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NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

Chicago Horticultural Society

1000 lake cook road glencoe, illinois 60022

Board of Directors

chicagobotanic.org

Officers and Executive Staff as of 12/31/2019

Jennifer Schwarz Ballard, Ph.D., Vice President, Learning & Engagement

Jean M. Franczyk, President & Chief Executive Officer

Aida Z. Giglio, Vice President, Human Resources

Fred Spicer, Executive Vice President and Director

Gregory M. Mueller, Ph.D., Chief Scientist and Negaunee Vice President of Science

Thomas J. Nissly, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Harriet Resnick, Vice President, Visitor Experience and Business Development

James F. Boudreau, Executive Vice President, External Affairs 2019 Life Directors

Dana Anderson

M. James Leider

Marilynn B. Alsdorf*

Russell F. Bartmes

Benjamin F. Lenhardt, Jr.

J. Melfort Campbell

Martha D. Boudos

Anne Leventry

Barbara Whitney Carr

Terrence R. Brady

Diane vS. Levy

Gary P. Coughlan

Jennifer K. Brown˚

Laura M. Linger

Peter R. Crane

Neville F. Bryan

Anne S. Loucks

When we first wrote this letter, we simply wanted to thank you for

New reach

delivering one of the most successful years ever at the Chicago

Our new holiday light show, Lightscape, sold out. More than 175,000

Botanic Garden in 2019—and then the world changed. The new

people attended—20 percent of whom were first-time visitors to the

coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak became a worldwide pandemic.

Garden. Lightscape, and other programs such as the pollinator-

We temporarily closed our beloved Garden, based on the recom-

focused Bees & Beyond, helped propel attendance to a record

mendations of federal, state, and county officials. All classes,

1.275 million visitors, up 22 percent from 2018.

programs, and events were canceled. What has not changed is our commitment to inspire and touch lives

You helped us achieve record levels of earned and raised revenues,

Suzanne S. Dixon

through the natural world. A growing body of research shows that

and Annual Fund contributions. Facing substantial cuts in government funding, we doubled down on our strategic imperative to

Michael J. McMurray

Thomas A. Donahoe

Michael J. Busch

Christopher Merrill

Peter B. Foreman

We will emerge from this crisis stronger and more relevant than ever

diversify and grow revenue, and to become more widely known and

Heidi B. Capozzi

William E. Moeller

Ralph F. Fujimoto

to the health and well-being of the communities we serve.

appreciated.

David R. Casper

Gregory A. Moerschel

James J. Glasser

Robin Colburn

Lois L. Morrison

Caryn L. Harris

As we write this letter, the scent of witch hazel lingers in the Sensory

Thank you to our loyal staff, boards, volunteers, members, visitors,

Jill M. Delaney

Henry Munez

Pamela K. Hull

Garden, and thousands of sunny ‘Yellow Mammoth’ crocuses

and donors, and to our partner, the Forest Preserves of Cook

James W. DeYoung

Jennifer J. Neighbours˚

Thomas B. Hunter III

Timothy A. Dugan

Craig Niemann

Posy L. Krehbiel

bloom in the grassy meadow of Evening Island. We send a message

County. You help us improve lives, communities, and our planet.

Peter M. Ellis

Jane S. Park

William H. Kurtis

Jean M. Franczyk˚

Katie Parks˚

Donna La Pietra

Dorothy H. Gardner

George A. Peinado

Daniel I. H. Linzer

Steven J. Gavin

Toni Preckwinkle˚

Josephine P. Louis

Arthur J. Gibson

Bob Probst

Mary L. McCormack

Nancy Gidwitz

Arnold Randall˚

Jeanine McNally

Christopher E. Girgenti

achievements of 2019. Here’s a quick recap of what we accomplished together:

New momentum

Mary B. Richardson-Lowry

William A. Osborn

We completed the ten-year “Keep Growing” capital and endowment

John C. Robak

Homi B. Patel

campaign. The campaign, which modernized and improved the

John K. Greene*

James Robinson

Susan L. Regenstein

Garden, raised $140 million, including $44.9 million in endowment.

Charles V. Greener

Ryan S. Ruskin

Anne O. Scott

Joseph P. Gromacki

Darren Serrao

David Byron Smith

Gillian Growdon

Robert E. Shaw

Susan K. Stone

William J. Hagenah

Andrew Sinclair

Richard L. Thomas

Jonathan S. Holloway

Thomas E. Skilling

Howard J. Trienens

John L. Howard

Maria Smithburg

Ernest P. Waud III

the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, one of the

Jane Irwin

Harrison I. Steans*

Arthur M. Wood, Jr.

world’s most-cited and comprehensive scientific journals, and on

Gregory K. Jones

Pam F. Szokol

green plant evolution in the prestigious journal Nature.

Jennifer M. Kasten

Kimberly Vender Moffat˚

˚ex officio *deceased

Peter Keehn

Catherine M. Waddell

R. Henry Kleeman

Andrew J. Warzecha Melvin F. Williams, Jr.

Nancy Kurz˚

Nicole S. Williams

Thomas E. Lanctot

Michael R. Zimmerman

chicagobotanic.org/annual_report

of hope for the future, as well as gratitude for the extraordinary

Ellis M. Goodman

Susan A. Willetts

To find complete donor list and view our Annual Report online, please visit

Throughout 2019, we pushed ourselves hard, and you responded.

John H. Buehler

Judith H. Konen˚

PERMIT NO. 1568

Annual Report | 2019

A message from the Chairman of the Board and the President & CEO

people live happier, healthier lives when they spend time in nature.

Angela Korompilas

NORTHBROOK, IL

One of the treasures of the Forest Preserves of Cook County

Robert F. Finke Chair

2019 Board of Directors

US POSTAGE PAID

New impact The Garden achieved widespread recognition for its conservation science work. Our scientists published research on prairie plants in

Jean M. Franczyk, President & CEO, and Robert F. Finke, Chairman of the Board

We cultivate the power of plants to sustain and enrich life.

The Farm on Ogden, the project of the Garden and Lawndale Christian Health Center, continues to thrive, supporting and sustaining a healthy urban community. The multiuse facility, in the North Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago, won a Distinguished Building award from the American Institute of Architects Chicago in 2019.


NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

Chicago Horticultural Society

1000 lake cook road glencoe, illinois 60022

Board of Directors

chicagobotanic.org

Officers and Executive Staff as of 12/31/2019

Jennifer Schwarz Ballard, Ph.D., Vice President, Learning & Engagement

Jean M. Franczyk, President & Chief Executive Officer

Aida Z. Giglio, Vice President, Human Resources

Fred Spicer, Executive Vice President and Director

Gregory M. Mueller, Ph.D., Chief Scientist and Negaunee Vice President of Science

Thomas J. Nissly, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Harriet Resnick, Vice President, Visitor Experience and Business Development

James F. Boudreau, Executive Vice President, External Affairs 2019 Life Directors

Dana Anderson

M. James Leider

Marilynn B. Alsdorf*

Russell F. Bartmes

Benjamin F. Lenhardt, Jr.

J. Melfort Campbell

Martha D. Boudos

Anne Leventry

Barbara Whitney Carr

Terrence R. Brady

Diane vS. Levy

Gary P. Coughlan

Jennifer K. Brown˚

Laura M. Linger

Peter R. Crane

Neville F. Bryan

Anne S. Loucks

When we first wrote this letter, we simply wanted to thank you for

New reach

delivering one of the most successful years ever at the Chicago

Our new holiday light show, Lightscape, sold out. More than 175,000

Botanic Garden in 2019—and then the world changed. The new

people attended—20 percent of whom were first-time visitors to the

coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak became a worldwide pandemic.

Garden. Lightscape, and other programs such as the pollinator-

We temporarily closed our beloved Garden, based on the recom-

focused Bees & Beyond, helped propel attendance to a record

mendations of federal, state, and county officials. All classes,

1.275 million visitors, up 22 percent from 2018.

programs, and events were canceled. What has not changed is our commitment to inspire and touch lives

You helped us achieve record levels of earned and raised revenues,

Suzanne S. Dixon

through the natural world. A growing body of research shows that

and Annual Fund contributions. Facing substantial cuts in government funding, we doubled down on our strategic imperative to

Michael J. McMurray

Thomas A. Donahoe

Michael J. Busch

Christopher Merrill

Peter B. Foreman

We will emerge from this crisis stronger and more relevant than ever

diversify and grow revenue, and to become more widely known and

Heidi B. Capozzi

William E. Moeller

Ralph F. Fujimoto

to the health and well-being of the communities we serve.

appreciated.

David R. Casper

Gregory A. Moerschel

James J. Glasser

Robin Colburn

Lois L. Morrison

Caryn L. Harris

As we write this letter, the scent of witch hazel lingers in the Sensory

Thank you to our loyal staff, boards, volunteers, members, visitors,

Jill M. Delaney

Henry Munez

Pamela K. Hull

Garden, and thousands of sunny ‘Yellow Mammoth’ crocuses

and donors, and to our partner, the Forest Preserves of Cook

James W. DeYoung

Jennifer J. Neighbours˚

Thomas B. Hunter III

Timothy A. Dugan

Craig Niemann

Posy L. Krehbiel

bloom in the grassy meadow of Evening Island. We send a message

County. You help us improve lives, communities, and our planet.

Peter M. Ellis

Jane S. Park

William H. Kurtis

Jean M. Franczyk˚

Katie Parks˚

Donna La Pietra

Dorothy H. Gardner

George A. Peinado

Daniel I. H. Linzer

Steven J. Gavin

Toni Preckwinkle˚

Josephine P. Louis

Arthur J. Gibson

Bob Probst

Mary L. McCormack

Nancy Gidwitz

Arnold Randall˚

Jeanine McNally

Christopher E. Girgenti

achievements of 2019. Here’s a quick recap of what we accomplished together:

New momentum

Mary B. Richardson-Lowry

William A. Osborn

We completed the ten-year “Keep Growing” capital and endowment

John C. Robak

Homi B. Patel

campaign. The campaign, which modernized and improved the

John K. Greene*

James Robinson

Susan L. Regenstein

Garden, raised $140 million, including $44.9 million in endowment.

Charles V. Greener

Ryan S. Ruskin

Anne O. Scott

Joseph P. Gromacki

Darren Serrao

David Byron Smith

Gillian Growdon

Robert E. Shaw

Susan K. Stone

William J. Hagenah

Andrew Sinclair

Richard L. Thomas

Jonathan S. Holloway

Thomas E. Skilling

Howard J. Trienens

John L. Howard

Maria Smithburg

Ernest P. Waud III

the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, one of the

Jane Irwin

Harrison I. Steans*

Arthur M. Wood, Jr.

world’s most-cited and comprehensive scientific journals, and on

Gregory K. Jones

Pam F. Szokol

green plant evolution in the prestigious journal Nature.

Jennifer M. Kasten

Kimberly Vender Moffat˚

˚ex officio *deceased

Peter Keehn

Catherine M. Waddell

R. Henry Kleeman

Andrew J. Warzecha Melvin F. Williams, Jr.

Nancy Kurz˚

Nicole S. Williams

Thomas E. Lanctot

Michael R. Zimmerman

chicagobotanic.org/annual_report

of hope for the future, as well as gratitude for the extraordinary

Ellis M. Goodman

Susan A. Willetts

To find complete donor list and view our Annual Report online, please visit

Throughout 2019, we pushed ourselves hard, and you responded.

John H. Buehler

Judith H. Konen˚

PERMIT NO. 1568

Annual Report | 2019

A message from the Chairman of the Board and the President & CEO

people live happier, healthier lives when they spend time in nature.

Angela Korompilas

NORTHBROOK, IL

One of the treasures of the Forest Preserves of Cook County

Robert F. Finke Chair

2019 Board of Directors

US POSTAGE PAID

New impact The Garden achieved widespread recognition for its conservation science work. Our scientists published research on prairie plants in

Jean M. Franczyk, President & CEO, and Robert F. Finke, Chairman of the Board

We cultivate the power of plants to sustain and enrich life.

The Farm on Ogden, the project of the Garden and Lawndale Christian Health Center, continues to thrive, supporting and sustaining a healthy urban community. The multiuse facility, in the North Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago, won a Distinguished Building award from the American Institute of Architects Chicago in 2019.


2,000

free VeggieRx boxes distributed to food-insecure patients through Windy City Harvest

the life cycles and timing of plants, and Plants of Concern, which monitors rare plants.

TOTAL

Major private grants received in 2019 will allow technology improvements to help data collection and more for volunteers for Budburst, which tracks

29,000

The Garden’s Science Career Continuum program received a prestigious presidential award of excel-

Total liabilities

$130.8 94.2

Total net assets

$225.0

TOTAL

Windy City Harvest, the Garden’s urban agriculture

program, now runs 16 farms in the Chicago area. It

$41.6 million

nership for food, jobs, and health with Lawndale

provides free, doctor-prescribed boxes of vegeta-

983,000

ALLOCATION OF LONG-TERM INVESTMENTS 5%

bulbs planted

bles to qualified participants, along with nutrition training.

Negaunee Institute named

Year-round destination success

In 2010, we kicked off the “Keep Growing” campaign with an ambitious goal: $125 million. By the end of 2019, we had

The new name of the Garden’s science program, the

This is the year we underscored our success as a

raised $140 million, including $44.9 million in endowment to support staff positions and programs. Major projects included

Negaunee Institute for Plant Conservation Science and

year-round destination. Lightscape, the after-dark,

the following:

Action, reflects our standing as a leader in plant conserva-

illuminated trail, sold out in its 2019 debut and was

tion science. The major gift from the Negaunee Foundation

the holiday season’s hottest ticket. Bees & Beyond

supports scientist and staff positions, our joint graduate

filled the summer with pollinators and the work we do

program in plant biology and conservation with North-

to protect them. Night of 1,000 Jack-o’-Lanterns, a

• North Lake Shoreline Restoration Project

western University, and future collaborative research with

Halloween favorite, added five nights—and still sold

• Garden View Café renovation

other peer organizations such as the Field Museum.

out. And In the Tropics was our most popular Orchid

• Regenstein Learning Campus and its components • Kris Jarantoski Campus production greenhouses and nursery

• North Branch Trail extension

Show ever.

Forest Preserves ecologists in plant identification. We also shared more than 30 pounds of diverse, wild-collected seeds from the Garden’s McDonald

1.275

VISITOR PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONS 20%

$39.6 million

MEMBERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT 9%

species at Forest Preserves sites.

COMMUNICATIONS 7%

11.4

million

page views on the Garden’s website

SPONSORSHIPS 2% RESTRICTED PROGRAM GIFTS 6%

ADMINISTRATION 14%

ect, Plants of Concern, we help monitor 58 rare

GOVERNMENT GRANTS 8%

Operating budget expenditures

visitors

Woods. And through our rare plant monitoring proj-

CONTRIBUTIONS 17%

FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT OF COOK COUNTY 22%

Woods for use at the Forest Preserves’s Turnbull

• •

MEMBERSHIP 11%

million

OTHER INCOME 3%

EDUCATION FEES 6%

Forest Preserves projects advance As part of our ongoing collaboration, we trained

$289.8

Revenue

Operating budget revenue and other support

was a busy year for the Farm on Ogden, the part-

Farm’s popular offerings include VeggieRx, which

$64.9

Net Assets Without donor restrictions With donor restrictions

Urban agriculture flourishes

Christian Health Center in North Lawndale. The

$5.4 10.0 49.5

in environmental STEM subjects.

Photo by John Faier

$289.9

students participated in guided field trips

lence from the White House for mentoring students

“Keep Growing” capital and endowment campaign completed

$6.4 26.1 2.8 129.1 1.6 123.9

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses Other liabilities Bonds payable

National recognition for STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) program

You made 2019 a year of innovation and achievement.

As of December 31, 2019 (in millions of dollars) ASSETS Cash Pledges receivable Accounts receivable Investments Other assets Property and equipment

Community science programs grow

Our heartfelt thanks

Statement of financial position

VISITOR PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONS 15%

• • •

GARDENS AND GROUNDS 27%

SCIENCE AFFAIRS 14%

EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS 14%

Complete, audited financial statements for the Chicago Botanic Garden, including the auditor’s report, for the year ending December 31, 2019, are available at chicagobotanic.org/annual_report.


2,000

free VeggieRx boxes distributed to food-insecure patients through Windy City Harvest

the life cycles and timing of plants, and Plants of Concern, which monitors rare plants.

TOTAL

Major private grants received in 2019 will allow technology improvements to help data collection and more for volunteers for Budburst, which tracks

29,000

The Garden’s Science Career Continuum program received a prestigious presidential award of excel-

Total liabilities

$130.8 94.2

Total net assets

$225.0

TOTAL

Windy City Harvest, the Garden’s urban agriculture

program, now runs 16 farms in the Chicago area. It

$41.6 million

nership for food, jobs, and health with Lawndale

provides free, doctor-prescribed boxes of vegeta-

983,000

ALLOCATION OF LONG-TERM INVESTMENTS 5%

bulbs planted

bles to qualified participants, along with nutrition training.

Negaunee Institute named

Year-round destination success

In 2010, we kicked off the “Keep Growing” campaign with an ambitious goal: $125 million. By the end of 2019, we had

The new name of the Garden’s science program, the

This is the year we underscored our success as a

raised $140 million, including $44.9 million in endowment to support staff positions and programs. Major projects included

Negaunee Institute for Plant Conservation Science and

year-round destination. Lightscape, the after-dark,

the following:

Action, reflects our standing as a leader in plant conserva-

illuminated trail, sold out in its 2019 debut and was

tion science. The major gift from the Negaunee Foundation

the holiday season’s hottest ticket. Bees & Beyond

supports scientist and staff positions, our joint graduate

filled the summer with pollinators and the work we do

program in plant biology and conservation with North-

to protect them. Night of 1,000 Jack-o’-Lanterns, a

• North Lake Shoreline Restoration Project

western University, and future collaborative research with

Halloween favorite, added five nights—and still sold

• Garden View Café renovation

other peer organizations such as the Field Museum.

out. And In the Tropics was our most popular Orchid

• Regenstein Learning Campus and its components • Kris Jarantoski Campus production greenhouses and nursery

• North Branch Trail extension

Show ever.

Forest Preserves ecologists in plant identification. We also shared more than 30 pounds of diverse, wild-collected seeds from the Garden’s McDonald

1.275

VISITOR PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONS 20%

$39.6 million

MEMBERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT 9%

species at Forest Preserves sites.

COMMUNICATIONS 7%

11.4

million

page views on the Garden’s website

SPONSORSHIPS 2% RESTRICTED PROGRAM GIFTS 6%

ADMINISTRATION 14%

ect, Plants of Concern, we help monitor 58 rare

GOVERNMENT GRANTS 8%

Operating budget expenditures

visitors

Woods. And through our rare plant monitoring proj-

CONTRIBUTIONS 17%

FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT OF COOK COUNTY 22%

Woods for use at the Forest Preserves’s Turnbull

• •

MEMBERSHIP 11%

million

OTHER INCOME 3%

EDUCATION FEES 6%

Forest Preserves projects advance As part of our ongoing collaboration, we trained

$289.8

Revenue

Operating budget revenue and other support

was a busy year for the Farm on Ogden, the part-

Farm’s popular offerings include VeggieRx, which

$64.9

Net Assets Without donor restrictions With donor restrictions

Urban agriculture flourishes

Christian Health Center in North Lawndale. The

$5.4 10.0 49.5

in environmental STEM subjects.

Photo by John Faier

$289.9

students participated in guided field trips

lence from the White House for mentoring students

“Keep Growing” capital and endowment campaign completed

$6.4 26.1 2.8 129.1 1.6 123.9

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses Other liabilities Bonds payable

National recognition for STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) program

You made 2019 a year of innovation and achievement.

As of December 31, 2019 (in millions of dollars) ASSETS Cash Pledges receivable Accounts receivable Investments Other assets Property and equipment

Community science programs grow

Our heartfelt thanks

Statement of financial position

VISITOR PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONS 15%

• • •

GARDENS AND GROUNDS 27%

SCIENCE AFFAIRS 14%

EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS 14%

Complete, audited financial statements for the Chicago Botanic Garden, including the auditor’s report, for the year ending December 31, 2019, are available at chicagobotanic.org/annual_report.


2,000

free VeggieRx boxes distributed to food-insecure patients through Windy City Harvest

the life cycles and timing of plants, and Plants of Concern, which monitors rare plants.

TOTAL

Major private grants received in 2019 will allow technology improvements to help data collection and more for volunteers for Budburst, which tracks

29,000

The Garden’s Science Career Continuum program received a prestigious presidential award of excel-

Total liabilities

$130.8 94.2

Total net assets

$225.0

TOTAL

Windy City Harvest, the Garden’s urban agriculture

program, now runs 16 farms in the Chicago area. It

$41.6 million

nership for food, jobs, and health with Lawndale

provides free, doctor-prescribed boxes of vegeta-

983,000

ALLOCATION OF LONG-TERM INVESTMENTS 5%

bulbs planted

bles to qualified participants, along with nutrition training.

Negaunee Institute named

Year-round destination success

In 2010, we kicked off the “Keep Growing” campaign with an ambitious goal: $125 million. By the end of 2019, we had

The new name of the Garden’s science program, the

This is the year we underscored our success as a

raised $140 million, including $44.9 million in endowment to support staff positions and programs. Major projects included

Negaunee Institute for Plant Conservation Science and

year-round destination. Lightscape, the after-dark,

the following:

Action, reflects our standing as a leader in plant conserva-

illuminated trail, sold out in its 2019 debut and was

tion science. The major gift from the Negaunee Foundation

the holiday season’s hottest ticket. Bees & Beyond

supports scientist and staff positions, our joint graduate

filled the summer with pollinators and the work we do

program in plant biology and conservation with North-

to protect them. Night of 1,000 Jack-o’-Lanterns, a

• North Lake Shoreline Restoration Project

western University, and future collaborative research with

Halloween favorite, added five nights—and still sold

• Garden View Café renovation

other peer organizations such as the Field Museum.

out. And In the Tropics was our most popular Orchid

• Regenstein Learning Campus and its components • Kris Jarantoski Campus production greenhouses and nursery

• North Branch Trail extension

Show ever.

Forest Preserves ecologists in plant identification. We also shared more than 30 pounds of diverse, wild-collected seeds from the Garden’s McDonald

1.275

VISITOR PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONS 20%

$39.6 million

MEMBERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT 9%

species at Forest Preserves sites.

COMMUNICATIONS 7%

11.4

million

page views on the Garden’s website

SPONSORSHIPS 2% RESTRICTED PROGRAM GIFTS 6%

ADMINISTRATION 14%

ect, Plants of Concern, we help monitor 58 rare

GOVERNMENT GRANTS 8%

Operating budget expenditures

visitors

Woods. And through our rare plant monitoring proj-

CONTRIBUTIONS 17%

FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT OF COOK COUNTY 22%

Woods for use at the Forest Preserves’s Turnbull

• •

MEMBERSHIP 11%

million

OTHER INCOME 3%

EDUCATION FEES 6%

Forest Preserves projects advance As part of our ongoing collaboration, we trained

$289.8

Revenue

Operating budget revenue and other support

was a busy year for the Farm on Ogden, the part-

Farm’s popular offerings include VeggieRx, which

$64.9

Net Assets Without donor restrictions With donor restrictions

Urban agriculture flourishes

Christian Health Center in North Lawndale. The

$5.4 10.0 49.5

in environmental STEM subjects.

Photo by John Faier

$289.9

students participated in guided field trips

lence from the White House for mentoring students

“Keep Growing” capital and endowment campaign completed

$6.4 26.1 2.8 129.1 1.6 123.9

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses Other liabilities Bonds payable

National recognition for STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) program

You made 2019 a year of innovation and achievement.

As of December 31, 2019 (in millions of dollars) ASSETS Cash Pledges receivable Accounts receivable Investments Other assets Property and equipment

Community science programs grow

Our heartfelt thanks

Statement of financial position

VISITOR PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONS 15%

• • •

GARDENS AND GROUNDS 27%

SCIENCE AFFAIRS 14%

EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS 14%

Complete, audited financial statements for the Chicago Botanic Garden, including the auditor’s report, for the year ending December 31, 2019, are available at chicagobotanic.org/annual_report.


Statement of financial position As of December 31, 2019 (in millions of dollars) ASSETS Cash Pledges receivable Accounts receivable Investments Other assets Property and equipment

$6.4 26.1 2.8 129.1 1.6 123.9

TOTAL

$289.9

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses Other liabilities Bonds payable

$5.4 10.0 49.5

Total liabilities

$64.9

Net Assets Without donor restrictions With donor restrictions

$130.8 94.2

Total net assets

$225.0

TOTAL

$289.8

Revenue

Operating budget revenue and other support $41.6 million ALLOCATION OF LONG-TERM INVESTMENTS 5%

OTHER INCOME 3%

CONTRIBUTIONS 17%

EDUCATION FEES 6%

GOVERNMENT GRANTS 8%

MEMBERSHIP 11%

• •

VISITOR PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONS 20%

RESTRICTED PROGRAM GIFTS 6%

FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT OF COOK COUNTY 22%

SPONSORSHIPS 2%

Operating budget expenditures $39.6 million ADMINISTRATION 14% MEMBERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT 9% COMMUNICATIONS 7% VISITOR PROGRAMS AND OPERATIONS 15%

• • •

GARDENS AND GROUNDS 27%

SCIENCE AFFAIRS 14%

EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS 14%

Complete, audited financial statements for the Chicago Botanic Garden, including the auditor’s report, for the year ending December 31, 2019, are available at chicagobotanic.org/annual_report.


Chicago Horticultural Society Board of Directors Officers and Executive Staff as of 12/31/2019

Robert F. Finke Chair

Jennifer Schwarz Ballard, Ph.D., Vice President, Learning & Engagement

Jean M. Franczyk, President & Chief Executive Officer

Aida Z. Giglio, Vice President, Human Resources

Fred Spicer, Executive Vice President and Director

Gregory M. Mueller, Ph.D., Chief Scientist and Negaunee Vice President of Science

Thomas J. Nissly, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Harriet Resnick, Vice President, Visitor Experience and Business Development

James F. Boudreau, Executive Vice President, External Affairs 2019 Life Directors

2019 Board of Directors Dana Anderson

M. James Leider

Marilynn B. Alsdorf*

Russell F. Bartmes

Benjamin F. Lenhardt, Jr.

J. Melfort Campbell

Martha D. Boudos

Anne Leventry

Barbara Whitney Carr

Terrence R. Brady

Diane vS. Levy

Gary P. Coughlan

Jennifer K. Brown˚

Laura M. Linger

Peter R. Crane

Neville F. Bryan

Anne S. Loucks

Suzanne S. Dixon

John H. Buehler

Michael J. McMurray

Thomas A. Donahoe

Michael J. Busch

Christopher Merrill

Peter B. Foreman

Heidi B. Capozzi

William E. Moeller

Ralph F. Fujimoto

David R. Casper

Gregory A. Moerschel

James J. Glasser

Robin Colburn

Lois L. Morrison

Caryn L. Harris

Jill M. Delaney

Henry Munez

Pamela K. Hull

James W. DeYoung

Jennifer J. Neighbours˚

Thomas B. Hunter III

Timothy A. Dugan

Craig Niemann

Posy L. Krehbiel

Peter M. Ellis

Jane S. Park

William H. Kurtis

Jean M. Franczyk˚

Katie Parks˚

Donna La Pietra

Dorothy H. Gardner

George A. Peinado

Daniel I. H. Linzer

Steven J. Gavin

Toni Preckwinkle˚

Josephine P. Louis

Arthur J. Gibson

Bob Probst

Mary L. McCormack

Nancy Gidwitz

Arnold Randall˚

Jeanine McNally

Christopher E. Girgenti

Mary B. Richardson-Lowry

William A. Osborn

Ellis M. Goodman

John C. Robak

Homi B. Patel

John K. Greene*

James Robinson

Susan L. Regenstein

Charles V. Greener

Ryan S. Ruskin

Anne O. Scott

Joseph P. Gromacki

Darren Serrao

David Byron Smith

Gillian Growdon

Robert E. Shaw

Susan K. Stone

William J. Hagenah

Andrew Sinclair

Richard L. Thomas

Jonathan S. Holloway

Thomas E. Skilling

Howard J. Trienens

John L. Howard

Maria Smithburg

Ernest P. Waud III

Jane Irwin

Harrison I. Steans*

Arthur M. Wood, Jr.

Gregory K. Jones

Pam F. Szokol

Jennifer M. Kasten

Kimberly Vender Moffat˚

˚ex officio *deceased

Peter Keehn

Catherine M. Waddell

R. Henry Kleeman

Andrew J. Warzecha

Judith H. Konen˚

Susan A. Willetts

Angela Korompilas

Melvin F. Williams, Jr.

Nancy Kurz˚

Nicole S. Williams

Thomas E. Lanctot

Michael R. Zimmerman


NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

Chicago Horticultural Society

1000 lake cook road glencoe, illinois 60022

Board of Directors

chicagobotanic.org

Officers and Executive Staff as of 12/31/2019

Jennifer Schwarz Ballard, Ph.D., Vice President, Learning & Engagement

Jean M. Franczyk, President & Chief Executive Officer

Aida Z. Giglio, Vice President, Human Resources

Fred Spicer, Executive Vice President and Director

Gregory M. Mueller, Ph.D., Chief Scientist and Negaunee Vice President of Science

Thomas J. Nissly, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Harriet Resnick, Vice President, Visitor Experience and Business Development

James F. Boudreau, Executive Vice President, External Affairs 2019 Life Directors

Dana Anderson

M. James Leider

Marilynn B. Alsdorf*

Russell F. Bartmes

Benjamin F. Lenhardt, Jr.

J. Melfort Campbell

Martha D. Boudos

Anne Leventry

Barbara Whitney Carr

Terrence R. Brady

Diane vS. Levy

Gary P. Coughlan

Jennifer K. Brown˚

Laura M. Linger

Peter R. Crane

Neville F. Bryan

Anne S. Loucks

When we first wrote this letter, we simply wanted to thank you for

New reach

delivering one of the most successful years ever at the Chicago

Our new holiday light show, Lightscape, sold out. More than 175,000

Botanic Garden in 2019—and then the world changed. The new

people attended—20 percent of whom were first-time visitors to the

coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak became a worldwide pandemic.

Garden. Lightscape, and other programs such as the pollinator-

We temporarily closed our beloved Garden, based on the recom-

focused Bees & Beyond, helped propel attendance to a record

mendations of federal, state, and county officials. All classes,

1.275 million visitors, up 22 percent from 2018.

programs, and events were canceled. What has not changed is our commitment to inspire and touch lives

You helped us achieve record levels of earned and raised revenues,

Suzanne S. Dixon

through the natural world. A growing body of research shows that

and Annual Fund contributions. Facing substantial cuts in government funding, we doubled down on our strategic imperative to

Michael J. McMurray

Thomas A. Donahoe

Michael J. Busch

Christopher Merrill

Peter B. Foreman

We will emerge from this crisis stronger and more relevant than ever

diversify and grow revenue, and to become more widely known and

Heidi B. Capozzi

William E. Moeller

Ralph F. Fujimoto

to the health and well-being of the communities we serve.

appreciated.

David R. Casper

Gregory A. Moerschel

James J. Glasser

Robin Colburn

Lois L. Morrison

Caryn L. Harris

As we write this letter, the scent of witch hazel lingers in the Sensory

Thank you to our loyal staff, boards, volunteers, members, visitors,

Jill M. Delaney

Henry Munez

Pamela K. Hull

Garden, and thousands of sunny ‘Yellow Mammoth’ crocuses

and donors, and to our partner, the Forest Preserves of Cook

James W. DeYoung

Jennifer J. Neighbours˚

Thomas B. Hunter III

Timothy A. Dugan

Craig Niemann

Posy L. Krehbiel

bloom in the grassy meadow of Evening Island. We send a message

County. You help us improve lives, communities, and our planet.

Peter M. Ellis

Jane S. Park

William H. Kurtis

Jean M. Franczyk˚

Katie Parks˚

Donna La Pietra

Dorothy H. Gardner

George A. Peinado

Daniel I. H. Linzer

Steven J. Gavin

Toni Preckwinkle˚

Josephine P. Louis

Arthur J. Gibson

Bob Probst

Mary L. McCormack

Nancy Gidwitz

Arnold Randall˚

Jeanine McNally

Christopher E. Girgenti

achievements of 2019. Here’s a quick recap of what we accomplished together:

New momentum

Mary B. Richardson-Lowry

William A. Osborn

We completed the ten-year “Keep Growing” capital and endowment

John C. Robak

Homi B. Patel

campaign. The campaign, which modernized and improved the

John K. Greene*

James Robinson

Susan L. Regenstein

Garden, raised $140 million, including $44.9 million in endowment.

Charles V. Greener

Ryan S. Ruskin

Anne O. Scott

Joseph P. Gromacki

Darren Serrao

David Byron Smith

Gillian Growdon

Robert E. Shaw

Susan K. Stone

William J. Hagenah

Andrew Sinclair

Richard L. Thomas

Jonathan S. Holloway

Thomas E. Skilling

Howard J. Trienens

John L. Howard

Maria Smithburg

Ernest P. Waud III

the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, one of the

Jane Irwin

Harrison I. Steans*

Arthur M. Wood, Jr.

world’s most-cited and comprehensive scientific journals, and on

Gregory K. Jones

Pam F. Szokol

green plant evolution in the prestigious journal Nature.

Jennifer M. Kasten

Kimberly Vender Moffat˚

˚ex officio *deceased

Peter Keehn

Catherine M. Waddell

R. Henry Kleeman

Andrew J. Warzecha Melvin F. Williams, Jr.

Nancy Kurz˚

Nicole S. Williams

Thomas E. Lanctot

Michael R. Zimmerman

chicagobotanic.org/annual_report

of hope for the future, as well as gratitude for the extraordinary

Ellis M. Goodman

Susan A. Willetts

To find complete donor list and view our Annual Report online, please visit

Throughout 2019, we pushed ourselves hard, and you responded.

John H. Buehler

Judith H. Konen˚

PERMIT NO. 1568

Annual Report | 2019

A message from the Chairman of the Board and the President & CEO

people live happier, healthier lives when they spend time in nature.

Angela Korompilas

NORTHBROOK, IL

One of the treasures of the Forest Preserves of Cook County

Robert F. Finke Chair

2019 Board of Directors

US POSTAGE PAID

New impact The Garden achieved widespread recognition for its conservation science work. Our scientists published research on prairie plants in

Jean M. Franczyk, President & CEO, and Robert F. Finke, Chairman of the Board

We cultivate the power of plants to sustain and enrich life.

The Farm on Ogden, the project of the Garden and Lawndale Christian Health Center, continues to thrive, supporting and sustaining a healthy urban community. The multiuse facility, in the North Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago, won a Distinguished Building award from the American Institute of Architects Chicago in 2019.

Profile for Chicago Botanic Garden

2019 Annual Report for the Chicago Botanic Garden  

2019 Annual Report for the Chicago Botanic Garden  

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