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chiara turchi selected.works


contents This portfolio contains selected works from different kinds of projects developed through my university career at Poltecnico di Milano and Istanbul Technical University and extra-curricular activities like workshops and courses. These projects were chosen to enlight the diverse approaches and scales encompassed in my career. Attention to details, to light and creation of space are at the basis of a mostly requalification-focused work which shows my interest towards our immense patrimony and its intrinsic value.


I Architecture 1.

DOLOMITI UNESCO FOUNDATION

2.

ORSOLINE COMMUNITY

3.

SEE THROUGH MANTUA

4.

PORTA ROMANA RAIL YARD

5.

PORTA VIGENTINA CULTURAL CENTER

8

a cultural container in the former ENI village by Edoardo Gellner

MASTER THESIS | INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

30

reception and recreation in Fidenza

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

44

a new exposition gallery in the secret apartment of Palazzo Te

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

58

urban regeneration in one of the milanese hot spots

URBAN DESIGN

70

library extension in Milan

ARCHITECTUR DESIGN

II Product Design 1.

PORTABLE, FOLDABLE, COMPOUNDABLE

backpack-stool design project for small gatherings

82

III Photography 1.

MUZIO MILANO photographic exposition on the milanese architect

90


Chiara Turchi A R C H I T E C T Chiara was born in Italy in 1992. She got a degree in Languages but changed her field chosing architecture. After the Bachelor in Architecture at the Politecnico of Milan, she decided to specialize in interior architecture and refurbishment attending an english master in the same university, meanwhile practicing different side jobs like babysitter, EXPO standist and receptionist. She graduated April ‘17 and earned the official Architect title in december ‘17.

education 2017

Università degli studi di Firenze ABILITATION EXAM

Florence

2014.2017 Politecnico di Milano. Architectural Design M.Sc. DEGREE Milan

2015 Period of study abroad EXCHANGE

Istanbul, Turkey

2011.2014 Politecnico Milano. Scienze dell’architettura B.Sc. DEGREE Milan

2006.2011 Liceo Classico T. Mamiani, Dipoloma di Lingue A. Lev.DEGREE

Pesaro

places lived and experienced

via Bologna, 45 Cattolica RN. IT. +39 333 8322446 chiaraturchi92@gmail.com www.instagram.com/chichi.trc/ www.twitter.com/chiara_turchi_ in

www.linkedin.com/in/chiara-turchi-/

experiences 2017 HUMANITARIAN TRIP India

2016

COMPETITION Photographic competition about G. Muzio Milano, Archivio Muzio

2015

WORKSHOP Restauration project of a humanitarian mission Inhambane, Mozambique

2014

PRACTICE Period of collaboration at Fabbrica del Duomo Milan, arch. Enrico Sacerdote

2014

WORKSHOP “paris is always a good idea” . Progect on public living Paris, France

expositions|publications 2017

PUBLICATION D. Chizzoniti, “Fidenza. Progetti per la città” Aiòn, Firenze, 2017.

2016

EXPOSITION Cowinners of the G. Muzio photography competition Milano, Castello Sforzesci

2015

interests photograhpy FAI activist museums/expo music history of art cinema backpacking writing illustration literature

professional skills teamowork model making project management

EXPOSITION Design for small gathering, furniture exposition UNIQ Gallery, Istanbul

2013

EXPOSITION Extension projects exposition for the villa Urbino, Ca’ Romanino, Giancarlo de Carlo

2013

PUBLICATION On the 21/09/2016 online Casabella article see also pag 74-75

skills italiano [mothertongue]............................................ english [Trinity TEFL] .......................................... español .......................................... français .......................................... deutsch .......................................... português ..........................................

language

software

............................................ Adobe

Photoshop Illustrator/Indesign ............................................ Autodesk Autocad ............................................ Sketchup ............................................ Vray ............................................ Microsoft Office ............................................ Adobe Ps. Camera Raw/Lightroom ............................................ Adobe


Architecture

Master thesis | Interior design


Fondazione Dolomiti Unesco A CULTURAL CONTAINER IN THE FORMER ENI VILLAGE BY EDOARDO GELLNER

Cortina d’Ampezzo

site: Borca di Cadore, Veneto, Italy working group: Alfonso Di Sabato, Tommaso Lolli relators: Stefania Varvaro, Rossana Gabaglio co-relators: Francesca Zaffaroni

T

he Eni Village of Borca di Cadore (BL) was built between the tail end of the 50s and the first years of the 60s, thanks to the political and entrepreneurial ability of Enrico Mattei. It’s a large compound (over 100.000 sm), equipped with an articulate on various structure, and developed, by innovative criteria, in the great woods at the foot of Mount Antelao(3.242m), that dominates the Cadore area, and overlooks the village of Borca, some ten kilometres from Cortina D’Ampezzo. The idea at the basis of this visionary and innovative project-site, was a kind of social town-planning plant, thought up by the exuberant mind of Mattei himself, and then made true, with a great architectural quality, by Edoardo Gellner first and foremost, in collaboration with Carlo Scarpa for some of its parts. 


Clockwise from top, left: Aereal view of the complex, 1957.[1] A picture of the meeting between Eni president, Enrico Mattei, and the architect Edoardo Gellner.[2] An early sketch by Gellner of the project.[3] 


The Colonia A GLIMPSE OF THE SUMMER CAMP

T

he main structures of the site are the large Colonia (Eng.: summer camp building, of 30.000 square meters, the Nostra Signora del Cadore (Eng.: Our Lady of the Cadore) Church, the Permanent Tents Camping, the 280 cottages, the residence.

single body but of 17 buildings joined together by a system of covered ramps that gravitate around the large central pavilion. In addition to the central hut, AS, there are five dorms, M F MF 2M 2F, with the respective play huts, A1 A2 A3, various service buildings, a porter’s lodge U, a RS refectory, a infirmary , INF, a showers’ hall, S, and an outdoor theater, O.

The colonia, built between 1955 and 1962 to accommodate 600 children, due to the shape of the land, is not made up of a 


Clockwise from up left: The morning routine: children singing during the daily flag-raising ceremony.[1] View of the ramp and its structure inside a dormitory.[2] Aereal view of the Colonia, 1957.[3] Left page: original Gellner’s plan and section from the IUAV archive 


J

F

M

A

M

J

L

A

S

O

N

D

The Colonia NEW IDENTITIES FOR THE E. GELLNER SUMMER CAMP

Q

ART FAIR AND FILM FESTIVAL

uestioning on how to properly valorize the setting, we have come to the conclusion that using an array of different functions would lead to real improvement.

Being both affiliated and synchronized to sponsorizing entities (i.e. Biennale di Venezia and Festival del cinema di Venezia), they represent a try to recall a national audience that could improve the colony’s name.

Given the big dimensions of the complex, we opted for an alternance and ciclycity throughout the year of the different functions, in order to have a bigger response at different scales, without any risk of saturation. Everything, then, would be sponsored by the Dolomiti Unesco foundation which ultimate aim is to safeguard and valorize the territory.

DOLOMITI UNESCO FOUNDATION The Colonia will host offices, workshop, libraries, formation (about the safeguard of the mountain environment) and whatever needed to create a cultural hub. Formation courses for intelligent start-ups and entrepeneurial formation will be held too.




FOUNDATION

FACILITIES

COOPERATIVE

FILM FESTIVAL

ART EXPO

KITCHEN FOOD HALL CONFERENCE ROOM STUDY ROOM

LEADERSHIP OFFICES HALL

CAFE’ AUDITORIUM

DORM

BOOK SHOP

DORM

READING ROOM

COMMON SPACE DORM DORM COMMON SPACE

COWORKING COWORKING ADMINISTRATION

OPEN AIR THEATER

HOSTEL PORTER

COMMON SPACE

EXPOSITION EXPOSITION EXPOSITION

EXPOSITION

MULTIFUNCTIONAL HALL | DEPOSIT

EXPOSITION EXPOSITION MULTIFUNCTIONAL HALL | DEPOSIT

EXPOSITION EXPOSITION EXPOSITION MULTIFUNCTIONAL HALL | DEPOSIT DEPOSIT

FACILITIES

COOPERATIVE

Cafès, restaurants hostel and more services still need to function throughout the entire year, regardless of which big or smaller event is taking place.They will co-work with the other activities of Borca center

This particular economic structure is our response to the Belluno province request: a valorization and improvement of the territory and its activities. The colony, through its revisited architecture, would be the showcase of local products and a significant boost to the local economy.




The Colonia DRAWINGS AND ANALYSIS

Elevation of the entire complex, in orange the intervention.[1]


Progressive plan of the complex (i.e. with increasing quotes, for each building is shown the ground floor) [2]


Gellner’s spaces underwent a specific functional program: boys and girls apart. The re-evaluation of the Colonia deals with other kinds of activities and flows with no need of such defined paths. The new concept of the cooperative buildings:[1] Exploded axonometry of the new aereal link between the F and MF dorms [2] 


From top: Axonometry of the coperative system [1] Plan at the intervention. On the left side the new bridge that links the two buildings at different floors, thanks to the slope. The section plan show the new setting of the dormitories in the southern building. [2] 


The Central Hall, AS THE CORE OF THE COMPLEX


A cafeteria benefits from the generous dimensions of the first floor and a cinema-auditorium; defined by the addition of a wooden volume set on a concrete basement, fits in the back side of the ground floor. The skylights link the two floors both internally and externally, creating an intense relation with the incoming light.

PERSPECTIVE CROSS SECTION


[1]

[4]

Clockwise from top letf: First floor plan.[1] Basement plan with auditorium and open air theater.[2]

Longitudinal section right at the roof ridge.[3] Skylights intervention concept scheme.[4] 


[2]

[3]




The dorm, MF

The MF dorm, like the others F and M, is charachterized by a modular structure made of concrete portals and metal IPEs columns and ramps distribution. Starting from the valorization of this aspect and keeping the functional division between “central corps” and services in the “heads”, we doubled the height inserting a light structure and modfying the norther facade, thus enabling light to spread.




From top: The concept dyagram of the dorms’ intervention.[1] Perspective longitudinal section of the MF dorm.[2] 


state of art project

compression

light

direct view

expansion

From left to right: Height modules’ diagram.[1] Light incidence diagram.[2] Direct views diagram.[3] Other page: Technological cross section.[4]







MF dorm’s perspective section.[1] 


Clockwise: the F-MF bridge.[1] The viewpoint looking at the Pelmo’s peak.[2] The Capanna centrale and its new skylights and open space.[3]




Architecture

Architectural design II


Orsoline community RECEPTION AND RECREATION IN FIDENZA

site: former Orsoline Monastery, Fidenza working group: Federica Novati professors: Domenico Chizzoniti assistants: Luca Preis, Monica Moscatelli

T

he Orsoline community idea derives from the need of a meeting point for the entire city and the need of a stopover for the peregrines walking the ancient Via Francigena, a segment of the wider path linking Rome to Canterbury through central Europe. The existing building, a convent of the Orsoline monastic order, throws its roots back in the XV century and has undergone a number of renovation works in order to modify and adjust the structure to the most diverse uses it has been having through the centuries. The project is functionally and structurally devided into two parts: the hosting function provided by the Hostel in the minor courtyard and the didactic function of the civic center, in relation with the old chapel and the Renessaince museum, situated in the ground floor of the northern wing. The two functions are both served by a third one:a bicycle cooperative used both by citizens and peregrins. 


Clockwise from top, left: A topographical survey of the two complexes of the Orsoline and

Gesuiti, belonging to the Maps and Drawings Fund of the Parma State Archives.[1] A view of the chapel from the mayor courtyard.[2] Aereal photo of the complex, Bing 2012.[3] 


a b

W

hat is best shown in the drawings, is the south-western wing’s incompleteness which turned out to be the keystone and fulcrum of our project. The structure of the project tries to enhance the architectural value of the existing part and is composed by a series of parallel load-bearing partition walls which recall the modular dimensions of the double courtyard; developing an organic system of well-defined but connected and communicating volumes.




hostel bicycle cooperative|gym external intervention

integrative restauration conservative restauration

cafè food court civic center civic museum

new from exixsting borders new construction

Opposite page: modular dimensions.[1] Functions’ diagram.[2] Intervention level and alignments with the existing building.[3]




Project drawings URBAN CONTEXT, PLANTS

FUNCTIONS: The hosting function is the beating heart of the project: it keeps it active both during daytime and night hours; offering to peregrines hospitality and a number of facilities distributed in three different volumes. The entrance at the site is both from via Costa, via E. Pescina and via I Maggio. The various functions are easily reachable: one can access both the facilities and common spaces at the first floor, both the refurbished camarades and double cells placed in the new southern branch, using a capillar sys-

tem of suspended walkways and stairs. The system, comfortably linking inside and outside, is also served by elevators and fire escapes. The central branch and the western wing host respectively the cafè and the food court. Both at the service of the citizens and the hosts, this gives the system an heterogeneous identity and a climate of discreet coexistence.




The project inserted in the pattern of the old town. [1] Grund floor plans of the intervention, the gesuiti monastery and church and of the terraglio area.[2]

The Civic Center is the heart of the project, entirely hosted by a new construction building. It’s generated by a series of parallel walls whose rythm is simultaneously marked and broken by a 180 degrees rotated volume (on the grounds of the ancient “Terraglio”). This empty volume opposes to the main orientation but links, at the same time, different levels: from the basement till the terrace at a height of 13.00 meters. It’s the basement itself, at - 2.60 meters, that connects the new intervention with the existing building

thanks to the old chapel, transformed into an auditorium thanks to a light structure working as stands. Nowadays the convent hosts a number of functions like public library, museum and offices; they will be integrated with the introduction of an expositive gallery at a depth of 2.60 meters.




ground floor +1.8m

first floor +5.8 m


basement -2.5m

model photo


Project drawings ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS

LONG ELEVATION

SHORT ELEVATION




CROSS SECTION 1

LONGITUDINAL SECTION 2

LONGITUDINAL SECTION 3





View from [1] The facade of the former San Bernardo church.[2] The project area inside of the Spanish walls; Porta Romana axe and door.[3]




Architecture

Interior architecture I


See through Mantua A NEW EXPOSITION GALLERY IN THE SECRET APARTMENT OF PALAZZO TE

year: 2014.15 site: Palazzo Te, Mantova working group: Greta Bosio, Giulia Dagheti, Alessandra Guizzi professors: Stefania Varvaro, Rossana Gabaglio assistants: Luca Faverio, Caterina Gallizioli

P

alazzo Te, built between 1524 and 1534 on commission of Federico II Gonzaga, is the most famous work of the Italian architect Giulio Romano. The complex is now home to the civic museum and, since 1990, the Te International Center of Art and Culture which organizes ancient and modern art and architecture exhibitions. The bih complex hides, in one of its corners, a so called Secret Apartment and, with it, a secret garden: an exquisite and precious piece of art with frescos, mosaics, voulted ceilings and rich vegetation. The request is to transform It into a flexible exhibition space, where the new structure won’t cover the rich walls’ and ceyling’s decoration and that could host different functions in order to attract more people. 


View on the secret apartment with part of the exedra on the back.[1] The Loggia of Honor and the bridge on the fishponds.[2] Old plan of Palazzo Te with the project site in yellow.[3] 


project views

2.2 m

outer views

1.1 m

0.5 m

Visual cones dyagram.[1] Modular dimensions’ dyagram.[2] 


pass by

seat

look around

look

read

stay

path

Time of the experience dyagram.[3] Functions’ patter dyagram.[4] 


Project drawings

LONG STOP

AVG. STOP

FAST STOP

PLANS AND SECTIONS

A

The exhibition is therefore generated by a geometric grid, only interrupted in a few occasions, that helps giving armony and coherence to the entire system.

Another key concept is the “see through”, created with the combination of metal profiles, to create paths and ambients in a delicate way. The decorations of the apartment are still visible and their relation with the project is represented with more density or expansion of the elements: they are enlighted or hidden, depending on the need.

Two submodules 1.1 m and 0.5 m stand at the basis of the dimensions of seats, panels and all the other elements.

The idea of the “flow” also permeates the exhibition: an imaginary sewing thread, tights together the inside and the outside.

nalyzing the dimensional relations between the rooms, we found out a 2.20 meters module determining the entire plan.




[b]

[a]

[a]

[b]

Clockwise from left, bottom: function vs. time dyagram.[1] Cross section [b-b].[2] Long. section [a-a].[3] Plan of the exposition.[4] 


Project detailed study

A GLIMPSE OF THE MODULAR STRUCTURE Particular interest is given to the structure: it’s self-supporting with a trilitic portal made of 3x3 sticks, from which all the others are generated. Three levels overlap on the top of the structure in order to give a general look of lightness and dynamism.

On top, when they intersect, led lights hang on the higher sticks. Simply moving the elements -see right page dyagram- we can totally transform the layout of the bigger room into a conference room with 20 seats.


CONFERENCE SETTING

[a] Mobile panels and seats

[b] The principal elements of the structure remain unchanged

[c] Secondary sticks can be removed, leaving a clear view to the guests

PERSPECTIVE SECTION


A sliding system A sliding system

[a] anti-swinging weight

hanging panels system B hanging panelsBsystem

[b] window frame

C anti-swinging system C anti-swinging system

D anti-swinging system D anti-swinging system

Project detailed study TECHNICAL DETAILS

Clockwise from left: The

vaulted ceyling of the rectangular room.[1] The frescos in the garden loggia.[2] The entrance at the cave-church on the opposite side of the garden.[3] 


[c]

[d]

[b] [a]

[c] sliding system

A sliding system

A sliding system

C anti-swinging system

C anti-swinging system

[d] hanging panel

B hanging panels system

B hanging panels system

D anti-swinging system

D anti-swinging system

Detailed plan of a section of the project: highlighted the metal seats and outdoor setting.[1] 


55 cm

30 cm

55 cm

Clockwise from left: Exploded axonometry of the modular system composed by[1]: 55x55 pattern-pierced panel with different uses[2], 55 cm high wedging sticks and l-shaped metal bar of 30x30cm, used to join the pieces.[3] right page: Detail of the stick-stick joint.







Architecture

Urban design


Porta Romana rail yard URBAN REGENERATION FOR ONE OF THE MILAN HOT SPOTS

year: 2013.14 site: Porta Romana rail yard, Milan working group: Sarah Zaki, Selene Zenobi professors: Francesco Vescovi, Massimo Brignoli assistants: Astuto, Marcinkiewicz

T

he territory of Milan is deeply characterysed by its industrial and commercial roots. Besides all the active stations, there is a number of disused and abandond rail yards. This reperesents a huge urban wound that undermines the delicate balance of communications and relations within the community. These big empty urban voids have to be sewn up to fully live the potencial of the city. The Porta Romana rail yard is one of these voids. 


View of the AEM foundation, the complex occupying the north-western corner of the yard. [1] View of Corso Lodi, the big avenue leading to the center of the city. Redefossi channel is still visibile in this picture (it would be closed by the end of the XIX century). [2] The Porta Romana rail yard area, extract of a 1910 map. [3] 


Porta Romana neighbourhood ANALYSIS AND MASTERPLAN

T

here is only one working line that connects Milan to the hinterland and the rest of the yard is abandoned and cause for degradation of the entire neighbourhood and for separation of the northern and the southern part of the city.

We approached this “wound”, burying the one working rail and using the different quotes that came after as a chance to uniform the landscape through terraces and slopes.

Since the area underneath the yard lacks of services, infrastructures and residences, we carried out a redistribution of the facilities and companies in order to later intensify the residences.

The project area is thought to be entirely pedestrian; we focused on creating more common spaces like squares, or meeting points in order to encourage and ease socilization and benefit in the citizens’ everyday life.




The chapels from the former San Bernardo church.[1] The facade of the former San Bernardo church.[2] The project area inside of the Spanish walls; Porta Romana axe and door.[3]




station main buildling private residences CULTURE

theater museum library university

gallery theater new IED seat labs,classrooms art pavillions

FACILITIES shops supermarket covered market restaurants|bars schools gym sport center WORK administrations arTesanal lab.s hubs

[1]

RESIDENCES co-housing private residences affiliated residences students residence RESIDENCES’ FACILITIES shops

supplies stores stores schools culture hubs IED university center

[2]

The functions at the ground floors.[1] The residences and its facilities [2] 


public green areas parks park

semi-pvt. green areas squares

shared orchard

green squares dog parks play yards sport yards principal paths

[3]

ACCESIBILITY cycle paths bike-mi stations street parking 30 km|h area public sub. parking private sub. parking mixed sub. parking walkable distance of 35 mins.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT yellow subway MM3 tram bus lines passante train

ROADS secondary roads primary roads

[4]

The open space system.[3] The accessibility system. [4]




Detailed-study project THE WESTERN SECTION STUDIED AT 1.500

[3]

[2]

[1]

PLAN, +1.5 M

CROSS SECTION [1]




PLAN, +7.5 M

CROSS SECTION [1]

LONG SECTION [3] 


[3]

[2] [1]

IMAGES OF PERCEPTION

[1]

[3]

[2]

View from the central square looking at the stairs leading to the higher pedestrian walkway.[1] View of the walkway and the entrance to the theater.[2] Aereal view of the minor square at the far western end of the project.[3] 


[3] [2]

[1]

[1]

[2]

[3]

View of the connection between the central square and the higher pedestrian walkway.[1] Aereal view of the linear park.[2] View of the tree-lined walkway on the side of via Giovanni Lorenzini (southern side).[3] 


Architecture

Architectural studio I


Porta Vigentina cultural center A LIBRARY EXTENSION PROJECT IN MILAN

year: 2012 site: corso di Porta Vigentina, Milan working group: Sarah Zaki, Selene Zenobi professors: Angelo Lorenzi, Carlo Ponzini, Gabriele Milani assistants: D. Annoscia, M. Caputo, G. Lorenzi, F. Martini, P. Molteni, E. Solbiati, V. Verzi

T

he extension project works on the Milan urban context and specifically on the existing library laying on the axe of Porta Vigentina. The project area occupies the ground left by the former San Bernardo Church, collapsed in 1970, because of a structural failure. The only part surviving the collapse are the three lateral chapels, leaning against the external wall of the former boarding school. The new complex will integrate the actual library and will also become a point of reference in the neighborhood’s cultural and social life, with an exposition hall, auditorium or cinema and reading room. 


The chapels from the former San Bernardo church.[1] The facade of the former San Bernardo church.[2] The project area inside of the Spanish walls; Porta Romana axe and door.[3] 


Project drawings URBAN CONTEXT

C

onsidering the introvert nature of a monastic structure, main aim was to actively interact with the urban contest.

the upper one projecting onto the other to highlight the entrance and ideally extend Via Quadronno’s axe. The heights are strictly referred to the former church.

As regards the arrays we took as a referment the existing structure and via Quadronno, the road intersectig the corso right in front of the project area (bith in yellow in the image above). This choice assumes the form of two overlapping volumes,

As regards the concept, we took as a treshhold the idea of the thick carved wall that directly recalls the idea of the niches and that hosts most of the services, like the wardrobe or the cafè. 


Left page:Planivolumetric and the main axes.[1] Right page: Lights diagram.[2] Functions and paths diagram.[3]




Project drawings PLANS AND SECTIONS

6

1 2 3

6

4

2

5

1. foyer 2. distribution and services 3. library hall 4. filter spaces, secondary entrance and exit 5. cloister 6. outer space 


Left page: Scheme with ground plan and the main axes. [1] Functions diagram.[2] Right page: Ground floor plan.[3]




[1]

[2]

Longitudinal section d/d. [1] Western elevation e/e. [2] 


[3]

[4]

[5]

Cross section a/a. [3] Cross section b/b. [4] Cross section c/c. [5] 


Clockwise: Eye level view from the entrance.[1] Eye level view from across Corso di Porta Vigentina. [2]

Aereal front view.[3]







product design

Design for small gatherings


Portable, foldable, compoundable A BACKPACK-STOOL DESIGN PROJECT WITH PAPER

year: 2015 site: UNIQ gallery, Istanbul working group: Daniela Lemak, Meghana Deshpande professors: Ozge Cordan assistants: Müge Belek, Çağıl Yurdakul, Tarik Orgen

T

hey challanged us, asking for a paper-made piece of furniture. Specifically a seat. It was supposed to be easily carried everywhere, a design choice and something new. We started analysing all the similar products that had been made sofar with the same.materials, their structure, the way they worked and the kind of paper they used. We decided to eploit the full potential of carboard when using more layers side-by-side; and to use those layers in order to compose a structure that could be used whether as a stool, whether storaged in a thin bag. To design a more appealing piece of design we decided to use this box as a backpack and to play with different colours for the laces of the final backpack. 


Clockwise ftom top, left: The cardboard backpack when close.[1] The cardboard backpack when open.[2] The cardboard backpacks used as stools at the UNIQ Gallery in Istanbul.[3] 


Project developing SCHEMES AND PRODUCTION PHASES

Turskish stool.[1]

Turskish chilling[2]

abstract shape[3]

applied technique[4]

carboard box.[1]

foldable[2]

compoundable[3]

portable[4]

0

Paper, in particular cardboard is a recycleable, light, cheap and flexible material. Using its properties it can also be very strong and durable.[1] Using several layers increases carboard resistance and allows the user to pack them together when not in use and assemble them together, when needed. [2] The modules, fit into each other and act form the structure itself.[3] The modules fit in the box that can be used as a backpack and easily carried everywhere.[4]

ne can see the typical turkish stool being used in every shop, inside and outside, on the treets, by hockers and even coffee shops. [1] This simple and small piece of furniture stays at the basis of turkish people gatherings. [2] Starting from the measures and shape of the stool we started developing our furniture. [3] Mixing the tradition with new materials and techniques. [4]




[1]

[2]

[3]

[4]

[5]

Unfolded cardboard box.[1] Laser-cut cardboard pieces of the stool.[2] Final product in use at the UNIQ Gallery.[3] Composing the parts.[4] Finalizing the product.[5] 


Exposition UNIQ GALLERY, ISTANBUL

T

he stool was later selected for an expositon of small design pieces at the UNIQ Gallery in Istanbul; curated by architects, professors of the Istanbul Technical University and the visiting US professor, Tarik Orgen from Auburn, Alabama. We were also asked to make ten more samples to ensure everybody could rest during the exposition itself and later during the performance of an Istanbul-based band called the Zuhal band.

The stool used at the Zuhal band’s exhibition at the UNIQ Gallery.[1] 


The event flyer.[2] Students at ITU wearing the backpack-stool.[3] 


photography

Photography of architecture


MuzioMilano A PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION ON THE MILANESE ARCHITECT

year: 2015 site: Milan working group: Alfonso Di sabato professors: Marco Introini

T

he aim of the work was to tell the spacial experience of the sacred places through a series of images that give back an interpretation of the architecture that is shaping them. The logic connection among all the 24 shots and between every single photo with the previous and the subsequent, alternates two forms of narration: an emphisized perspective and geometric setting to narrate the physic space and a plausible astraction, similar to reality but more likely relatable to the architects’ way of acting. Both the squared format and the Black and White choice collaborate to a ore clear interpretation of the image. Volumes, geometry; pattern and weave are the indisputable protagonist of the composition and research of Giovanni Muzio.

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Milanese fallen soldiers’ memorial, 1930 [1] Milanese fallen soldiers’ memorial, front view.[2] Santa Maria annunziata in Chiesa Rossa Church, Milan, 1932.[3] Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Chapel, Milan,1932.[4] 


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Santa Maria annunziata in Chiesa Rossa Church, detail of the nave. [1] Santa Maria annunziata in Chiesa Rossa Church, view on the facade. [2] Santa Maria annunziata in Chiesa Rossa Church, left elevation.[3] Four Saint Evangelists church, 1950.[3] 


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“Angelicum” convent, Milan, 1942.[1] San Giovanni Battista alla Chiesa Church, 1948; southern aisle.[2] Four Saint Evangelists church, view from the altar.[3] San Giovanni Battista alla Chiesa Church, View of the facade.[4] 


THE WINNIG SHOT CHOSEN BY CASABELLA Clarisse convent 1955 This shot was chosen with others, to be exposed at Castello Sforzesco in Milan during the exposition dedicated to the milanese architect Giovanni Muzio. Small structure located by the Martesana naviglio (channel), It is articulated in three volumes and It is clearly devided into a more public area, the garden with its secular trees, and the more religious one represented by the chapel, in the photo, the choire and the convent. This intimacy and religious respect are what stands out the most in the picture. The chapel is here the common ground where the constant fight between loud light and silent prayer is taking place.

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chiara turchi

0039.333.8322446 chiaraturchi92@gmail.com

Profile for chiara turchi

selected works . chiara turchi  

This collection contains selected works from different kinds of projects developed through my university career at Poltecnico di Milano, Ist...

selected works . chiara turchi  

This collection contains selected works from different kinds of projects developed through my university career at Poltecnico di Milano, Ist...

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