judith Joseph, artist and educator $59/$74 It’s never too late to think about personalized holiday cards! You’ll create a holiday letter that will stand out from the pack if you join artist Judith Joseph to learn the fine art of text decoration. Whether you’re an experienced calligrapher or plan to cut and paste text from your computer printer, you will learn to lay out and enhance your note with beautiful, hand-drawn capitals and decorative borders. There is no need to have a completed letter; just bring your favorite art supplies. The finished product can be digitally scanned or color-copied for mass production. A supply list will be sent.

Wrapped in Red: Silk Scarf Dyeing With Natural Dyes November 30 Wednesday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Annex 1 Pamela Feldman, artist and educator $79/$99 In this one-day class, students will learn about two different natural red dyes: cochineal, a blue-red dye from the Americas, and madder, an orange-red dye from Asia Minor. We will combine these two dyes to produce a unique red color on a silk scarf. Each student will dye a large silk scarf to take home. Scarf and dyes are included in the class fee. A short supply list will be sent to each student.

Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Botanical Arts and Humanities

In this workshop, you will create your own festive holiday wreath featuring a bevy of berried branches. Fresh evergreens will be used as the base, and a variety of seasonal berried branches, including hypericum, pepperberry, blueberry, juniper, and others will be added for color and texture. This wreath will be great for your own home or for holiday gift giving. Please bring gloves, pruners, and a box for your finished wreath. The fee includes all other materials.

New! Holiday Carnation Tabletop Tree December 15 Thursday 10 a.m. – noon Annex 2 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $65/$82 Create a long-lasting floral topiary of red carnations in the shape of a holiday tree. It is easier than you think and makes a colorful addition to any table. It also makes a great gift. Learn how to make other floral pieces using the same technique! All materials are provided. Please bring a hand pruner and small, deep box to carry the finished project home.

Holiday Centerpiece December 20 Tuesday 9:30 a.m. – noon or December 20 Tuesday 6:30 – 9 p.m. Annex 2 Liz Rex, horticulturist, Chicago Botanic Garden $59/$74 Join us at the Garden and create a lovely, long-lasting holiday centerpiece, using fresh-cut evergreens and seasonal flowers—ideal as a holiday centerpiece to grace your home, or to give as a special gift. Bring gloves, pruners, and a box for your finished arrangement. The fee includes all other materials.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

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Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Calligraphy and Floral Decoration

Beginning Frame Loom Weaving

Watercolor in the Greenhouse

January 12 – February 16 6 Thursdays 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Design Studio Judith Joseph, artist and educator $229/$287

January 17 – March 20 10 Tuesdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Design Studio Pamela Feldman, artist and educator $379/$474

January 19 – March 8 8 Thursdays 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Michelle Kogan, artist and instructor $299/$374

Learn the art of beautiful writing and the flourishes of botanical illustration: it’s a match made in heaven! Beginners, start with the basics of calligraphy and floral decoration for invitations and cards. More experienced students, polish your skills and complete a project. A supply list will be sent.

In this beginning level class, we examine the many possibilities of creating woven forms using a simple frame loom. Students begin by experimenting with the basic techniques of tapestry and plain-weave, and then explore ways of creating surface, image, and text within a woven form. Each student will weave both a sampler and final project. Visual presentations and demonstrations are included. Basic supplies are included in the class fee.

Join us for a warm retreat watercoloring in the Greenhouse. In this lush venue, we will create finished compositions using your choice of watercolor pencils, cakes, and tubes. Both beginners and seasoned artists are welcome. Beginners will focus on exercises starting with monochromatic (one-color) paintings and build up to full-color compositions, while seasoned artists will be given criticism in composition, color, and materials. Each student will receive individual critiques. Some prior drawing experience would be helpful. A supply list will be sent.

Photography for Beginners January 14 – February 4 4 Saturdays 9 a.m. – noon Design Studio Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $129/$162 If you have a camera but are new to photography, join professional photographer Jack Carlson as he explains how your camera works and how to use it to get the best images possible. Classroom sessions are followed by trips outdoors to immediately practice new skills with hands-on assistance. Returning to the classroom allows students to view and discuss the newly created images. The Garden is a perfect setting for learning how to use your camera and to appreciate the natural environment.

Macro Photography in the Greenhouse January 17 – February 7 4 Tuesdays 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. Design Studio Jessie Stevens, principal photographer, Simply Jessie Photography $129/$162 Get away from the winter blues and come explore the Greenhouse. This class will introduce you to a world of detail often not noticed. The succulents, tropical blooms, and greenhouse color will serve as our natural laboratory. Each class will consist of learning new macro techniques followed by trips into the Greenhouses to practice new skills and artistic elements. Designed for intermediate photographers comfortable with basic photography techniques. Digital SLR, macro lens, and tripod required.

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Frame Loom Weaving January 18 – March 21 10 Wednesdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Design Studio Pamela Feldman, artist and educator $379/$474 This class will focus on students’ individual weaving projects and skill building. We will begin the class by assessing student levels, and then design a skill-building outline that will help students increase their ability to express themselves through the tapestry medium. Visual presentations and demonstrations are included. Basic supplies for the samples are included in the class fee. Students are expected to purchase additional materials for the final project. Requirements: Beginning Frame Loom Weaving, consent of instructor, and your own loom.

Behind-the-Scenes Tour: The Flower Market January 18 Wednesday 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Annex 2 Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $89/$112 Get a behind-the-scenes look at a local wholesale floral supplier. We will meet at the Garden for a floral design workshop on how to arrange a tabletop centerpiece. After lunch, we will caravan to the market for a unique tour, then shop for flowers and supplies that you can arrange at home, so bring your wallet! The program will conclude at the flower market in Northbrook. Please bring pruners and a box to transport your completed arrangement. All other materials for the workshop will be included in the fee. Please bring a sack lunch.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

Botanical Art: Learning How to Draw January 20 – February 24 6 Fridays 9 a.m. – noon Design Studio Derek Norman, artist and director, Midwest Center for Botanical Documentation $249/$312 This class is designed for those who have a desire to draw and paint and who are convinced they can’t. If you are intimidated by the sight of a sheet of white paper, this class is for you. Learn the fundamental principles of putting pencil to paper by developing a basic pencil-line technique. Understand how to establish shape, form, depth, and dimension, as well as proportions and perspective! This class is also recommended for beginning horticultural students.

New! Botanical Art: Painting in Gouache January 20 – February 24 6 Fridays 1 – 4 p.m. Design Studio Derek Norman, artist and director, Midwest Center for Botanical Documentation $249/$312 Historically, there is a rich tradition in the world of botanical art and illustration for painting in gouache. This studio class offers the chance to discover some of the traditions that make this technique so satisfying and appealing to both the accomplished and the beginning botanical artist. Gouache (opaque watercolor) technique is ideal for highly detailed botanical painting and also for a looser, more interpretive, approach. Students will work from botanical specimens to learn and observe the rhythms of natural botanical shapes and floral forms. Current and historical examples of gouache technique will be studied to help further the students’ awareness of accomplished gouache technique.


February 2 – 23 4 Thursdays 1 – 3 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Nancy Clifton, program specialist, Chicago Botanic Garden $229/$287

The Magical World of Floral Close-Ups March 9 Friday 7 – 9 p.m. Alsdorf Auditorium Allen Rokach, master garden photographer $29/$37

Join Nancy Clifton and learn the basics of flower arranging in this series of hands-on classes. The first week focuses on the basics, such as cut-flower care, mechanics, wiring, and many other techniques, including the types of tools used when working with fresh flowers. Week two features the simple beauty of line arrangements. Week three highlights the most popular style, the mass arrangement. Week four combines the line style with the mass arrangement to create a style that has it all! No previous knowledge is needed to attend this series. Please bring pruners and a small box for your finished arrangements. All other materials are included in the fee.

February 3 Friday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Shawn Sheehy, pop-up engineer and author $89/$110 Create pop-up cards featuring native flowers of the Midwest! Fundamental techniques of pop-up engineering will be demonstrated and practiced while building these flowers, using little more than a knife, glue, and card stock. At the end of the day, you will have a collection of four or five cards that you might either keep for further study or give to family and friends. No experience is necessary, but binding and/ or sewing skills will speed your progress. A supply list will be sent.

New! Pop-Up Flowers of the Midwest: Intermediate February 10 Friday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Linnaeus Room Shawn Sheehy, pop-up engineer and author $89/$110 If you completed the simpler blooms in the beginner’s workshop, you’re ready to move on to the complex flowers of this intermediate pop-up flower workshop. Columbine, pasture rose, and blue flag iris are among the blooms included in this set of cards. A supply list will be sent.

Allen Rokach will take you on a visual journey that begins with his early attempts at flower photography. He shows the path he traveled to become a master flower and garden photographer, with the emphasis on his dramatic floral close-ups and his new impressionistic images.

Floral Close-Up Photography with Allen Rokach March 10 Saturday 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Garden View Room Allen Rokach, master garden photographer $179/$224

Photo by Allen Rokach

Pop-Up Flowers of the Midwest: Beginners

Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Back by Popular Demand!

Beginning Flower Arranging

Master photographer Allen Rokach reveals secrets of close-up garden photography.

Beginning Silk Painting February 6 – April 2 (no class February 20) 8 Mondays 1 – 3 p.m. Design Studio Vivian Visser, artist and educator $239/$299 This class will help you develop techniques in silk painting. This will include color mixing, textural applications, design, and detail painting. The classes will start with very simple techniques and gradually become more difficult. Beginners are welcome. Each class will start with the presentation of a sample piece and an explanation of how it is created. You will then make your own attempts at the technique with guidance by the instructor. The fabric is then fixed with the use of an iron, and you will take home your finished work. Silks and paints are included in the fee.

Beginning Watercolor March 1 – April 5 6 Thursdays 1 – 3:30 p.m. Design Studio Patsy Welch, artist and educator $189/$237

Discover the magical miniature world found in close-ups of flowers with master photographer Allen Rokach. He will show you how to use macro lenses, as well as inexpensive extension tubes and close-up filters on lenses you already have, to help you create dramatic and aesthetic images of flowers as you have rarely seen them. You will learn how to pre-visualize the image you want and use conventional and digital camera settings to achieve the results you desire, control sharpness in the subject and background, use color and composition aesthetically, work with natural light and electronic flash to add light as needed, explore creative solutions to difficulties such as motion, and use simple “after capture” techniques to expand your creative toolbox.

Photographing Signs of Spring March 16 – April 6 4 Fridays 9 a.m. – noon Design Studio Jack Carlson, certified professional photographer $99/$124 When new shoots begin to appear through the light coating of frost that’s still on the ground, it’s a perfect time to reach for your camera. Join Jack Carlson on a photographic journey through the Garden to capture those subtle signs of the season that are often overlooked. From new pinecones in the Dwarf Conifer Garden to trumpeter swans, spring will be here in many forms just waiting to be photographed. Participants are strongly urged to bring a tripod. A close-focusing lens would be helpful, but is not required. Both film and digital capture are welcome.

Watercolor is a delightfully fun medium! In this class, you’ll learn a variety of watercolor techniques, including washes and how to make a range of textures on paper, plus some color theory to get you started. No prior experience is necessary. A supply list will be sent.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

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Adult Education: Botanical Arts & Humanities

Botanical Arts Certificate of Merit Botanical Drawing 1 Winter session January 17 – March 6 8 Tuesdays 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Field Museum $279/$349 ART requirement Strong drawing is the cornerstone of botanical art. In this class we will work in pencil, covering the fundamentals of proportions, line, tone, dimensionality, and expression. We will work from live specimens, flowers, seeds, and fruit to learn to draw plants accurately and beautifully.

Botanical Drawing 3 January 21 – February 25 6 Saturdays 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Plant Science Lab, Regenstein Center Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Field Museum $229/$287 ART elective We will explore different approaches to capture beautiful and accurate botanical detail, frequently using the microscope. We will work primarily in pencil and will experiment with different tools to achieve particular textures and effects. Prerequisites: Botanical Drawing 1 and 2 or equivalent.

Pen and Ink I January 23 – March 5 (no class February 20) 6 Mondays 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Derek Norman, artist and director, Midwest Center for Botanical Documentation $229/$287 ART requirement, traditional track

Color Mixing

Pen and Ink 2

March 13 – April 17 6 Tuesdays 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Field Museum $229/$287

April 30 – June 11 (no class May 28) 6 Mondays 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Derek Norman, artist and director, Midwest Center for Botanical Documentation $229/287

ART requirement Learn to mix accurate, exciting color including the vivid, specific hues of flowers, the bright and subdued greens of leaves, and the deep, subtle colors in shadows. We’ll make charts for permanent reference and then apply this knowledge to paint flowers and leaves from live specimens. We will work in watercolor, but the exercises apply to all media.

Dry and Wet Colored Pencil Workshop March 29 – April 26 (no class April 19) 4 Thursdays 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Priscilla Humay, artist and educator $139/$174 Explore this medium through drawing from real life provided by nature in the Garden. Learn various color application techniques of dry application, wet color surface mixing, and dry and wet color layering. Find the underlying form, color, and line on which to build a solid drawing. Demonstrations, individual guidance, and open critiques are given each session. The School’s CEUs=1.2

Botanical Drawing 2 April 24 – May 29 6 Tuesdays 6 – 9 p.m. Design Studio Marlene Hill Donnelly, scientific illustrator, Field Museum $229/$287

This studio class will examine advanced pen and ink techniques and composition in classic botanical documentation and illustration. We will draw advanced plant forms and their parts under the microscope, developing sound linear and tonal skills, communicating accurate botanical information and the aesthetics of botanical drawing and composition. Students will work using both a crow quill (dip pen) and technical drawing pens. Prerequisites: Botanical Drawing 1, Pen and Ink 1.

Form and Texture in Watercolor Visiting Artist Program May 4 – 6 Friday – Sunday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Design Studio Marilyn Garber, artist and educator, Minnesota School of Botanical Art at The Bakken Museum in Minneapolis $359/$449 ART elective This class will emphasize creating optimum form while illustrating a variety of plant textures. Translucent petals, veins in petals, shiny leaves, bumpy leaves, hairy leaves and stems, and color patterns will be experimented with as you create a study sheet of textures in watercolor. Flat wash with an emphasis on dry brush will be incorporated. A presentation on the unfinished works of Franz Bauer will be included. The School’s CEUs=1.8

ART requirement Continue to build your drawing skills with advanced graphite techniques, light and dark media on toned paper, and carbon dust. We will work outside whenever the weather permits. Prerequisite: Botanical Drawing 1.

This studio class will examine pen and ink drawing by the study of natural botanical forms, shapes, and dissections. We will study the use of a variety of pen and ink techniques (stipple, cross-hatching, contour-line, and combinations); the execution of black-and-white elements to create value, tone, and texture (such as leaf venation, stem texture, and shading); and create positive and negative tones to create depth and dimension. Prerequisite: Botanical Drawing 1.

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ART requirement, traditional track

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/school/faculty for faculty biographies. Chicago Botanic Garden members pay the lower of the two fees listed.


Adult Education: Wellness & Fitness

Wellness & Fitness Discover the many possibilities offered at the Chicago Botanic Garden for growing and healing your body and spirit.

New! Aromatherapy for Colds Workshop January 13 Friday 1 – 3 p.m. Garden View Room Etsuko Kobira Rutz, IFA Aromatherapist, LMT, BSc $39/$49 Did you know that aromatherapy can help prevent colds or speed your recovery from a cold? We will learn about therapeutic essential oils that can be used as self-care to maintain your well-being this winter. We will also make two sample-sized take-home projects during the workshop: a perfume and mouthwash that both use appropriate and safe essential oils to help prevent catching cold this winter! All materials are provided.

New! Take Charge of Your Health! January 25 – February 29 6 Wednesdays 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Linnaeus Room White Crane Wellness Center instructors $30 Through this discussion-oriented six-week workshop, discover a new way to be in control of your health troubles, and live the life you WANT to live! This is a friendly and supportive workshop designed for people with different chronic health problems. Subjects covered include dealing with such problems as frustration, fatigue, pain and isolation; appropriate exercise for maintaining and improving strength, flexibility, and endurance; appropriate use of medications; communicating effectively with family, friends, and health professionals; nutrition; and how to evaluate new treatments. Students who attend at least four of the six sessions will also receive a $15 gift card to a local grocery store. This program is brought to the Garden by the White Crane Wellness Center, a nonprofit organization that offers health education/health promotion programs for adults.

New! Home Spa Aromatherapy Workshop

Yoga Flow Beginner

February 4 Saturday 10 a.m. – noon Fairchild Room Etsuko Kobira Rutz, IFA Aromatherapist, LMT, BSc $39/$49

Winter session: January 10 – March 13 Spring session: April 3 – June 12 (no class April 17) 10 Tuesdays 9:15 – 10:30 a.m. or 6 – 7:15 p.m. Garden View Room Steve Nakon, director, Whole Journey Northwest Yoga $135/$170

Aromatherapy is a perfect tool for stress management and there are lots of essential oils that help promote relaxation and calm your busy mind! Do you want to learn how you can use essential oils for home spa treatments? Pamper yourself or a loved one with the fun sample-sized products you create in this workshop: a bath salt, body lotion, and mask. Come join the fun and have a fantastic and aromatic time with us! All materials are provided.

Yoga Classes Yoga is an ancient practice that unites body, mind, and spirit. For all sessions, wear comfortable clothing (sweats, shorts, or yoga pants) with socks or bare feet. Yoga mats are required. It is also suggested that you bring a towel with you, as well as a sweatshirt for cool-down. All yoga classes last approximately 75 minutes. One-time class trial fee: $15.

Gentle Yoga

Yoga Flow Intermediate Winter session: January 10 – March 13 Spring session: April 3 – June 12 (no class April 17) 10 Tuesdays 8 – 9:15 a.m. or Winter session: January 12 – March 15 Spring session: April 5 – June 14 (no class April 19) 10 Thursdays 9 – 10:15 a.m. or 6 – 7:15 p.m. Garden View Room Steve Nakon, director, Whole Journey Northwest Yoga $135/$170

Winter session: January 9 – March 12 Spring session: April 2 – June 11 (no class April 16) 10 Mondays 9 – 10:15 a.m. or 5:15 – 7 p.m. Garden View Room Steve Nakon, director, and Patricia Nakon, co-director, Whole Journey Northwest Yoga $135/$170

The Yoga Flow series combines movement linked to the breath, working the body and engaging the mind. This is a more exhilarating, challenging Flow series for students who have taken Beginner Flow or have comparable experience. On occasion, when weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Gentle yoga features a series of yoga poses and breathing exercises designed and adapted for a tranquil, relaxing yoga experience. In this course, we will take a gentle, restorative approach to the practice. All students are welcome. Come and enjoy sense of peace and balance. On occasion, when weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Tai Chi Classes

Introductory Yoga Winter session: January 11 – March 14 Spring session: April 4 – June 13 (no class April 18) 10 Wednesdays 5:15 – 6:30 p.m. or 7 – 8:15 p.m. Garden View Room Steve Nakon, director, Whole Journey Northwest Yoga $135/$170 Introductory yoga is a course for the newer student, focusing on yoga movement and breathing basics. We will investigate how the principles of yoga help support health and well-being. On occasion, when weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden. All are welcome. Join us as we explore the yoga basics.

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The Yoga Flow series combines movement linked to the breath, working the body and engaging the mind. This is a moderately challenging course for students with some yoga experience. On occasion, when weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Tai chi’s fluid movements make the Chicago Botanic Garden an ideal location for classes. People of all ages and physical conditions can learn these movements. Tai chi is best practiced in loose clothing and stocking feet or comfortable flat shoes. Dress for the weather as class may be held outside when weather allows. One-time class trial fee: $15.

Beginning Tai Chi Spring session: March 14 – May 23 (no class April 18) Summer session: June 6 – August 22 (no class June 20 or July 4) 10 Wednesdays 8 – 9 a.m. Burnstein Hall Gordon Lock, instructor $115/$165 The course will introduce students to the principles of tai chi. It will include qigong warm-ups and practice of part I of the tai chi form. On occasion, when weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school/registration_policies for information on registration procedure and policy.


Fitness Walks

Spring session: March 15 – May 24 (no class April 19) Summer session: June 7 – August 23 (no class June 21 or July 5) 10 Thursdays 8 – 9 a.m. Burnstein Hall Gordon Lock, instructor $115/$165

Walking is a great cardiovascular workout for all fitness levels. Maximize the benefits of walking for exercise by learning about proper posture, muscle strengthening, and stretching. The Chicago Botanic Garden’s outdoor environment is a unique alternative to a health club, offering fresh air and a place where beautiful scenery changes weekly. Classes are conducted in the Regenstein Center courtyard during inclement weather. All fitness levels are accommodated. Dress for the weather; wear comfortable clothing and walking shoes. A water bottle will help keep you refreshed. The incremental multi-session pass allows the walker to choose which sessions to attend during the season. All 2012 passes expire on Saturday, November 17, 2012.

For students with tai chi experience, this course will provide instruction in qigong warm-ups and refinement of part I of the tai chi form. On occasion, when weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Intermediate II Tai Chi Spring session: March 15 – May 24 (no class April 19) Summer session: June 7 – August 23 (no class June 21 or July 5) 10 Thursdays 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. Burnstein Hall Gordon Lock, instructor $115/$165 This course will provide instruction in qigong warm-ups, refinement of part I, and instruction in part II of the tai chi form. On occasion, when weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Esther Gutiérrez-Sloan, certified personal trainer and president, SALSArobics, Inc. # of Sessions

Member/Nonmember

4 Sessions 8 Sessions 12 Sessions 16 Sessions Season Pass Drop-in Rate

$38/$46 $76/$92 $114/$138 $152/$184 $285/$345 $10

ExerScape Fitness: Strength & Toning

Adult Education: Wellness & Fitness

Intermediate Tai Chi

ExerScape will be back in spring 2012—please check www.chicagobotanic.org/wellness for more information. This class focuses on strength and conditioning amid the scenic beauty of the Garden. Enjoy energizing resistance workouts outside of a stuffy gym! These classes use resistance tubing and functional movements to help reduce your weight, improve your muscle tone, help increase your bone density, and broaden your flexibility and range of motion. Yoga mats are required. All fitness levels are accommodated. Dress for the weather, as class will be held outdoors whenever possible. Wear comfortable clothing and walking shoes.

Saturdays, March 3 – November 17, 8 – 9 a.m. Meet in Visitor Center

Advanced Tai Chi Spring session: March 14 – May 23 (no class April 18) Summer session: June 6 – August 22 (no class June 20 or July 4) 10 Wednesdays 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. Burnstein Hall Gordon Lock, instructor $115/$165 This course will focus on part II of the tai chi form and qigong warm-ups. Part I will be practiced occasionally. When weather permits, class will occur outdoors in one of the beautiful areas of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

The Garden offers yoga for all levels.

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/school to register.

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Botanical Arts & Humanities Adult Education: Community Gardening

Community Gardening Workshops in Sustainable Vegetable Production Windy City Harvest trains adults in sustainable horticulture and urban agriculture. All courses are held on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon in the greenhouse and classroom at the Daley College/Arturo Velasquez Institute, 2800 S. Western Ave. (enter the south parking lot from 31st Street). All materials and handouts are provided. Courses are taught by Chicago Botanic Garden and Windy City Harvest staff. Each workshop is $39. Registration for each class ends a week before the class begins. There is a minimum of five students required to run the program and a maximum of 15 students.

Registration Online: www.chicagobotanic.org/ windycityharvest/courses

Crop Planning January 28, 2012 Cabin fever is setting in. It’s time to grab your seed catalogs and start dreaming about the growing season. Let’s plan your veggie garden early!

Seed Starting February 18, 2012 Learn different techniques for starting your own vegetable transplants. Learn a sustainable method for starting seeds. Blend your own seed-starting mix and use a soil-block maker.

Season Extension March 31, 2012 Learn how to extend your spring and fall growing seasons with low tunnels and cold frames.

Workshop participants learn best practices from Garden experts.

Mail: Send completed registration form to Education and Community Programs Registrar Chicago Botanic Garden 1000 Lake Cook Road Glencoe, IL 60022 Fax: Fax completed application to (847) 242-6330. 58

Call (847) 835-8261 or visit www.chicagobotanic.org/windycityharvest to register.


Youth & Family Programs

Youth and Family Programs Early positive experiences in nature or other plant-rich environments can foster a lifelong appreciation of the natural world. That is why, with the support of the Guild of the Chicago Botanic Garden, we are deeply committed to engaging families and children of all ages with a year-round schedule of professionally designed, age-appropriate programs held throughout the Garden.

Earn a Green Badge for Valentine’s Day Chicago Botanic Garden Scout Seasonal Workshops involve girls and boys in fun, hands-on, outdoor educational activities. On Saturday, February 11, from 12:45 to 3 p.m., Scouts are invited to take part in a brand-new program. Celebrate Valentine’s Day and earn a Chicago Botanic Garden patch while making valentines from recycled materials and learning about the cacao tree and chocolate. The $12 fee per child includes parking and all materials. Adults should plan to stay with their Scouts for the duration of the program. At least one adult chaperone for every five Scouts is required. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/scout or call (847) 835-6801.

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www.chicagobotanic.org/forfamilies

Scout Seasonal Workshops are a fun way for Scouts to meet new people and experience nature’s changes. Individuals and groups are welcome to sign up.


Fee-based Programs

NEW! Play with Plants November 19

Free Programs

Little Diggers

Design toys from all different kinds of plant parts! Explore seeds and use them to make an ancient board game, and examine leaves from corn and turn them into people or animals.

Discovery Backpacks Enliven your family’s Garden visit using tools to identify and observe plants and animals. Check out one of our free Backpacks, available on a first-come, first-served basis at the Information Desk in the Visitor Center.

Story Time Mondays, January 9 – May 21 10 – 11 a.m. Stop by the Lenhardt Library on Monday mornings for nature-themed stories and hands-on activities. Geared toward children ages 2 to 5 with a caregiver. No program April 23.

Tu B’Shevat Family Activities Sunday, January 29 1 – 4 p.m. Celebrate the Jewish festival of trees! Families can explore trees in the Greenhouses, enjoy a reading corner with books about trees, and take a plant home. These activities are provided by the National Council of Jewish Women, Chicago North Shore Section.

Malott Japanese Garden Spring Weekend Saturday, March 24 & Sunday, March 25 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Celebrate spring by writing a seasonal haiku and making a cherry blossom hanging scroll, plus try other hands-on activities. Enjoy suminagashi painting, storytelling and musical performances, and take a walk in the Japanese Garden. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/familyprograms/ dropin for more information on all of these programs.

At Little Diggers, children explore nature through stories, outdoor walks, and art projects like leaf stamping.

Thursdays: January 12, February 9, March 8 & April 12 Fridays: January 13, February 10, March 9 & April 13 Saturdays: January 14, February 11, March 10 & April 14 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. $56 Garden Plus member per child $64 Nonmember per child

Joyful Gingerbread December 3 or 17 Explore all the different plants and plant parts needed to make gingerbread. Take home a future ginger plant, decorate cookies, and mix up a batch of gingerbread to bake at home.

Learn about flowers, discover animals, experience the changing seasons, and more! These four-class series for children ages 2 to 4 and caregivers meet mornings, once a month. Each program includes group activities, time for free play, and a planting project.

Pizza Gardens January 7

Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/littlediggers to register or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Gumballs & Superballs January 21 or 28

Weekend Family Classes

Find out how to use parts of rainforest trees to make chewing gum and rubber. Create your own bouncing ball and flavorful gum to take home.

Saturdays 9:30 – 11 a.m. or 1 – 2:30 p.m. $22 Nonmember per child Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Together, adults and children ages 4 to 10 can explore cool things about how plants connect to science, art, history, and culture. Each Saturday program includes a variety of hands-on activities and projects, as well as opportunities to bring the Garden home.

NEW! Bathtub Botany November 5 Mix up a bag of fragrant tub tea using dried flowers and herbs and create your own handmade soap using plant materials for the color, scent, and texture.

Sample some of the different plants used to flavor pizza, learn to mix and knead pizza dough, and plant a special Italian herb garden to make tasty pizza treats at home!

HOT Chocolate February 4 or 18 Examine the cacao tree, learn how bitter beans make delicious desserts, mix up an ancient Aztec chocolate, and take home chocolate mint and chocolate pepper plants.

NEW! Deserts & Dinosaurs February 25 Walk through our Greenhouses to see special plants that grow in hot, dry places and ancient plants that shared the planet with dinosaurs. Create your own plant fossil and take home a desert plant and a dinosaur plant—a fern cupcake!

Youth & Family Programs

Family


Youth & Family Programs

Weekend Family Classes continued Japanese Dry Gardens March 3 Cross bridges and count lanterns as we visit the Malott Japanese Garden. See the large dry garden and take home your own miniature dry garden designed with sand and rocks. Homemade Ice Cream March 17 or 31 Get an up-close look at one of the world’s tiniest seeds from the vanilla orchid, make a batch of ice cream, and pot up a plant that can flavor ice cream. Critter Crew April 7 Discover habitats in the Garden and learn how important natural spaces are to our finned, feathered, and furry friends. Explore materials animals use in building their homes and construct an insect habitat. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/familyprograms or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Birthday Parties Celebrate your child’s birthday with a garden-themed party! Choose from a variety of themes. All parties include educational hands-on activities led by Garden staff. Every child takes home a plant plus additional items they’ve created. Parties can be scheduled year-round on Saturday or Sunday mornings or afternoons for children turning 4 and up. Garden Plus membership required. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/birthdays or call (847) 835-8275 for more information.

Youth

Scout Seasonal Workshop: Valentine’s Day

Scouts

$12 per child

Scout Badge Programs $10/child for 90-minute programs (ages 6 – 8) $15/child for 2-hour programs (ages 9 – 12) Scouts can complete badge requirements with challenging activities. Our wide range of Scout programs take children throughout the Garden and can be scheduled after school Monday through Friday, and on select Saturdays between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/scout or call (847) 835-8239 for more information about these programs.

Scout Seasonal Workshop: Winter Wonders Saturday, December 10 12:45 – 3 p.m. $12 per child Scouts can discover the magic of nature in winter through hands-on activities that combine art and science. Take a winter wildlife hike through the Garden. Make a fragrant evergreen swag, a snowflake journal, and a beeswax candle. Adults should plan to stay with their Scouts for the duration of the program. At least one adult chaperone for every five scouts is required. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/scout/seasonal or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Saturday, February 11 12:45 – 3 p.m.

Join fellow Scouts to celebrate Valentine’s Day. Scouts will make recycled Valentines and check out the tree that provides cacao, the main ingredient in chocolate! Adults should plan to stay with their Scouts for the duration of the program. At least one adult chaperone for every five Scouts is required. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/scout/seasonal or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Break Camps Winter Break Camp December 19 – 22 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. $275 Nonmember per child Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Children ages 5 to 8 can engage in exciting hands-on indoor and outdoor activities while discovering the Garden in winter. They’ll investigate weather, explore seasonal adaptations of plants and animals, and enjoy a visit to our Wonderland Express holiday exhibition. Our Do North partner Writers’ Theatre will provide campers with activities for developing their creative expression. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/winterbreakcamp to register or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

Spring Break Camp March 26 – 30, 2012 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. $345 Nonmember per child Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Children ages 5 to 8 will participate in high-quality learning activities with experienced teachers who use inquiry-based, hands-on activities. Programming connects nature to a range of themes including art, cuisine, and conservation. This spring, children will dissect and plant seeds, explore fragrant herbs and flowers, search for birds and early spring plants on nature hikes, take a trolley ride around the Garden, create take-home science-themed projects, and much more! Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/springbreakcamp to register or call (847) 835-6801 for more information.

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Children can celebrate birthdays with fun, nature-themed parties about birds or bugs.


Youth & Family Programs

Camp CBG Camp CBG provides exciting and enriching learning experiences for your child, with programs for children ages 2 to 12. All camps include nature exploration, inquiry-based activities, games, hands-on projects, and planting. The Garden offers weeklong morning, afternoon, and all-day camps from June to August. Register by February 29, 2012, to receive a $5 per camp Early Bloomer discount.

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www.chicagobotanic.org/camp

Registration begins December 5, 2011.

www.chicagobotanic.org/camp

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Born on or before September 1, 2010

$82 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Would you like to spend some time learning, exploring, and bonding with your child in an engaging environment? Welcome to My First Camp! My First Camp Age 2 Information • Camp meets Tuesday & Thursday from 9:45 to 11:15 a.m. • An adult must accompany each registered child. • To make camp enjoyable and fair to all, do not bring unregistered children, including siblings, to camp. Nursing mothers may call (847) 835-8361 to make arrangements. • Camp locations will be e-mailed the week prior to your camp.

Art & Music June 19 & 21 July 24 & 26 Share the joy of creating garden-inspired art with your child. Have fun practicing fine and gross motor skills while developing your child’s appreciation of nature and the arts. Fantastic Foods July 17 & 19 August 14 & 16 Is your tot interested in helping out in the kitchen, setting the kitchen table, or eating new foods? Discover new foods, prepare a tasty snack, and work on kneading, mixing, grating, and spreading skills. My First Garden June 26 & 28 August 7 & 9 Your little gardener will dig, sow, and harvest with our child-sized tools! Grow those gardening skills by digging in the dirt and helping us create a garden! Small Scientists July 10 & 12 July 31 & August 2 Toddlers will explore the world using magnets, water, sand, and the colors of the Garden. Discover textures and smells in nature, practice observation skills, and use scientific tools.

Most children are 4 or 5.

Jk-K

$123 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

$205 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

Would you like to spend some time learning, exploring, and bonding with your child in an engaging environment? Welcome to My First Camp!

Green Sprouts Information

My First Camp Age 3 Information

• Dress for the weather.

• C amp meets Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9:45 to 11:15 a.m.

• Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily.

• An adult must accompany each registered child.

Bug Brigade June 18 – 22, 9:30 a.m. – noon July 30 – August 3, 12:30 – 3 p.m.

• To make camp enjoyable and fair to all, do not bring unregistered children, including siblings, to camp. Nursing mothers may call (847) 835-8361 to make arrangements. • Camp locations will be e-mailed the week prior to your camp. • Dress for the weather. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily.

• Dress for the weather. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily.

Green Sprouts

Grades

Born on or before September 1, 2009

3

Age

2

Age

My First Camp Age 2

My First Camp Age 3

Art & Music June 18, 20, 22 July 23, 25, 27 Preschoolers’ creativity will thrive with natureinspired art and music activities. Engage in clay work, movement, music, and interactive storytelling with your little one at the Garden. Fantastic Foods July 16, 18, 20 August 13, 15, 17 You and your preschooler will discover the different foods that come from plants. Plant an herb garden, practice slicing, pouring, and chopstick skills, and make a fruit salad! My First Garden June 25, 27, 29 August 6, 8, 10 Your preschooler will create a garden and care for plants, from planting to watering to harvesting. Taste the bounty of the Garden and sell produce at our Farmers’ Market! Small Scientists July 9, 11, 13 July 30, August 1, 3 Preschoolers will be introduced to the parts of a flower; learn about ants and their body parts; and explore wind, water, and worms through developmentally appropriate activities.

• Camps meet Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to noon or 12:30 to 3 p.m.

Is your child fascinated by bugs? Children will get up close and personal with butterflies and bees, learn how their favorite insects see, and make a bug sucker to collect and study insects. Fun with Physics June 25 – 29, 9:30 a.m. – noon August 6 – 10, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Green Sprouts will perform basic physical science experiments and discover the laws that rule the natural world. They’ll explore why items sink or float, how magnets work, and static electricity. Garden Expedition June 25 – 29, 12:30 – 3 p.m. July 16 – 20, 9:30 a.m. – noon Young ecologists will investigate trees, leaves, prairie plants, and aquatic creatures, discovering all that the natural world of Illinois has to offer. They’ll learn how to preserve these wonders for future generations. Habitat Hunters July 9 – 13, 9:30 a.m. – noon August 13 – 17, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Habitat Hunters will explore the different habitats the Garden has to offer, learn how to track animals, and make a habitat for one of the creatures that lives here. Hidden Treasures June 25 – 29, 9:30 a.m. – noon July 16 – 20, 12:30 – 3 p.m. August 6 – 10, 9:30 a.m. – noon Campers will use a map to find their way, create a treasure chest, and dig up a treasure to keep. They’ll also bring home a plant with a hidden treasure to share. Mad Scientists June 18 – 22, 12:30 – 3 p.m. July 23 – 27, 9:30 a.m. – noon August 13 – 17, 9:30 a.m. – noon For young explorers who have ever wondered how fireflies glow, why leaves change, whether fish sleep, or just WHY? They’ll find these answers and many more as they become not-so-mad scientists.

www.chicagobotanic.org/camp

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Youth & Family: Camp CBG

Weeklong camps


Most children are 6 or 7.

1-2

Grades

Youth & Family: Camp CBG

Green Thumbs

$205 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Green Thumbs Information Camps meet Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to noon or 12:30 to 3 p.m. • Dress for the weather. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily.

Green Sprouts continued Nature Art July 9 – 13, 12:30 – 3 p.m. July 30 – August 3, 9:30 a.m. – noon August 13 – 17, 9:30 a.m. – noon Explore all the ways to make art from nature! Green Sprouts will use the sun’s power to make prints and dyes, use clay for sculpture, and become inspired by flowers with watercolor painting. Salad Science June 18 – 22, 9:30 a.m. – noon July 23 – 27, 9:30 a.m. – noon

Green Thumbs discover different natural artistic styles while they explore the Garden. They’ll sculpt with clay, make plant dyes, and create their own paper. Incredible Edibles July 23 – 27, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Young chefs will explore the Garden with their taste buds and find out how plants turn the sun’s energy into fuel for our bodies! We’ll explore how we eat plant parts every day, harvest food grown in the Outdoor Classroom, make our own tasty snacks, and plant an herb garden to take home.

We eat parts of plants every day. Young food scientists will explore the Garden to discover how foods grow. We’ll discover how plants change the sun’s energy into energy for our bodies, prepare our own snacks, and plant a salad to take home!

Kinetic Kids August 6 – 10, 9:30 a.m. – noon

Sprouting Wizards July 9 – 13, 9:30 a.m. – noon July 23 – 27, 12:30 – 3 p.m. July 30 – August 3, 9:30 a.m. – noon

Treasure Hunt June 25 – 29, 12:30 – 3 p.m. July 16 – 20, 9:30 a.m. – noon

Kids become science wizards as they explore basic chemistry and the properties of solids, liquids, and gases through experimentation. No need to bring magic wands…we’ll make our own! Super Seedlings July 16 – 20, 9:30 a.m. – noon August 6 – 10, 9:30 a.m. – noon Campers will dig, plant, water, weed, and sow in the Garden. Working together, they’ll create a garden, practice seed dissection, and become true gardeners!

Register by February 29, 2012, to receive a $5 per camp Early Bloomer discount.

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Art in the Garden July 9 – 13, 9:30 a.m. – noon July 30 – August 3, 12:30 – 3 p.m.

Budding physicists will discover cool science tricks, explore the laws of motion, and perform physical science experiments with toys.

Campers will develop map-reading skills, use compasses, and discover how archeologists excavate sites. They will create a hidden treasure map and find secret plant treasures, too.

Expert Wizardry July 23 – 27, 9:30 a.m. – noon Young wizards will discover the magic of science as they create strange potions and perform unbelievable experiments while learning basic chemistry. No book of spells necessary—we’ll make our own. Explore Your World June 25 – 29, 9:30 a.m. – noon July 16 – 20, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Curious campers will learn about the natural world through guided exploration and discovery by visiting the many habitats at the Garden. They’ll also learn how to help preserve these habitats. Plant People August 6 – 10, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Young horticulturists will explore the fascinating life cycle of plants with plenty of opportunity for scientific discovery, hands-on experiments, and garden cultivation. Grossology June 18 – 22, 9:30 a.m. – noon August 13 – 17, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Campers will uncover the science behind “gross” things around and inside them as they explore slimy and smelly natural phenomena. They’ll use their observation skills along with scientific tools. Wildlife Wanderers July 9 – 13, 12:30 – 3 p.m. August 13 – 17, 9:30 a.m. – noon Junior ecologists will study creatures on the ground, in the air, and in the water. Create a science kit, plant a terrarium, identify trees and animal tracks, and record everything in your journal. Insect Investigation June 18 – 22, 12:30 – 3 p.m. July 30 – August 3, 9:30 a.m. – noon Bug lovers, unite! Green Thumbs will search for insect homes, make insect display cases, and create insect-vision glasses to take home.


Have you ever wondered how dirty, grimy, and grubby you can get working in a garden? Campers see what is in a day’s work at the Garden–keeping our worm bins healthy, learning about the importance of compost, designing and planting a garden, and meeting a Garden scientist! Forensic Investigators June 25 – 29, 9:30 a.m. – noon This year’s all-new mystery will require young CSI team members to try investigative techniques used by the pros to help us get to the bottom of this summer’s hot case.

Most children are 8 or 9.

3-4

Grades

Explorers

$205 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Explorers Information Camps meet Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to noon or 12:30 to 3 p.m. • Dress for the weather.

Garden Caching July 16 – 20, 12:30 – 3 p.m. August 6 – 10, 9:30 a.m. – noon A Garden adventure awaits! Explorers will search for hidden caches using compasses, maps, and GPS, as they learn the etiquette of geocaching. They’ll also create a cache for others to find. Konnichiwa Japan August 13 – 17, 9:30 a.m. – noon Time for immersion in Japanese culture as we explore Sansho-En, learn the art of bonsai, create sushi-inspired snacks, discover the art of calligraphy, and visit the Shoin House.

• Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily. Alfresco Art June 18 – 22, 9:30 a.m. – noon July 23 – 27, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Campers will become artistically inspired by the Garden and try their hand at botanical illustration, sculpture, printmaking, and painting. We’ll explore new techniques each day of this outdoor art program. Amazing Adaptations July 9 – 13, 9:30 a.m. – noon August 13 – 17, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Explorers will unearth the secrets of plants, animals, and insects as they discover how each has adapted in cool, scary, or wacky ways in order to live in their habitats.

Surviving Outdoors June 18 – 22, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Explorers will discover the secrets pioneers used to find water, make a collection of safe and useful plants, create a shelter, and learn about how to predict weathers and storms. Wicked Plants July 9 – 13, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Proceed with caution—this camp will explore plants that have held bad reputations for centuries! We’ll discover the importance of proper plant identification, historical spells and potions, and go on our own plant hunt in the Garden—who knows where a wicked plant may lurk?!

Most children are 10 to 12.

5-7

Grades

Adventurers

$420 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Adventurers Information

Camps meet Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. • Dress for the weather. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily. • Campers must bring a peanut-free lunch that does not require refrigeration. Art July 16 – 20 August 13 – 17 Artists will introduce Adventurers to the use of various mediums to create their own art. Using the Garden as a backdrop, students will develop their photography, sculpture, and drawing skills. They will explore the use of natural materials and learn various tricks of the trade used by professional artists. Chemistry June 18 – 22 July 23 – 27 Who knew chemistry could be so cool?! Adventurers will explore the basics of chemistry and chemical reactions. By performing simple experiments, they will develop a basic understanding of acids and bases, fine-tune measurement skills, and understand the importance of accurate data observation and recording. Cuisine July 9 – 13 August 6 – 10 Calling all aspiring chefs! Campers will discuss menu techniques and preparation; learn principles of cooking with fruits and vegetables; improve basic chopping skills; and learn the importance of kitchen safety. Campers will set a table, plate dishes, and create a healthy meal. We’ll use our harvest in simple summer recipes—ice cream, pasta, and more!

Botany in the Kitchen July 16 – 20, 9:30 a.m. – noon July 30 – August 3, 12:30 – 3 p.m.

Ecology June 25 – 29 July 30 – August 3

Young chefs will discover how fruits, vegetables, herbs, and nutrients make cooking fascinating. They’ll harvest vegetables and plant an herb garden.

What does an ecologist do at the Garden? Adventurers will discover what scientists do as they explore the Garden’s native Illinois habitats. Campers will conduct studies in our prairie, wetland, and woodland habitats, becoming familiar with native species. They will perform their own surveys, identifications, and field observations.

Camera Craft June 25 – 29, 12:30 – 3 p.m. July 30 – August 3, 9:30 a.m. – noon Campers will learn the elements of composition and framing snapshots, and practice shooting photos around the Garden. They’ll create a pinhole camera and rediscover the magic of nineteenth-century photography. Each camper must bring two disposable film cameras on the first day of camp.

Register by February 29, 2012, to receive a $5 per camp Early Bloomer discount.

www.chicagobotanic.org/camp

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Youth & Family: Camp CBG

Dirty Jobs July 23 – 27, 9:30 a.m. – noon August 6 – 10, 12:30 – 3 p.m.


Youth & Family: Camp CBG

NEW for 2012 Two-week camps The Garden now offers two-week full-day camps for Green Thumbs and Explorers! We have grouped four of your favorite camps into a fun-filled, outdoor, educational two-week-long camp program. Choose one or all four! Remember to pack a water bottle and snack daily, along with a peanut-free lunch that does not require refrigeration.

3-4

Grades

1-2

Grades

Green Thumbs

CBG Adventure July 23 – August 3 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Explorers

$840 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

Plants & the Arts June 18 – 29 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

$840 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

Green Thumbs can investigate the amazing plants and animals found in Garden habitats in the following camps:

$840 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

Green Thumbs will explore the Garden’s beauty and bounty in the following camps:

Treasure Hunt Plant People Wildlife Wanderers Explore Your World

Explorers can discover the Garden’s art and bounty in the following camps: Alfresco Art Camera Craft Botany in the Kitchen Konnichiwa Japan

Most children are 6 or 7. Art & Plants June 18 – 29 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Art in the Garden Incredible Edibles Plant People Expert Wizardry Fun with Science July 9 – 20

Mix It Up August 6 – 17 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

$840 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

$840 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

Does you camper like to try a little bit of everything? This camp combines the best of science, foods, and art:

Campers will dig deeper into the scientific process, while discovering all the science that can be found in the Garden:

Treasure Hunt Art in the Garden Grossology Incredible Edibles

Expert Wizardry Grossology Kinetic Kids Insect Investigation

Most children are 8 or 9.

Explore CBG July 9 – 20 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. $840 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Campers will explore the many gardens, while discovering some new places and facts about plants: Dirty Jobs Konnichiwa Japan Wicked Plants Garden Caching Science Explorer July 23 – August 3 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. $840 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Explorers will investigate plant, animal, and human adaptations, while utilizing the scientific process: Amazing Adaptations Surviving Outdoors Wicked Plants Forensic Investigators Explore It All August 6 – 17 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. $840 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Campers can try some of our most popular camps during this two-week session: Forensic Investigators Camera Craft Alfresco Art Surviving Outdoors

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Youth & Family: Camp CBG

Returning in 2012! Yoga Bash Camp at CBG Ages 6 – 10 $205 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount. Yoga Bash Camp Information • Camps meet Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to noon. • Bring a mat or purchase one of our mats for $10. • Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily. Grow the Pose with Yoga June 18 – 22 Campers will build strength, flexibility, and confidence through practicing yoga, as we explore the Garden while learning about elements such as the earth, air, and water.

Camp registration and cancellation policies Registration Deadline

Special Needs

Registration is open until camps fill or one week prior to the start date of camp. You will receive an automated reply immediately upon completion of your online registration.

The Garden is committed to providing accessible experiences for all children. If your child will require special accommodations, please call (847) 835-8361 to discuss your situation prior to registering.

Membership

Please Do Not Bring to Camp The Garden is NOT responsible for any item lost or broken during camp. Please leave the following items at home: personal video game players, cell phones, MP3 players/iPods, and iPod-type devices.

Hubbard Street Dance Camp Information

Garden Plus and above members receive a 20 percent discount on all Camp CBG programs! Those holding individual Garden memberships will not receive this discount. Please call (847) 835-8215 if you would like to upgrade your membership in order to receive the discount. You will need to provide a member ID number at the time of camp registration. Please note that Garden membership is nontransferable.

• Camp meets Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to noon.

Age Limits

Learning the Lotus July 16 – 20 We will draw on imagination, creativity, music, and stories to help us promote balance, movement, and harmony. Hubbard Street Dance Camp Ages 6 – 10 July 30 – August 3 $325 Nonmember per child per camp Garden Plus members receive a 20 percent discount.

• Pack a water bottle and peanut-free snack daily. Energy collides with creativity at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago’s Discover Dance© Summer Camp! Campers will be introduced to the exciting world of contemporary dance. Working with the professional dancers and teaching artists of HSDC, campers will explore how contemporary dance is created, then use that experience to create a new work. This workshop is appropriate for aspiring dancers of all abilities.

Leaders in Training Our Leaders in Training (LITs), ages 13 to 15, will help prepare for camps, assist teachers during the day, and learn life skills that benefit future job searches and college preparation in our two-week program. For an application and further information regarding the LIT program, please contact the camp manager at (847) 835-8361.

Please note the age/grade requirements for each camp group. Campers must be entering the listed grade in fall 2012. We regret that we cannot make any exceptions to this policy. Campers in the Green Sprouts group and above must be toilet trained.

Online Emergency Forms Camp CBG does not require a medical examination to attend camp; however, we ask that you fill out our Online Emergency Form as soon as you complete your online registration. In order for your child to attend camp, we must have a completed health form on file by June 1, 2012. The form is available at www.chicagobotanic.org/contact/index_camp.php on the Camp CBG website.

Snacks Please pack a peanut-free snack for your camper each day. We will take a snack break midmorning and midafternoon daily. Some camps may be making their own additional snacks during Camp CBG. If your child has food allergies that may prevent him from consuming these snacks, please specify to what degree on the Online Emergency Form.

Camper Code of Conduct You will be asked to review the CBG Camper Code of Conduct upon completion of the Online Emergency Form: • Campers will treat their fellow campers, instructors, and volunteers with respect. • Campers will follow directions and stay with their group. Please read and discuss these expectations with your child. In the event that a camper does not follow the Code of Conduct, or his or her behavior endangers other campers or interferes with an instructor’s ability to provide programming, the coordinator of Camp Programs or camp instructor will inform the parent at pick-up or through a phone call. If a second incident occurs, parents may be asked to withdraw their child from camp. Refunds will not be given for behaviorrelated withdrawals.

Lunch Camp CBG offers a supervised lunch period for Green Sprouts, Green Thumbs, and Explorers campers for $10 per child per week. Pack a peanut-free lunch for your child that does not require refrigeration, and we will supervise your child during lunch (noon to 12:30 p.m.) and escort your child to his afternoon camp.

www.chicagobotanic.org/camp

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Time

June 18-22

Yoga & Dance

9:30 a.m. - noon

Yoga Bash Camp

My First Camp 2&3

9:45 11:15 a.m.

Art & Music

My First Garden

Small Scientists

Fantastic Foods

Art & Music

Green Sprouts

9:30 a.m. - noon

Bug Brigade

Hidden Treasures

Habitat Hunters

Garden Expedition

Green Sprouts

9:30 a.m. - noon

Salad Science

Fun with Physics

Green Sprouts

12:30 - 3 p.m.

Mad Scientists

Garden Expedition

Green Thumbs

9:30 a.m. - noon

Grossology

Green Thumbs

12:30 - 3 p.m.

Insect Investigation

FULL-DAY TWO-WEEK

Art & Plants Art in the Garden, Incredible Edibles, Plant People, Expert Wizardry

July 9-13

July 16-20

July 23-27

August 6-10

August 13-17

Small Scientists

My First Garden

Fantastic Foods

Salad Science

Nature Art

Super Seedlings

Mad Scientists

Super Seedlings

Mad Scientists

Sprouting Wizards

Hidden Treasures

Nature Art

Nature Art

Hidden Treasures

Sprouting Wizards

Bug Brigade

Fun with Physics

Habitat Hunters

Explore Your World

Art in the Garden

Treasure Hunt

Expert Wizardry

Insect Investigation

Kinetic Kids

Wildlife Wanderers

Treasure Hunt

Wildlife Wanderers

Explore Your World

Incredible Edibles

Art in the Garden

Plant People

Grossology

2

Mix It Up Treasure Hunt, Art in the Garden, Grossology, Incredible Edibles

HSDC Discover Dance

Yoga Bash Camp

Sprouting Wizards

week camp

Fun With Science Expert Wizardry, Grossology, Kinetic Kids, Insect Investigation

week camp

Forensic Investigators

Amazing Adaptations

Botany in the Kitchen

Dirty Jobs

Camera Craft

Garden Caching

Konnichiwa Japan

12:30 - 3 p.m.

Surviving Outdoors

Camera Craft

Wicked Plants

Garden Caching

Alfresco Art

Botany in the Kitchen

Dirty Jobs

Amazing Adaptations

FULL-DAY TWO-WEEK

Plants & the Arts Alfresco Art, Camera Craft, Konnichiwa Japan, Botany in the Kitchen

Explorers

Alfresco Art

Adventurers

Green Thumbs

2

Explorers

2

CBG Adventure Treasure Hunt, Plant People, Wildlife Wanderers, Explore Your World

Explorers

2

July 30Aug 3

9:30 a.m. - noon

Grades

5-7

June 25-29

9:30 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Grades

3-4

3-4

Grades

1-2

Grades

Grades

1-2

Grades

Jk-K

Ages

2&3

Camp CBG Schedule

9:30 a.m. - 3 p.m.

9:30 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Chemistry

2

week camp

Ecology

Explore CBG Dirty Jobs, Konnichiwa Japan, Wicked Plants, Garden Caching

Cuisine

2

week camp

Art

Science Explorer Amazing Adaptations, Surviving Outdoors, Wicked Plants, Forensic Investigators

Chemistry

week camp

2

week camp

Ecology

Explore It All Forensic Investigators, Camera Craft, Alfresco Art, Surviving Outdoors

Cuisine

week camp

2

week camp

Art


Teacher & Student Programs

Teacher and Student Programs The Garden is a living laboratory, an ideal setting for learning about plants, ecology, conservation, and the natural world. From school field trips to teacher workshops and student internships, educators and students encounter fresh ideas, innovative teaching techniques, and meaningful science content that supports Illinois learning standards.

Curriculum rooted in conservation Take a break from the classroom this winter with a field trip to the Chicago Botanic Garden. Led by trained volunteer facilitators, these guided, interactive programs provide a meaningful learning experience for students in grades PreK through 12, taking advantage of the great outdoors and nature to meet Illinois state learning standards in science, language arts, math, health, and social studies. Winter and spring programs tailored to grades K – 5 include Garden Inquiry, January 23 through March 30, for grades K – 2; Plant Propogation, January 23 through March 30, for grades 3 – 5; and Science Sleuths, April 16 through June 1, for grades K – 5. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl/fieldtrips/k_5 for more detailed information or www.chicagobotanic. org/contact/index_explorations to register online. Teachers wishing to visit the Chicago Botanic Garden prior to a field trip may request a Teacher Pretrip Pass by calling (847) 835-6801.

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The Greenhouses provide a green oasis for school groups to learn about the plant world in the winter.


We invite you to expand your knowledge, enrich your teaching techniques, and enliven your grades preK – 12 classrooms, while earning professional development and graduate credit. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ teacherprograms for more detailed program descriptions and to register for classes. Unless otherwise indicated, all programs are from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

2012 Winter Programs

2012 Spring Programs

New! Natural History and Cultural

Illinois Department of Natural Resources ENTICE Workshop: Effects of Climate Change on Illinois Plants

Connections

January 21 at the Chicago Botanic Garden January 28 at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum Saturdays $140 (20 percent discount for Educator Members) Grade level: K – 12 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1

$10

Study the natural history of the Chicago region, and the interaction of people and plants in Illinois and across the Midwest. Learn about the local connections to the land and cultural uses of plants while enjoying hands-on activities. Investigate multiple perspectives and environmentalism through children’s literature, and explore the Garden’s plant collections and the Nature Museum’s exhibits.

The Chicago Botanic Garden is a national leader in collecting and analyzing data relating how changes in our climate are causing behavioral changes in plants. Scientists from the Garden will lead this workshop for educators of grades 6 through 12 and discuss their work. You’ll receive Illinois-specific resources and learn about how you and your students can participate in Project BudBurst, a national citizen-science initiative that contributes to research on the impacts of climate change on ecosystems.

New! Art and Science with Found Objects

2011 Fall Programs New! Cycles of Life: A Workshop for

A Workshop for Preschool Teachers

February 18 at the Chicago Botanic Garden February 25 at Kohl Children’s Museum Saturdays

Preschool Teachers

$150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members)

November 5 at Erikson Institute November 12 at the Chicago Botanic Garden Saturdays

Grade level: PreK – 2 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1

$150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members)

The Chicago Botanic Garden and the Kohl Children’s Museum are excited to partner for the first time to offer this workshop for preschool teachers. This workshop will focus on creating art using repurposed materials and incorporating science in your classroom using objects from nature. This class is designed for preK educators but is adaptable for grades preK through 2.

Grade level: PreK – 2 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1 The cycle of life is an amazing yet difficult concept to understand, especially for young children. In this workshop, learn how to help children come to an emotional understanding of caring for other living things and the natural process of loss. Through hands-on activities, singing, and movement, learn how to use the plant life cycle as a way to help children experience empathy, nurturing, and change. This workshop is appropriate for anyone working with preschoolers to second graders.

New! Year-Round School Gardening March 17 at the Chicago Botanic Garden March 24 at Arturo Velasquez Institute Saturdays $150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members)

New! Island Life: Evolution of Island Plants

Grade level: PreK – 12 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1

December 3 at the Chicago Botanic Garden December 10 at the Brookfield Zoo Saturdays

Greenhouses and cold frames help you extend your fruit- and vegetable-growing season past the summer months in your school garden. Gain the resources to restore greenhouses or build simple low tunnels, hoop houses, or cold frames for your school garden. Outcomes include developing a crop plan, learning about organic gardening techniques, and observing successful working models at Dyett/Washington Park Green Youth Farm.

and Animals

$150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members) Grade level: K – 12 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1 Learn about the evolution of amazing plants and animals that live nowhere else on earth but their island homes, and how we can protect them. Discover how invasive species have affected these islands. We’ll explore the Greenhouses of the Chicago Botanic Garden and meet some special Brookfield Zoo animals. This workshop will prepare you to explain issues of interdependence and evolution.

April 28 at the Chicago Botanic Garden Saturday 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Grade level: 6 – 12 CPDU credit: 6, Lane credit: NA, Graduate credit: NA

Plant and Animal Interactions May 12 at the Brookfield Zoo May 19 at the Chicago Botanic Garden Saturdays $150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members) Grade level: PreK – 12 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1 Come explore the amazing interactions among plants and animals in this two-day workshop. One day will be spent at the Chicago Botanic Garden and another at the Brookfield Zoo learning how plants and animals have evolved together. Learn how local plants have adapted to attract animals to pollinate their flowers and disperse their seeds. This course will assist in the teaching of interdependence.

Bringing Up Bookworms: Using Children’s Literature to Teach Plant Science June 2 & 9 at the Chicago Botanic Garden Saturdays $150 (20 percent discount for Educator Members) Grade level: PreK – 8 CPDU credit: 15, Lane credit: 1, Graduate credit (additional fee): 1 The Garden brings you the latest techniques for fostering literacy through science and science through literacy. Learn how to develop practical lesson plans that inspire kids to read, write about, and discover science and nature. We will look at some of our favorite books and learn a number of bookmaking techniques. Award-winning children’s book author Cheryl Bardoe will discuss hallmarks of excellent science literature and share her own techniques to pass on to your students for writing about nature with clarity and creativity.

www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl 73

Teacher & Student Programs

Teacher Professional Development


Teacher & Student Programs

Other Teacher Programs Custom Workshops Education staff can develop custom workshops to be delivered at your site. Teachers, administrative staff, and parent or neighborhood volunteers can all participate through active learning. The workshops model grade-appropriate techniques for integrating plant-based learning into the curriculum. Please call Teacher Programs at (847) 835-6801 for more information about scheduling and pricing for custom workshops.

Green Teacher Network The Chicago Botanic Garden, Garfield Park Conservatory Alliance, and Openlands have teamed up to form the Green Teacher Network. This collaboration encourages Chicago-area schools to adapt plant-based education activities, and supports teachers’ efforts to build and use school gardens as curricular tools. For more information or to become a member, contact Jaime Zaplatosch at Openlands at (312) 863-6270.

Free Classroom Resource Kits for Loan The Center for Teaching and Learning offers a variety of resource kits of learning materials for educators to use in the classroom. Borrowing a kit requires a $50 deposit, which is refunded upon the return of the complete kit. For kit availability and/or to arrange for kit pickup call (847) 835-6801.

School Field Trips Enrich your students’ educational experience with a visit to the Garden. Choose from a variety of programs that feature plant and nature topics appropriate for specific grade levels. Guided and self-guided options are available. Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/ctl/fieldtrips for complete program information and to schedule your visit. New this fall: School buses will use our new driveway turnaround to drop off groups at the Children’s Learning Center. Homeschool Groups We welcome you to register for field trips to the Garden. If your homeschool group includes a range of ages, please review our complete program descriptions online and select a program that best matches your group’s grade level and knowledge base.

Guided Programs for Children with Special Needs K – 12 Monday through Friday $120 (includes all materials) Maximum number of children: 15 Bring your students to the Chicago Botanic Garden for a customized therapeutic program in the Buehler Enabling Garden’s outdoor classroom. These one-hour programs provide a guided, structured experience with nature and are designed for youth with special needs while meeting educational goals. If you find it difficult to travel with your students, please contact us to discuss possible programs delivered in your school. Call (847) 835-6801 to learn more about horticultural therapy for your students or to schedule a program.

Self-Guided Field Trips Year-round Monday through Friday 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. $30 per classroom (maximum 30 students); no additional parking fee required Self-guided field trips allow students to explore while you lead them through the Garden. Register in advance and Garden staff will be happy to discuss areas suited for any curricular topic, and distance to gardens.

The hands-on activities in our programs give teachers the confidence to teach plant science in the classroom.

74 www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl

New! Self-Guided Activity Backpacks $10 per class Self-guided activity backpacks provide hands-on activities for teachers to lead while visiting the Sensory Garden, Malott Japanese Garden, and McDonald Woods. Each backpack includes all supplies for the activities for a group of 30 and can be checked out for either the morning (9 a.m. to noon) or the afternoon (12:30 to 3:30 p.m.). Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/ctl/fieldtrips/selfguide. php for more information.

Guided Field Trips Unless otherwise stated, programs cost $115 per class of 30 students. Available dates and times vary with the program. Guided programs are led by trained facilitators who will engage your students with hands-on activities. Students will to learn about plants and habitats found at the Garden. Field trips include outdoor exploration activities, so please dress for the weather. Visit www. chicagobotanic.org/ctl/fieldtrips for more detailed grade-specific program descriptions, applicable state standards, and to schedule your visit.

Guided Programs PreK Unless otherwise stated, all preK programs are from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. or 10 a.m. to noon and cost $115. The maximum number of children is 25, and a 1:5 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Discovering Trees February 6 – 10, 2012 March 19 – 30, 2012 To investigate the world of trees, students will either explore the new Grunsfeld Children’s Growing Garden or take a trolley ride to the main island. Students will take home a “tree cookie” to remember their Garden experience.

Guided Programs PreK – 2 Unless otherwise stated, all grade preK – 2 programs are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to noon and cost $115 per class. A 1:5 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

New! Trains and Trees Holiday season, November 28 – December 16, 2011 Explore the enchanting Wonderland Express exhibition and learn more about evergreen trees and their adaptations to the change in seasons. Students will take home a special holiday craft.


Teacher & Student Programs

2011–2012 School Field Trips at a Glance Age Group

Program

Early Fall 9/6-10/14/11

Late Fall 10/31-11/11/11

Holiday 11/28-12/16/11

Winter 1/23-3/30/12

Spring 4/16-6/1/12

PreK – K Discovering Plants Discovering Trees PreK – 2 Trains & Trees K – 2 Surprising Seeds Garden Groceries A Walk in the Woods Garden Inquiry Insect Investigations 3 – 5 Flower Lab Plant Propagation Pondering the Prairie Forest Fundamentals K – 5 Science Sleuths 6 – 12 Water Quality Ecosystems & Adaptations Photosynthesis Journey Through Rare Books Green Buildings

Guided Programs K – 2

Guided Programs 3 – 5

Guided Programs 6 – 12

Unless otherwise stated, all grade K – 2 programs are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to noon and cost $115 per class. A 1:5 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Unless otherwise stated, all grade 3 – 5 programs are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to noon and cost $115 per class. A 1:7 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Unless otherwise stated, all grade 6 – 12 programs are available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to noon and cost $115 per class. A 1:10 ratio of chaperones to students is required.

Surprising Seeds

Flower Lab

Ecosystem and Plant Adaptations

Early Fall and Winter

Early Fall and Winter

Late Fall and Winter

What is inside a seed? As junior botanists, students learn about seed parts and how they work together to produce a new plant. Students will pot a seed to take home and also look for seeds in the Garden.

Why do plants make flowers? As junior botanists, students learn about flower parts and how flowers, with pollinators’ help, produce seeds. Students will pot a flower seed to take home and will also look for flowers in the Garden.

How do plants fit their place? Discover how plants have adapted to abiotic factors in an ecosystem. Student investigations include learning about the unique abiotic conditions that define many of the ecosystems of the world, including Illinois.

Forest Fundamentals

Photosynthesis Lab

Late Fall (9:45 – 10:45 a.m. or 11 a.m. – noon)

Late Fall and Winter

During this one-hour nature walk, students find evidence of seasonal change, food chains, and nutrient cycles. They record their observations in a field journal. Woodland programs take place outdoors in McDonald Woods.

Students will explore photosynthesis, investigating how and where it takes place, how plants obtain the materials necessary for it to occur, and its products. Students will use scientific equipment to measure gas exchange in plants.

Plant Propagation

A Journey Through Rare Books

Winter

Winter

Clone a new plant from part of another one! Compare and experiment with some different methods of propagating plants as you learn about various ways plants reproduce. Plant a stem cutting to take home and watch the roots grow.

Investigate the history of books and botanical illustration. With group research projects as the focus, students will explore the Lenhardt Library’s rare book collection and see books dating back to 1483. This program incorporates plant science, library research skills, exposure to rare books, and Garden exploration.

A Walk In the Woods Late Fall (9:45 – 10:45 a.m. or 11 a.m. – noon) During this one-hour nature walk, students will survey the Garden’s woodland habitat and use a field book to record observations. Woodland programs take place outdoors in McDonald Woods.

Garden Inquiry Winter Using the process of inquiry, students will choose an age-level winter garden research question. As scientists using available tools, they will also find the answer to their question.

Science Sleuths Spring ($100) Students will be immersed in hands-on adventures relating to plants and their role in the ecosystem. Discovery stations in diverse Garden areas facilitate an exciting outdoor, garden-based experience with plants and the environment.

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Science Sleuths Spring ($100) Students will be immersed in hands-on adventures relating to plants and their role in the ecosystem. Discovery stations in diverse Garden areas facilitate an exciting outdoor, garden-based experience with plants and the environment.

Green Buildings Spring (Tuesdays and Thursdays) Visit the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center to learn about the outstanding conservation features of this remarkable building. Grades 6 through 8 will investigate the Rainwater Glen and build a model to test which materials are best for water conservation. Grades 9 through 12 will experiment with different building materials to learn about green roofs.


Wonderland Express November 25, 2011 – January 1, 2012 $3 per person Visit an enchanting winter wonderland with twinkling lights and a magical indoor train. Model trains travel over bridges, under trestles, past waterfalls, and through more than 80 miniature versions of Chicago landmarks. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland for more information about Wonderland Express.

2012 Guided Walking Tours Spring: April 16 – June 1 Tuesdays and Thursdays 30 minutes $80 classroom (maximum 30 students); 1:7 ratio of chaperones to students is required. Explore the Garden with an expert. Tours allow students to explore one garden in more depth. Choose from one of the following: English Walled Garden, Greenhouse (select one), Malott Japanese Garden, or the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center.

2012 School Tram Tours Spring: April 16 – June 1 Summer: June 4 – September 2 Fall: September 4 – October 26 $2.50 per person Grades PreK, K – 2, or 3 – 6 30 minutes Embark on a delightful journey around the Garden. Your tram tour guide will show you things you might not notice on your own and invite you to search for clues to nature’s secrets. Grades 7 – 12 35 minutes Climb aboard for a narrated tram tour around the 2.6-mile perimeter of the Garden. Your tour guide will present highlights and history of this living museum, and share information about our research projects and conservation efforts.

Model Railroad Garden May 14 through October 26 $3 per person Guide your students around our popular model railroad exhibition, where 7,500 square feet of miniature gardens and unique settings delight students and chaperones alike. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/railroad for more information.

Community Outreach Chicago Public School Teachers: Great Opportunity for Students Interested in Science Science First

Science First is a free four-week summer program for Chicago Public School students currently in grades 7 through 9. While enjoying hands-on, nature-based science activities, indoor and outdoor investigations, and exposure to real scientists who work at the Garden, students improve their understanding of the scientific method and careers in science. Transportation and free lunch are provided. Applications for summer 2012 will be due in April. Chicago Public School teachers are encouraged to share registration materials with promising students. Visit www. chicagobotanic.org/sciencefirst for more information. Science First and College First are made possible by the generous support of Discover Financial Services, the Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, the Trillium Foundation, the Sheridan Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Leo S. Guthman Fund, the Motorola Solutions Foundation, the Harold M. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation, the W.P. & H.B. White Foundation, the Bertha Lebus Charitable Trust and the Stiles-Levy Family Fund.

College First

College First is an eight-week internship and field ecology course for Chicago Public High School students in their junior or senior year. Students get paid and earn college credit while studying environmental science, conducting a research project, and interacting with scientists at the Garden. Students meet monthly during the school year to learn more about preparing for college. Transportation is provided. Applications for summer 2012 will be due in April. Chicago Public School teachers are encouraged to share registration materials with promising students. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/collegefirst for more information.

Organic Farming for Youth Green Youth Farm

Each year, up to 70 students ages 13 to 18 work from mid-May through mid-October at four sites, earning their summer pay the old-fashioned way. The Green Youth Farm program offers students the opportunity to learn all aspects of organic farming. By the end of the season, participants have learned how to work together as a team, gained valuable job skills, discovered a whole new way to look at the food they eat, and grown their support system. Students from Waukegan High School, North Chicago Community High School, North Lawndale College Prep, Manley Career Academy, Farragut High School, and Dyett High School in Chicago are eligible to participate. The program also includes Jr. Green Youth Farm, which serves middle-school students and is located at Reavis Elementary School. The Jr. Green Youth Farm of Reavis School is conducted in collaboration with Elev8 and Quad Cities Development Corporation (QCDC). Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/greenyouthfarm for more information. Major support for the Green Youth Farm is provided by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, JPMorgan Chase Foundation, Polk Family Charitable Fund, Steans Family Foundation, After School Matters, Inc., The Bank of America Charitable Foundation, The Grainger Foundation, and the McKenna Foundation. Additional support is provided by an anonymous donor, the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services, Midwest Foods, Grace Bersted Foundation, Starbucks Foundation, The Crown Family, Charter One Foundation, Northern Trust Charitable Trust, Kaplan Foundation Fund, Walter S. Mander Foundation, Sheridan Foundation, SARE-Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education, and the Alvin H. Baum Family Fund. The Albers/Kuhn Family Foundation, Harold M. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation,Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Lake County Community Foundation, North Shore Garden Club, NeighborSpace, UnitedHealthcare of Illinois, Rotary Club of Deerfield, The Comcast Care Foundation, Kathy Richland Pick, and Janice Becker also contribute to Green Youth Farm.

Science First and College First are made possible by the generous support of Discover Financial Services, the Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, the Trillium Foundation, the Sheridan Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Leo S. Guthman Fund, the Harold M. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation, the W.P. & H.B. White Foundation, the Bertha Lebus Charitable Trust, and the Stiles-Levy Family Fund.

Project BudBurst

Join students and communities from across the country in collecting and sharing plant life-cycle data on our user-friendly database. Visit www.budburst.org for details, curriculum materials for grades K through 12, and data from past years. Project BudBurst is supported by grants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Ecological Observatory Network.

Students enjoy learning about healthy eating while gaining valuable skills in organic gardening in Green Youth Farm.

Teacher & Student Programs

Additional Field Trip Experiences


Teacher & Student Programs

Cultivating Health and Well-being Horticultural Therapy

Since 1977, the Garden’s Horticultural Therapy Services Program has supported the establishment of horticultural therapy programs at healthcare and human service agencies serving schools, VA hospitals, people with disabilities, and older adults in the Chicago region. The program serves as a primary regional, national, and international resource for information while offering a full range of professional training opportunities. Also available are consulting services in barrier-free greenhouse and enabling garden design, sensory landscaping, and horticultural therapy program planning. Visit www.chicagobotanic. org/therapy for more information. Horticultural Therapy is supported by an endowment from the Buehler Family Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Albers/Kuhn Family Foundation, Blowitz-Ridgeway Foundation, Grant Healthcare Foundation, Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs, Tawani Foundation, and the Edmond and Alice Opler Foundation as well as endowments established by the estate of Florence Rantz, the Kenilworth Garden Club, and the Julien H. Collins and Bertha M. Collins Fund and Helen and Maurice Weigle Fund at The Chicago Community Trust.

Windy City Harvest offers Positive Change, Future Careers Windy City Harvest

Windy City Harvest trains adults in sustainable horticulture and urban agriculture. Both are dimensions of the urban greening and healthy, affordable, local food movements to which the Chicago Botanic Garden has an institutional commitment. Certificate Training The cornerstone of Windy City Harvest is a ninemonth college credit certificate in organic vegetable production that enrolls 15 to 20 students annually through the City Colleges of Chicago. Delivered by Garden staff at the Arturo Velasquez Institute, a Daley College campus, Windy City Harvest trains students in best practices for year-round growing and sales of high-value vegetables, and offers a paid threemonth internship. Graduates are now working in a range of full-time and seasonal jobs in the local horticulture and urban agriculture industry. Visit www.chicagobotanic.org/windycityharvest for more information.

Horticultural therapy programs at the Garden bring gardening to people of all ages and abilities.

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Cook County Sheriff’s Boot Camp Windy City Harvest has been active at the Cook County Sheriff’s Boot Camp (CCBC) since 2009 with a garden program on a one-acre farm within its grounds. An alternative-sentencing facility for nonviolent young male offenders, the CCBC offers approximately 70 young inmates the chance to grow, maintain, and learn about organic vegetable production and basic environmental concepts. The vegetables are used in the camp’s mess hall and donated to local food pantries. Following the program’s initial success, the Garden received funding to establish a compost operation on adjacent land, where CCBC food scraps and garden waste create high-quality compost for expanding the farm. Program graduates are now employed at the compost operation and at the Chicago Botanic Garden as landscape crew. Three graduates are enrolled in the 2011 Windy City Harvest certificate training program. Native Seed Garden This project, another initiative of Windy City Harvest, in collaboration with the Garden’s plant scientists, will test whether native seed is a viable production crop for urban farmers. While employing Windy City Harvest students and CCBC graduates, the Native Seed Garden project will grow Midwest prairie species that are becoming increasingly rare due to habitat loss and deterioration. The combined expertise of the Garden’s native seed scientists and Windy City Harvest educators and trainers offers the possibility of an exciting new angle on “urban farming.” The first site is in Chicago’s Bridgeport neighborhood and was made possible by a collaboration among Commissioner John P. Daley, Alderman James A. Balcer, the Chicago Botanic Garden, Cook County Sheriff’s Boot Camp, and Archeworks, which designed the garden’s layout.

Major funding for Windy City Harvest is provided by an anonymous donor, the Cook County Environmental Control Department, Leo S. Guthman Fund, Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Institute of Museum and Library Services, Polk Bros. Foundation, SARE-Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education, and United States Department of Agriculture NIFA. Additional support is provided by an anonymous donor, Alvin H. Baum Family Fund, The Crown Family, George and Amanda Hanley Foundation, Sara Lee Foundation, and the Steans Family Foundation. Also contributing to Windy City Harvest are NeighborSpace as well as Nancy Gidwitz and Jeff Grossman in memory of Marjorie I. Mitchell, the Stuart and Marcella Bernstein Philanthropic Fund, Scott & Patrice Brickman Family Foundation, PritzkerTraubert Foundation, Wedner Family Foundation, Wilson Family Charitable Fund, and 24 individuals who responded to a challenge grant. The following foundations and corporations support all education and community programs: The Helen V. Froehlich Foundation, The Brinson Foundation, HSBC – North America, and Kemper Educational and Charitable Fund.


This Season in the Garden

This season in the Garden Kris Jarantoski, executive vice president and director Winter is always my favorite season! Without leaves or a profusion of colorful flowers to capture my attention, I am able to fully appreciate the beautiful branching structures of our deciduous trees. Snow adds an enticing sparkle to the entire landscape, making it an extraordinary time of year to walk through gardens distilled to their very essence. Winter is also an excellent time to evaluate a garden’s basic structure and proportions. How does your garden look in winter? If you decide that changes would make it even more enjoyable to look at during our long winter season, a visit to the Chicago Botanic Garden will introduce you to trees and shrubs with textured or colorful bark, evergreens that add warmth, and plants with ornamental fruits that add much-appreciated winter color. To make it easier for you to find plants such as these whenever you visit, we are beginning to implement a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services that will make information about our more than 2.5 million plants more accessible. Our first goal is to install computer stations in the Plant Science Center, in the Lenhardt Library, and adjacent to the Plant Information Service office in the Visitor Center. These computers will enable visitors and researchers to determine where a specific plant is growing at the Garden. Over time, we will add the ability to search for plant categories or specific characteristics, eventually with smartphones. One plant many people want to know more about now is the ash tree. Sadly, last summer we found emerald ash borers in traps placed at the south end of the Garden. Fortunately, we have been preparing for this difficult situation. Several years ago, we began using a systemic insecticide to protect the 51 of our 463 ash trees that we determined were of particular importance to our landscape design and/or the goals of our permanent collections. We also replaced the ash trees in the Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden, where we only use organic treatments. Over the next several years, we are prepared to replace affected ash trees with other species of trees. While winter transforms our outdoor display gardens—no more magically than during Wonderland Express—our horticultural staff has worked over the past few years to transform our three display Greenhouses. Because they now offer many more flowers from January through March, our Greenhouses have become a priority destination for people who want a warm and inspiring winter break without the plane ride! Spearheading this project is Sharon Nejman, a senior horticulturist who joined the Garden in 2007. I hope you will visit the Greenhouses in the Regenstein Center this winter to enjoy their beautiful flowers. During winter, when our horticulture staff is racing to complete winter pruning while also removing snow and watching for rodent damage, our plant production department is equally busy growing plants. Each year, more than 250,000 plants pass through the production area at the south end of the Garden. These plants are used for seasonal flower and vegetable displays, expanding permanent collections, restoring habitats or rejuvenating gardens, and scientific research and evaluation, as well as for our year-round schedule of classes and visitor programs. What our talented staff can accomplish is limited only by the size and scope of our production capabilities. Plans are currently being developed to increase our capabilities, so we are able to grow the diversity of plants that a garden of our stature requires. I look forward to sharing these exciting plans with you in future issues of Keep Growing. For now, an ever-busier schedule of programs and activities, combined with preparing for spring, makes winter a short season indeed. I hope you don’t miss the many pleasures—indoors and out—at the Chicago Botanic Garden this winter!

Greenhouses in the Regenstein Center are an inspiring destination during the winter months. 80 www.keepgrowing.com


Antiques & Garden Fair 15 www.chicagobotanic.org/antiques


www.chicagobotanic.org

For more information, please visit Keep Growing online. www.keepgrowing.com

The Chicago Botanic Garden is one of the treasures of the Forest Preserve District of Cook County.

Wonderland Express Members-only Event Wednesday, December 14 Don’t miss an exclusive visit to Wonderland Express, with cookies, hot chocolate, and carolers, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Purchase timed tickets in person or online at www.chicagobotanic.org/wonderland— new this year: no fees online! Purchase your tickets early, as the quantity is limited.

For tickets:

One of the treasures of the Forest Preserve District of Cook County

www.chicagobotanic.org


Keep Growing Winter 2011-2012  

Magazine and Program Guide for the Chicago Botanic Garden Winter 2011-2012

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