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THE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB presents:

FUTURE PRENTICE

2012 CHICAGO PRIZE COMPETITION 71 entries / 13 countries Competition partners:


FIRST PRIZE Title: The Buildings are sleeping, you should go and wake them up, she says. Team: Cyril Marsollier Wallo Villacorta


The buildings are sleeping, you should go and wake them up, she said.

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Nurture Two exibition sequences spiral through the emptied core.







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Addition Vs. Demolition Self-functioning laboratory research facility.

 





th Flr Floorplan

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Through an appreciation of the validity in Northwestern University’s (NU) need for a new IXQFWLRQDOIDFLOLW\DQGWKHSXEOLF¡VLQWHUHVWLQSUHVHUYDWLRQFRQĂ LFWLQJLQWHUHVWVFDQEHUHFRQFLOHG with thoughtful negotiation. As is, Prentice Women’s Hospital cannot accommodate NU’s intended use of it as a lab research facility. Maintaining the existing structure celebrates the possibilities of free space. Introducing a third entity achieves the functionality of the desired research facility. The new volume embraces half of the existing structure while the intersecting facade preserves the complete iconic image of Prentice Women’s Hospital. The black volume is transformed to include an auditorium and thus anchors the connection between all other entities through mutual use. %HFDXVHRILWVJHQHURXVĂ RRUSODQYHUVDWLOLW\DQGEHLQJHPEHGGHGLQDFXOWXUDOO\ULFKHQYLURQPHQW Prentice effortlessly becomes a museum. The building engages in an automatic dialogue about the value of preservation and its marriage to un-manifested concepts. “[The buildings] are sleeping, you should go and wake them up, she says.â€? ²5REHUW0RQWJRPHU\

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SECOND PRIZE Title: Superimpositions: Prentice as Additive Icon Team: Noel Turgeon Natalya Egon


ADDITIONS

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ARoS - Rainbow Panorama 0SJHJOBM#VJMEJOHt4DINJEU)BNNFS-BTTFOt "EEJUJPOt0MBGVS&MJBTTPOt

Caixa Forum

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Louvre

Boston Public Library

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0SJHJOBM#VJMEJOHt.D,JN.FBE8IJUFt "EEJUJPOt1IJMJQ+PIOTPOt

1700

2050 1750

1800

1850

1900

1950

2000

Chicago Federal Chicago, 1905 - 1965

Pruitt Igoe

St. Louis, 1954 - 1975

Stock Exchange

Chicago, 1894 - 1971

Singer Building

Mahattan, 1908-1968

Larkin

Penn Station

Buffalo, 1906 - 1950

Manhattan, 1910 - 1963

DEMOLITIONS

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DEMOLISHED ADDITIONS

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ICON AS ADDITION "TFMFDUJPOPGQPTTJCMFJDPOJDBEEJUJPOTCBTFEQVSFMZ POGPSNUPEJìFSFOUJBUFQFSJPETPGUIFUJNFMJOF

16


SUPERIMPOSITIONS "EEJUJWFFMFWBUJPOPWFSUJNF *UFSBUJWFDPNQPTJUJPOT

100 years

80 years

60 years

40 years

20 years

16


SUPERIMPOSITIONS 6SCBO*DPO

structure as icon

icons as icon

innovation as icon

utility as icon

corncob as icon

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16


THIRD PRIZE Title: Bridging Prentice Team: James Wild, Lauren Haras, Katherine Lee, Andres Lemus, Tom Marquardt, Pedro Melis, Aman Moayer, Kerry Rutz, Katelyn Smith, Ashley Wendela


URBAN PLANNING Our strategy is to offer a new green space and public plaza at the center of the Northwestern Medical campus. These green amenities will offer respite to patients, faculty, staff and the surrounding community, thereby creating a world destination for the new, highly public and iconic campus center.

N

The circulation ‘bowl’ you ascend to the elevated bridge offers picnic areas, views to the plaza and a landscaped, above ground park. The plaza below boasts an urban relief gesture, honoring Prentice by allowing it to become a sculptural object at a civic scale. The new lab building is intentionally modest and both veils and frames Prentice to celebrate the co-existence of new and old, making this center a new civic icon for the City of Chicago.

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BRIDGING PRENTICE Innovation is built on a foundation of knowledge gathered by those before us. Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Hospital was an innovative engineering feat that changed the course of modern healthcare when it was built in 1975, and today, Northwestern University strives to push the envelope with new, groundbreaking medical discoveries. This proposal celebrates the past through reinterpretation for the future by celebrating a moment in Chicago architectural history by promoting progressive community programs and Northwestern’s forward-looking medical research.

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PRENTICE TOWER gallery and learning labs

NEW 500,000 SF LAB BUILDING research facilities, offices, conference

The floor plates have been strategically removed within the cloverleaf volumes and through the entire center to create a new, naturally lit space with an open atrium. The galleries provide rotating, interactive exhibits that integrate science and art to further reinforce the S.T.E.M and Vista programs.

The proposed new lab building will offer state-of-the-art laboratories with an open-air atrium that provides naturally lit offices that face the Prentice site. The bridge linking the two buildings provides a publicly accessible green space within the center of the community and the Northwestern Hospital Streeterville campus. The bridge activates and overlooks the plaza space while linking the existing Prentice building with the new lab building.

New atrium and skylight opens up the interior to vertical natural light. A monumental glass sculpture is based on biological fractal model.

A monumental archway frames

PRENTICE PLINTH circulation hub and public amenities

a view to Prentice.

GROUND FLOOR: PUBLIC The ground floor is the circulation center and contains an information kiosk, lounge areas and transparent, open views from the Prentice building to the lab building lobby. SECOND FLOOR: PRIVATE Administrative offices, community outreach support staff and conference rooms. THIRD FLOOR: PUBLIC Escalators ascend directly from the ground floor to the cafe where visitors may scale the ‘bowl’ ramp which allows direct access to the outdoors and green bridge. Also accessible from this floor are elevators up to the Prentice tower and an auditorium/multi-use area with reception space, which round out the public program.

An elliptical cut out allows natural light inside the bridge and to the plaza below.

FOURTH FLOOR/BRIDGE LEVEL:PUBLIC/ PRIVATE The top floor of the Prentice plinth extends over to the new lab building. This space also includes additional learning labs, seminar space, and meeting rooms.

Mechanical equipment is relocated to below Lansdscaped ‘mounds’ offer

to provide an open

subtle grade changes on the

pavilion at the roof top

otherwise flat green roof.

level. The bowl acts as a ramp as well as a sloped seating area for summer concerts and plays.

A three story lobby entrance directs one to the information center on the ground floor or up the escalator to the new public cafe, auditorium and rooftop park

The ground floor transforms into the circulation cetner of the Entire Northwestern Streeterville Campus.

The café area filters

S.T.E.M exhibit + learning labs

circultion from the

green bridge + bowl

ground floor to the

new labs + research

bowl for the green roof

staff offices + conference

access.

public information, kiosk + cafe auditorium, event + prefunction naturally-lit atrium space

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HONORABLE MENTION Title: Project X Team: Anja Buttolo Tilmann Lohse Priska Lohse Michael Pancost


B3 99952


B1 99952


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ALL OTHER ENTRIES


Title: [Inside Out] In: Extending Future Prentice Team: Studio Link-Arc Yichen Lu Amy Shu Chang


Villa Rotunda

Guggenheim Museum

Museum fur Nordrhein-Westfalen

Scale Comparison of Atrium Spaces

PROGRAM

PROGRAM

1. PRENTICE RE-FOCUSED The design of the new Prentice extension intends to preserve the iconic reinforced con-

FUHWHVKHOOGHVLJQHGE\%HUWUDQG*ROGEHUJ5HFRJQL]LQJWKDWWKHH[LVWLQJIORRUDUHDVDQGKHLJKWVGRQRWVXVWRUWKZHVWHUQ8QLYHUVLW\¶V need for medical research lab facilities, we propose to remove the existing programs within the concrete shell, and place the programs RIPHGLFDOUHVHDUFKODERQWKHH[WHULRURIWKHVKHOO*ROGEHUJ¶VLFRQLFIRUPEHFRPHVWKHnew atrium for the medical research facility, visible from the urban context, yet preserved to serve as a public space for the campus.

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[1]

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Chicago City Grid

= New Volume

Prentice Floor Plan

Urban Fabric Extended

Cornell Campus Green

Yale Campus Green

Northwestern Downtown Campus Green

Scale Comparison of Campus Greens

2. URBAN CONNECTION Elements of the Chicago city and the Northwestern hospital campus are embodied in both the urban scheme and building scheme of the future Prentice extension. The rectilinear urban fabric of Streeterville is conceptually extended within the new volume, wrapping around the organically shape of the existing Prentice building and programmed with medical research facilities. We addressed the need for a campus heart in the Northwestern Downtown campus by reserving Site B for a new common green. The siting of the new campus green next to the Prentice building enriches the hospital campus by creating a focal point that gathers students, researchers and the general public. We provided future underground parking under the green, with easy access from North Fairbanks Court.

Circulation Diagram

[INSIDE OUT] IN : EXTENDING FUTURE PRENTICE

Northwestern University Downtown Campus

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CAMPUS HEART

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3 7

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Ground Floor Plan

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Typical Floor Plan

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Program Areas

Atrium Circulation Public Space Circulation

3. PROGRAM PROVISION 7KHQHZYROXPHRIWKH3UHQWLFHEXLOGLQJH[WHQVLRQZLOOKRXVH1RUWKZHVWHUQÂśVVWDWHRIWKH art medical research lab facilities. Double height open laboratories receive natural light on the north and are interconnected to lab support spaces. Offices surround the existing concrete clover form. Natural light shines through the existing oval windows into the offices from the new atrium void.

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Public Space

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4. SPATIAL CLARITY

The carved-out voidRI*ROGEHUJ¶VFORYHUIRUPEHFRPHVDPL[LQJFKDPEHUIRUYDULRXVXVHUVRIWKHPHGLcal facility. At various floor levels in the volume are spaces for exchange of ideas, knowledge, and culture. Circulation is devised around WKHVSDWLDOH[SHULHQFHRI*ROGEHUJ¶VFORYHUVKHOOE\DOORZLQJWKHSXEOLFWRDVFHQGZLWKLQLWDQGDURXQGLW(GXFDWLRQDOSURJUDPVSXEOLF spaces, and cultural events wrap around the exterior of the clover-shell, attracting the public from entrance plaza. In this new volume, the LGHDOL]HGJHRPHWU\RI*ROGEHUJ¶VGHVLJQLVIXVHGZLWKWKHIOXLGLW\RIVW&HQWXU\DUFKLWHFWXUH Section

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reg.# 0T098


Title: The Prentice Y Team: HiWorks Architecture Brantley Hightower, AIA, LEED AP


The YMCA has been an international institution for nearly 170 years. While these facilities have always provided a variety of services and social opportunities to a range of different communities, in the US they were originally intended to provide a safe environment for young men as they transitioned from rural to urban living.

the

Prentice Y

In the second half of the twentieth century, the mission of the YMCA expanded to include women and families. Today, the Y is dedicated to the development of a healthy “body, mind and spirit.� While this mission is most often met with athletic programming, the Y continues to provide a range of services to a broad social and economic spectrum.

It is a curious artifact of history that both the Loop and the Near North Side of Chicago currently lack a Y that serves its general population. Given the number of residents who have moved into the area in the last few decades, there exists an acute need for a downtown neighborhood Y.

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The Prentice Y

Athletic Extension group exercise rooms racquetball courts

natatorium meeting rooms theater climbing wall running track gymnasium locker rooms

would provide for a variety of community needs just as the original Prentice Women’s Hospital consolidated multiple women’s health services in a single location. In addition to standard YMCA athletic amenities, the Prentice Y would also provide expanded facilities for childcare, job education and counseling. Furthermore, it would offer meeting space for community groups. In the proposed scenario, Goldberg’s original structure becomes the base for a vast programmatic expansion. Given the dimensional requirements of athletic facilities relative to the dimensions of the existing tower, the added functions of the Prentice Y would be stacked vertically creating a layered program organization. The design would actively take advantage of the unique spatial opportunities resulting from the engagement of its form with the specifics of its internal program and its outward relationship to its site.

exercise floor administrative offices mechanical spine Existing Tower playland science lab classrooms

The Athletic Extension is supported by concrete piers and is braced by the Existing Tower. Goldberg’s original structure was defined by curving planes of poured concrete while the Extension is made of interconnected concrete trusses.

bouncy castle pterodactyl indoor playground office space retail space

The vertical organization of an athletic facility is not without precedent. Manhattan’s Downtown Athletic Club was memorably conceptualized as a series of stacked fields, courts and pools. Rem Koolhaas of course made this diagrammatic approach famous in Delirious New York. As compelling as its diagram was, the building lacked any outward expression of its unusual organization and few opportunities for program interaction were exploited internally.

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The curtain wall skin of the building’s base is formally extended to become a frame whose rigid lines contrast with the softer curves of the existing hospital tower. Within fields of highly tinted glass, zones of clear glazing provide directed views south toward the Loop and east toward Lake Michigan.

The Existing Tower

is reimagined as a multi-level childcare facility that serves both the needs of Y users as well as other members of the community. This particular program also represents an ideal fit for the former hospital floors. While the limited floor heights would pose a challenge for other potential program types, here it represents an environment perfectly scaled for children. By eliminating the need for interior partitions, the design is able to express the purity of Goldberg’s design in a way that was not possible in the building’s original configuration. This sense of openness is heightened through the strategic cutting of holes in floors to provide space for special activities to occur while at the same time allowing visual connections to be made between multiple levels.

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The Athletic Extension

offers an opportunity to explore the spatial possibilities implied by the Downtown Athletic Club. In addition, this vertical stacking of spaces give certain activities privileged locations that are typically only available to only the most powerful executives and wealthiest property owners. At the Prentice Y it is not the most privileged who enjoy the best view. Rather it is anyone who shows up for the 6:00 free swim.

More than a place to exercise, the Prentice Y is intended to act as a true community center offering a range of cultural and entertainment opportunities for those working and living downtown. Because of its location in the heart of Northwestern University Medical Campus, it can also provide a needed respite for family and friends of patients.

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Title: Prentice Tower. Iconic Past - Beacon for the Future Team: Brinckerhoff and Associates LLC Peter Brinckerhoff AIA, LEED AP Visualizedconcepts inc. Thorsten Bosch, Associate AIA Nick Glazebrook Felipe Patino Michal Ciurej


Title: Future Prentice Team: Bozhidar Hinkov, Architect Stoian Andonov Martin Krastev


Title: Radical Preservation Team: Andrew Kovacs


RADICAL PRESERVATION

ARCHITECTURE AS COLLECTIBLE

REGISTRATION NUMBER: 1A207

When architecture becomes useless - or it can no longer fulfil its intended purpose of function it becomes a collectible. This project proposes a radical re-purposing of Goldberg’s masterpiece. Rather than awkwardly reprogram the structure, this proposal radically declares a new function for the Goldberg’s masterpiece as a collectible - or a form of architectural preservation through designed demolition. The only way to really save Goldberg’s structure is by making it into smaller pieces, effectively a set of collectibles. A 3-dimensional preservation/demolition plan is generated through Goldberg’s initial column grid. Cube chunks of the structure are systematically dismantled with love and care to generate a new function where useless architecture may have new life as a collectible.

RADICAL PRESERVATION: Chicago Prize 2012 Future Prentice


PRESERVATION THROUGH DESIGNED AND CURATED DEMOLITION...

REGISTRATION NUMBER: 1A207

RADICAL PRESERVATION: Chicago Prize 2012 Future Prentice


A SET OF COLLECTED PIECES...

REGISTRATION NUMBER: 1A207

RADICAL PRESERVATION: Chicago Prize 2012 Future Prentice


REGISTRATION NUMBER: 1A207

TO THE COLOSSAL.

PRESERVED THROUGH DEMOLITION FROM THE MINIATURE...

RADICAL PRESERVATION: Chicago Prize 2012 Future Prentice


Title: Out to Pasture Team: Matthew Messner Piotr Drezek Obed Lopez Belem Medina Jeisler Salunga Matthew Schneider


Out to Pasture

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FUTURE PRENTICE

There comes a time in every buildings existence when it has outlived its purpose. Those unlucky ones, slowly degrade into abandonment. Others leave us in a blaze of imploding glory. A select few, on the other hand, find a new place in the world where they can feel useful again. No one ever said life on a farm was easy, but if any building can handle it, Prentice Women’s Hospital is one of them. Never quite fitting in to its surroundings, imagine the epiphany Prentice would have among structures of similar formal language. Not only would it be more comfortable in the fresh air of the countryside, it would be the greatest of its peers, for once. Away from the pressures of the city life, and those that would see harm come to it, Prentice could exist with dignity and honor. And when asked by our children, “Where did Prentice go?” We can answer with a clear conscience, “It lives on a nice farm, where it can be free.”

Site Plan

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FLOOR TO FLOOR HEIGHTS

187’-0”

133’- 5”

CORN

13’-6”

THIRD FLOOR COW FARM

13’-6”

SECOND FLOOR COW FARM

13’-6”

FIRST FLOOR COW FARM

13’-6.5”

GROUND FLOOR COW FARM

FLOOR DEPTHS FOR TOWER APPROX. 15” FLOOR DEPTHS FOR PODIUM APPROX. 12”

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Title: Hotel Bertrand Team: John H. Nelson Christian Dethloff Samuel Pavlovcik


Hotel Program •

• • • • • • • •

144 Rooms • 56 Double bed suites • 88 Single bed suites • 34 Short term Mini suites Bar & Lounge Restaurant Ballroom Street level Café Business center Conference Rooms Roof Terrace Green Space Workout Center • Lap Pool • Sauna Spa & Care Center

RooftopViewingArea

OpenAtrium TowerSuites Mechanical Bar

RoofTerrace&GreenSpace

Restaurant

TwoStoryGrandBallroom

MainEntryandLobby GrandStairAtrium

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Typical Hotel Rooms • Double Bed Suites • Single Bed Suites • “Capsule” Efficiency Suites Features • Built In cabinetry • Vintage Chic Style • En Suite Bathroom • Mini Lounges at each Quad • Guest Laundry Facilities on each level • Queen Sized Beds Minimum

Typical“Capsule”SuitePlan(Partial)

TypicalSingleBedSuite

TypicalTowerPlan

Typical“Capsule”Suite

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Exterior Improvements • New Curtain wall at base • Atrium Glass • New Energy Efficient Windows • Green Roof • New Hardscape & Planting at Ground Level • Remain Sensitive to Historic Facade

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Hotel Program CafĂŠ Restaurant Workout center Bar Guests Suites Ballroom Conference Areas

GroundFloorPlan

Level1Plan

Level3Plan

Level2Plan

TerracePlan

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Title: Future Prentice Team: Edith Wong


Title: Biophilia Through Medical Spaces Team: Yanelys Rosua Silvia Baldoquin Candace Hoskins


biophilia through medical spaces design strategies:

landscape treatment of the entrance (green areas.) N

nature trails

MEDICAL LAB FACILITIES

500 ft

(rendering of structure, spatial connections)

connection

GREEN HOUSE BRIDGE

(rendering of bridge looking towards prentice women’s hospital) PERMANENCE AND HOMENAGE TO EXISTING CONDITIONS

west view towards michigan lake

Photo credit: Chicago Architectural A Club

PLANTS CONSERVATORY

(photoshop renderings, or landscape diagram of native plants and its location in site)

native plants

PLANT NURSERY

interior view from medical facility

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Image courtesy of Landmarks Illinois


nursery/ conservatory spaces

programatical section a

programatical section b

(redbud, american linden, european beach, white fir, bur oak, pagoda dogwood, new england aster, blue flag iris, common ninebark)

interior view nursery/ green house bridge

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Image courtesy of Landmarks Illinois


green house connector through medical spaces

circulation diagram

(retractable enclosed bridge serves as a warm transitional and programatical space between medical facailities)

(prentice medical facility > green house bridge > new medical facility > nursery > garage bridge )

green house connector through medical spaces

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Image courtesy of Landmarks Illinois


Title: Lab Life -Chicago self sufficient research facilities Team: Grzegorz Owczarczyk Michal Kubrak


LAB LIFE-

CHICAGO SELF SUFFICENT RESEARCH FACILITIES

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LAB LIFE-

CHICAGO SELF SUFFICENT RESEARCH FACILITIES

“LAB LIFE” workday cycle includes all important aspects and needs of being a LAB worker or researcher. Proximity of housing and green spaces (roofs), work spaces and recreational + meeting spaces (Old Prentice Building) creates a whole new kind of environment. A life becomes a balanced circle. Housing units for lab workers and researchers, different unit combinations + sizes in towers on top

LAB space, research rooms, study space and other facilities + green roof (possible for plant growing etc.)

Bars, casinos - entertainment space serving the LAB and housing

Recreational facilities for lab workers Old building serving new functions to emphasize the form Hotel facilities for guest scientists and businesman having meetings and working with local professionals

Public space for both lab workers and other citizens. Lab campus connectconnect ed with Prentice underground

2IÀFHDQGPHHWLQJVSDFHIRUFRQnecting business and science / research - maximum cooperation

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LAB LIFE-

CHICAGO SELF SUFFICENT RESEARCH FACILITIES

What is the real quality of the Old Prentice Building and why in fact do we want to preserve it? Why is this building so important for the architectural history and how can it re-gain its lost youth and be brought back to life? Trying to implement new laboratories there certainly won’t be a good idea - there is not enough space for that and it will not be cheap. It will also be expensive comparing to coming up with new spaces for laboratories. How can we then emphasize the structure and materiality of the Old Prentice Building treating it as a symbol of its age and rather as a monument instead as a really functional and feasible object? Idea of bringing attention to it can be realised by making it more of a public space containing different functions and forgeting about its previous life. Hotels, bars, conference rooms or sport facilities will bring new life for the object. Combining this with new lab facilities + housing units creates a whole life environment for researchers and workers while giving new importance for the 3UHQWLFHEXLOGLQJ7KDWZD\PRVWRIWKHVFLHQWLVWVDQGUHVHDUFKHUVZLOOKDYHVWURQJFRQWDFWZLWKLWZKLOHDOVREHLQJDEOHWRÀQGFRPIRUWDEOHZRUNHQYLURQment in new laboratory facilities.

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Title: Hotel Bertrand and Med City Team: Studio Sym Design Mark P. Miszuk AIA, LEED AP Rene Steevensz AIA Mo Yala AIA


SUPERIOR STREET

ROOF DECK / RESTAURANT (5th Floor)

2nd Thru 4th

GROUND FLOOR

Program

Parking Spaces Hotel Rooms

SUPERIOR STREET

KITCHEN (6th Floor)

TYPICAL HOTEL FLOOR (8th thru 14th)

SECTION LOOKING EAST

103 112

HOTEL BERTRAND

HURON STREET

ID: 3B210


ID: 3B210

HOTEL BERTRAND


TYPICAL APARTMENT FLOOR

APARTMENT FLOOR

RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT FLOOR

ROOF TERRACE

APARTMENTS

MEDICAL MALL PARKING / MECHANICAL

E. HURON STREET

N. McCLURG CT

N. FAIRBANKS CT

APARTMENTS

APARTMENTS

RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

E. ERIE STREET

Program

MED CITY

GROUND FLOOR Parking 1000 Spaces Apartment Area 900,000 SF Medical Mall Area 712,000 SF Research Development Area 480,000 SF

ID: 3B210

LOWER LEVEL LOADING / PARKING FLOOR


MED CITY ID: 3B210


Title: An Expansion to a Masterpiece Team: Kathleen Guede Heriberto Delgado


Title: Live Grow Learn Team: Dan Marta Nick Spoor Josh Myers Christian Torres


LIVE:

GROW:

RESIDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO USE NEW GREEN HOUSES SPACE TO GROW CROPS FOR USE IN THE COMMUNAL KITCHENS AND FOR SALE IN WEEKLY FARMERS MARKETS HELD ON NEW GREENSPACE BRIDGEING THE EXISTING ROAD. THE YEILD OF THE GREENHOUSES WILL BE BOL STERED, IN THE GROWING MONTHS, BY USE OF EXISTING VACANT LOT AS A NEW URBAN FARM CULTIVATED BY OCCUPANTS AND OTHERS IN NEED.

UTILIZE EXISTING WEDGE SHAPED PATIENT ROOMS AS SINGLE RESIDENCE OCCUPANCIES ALLOWING PEOPLE TO TRANSITION TO PERMANENT HOMES. EXISTING NURSING STATIONS WILL BE TRANSFORMED INTO COMUNAL KITCHENS ALLOWING RESIDENTS TO LIVE INDEPENDENT LIVES.

LEARN:

EXISTING PODIUM WILL BE UTILIZED AS A COMMUNITY CENTER. OCCUPANTS OF THE NEW FACILITY WILL BE ABLE TO TAKE ADVANTGE OF THE SPACE AND SOCIAL SERVICES TO LEARN NEW SKILLS MAKING THEM BETTER ABLE TO FIND WORK.

Registration #3FM08


Registration #3FM08


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1

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LIVE GROW FLOOR PLATE OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5

Resident Rooms Double Height Green House Rain Water Irragation Communal Kitchens Dining Area

Registration #3FM08


Registration #3FM08


Title: Prentice Science Conference Hall Team: Johan B채ckman


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PRENTICE SCIENCE CONFERENCE HALL PROBLEM: - The qualities of the Old Prentice are being overshadowed by the dislike of its raw appeal and vacant feel - The land owners find the building unsuiting for their uses SOLUTION: - By making the building interact with the public the opinions could change

Function seperation of upper stories

- By giving it a new more dynamic function its role in the area could be lifted CONCEPT: - The building is split into a park and a conference center - The reason is to attract different users to make the building reach out to more people - The aim is to achieve a symbiosis between the two functions, so that the generation and distribution of information is as dynamic as possible

Remains of former slabs, used as an urban park

Ramp between the slabs

Conference hall and workshop pods 3FS24


changing rooms & toilets

yoga deck

green park

sun deck

Floor order diagram

conference hall cafeteria

administration terrace toilets

foayer

reception

Flow diagram 3FS24


services

restaurant & sky bar

workshop spaces

administration

workshop pod

interrior of the workshop pods

3FS24


Title: Save Prentice Team: Matthew Claus Bear Pope Dan Drecoll


Title: Future Prentice Team: Gabriella Moreno


Title: Embracing Prentice 2012 Team: BauerLatoza Studio Jaime Aubry Roberta Brucato John Cramer Sarah Olson Theresa Potter Tim Vacha


                ���      



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 





   

 

 



      

  



 







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    

  

      

 

 





 










             

      

                       

     






Title: Prentice Re-Framed Team: Martin Cerna Dan Penick


RE FRAMED The decision to destroy an architecturally significant work such as the Prentice Women’s Hospital is one that should not be made without considering all potential alternatives. Our main objectives to preserve the existing tower as an architectural monument are to utilize the land as a premier research laboratory and introduce a new program which frames the site as a centralized scientific hub. Acknowledging that the existing tower does not allow for an ideal research facility, we propose to elevate the research laboratories above the existing tower thereby freeing the plan for a more appropriate use. By allowing the tower to maintain its formal integrity of its open plan, we are able to house a program which is flexible by nature. To activate the new program and structurally support the lifted laboratories we introduced a new tower to north of the site. As a central hub we introduced a large scale science library that works together with both the research laboratories and the adjacent scientific community. Because of this, the purpose of the podium is defined by more publicly accessible programs that support both the library and the community’s academic goals. Meanwhile, the northern tower is used to house larger and more informal spaces such as reading rooms and computer labs so that the existing tower can leverage its flexibility for book stacks. With these programmatic moves we arrived to an architectural language which treats the elevations as a device to frame the existing tower as a three dimensional sculpture.

Entry Number: 04E07


Programmatic Shifting

1.

2.

Podium as Research Facility

3.

Free program from towerr

4.

Surround tower with Program

Activate site by injecting Library of Science

LEGEND 1. Main Lobby Below 2. Auditorium 3. Extended Classrooms 4. Circulation Core 5. Classroom Support 6. Gathering Space 7. Lobby Extension 8. Open Reading Area 9. Library Book Stacks 10. Offices 11. Conference Room 12. Rest rooms 13. Break room 14. Research Labs 15. Lab Support 16. Collaboration Space 17. Communal Space

1

2

8

1

5

10

10 11

2

1

1

3

15 9

4

5

9

3

9

15

4

4

15

8

5

3

2

3

1

12 12

3

13

2

3

3

1

1

15

14

5

14 17

15

9

6

5

15

6

6

16 3

3

3

3

16 7

A

B

Podium Level

C

D

E

7

A

B

Tower Level

C

D

E

7

A

B

C

D

E

Upper Research Level Entry Number: 04E07


Private Programs Library Programs

14

Educational / Support Main Circulation

14

Display Boxes

14

Display Case Mega Truss

5.

Architectural Tec tonics

LEGEND 1. Main Lobby Below 2. Auditorium 3. Extended Classrooms 4. Circulation Core 5. Classroom Support 6. Gathering Space 7. Lobby Extension 8. Open Reading Area 9. Library Book Stacks 10. Offices 11. Conference Room 12. Rest rooms 13. Break room 14. Research Labs 15. Lab Support 16. Collaboration Space 17. Communal Space 18. Vivarium

9

9

8

8

9 8

2

9

8

18 3 3

Entry Number: 04E07


Entryy Number: 04E07


Title: Turning Inside-Out Team: NJBA A+U Noel J Brady MRIAI MIDI


Chicago Architectural Club 2012

FUTURE PRENTICE

Proposed Ground Floor

Existing Ground Floor

Proposed Floor Level 5 (and above)

Existing Floor Level 5

4J862


Chicago Architectural Club 2012

FUTURE PRENTICE

Turning Inside Out

Typical Laboratory Floor

Proposed Side Elevation

4J862


Chicago Architectural Club 2012

FUTURE PRENTICE

Existing Superior Street View

Proposed New Screened Facade

4J862


FUTURE PRENTICE

Chicago Architectural Club 2012

4J862


Title: Northwestern University Central Plant and Facilities Headquarters Team: Burnham & Van Cleave Suzie Van Cleave, AIA David Burnham Bryan Abbott Allison Kenney Cooling Tower Depot, Inc.


Title: The Building Goes On Team: JAQ Corp, int’l John M. Gay Terron Wright Leeswann Bolden Nickolas Hill


Title: Chicago Vivarium Team: Thomas de Monchaux Rodrigo Zamora


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Title: The Trophy Team: Choi, Hyung Jin Kang, Mi Ju


Title: Research Apparatus Team: Alexandre Guilbeault, M. Arch David Giraldeau, M. Arch, B.A.


Title: Urban Village Team: Brian Bedford Kate Bedford


Chicago’s Land Policies Plan 2 acres / 1,000 residents Streeterville

17.7 acres / 11,533 residents 1.53 acres / 1,000 residents

Chicago’s open space is unevenly dispersed to its 2.7 million residents. While generous space has been given along sections of the water’s edge, much of the existing open space is isolated from the city fabric. (Northwestern University Future Growth)

THE HEART OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD This urban and architectural solution not only meets the needs of Northwestern University, but is envisioned to become the heart of the Streeterville neighborhood. The district, with a rapidly climbing residential population and home of a growing university and medical campus, currently lacks the open space required by the City of Chicago. This solution, largely about social integration, involves a deliberate crafting of open space around carefully considered University and public program. This space offers opportunities for public engagement - both a necessity in university education and supportive of community development. The result is a symbiotic relationship in which the health and welfare of employees, patients, businesses and the greater community are paramount. 6Y440


CONTEXT WITHIN THE STREETERVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD *cross-hatching indicates surface or garage parking

Northwestern University and Hospital 0

40’

120’

240’

Businesses

Residential and Restaurants

City Bus Route

Outdoor Living Room

WEAVING PUBLIC AND PRIVATE The Outdoor Living Room is activated by a density of “pedestrian edges” – effectively doubling the walkable perimeter of the standard block. Pedestrian access links the former Prentice building and the Northwestern campus to this open space and business hub, which will provide tenant opportunities for services and amenities that the neighborhood currently lacks. The weaving of public and private through mixed uses supports sustainable economic development where convenience, activity and a dense population coalesce. Below the Outdoor Living Room, a central connector links the research facility to a building for future campus growth. These structures are sited and shaped to minimize canyonization in the open space. 6Y440


VIEW SOUTH FROM PRENTICE Event Center

Restaurant URBAN VILLAGE In this solution, a tower addition connects to the existing Prentice structure, converting it into what could become one of Chicago’s most distinct and desirable hotels. As Northwestern continues its ownership of the building, the University’s hotel, conference, and event space needs will take priority; rooms and spaces will be made available to the others thereafter. A public circulation route connects through the structures, crossing over university program as it winds down to the street level. Bertrand Goldberg’s concept of making “villages” is given new life, through the intermingling of public and private programs within the building and adjacent site.

Social Spaces

Hotel Rooms

Hotel Rooms

u A t r i

m

Public Level

Cafe

Public Circu

lation

Services & Retail

NW University Administrative Offices NW University Bookstore

NW University Welcome Center

Connector

6Y440


HOTEL ATRIUM SPACE

HOTEL LEVEL FLOOR PLAN

to

be

10

30

60

low

o pe

n

0

A NEW LIFE FOR PRENTICE Prentice is valuable as a singularity. Within the modified building, a narrow atrium separates the original structure from the addition, pierced only to allow for necessary circulation between the two volumes. The atrium gives the visitor access to experience the uniqueness of Prentice, the building’s innovative and sculptural concrete shell. This relationship makes the original structure more approachable and relatable than its former life, highlighting its value through human interaction. By preserving Prentice, the richness of Chicago’s architectural fabric will be bolstered in the Streeterville neighborhood, giving current and future residents the opportunity to be deeply connected to this place. 6Y440


Title: Next Library Team: Sheehan Partners, LTD. Neil Sheehan Sylvia Billisics Jeremy Mickler Bryn Namivari Laura Bowe Jac Selinsky Tom Veed


: NEXT : L IB R A RY

6YF92


FUTURE: :PRENTICE

Innovation involves drawing from the past while looking to the future. Goldberg’s tower is reinvigorated as The Next Library. No longer simply a repository for knowledge, it is the physical manifestation of the digital power required to process as well as preserve new research. Inside the concrete cloverleaf, four dual rings of servers rise seventy feet, supported from the shell by a system of steel bracing that replaces the floors and creates a single volume that extends from the topmost server to the glass-enclosed base. Hot air is exhausted between the server rings and rises to the roof stack, drawing cool air from louvers below. In the summer, cool air is created from lake water, while in winter waste heat is reclaimed to preheat intake air. Grated catwalks provide technician and public access to the neural network of conduit, fiber, and computer.

SERVER CORES: data storage:petaflop processing

The reimagined podium hovers between the tower and public landscape below, embracing the tower base without infringing on it, and is the interface by which users access data above. Contained within is an evolving infrastructure for multiple modes of input and output. The underside of the building is a digital surface, lifted on its north side to express the auditorium slope. The streetscape extends beneath the building connecting Huron and Superior Streets via a forest of columns punctuated by the revelation of the tower’s base through the podium’s open court. Pedestrians can witness the servers rising above consistently processing and perpetually aiding the expansion of human knowledge.

TOWER: server housing:stack vent

PODIUM: input:infrastructure for interface

DIGITAL SURFACE: output:project projection NETWORK:campus extension librarys:museums:labs:hospitals:universities

OPEN SPACE:critical path parks:unprogrammed lots:public space:pedestrian paths

WATER:resource utilization lake:river:main:treatment:locks:breaks

6YF92 6YF92


6YF92

switchgear

substation

generator stack

backup generators

public space

outreach

performance

large format

lab

office

imaging

amenities

reference


winter:exhausted waste heat to preheat intake air

summer:lake source cooling

SERVER CORE:PASSIVE STACK

server catwalk

server lobby

tower lobby street interior court

tower lobby

LINES OF SIGHT:VIEWS

6YF92


Title: The Incubator Team: Lina Nilsson


THE INCUBATOR A NEW PROGRAM FOR A NEW TIME The Incubator is Prentice Tower as a creative space for start-up companies in the bio-medical field The Incubator is a business model that combines biomedical education & research with the goal to launch successful start-ups in biotech as well as showcasing Northwestern University to the public. With office spaces and Lab spaces for lease as well as audiotoriums, show rooms and conference rooms and even short stay hotel rooms for guest researchers all the functions a startup company can need are represeted. With its close proximity to the rest of the Campus / hospital neighbourhood there are many synergy effects for the whole area to be obtained. Finally the program in the building includes many recreational functions that are open to the public as well, such as a sky bar and a rooftop swiming pool /gym. The audiotoriums and exhibition areas can also be used for public events.

PODS All the functions are grouped together in clusters of circular slabs and stacked and entwined vertically like a DNA-string for a spatially interesting and flexible effect. This liberates the curvlinear space inside Prentice tower and releases its sculptural effects also from the inside.

PRESERVATION = REMOVAL OF THE OLD SLABS.. The existing floor slabs in the building are demolished and replaced by the pods. Since the slabs aren’t flexible enough neither in plan or section; and since the most important feature of the Prentice tower is its load-bearing, concrete shell-structure, this operation is done to liberate the curvilinear, beautiful space inside the Prentice tower. Before Prentice tower was seen as a sculptural building form the outside, but now this is true for the inside as well.

..BUT PRESERVATION OF THE SHELL The shell is keep intact, it’s the best feature of Prentice Tower. It get a new dramatic light effect from the refurbished teracce area. LABORATORIES FOR LEASE IN THE BASE The labs for lease are placed in the base of the building. This part get a new more translucent, double skin facade of glass and metal mesh.

NEW LAB On the plot across the street from the Prentice building a new state of the art medical lab is built and connected with the Prentice building with a foot bridge. PUBLIC SQUARE In connection with the new reserach lab a public space is c reated.

urban situation & concept

7C248


meeting & conferance rooms

sky bar / green house offices

show room / exhibition

pool / gym

bio-food court

audiotorium

researchers in recidency / short stay hotel rooms terrace

laboratories & lab support area

offices

lobby

exploded axonometry

7C248


cross section

perspective from the exhibition area

7C248


perspective from the sky bar

7C248


Title: The Glass Museum Team: Volodymyr Ilchyshyn


The Glass Museum Chicago has a reputation for being a melting pot of architecture with different typesof structures covering not only its downtown area but also its outskirts. The melting pot should be preserved and documented in a museum which is more than the Architectural Foundation’s model of downtown. Bertrand Goldberg’s Prentice Hospital is the facility which could house the museum. With a bit of restoration and an addition to encase the entire clover shaped structure and keep it away from the weather the former hospital becomes an historic architectural piece inside of its own casing. (continued, pg.2)

7C826


The lower part of the new museum could be used for large exhibition halls and traveling exhibitions. The clover structure would become the permanent location for the history of architecture. Each of the floors would be a different era in architecture. The exterior of the clover, which would be encased in the new glass box, would allow viewers to get closer to the clover shaped structure via stairs and balconies attached to the glass box. The roof level of the base structure would also be used for events and exhibition openings.

7C826


Architecture throughtout the years

Events/open area

New Exhibitions

7C826


Title: Re-Imagine: Re-Construct: Re-Instate Team: Phil Stott Jon Gately


Title: Preserving History Team: Lily Alvarez Lillian Campos Jose Garcia


PRESERVING HISTORY

Future Prentice 2012 Competition

Once an innovative structure in the Chicago skyline, today a dated building, but a building that holds significant meaning in both its design creation and in the lives of many of Chicago's citizens. When the building was designed it was an innovative structure because of its monolithic concrete shell which was completely cantilevered of the core. The elimination of columns for support allowed for a free plan, flexible to accommodate the multi-purpose program. It was necessary for our design to keep these points present in the preservation of the Prentice building. Our design is a monumental glass and steel skin that treats the Prentice building as a habitable sculpture. The existing structure is experienced by the user spatially in four different ways. The first way is the building being seen from a far in which it is seen as a precious sculpture protected from the elements. The second experience occurs in the entrance hall in which the building is seen form worms eye view. The third is the experience of the user from within the existing structure in which the program takes precedence of the experience, and the fourth is located on the tenth floor where the space exposes the user to an exterior interior relation with the existing structure and the skin.

Plan view Hierarchal Views and Axis Diagram

Elevation Structure Diagram Skin Design

Sectional Expansion and Contraction Slab Diagram

Natural Light Spatial Study

N

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB: FUTURE PRENTICE 2012 COMPETITION ID: 7SA68


Square Footage and Program Analysis Total Square Footage: 556, 922 sq. ft. Lecture Halls Large Lecture (120)- 1,200 sq. ft. Meeting Room (30)- 760 sq. ft. Computer Lab: 800 sq. ft. Rest Rooms: 800 sq. ft.

Tectonics and Materials: Exterior

White Concrete

Interior Double Insulated Glass

Landscape

White Concrete

Wood

White Concrete

Steel

Steel

White Tile

Grass

Prentice Concrete

Prentice Concrete

Clinics Waiting Area: 120 sq. ft. Reception: 60 sq. ft. Physician Office: 120 sq. ft. Exam Room: 110 sq. ft. Nurse Work Area: 80 sq. ft. Medical Records: 60 sq. ft. Medication Storage: 60 sq. ft. Supply Room: 150 sq. ft. Rest Rooms: 800 sq. ft. Reception/ Recreation Area Recreation Area: 20,400 sq. ft.

Research Labs Labs: 600 sq. ft. Research Office: 200 sq. ft. Medication Storage: 60 sq. ft. Supply Room: 150 sq. ft. Break Room: 400 sq. ft. Rest Rooms: 800 sq. ft. Library Check Out: 160 sq. ft. Reference Desk: 160 sq. ft. Audio Lab: 300 sq. ft. Visual Lab: 600 sq. ft. Librarians Office: 200 sq. ft. Work Room: 200 sq. ft. Storage Room: 300 sq. ft. Rest Rooms: 800 sq. ft. CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB: FUTURE PRENTICE 2012 COMPETITION ID: 7SA68


CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB: FUTURE PRENTICE 2012 COMPETITION ID: 7SA68


7XV08 Title: Saving Prentice - Goldberg Commons Team: Paul Benigno Gregory L. Klosowski Christina Bies Jill Macal


GOLDBERG COMMONS

The debate to save Prentice Women’s Hospital can be distilled down to the concepts of private property ownership set in contrast to an inherent responsibility to the larger city, as evidenced by the multifaceted public discourse between private corporate owners and the collective consciousness of a broad range of artists, architects and a design-fluent public.

A viable solution must offer more to the larger campus than square footage. This is an opportunity to spark the imagination and broaden the positive impacts, not just at this building, but throughout the campus, the neighborhood of Streeterville, and the larger city. Goldberg’s groundbreaking iconic four leafed plan was inspired by an idea of community where the center held common support programs for the patients at the outer edges. We realized the larger campus needed a heart, achievable through the transposition of the original parti to the larger scale of the neighborhood, campus, and proposed buildings, creating a university commons.

Labs Commons

Initial idea of unifying the site through a common ground plane

Labs

Site plan diagram

The proposed structures for research labs define the edges of this new piazza, creating overlapping public and semi-protected spaces. The notion of a hybrid zoning condition allows the institutions to achieve their practical goals while providing a vital place in the heart of Streeterville. Prentice, not only acting as a visual anchor for this new campus heart, has a functional redefinition as a university owner hotel and a global architectural tourist destination. The programmatic viability is supported the proximity to retail, a museum and the lakefront. This intentional interlacing of zoning and use enlivens and enriches the area on multiple scales, allowing the spaces to live on beyond typical business hours.

Michigan Avenue Retail District

Towers lacking pedestrian scale

Scaleless urban edge

Michigan Avenue / Retail District

Pedestrian connection to lake

Navy Pier entertainment center

View of the lakefront

Streeterville Boundry

Northwestern campus buildings

Navy Pier

7XV08


D

E

D A

D C

A C B

View of the commons and surrounding structures as seen from the south. The larger scale massing of the towers are situated to maximize solar exposure to the outdoor commons balanced against the need for a half million square feet of lab spaces.

DRAWING KEY A Laboratory Tower B Linear labs / Commercial base C Interior food court / commercial D Daylighting / Common space E Goldberg Hotel F Hotel rooms G Below grade parking

“....The city from a simple settlement became the place of assembled institutions. The measure of the greatness of a place to live must come from the character of its institutions sanctioned through how sensitive they are to renewed desire for new agreement... The street is a room by agreement. A community room the walls of which belong to the donors...the ceiling is the sky...� Example of traditional piazza

Example of traditional stoa building type

From a sketch on the Drawings for City

Louis Kahn

7XV08


Remainer of the hotel rooms above, 140 suites total

Typical hotel floor alternate plan

Typical hotel floor

Rooftop pool and lounge area

Curtain wall is removed and replaced with new metal screen wall system

View of the hotel rooftop with seatling, lounges and a pool

We realized the larger campus needed a heart, achievable through the transposition of the original parti to the larger scale of the neighborhood, campus, and proposed buildings, creating a university commons.

Floor 4 is removed to restore base to the original height

F Staggered floor plates to create areas with varying ceiling heights for hotel program

A

D

Floor 3: Meeting rooms Floor 2: Lounge and bar Floor 1: Lobby and Support Ground: Open

Existing structural frame

D

C

Courtyard paving continues into building base

G 7XV08


Above: As seen from the upper level, the commons is active on several levels with adjacent structures that respond to the original structre’s form

Above: The commons as seen from the ground floor at the repurposed Prentice building. Large rolling doors open up the interior to the outside when the weather permits.

This intentional interlacing of zoning and use enlivens and enriches the area on multiple scales, allowing the spaces to live on beyond typical business hours

Above: Looking southwest, the commons transforms at night, with active retail and visible lab circulation. Rooftop spaces, lit above a common datum, would accentuate the more daring engineering moves and cast a beautiful glow. . Below left: A view from the upper level circulation with the unifying sculptural canopy element. Below right: a view along the pathway that connects the southwest corner to the interior commons (on left) and exterior commons (beyond)

Below: Goldberg hotel on the left with the fifth floor roof deck and pool visible to the interior lounge below. The surrounding circulation and overlapping uses create multiple active vertical datums.

7XV08


Title: Future Prentice Team: Amira Ajlouni


FUTURE PRENTICE

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB: 2012 CHICAGO PRIZE COMPETITION

CONCEPT


FUTURE PRENTICE

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB: 2012 CHICAGO PRIZE COMPETITION

ID : 8LH86


FUTURE PRENTICE

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB: 2012 CHICAGO PRIZE COMPETITION

Bridge Connection

ID : 8LH86


Title: Future Prentice: A mixing box for engaged research Team: Damon Wilson Frank Nelson


Title: The Garden and the Void Team: Mircea Eni Nikita Troufanov Kyle Breelove Katy Manwaring


THE GARDEN AND THE VOID

09S44


VOID EXIST’G CAMPUS

GARDEN THE HUB PLAZA

FUTURE DEV’T

Old Prentice Hospital is reimagined as an inverted space. What was interior has worn out it’s function and is stripped away, opening up to the elements. The exterior in turn is cherished and enclosed, becoming interior space. The void of the old bed tower serves as a courtyard, a spatial sculpture and a water recycling system. The enclosed exterior serves as a winter garden. The new building takes on a new spirit and function as a connection node within the University Campus. It offers a public plaza, healing center and a winter garden for the patients, staff and visitors. It connects the campus buildings by plugging into the existing sky-bridge network on every side, acting as a HUB. Both a transitional space and a destination, the HUB provides health and recreation functions, designed around the principles of Evidence Based Design. The floors are connected through a series of walkable ramps, eventually emerging at the roof into a winter garden.

09S44


0 AS IS

1 REMOVE GROUND FLOOR

2 REMOVE FLOOR SLABS

3 CONNECT THE PEOPLE

This allows for an urban plaza that will act as crossroads of Northwestern’s campus. A refection pool marks where the tower touches the ground. The tower becomes the healing nucleus nucleus of the campus.

The tower’s sculptural beauty is enhanced and celebrated while ceilings are heightened in the podium.

A continuation of Northwestern’s existing sky bridge network connects patients, students, and staff through a hub of activity.

3 SPACES FOR RELAXATION

4 OUTDOORS, INDOORS

5 THE AXIS OF THE CAMPUS

5 ENCLOSED SANCTUARY

The Healing Center offers patients, visitors and staff a place to escape the confinement of the hospital. A cafe, spa, and chapel offer what they are looking for. Spaces appear to float amongst the crossing skybridges

A park then tops the podium and surrounds the stalk of the tower. The park is a retreat elevated from the city sculpted to be a place of repose, refreshment, and recovery.

Visitors can access from a stair or elevator in the core as well as the skybridges. The Garden and the Void is meant to be a hub of the communities healing and social health.

A screen covers the facade elements while a crystal glass structure encloses the park into a winter garden.

09S44


09S44


Title: Future Prentice Team: Mark Bruzan Architect AIA, LEED Green Associate


Lake Michigan

SUPERIORSTREET Hotel& Admin.Off.

SITELOCATIONPLAN

Park

SiteBͲ LabBuilding

McCLURGCOURT

FAIRBANKSCOURT

HURONSTREET

ERIESTREET

N

Site B is developed with a mixedͲuse building which includes 500,000 S.F. of lab space.

The balance of the site is developed as a park featuring a large reflecting pool and green space.

Green roofs are incorporated on both the existing and new structures.

FUTUREPRENTICE110.15.12

SITEPLAN

This

proposal envisions a mixedͲuse complex to satisfy Northwestern University’s desire for a state of the art medical research lab facility. The program includes the adaptive reͲ use of Goldberg’s iconic structure and utilizes the adjacent site for the new lab building.

9AW17


The design establishes a dialogue between the existing and new while expressing dynamic imagery of medical research through the use of innovative materials. The new facility shall strive to obtain LEED Platinum certification by employing environmentally sound and sustainable strategies.

Retail spaces ring the ground floor at the new lab building. The second through fourth floors are split between lab storage/archive spaces and a parking garage. The fifth floor contains mechanical space and additional archive rooms. The sixth through eight floors house the lab spaces. An egg shaped “embryo” form faces the park and houses staff offices. Clad in stainless steel, the embryo becomes a provocative counterpoint to the concrete clover of the Goldberg structure.

A

reinforced concrete framework references the existing Women’s Hospital. Exterior walls at the building are concrete up to the lab levels where zinc wall panel cladding is employed.

PROGRAM OF SPACES EXISTING PRENTICE HOSPITAL ADAPTIVE REͲUSE Ground Floor Floors 1Ͳ3 Floor 4 Floors 5Ͳ11

hotel lobby / café / shops NU administrative offices green roof terrace / restaurant/ meeting rooms / lounges 140 hotel guest rooms

NEW MEDICAL RESEARCH LAB / MIXEDͲUSE BUILDING Ground Floor Floors 2Ͳ4 Floor 5 Floors 6Ͳ8

lobby / retail spaces lab archive and storage spaces / parking garage mechanical research lab spaces

FUTUREPRENTICE210.15.12

9AW17


The existing Women’s Hospital is reͲdefined to house administrative offices in the base portion of the building and a 140 room boutique hotel at the quatrefoil shaped tower. The hotel is envisioned to serve guests and visiting professors to the facility as well as the general public. A bridge walkway connects the offices to the new lab acros s Huron St.

Green roofs

are incorporated and new glazed enclos ures are added to the clover form at the fourth floor – serving as a restaurant, conference/meeting rooms and lounges for the hotel.

Images of organisms under a microscope – dictydium cancellatum Ͳ

are screen printed on the structural glass. Similar glazing utilized in the new building’s entrance locations serve as linkages between existing and new construction.

FUTUREPRENTICE310.15.12

9AW17


The lab building entry faces

the park and is oriented on a north/south axis with the existing Prentice building. A four story height structural glass wall with a screen printed image Ͳ Defects in the Cholesteric Texture = punctuates the axis at the south façade at Erie St.

The new building will provide daylighting to 90% of it’s spaces, largely in part of a three story height atrium at the lab levels. A window wall at the east facade provides dramatic views to the embryo form.

A

variety of sun screens are employed to modulate solar radiation including operable light shelves that are programmed to adjust throughout the day and aluminum screens layered over the egg shaped offices. The parking garage is screened with perforated metal panels screened with an image of an Arabidopsis thaliana seedling.

FUTUREPRENTICE410.15.12

9AW17


Title: Prentice Volume II Team: Michael Charters


VOL

PRENTICE 02 A New Center

Current trends show top medical research institutes moving towards programmatically diverse, campus-like master plans. Northwestern University’s current Chicago campus is a piecemeal collection of facilities without a cohesive identity. Through the refurbishment of Prentice and the development of the adjacent lot, Northwestern has a rare opportunity to create an iconic campus core which brings in revenue, enhances staff and patient experience, while establishing a recognizable identity for the Chicago campus.

01

Red envelope shows the University’s current plan to build a laboratory tower in place of the current Goldberg structure. In addition to an uncomfortable neighboring adjacency, a vertical massing isn’t best suited for a research facility.

02

A courtyard building better addresses the collaborative nature of a research facility.

03

A new central plaza is created, enhancing the current green corridor.

E SUPERIOR ST

K E L A

LA

M

KE

I C

SH

H

OR IV E

A N

DR

I G

E

E HURON ST

04

N FA I R B A N K S C T

E ERIE ST

An expanded pedway system, creating a central media/social hub in the Prentice Podium.

05

A diverse program ensures 24 hour activity.

9WB40


Hotel atrium, made possible by rearranging the mechanical penthouse

Prentice Hotel and Conference Center

Given the University has rejected the reuse of Goldberg’s iconic structure as housing, laboratory, and office space, I propose it be repurposed as a hotel. There are several working examples of medical university run hotel and conference centers, most notably on the Georgetown medical campus. The hotel would serve hospital patient families, prospective faculty and students, alumni, as well as general tourists. I propose shifting the mechanical penthouse order to allow for a central atrium, bringing light deep into the floor plate. Additionally, the podium will feature a native vegetation roof garden, restaurant, bar, conference center, children’s care, and a media hub as part of an expanded pedway system.

FIG 01

FIG 01

A void cut into the podium for vertical circulation pays homage to the original structure

03 02

01

Plan - Typical Hotel

Plan - Podium Roof 01 - RECREATION ROOM 02 - SUN DECK 03 - PLAYGROUND

01 05

01 04

Standard Room

Large Suite

Extended Stay Family Suite

02

TO LABS

05

02

04

03 03

Plan - Ground Level

Plan - Level 03

01 - BACK OF HOUSE 02 - LOBBY/CONCIERGE 03 - BAR 04 - RESTAURANT 05 - DROP OFF

01 - PRESENTATION ROOMS 02 - CONFERENCE ROOM 03 - OPEN CONVENTION AREA 04 - CHILDREN’S CARE 05 - MEDIA HUB

9WB40


Refurbished Prentice structure and new administrative campanili overlooking main plaza

Plan - Typical Tower

01

01 - OFFICE

TO HUB

03

02

01

Plan - Typical Laboratory 01 - OFFICES AND CONFERENCE 02 - LABORATORY 03 - BREAK OUT SPACE

New Research Laboratories

In contrast to Northwestern’s plans of constructing a laboratory tower, I am suggesting horizontal courtyard layout on the adjacent lot. New research facilities tend to rely heavily on lateral adjacencies for encouraged collaboration, a tower is counterproductive in its isolating, elevator dependent circulation. An administrative spire doubles as a campanili clock tower.

04

06 07 02

03

Plan - Ground Level 01 - OFFICES AND CONFERENCE 02 - PLAZA 03 - BREAK OUT SPACE 04 - BOOKSTORE 05 - CAFE 06 - GARDEN 07 - WINTER GARDEN

05

01

LEVEL 02

LEVEL 01

9WB40


Title: Here and Now Team: David Evancho Zach Hoffman Dan Jick John Lee


HERE AND NOW —FUTURE PRENTICE CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE 2012 COMPETITION HERE AND NOW AIMS AT REALIGNING NORTHWESTERN'S CAMPUS LIFE WITH THE EXIS ING PRENTICE HOSPITAL THROUGH AN ARCHITECTURE DRIVEN BY A CERTAIN LEARNING ENVIRONMENT— AN ENVIRONMENT NOT DEFINED BY STATIC CAMPUS LIFE, BUT ORIENTED TOWARD A DYNAMIC PEDAGOGICAL POSSIBILITY THROUGH THE USE OF FLEXIBILITY AND CIRCULATION.

12R09


The Future Prentice reinitiates Goldberg’s vision of flexible planning and proximity by replacing the core with open circulation that connects each of the floors. The spiral itself becomes a primer for a new pedagogy.

The new learning environment is situated in motion, where "classrooms" are no longer relevant spatial experiences.

12R09


Research as education is non linear. Future Prentice is about using flexible partition spaces to organize new educational ensembles for today’s campus. This spatial rethinking is meant to orient students toward communicating and learning based on their own needs.

This entrepreneurial model of spatial orientation then becomes a service for today's campus life. This new platform is easily adaptable to Goldberg's open floor plan.

12R09


3

1

1. CIRCULATION 2. INTERIOR PARTITIONS 3. FAÇADE TREATMENT

2 Diagrammatic Section

A dynamic nexus point VKRXOGUHpHFWWKH burgeoning Northwestern Campus. This new approach of free form planning, rooted in campus life, draws inspiration from Goldberg’s own geometry WRSURYLGHpH[LELOLW\DQG new opportunities for the school and hospital, inside and out.

Plan 1/64"=1'0


Title: On and On Team: Matthew Messner Piotr Drezek Obed Lopez Belem Medina Jeisler Salunga Matthew Schneider


On and On

The value of Prentice Women’s Hospital can be measured in many ways. Efficiency, iconography, and spatial experience, to name a few, weigh heavy on its cantilevered shoulders. Perhaps it is time Prentice re-imagined a play known so well to its contemporaries. To make a building tall, very tall, is the surest way to cement its place in the collective consciousness and its place in the city. More square footage per footprint, a place in the sky line, and awe inspiring views. Future Prentice wouldn’t just be another tall building. A unique structure at its current height, one hundred stories taller it would stand out as one of the most unique highrises ever conceived. Every one of Goldberg’s innovations multiplied by ten. A building redefined, to redefine all other tall buildings.

23T16


10’-6”

TWENTY-FOURTH FLOOR

10’-6”

TWENTY-THIRD FLOOR

10’-6”

TWENTY-SECOND FLOOR

10’-6”

TWENTY-FIRST FLOOR

10’-6”

TWENTIETH FLOOR

10’-6”

NINETEENTH FLOOR

10’-6”

EIGHTEENTH FLOOR

10’-6”

SEVENTEENTH FLOOR

10’-6”

SIXTEENTH FLOOR

10’-6”

FIFTEENTH FLOOR

10’-6”

FOURTEENTH FLOOR

10’-6”

THIRTEEN FLOOR TWELFTH FLOOR

10’-6”

FLOOR DEPTHS FOR TOWER APPROX. 15” FLOOR DEPTHS FOR PODIUM APPROX. 12”

14’-8”

ELEVENTH FLOOR

10’-6”

TENTH FLOOR

10’-6”

NINTH FLOOR

10’-6”

EIGHTH FLOOR

10’-6”

SEVENTH FLOOR

10’-6”

SIXTH FLOOR

10’-6”

FIFTH FLOOR

22’-1.5”

FOURTH MECHANICAL

22’-10.5”

FOURTH MECHANICAL

10’-0”

790’-0”

FOURTH FLOOR (Existing steel frame addition not shown)

13’-6”

THIRD FLOOR

13’-6”

SECOND FLOOR

13’-6”

FIRST FLOOR

13’-6.5”

GROUND

SCHEMATIC SECTION

FUTURE PRENTICE: 2012 CHICAGO PRIZE COMPETITION_7

23T16


23T16


Title: Water Purification Tower Team: Sang Wook Park Chong Woo Shin Jin Soo Baek


CHICAGO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB

2012 CHICAGO PRIZE COMPETITION / FUTURE PRENTICE

Northwestern Memorial Hospital Inpatient beds 894 beds Waste water Black water

Located on the campus of Northwestern University, the current site is surrounded by medical facilities, research labs and university residences, all buildings that produce an abundant amount of grey water. Known to be a relatively benign form of waste water, grey water can be recycled and reused fairly easily after having gone through an appropriate filtration process. The main concept of our design is to bring together the grey water from the neighboring buildings and to create a facility that can serve not only as a water purification system but also as a means to knit the diverse community together. The building will provide a myriad of opportunities for education, including a library, a gallery and an observatory, as well as social and commercial opportunities. Its main purpose, however, will be to serve as the focal point for the recycling of the grey water produced in the area, and to store and transport it back into the city. With this newly instilled purpose to a building currently with no specific use, the former Prentice Women’s hospital will no doubt serve a pivotal role in water recycling for the community.

min. 44,342liter/day

Grey water

Black water vs. Grey water = 31% : 69% min. 98,697liter/day

Total Black water: 191,406 liter/day

Total water usage > 617,440 liter/day

Total Grey water: 426,033 liter/day

White water required per day > 620,000 liter/day

Library, Dormitory, School of Engineering and applied science, School of law Waste water Black water min. 28,644liter/day

Grey water min. 63,756liter/day

Feinberg school of Medicine Inpatient beds 2200 beds Waste water

Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago Inpatient beds

Black water

182 beds min. 109,120liter/day

Grey water

Waste water Black water min. 9,300liter/day

Grey water min. 242,880liter/day

min. 20,700liter/day

27H69


Alisma Reed

Iris

Water hyacinth

Phragmites japonica Lemnaceae

Typha orientalis

Ottelia alismoides

Hydrilla verticillata

Lotus

Bur reed

Hornwort

Hydrocharis asiatica

Scirpus trigueter

Hyacinth

Hydrocharis

Javan Waterdropwort Thunbergii

The grey water from the nearby buildings is collected in the lower levels of the structure, where it goes through the initial process of sedimentation. During this process, the suspended solids settle down in the water under the influence of gravity. The solids that collect in the bottom of the sedimentation tank are then separated from the water and are removed from the tank on a regular basis. Subsequently, the filtered water is then transported to the top level of the tower, triggering the second step of water purification. Starting from the top level, the water travels vertically through the floor slabs of the tower at a low velocity, going through various aquatic plants that each serves a distinct function in decontamination. As the water travels through more floors, the more filtered it becomes; once it reaches the lower levels, the water will then be stored and transported for immediate usage.

Typha orientalis Lotus

Hydrilla verticillata

Hydrocharis asiatica: neutralize polluted air with an absorption of carbon

Mentha arvensis Ottelia alismoides Hornwort

Lemnaceae: neutralize acid water with an absorption of N(nitrogen) and P(phosphorus).

Hydrocharis asiatica

Phragmites japonica

Water hyacinth: neutralize acid water with an absorption of N(nitrogen) and P(phosphorus).

Bur reed

Isoetes coreana

Reed: neutralize acid water with an absorption of HNO3(nitric acid), P(phosphorus), K(potassium), Ca(calcium) and Mg(magnesium).

Scirpus triqueter Potamogeton pectinatus

Fresh water Fresh water

Phragmites jasponica: neutralize acid water with an absorption of nitric acid(HNO3) and can use it as medication.

Pure water storage

2nd pur

ification

site B Sediment process

All these ‘Hydrophytes’plants have an ability to purify N(nitrogen), P(phosphorus), K(potassium), Ca(calcium), Mg(Magnesium) in polluted water.

process

in site B

Sediment

27H69


19.

1. Reed 2. Alisma 3. Iris 4. Hydrocharis 5. Hyacinth 6. Lemnaceae 7. Thunbergii 8. Thypha orientalis 9. Javan Waterdropwort 10. Lotus 11. Hydrilla verticilata 12. Mentha arvensis 13. Hornwort 14. Ottelia alismoides 15. Hydrocharis asiatica 16. Isoetes coreana 17. Bur reed 18. Phragmites japonica 19. Scirpus triqueter 20. Potamogeton pectinatus

1.

14.

1.

17.

21.

17.

18.

LURIE RESEARCH CENTER 17.

8.

8.

14.

1.

15.

1.

21. Outdoor Theater 22. Gym 23. Sediment process 24. Pool 25. Cafe 26. Restaurant 27. Library 28. Gallery 29. Conference room

19.

2.

1.

6.

5.

3.

25.

26.

4.

10F: Restaurant

11F: Observatory/Cafe

27.

9.

10.

7.

8.

11.

8.

12.

8F: Library

9F: Library 18.

27.

1.

22.

21.

14.

13.

18.

15.

28.

28.

17.

24.

5.

17.

8.

23.

16.

17.

6F: Gallery

7F: Gallery

17.

10.

2F: site A Table

1.

8.

29.

1.

1.

1.

free-floating hydrophytes

REHABILITATION INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO 1.

19.

6.

21.

submerged hydrophytes

20.

emergent hydrophytes 21.

5F: Conference room site B

Masterplan

27H69


00000 27H69


Title: A Building Inside Team: Cristina Chamero. Architect Juan Felipe GarcĂ­a. Technical Architect


Title: Chicago Skywalker Team: RubĂŠn Bodewig Belmonte Alejandro Soriano Herrera


WHERE CITY AND UNIVERSITY MEET AGAIN

SAVE PRENTICE

ID 32B31


ossible is n p m oth :I #3 in Y

!!

NU

BO

g

Northwestern University wants to demolish Old Prentice Women’s Hospital building to replace it and build in this place a 500.000 sqft new facilities. But... is it necessary?

1p

NO

H RT E NOHOR 0 68 E S K LA IVE DR

RE

DI

ST

RI

BU

TI

ON

OV E

trategy to mov »s ep «L

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campus. the in

!! er

IE UR . L N’S H T RE L ER LD ITA OB CHI SP GO R & HO ICA N CH AN OF

The Northwestern University campus and Northwestern Memorial Hospital mobility patterns currently are too much dependent on parking lots for private vehicles.

STRA TE G

S

HO

Y

e peoplemov h T : er #1

We could learn from the Loop, and improve the interior mobility network to connect every building of the Campus and provide hubs to link with exterior networks based on sustainable transport. That would be a healthy change for a Medical Hub.

Northwestern University Chicago Campus Loop urban orbit

ID 32B31

T R

A

lon g

E IC NT ’S E N PR ME H) WO (NM AL PIT

trategy to mo ys ve t i rs

d link pl ac le an es op pe

E W GA

C &M N S O N S OL ILIO V PA

RD WAIAL R MO ING ME ILD BU

p. oo eL

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The vacant lot in front of the former Prentice is an unique opportunity to create a green heart for the campus, turning this place into a medical and social hub for the community.

R .LU TH R BE L RO DICACH E M EAR S R RE TE N CE

ft

0

ON RT L MODICAH ME ARCG SE IN RE ILD U B

cyclists live

T AS ET 3 E RE 23 E ST I ER

N L ER ITA ST OSP E HW L H RT IA NO MOR ME

IE

LE AR AL SE DICRCH MESEA NG I RE ILD BU

us tr a k p n i l ns l aces bs nd por a hu i h e n t t i l n w e t k r wo p th eo

p

E FU X T R PA U E N R S S E E I R O V N E

m

N

E

E

215.000 s qft new

ca

LO T

R

5

8

=

R

prove everyw m I : he #2 r The

university campus, specially focused on medicine and health, should be surrounded by a healthy and green environment that could contribute to create a better atmosphere for patients, doctors, investigators, students...

STRA TE G

EP

G

K IC RM O C MCLL HA ER DT AY OL M Y EB I V W LL LE LL HA HA

tons/year

lev els

E 16 NT P 0x O 22 DIU 0f M t ( SU 35 R .10 FA 0 s CE qf t)

ted

en heart gre F OF BL ING U R ILD BU

1.3 CO2

Y

TH

G IN AT HE NT A PL

each bike saves

=5

E leva

ea

TT BO AB LL HA

20

RR

RT HW NE EST W E 50 PR RN 0.0 OJ UN 00 EC IVE sq T S RS ft UR IT =1 F Y 6x AC lev E els

R

n areas to gree cre at

ke t

rthwestern Un No ive

What if we could generate this new space saving the building and generating a new identity landmark in the campus? We propose to move the projected built surface of the new building to a new external volume over a new green heart of the Campus.

connect campus buildings

CU

ac

Ch ica g

STRA TE G

CE PA S S


200

Viewpoint deck

Cafe & Restaurant Garden

ft

100

University Facilities

0

Hall & Mezzanine

50

Boardrooms & Offices

Campus extension: lecture hall, labs, offices, research, classrooms.

Mixed use building: offices, labs, meeting rooms, library... Campus transport hub: connection with park lots, bike service, interior street, elevated plaza.

1 Prentice building .................. 327.000 sqft 2 Connection building ............. 186.000 sqft 3 Campus extension ................ 165.000 sqft Total

2

3

0

50

100

................................... 678.000 sqft + 215.000 sqft green heart!

1

200

ft

ID 32B31


BACK TO THE FUTURE Could a modern building come back to life and get updated according to other modern architecture concepts and references?

A MODERN TRIBUTE

The architectural history teaches us that there are some universal languages used by civilizations to build a memorial for paying tribute to an important figure of the past. Maybe if the city of Chicago does not recognize the importance of Bertrand Goldberg’s legacy, is because this building is not within the appropriate framework to understand its importance.

Bauhaus Dessau - Walter Gropius, 1926

So we’ll convert its environment in a temple to honor his memory with a universal language through three well known strategies: PODIUM: Locate the building on a raised platform that allows it to rise and be seen as a monument to the memory.

Continuous Monument - Superstudio, 1969

Statue of Liberty - Bartholdi + Eiffel , 1886 FOOTPRINT: Recognize a legacy of the past through the void of the trace left, as a scar on the ground.

Exodus - Rem Koolhaas, 1972

Berlin Wall Memorial - Kohlhoff & Kohlhoff, 1998

La Ville Spatiale - Yona Friedman, 1960

High Line NYC- Diller Scofidio + Renfro, 2003

GHOST: Preserve for the future the spirit of a memory beyond the material, the tangible and the visible things.

National S11 Memorial - Michael Arad, 2011

ID 32B31


Title: Frame the Future Team: Hui Xu


FRAME THE FUTURE The most critical issue on the site has to do with two things: what is a future space for medical research programs like? How to preserve and even exaggerate the evocative characteristics of existing structure? What we propose is an engaging framework that could bring people closer than ever before to the important medical world it carries out by revealing the medical researchers at work. The renovation offers visitors an insight into the full spectrum of the world of medical science. The existing structure as a beautiful object of being could serve as a container for the exchange of information and education. The central core of the existing floors is cut through a spiral ramp, connecting both the entrance at the ground level and the four petal-spaces arranged in split-level series. The pedal spaces contain both various exhibitions on research progress and open labs where public science activities take place. The existing structure is framed by a tower stands behind acting as the stage setting. It also holds the main medical program. Horizontally, the tower and the existing structure are connected by a new podium with a courtyard open to public. Both the scientists and the visitors to the museum will be gathering together in this space. This courtyard also provides a fantastic platform for people to have an overall view of the unique outline of the tower and the winding ramp. This proposal shows a maximum of respect for the current architectural legacy.

FRAME THE FUTURE 40X48

1


MEDICAL RESEARCH LABS PUBLIC PODIUM MEDICAL MUSEUM

SITE PLAN

SCHEMATIC SECTION

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN

FRAME THE FUTURE 40X48

2


FRAME THE FUTURE 40X48

3


FRAME THE FUTURE 40X48

4


itle: Architecture, Aging-In-Place Team: Elizabeth George Jason Dobbin


RESIDENTIAL NORTHWESTERN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL CAMPUS SITE A: TO BE UTILIZED BY NORTHWESTERN SITE B: ONLY SITE UTILIZED IN THIS PROPOSAL

STREETERVILLE, GOLD COAST, AND RIVER NORTH BOOMER RESIDENCES CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

On January 1, 2011, the oldest members of the Baby Boom generation turned 65 years old. “On that day, today, and every day for the next 19 years, 10,000 baby boomers will reach age 65”. The needs for this American demographic (26% of the total U.S. population) will dramatically change the composition and subsequently the landscape of this country. As Boomers typically feel a decade younger than their actual age, they may stay socially active longer than those of previous generations. - Pew Research Center

T THHEECCHHICICAAGGOO ININT TEERRGGEENNEERRAAT TIOIONNAAL L CCOOMMMMUUNNITITYYCCEENNT TEERR 50R28


SUPERIOR STREET

1

2

3 6

4

7 9

5

6

9

8

8

10

14 ASSISTED LIVING

15

1 DROP-OFF 2 RESIDENT ENTRY 3 RESIDENT LOBBY 4 FRONT DESK/CONCIERGE 5 LEASING/ADMINISTRATION 6 CAFE’/KITCHEN 7 ELEVATORS 8 STAIRS 9 RESTROOMS 10 COMMUNITY CENTER 11 COMMUNITY MARKET 12 PUBLIC ENTRY 13 MARKET ENTRY 14 BUS DROP-OFF/LOADING 15 RAMP TO EXIST. PARKING (BELOW GRADE)

11

SKILLED NURSING WELLNESS: FITNESS/SPA/REJUVENATION GARDEN CAFETERIA/RESTAURANTS/ADMINISTRATION

13

12

COMMUNITY: ARTS/ACTIVITIES/DOMESTIC COMMERCE/ADMIN. MECHANICAL

HURON STREET

ENTRY LEVEL

TH E CH I CA GO I N TE R G E N E R A TI ON A L C OM M U N I TY C E N TE R 50R28


1 17 11

8

12

9

18

4

REJUVENATION GARDEN

18

9 13

7 2

14

7

3

8

8

10

19

8

8 18

18

6

19

16

6 15

5

5

COMMUNITY ARTS FLOOR FLOOR 2

REJUVENATION ROOF GARDEN FLOOR 5

1 GALLERY/FLEXIBLE SPACE 2 RELIGIOUS SPACE 3 THEATER 4 COMMERCIAL KITCHEN 5 ART ROOM/CLASSROOM 6 CLASSROOM 7 ELEVATORS 8 STAIRS 9 RESTROOMS 10 LOBBY/LOUNGE 11 EXTERIOR FITNESS SPACE 12 HAMMOCK FIELD 13 AMPITHEATER 14 FORMAL PATIO 15 POOL 16 GARDEN PLOTS 17 WALKING (WANDERING) PATHS 18 CHANGE ROOMS/SHOWERS 19 SUPPORT STORAGE

AGOO T THHEECCHHI CI CAG AL I NI NT TEERRGGEENNEERRATATI OI ONNAL CCOOMMMMUUNNI TI TYYCCEENNT TEERR 50R28


15 12 12

15

15

1

14

15

13

17 16

7 7

4

3

2

9

8

15

11

12

15 15

16

13

5

6

6

4

4

3

16 9

2

17 10

7

8

16 11

13 16

16 15

16

5

7

16

16

12

16

16

16

14

2

17

10

5

3

16

12

1

16

17

6

12

16

16

16

16

16 8

16

16 16

5

16

16

16

15

16

16

12 16

13 16

12

16

16

HOUSEHOLD I

TYPICAL ASSISTED LIVING FLOOR PLAN

16

16

16

FLOOR PLAN KEY 1 ENTRY/ELEVATOR 2 ACTIVITY KITCHEN/ NURSE STATION 3 DINING/ACTIVITY 4 PANTRY/KITCHEN/SERVERY 5 CONVENIENCE VENDING 6 MEDICINE ROOM 7 SPA/TUB 8 PUBLIC WASHROOMS 9 SOILED ROOM 10 CLEAN ROOM 11 COMMUNITY ROOM 12 WORK STATIONS 13 DEN/LIVING 14 LIBRARY/LIVING 15 ONE BEDROOM LIVING UNIT 16 STUDIO LIVING UNIT 17 STAIRS

HOUSEHOLD II

TYPICAL SKILLED NURSING FLOOR PLAN

FLOORS 11, 12, 13., 14

FLOORS 8, 9, 10

UNIT PLAN KEY E

D

D

E C

F

B A

UNIT INTERIOR

TYPICAL STUDIO UNIT PLAN

G

A ENTRY CLOSET B KITCHENETTE C DINING/ACTIVITY D LIVING E BATH F BEDROOM G WALK-IN CLOSET

A

TYPICAL 1 BR UNIT PLAN

T H E C H I C AG O I N T ER G EN ERAT I O N AL C O M M U N I T Y C EN T ER 50R28


Title: Healing Ecology. The New Center For Integrative Medicine At The Northwestern Memorial Medical Campus. Team: Paul Alt John Jewell Chris Wolf Robert Christo Colin Emch-Wei


Lake Michigan

Water Tower

Museum of Contemporary Art

Lake Shore Park

Views of Lake

Vertical Circulation

Beach

Mechanical Space e sh

Lak

Prentice Women’s Hospital

Yoga Tai Chi Aerobics

D ore

Lurie Children’s Hospital

rive

Existing Center for Integrative medicine

Health Education Center

Rehabilitaion Institute of Chicago

Michigan Avenue

Communal Event Space

Hotel Rooms

680 N. Huron D

Behavioral Therapy Rooms N

Existing Center for Integrative medicine

Accupunture Aroma Therapy Reiki

New Center for Integrative Medicine

Communal Assets

Site Connections

Northwestern Memorial Medical Campus

HEALING ECOLOGY

THE NEW CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE AT THE NORTHWESTERN MEMORIAL MEDICAL CAMPUS

Art Gallery

Art Therapy Music Therapy/ Performance Space Retail Space

We propose to reprogram the building using evidence-based design to foster architecture as a tool for healing. This design program is intended to interface with traditional clinical programming to increase the efficacy of treatments for those trying to overcome disease, prevent chronic health conditions, and enhance their well-being. The use of complementary medicine treatments researched by the National Institute of Health like reiki, meditation, music therapy, and art therapy will be provided alongside traditional clinical programs for chemotherapy, diabetes, and other chronic diseases. In summation, we propose to house the Northwestern Memorial Hospital Integrative Health Department in the Ida B. Stone Pavilion. Currently, this department is temporarily located in an office building adjacent to a hotel. Our proposed Integrative Health Center will contain spaces that range from organic food stores, a pharmacy, communal healing event space, individual healing event space, hotel, and an education center. The proposed center will act as the gateway between the Northwestern Memorial Hospital, The Rehabilitation Institute, Children’s Hospital, and the surrounding community. Healing never occurs in isolation. By integrating adjacent community assets like Lakeshore Park, the Chicago Lakefront, the MCA, and the Looking Glass Theater, opportunities for activating additional communal healing events become available for the programming of the proposed center. Additionally, the surrounding medical buildings are packed with clinics, laboratories, and medical offices that focus services on individual care. Our proposal will create a comprehensive integrative medical facility that serves all patient needs including food, medication, health and lifestyle education, group and individual therapy…all the while employing strategies that unify the mind, body, and spirit.

Lounge Area

Universal Worship space Therapeutic Garden Office/Clinic Space

Lobby

Communal Healing Space Office/Clinic Space Hotel Rooms Individual Healing Space

N

Therapeutic Garden Space ENTRY ENTRY ID: ID: 53F06


OFFICE SPACE/ CLINICAL SPACE

The 3rd & 4th floors are dedicated to medical office space and clinics.

Base

ART THERAPY

The communal art therapy space links to an adjacent garden space, roof garden above, and allows northern light. In addition, the sunlight penetrates to the music therapy space below.

ART THERAPY

GALLERY SPACE

The gallery space wraps around the music therapy/performance space to create a sequence of healing programming.

MUSIC THERAPY/ PERFORMANCE SPACE This space can be used for large performances for visitors and patients as well as a healing environment for music therapy.

MUSIC THERAPY/PERFORMANCE SPACE

LOBBY The lobby is located between the north and south entrances with a reception pod between the elevators and the grand staircase.

RETAIL SPACE

Retail Space is located on the ground floor connecting to the lobby. Retail opportunities include a pharmacy, a cafe, and an organic market.

N LOBBY

ENTRY ID: ID: 53F06 ENTRY


Middle

BEHAVIORAL THERAPY SPACES The behavioral therapy space cantilevers off of the underside of the north facing section of the structure. The spaces provide an opportunity for meditation, journaling, and other behavioral therapies. BEHAVIORAL THERAPY SPACE

MECHANICAL TO TOP TREES TO ROOF

By moving the mechanical space from the middle to the top of the building, both access to the roof and the opportunity for a therapeutic roof garden is created.

UNIVERSAL WORSHIP SPACE The worship space facilitates communal spiritual healing services for all denominations. The lights floating within the atrium above are a metaphor for hope and future possibilities.

UNIVERSAL WORSHIP SPACE

THERAPEUTIC GARDENS The therapeutic garden is a forest of trees sitting on the roof of the base element of the building. It provides for passive and active participation within a garden and forest environment.

N

THERAPEUTIC GARDENS

ENTRY ENTRY ID: ID: 53F06


YOGA/TAI CHI/AEROBICS SPACE The double height space in the middle of the top two levels is designated for yoga, tai chi, and aerobics. Top

INDIVIDUAL THERAPY ROOMS The adjacent therapy rooms are designated to help participants with complementary therapies such as acupuncture, reiki, and aromatherapy. YOGA/TAI CHI/AEROBICS SPACE

LOUNGE SPACE CENTER MOVES OUT

By moving the circulation out of the center it has created the opportunity for a double height space for communal activities.

These are communal spaces where people can share stories or view adjacent healing activities.

HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER This is a resource center where participants can research and learn about complementary medicine.

HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER

HOTEL ROOMS

Hotel Rooms are provided for outof-town participants engaging in the complementary medicine therapies as well as the surrounding traditional clinics at Northwestern Memorial Campus.

HOSPITAL ROOMS TO HOTEL ROOMS

By subtracting from the existing hospital rooms, a more spacious hotel sized room is created with access to two bathrooms for families. N

COMMUNAL EVENT SPACE This is a flexible space for communal activities such as the celebration of healing through meals, dancing, and presentations HOTEL ROOM

ENTRY ID: ID: 53F06 ENTRY


Title: The Prentice & The Pauper - (Goldberg Storytelling Center) Team: C_UP T. Joseph Surjan Stephanie H. Fumanelli John F. Perrine


Storytelling is a form of talk therapy. FOUR storeys of matter : Existing Condition

Remove Podium

Staircase Plinth & Water Basin

Floating Garden & Auditoriums

SOLID = Static

LIQUID = Non-equilbrium

GAS = Equilbrium

PLASMA = Public

Storey

Storey

Prentice & Pauper - ( Goldberg Storytelling Center ) the

the

Storey

Storey

Chicago Architectural Club: 2012 Chicago Prize Competition - FUTURE PRENTICE registration number -

85X36

panel 1/4


In this new tale, the Prentice plays herself, and the role of the Pauper is performed by a civil servant known as Staircase. Staircase Plinth :

North Elevation

Prentice & Pauper - ( Goldberg Storytelling Center ) the

the

West Elevation

South Elevation

Chicago Architectural Club: 2012 Chicago Prize Competition - FUTURE PRENTICE registration number -

85X36

panel 2/4


Stories adapt & change over time as a direct link to the storyteller.

Precast Concrete Components :

Staircase

Tread & Riser as single unit.

Prentice & Pauper - ( Goldberg Storytelling Center ) the

the

Vault

Entry Vestibule @ Water Basin

Floating Garden

Filtered light for Interior & Exterior

Chicago Architectural Club: 2012 Chicago Prize Competition - FUTURE PRENTICE registration number -

85X36

panel 3/4


A city is a story, & every story is a city. CITY

FOUR scales :

Prentice & Pauper - ( Goldberg Storytelling Center ) the

the

DISTRICT

STREET

HOUSE

Chicago Architectural Club: 2012 Chicago Prize Competition - FUTURE PRENTICE registration number -

85X36

panel 4/4


Title: The Seed Of Culture / Newborn Prentice Team: Tipo Elena Bellini Marco Benvenuti Marco Bartoli Niccolo Bassilichi Annalaura Ciampi Sara Ramundo


Title: PWH Hotel Team: Chris Curley Josye Utick


PWH HOTEL

An Entrepreneurial Shift from Hospital to Hospitality Chicago Architectural Club’s 2012 Chicago Prize Competition ID Number 70J87


Ground Floor Plan

Level 1 Floor Plan

skybridge connections

Front Desk Area

Incubator Hub

Student Cafe/Coffee Shop

Guest Rooms

Front Office & Admin

Public Circulation

Restrooms

Meeting/Conference/ Classrooms

Bar Lounge/Coffee Shop/Restaurant

Fitness

Back of House/Service

Vertical Circulation

PWH HOTEL

An Entrepreneurial Shift from Hospital to Hospitality Chicago Architectural Club’s 2012 Chicago Prize Competition ID Number 70J87


Level 2 Floor Plan

Level 3 Floor Plan Front Desk Area

Incubator Hub

Student Cafe/Coffee Shop

Guest Rooms

Front Office & Admin

Public Circulation

Restrooms

Meeting/Conference/ Classrooms

Bar Lounge/Coffee Shop/Restaurant

Fitness

Back of House/Service

Vertical Circulation

PWH HOTEL

An Entrepreneurial Shift from Hospital to Hospitality Chicago Architectural Club’s 2012 Chicago Prize Competition ID Number 70J87


section

Guest Room Level Floor Plan

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

no vertical expansion/168 guest rooms

2 story vertical expansion/216 guest rooms

Front Desk Area

Incubator Hub

Student Cafe/Coffee Shop

Guest Rooms

Front Office & Admin

Public Circulation

Restrooms

Meeting/Conference/ Classrooms

Bar Lounge/Coffee Shop/Restaurant

Fitness

Back of House/Service

Vertical Circulation

5 story vertical expansion/288 guest rooms

PWH HOTEL

An Entrepreneurial Shift from Hospital to Hospitality Chicago Architectural Club’s 2012 Chicago Prize Competition ID Number 70J87


Title: Water the Clover Team: Mohamad Dehnee


Title: reC/OVER LEAF Team: Supachai Chalermratananon Jeranun Lowatcharagul


reC/OVER LEAF "Chicagoland" is revolved from "the great Chicago fire". Shall  "reLeaf"  prentice  women’s  hospital  be  motivated  from  her  relict... Prentice women's hospital by Bertrand Goldberg is one of the significant historic landmark at global city, the heart of four clover leaf architectural form emerges among the fog of ordinary boxy building since then. As one part of the Northwestern University expansion phase; "reC/over" the utilizable place for the future of medical research program is the design treatment that vertically grows to reach the recent Chicago skyline celebration. Such as new leaves springing, clover leaf floor plate forms from the art of the missing leaf, the variety of the floor openings create the common internal court between levels. From the original massive concrete converses to the new transparency material, through this dissolution facade merges into the sky that allows the light transmitting inside as well as the panoramic views to Lake Michigan and cityscape. For public access and Northwestern university campus network; by disappearing its podium that exposes the sculptural concrete stem with the radical linkages to the other buildings, at its base provides the common area for public activity domain, also an underground exhibition accessibility. reC/over  is  one  that  recovers  the  magnificent  modern  architecture’s  master  while  metro-fitting  the  existing  building  to  meet  the  new  programmatic  requirement.  It  is a  concept  that  honor  for  the  life  and  soul  of  “Chi-City”.

03895


MEDICAL RESEARCH

DATA RESEARCH

INTERCHANGE

03895


STRUCTURE

As remaining the existing core system state. Rather insert the rigid frame (shown as red) for reinforcing By minimized footprint, provides the transfer bracing to receive the extension load growth.

FACADE

Translucent concrete is based building envelope material with light-transmissive properties due to embedded light optical elements. This results into the certain light pattern on surface, depending on the fiber structure... creates the gradient transition to transparency glass at top of the tower.

03895


03895


Title: Future Prentice Team: Iori Architects Inc. Clelia Iori, BArch OAA Principal Yoonsun Chang, Arch.Sci.,Associate


Title: Ghost Team: Kyle May Shane Neufeld


33287


G

H

O

S

T

WE OFTEN TAKE FOR GRANTED THE THINGS CLOSEST TO US. IT IS ONLY AFTER WE HAVE LOST THEM THAT THEIR MEANING CAN TRULY BE UNDERSTOOD. AS IS THE CASE WITH ARCHITECTURE, WHERE A BUILDING’S DESTRUCTION MAY BE PAINFUL, OUR COMPREHENSION OF THIS LOSS CRYSTALLIZES ONLY AFTER THE WORK HAS DISAPPEARED FOREVER. CHICAGO’S PRENTICE HOSPITAL, SLATED FOR DEMOLITION, OFFERS US THE OPPORTUNITY TO RE-THINK THIS PERILOUS YET TRADITIONAL OUTCOME AND TO PROPOSE AN ENTIRELY DIFFERENT TYPE OF RESPONSE. WHAT IF THE DECISION WEREN’T TEARING IT DOWN OR LETTING IT STAND, BUT RATHER, TO ACCOMPLISH BOTH? IN ORDER TO DO JUST THAT, OUR PROPOSAL ENCAPSULATES PRENTICE IN A MULTI LAYERED GLASS CASE—LIKE AN ARTIFACT IN A MUSEUM—WHOSE QUALITIES BOTH ALLOW FOR ABSOLUTE TRANSPARENCY AS WELL AS OPTICAL DISTORTION. THE GLASS MAY FOG, GLITTER, REFLECT, OR COMPLETELY GO AWAY. THE IMAGE OF PRENTICE WILL NO LONGER REMAIN BRUTAL AND CONSTANT, BUT WILL INSTEAD BEHAVE AS AN APPARITION, TRANSFORMING FROM ONE DAY TO THE NEXT. LIKE A GHOST, PRENTICE WILL DISAPPEAR WHEN WE LEAST EXPECT IT, BUT RETURN TO HAUNT US JUST TO REMIND US HOW MUCH WE MISS IT.

33287


33287


Title: PWH: Old shape, New landmark Team: Pragmatopia Marc Kirschbaum Stefanie Weidel


1148ft John Hancock Center

725ft Olympia Center

843ft Park Tower

859ft Water Tower Place

871ft 900 N Michigan

608ft Chicago Place 525ft New Prentice

Chicago

Near North Side

Chicago Avenue

Fairbanks Court

Superior Street

Huron Street

Erie Street

N

FUTURE PRENTICE 12345 PWH: old shape, new landmark

64235


Concept - scheme

characteristic landmark

PROTECTING

revision Goldberg

keeping place identity

unique architecture

+

PRESERVING

MEDICIAL RESEARCH CENTER

old shape, new landmark

preserving the original facade

floor 23 floor 22 floor 21

+

floor 20

RISING OFFICE

worth keeping

energetic rehabilitation

reflate vacancy floor 15

VERTICAL GARDEN

floor 14 floor 13

historical and futurize

climatic facade

space expansion for Northwestern University

floor 12

LAB floor 11 floor 10

ROOF TERRACE GUEST HOUSE/ APARTEMENTS

USE BY UNIVERSITY ENTRY

floor 2 floor 1

64235


Floor plans & vertical gardens

view green area cafeteria region of nonoperation meeting point old facade usable space

climatic facade

lab / office stairs to upper/lower green areas

green area

part of bearing structure N

floor 12+13

floor 14+15

floor 16+17

floor 18+19

floor 20+21

floor 22+23

floor 24+25

64235


Section | Green area setting

lab / office

climatic facade exterior facade interior facade

opening windows

open or close space green area

technical area

N

N

64235


Title: Move IT, or LOSE it Team: Jeff Jeno


Title: “Sports Research Facility builds on Architect Goldberg’s rich Chicago vision for architecture!” Team: Cesar M. Ceballos, AIA Kerry Shahan, AIA Tony Rios Lelee Laosy Jesus Rangel


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75219


Title: (great) Food, (teach) Architecture Team: Mark Davis Clarisse Labro Pavla Cervova


Future Prentice Chicago Architectural Club

95639

2012 Chicago Prize Competition


North

eS

e hor

ak NL

ve

Dri

N Mc Clug Ct.

Model, view from northwest FONTION CONNECTIONS

E. Erie Street

E. Huron Street

E. Superior Street

E. Chicago Ave.

NEW BUILDING

PRENTICE HOSPITAL

N Fairbanks Ct.

PLAZA

Site plan Future Prentice Chicago Architectural Club

SEMI PUBLIC SPACE 30 000 m2

OBESITY CENTRE 32 000 m2

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

School

Nutrition Activity Ctr.

LABS 48 000 m2

Indoor Public Space

Laboratories

Programmatic Section

95639

2012 Chicago Prize Competition


Playing courts on roof

Small vegetable market stalls

North, transparency view of Prentice

Upper Floor-plate, School typ. A Inserting large classrooms and workspaces around a free plan with central open stair. Adjacent rooms have enclosed entrance foyers.

Lower Floor-plate, Mixed-use typ. A (school and laboratories) Functional organization around a central atrium.

Cores

Large commercial open to street, with spill out into interior

Upper Floor-plate, School typ. B Smaller classrooms and technical rooms. Natural light enters circulation space at the crease.

Future Prentice Chicago Architectural Club

Lower Floor-plate, Mixed-use typ. B (all users, students, workers) Mixing all users in largest possible room, free plan cafeteria.

Ground Floor Level, Mixed-use slab Grandiose indoor public room, with bound on two sides by small market stalls and large commercial tenants.

South facing, ofďŹ ces, work rooms

Upper Floor Level, Mixed-use slab Longitudinal circulation along north transparent façade. Occupiable roof playing courts.

95639

2012 Chicago Prize Competition


Urban Farm,

Rooftop Greenhouse supplies kitchens, on-site market, school visits

Vertical Circulation, 1

Transparency on façade, longitudinal paths for program mixing expressed on exterior glass wall

Vertical Circulation, 2

Transparency between floor plates, around common space in school and laboratories

Big Room, 2

Program mixing on top floor of plinth Cafeteria serves produce grown on site

Big Room, 1

Program mixing inside the horizontal slab, indoor market and forum, low winter garden

Future Prentice Chicago Architectural Club

95639

2012 Chicago Prize Competition


Title: Thermae Chicagiensis Team: Bureau for Architecture and Design Felix Monasakanian Mohamed Sharif Efren Soriano Michael A. Durรกn (support)


The aging hospital is made-over as a vertical public bathhouse. a combination of Reductive surgery and circulatory catheterization formally and socially rejuvenates it into a vigorous center of health and wellness. ‘Future Prentice’ is ‘Thermae Chicagiensis’, Chicago’s new, water-fueled, gold-leafed, fun palace; where historic preservation is lavishly splashed with leisure and pleasure. A libidinously charged theater, it is home to lovers of watery indulgences, raw concrete and slow-paced hedonism. Within its fullfigure—arguablyexperienced as a tower for the very first time and revives Goldberg’s idea that he had designed it “from the inside out”—a luxurious atmosphere is all-pervasive,andacontemporary commingling of ‘promenade architecturale’ and ‘raum plan’ inducesasenseofviscousdelirium.

9

8

3

5

2

I OF IV


i ii

iii

iv v vi

vii

viii

xi

i. caldarium ii. sudatoria iii. towels iv. sudatoria v. tepidarium vi. frigidarium vii. towels viii. palaestrum ix. natatio x. open court xi. bridge to south campus

ix

x

9

8

3

5

2

II OF IV


ii

i

ii

i

i

viii

ii

vii viii

iii

iv

i

ii

iv

v

iii

v iii

iv v

iv

vi

ii

vi iii

v

vii

iv

ix i

ii

6

vi

vii

24

vi

iii

48

12

viii

v

vi

vii

CAMPUS i. OPEN COURT (NORTH CAMPUS ENTRANCE) ii. LiNE OF PODiUM ABOvE iii. BRiDGE TO SOUTH CAMPUS ABOvE iv. LOBBY v. UP vi. DOWN vii. FORECOURT (OPEN AiR yoga iNSTRUCTiON)

PALAESTRUM I i. LANDiNG AT BRiDGE TO PALAESTRUM II i. SPA ENTRANCE ii.. apodyteria SOUTH CAMPUS ii. ESCALATORS TO SPA/ iii.. OFFiCE OFF iv. RAMP UP TO PODiUM UM AND SPA v. FROM PODiUM ROOF iii. GYMNASiUM LOBBY MECHANiCAL vi. DOUBLE HEiGHT BRiDGEvii. iv. apodyteria v. GYMNASiUM vi. ExERCiSE OCULUS AT NATATiO (ABOvE) viii.. POOL SKY SKYSTEPS vii. DOUBLE HEiGHT BRiDGE TO SOUTH LiGHTS CAMPUS thermae chicagiensis

PODIUM ROOF i. NATATiO (FOR COOLiNG NG OFF iN N SUMMER AND iCE SKATiNG iN WiNTER) ii.. OCULUS iii. LOBBY iv. DiSROBiNG CUBiCLES v. HOT SPA vi. RAMP DOWN TO PALAESTRUM ii vii. RAMP UP TO THERMAE TOWER viii. SUMMER POOL AND SUNBATHiNG DECK ix. JUiCE BAR

COMPOSITE THERMAE PLAN i. CALDARiUM (TEPiDARiUM BELOW) ii. SUDATORiA iii. DRY POOL - TOWELS AND REFRESHMENTS

e or

sh

ke la dr

huron st

mcclurg ct

fairbanks ct

future campus addition

9 100 50

8

3

5

2

400 200

III OF IV


viEW TO SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THERMAE CHiCAGiENSiS

viEW SOUTHWARD FROM OPEN COURT TO ESCALATORS TO PALAESTRUM

viEW NORTHWARD FROM ESCALATOR TO PODiUM ROOF AND TOWER

bridge

50 100

200 400

viEW SOUTHWARD FROM PODiUM LOBBY TO SPA—THERMAE RAMP

future campus addition

9

viEW NORTHWARD FROM PODiUM ROOF TO NATATiO

8

3

5

2

IV OF IV


Title: 3 ACTS OF PRESERVATION Team: Norman Kelley Thomas Kelley


1

2

3

Acts

of Preservation

‘The age value of a monument reveals itself at first glance in the monument’s outmoded apperance.’ -Alois Riegl, The Modern Cult of Monuments: Its Essence and Its Development

Acts of preservation are always works of approximation. Unlike acts of forgery or plagiarism, they are not facsimiles. Too often, however, they are cast as lacking opportunity. This is the error of outmoded appearances. This project aims to widen the manners in which the whole, or part of a work may be approximated. The future of historic preservation now includes confronting its opposition - Modernism. This is an opportunity to revisit antiquated notions of preservation and embrace this new territory with ulterior acts.

6TM46


3

The Double Icon

Act 1

4

...if two lie down together, they will keep warm. But how can one keep warm alone? 12 Though one may be overpowered, two can defend themselves. -Ecclesiastes 4:9-12 6TM46


5

Cockeye Preservation

Act 2

6

The body is no body to be seen But is an eye that studies its black lid. -Wallace Stevens

6TM46


7

Approximate Commemoration

Act 3

8

MONUMENT, n. A structure intended to commemorate something which either needs no commemoration or cannot be commemorated. -Oxford American Dictionary

6TM46


Title: Rebirth of Prentice Team: Daniel Pitaluga


Title: Prentice Green Team: Mariela M. MartĂ­nez Correa


PRENTICE GARDEN HILL IS A PROPOSAL BASED ON TURNING THE FORMER PRENTICE WOMEN’S HOSPITAL INTO A LUXURY AND WELL CENTERED APARTMENT COMPLEX FOR THE NORTHWESTERN STUDENTS AND EVEN SOME OF ITS FACULTY. THE PROPOSAL FOCUSES ON CREATING DIVERSE GREEN

AREAS FOR THE WELL BEING OF ANY OF ITS RESIDENTS, WHILE AT THE SAME TIME, SATISFYING SOME OF THEIR OTHER NEEDS, SUCH AS CREATING SOME

COMMERCIAL AREAS.

THE PRENTICE AREA ALSO COMES EQUIPPED WITH SEVERAL GREEN BE ACCESSED EITHER THROUGH PRENTICE

GARDEN HILL’S GREEN ROOF OR THROUGH STREET

LEVEL, PROVIDING CIRCULATION AREA, AS WELL AS, RESTING COME TO RELAX. SOME

PLATFORMS THAT CAN

SPACES, WHERE PEOPLE WOULD

COMMERCIAL SPACES CAN BE LOCATED BETWEEN THE PLATFORMS.

3G653


student recreational area

EXISTING CONDITIONS

Usable Area = 15,50

restaurant space

study hall

3G653


3G653


student residence PRIVATE SPACE

RESIDENTIAL AREA

student garden area

PUBLIC SPACE

green/commercial space

PUBLIC PLAZA COMMERCIAL AREA STUDY AREA RECREATIONAL AREA

3G653


Title: Wellness Center and Research Facility Team: Danielle Bayrami


Title: Future Prentice Team: Charles Francis Pigott


Title: New Prentice Team: Jeremy Woolley


to appease those who view the Prentice is somewhat of an “eyesore,� yet also bringing a new purpose to this now obsolete facility, the first step of the repurpose is to bring new life to the exterior, while trying to maintain some of the core identity of the original architecture, and that of Chicago.

with green walls around three of the four sides, and a glass curtainwall system encasing the upper portion of the Prentice, the architecture is preserved, while providing an opportunity to incorporate the architecture into the surrounding chicago vernacular of rectangular, high rise buildings.


north

on the entry floor, and next three floors, the new focus on the space is to become a versatile public and performing arts space. with mobile partitions, small galleries and gatherings can take place, or the partitions could be removed (as seen in the plans above) to be an open space for a multitude of purposes.


on the first roof, removing the mechanical equipment once needed for medical air circulation, the patio can once again be open. bringing vegetation to the space also brings a new potential for various public gatherings, small performances, or even an equivalent to an atrium. the old patient rooms, in the upper seven floors, will be removed, creating vast open spaces for rotating and permanent art galleries. some of the pieces could come from local artists, or on loan from the nearby museum of contemporary art.

north


the site shows the transition of the women’s hospital, and the programming needs, moving to a new 500,000 square foot facility to the old VA hospital site. since the site affords the opportunity for a large open space, the initial thought is to create a planned open space, while creating vertical hospital on the western end of the site. in the planning of the site, creating a link between the new and the old, through site, form, and space will provide a story of the new and old Prentice, and the roles each now play.


Title: Future Prentice Team: Rosalyn L. Mitchell, AIA Mark L. Bruzan, AIA, LEED AP, Erica P. Garcia, Interior Designer


EXAMPLES OF BIOMIMETICS

GECKO FOOTPRINT

FUTURE PRENTICE

CELL BASED INFLATABLE FURNITURE.

1

8YB66


1-3 FLOOR PLAN

FUTURE PRENTICE

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

2

8YB66


FUTURE PRENTICE

KALIDESTOPE INSPIRATIONS

3

8YB66


FUTURE PRENTICE

RENDERING: BUILDING BATHED IN PINK LIGHT

4

8YB66


Title: Future Prentice Team: Chipman Design Architecture Inc. Diana Naydenova


curtain wall mesh screen

OPS49


inspiration : roy lichtenstein

OPS49


Title: The Urban Garden Team: John Delgado Yesenia Hernandez


Title: Growth Out of Unity Team: Mathieu Tronel



Future Prentice: Chicago Prize 2012