Fall 2021 | Invest In Style Magazine

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V O LU M E 4 | I S S U E 4 | FA L L 2 0 2 1

UXBRIDGE LIVING

Chestnut Park’s Uxbridge Office Grand Opening Celebration

COVER STORY

Making Waves

Niru Somayajula Steers the Ship From Collingwood to Nova Scotia

TRAVEL

Charlottetown & Eastern Prince Edward Island

Real Estate Confidential: What Happened to the Real Estate Market Beyond Toronto, and Why? | Heartful Heroes: Seeds of Hope | Prince Edward County Living: The Grist Mill in Consecon PEC Luxury Listings | Industry Experts | Featured Articles




// A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT //

Chris Kapches, President & CEO of Chestnut Park Real Estate Limited, Brokerage, is a lawyer with an extensive career working within real estate organizations. Chris has served as Executive VP for the Toronto Real Estate Board (TREB), as well as roles on numerous TREB committees. Chris has been the Chairman of the Real Estate Council of Ontario’s Discipline and Appeals Committee for more than fifteen years.

Travel & Tourism

Art & Design

Charlottetown and Eastern Prince Edward Island

In Conversation With Dahlia Labatte

Cover Story

Interior Design

A 19th Century PEC Farmhouse Gets a Modern Update

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Making Waves Niru Somayajula Steers the Ship From Collingwood to Nova Scotia

elcome to our fall 2021 issue of Invest in Style. The holiday season is fast approaching. Whatever you celebrate, we know that simple togetherness will be an extra special part of it this year.

Our cover story, “Making Waves,” features Collingwood-based Niru Somayajula, President and CEO of Sensor Technology, a worldleader in the manufacturing of underwater sonar solutions. In order to be closer to the ocean and other like-minded companies, Sensor Technology, and Ms. Somayajula, also have a home in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. With customers across the globe, pre-pandemic she was on an international flight about once a month, sometimes with her two young daughters. Read about how this company leader and tri-athlete carves some waves of her own. Our Heartful Heroes feature in this issue is Seeds of Hope. From transitional housing, to art and wellness programs, Seeds of Hope provides opportunities for socializing and employment training. Pre-pandemic, Seeds of Hope made meals for 500 people each week. Now they prepare 5,000. We hope you enjoy seeing the work of talented designers and artists in this issue. An 1800s Wellington farmhouse gets a stunning new addition that both blends in and stands out. Young artist Dahlia Labatte, in partnership with her mother, recently opened her first exhibit in PEC. And oh-la-la check out the colourful pieces – many of them wearable – of glass fusion artist Kirei Samuel, at her Lalaland Glass Studio in PEC.

Southern Georgian Bay Living

Doing the Community Proud: The Rainbow Club of Southern Georgian Bay

since 1945. Bigley Shoes and Clothing (1911) in Bobcaygeon has become a tourist attraction, and The Grist Mill (originally built in 1808) in Consecon, PEC, is now a bar and event venue. We also feature the Owen Sound Farmers’ Market, an indoor market since 1936 (until the pandemic!), and Kingston’s historic Springer Market Square, one of the oldest open-air markets in North America. One of the things the pandemic has taught us is how much we value the place we call home. As we grow older, we are more likely to want to stay in our own homes, a concept called “aging in place.” In this issue we bring you a luxurious home that developers built in consultation with clients who intend to stay in this home long into the future when mobility may be limited and memory not as sharp. And we invite you to consider a trip to beautiful eastern Prince Edward Island, beginning in the historic harbourfront capital of Charlottetown. With dozens of oceanside beaches, singing sands, rare parabolic dunes and incredible hikes for all levels, a week in eastern PEI, with its fresh seafood and welcoming culture, is good for the soul. The spectacular Ontario properties featured in these pages are represented by our Chestnut Park agents. We hope you enjoy looking at the photographs of these and other luxury properties around the world represented by Christie’s.

Speaking of colourful, The Rainbow Club of Southern Georgian Bay provides advocacy and awareness, and hosts social events for the LGBTQ+ community. They are hopeful that a pride parade and outdoor street festival will be possible in 2022. Everyone welcome!

Chestnut Park is pleased to announce that in September we celebrated the opening of our new Uxbridge office. A big thanks to the local community and agents who came out to welcome and support us and join in the festivities. We look forward to serving our expanding market of clients throughout Southern Ontario. Stop by to say hello, and, if you’re new to Uxbridge, make sure to check out Blue Heron Books, a community haven as well as a popular bookstore, and enjoy a delicious farm-to-table meal at the Urban Pantry.

In these pages you’ll read about businesses that have been around for decades – in some cases more than 100 years. The Smithy, in Glen Orchard, Muskoka, has been a family-run blacksmith business

We hope you enjoy this issue of Invest in Style as much as we enjoyed producing it for you. Seasons greetings to you and your families from all of us here at Chestnut Park.

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CHESTNUT PARK RE AL ESTATE LIMITED, BROKERAGE

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT REAL ESTATE CONFIDENTIAL

What Happened to the Real Estate Market Beyond Toronto, and Why?

INTERIOR DESIGN

A 19th Century PEC Farmhouse Gets a Modern Update

ART & DESIGN

In Conversation: With Dahlia Labatte

MUST HAVES Lalaland Glass Studio FASHION

Fall Fashion at Bigley Shoes and Clothing

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HEARTFUL HEROES

44 48 50 52

TORONTO LIVING

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HEALTWH & WELLNESS

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PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES

Seeds of Hope

//

INVEST IN STYLE MAGAZINE

The Lure of Lexus ES TRAVEL & TOURISM Charlottetown and Eastern Prince Edward Island The Beach Neighbourhood

TORONTO LIVING

The Distillery Winter Village

ON THE WATER

Rossiter 20 Coastal Cruiser Review

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Reena Offers a Community a Place to Belong Aging in Place

Toronto

VOLUME 4

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PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES

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SOUTHERN GEORGIAN BAY LIVING

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PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY LIVING

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FALL 202 1

MUSKOKA LIVING Muskoka Lakes Museum

MUSKOKA LIVING

Forging Ahead The Smithy Blends Tradition and Technology

Southern Georgian Bay

To Market We Go: The Owen Sound Farmers’ Market

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COVER STORY

Bushels of Fun at Campbell’s Orchards

Making Waves Niru Somayajula Steers the Ship From Collingwood to Nova Scotia

UXBRIDGE LIVING

Blue Heron Books: A Passion for Books That Goes Beyond Four Walls

KINGSTON LIVING

History Squared: Springer Market Square

CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL

Chestnut Park’s Global Partner

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CHRISTIE’S LUXURY DEFINED

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CHRISTIE’S

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Huntsville // Lake of Bays // Almaguin

Buying Art: How to Find Up-and-Coming Artists

A Peek at Luxury Living Around the World

MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS OUR CHESTNUT PARK OFFICE LOCATIONS

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SOUTHERN GEORGIAN BAY LIVING

V O LU M E 4 | I S S U E 4 | FA L L 2 0 2 1

InvestInStyle.ca

ISSUE 4

PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES

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View embedded video on select ads and articles. in the digital version of

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AUTOMOTIVE

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Pressing Matters: Duxbury Cider Company Flavours of Autumn, Distilled and Available Year-Round

ON UXBRIDGE LIVING

Chestnut Park’s Uxbridge Office Grand Opening Celebration

COVER STORY

Making Waves

Niru Somayajula steers the ship from Collingwood to Nova Scotia

TRAVEL

Charlottetown & Eastern Prince Edward Island

Real Estate Confidential: What Happened to the Real Estate Market Beyond Toronto, and Why? | Heartful Heroes: Seeds of Hope | Prince Edward County Living: The Grist Mill in Consecon PEC Luxury Listings | Industry Experts | Featured Articles

ON THE COVER

Cover photo by: Taylor Nullmeyer

® CHESTNUT PARK is a registered trademark of PRP CP Holdings Inc., used under license by Chestnut Park Real Estate Limited. 6

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FOOD & DRINK

Urban Pantry Restaurant A Sophisticated Farm-to-Table Dining Experience in Downtown Uxbridge

President & CEO Chris Kapches

Director of Marketing & Operations Maria Neves

Creative Director Philip Feder

Editor

Lesley Kenny

Graphic Design Manager Caitlin Hufana

Digital Marketing Manager Rochelle Rondon

Creative Production Coordinator Rafaela Marcelino

Marketing Coordinator Advertising Sales Coordinator Editorial Coordinator

Alison Kinghorn investinstyle@chestnutpark.com

Graphic Design

Sarah Cockwell Norita Dhaigham Erica Giansante

Editorial Contributors Anna Cipollone Matt Driscoll Andrew Hind Chris Kapches Lesley Kenny Bob McHugh Drew McMillin Richard Stewart Michele Viner Lesley Wilkins

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UXBRIDGE LIVING

Chestnut Park’s New Uxbridge Office: A Successful Grand Opening Celebration!

Digital Team Lead // Photography Taylor Nullmeyer digital@chestnutpark.com Office: 416 925 9191 ext 2460

Digital Marketing Coordinator Saron Desta

Questions

Chestnut Park Real Estate Limited, Brokerage Office: 416 925 1743 1300 Yonge Street, Suite 100 Toronto, ON, Canada M4T 1X3 investinstyle@chestnutpark.com

Distribution Enquiries

Alison Kinghorn digital@chestnutpark.com

Publisher

THN Media 2187 Dunwin Drive, Mississauga, ON, L5L 1X2

President THN Media James Baker

THN Administration Diana Lynas

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PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY LIVING The Grist Mill In Consecon PEC

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Canada Post Agreement #41362062 DISCLAIMER: Every effort has been made to publish this magazine as accurately as possible; however errors and omissions can occur. THN Media, their employees, agents, representatives and vendors are not liable for any damages relating to errors or omissions in the editorials or advertising which may appear herein except where a specific charge has been made. In such cases THN Media shall have limited liability only to the charge for such advertising or editorials. 7


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// PRINCE EDWARD COUNT Y LIVING //

// REAL ESTATE CONFIDENTIAL //

Richard Stewart, LLB, LLM, Vice President, Legal Counsel, Broker, is a lawyer who has practised in both the private and public sectors. Richard contributes

additional depth to the Chestnut Park’s leadership team by ensuring ongoing accessibility to legal counsel and assistance on professional and practical issues that arise in the course of real estate transactions.

What Happened to the Real Estate Market Beyond Toronto, and Why?

One of the most significant health crises to confront humankind in a century prompted seismic shifts in buying patterns and behaviour, forever changing recreational, rural and hybrid real estate markets.

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hile these changes are not news, a lot of other things have changed over the last year and a half or so, and many aspects of life are either fundamentally different or no longer as relevant. Specifically, the restrictions and safeguards imposed to address the threat posed by the coronavirus pandemic have resulted in a collective loss of innocence. So many of the activities and routines that we took for granted, and so many of the touchstones and points of reference by which we measured our lives, such as travel, entertaining, cultural and sporting events have either been prohibited, suspended or fundamentally altered in one form or other. With the threat of infection and illness combined with the consequent disruption to traditional working arrangements tied to bricks and mortar 10

workplaces, life focus shifted ever more acutely onto the importance of hearth and home and domestic life. As a result, a renewed emphasis was placed on the need for sanctuary, health and safety, space and access to the outdoors. Proximity to urban centres and all the associated attributes that traditionally attracted many to live in the downtown core and consider issues like walk scores, easy access to work, restaurants, theatres, galleries and public transit became not only much less important, but also potentially negative given that these things are usually associated with density and close interaction with others. The impact of this profound shift in priorities prompted many to reconsider their living spaces and chosen locations. Needless to say, and as is inevitably the case, the critical issue of affordability was also very much a factor in the mix.

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// REAL ESTATE CONFIDENTIAL //

Not surprisingly, the focus of many shifted to the suburbs where buyers could get more living space on bigger lots, with easier access to the outdoors for less money than in central urban cores. This trend was supported by greater locational flexibility given that the physical ties to workplaces in many instances had been loosened through remote working arrangements brought on by the pandemic, and facilitated through the advance of technology. Given this evolution, many took it a step further and considered moving even further afield to take advantage of greater lifestyle opportunities and in some cases transforming what might have initially been exclusively a recreational property purchase to what they might now consider to be their primary residence, or some hybrid thereof. In addition to that, many who had been accustomed to travel for their holidays and leisure activities were now considering, for the first time, the advantages of securing a recreational or holiday home of their own in their own backyard, so to speak, where they could pursue rest, relaxation and sanctuary without worrying about international border crossings and the risks and complications of restricted commercial travel options. This at least provided lifestyle options with ease, reliability, dependability, and security. After people began to emerge from the initial lockdown in the early spring of 2020, and adjust to their new reality, many potential buyers did in fact shift their focus from downtown, or more urban property choices, to more rural and recreational ones. The impact on these markets was profound. The surge in interest prompted by many trying to take advantage of the newly highlighted attributes of these areas brought into focus by the pandemic, compounded by the advantages of greater comparative affordability, precipitated a massive jump in interest and activity. Supply simply could not keep up with this sudden and seemingly unquenchable Not surprisingly, prices in more rural or recreational markets, which had traditionally avoided the volatility and affordability challenges experienced by urban markets, followed suit. There is no question that the renewed interest and consequent heightened activity in these “secondary” markets had already begun prepandemic. Anyone following the news over the last few years is well aware of the challenges that many families and new home buyers have been facing for some time in getting into the real estate market and securing the homes of their choice.

Many potential buyers did in fact shift their focus from downtown, or more urban property choices, to more rural and recreational ones.

Given robust economic and population growth spurred by strong migration patterns, larger urban centres across Canada, where much of the economic activity is centred and consequently many families choose to settle, have been experiencing an ongoing housing crisis in which supply simply cannot keep up with demand. This has resulted in increasing affordability challenges for many, and has prompted government intervention in several markets to address the disparity between supply and demand, and the fact that an ever-growing number of families were being pushed to the sidelines, unable to find properties they could afford. It is not surprising that, as this trend continued, potential buyers were forced to look further afield to find properties that they could afford. This inspired the expression bandied about in real estate, “drive ‘til you qualify.” The pandemic and all of its side effects simply accelerated a trend that was already in place. But the extent of this shift and the lasting impact on these communities and their residents cannot be over emphasized. In the Greater Simcoe Region for instance, an area just north of the outer boundaries of the Greater Toronto Area comprised of a hybrid of urban, suburban, and recreational property types including the area around Lake Simcoe (still largely within commuting distance of the city), the shift in buying patterns, activity and prices over the last two years has been seismic. In March, 2019, the average sale price hovered slightly above the $500,000 mark with sales of over 600 properties per month, increasing as the selling season progressed. One year later, as the market was starting to grapple with the initial lockdown caused by the onset of the coronavirus, monthly sales had increased to approximately 650 properties and the average sales price had risen to almost $540,000. Activity ground to a halt as the pandemic first took hold, but then started to rebound in May, 2020, and then caught on fire in June fuelled by the search for more space, access to the outdoors and related shifting priorities and new reality brought on by the pandemic. In June of last year sales had surged to well over 1000 properties per month, and average prices climbed to over $580,000. While supply increased as well, with sellers keen to take advantage of the bump in demand, the market became increasingly tight.

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// REAL ESTATE CONFIDENTIAL //

Except during the darkest period of the initial lockdown, sales ranged between 30 and 40 properties per month across Prince Edward County, which, while well known, is in fact a relatively small trading area. Wellington Beach in Prince Edward County. Photo by Taylor Nullmeyer

This trend continued throughout the rest of 2020 and into 2021, with sales peaking in March at well over 1300 properties and average prices continuing to rise through May and June where they broke through the $800,000 threshold for the first time. These statistics are truly jaw dropping and, as indicated, the impact on the market is profound. Setting aside the initial months of the lockdown when virtually all activity ground to a halt, over the period of two years the pace of sales virtually doubled at its peak and average prices soared from just over $500,000 to over $800,000, an increase of approximately 60%. While both prices and activity have pulled back somewhat, these numbers vividly illustrate the effects of the pandemic as well as the shift in buying patterns over a brief period of time. Needless to say, incomes have not kept up with the surge in property prices. These same trends have played out in similar ways in other rural, recreational and hybrid markets across Southern Ontario. While it is not possible in the course of this article to cover them all, in order to paint a picture and highlight the breadth and magnitude of this phenomenon, I will review two very popular areas within a couple of hours of Toronto which have been characterized as personifying this trend, namely Prince Edward County and the Western District of Southern Georgian Bay encompassing Collingwood, the Blue Mountains and Clearview. After years of relative stability and only incremental and gradual price movement, the average sale price of a property in Prince Edward County hovered around $400,000 in early 2020. Except during the darkest period of the initial lockdown, sales ranged between 30 and 40 properties per month across Prince Edward County, which, while well known, is in fact a relatively small trading area. Once the impact of the pandemic kicked in, sales and prices took off. In June, 2020, the number of properties recorded as sold 12

increased to almost 80 and then surged further as the season moved into summer with over 140 recorded sales. Average prices in turn surpassed $500,000, and then broke through the $600,000 mark as the year progressed, and then by year end strained beyond reason towards the threshold of $800,000, almost doubling in over a year and a half. As in many markets across Southern Ontario, both sales and prices have pulled back somewhat after months of frantic activity and record smashing price increases, but the market remains very tight and definitively transformed from what it was before the pandemic with a whole new demographic and cross section of buyers eager to get a piece of “the County,” with average sale prices hovering now around the $700,000 range. The Southern Georgian Bay area tells much the same story. While for many of the same reasons that market has been on the rise over the last few years (following a similar extended period of relative price stability as Prince Edward County), the pandemic turbo-charged what was already a gathering trend. In the months immediately preceding the onset of the pandemic in the early spring of 2020, sales ranged in and around 150 properties per month, with an average sale price around $600,000 give or take. Once the market emerged from the lockdown a couple of months later, the same trend resulting from the shift in priorities and post Covid reality came into play in earnest. Sales for all intents and purposes doubled and more, and, as a result, prices were dragged upward at an unforeseen pace, peaking in May of this year at an unimaginable average sale price approaching $900,000. As indicated, and consistent with the above, the market has pulled back somewhat, due to absorption, buyer fatigue, the lifting of restrictions and re-opening of society, allowing people to turn their minds to other things and imagine some return to normalcy approximating the lives they had before the pandemic.

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// REAL ESTATE CONFIDENTIAL //

Needless to say, another moderating factor is the dramatic impact on affordability brought on by a year of frantic buying. Despite the continuation of low interest rates and cheap financing, incomes have not kept up with the leap frogging cost of purchasing property in these now highly desired “secondary” markets. The impact on those who are not in a position to leverage their purchases with the sale of higher priced homes in the urban core has been devastating, and many have found themselves priced out of the markets in which they have spent their whole lives. Residents in these markets are not used to market swings of this magnitude, but are accustomed to much more stable markets where properties traditionally sit on the market for months and purchases are negotiated over time with compromise and give and take on both sides. Suddenly they have been catapulted into a new reality, forced to compete for properties that are flying off the shelf in multiple offers for huge premiums after being on the market for only a matter of days. Many were forced to consider options ever further afield creating ripple effects in markets such as North Bay and Timmins, and even out of province in the Maritimes and beyond. With the roll out of vaccines and the phased provincial reopening, there was a sense of optimism that life might return to some semblance of normal with renewed attendance at cultural, sporting and social events and a restoration of life as we knew it in urban centres. Businesses too began to plan for a return to the office and in-person work schedules. That, mixed with the warmer weather and many simply wishing to change the channel and recover from the trauma and stress of navigating and coping with the coronavirus over the previous year were likely factors contributing to the market pressing pause. People might simply have wanted to take a breath to regain their bearings and assess prospects for the future to the extent possible under all of the circumstances.

Businesses are begining to plan for a return to the office and in-person work schedules. Many are simply wishing to change the channel and recover from the trauma and stress of navigating and coping with the coronavirus over the previous year.

With that in mind, it is interesting to note that as the market has moderated, one of the notable exceptions to this trend is the condominium market which has seen a renaissance of sorts since the new year. While this market in the urban core had been hardest hit by the “pandemic syndrome” of people wanting more space and access to the outdoors, as vaccines were administered with the hopes and promise of a return to normalcy being top of mind, buyers re-engaged with this market, made all the more attractive by virtue of its perceived value given the price correction and the commensurate unaffordability of other options. In the face of all this, the question for many was whether getting a handle on Covid-19 and the further re-opening of society would put a halt to current real estate trends and result in what could be described as an elastic effect with a rush back to urban centres and consequent unloading of at least a portion of the properties that had been purchased in “secondary” markets during the pandemic, as travel once again became an option and employees jockeyed to return to the office and all of the attractions that lured so many to urban life re-opened once more. As most have come to realize, however, there are so many moving parts to current conditions over which no one has control to be able to predict anything with any certainty. Indeed, the fourth wave of the coronavirus is very much a factor. It is not by any means clear how this will play out in the context of ongoing vaccinations, stemming the spread of the new virus variants, and how society will be able to negotiate further re-openings, and any definitive return to the world that we knew before Covid-19. One thing that is clear, however, is that society simply is not, and is unlikely ever to be, the same again after what it has gone through over the last almost two years. As I stated at the outset of this article, there has been a collective loss of innocence, and a sense that it might never be possible to take for granted again many of the activities and things that were considered to be a given before this pandemic. The renewed importance of sanctuary, safety, health and security is unlikely to go away any time soon, and many may be reluctant to give up their new lives or habits in exchange for throwing their eggs back into the one old basket with which they were once familiar. The world has changed and the ongoing advances of technology continue to expand the range of activities and pursuits that can be done remotely, giving homeowners ever-increasing flexibility to live where they wish without the traditional constraints to which they were once bound. People may think twice before giving up their new, more flexible and integrated lifestyles where the division between work, leisure and home life has been blurred, and where all things home related have taken on priority status. In short, while the revolutionary change and seismic shift experienced by “secondary markets” may subside and calm somewhat after the frenzied pace of the last year or so, the world is not the same place as it was, and it is not going back. Accordingly, it is safe to say that these secondary markets have also been irrevocably altered and will reflect that in both activity and price point. Affordability and supply will remain challenges moving forward in response to this behavioural and lifestyle shift.

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// INTERIOR DESIGN //

Anna Cipollone is a writer and editor based in Toronto. Her work has appeared in magazines like Chatelaine, Canada’s 100 Best , Festival Style, Yoga Journal and FASHION, with topics focused on style, design, yoga, arts and culture. She splits her time between Roncesvalles and the Kawarthas.

A 19 Century PEC Farmhouse th

Gets a Modern Update PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF FARMHOUSE DESIGN STUDIO

The Main Street building is an 1800s Wellington farmhouse with a modernized addition that incorporates the local landscape for a perfectly renewed historic homestead.

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esigned as a family home ideal for gathering and entertaining, this modern addition was meant to complement the existing structure without overpowering the original Prince Edward County home. Through neutral design choices juxtaposed against the charm and character of the 19th century, the addition project was designed by Farmhouse Design Studio’s project coordinator Evan Nash–just prior to the studio’s formation in 2019. “We formed Farmhouse Design 14

Studio because we wanted to introduce the architectural design process into what Evan had started with this project , and offer it as a service,” says designer Gabriel Ramirez . Based in Prince Edward County, the studio focuses on residential design with an ethos that seeks to embed environmentally conscious building and design into the current reshaping and development that ’s become prevalent in the County. “A very heavy emphasis was put on respecting the beauty and heritage of the original building,” says Nash.

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// INTERIOR DESIGN //

The extruded gable end over the half hexagonal window bank to a calling card of noteworthy local builder WW Fitzgerald. It can be seen on several prominent homes in and around Wellington.

Cedar shakes were used as exterior cladding against white trims to enhance the dramatic look of this feature

“Anything that could be restored in the original structure, was.” Whenever you open up a house that’s more than a hundred years old, there are bound to be some surprises, he says, “but the trick is to plan for the unexpected.” They were able to restore the original floors, saving 90% of them. One primary hurdle for the property was water mitigation, which became a prominent concern once excavation began. “ The water from the fields to the north seemed to run right off the shale into the back of the house,” explains Nash, noting the grading was corrected to create a swale at the rear of the property. The home itself integrates effectively with its surrounding natural environment. “ The setting is parklike and always full of birds, squirrels, rabbits, foxes and other wildlife. We sought to create a good flow between the indoor and outdoor living spaces while retaining privacy,” says Nash. The aim of the exterior was to maintain the look and feel of the handsome century home as it is viewed from the street while creating a modern feel from the back. A shed roof was chosen to direct water run off safely away from the building and the neighbours.

With strategic window placement , the addition ensures street views and neighbours are blocked from view while the windows focus the eye outward to the surrounding greenspace.

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// INTERIOR DESIGN //

The kitchen was designed to be the heart of this home. The space is large enough to accommodate a group but still homey when not filled with people.

Painstaking care was taken to restore the beautiful features from the turn of the century, the floors and ceiling were stripped and refinished. The tin panels were repaired and repainted as needed. A local craftsman was able to reproduce the baseboard profile to make repairs and modifications.

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// INTERIOR DESIGN //

The flow in the spaces accommodates multiple people. While leaving enough room for the cook to work without crowding.

This beautiful brick house offered a few pleasant surprises–like the wooden wall behind the T V in the living room, hidden trim, and the original hardwood flooring. “I love this house because it ’s Fitzgerald,” explains Nash. “W. W. Fitzgerald was a prominent builder and architect in Wellington at the turn of the century. He was ahead of his time in some respects and is responsible for some of Wellington’s finest homes. I consider his work very important to Wellington and if I get the opportunity to work on one of his buildings, I always try to leave it better than when I found it.” Elevating this project was one of Nash’s favourite exterior features: cedar shakes. They can be challenging because you must anticipate they will change colour over time. “ This house had an interesting pronounced shape from the street side,” says Nash. “ The shakes allow the focus to be on the architecture of the structure rather than the cladding.” Farmhouse Design Studio strives to create buildings that are respectful of the traditional architecture in PEC while adding contemporary comfort and style to the captivating history that is deeply embedded in its buildings. “We want to create bespoke spaces that will foster a sense of place, while working within the vernacular, natural beauty, and history of Prince Edward County.” The rear addition space was created to offer informal entertaining space with easy transition between casual seating, the kitchen and the outdoor living area.

farmhousestudio.ca

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// COVER STORY //

Making Waves BY MATT DRISCOLL PHOTOGRAPHY BY TAYLOR NULLMEYER

Niru Somayajula steers the ship from Collingwood to Nova Scotia

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// COVER STORY //

hether it’s navigating the ebb and flow of national economic cycles or the frigid swells of the Great Lakes, Niru Somayajula knows how to ride the waves.

Somayajula is the President and CEO of Sensor Technology Ltd, a world leader in hi-tech manufacturing of underwater sonar solutions based out of both Collingwood, Ontario, and Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. “I hate to say I live a double life but I kind of do,” explains Somayajula from her part-time home in Halifax. “Collingwood is an incredible place to live but Ontario is very isolated when it comes to ocean tech. Out here, we’re able to do testing in the ocean and we’re surrounded by like-minded companies along with many of our customers and partners.” It’s a long way from the Collingwood pottery company where Sensor Technology has its roots. Those roots began with Blue Mountain Pottery, a Collingwood-based company founded in 1953 and closed in 2004.

Growing up in small-town Ontario, like a lot of kids I wanted nothing more than to leave and see the world. —Niru Somayajula

At one point, Blue Mountain Pottery was one of the largest pottery manufacturers in the country, employing more than 700 people from its Collingwood headquarters. Blue Mountain Pottery hired Dr. Eswar Prasad, who holds a degree in physics and also happens to be Somayajula’s father, to handle a new hi-tech division of the pottery company. While Blue Mountain Pottery was eventually forced to close its doors, the hi-tech branch, under Dr. Prasad and Somayajula’s mother, Shashi, broke away and eventually formed Sensor Technology Limited.

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Sensor Technology has been committed to designing and manufacturing the highest quality acoustic products since the very beginning and that ethos has not changed.

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// COVER STORY //

With over 35 years of experience, Sensor Technology specializes in working with their clients to provide innovative, customized solutions that provide repeatable results. Their market penetration is global in scope, and they specialize in these industry sectors: defense, aquaculture, energy, oceanography and hydrography.

Sensor Technology is focused on the design and manufacturing of piezoelectric ceramic materials, custom acoustic transducers and custom hydrophones. These products are used in all manner of underwater applications. Oil and gas companies use them to locate hydrocarbons, others use them in underwater construction and they have even been used to locate the wreckage of historic plane crashes underwater using echolocation, similar to the method bats use to navigate through the dark. While the tech used might seem complicated to the layperson, it’s second nature to Somayajula. “Some of my earliest memories are of walking around the factory floor,” she says. “I guess it’s in my blood.” That being said, the path from owner’s daughter to president and CEO was far from a linear one. “Growing up in small-town Ontario, like a lot of kids I wanted nothing more than to leave and see the world,” says Somayajula. In 2007, she was in grad school when her parents asked her to step in as interim manager of the company while it was in the process of being sold. The sale ultimately fell through, but Somayajula found that she had fallen in love with the family business and in 2011 she assumed the role of president and CEO and bought out the shares of the business. Since then, the company has seen significant growth, including their expansion into Nova Scotia. Somayajula describes that move as difficult but worthwhile in the end.

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Niru Somayajula runs Sensor Technology as a family-run Canadian company which keeps the organization nimble and adaptable.

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// COVER STORY //

She says the technology they develop can be used in everything from barbecue lighters to medical equipment and over time they plan to expand into other markets. In the past three years, the company has invested somewhere between $500,000 and $1 million in new equipment at their plant in Collingwood, and roughly $1 million at their facility in Nova Scotia. In addition to balancing two geographic locations from the business side of things, Somayajula also needs to balance family life with two daughters of her own. While the girls live in Collingwood, they often accompany her to Halifax, and, when the pandemic permits, sometimes even further afield. “We have customers all over the world. I’m typically on an international flight at least once a month,” she says. “There are some days when I wake up and I’m not sure which city I’m in.”

Some of the world’s most advanced detection, ranging and navigation systems rely on Sensor Technology products.

To stay sharp mentally and physically, Somayajula is an avid triathlete and a part-time surfer. Despite spending so much of her time near the ocean, Somayajula cut her teeth on a surfboard carving the waves of Georgian Bay. “I wanted to try surfing and I had a coworker - in Nova Scotia actually - who told me I should start in Georgian Bay,” she says. “I found the Georgian Bay Surf Club and now I love it. You can pretty much surf anywhere in the world.” While the past 18 months have seen some particularly rough seas for most industries, Somayajula says Sensor Technology Limited has managed to not only stave off a downturn but has increased sales by roughly 30% year-over-year for the past two years. Somayajula says she’s eager to get back on the road and continue the company’s expansion, but she adds that Sensor Technology will always call Ontario home and take pride in their Collingwood roots.

Sensor Technology is a leader in the development of hi-tech of Piezoelectric ceramic composites.

sensortechcanada.com @nirutheceo @ceowhocooks

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// ART & DESIGN //

In Conversation

With Dahlia Labatte BY ANNA CIPOLLONE

With the recent launch of PEC-based gallery Dahlia S L, contemporary artist Dahlia Labatte, in partnership with her mother Belinda, is looking to expand the local conversation surrounding art. Fostering an environment where the relationship between art and its audience is constantly shifting and evolving, their first exhibit, ‘Stripped,’ is an exploration of the human figure and portraiture by three Ontario artists. Many of the pieces were created during the pandemic–a time in which closeness and intimacy were challenged.

“Decay of the Species Being”, Diptych: each acrylic on canvas 24” x 30” .

What subject matter are you currently exploring in your work? The human portrait has always interested me. This idea of capturing an authentically human shape or moment. Abstract art has also been equally impactful, and so my recent pieces merge the two. Describe the philosophy behind your art. A lot of the initial decisions about my work are to achieve a certain visual, regardless of whether that’s composition, colour, shape, or mood. As I’m painting, it’s almost like a meditation–I think deeper into the work as I’m creating it. And because my work goes through multiple stages of progress and I can work on paintings for a while, I’m able to think pretty deeply into the subject. The meaning only becomes complete as I finish my work.

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// ART & DESIGN //

“Studies of Smiles and the Crying Man” , acrylic on canvas 30” x 40”.

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// ART & DESIGN //

Where do you find inspiration? From other forms of art; recently, from books, such as The Iliad, Interviews with Francis Bacon and The Secret History. I’m also always surrounding myself with the work of other artists. How do you cope with creative blocks? Creative blocks occur when I’ve worked myself too hard and gone over my limits in terms of creative energy. I take a step back in my work and put it down for however long I need. I take to sketchbooks and small papers and just make marks, not focusing on making art of any kind and taking care to not judge myself too harshly. Do you have preferences around how your work is received? I think the reaction of the viewer is part of my work. When I create something, I do have my own ideas and reasoning behind it, but once I’ve put it out in the world, the impact on the viewer and their opinions are as important as my own reasoning. Why is art important to you? My family has been bringing me to museums and galleries since I was young, and I’ve always sought out art. The experience of art and the creation of art are both deeply meditative activities, and I hold them dear to my heart. Now with the Dahlia S L gallery and my own artwork I’m able to pursue art professionally. We are most excited to share the experience of art with others, in a deeper and more emotional way. To create connections between each piece and the viewer and then match the pieces to the right collector. What in life is beautiful to you, in the sense that it has the power to move you?

“Two Shoulders” acrylic on canvas 20” x 30”.

How did your childhood shape your relationship to art?

The things in life I find most beautiful are mundane activities and things that bring me happiness. Coffee and tea, rain, train rides, getting lost in a book, music, art museums.

My family is full of artists, and I have been drawing and painting since I could hold a crayon. Art has been a constant in my life, and I treat it as a deeply personal and solitary activity. And so, starting Dahlia S L art gallery with my mother, who also has a passion for the arts as a collector and is herself an amateur painter, was simply a natural step. Another way to express our joint passion for art. 24

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For more information about Dahlia Labatte visit: dahliasl.com



Must Haves LALALANDGLASSSTUDIO.COM BY KIREI SAMUEL

Lalaland

Glass Studio

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BY LESLEY KENNY

nside a century-old barn, Lalaland Glass Studio is located near Bloomfield, in beautiful Prince Edward County. Glass fusing artist Kirei Samuel’s 30-year love affair with her fragile and colourful medium results in one-of-a-kind, hand-crafted pieces. Her glass art includes a range of affordable jewellery, stunning accent pieces (often sold out), vases, bowls, plates and custom pieces. All her work can be purchased in person, at Lalaland Glass Studio, or ordered online and shipped.

Aurora Borealis

I wanted to emphasize the North, polar bears and the startling colours portrayed by the aurora borealis - how the night sky lights up and splashes colour onto the darkness below, revealing what lies beneath.

Twisted Pendant

From May to October, Kirei’s work is available at the Wellington Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. Last year, she started the hugely successful Pink Cow Market, on her property, to provide local artists with an outdoor venue during the restrictions of the pandemic.

A dynamic one-of-a-kind pendant. Big, bold and beautiful! Due to the complicated nature of the process, these pendants often do not make it to the finish line. I drill a hole to hang the pendant from a sterling silver bail. The cord is leather.

Kirei also teaches a 5-day intensive glass fusion workshop at the Haliburton School of Art and Design and she offers private online lessons for aspiring glassmakers. Lalaland Glass Studio is part of the annual PEC Studio Tour of County artists. This sought-after artist is always learning and pushing the boundaries of her craft. “The techniques in glass intrigue and challenge me,” says Kirei, “continually forcing me to expand past my comfort zone, to enter areas of unknown territory which excite and terrify me at the same time.” Visit her website to see the full range of her glass art and to place your order. Her pieces are popular during the holiday season and, as many sell out, this is your heads up to get your order in now! lalalandglassstudio.com lalalandglassstudio@gmail.com 2317 Prince Edward County Road #1 (aka Scohari Road) Prince Edward, Ontario 613 393 1307

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Squares

A splash of colour that accents any place in the house. This piece is so much fun to make as working with so much colour lifts the spirits and brightens any day. I cut many different coloured pieces of glass into squares to create this plate.

Pine Tree Sun catcher

Inspired by the Muskoka Pines in Cottage Country, this sun catcher will take you back to those nature walks in the woods. The pine trees are packaged and a suction cup is included in the box.

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// MUST HAVES //

Rainforest Bracelet

Vibrant colours reminiscent of the rainforest are encased in clear glass giving this bracelet its own distinct character.

Orgainized Chaos

Fluid but geometric, the luminescent glass used in this piece changes colours as the light hits it. The plate appears clear with iridescent qualities when held in the light. The darker the surface the plate is placed on affects the intensity of the colour of the glass. Photographed here on a black background.

The Poppy Field

Nothing is more beautiful than a field of poppies fluttering in the breeze. This intricate piece reminds me of the carefree feeling of lying in a meadow, cloud watching.

Fire Pendant

I am fascinated with volcanos and how lava flows. This piece honours the power of nature. I make this piece using 10 layers of glass. Once fired, it is diamond-polished and placed back in the kiln for a final fire polish. I drill a hole for the pendant to hang from a sterling silver bail. Sold with a sterling silver chain.

County Road 34

Inspired by a winter’s outing in Prince Edward County, the lone tree stands majestically in its surroundings, waiting for spring. I make the background first by twisting molten glass. The last stage is to fire the enameled-based tree onto the glass. The pendant is then wire-wrapped with sterling silver. A sterling silver chain is included in the price.

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// FASHION //

Fall Fashion

at Bigley Shoes and Clothing BY ANNA CIPOLLONE PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF BIGLEY SHOES & CLOTHING

In the heart of Bobcaygeon, a century-old business features luxury outerwear and an impressive selection of shoes, boots and accessories for every season. It’s become a destination in itself.

Bigley Shoes and Clothing has been a family-run business since 1911. They feature one of the largest selections of shoes in Eastern Ontario for adults and children.

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hat began as a shoe store and harness repair shop in 1911, opened by Charles Bigley and today owned and operated by the Peel family, is now a tourist attraction with some of the best brands in shoes and clothing, housed in a charming, historic building on the main strip in Bobcaygeon. Its purpose is to serve as a community hub for shopping and private events, while offering superb customer service for those in search of the perfect-fitting shoe that is both supportive and stylish. “My father-in-law and I were a team, and his motto was good, better, best,” says owner Sherry Peel.

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// FASHION //

At Bigley’s you will find hundreds of brand names in clothing & footwear for both men and women including bathing suits, jewellery and accessories. There is also a kitchen store with a coffee bar for visitors to enjoy.

“Through the years, the market moved it more to better, best– our customers wanted more quality, and a lot of doctors refer patients to us that need shoes that accommodate orthotics, fit well and are comfortable.” And for their unique clothing selections, she credits her daughter-in-law for keeping on the fashion pulse and handling all the buying. In recent years, the business has flourished, expanding its inventory of shoes and adding luxury outerwear, on-trend clothing and a kitchen store with coffee bar, buying up buildings to grow the original flagship. Customers can browse from shop to shop without ever leaving the building. Bigley Shoes and Clothing attracts generations of families and groups of friends visiting the Kawarthas and has become a tourist attraction in itself.

At Bigley’s, you can enjoy big city fashion in a cottage country atmosphere.

“It was about us trying to build something for the village and it became a destination,” says Peel. “It’s created a social environment.” They’ve hosted day trips and private shopping events–like bachelorette parties where a group can shop all day and then stay for a dinner hosted by the store. And while groups travel from all over Ontario, the locals remain an integral part of the business, particularly during the holidays when families will visit from the city and spend the day strolling the Bobcaygeon strip with the final destination of everyone shopping together at Bigley.

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// FASHION //

Bigley’s rich, 110-year history has seen the store evolve and shift into a fashion mecca for the north. But what has remained a constant is Bigley’s passion for fitting the entire family with high quality footwear and serving its loyal customers, from spring to winter, every year (they’re open 360 days a year). Along with apparel, water toys, kids’ toys and crafts, and its very own Bigley’s Sweet Treats that carries none other than Kawartha Dairy Ice Cream, the whole family can indulge at this must-visit boutique. Between

Lack of Color Forest Rancher in Forest Green, $144

cottage country season, and the locals who frequent the shop all year round, Bigley offers a great selection of fall fashion. With autumn tones of forest green, orange, reds and neutrals, check out the apparel, shoes and accessories featured at Bigley this fall season. bigleyshoes.com 35-45 & 50 Bolton St. Bobcaygeon, Ontario

Django & Juliette Pinot Nat Heel, $269.95

Fraas Plaid Wool Ruana in Camel, $238

Fraas Patchwork Houndstooth Cashmink Scarf, $55

Ammann Splugen Black & White Cowskin, $390

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Levi’s Classic Worker, $64.95

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// HEARTFUL HEROES //

Seeds of Hope BY MICHELE VINER PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF SEEDS OF HOPE CHESTNUT PARK’S

oes

H

ear

Heartful Heroes

tful H er

The power of caring. 1.

2.

s

He

e

roe

H

art

ful H e

art

f u l Hero

es

4.

3.

H eartful H eroes 5.

Volunteers at 6. St. Joseph Street.

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hen Kimberly Curry first started coming to Toronto as a young child, she would often ask her parents why some people were lying in the streets, and why other people were walking around them? Years later, as an adult with a background in writing and design, Kimberly returned to the city to find her career and instead found even more homeless people, and a new direction. She began to volunteer for charities that provided food and care to those in need and found herself at an organization called Seeds of Hope. Twelve years later, she is still there, no longer as a volunteer, but as its Executive Director. Started in 2009, Seeds of Hope is an organization that works to create spaces for food, warmth and comfort to people in need; 32

people at a crossroads in their life. Through a variety of services and centres, Seeds of Hope offers transitional homes, safe places and creative spaces that enhance livelihood, learning, and social opportunities. “We are a peer-to-peer organization that believes everyone can care and help,” says Kimberly. We are not social workers; we work with professionals in the areas where people require help but we exist to offer support alongside that help, and as conduits to this expertise.” Seeds of Hope works with people in every capacity - from supplying food and shelter, to offering various programs in everything from art and wellness courses, to planting and tending gardens, to training for employment.

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// HEARTFUL HEROES //

Tending to the Healing in Nature garden.

All programs are run by volunteers of the organization. “Our volunteers are our lifeline,” says Kimberly, “our work goes far beyond one person. We would not exist without the help of incredible people who care deeply about others and who put that caring into action.” Joanna Sable is one of those many volunteers. A Cordon Bleu chef who has trained and worked in some of the finest kitchens in the world, Joanna’s “kitchen” of choice these days is the back seat of her car as she works to deliver food to those in need. Nowhere has the need been greater than in the area of food insecurity, particularly since the pandemic hit in 2020 and things turned dire for many families. Before that, Seeds of Hope would prepare 500 meals a week for people who were in need; since Covid, that number has risen to 5,000 meals a week. “When Covid first hit, it was virtually the 9-1-1 of food,” says Joanna, “and many organizations were shutting down just as the need to feed people was becoming greater. The restaurant and food industry in Toronto is filled with incredibly generous people who suddenly found themselves with excess food in the early days of the pandemic and didn’t want it to go to waste. We worked together to find an organization that could put the food to use and we found Seeds of Hope.” Joanna credits a group effort of many giving and incredible people who have ensured the effort of delivering food continues, something that makes Kimberly Curry feel very grateful. “I have seen over the years that people do care about each other – it just takes a bigger percentage of people doing a little bit more. No one has to stop what they are doing and spend every day with the homeless, they just need to go that tiny bit further. You don’t have to be an expert to care or to encourage a fellow human being.”

Healthy ingredients make healthy meals for those in need.

YELLOW DOOR LEARNING CENTRE

Joseph House - art, music and wellness courses.

SAINT JOSEPH TABLE

The cafe at 6 St. Joseph House where all are welcome.

HEALING IN NATURE

A garden designed, built, planted, and harvested by Seeds of Hope volunteers and residents. Also, farm, hiking and camping excursions.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

Facilitating people training experience and jobs to aid with a self-sustainable, joyful life.

BROADVIEW HOMES

Abstinence-based supportive housing for people in early stages of recovery from addiction.

LAZARUS HOUSE

Transitional housing for women who become homeless lving with mental illness.

To learn more about Seeds of Hope, visit seedsofhope.ca

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// AUTOMOTIVE //

Bob McHugh is an Automotive Writer and has written car reviews and auto-related stories for over 25 years. He is a long time member of the Automobile Journalists Association of Canada.

The Lure of Lexus ES An E xceptionally S olid performer since the birth of Lexus.

E

ven luxury class buyers are drifting to the utility vehicle buying option these days. Yet, the sleeker styling lines and more involved driving experience of a well designed and engineered sedan is still my preference. And few cars, if any, can match the sophistication, dependability, ride quality and security that a Lexus ES provides.

Introduced in 1989, the ES name apparently stands for “Executive Sedan” or “Elegant Sedan,” depending on who you ask. Now in its seventh generational redesign, with a legion of highly-satisfied repeat buyers, the top-selling Lexus ES is still the mid-sized luxury sedan that all others are measured against.

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// AUTOMOTIVE //

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// AUTOMOTIVE //

F SPORT features range from rear spoilers, 3-spoke steering wheels, leather seats and distinctive style only Lexus has to offer. Drivers familiar with the ES series will appreciate the emphasis on spaciousness, quiet driving acoustics and safety.

There are three versions of the Lexus ES and it can be a surprisingly good value and/or an eco-friendly vehicle choice. Lexus no longer offers a GS model, so the next sedan alternative up the Lexus ladder is now the full-sized ($100,000+) Lexus LS. And the topdollar value surprise kicks in when you sell or trade your ES, after owning it for a number of years. The lowest priced ES250 comes with all-wheel-drive and an economical 2.5 litre, four-cylinder (203 horsepower) engine. My test drive was in a frontdrive ES350, which comes with a more powerful 3.5 litre six cylinder (302 horsepower) engine. The eco family member is ES300h, which has a hybrid, gas/electric powertrain. A 2.5 litre Atkinson Cycle gas engine is linked to a CVT (continuously variable transmission) and they can generate up to 215 horsepower. More importantly, this ES claims a very impressive (combined city/highway) fuel efficiency rating of just 5.3 L/100km. 36

4 th generation self-charging Lexus hybrid electric system. With impressive fuel efficiency and no compromise on performance.

Despite its conservative, ‘Elder Statesman’ pedigree, the current ES has sharp and surprisingly daring styling. It’s long, low and wide with a slanted rear roofline that creates a coupe-like silhouette. An extra-large front grille now has a refreshed look and features wrap-around slim design tri-beam LED adaptive headlights. My tester came with the F Sport package, which gives the grille a black finish that’s also used on wheels and other trim pieces, for an even bolder look. Loved the strong yet smooth power surge, throughout its rev range, that the V6 engine can provide when needed. Steering feel is on the light side, yet it’s surprisingly responsive, and it certainly adds to the composed, confident ES driving experience.

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// AUTOMOTIVE //

That said, passenger ride comfort and an extremely quiet cabin are still crucially important traits of any Lexus ES. It’s a premium road trip sedan with a lush, bump-absorbing suspension that’s totally at home on the highway. And, of course, ES also has lots of room for your luggage (and/or golf bags) in its expansive (394L) trunk. Every ES also comes with an excellent array of passive and active safety features, including Lexus Safety System + 2.0. This high-tech package is designed to support driver awareness and decision making. It focuses on three key areas; mitigating (primarily frontal) collisions with other vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists; keeping the vehicle within its highway lane at higher speeds and enhanced lighting during night driving. I got a surprise taste of the ES’s rear auto-brake system while reversing outof a parking stall at a local shopping mall. A rear sensor had picked up a vehicle outside my line of vision, which was on a potential collision course. My initial alarm turned to admiration, when the other vehicle came into view. F SPORT features interior enhancements such as paddle shifters, an LFA-inspired digital dashboard, and enhanced steering wheel, shift knob and seating.

Lexus Enform also offers progressive technology to make every journey richer. The display is compatible with Apple CarPlayTM and Android AutoTM.

There’s so much more to the Lexus ES ownership experience, just ask an owner!

With a 215 HP engine in the 300h you will never compromise on performance.

Lexus ES 2021 300h

Executive Sedan: Actually, you don’t have to be an Extra Smart business person to buy an ES, but it is an intelligent vehicle purchase. Elder Statesman: When you buy a new Lexus ES, you also buy over 30 years of engineering refinement, the very latest in vehicle safety technology and its unbeatable reputation for dependability.

LEXUS ES250 AWD: LEXUS ES 350: LEXUS ES300H:

$45,250 $49,450 $51,450

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// TRAVEL & TOURISM //

Lesley Kenny is a professional writer and editor with 20+ years of

experience with lifestyle, literary, and academic publications. She is the editorial editor for Invest in Style.

Charlottetown

and Eastern Prince Edward Island Experience the delights of this historic harbour city then wend your way through Eastern PEI for a week of seashores, seafood, and surprises.

Y

es, you could travel the entire province of PEI in just a week (by car, tip-to-tip takes less than 4 hours). But why would you want to rush around one of the most scenic and welcoming places in Canada?

The capital city of Charlottetown, with its wide streets, historic buildings and 400 acres of developed parkland, feels more like a charming seaside town – with all the cultural amenities of a big city. Tucked into its namesake harbour, Charlottetown is within a one-hour drive from all access points to PEI (Charlottetown airport is minutes from downtown), and makes a great home base for your holiday. Charlottetown’s plentiful accommodations include budget-friendly motels, boutique inns, B&Bs, and full-service hotels. You can even rent a floating cottage in Peakes Quay and watch the boats come and go in the harbour from your rooftop deck. The Great George Hotel, in the historic district, is an eclectic cluster of restored heritage buildings with a range of room sizes and shapes, and unique décor. Downtown Charlottetown is safe, friendly and walkable. A number of farmers’ markets and food festivals give the city its reputation for being a food-lover’s destination, with its abundance of freshly-caught seafood and local fruits and vegetables. Colourfully painted homes and commercial buildings in muted blue, yellow and red hues suggest the island’s natural colour palette of sea, sand and red cliffs. There are plenty of parks and things to do for kids, including a downtown pool and splash pad, and a scavenger-style search for the nine bronze mice hiding throughout the downtown. Covering an entire city block, Confederation Centre of the Arts houses an art gallery that exhibits the traditional work of Canadian artists, as well as digital media and interactive installations. The Centre’s Mainstage Theatre features plays, musicals, ballet and live music. Confederation Centre hosts the annual Charlottetown Festival each May-through-October, a celebration of Canadian musical theatre and comedy.

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// TRAVEL & TOURISM //

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// TRAVEL & TOURISM //

What we now call PEI has been home to the Mi’kmaq (“meeg mah”) Indigenous people for more than 12,000 years. Mi’kmaq culture is featured and celebrated throughout the year in Charlottetown and throughout PEI. Between the harbour and Confederation Centre, the spires of St. Dunstan’s Basilica (a National Historic Site of Canada) pierce the sky. Along the waterfront, in the almost-50-acre Victoria Park, a wide, accessible boardwalk curves beside the water for a perfect evening stroll. From your accommodations in Charlottetown, enjoy daytrips throughout Eastern PEI, or pick new places to stay along the way. Points East Coastal Drive will lead you to the main towns and sites, but don’t resist the temptation to go off the beaten path. Quiet fishing villages and hamlets may surprise you with their unpretentious and delicious meals, and the work of skilled, local artisans. From downtown Charlottetown, cross the Hillsborough River Bridge then wend your way through the picturesque coastal towns of Stratford, Murray River, Montague, Georgetown and Cardigan. Eastern PEI is studded with bays, coves and lighthouse points, and includes national parks and supervised beaches. Walking, hiking and bike trails circumnavigate the island. New in 2020 is the Island Walk, a 700km well-maintained path (including a section of Confederation Trail) around the entire island, accessible from many points. There’s no shortage of things to do in Eastern PEI. Hit the links with incredible ocean views, tour estate wineries and vineyards, wander around museums and historic lighthouses and enjoy oceanside dining. But the non-commercial heart of Eastern PEI – its spectacular natural beauty and down-to-earth people – will restore your faith in your inner wild. The shores of Eastern PEI include more than 50 breathtaking beaches. Whether you go digging for clams, horseback riding along the water’s edge, or sit on the soft sand and lose yourself in the rhythm of the lapping waves, there’s a beach just for you. One of the most popular is the beach at Basin Head Provincial Park, with its famous singing sands. Drag your foot across the sand here and the high silica content heated by the sun results in a kind of chirping sound.

Quiet fishing villages and hamlets may surprise you with their unpretentious and delicious meals, and the work of skilled, local artisans.

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The red sand and cliffs in PEI are a result of oxidized rust red colour.

The floating boardwalk at Greenwich, PEI National Park.

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// TRAVEL & TOURISM //

iron. When the iron-rich sands meet air, they take on this

An accessible boardwalk curves along the waterfront in Charlottetown’s 50-acre Victoria Park.

A channel divides the beach into two sections and swimmers can jump from the channel sides or the adjoining bridge into the water below, to be (gently) swept towards the beach. There’s also a fisheries museum at this park, play areas for kids, concessions, washrooms and showers. A few minutes from Basin Head lies the seaside town of Souris. Stop by Chef Michael’s Flavour Shack for some tasty sauces and kitchen goodies. From Souris you can take a 5-hour ferry ride to the rural Magdelen Islands, a small archipelago in the Gulf of St. Lawrence that’s actually part of Quebec, although geographically closer to the Maritime provinces. Along the north shore of Eastern PEI, on the Greenwich Peninsula, the farming hamlet of Greenwich extends from St. Peters. Here, a rare system of parabolic dunes – U-shaped sand dunes with extended arms – are protected by PEI’s National Parks. While you can’t walk on these stunning natural shapes that shift and change with wind and water, you can see them from the dune trail. Starting from St. Peters’ Bay, through woodland and then emerging at Bowley Pond, the 4.4km trail includes a floating boardwalk and, at the end, a white sandy beach. Of course. Culturally vibrant and naturally pretty, Charlottetown is the perfect place to begin your exploration of Eastern PEI. Come for the culture, stay for the wild.

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// FOOD & DRINK//

Lesley Wilkins

is a full-time writer, avid shoe collector and Uxbridge enthusiast. She takes enormous pride in sharing her passion for everything this town has to offer- from book clubs to live music, mountain biking to horse back riding, trail running and more.

A world of flavours thoughtfully combined by Chef Mike Crockford into delicious internationally-inspired Canadian cuisine.

Urban Pantry Restaurant

A Sophisticated Farm-to-Table Dining Experience in Downtown Uxbridge BY LESLEY WILKINS PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF URBAN PANTRY RESTAURANT

With an aesthetic and menu to rival any downtown Toronto establishment, Urban Pantry Restaurant is a hub for sophisticated dining nestled in the heart of historic Uxbridge.

F

or over 10 years the sparkling urban décor and stylish outdoor dining area has provided families and couples with an ideal backdrop for connecting over contemporary Canadian farm-to-table cuisine served with a generous helping of Greek hospitality.

Throughout the challenges of covid lockdowns and seating restrictions this beloved dining hotspot has found innovative ways to continue serving their dedicated customers. From comforting family-style meals ready for pickup to well spaced seating on their newly expanded patio, Urban Pantry owner Niki Filntissis has met each challenge head on and her devoted clientele has backed her every step of the way. “It was unbelievable,” says Filntissis, “when Ontario went into lockdown and the restaurant doors closed, Uxbridge not only embraced the new pick-up model, many of our clients actually made a point of ordering every week specifically to ensure that the restaurant survived lockdown.

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// FOOD & DRINK //

The wall-to-wall windows, sparkling tiles, and wine display help to create an atmosphere that’s modern and inviting any time of day.

Our town is truly something special.” In fact, Filntissis and her family have always believed that Uxbridge is a special place. In 1984 her father John Pagidas - a Ryerson engineering graduate originally from Athens – first went into partnership then bought his friend’s Uxbridge burger joint and set to work turning Texas Burger into a welcoming family-run restaurant adored by locals. Twenty-six years later, with Pagidas ready to retire, Filntissis was eager to put her business degree and hospitality experience to good use and take over the family business. “The town was growing and I could sense that there was a demand for more restaurants offering a sophisticated dining experience.” And so, with nervous locals watching, a massive renovation began, and in 2011 Urban Pantry Restaurant opened its doors to rave reviews from locals and visitors alike. The goal for Filntissis was to provide a chic city-calibre dining experience in her hometown. And she hit the nail on the head. With floor-to-ceiling windows that span the length of the dining room and a modern outdoor patio, patrons can enjoy a daytime dining experience that is bright, welcoming and family-friendly. Once the sun sets the dining room and patio turn into a gently lit space where friends and couples are treated to a sophisticated fine-dining experience featuring seasonally inspired cuisine. For Urban Pantry’s Chef Mike Crockford – every ingredient plays an essential role, and even the tiniest details demand his care and attention. Nowhere is that attention to detail more obvious than in his kitchen’s constantly evolving menu spotlighting the very finest locally sourced ingredients.

Seasonal dishes at the Urban Pantry provide an explosion of colour and flavour.

But of course, every great meal deserves a great beverage to pair with it, and Urban Pantry Restaurant doesn’t disappoint. Living up to the standards set by their FeastOn® certification, their carefully curated selection of wines includes a selection of vintages from wineries throughout Ontario ranging from a Cave Springs Pinot Noir with a beautiful cherry aroma to a Marsanne from KEW Vineyard with notes of lemon and grilled pineapple. If wine isn’t your tipple Urban Pantry offers craft beer lovers a seasonal selection of beers from The Second Wedge Brewing Company - located less than a kilometre away – as well as locally produced small-batch cider from Banjo Cidery to name but a few.

As a FeastOn® Certified farm-to-table restaurant, Filntissis and Crockford take the word ‘local’ seriously – incorporating quality meats and produce from farms around Uxbridge area and throughout Ontario into contemporary Canadian dishes with an international flare.

Eager to experience this Uxbridge hotspot for yourself? Reservations should always be made well in advance to ensure you aren’t disappointed.

Customer favourites include Crockford’s mouth-watering Bison Burger featuring locally raised Thunder Ridge bison (yes Uxbridge has its own bison farm) combined with strip bacon, jalapeno havarti, pickled shishito peppers, and a creamy tex mex ranch dressing.

urbanpantry.ca 4 Toronto Street North Uxbridge, Ontario 905 852 5050 @urbanpantry

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// TORONTO LIVING //

Homes beside Kew Gardens, steps from Kew Beach.

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// TORONTO LIVING //

The Beach BY LESLEY KENNY

This family-friendly neighbourhood’s waterfront lifestyle, extensive green spaces and vibrant commercial streets offer a beach-town vibe just minutes from downtown Toronto. The beloved neighbourhood is bounded by Dundas Street and Coxwell Avenue on the west, Victoria Park Avenue on the east, Kingston Road to the north, and, to the south, Lake Ontario’s sandy shores.

L

aid-back yet buzzing, this much-loved east end neighbourhood is named after the 2km of Lake Ontario shoreline that mark its southern border. Whether you call this neighbourhood The Beach, as many locals do, or The Beaches, everyone knows where you mean.

What started as a waterfront cottage getaway location in the 1800s and grew to include Coney-Island-inspired amusement parks, began residential development in the early 1900s. Well-maintained Arts and Craft style cottages and turn of the century Edwardian brick homes are set back on treelined streets. Back to the stud renovations and striking new builds reflect contemporary tastes while honouring the neighbourhood’s history. Ashbridges Bay anchors the western waterfront of The Beach neighbourhood. A popular place to watch Canada Day fireworks and sunsets on the spit, Ashbridges Bay is home to marinas, a yacht club and a skateboard park, and is a good spot for fishing and bird watching. The Martin Goodman Trail, a 56km multi-use path that winds along the city’s waterfront, cuts through the north end of Ashbridges Bay. The R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant, which plays a starring role in Michael Ondaatje’s novel, In the Skin of a Lion, marks the south-eastern border of this neighbourhood, at the foot of Victoria Park Avenue. Open to the public during Door’s Open TO, the architecturally stunning buildings were deemed a national historic civil engineering site in 1992. The fortress-like setting overlooks Lake Ontario and views from inside are among the most impressive in the city. In the warmer months, white sandy beaches offer swimming, picnicking, beach volleyball, canoe and kayak rentals, boating, fishing and paddle boarding. Year round, a wide, 3km boardwalk winds alongside the beaches for daytime strolls, beautiful sunset views, and winter walks. Dogs are welcome on the boardwalk, on leash, with a water-side off-leash area for pooches to take a dip and run off their zoomies.

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// TORONTO LIVING //

Piper McMillan, a 7-month-old Zuchon, enjoyed her first swim this summer at the off-leash waterfront dog park on Kew Beach.

Leuty Lifeguard Station, an iconic Beach image, since it was built in 1920.

Shops along Queen Street East allow locals to complete errands on foot. The Beach is walkable and bicycle friendly.

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Back to the stud renovations


// TORONTO LIVING //

While the accessible beaches define this neighbourhood, the green spaces here are remarkable, particularly the 11-hectare Glen Stewart Park and Ravine which more-or-less bisects the neighbourhood at Glen Manor Road. This forest of rare red oak and red maple trees is home to more than 100 species of migrating birds, native plants including wildflowers, and is fed by Ames Creek. The elevated boardwalk inside winds past a number of staircases and lookouts and is a beautiful and accessible walk in all seasons. Two suspended wooden pedestrian bridges were part of a 2021 revitalization project for Glen Stewart Ravine. Kew Gardens’ 6.5 hectares, starting at Queen Street and extending to the lake, include a playground and splash pad, basketball court, tennis courts, a baseball diamond, and a skating rink in winter. It’s a popular spot for live concerts, yoga classes, picnics and sitting quietly, enjoying the scenery.

celebrated its centennial last year. Still an active station, it’s been credited with saving 6,000 lives

Shops along Queen Street East allow locals to complete errands on foot and include a variety of boutique shops. Cafes and ice cream parlours are plentiful. Popular restaurants, many of which have been in business for decades, fill up with neighbours and guests. Kingston Road to the north is home to a bustling commercial strip with more restaurants, grocery stores, bakeries, cafes and retail staples. The Beaches International Jazz Festival, an annual, month-long celebration and street festival throughout the neighbourhood, began in 1989 and is next scheduled for July, 2022. There are plenty of everyday entertainment opportunities here as well, including the Fox Theatre (in operation since 1914), where you can enjoy a craft beer or glass of wine with your popcorn and big-screen flick. Just 15 minutes east of downtown Toronto, this family-oriented neighbourhood offers a handful of renowned schools including public, catholic, independent and even outdoor. The Beach is a walkable and bicycle friendly neighbourhood that is served by TTC streetcar and buses. Minutes from the Don Valley Parkway, Lakeshore Boulevard, and the Gardiner Expressway, The Beach neighbourhood is accessible yet feels tucked away.

and striking new builds reflect contemporary tastes while honouring the neighbourhood’s history.

A testament to its stunning natural beauty and diverse commercial resources are the many people who grew up here, moved away – then returned, to raise their own families in The Beach.

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// TORONTO LIVING //

Winter Village vendors – a limited number this year – set up shop in individual chalet-style booths along the cobblestone streets.

The Distillery Winter Village BY LESLEY KENNY

Toronto’s Historic Distillery District’s special event welcomes visitors back, November 18 to December 31, 2021.

T

he Distillery Winter Village is a picture-perfect holiday experience where friends and family can gather to explore the rich history of The Distillery District as well as a selection of handmade items from some of Toronto’s finest local craftspeople, shops, restaurants and cafes.

Closed due to the pandemic in 2020, organizers are preparing to make it worth your wait. Back again: the magnificent 50-foot Christmas tree in Trinity Square, miles of traditional twinkling holiday lights,contemporary

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light installations, roving carolers, Santa and Elves, and some live performances. Vendors (a limited number this year) will set up shop in individual cabins along the cobblestone streets. In addition to its year-round restaurants and extended patios, this year The Distillery Winter Village has 12 new and exciting food offerings (and some past favourites). Walk around the 40 Victorian-era industrial buildings – the largest collection of its kind in North America— with a hot chocolate, or enjoy your grown-up drink on a restaurant patio.

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// TORONTO LIVING //

The magnificent Christmas tree in Trinity Square.

The stylish on-site shops will be open and staff ready to help you with your holiday gift list. The Distillery Winter Village opens November 18 and tickets are required for the tree-lighting event that evening. Not open on some Mondays, check their website for event hours. Admission is free, except Friday, Saturday and Sunday after 4pm when tickets are $8 for those six and older. Tickets are only sold through the website. The event is closed December 24, 25, and 26.

Admission to the Village is free except Friday, Saturday and Sunday after 4pm. Tickets are only sold online.

Outside of the official Distillery Winter Village hours, the 70+ Distillery District shops, restaurants and cafes are open as usual, seven days a week, starting at 10am. The Distillery District is closed on Christmas Day. The Distillery Historic District encourages you to check their Instagram and website for the most up-to-date information before you head out: www.thedistillerywintervillage. com/@distilleryTO #DistilleryWinterVillage.

A blend of traditional twinkling holiday lights, contemporary light installations, roving carolers, live music and great food make this winter village a local favourite.

With limited parking in the area, the best way to get to The Distillery Winter Village is by public transit, rideshare or bike share. And just a heads up: Santa will be walking around the Village inquiring about your behaviour this year – so get your story straight before you go.

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// ON THE WATER //

Drew McMillin

An avid waterskier, his summers growing up were spent behind the boat on Peninsula Lake in Huntsville, Ontario. A graduate of the College of Sports Media, Drew put in stints at TSN and CTV Northern Ontario before securing his dream job on the water hosting PowerBoat TV every Saturday morning on Global TV.

Rossiter 20 Coastal Cruiser Review

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF WALKERS POINT MARINA

Since the financial crisis of 2008, it’s become rare to see a “Made in Canada” label on a fibreglass boat, as the Great Recession claimed many of our nation’s most prolific producers of powerboats. Well-established brands like Doral and Grew were among those that found themselves in receivership shortly after the 2008 crash.

F

Using the very latest technology and materials, Rossiter boats are built to last a lifetime. Every Rossiter is built to the highest industry standards.

or domestic builders who were able to weather the storm and continue manufacturing north of the border, challenges still abound.

One Ontario builder, Rossiter Boats, has built a fiercely loyal customer base in Muskoka and Georgian Bay, but financial struggles still led to bankruptcy in 2018. “Probably the single largest hurdle that the company has to overcome is doing business in Canada,” says Blair Levinsky, who rescued Rossiter from insolvency, purchasing the company three years ago. “There’s not many of us left.”

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Already the owner of a 23-foot Rossiter outboard, Levinsky seized the opportunity to rescue a brand near and dear to his heart. “There’s tremendous pride in the fact that we produce these boats in Ontario, Canada, notwithstanding all of the challenges,” he says. “The easiest and best way is just to do what we do. Rossiter is an iconic Canadian brand, equally known for its classic design as it is for the quality of construction and the strength of its performance.” This was on full display on my visit to Rossiter’s production facilities last fall, where the company hand-builds 150 to 200 “semi-custom” boats each year in Markdale, Ontario. It’s come a long way since George Rossiter began building canoes and rowboats in his shed in 1974.

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// ON THE WATER //

The Rossiter 20 Coastal Cruiser combines superior big water performance with Rossiter’s trademark practicality, beauty, and comfort.

George’s first motorized offering was a 14-foot fibreglass outboard, which he designed with a lifting pad at the stern of a deep-vee hull. This lifted the craft on top of the water, which coupled with steep deadrise at the bow, was intended to give the small boat much bigger capability than expected. Given a bleak kidney cancer diagnosis, George sold his company in the early 2000s, but that design and his attention to detail provided the foundation on which Rossiter expanded its line to 17-, 20- and 23-foot models. After being declared cancer free some years later, George is back on board as a consultant with the company that has carried on his legacy. Knowing all this history, I was excited to finally sit behind the wheel of Rossiter’s R20 Coastal Cruiser. Introduced in 2017, the 20’ 6” boat offers practicality in its size, but big water capability in its design. The R20 is a striking boat on the water, with traditional customizable colour options pairing well with classic lines and a tall windshield to keep boaters warm and dry late into our short season. Along with a beautiful mix of teak and stainless steel, my favourite aesthetic feature is the rope rub rail accented with flecks of the same navy blue and black of the hull of our test model. The windshield is pushed about as far forward as possible, carrying the R20’s eight-foot, three-and-a-half-inch beam right up to a short closed bow. This allows for room for nine riders behind the windshield and pushes weight forward to get the boat out of the hole and up on plane as quickly as possible. The cockpit layout is one of the most unique I’ve seen, with asymmetric organization enhancing sociability on board. I love the double-wide bolstered captain’s bench that allows for two to enjoy the helm together while underway, with a single seat on the opposite side.

Living room-style seating wraps around the aft cockpit with a removable bench on the port side opening room for a snack table to be inserted. Each seat cushion is premium upholstered and removable to access storage compartments, or a transom walkthrough in the case of the aft starboard side. Our test model’s 200HP Yamaha four stroke – one of many outboard power options – allows for room to walk about the platform or swim off either side, with a telescoping ladder recessed to starboard. There’s also a pop-up ski pylon hidden flush to the transom. A large ski locker runs up the floor, with open shelves in each gunwale, a large glovebox and plenty more storage inside the closed bow, which can be used as a daybed or outfitted with an optional head. The helm is well appointed and ergonomic, but a large empty teak space is begging for the 10” touchscreen chartplotter offered as an option. On the water, the R20 was nothing short of an absolute delight to drive. George Rossiter’s lifting pad design puts the boat up on plane as quickly as any outboard I’ve driven. With the throttle down, the boat feels solid at every point. The deep hull slices through waves with no rattling from any fixtures on board. Taking corners at speed, it stays level the whole way with no skipping or aspiration from the motor. The boat wanted to ride around 28 or 29 MPH, where we settled into an incredibly comfortable cruise. rossiterboats.com walkerspointmarina.com 1035 Marina Rd, Gravenhurst, Ontario

ROSSITER 20 COASTAL CRUISER MSRP* STARTING AT: $110,788 CAD with a Yamaha 200

Fuel Capacity: 65 US gals 246 L

Length:

20’ 6”

6.25 m

Base Engine / Drive: Yamaha

Beam:

8’3.5”

2.53 m

Engine HP: 150

Dry weight: 2,629 lbs (no engine) 1,193 kg (no engine) Draft:

1’1.6”

34.8 cm

Fuel Type: Gas Deadrise: 22

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// HEALTH & WELLNESS //

Michele Viner

and wellness.

is a Toronto writer who writes about people’s lives and believes we all have a story to tell. She is also an advocate for mental health

Reena Offers a Community a Place to Belong PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF REENA’S PLACE

New state-of-the-art residence for people who live with development disabilities, mental health challenges and physical disabilities.

Greena is Reena’s newest environmentally-aware program that sees residents producing their own fruits and vegetables at the Reena Community Farm.

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ulia Slater, 24, is very excited about moving into her new home. “I have plans,” she says. “I have things that I want to do there.”

That home is in the newly-built Lou Fruitman Reena Residence in Vaughan. Julia is one of 138 residents who will move into this state-of-the-art facility through Reena, a non-profit organization that works with people who live with development disabilities like autism, mental health challenges and physical disabilities. Reena was created in 1973 when a group of parents looked for an alternative to institutions for family members with special needs. Within several years, Reena began to receive provincial funding and the Reena Foundation was established. The Toby and Henry

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Battle Developmental Centre, Reena’s first stand-alone facility, opened its doors in 1999 and offered day and evening programs for children and adults with developmental disabilities, offering a health and wellness centre, sports centre, creative arts workshop, computer lab, greenhouse and library. Since those early days, says Sheila Lampert, Executive Director at Reena Foundation, the organization has grown to over 700 employees with an annual operating budget of $55 million and has never waned in their commitment to promote dignity, individuality, independence, and personal growth among their individuals. Working with valued community partners, Reena has continued to offer programming to thousands of people in the areas of supported employment and community participation.

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// HEALTH & WELLNESS //

They have also provided care for over 30 group homes and 127 supported independent living apartments with partners such as Meals on Wheels, Circle of Care and March of Dimes. “Inclusion through building community is one of Reena’s core values,” says Bryan Keshen, CEO at Reena, “and to that end, housing is critical. Currently the wait time for housing for people with severe needs in the GTA is over 40 years; there are simply more people coming into need than there are resources.” Keshen says the Lou Fruitman Reena Residence, made possible by a lead donation by the Lou Fruitman family as well as many other generous private donations and government assistance, represents a radical change for families who will know that their loved ones will be safe and cared for. Help will be available 24-7 if it is required, and tenants can live in the building and still work with the agencies supporting them; and more housing is to come. While in the preliminary stages of its next project in Toronto, Reena will be rebuilding on the site of two group homes currently operating on Elm Ridge Drive with the plan for 100 self-contained apartment units to house 150 individuals, together with programming and administration spaces. Reena residents are given the opportunity to participate in art programs, among many others.

“Inclusion is also critical because it is a pathway to belonging,” says Keshen. “When we belong somewhere we feel comfortable and cared for, and know that others want us to be part of their lives. The beauty of this kind of housing is that it is in the heart of community - you have access to libraries, to community centres, to synagogues and churches. You are part of a community, not separate from it.” For Julia, that community is truly what makes the residence home, and her list of plans is long. “I will be teaching dance,” she says, “because I have been dancing since I was five years old and there is a special room downstairs where I will be able to do that. I will also be working in the garden because there is a big garden outside where we can plant things. Plus, I will have my friend living close to me and that makes me so happy.”

The Lou Fruitman Reena Residence in Vaughan opened its doors in August 2021. Planning for the next building project in Toronto is underway.

reenafoundation.org slampert@reenafoundation.org

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// HEALTH & WELLNESS //

Aging in Place BY LESLEY KENNY PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF PARC DE PRINCE

We plan for so many things except the one we’re guaranteed to face: age-related physical limitations. More than just installing hardware store grab bars in the shower, a plan to age in place (stay in your own home) can be incorporated into the overall design of a new home.

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e move around our homes from room to room without a thought. We bend down dozens of times a day to pick up kids’ toys, dog bowls, and socks. We talk about hopping in the shower, racing down stairs, and jumping into bed; that is, those of us fortunate enough to be physically able.

But this too shall pass. Regardless of how committed we are to our health and fitness, things will eventually change. The majority of Ontario seniors live in their own home and intend to for as long as possible. But for how long will that be possible? Statistics Canada says that if we reach the age of 85, there’s a one-in-three chance we’ll need to move to a seniors’ residence where there’s nursing care and modified amenities to help keep us safe.

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Yet, the hardest lesson we’ve learned from the pandemic is that nursing homes and long-term care residences are no longer places where an acceptable level of health and safety is a given. A recent study by Ryerson University’s National Institute on Ageing reports that 70% of respondents over age 65 said the pandemic has changed their thinking – they’re now even more committed to staying in their own homes. According to the Government of Canada, “aging in place means having the health and social supports and services you need to live safely and independently in your home or your community for as long as you wish and are able.” A key part of being ‘able’ is to ensure that the physical layout and amenities of your home are now, or will be in the future, suitable to your changing physical needs. More than just installing hardware store grab bars in the shower, a plan to age in place (stay in your own home) can be incorporated into the overall design of a home.

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// HEALTH & WELLNESS //

Aging in place means having the health and social supports and services you need to live safely and independently in your home or your community for as long as you wish and are able. —Government of Canada

One of Parc de Prince’s newest homes, built in consultation with the owners who are still healthy and active.

Park home for as long as possible. As falls are the leading cause of injury when we get older (hip fractures being the most common), it’s important that our homes don’t literally trip us up. In this new-build, the driveway acts as a ramp to the side of house and the entire first floor has no steps. Floor transitions from room to room are seamless for barrier-free accessibility throughout the house. Although there are stairs between storeys, there’s an elevator from the basement to the top floor.

There are several bathrooms in this home, including this one with a luxurious deep tub, and others with wheelchair accessible showers and vanities.

Arnaud Marthouret, Director of Business Development for Parc de Prince luxury home builders, explains that to have the home we will need later in life, either a full gut job or comprehensive renovation is usually required. “Or there’s the option of a full new construction where you can build it the way you want,” he says. “These tend to be large, luxury homes because of the space needed for the modifications.”

As an example, much of the housing stock in the GTA’s older homes now includes narrow, cramped corridors – barely wide enough to accommodate a mobility device such as a walker, never mind a wheelchair. One of Parc de Prince’s newest homes, completed in 2019, was built in consultation with the owners, a couple in their 70s, both still healthy and active but planning to stay in their new Sherwood

Marthouret says it’s common for Parc de Prince to shore up basements and ensure an at-grade main floor (most homes in Toronto have at least one step at their main entrance). The advantage to a shored basement is that it increases the value of the house by a multiple of what it costs to do a shoring job. “So, if it costs $100,000 just to shore it down to make 12-foot basement ceilings, this would increase the value of the house by approximately $300k,” he explains. “What’s unique is that Parc de Prince has looked at it in a way that if you spend more money on a feature, you would get that money back multiple times.”

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>>

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// HEALTH & WELLNESS //

The house is spacious on its own, but it also makes circulating in a wheelchair possible.

The deeper basement includes a separate suite either for family to stay or, if necessary, a caregiver. According to Marthouret, “the circulation was made wider so the house feels spacious on its own, but it makes circulating in a wheelchair possible. To make it fully accessible you might have to eventually remove a few pieces of furniture, but all the infrastructure is already in place.” There are multiple bathrooms in this new home and some have accessible showers – which means either no or very small transitions to get into the shower, even using a wheelchair. The house includes “smart features” says Marthouret. Heating, cooling, lighting and alarms can all be controlled by one of many iPads around the house, or by cell phone.

Heating, cooling, lighting and alarms can be controlled by one of many iPads throughout.

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If we live long enough (which of course we plan to), most of us won’t be able to afford a luxury built-to-order home with multiple bathrooms and an elevator. But we can start to think about what we will need and how that might be possible.

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// PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES // TORONTO //

Toronto cityscape. Toronto, Ontario

Toronto is Canada’s largest and most diverse city. More than

Toronto’s many galleries and museums, especially The AGO

half of the residents who call Toronto home have roots in

and The ROM, are renowned for their stunning architectural

another country, and almost 200 different languages are spoken

presence – and for how long guests want to spend inside.

here. The result is a vibrant and dynamic culture in business,

Residents and visitors enjoy world-class theatre and concerts,

arts, sports and education. The city’s skyline is famous for the

and crowds fill the Scotiabank Arena, Rogers Centre and

CN Tower, now the world’s third tallest tower and the highest

BMO Field to cheer on their favourite local and international

outdoor walk on a building. The glass-floor observation deck offers

teams. The city’s downtown core boasts everything from

visitors stunning 360-degree views of the city, Lake Ontario and

distinctive boutique experiences to trendy fashions, and a

the Toronto Islands. But back on the ground Toronto is known

dazzling assortment of traditional and innovative restaurants.

as the city of neighbourhoods, like lakefront Beaches, historic

Throughout the urban centre, tree-lined streets, expansive

Chinatown and Little Italy. Year-round festivals celebrate the

parks and green ravines are enjoyed year-round for morning

city’s diversity and hospitality.

runs, leisurely strolls and family outings.

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER

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// PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES // TORONTO //

AN ELEVATED LIFESTYLE AWAITS YOU AT THE JACK 6 Jackes Avenue, Toronto

Contemporary luxury living in Toronto’s coveted Rosedale neighbourhood. Brand new suites masterfully upgraded with high end finishes. A selection of 3 styles with airy bright open floor plans complimented by large sliding doors, letting the fresh air breeze through the gorgeous principal rooms. This luxury building and stellar location is just steps from the boutique shops, restaurants and patios of Summerhill, the Rosedale Ravine trails connect from the newly revitalized David Balfour Park where Jackes avenue terminates – at beautiful green space -making this address one of Toronto’s most remarkable.

SUITE 204

1399 square feet, 2 bedroom, 2 ensuite bathrooms, 10 foot ceiling height. 1 powder room, 2 covered balconies, 2 parking, 2 lockers

Offering price: $2,028,990

SUITE 211

SUITE 306

Offering price: $1,498,990

Offering Price: $2,047,990

1191 square feet, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 juliette balconies, 1 locker, 10 foot ceiling height

1575 square feet, 2 bedrooms, 1 den, 2 bathrooms, 2 juliette balconies, 2 parking, 2 lockers

Additional upgrades in all 3 suites: interior doors, lighting, pre-wired for electric window coverings, wood flooring, kitchen cabinets, countertop and backsplash, heated floors – primary ensuite, floor tiles, wall tiles, cabinets and countertops in bathrooms. Contact us to discuss the suite that will take your lifestyle to a whole new level.

Michelle Jalsevac *

Direct: 416 301 4844 michelle@chestnutpark.com 58

Wynn Theriault *

Direct: 416 710 3370 wynn@chestnutpark.com

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// PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES // TORONTO //

MAGNIFICENT SUNSETS, STARGAZING, TWINKLING CITY LIGHTS, SPARKLING LAKE VIEWS, INCLUDED

LUXURY ESTATE IN KILBRIDE

Offered at: $5,500,000

Offered at: $5,498,000

6 Jackes Ave, Toronto

Now let’s talk about the rest: 2395 sq ft of luxury interior space; 2 bedrooms & a lrg den, 2 bthrms + powder rm. Custom herringbone hrdwd floors, cove lit ceilings, upgraded lighting, autodraperies. Primary bdrm is serene and private with an ensuite boasting a standalone tub, huge multi-directional shower, smart toilet, heated flr and an extra long dbl vanity. Surrounded by 2600 sq ft of terrace with lights, irrigation, Wolf bbq & gas fireplace. 3 sliding door walk-outs. total of 5000 sq ft of indoor/outdoor space. 2 car prkng on P1. massive storage rm. Valet/concierge. Michelle Jalsevac *

Direct: 416 301 4844 michelle@chestnutpark.com

Burlington

This Private Luxury Estate is located in the heart of Kilbride and is 45 minutes west of Toronto on the Escarpment. This beautiful home offers 5.65 acres, tennis courts, an indoor saltwater pool, and a carriage house. This home is truly the crown jewel of Kilbride, surrounded by luxury homes.

Eileen Lasswell **

Direct: 416 875 8338 eileen@eileenlasswell.com

PRIVATE OASIS IN LORNE PARK Mississauga

Offered at: $2,500,000

Eileen Lasswell **

Direct: 416 875 8338 eileen@eileenlasswell.com

A once in a lifetime opportunity to create your dream home on this 75.59 X 288 ft lot situated on a quiet cul de sac in Lorne Park. A gardener’s paradise offering a backyard oasis with mature landscaping, raised garden beds, and an inground saltwater pool. Enjoy the privacy this property provides.

SENSATIONAL EAST END HOME Woodbine Gardens

Offered at: $2,399,000 Beautiful custom built 2017, 4+1 bedroom, 4 bathroom home with over 4200 sq. ft. of living space. Large family room and basement with separate entrance, ideal inlaw suite. 50 x 156 ft private lot with lush gardens. Built-in 1 car garage.

YORKVILLE/BLOOR STREET LUXURY SUITE Toronto

Offered at: $5,250,000 Live And Entertain In This One-Of-A-Kind Luxury Suite With South Facing Terrace At The Exclusive Museum House Boutique Condo. Over 2500 Square Feet Of Elegance. 3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms. Private Elevator Access. Expansive And Bright Exposure Over the Royal Ontario Museum And University Of Toronto With Unobstructed Views Of Downtown. Debbie Penzo* Direct: 416 520 1828 debbiepenzo@chestnutpark.com Graeme McIntosh* Direct: 416 993 5080 graememcintosh@chesntutpark.com Natasha Penzo** Direct: 416 417 4009 natashapenzo@chestnutpark.com

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER

Eileen Lasswell **

Direct: 416 875 8338 eileen@eileenlasswell.com

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// PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES // TORONTO //

39 WHITNEY AVENUE

182 CRESCENT ROAD

Offered at: $8,495,000

Offered at: $5,750,000

North Rosedale

South Rosedale

172 ROXBOROUGH DRIVE

80 SUMMERHILL AVENUE*

Offered at: $5,495,000

Offered at: $4,495,000

North Rosedale

Summerhill

CUR ATI NG YOUR B EST LIFE * WE PROVIDED THE BUYER

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// PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES // TORONTO //

49 HEATH STREET WEST

61 ROXOROUGH DRIVE

Offered at: $4,395,000

Offered at: $4,249,000

Deer Park

North Rosedale

88B CRESCENT ROAD

90 GARFIELD AVENUE

Offered at: $3,995,000

Offered at: $2,850,000

South Rosedale

Moore Park

DEFI N ED LUXURY IN RE AL ESTATE * WE PROVIDED THE BUYER

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER

JAMES STRATHY WARREN

BRYAN WOOD

ALEX OBRADOVICH

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

James@sw3.ca C: 416.520.5704 sw3.ca

Bryan@sw3.ca C: 416.904.6046 sw3.ca

Alex@sw3.ca C: 416.803.4140 sw3.ca

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// PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES // TORONTO //

32 EDGEWOOD CRESCENT

312 ISLAND

Offered at: $2,549,000

Offered at: $1,389,000

North Rosedale

Temagami, Ontario

PH07-1 BELSIZE DRIVE*

25 SOHO STREET, TH 110

Offered at: $1,350,000

Offered at: $1,349,000

Davisville

Queen West

CUR ATI NG YOUR B EST LIFE * WE PROVIDED THE BUYER

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// PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES // TORONTO //

55 DELISLE AVENUE, 803

20 GLADSTONE AVENUE, 704*

Offered at: $1,249,000

Offered at: $1,079,000

Deer Park

Queen West

191 DUNDAS STREET EAST, 3512

8 SCOLLARD STREET, PH 208*

Offered at: $648,800

Offered at: $599,950

Garden District

Yorkville

DEFI N ED LUXURY IN RE AL ESTATE * WE PROVIDED THE BUYER

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER

JAMES STRATHY WARREN

BRYAN WOOD

ALEX OBRADOVICH

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

James@sw3.ca C: 416.520.5704 sw3.ca

Bryan@sw3.ca C: 416.904.6046 sw3.ca

Alex@sw3.ca C: 416.803.4140 sw3.ca

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// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // HUNTSVILLE // LAKE OF BAYS // ALMAGUIN //

Fall colours in Huntsville , Ontario

Huntsville // Lake of Bays, Huntsville, the largest town in the Muskoka region, is a gateway to Canada’s treasure, Algonquin Provincial Park. Home to 20,000, Huntsville is about 2 hours north of Toronto. Its abundance of clear lakes and thousands of kilometres of untouched wilderness make it a popular playground for those who appreciate nature and wide-open spaces, away from the bustle of city life. Your Chestnut Park Huntsville Real Estate Agent is ready to help narrow your search and find the perfect location for you. Art is a very important cultural feature of the town. Huntsville’s astonishing scenery has become a magnet for, and home to, many acclaimed visual artists. Famed artists like Tom Thomson and The Group of Seven painted in Huntsville. Throughout the town there are tributes to their renowned work. The Huntsville Art Society

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hosts many annual shows, exhibits and skills-sharing workshops. Whether you prefer to hike, bike, swim, spend the afternoon in a canoe, or fishing, there’s much to explore and experience in Huntsville’s great outdoors. Your Chestnut Park Huntsville Real Estate Agent will be pleased to show off this outdoor playground. The natural beauty of the area, and the seemingly unlimited recreational opportunities, make Huntsville a popular cottage destination. There are even a number of acclaimed summer camps for children. The Chain of Four interconnected lakes (Mary Lake, Lake Vernon, Peninsula Lake and Fairy Lake) offer more than 60 kilometres of boating and waterfront activities. Permanent residents and summer cottagers can boat right into downtown Huntsville.

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// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // HUNTSVILLE // LAKE OF BAYS // ALMAGUIN //

LUXURY LOG RETREAT ON 100 ACRES Huntsville/Lake of Bays & Almalguin

Offered at: $2,249,000

Welcome to “The Echoes”. If you are looking for a truly one of a kind, private compound, this is it. This grand custom designed 4100 sq.ft white pine home is situated on 100 acres of natural Northern Ontario forest, abutting 200 acres of crown land. With serene views of the valley and pond below, this log home exudes true Canadian pride. Locally designed, sourced, and built, the modern interior finishes were intended to contrast with the massive timber structure itself. Some of the timbers are 2ft in diameter. An open functional design brings the outdoors in with its picture windows, living space to dine and chill with walk out to deck overlooking the pond. The chef inspired kitchen includes a Sub-Zero fridge, Wolf double oven, Wolf range, Miele dishwasher, complimented with a generous island designed for entertaining. The home is fully wired with CAT6 completely automated, so if working from home is on your radar, you can do that here. Visit: www.theechoes.ca for more info.

Kim O’Grady **

Direct: 705 788 4894 kim@kim-ogrady.com

PRIVACY ON LAKE OF BAYS

MUSKOKA MODERN FARMHOUSE

Offered at: $3,495,000

Offered at: $1,249,000

Huntsville/Lake of Bays & Almalguin

Huntsville/Lake of Bays & Almalguin

Situated on just over 2 acres with 367 feet of owned waterfront, this lake house property presents privacy and a peaceful tranquility second to none. This location offers the best of both worlds, a protected bay area ideal for swimming with minimal boat traffic along with open lake views to the south. The shoreline is extremely private given the frontage and the location of the neighbour’s docks. 4 bed, 3 bath over 3000sq.ft. of living space. Kim O’Grady **

Direct: 705 788 4894 kim@kim-ogrady.com

Introducing this Muskoka Modern Farmhouse where literally every detail has been considered. Tucked away amongst the trees surrounded by 80 plus acres of protected township property backing onto Mary Lake, if privacy is important to you, it’s here. There is literally nothing for your to do here but move in. The curb appeal speaks for itself with extensive landscaping including a grand stone entrance, Muskoka granite pathways, patios, strategic lighting, shrubs and plants. 3 bed, 3 bath, open floor plan, attached garage & incredible Muskoka Room. Kim O’Grady **

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// MUSKOKA LIVING //

Muskoka Lakes Museum was founded in Canada’s centennial year, 1967. Since then it has worked to preserve and interpret local history, from First Nations and early settlement to resorts and cottaging.

Muskoka Lakes Museum BY ANDREW HIND PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF MUSKOKA LAKES MUSEUM

For more than five decades, Muskoka Lakes Museum has exhibited and interpreted the area’s history.

M

uskoka Lakes Museum has been a fixture in Bartleman Park, on an island in the heart of Port Carling, since 1967. But even prior to that date, the island had a notable past. In the 1920s and ’30s, it was a hive of activity.

A government-operated fish hatchery raised trout to restock lakes that had been depopulated by pollution from sawmills - impressive concrete foundations from the hatchery can still be seen on the island’s north waterline. In addition to the hatchery, there was also a building with a pool hall on the ground floor and a movie theatre above, a boat livery that rented canoes and rowboats to tourists,

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a lawn bowling green, and a baseball field. But by the 1960s, the glory days were long past. The island was reinvigorated on July 2, 1967, when Muskoka Lakes Museum opened to the public. The museum proved so successful that it necessitated several expansions over the ensuing years. The most notable addition came in 1982, when Hall House, a log cabin from Glen Orchard, was acquired. Painstakingly disassembled, removed from its original site and reconstructed on the island, the cabin has been furnished with artifacts to demonstrate the lifestyle of a typical Muskoka settler. Visitors should note the massive size of the logs— 60 centimetres (24 inches) thick and nine metres (30 feet) long.

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// MUSKOKA LIVING //

The Hall House is an original settler’s log home, authentically furnished to the 1870s.

“We have something for everyone at the museum, regardless of your interests,” enthuses Director Curator Courtney Provan. People who like boats are engrossed with our Marine Room, with its antique boats [including a Dippy, a rare example of a Disappearing Propeller Boat built by W.J. Johnston, who for a time had boat factory on the island] and outboard motors, the earliest dating to 1916. Others, like our Resort Room, is designed to look like stepping into the lobby of an early Muskoka resort. Everyone seems to love the log cabin.” The First Nations Gallery is dedicated to the region’s first inhabitants. A replica wigwam, two authentic birch-bark canoes and a range of artifacts demonstrate the traditional Ojibway way of life. The gallery is particularly appropriate in this location because traditional campgrounds were located just across the river. A highlight of the museum is the Marine Room, appropriate as Port Carling was once a hub of wooden boat building.

With the influx of tourists in the 20th century, the Ojibway found a steady market for their handcrafted baskets and moccasins. A thriving First Nations community still resides in Muskoka. “I love when people get excited about an exhibit and then share their own personal stories related to it,” says Provan. “This happens a lot in the Technology Room, where we display items used by farmers, loggers and cottagers in years past.” Muskoka Lakes Museum engages the community through special programming, including the Wednesday Night Speakers’ Series (moved outside in 2021 due to Covid), a rotating series of interactive events in the gardens every Thursday throughout the summer, and an open house on Thanksgiving weekend when admission is free. “Muskoka has a rich history,” Provan says, “and it’s all on display here.”

Hundreds of artifacts are displayed, from First Nations’ arrowheads to a homesteader’s cart.

mlmuseum.com 100 Joseph Street, Port Carling, Ontario 705 765 5367

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// MUSKOKA LIVING //

Matt Driscoll is a freelance writer and editor based out of Bracebridge, Ontario. He was a former editor with Muskoka Magazine and former photojournalist with the Bracebridge Examiner and Sioux Lookout Bulletin. Matt worked for several years in the museums field, both in Canada and internationally, before moving into full-time journalism more than a decade ago.

Forging Ahead

The Smithy Blends Tradition and Technology PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANIEL McPHEDRAN

Once as ubiquitous as the community general store, the role of the blacksmith’s shop has now been largely relegated to history textbooks.

S

uch is not the case in the small community of Glen Orchard, Muskoka, where Ryan Church still plies the same trade as his grandfather Ted did when he opened the Smithy in 1945. “He was literally the village blacksmith,” says Ryan. “Most of his work was fixing tools or things people needed around the farm but it grew and

changed over the years.” The products created by Ryan and fellow blacksmith Christopher Hodgkinson these days now run the gamut from delicately detailed metal work to durable and functional wrought iron works. The shop can trace its roots back to the Second World War when Ted was working at the steel mills in Hamilton. Following the war, he moved to the Muskoka area and started up his blacksmith shop just metres away from the current location. While the creations were strictly functional at first, as Muskoka grew to be an

The designs created by Ryan Church and Christopher

increasingly popular tourist destination much of the work became more decorative and suited to the needs of the area’s cottagers.

The Smithy now specializes in everything from fireplace doors

All of Ted’s three sons would eventually enter blacksmithing but it was Ryan’s father

and screens to chandeliers, railings,

Tom who took over the family business in the 1970s. Ryan’s sister Kathy Foreman helped

ornate metal gateways and even

with the business for many years and took over when her father passed away in 2001.

dock ladders.

That was also around the time Ryan decided to get involved in the business. The technology has also improved “The family connection was definitely a big draw for me but when I was younger my

significantly since the operation

father never pushed me into it. He always told me I can do whatever I want to do,”

began in 1945. Coal-fired forges,

says Ryan.

which took many hours to heat, have now been replaced by gas and

Sadly, Kathy passed away last winter of cancer and Ryan has done his best to try

propane versions which can heat the

and take over her role as well as blacksmithing.

metal much quicker.

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// MUSKOKA LIVING //

Hodgkinson at the Smithy run the gamut from delicately detailed metal work to durable and functional wrought iron works.

Plasma cutters and electric hammers also help to make the work much more efficient and effective. Nonetheless, the work of the blacksmith remains essentially the same as it did originally- metal is heated and manipulated to create new strong and useful products. With business busier than ever at The Smithy, despite the pandemic, it’s safe to assume that the sparks will continue to fly and the sound of metal against metal will continue to ring out in Glen Orchard much as it has for 76 years. Following World War II, Ryan’s grandfather moved to Muskoka and started up his blacksmith shop in Glen Orchard.

The Smithy now specializes in everything from fireplace doors and screens to chandeliers, railings, ornate metal gateways and even dock ladders.

thesmithy.ca @thesmithyltd 4029 Hwy 169, Glen Orchard, Ontario info@thesmithy.ca // 1 888 SMITHY 1

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// PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES // SOUTHERN GEORGIAN BAY //

Blue Mountain Village, The Blue Mountains, Ontario. Photo by Taylor Nullmeyer

Collingwood has great warmth and a sense of hospitality. This community is rich in history and culture and is truly an active lifestyle community. Located on the southern shores of Georgian Bay, its waterfront provides endless opportunities.

The Blue Mountains scenic area offers an abundance of recreational activities for all four seasons, most notably winter. The Village at Blue Mountain has an array of boutiques and stores all within walking distance of the largest ski resort in Ontario.

Wiarton is located at the western end of the scenic shores of Colpoys Bay, an inlet off Georgian Bay on the Bruce Peninsula. Defined by the

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rugged limestone cliffs of the Niagara Escarpment, Wiarton is known for the Wiarton Willie Festival, in February each year.

Owen Sound is located on the southern shores of Georgian Bay. A true gateway, enjoy the waterfront trail system, farmer’s market and, in the winter, access the trail system, thousands of snowmobile trails and cross-country skiing areas.

Meaford is a four-season destination that has it all. The quaint and charming historic downtown district offers live theatre and concerts, fresh local food, unique shopping, nature at your doorstep, a beautiful harbour and so much more.

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// PORTFOLIO OF EXCEPTIONAL CHESTNUT PARK PROPERTIES // SOUTHERN GEORGIAN BAY //

WELCOME TO “LE COQ SUR MER” IN DOWNTOWN COLLINGWOOD Southern Georgian Bay/Collingwood

Offered at: $3,098,000

The beauty is in the details of this “URBAN FRESH” architecturally designed unique residence. The home encapsulates modern luxury and craftsmanship in a tranquil and Zen setting. Situated in a prime location, this impressive contemporary property with glass façade is designed to showcase the incredible views from all the main rooms of the home. Vast windows and doors flood the rooms with natural light, integrating the outside with the indoors. Immaculately designed with fine attention to detail throughout, this home offers luxury and comfort in equal measure, boasting impressive high-ceilinged architecture, vast windows flooding the rooms with natural light, spacious living areas inside and flourishing gardens and landscaping with further entertaining areas outside. This serene and elegant in-town home is undoubtedly one of the finest dwellings in the area, offering every conceivable convenience for the perfect lifestyle, exceeding all expectations. EXCLUSIVE.

Barb Picot * Direct: 705 444 3452 picot@rogers.com

Ron Picot * Direct: 705 446 8580 rpicot@rogers.com

4-SEASON SOUTHERN GEORGIAN BAY LIFESTYLE

PRESTIGIOUS GEORGIAN WOODLANDS IN CRAIGLEITH

Offered at: $2,900,000

Offered at: $2,125,000

Southern Georgian Bay/Blue Mountains

Skiing, golfing, biking & hiking almost at your doorstep! Exquisite post & beam residence located between the Georgian Bay Club & Georgian Peaks Ski Club. Over 5,000 sq. ft. with 4 Bedrooms & 3 ½ Baths including a finished Recreation Room & Gym. 10 mins to Blue Mountain Barb Picot * Direct: 705 444 3452 picot@rogers.com Village skiing. MLS®40154664 * Ron Picot Direct: 705 446 8580 rpicot@rogers.com

Southern Georgian Bay/Blue Mountains

Room for the whole family and more in this 7 Bedroom, 4 Bath home just a very short drive to Alpine, Craigleith, TSC and Blue Mountain ski hills. Extremely well-built residence with over 4,300 sq. ft. of finished living space. Views of Georgian Bay & the Nottawasaga Lighthouse. Barb Picot * Direct: 705 444 3452 picot@rogers.com MLS®40154610 * Ron Picot Direct: 705 446 8580 rpicot@rogers.com

IMMACULATE RESIDENCE IN CRAIGLEITH

VIEWS OF THE PEAKS AND GEORGIAN BAY

Offered at: $1,949,000

Offered at: $1,579,000

Southern Georgian Bay/Blue Mountains

CRAIGLEITH - 3,226 sq. ft. home with 6 Bedrooms & 4 Baths! Available to enjoy this ski season with your family! Walk to Georgian Bay (Northwinds Beach) and the Georgian Trail for hiking and biking. A skier’s paradise located only 5 mins to Blue Mountain Village shops & * Barb Picot Direct: 705 444 3452 picot@rogers.com restaurants. MLS®40163409 * Ron Picot Direct: 705 446 8580 rpicot@rogers.com

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER

Southern Georgian Bay/Meaford

Perched on the Escarpment above Thornbury is this 4 Bedroom, 3,823 sq. ft. Bungalow on a 2.3 acre estate lot! Landscaped grounds, pond, walking trail, large deck, hot tub, sauna and views to the Peaks Ski Club. Open concept Living/Dining Room with a wood-burning Barb Picot * Direct: 705 444 3452 picot@rogers.com fireplace. MLS®40167867 * Ron Picot Direct: 705 446 8580 rpicot@rogers.com

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Andrew Hind is a freelance writer specializing in travel, food, lifestyle and history. His work has appeared in dozens of periodicals, and he is the author of 25 books. Andrew lives in Bradford, Ontario.

Pressing Matters: Duxbury Cider Company

Flavours of Autumn, Distilled and Available Year-Round BY ANDREW HIND PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF DUXBURY CIDER CO.

Fall isn’t truly underway until the first bushels of shiny red apples have been picked. But for James McIntosh, apples are a year-round obsession. He sees an apple and his mind begins to conjure up new flavour profiles for the ciders he lovingly crafts as owner of Meaford’s Duxbury Cider Company.

Inspired by a visit to Normandy, France’s cradle of hard cider, James McIntosh decided to found Duxbury Cider Company in 2007 on a family farm in Meaford.

We’re still a relatively small cidery, but we make a superior product,” he explains. Though Duxbury Cider Co. is only a decade old, McIntosh began thinking about cider and its business potential much earlier. “I went to France at age 14 for D-Day anniversary celebrations. Normandy, where the landings took place, is the heart of French cider making. I sampled cider and caught the bug,” he recalls. Raised in Toronto, McIntosh spent summers on his grandmother’s Meaford farm, on Duxbury Sideroad, in the heart of apple country. Why, he wondered, wasn’t anyone in Meaford making hard cider?

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“Our ciders are a real taste of the region because we use only locally grown apples, including many heritage varieties,” says Duxbury’s founder James McIntosh.

After moving to Meaford full-time in 2005, McIntosh decided to fill that niche and began experimenting, using a borrowed apple press and knowledge gleaned from books. After several years of slowly building his skill, gaining an understanding of the fermentation process, and planting his own orchard, he founded Duxbury Cider Co. in 2007. “Our ciders are a real taste of the region because we use only locally grown apples, including many heritage varieties,” McIntosh says proudly. Not all hard ciders are made equal. There is as great a range in cider as with wine or beer. Cider is differentiated by the type of apple used, the strain of yeast (“using yeast is an artform, not a science,” explains McIntosh), whether one ferments at high or low temperature, and what additives go in during the blending process. “We do a lot more experimenting here in North America than they do in the old country,” says McIntosh, referring to European cider-making countries. “ They are more traditional because the market is more mature, but we can play more.”

The Canadian hard cider market is young and evolving, allowing Duxbury the freedom to innovate and experiment.

That freedom to experiment has enabled Duxbury Cider Co. to produce some unique flavour profiles. Take the Honey Rose Petal Cider, for example. The honey flavour is strong up front, balancing the heavier acidity of the apple, but followed by the delicate suggestion of rose petals. It’s an easy drink, the kind you bring on a summer picnic with friends. Ditto for the new kid on the block, Hopped on Honey, a collaboration with First Nations’ Makwa Makers Honey. Just as smooth, it’s an even smoother and sweeter drink that perfectly balances its three main flavours – honey, hops, and apples. McIntosh remains very proud of Heritage 1650, the first cider he produced for sale. And for good reason; it’s an excellent drink, dry and crisp with an intense flavour of heritage apples. It’s delightfully traditional. You can see the process of making cider and sample for yourself by visiting the cidery, open by reservations 12-4 on Saturdays, year-round. Duxbury ciders are also sold in the LCBO, grocery stores, and through the company’s online store. “Cider is growing in popularity,” says McIntosh, pointing to two primary reasons for its appeal. “It’s a really refreshing drink, more thirst-quenching than beer. And it’s gluten-free, so people who can’t drink beer can drink cider.” Duxbury Cider Company distills the flavour of autumn into a can – and offers it year-round.

Meaford has long been the heart of apple country, leading McIntosh to wonder why no one was making hard cider there. Duxbury Cider Company became the first.

theduxburyciderco.ca @DuxburyCider cider@theduxburyciderco.ca 265659 25 Sideroad (Duxbury Road), Meaford, Ontario 416 705 1404

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Collingwood is a diverse and inclusive community with a vibrant LGBTQ+ population.

Doing the Community Proud:

The Rainbow Club of Southern Georgian Bay BY ANDREW HIND PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF MYCOLLINGWOOD.CA

The face of Collingwood, and indeed the entire Southern Georgian Bay region, is changing. We’re a dynamic, diverse and inclusive community with a vibrant LGBTQ+ population,” says Andrew Siegwart, President of the Blue Mountain Village Association. “This evolution began several years ago as people began to embrace the appeal of small-town living, but it gained pace in the last year-and-a-half as city dwellers sought rural refuge in the face of the Covid pandemic.”

“We thought it was extremely important to create a pride event in Collingwood to both heighten awareness and as a means of raising funds for our projects,” explains Siegwart. “Our inaugural event was supposed to be 2020, but Covid had other plans. We were able to move ahead with a pride festival this year, but we’re still in a pandemic so we had to adapt and change the format to be safe.”

What was missing on the face of this changing demographic was an organization addressing the needs of the LGBTQ+ community. In 2017, Siegwart filled this void by co-founding the Rainbow Club of Southern Georgian Bay with a goal of providing advocacy and awareness, hosting social events, and developing memberfocused programs.

A street festival was clearly out. Instead Collingwood Pride 2021, which ran July 15-18, was primarily a digital event with speakers from across Canada. While many participants were from the southern Georgian Bay region, Siegwart noted people logging in from as far away as Windsor and eastern Ontario.

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In addition, many local businesses put on events, essentially serving as the stages for the festival. And the 3-D CWOOD sign that welcomes visitors to town was lit up in pride colours in symbolic support of the event.

The Rainbow Club of Southern Georgian Bay was founded in 2017, with a goal of providing advocacy and awareness, hosting social events, and developing member-focused programs.

Collingwood Pride is an exciting celebration of LGBTQ+ pride. The 2021 Pride was largely a virtual event, but organizers are looking forward to a more traditional event in 2022.

Siegwart is proud of Collingwood Pride and looks forward to the possibility of a more traditional event in 2022. “ There’s great value in a pride festival, not just to participants but to the community at large,” Siegwart asserts. “Economically, the Southern Georgian Bay region is on a major path of growth. We need to recruit the best of the best to come here; talent acquisition is vital if we want our community and businesses to thrive. Events like Pride, and organizations like the Rainbow Club, serve as great recruiters because they show the community is open and inclusive and a great place to live.” A man of ambition and infinite ideas, Siegwart is excited about Collingwood Pride and where it may go. But he also has bigger things in store. “We’re in the process of developing a strategic plan for the organization. We want to do much more to assist our LGBTQ community than just host social events,” he says. “We want to offer resources for the queer community, to assist parents whose young teens are coming out, we want to build better relationships with mental health providers. And more.” The Rainbow Club is focused on ensuring a better, more inclusive Southern Georgian Bay. The goal of advocacy isn’t solely the betterment of the LGBTQ+ community, but the enrichment and prosperity of the wider community. A Southern Georgian Bay everyone can be proud of.

The Rainbow Club is focused on ensuring a better, more inclusive Southern Georgian Bay.

therainbowclub.ca

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To Market We Go:

The Owen Sound Farmers’ Market BY ANDREW HIND PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF OWEN SOUND FARMERS’ MARKET

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Originally an open-air market, it’s been indoors since 1936. Until recently. ichard J. Thomas is a hard man to pin down. He’s a man of many hats – city councilor, videographer, and author of local history books and the acclaimed D.B. Murphy mystery novels – so he’s always on the go. But Thomas will always take time out of his schedule to chat about the Owen Sound & District Farmers’ Market.

An enthusiastic patron ever since moving to Owen Sound 30 years ago, Thomas currently sits as Market Manager and is passionate about the market and its role in the community.

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“The Farmers’ Market is a real asset to Owen Sound, an economic driver, and it has been for almost as long as the town has existed the Farmers’ Market has been in continuous business for 176 years,” he explains. Originally, the market was open-air, but it’s been indoors since 1936, occupying the historic and endlessly charming circa 1868 Waterworks Building. While browsing from vendor to vendor, take a moment to notice the rustic market tables – original to the market when it moved indoors, they speak to the history of this community institution.

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Vendors sell more than just fruit and vegetables. There is maple syrup, baked goods, and all manner of artistry, from textiles and paintings to pottery and soap.

Of course, the real stars of the show are the goods for sale. Food vendors include bakers, butchers, fish (Howell’s Fish is the longest-serving vendor), and locally grown vegetables and fruit. You won’t find apples and peaches like these in regular grocery stores. Supermarkets select their fruit for shelf life and uniformity over flavour, and most are imported from overseas. You’ll taste the difference. Owen Sound’s artistic community is well-represented as well. Here you’ll find everything from textiles and paintings to pottery, jewelry, beeswax , cards, soap, books, knitting and crocheting. Thomas notes that Owen Sound & District Farmers’ Market Association had to be creative and flexible in Covid-plagued 2020 to ensure the market’s streak of years in continuous operation didn’t stop at 174. “We were closed for months, during which time food vendors transitioned to farm gate sales to stay afloat. We assisted them by launching an online presence and webstore, becoming something of a virtual market,” Thomas explains. “We’ve had to be adaptive since then as well. The pandemic forced us to become an outdoor market again, at least in fair weather. The challenge came in the winter when we had to return indoors. Restrictions limited us to only 20 vendors at a time, so for the six weeks before Christmas - an important time for vendors - we did Double Market Days, with food vendors until noon and craft vendors in the afternoon. We anticipate doing that again this year as well.”

Thomas knows the reason for the recent success: “If we’ve learned anything from Covid,” he says, “we’ve learned the importance of fresh, local food sources.”

Locals have long embraced the Market, but an increasing number of cottagers and tourists are as well. In years past, it was unusual to reach 1,000 patrons on market day. This year, the market has seen that number every week. Word is getting out: the Owen Sound & District Farmers’ Market is something special.

Hours: 8-12:30 Saturdays (except during Double Market Days) Location: 88 8th Street East, Owen Sound, Ontario (behind Owen Sound City Hall) Phone: 519 371 3433 owensoundfarmersmarket.ca

The Farmers Market has been a part of Owen Sound for 176 years, selling fresh local producer. “If we’ve learned anything from Covid,” says Richard J. Thomas, Manager of the Owen Sound & District Farmers’ Market. “we learned the importance of fresh, local food sources.” The Market delivers.

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The Grist Mill is a lively public gathering place open to the public four days a week where guests have a drink, enjoy food from pop-up caterers, and listen to live music.

The Grist Mill

in Consecon PEC BY ANDREW HIND PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE GRIST MILL

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Equal parts charming history and warm hospitality, the Grist Mill is a bar and event venue like no other in Prince Edward County.

rince Edward County, with its appealing old-fashioned feel, scenic shorelines, and bucolic scenes of apple orchards and country lanes, exerts a nostalgic pull. Combine these elements with award-winning wineries and excellent food and it’s easy to see why people are increasingly concluding that the County is the ideal place to exchange wedding vows. The Grist Mill, a characterful Consecon bar that hosts weddings and events, encompasses the best of Prince Edward County – an impressive historic structure (as the name implies, a former grist mill) set in a sleepy village with charming views overlooking a gurgling stream.

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It’s postcard picture perfect. And yet, there’s a liveliness to the building – thanks to the sunny disposition of owner Brittiny Blodgett and her funky interior design aesthetics - that reminds us the Grist Mill is as much a part of the present as the past. “At its core the building is wonderfully rustic and charming, but I added a modern, eclectic vibe inside to make it a funky space ideal for the events I like to host,” says Blodgett, a professional wedding planner and mom to a three-year-old daughter. Blodgett remembers falling in love with the building the moment she saw it.

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As the name implies, The Grist Mill was an operational grist mill built in 1932 - the third mill to stand on the site dating back to 1808.

Brittiny Blodgett (not pictured above) recognized a gaping hole in Prince Edward County’s cultural scene and aims to fill it. “I want The Grist Mill to be a safe place for queer people to congregate, socialize and enjoy drag events,” she explains.

“I came upon it by accident,” she recalls. “At the time, I was looking for a workspace where I could collaborate with other wedding planners and save the cost of rent, but the realtor showed me the mill and I was smitten. I always wanted a wedding venue because that’s what I do, and I instantly knew that it would serve as both a great social gathering spot and a cool place for weddings. It has tons of character.” That character is owed to the building’s rich history. A grist mill has stood on this spot, anchoring the village, since 1808. The original mill burned to the ground in 1882. A replacement burned as well, gutted in 1931. Rebuilt once more, it’s this third mill that Blodgett assumed just before Covid hit in March, 2020. The pandemic has been a challenge, costing Blodgett her first summer. “It gave me a lot of time to renovate,” she says philosophically. “I’ve always been a designer, so I did a lot of the interior work myself. The mill still has history, but I modernized the building with warm colours, neon signs, wallpaper and funky décor so that it’s now fun and lively.” The Grist Mill is a lively public gathering place. “We’re open to the public four days a week where guests have a drink, enjoy food from pop-up caterers, and listen to live music,” she explains. Blodgett recognized a gaping hole in Prince Edward County’s cultural scene and aims to fill it. “I also want it to be a safe place for queer people to congregate, socialise and enjoy drag events,” she explains. “As someone who is queer, I knew it was badly needed.”

The Grist Mill is a characterful, charming location for weddings. Brittiny Blodgett , an experienced wedding planner, prefers small, intimate functions, so limits guests to 60.

The building is also available to rent for workshops or photoshoots and, of course, Blodgett offers the building up for weddings. Though the mill’s loft is cavernous, Blodgett prefers small, intimate functions, so limits guests to 60. With vision and flair, Brittiny Blodgett has revived the Grist Mill to ensure it remains an anchor in Consecon. thegristmill.ca 9 Division Blvd, Consecon, Ontario @the_grist_mill thegristmillpec@gmail.com 613 876 4656

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Bushels of Fun

at Campbell’s Orchards BY ANDREW HIND PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF CAMPBELL’S ORCHARDS

Over the past half century, June and Murray Campbell and family developed an overgrown farm into one of Ontario’s premier apple orchards and an autumn family destination.

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s far as autumn rituals go, I would say that visiting an apple orchard on a crisp fall day is as American as eating apple pie except, well, we’re in Canada. But the sentiment holds true: we love visiting orchards with baskets in hand and picking bushel after bushel from trees heavily laden with fruit. It’s a sweet tradition that embraces the best of the changing seasons.

Prince Edward County is blessed with several noteworthy orchards, each filled with row after row of fragrant apple trees. But those in the know suggest Campbell’s Orchards is among the best. The farm was founded in 1969 by June and Murray Campbell, self-taught farmers who transformed what was then a run-down farm into a thriving business. Fifty years later, the farm is run by their son Colin and wife Dianne. They grow raspberries, strawberries, various vegetables, and plump orange pumpkins ready for transformation into Jack-o’-Lanterns. But they are best known for their apples. Campbell’s Orchards says that it offers the most diverse selection of apples in the region by at least a country mile. That may not be an idle boast – there are 25 varieties growing fat and juicy on the trees, ranging from the standard MacIntosh and Northern Spy to the more obscure, like Snow Sweet (great for baking), Paula Red (one of the earliest apples, ripening in August), and Ginger Gold (a pale-yellow fruit). “Apple varieties tend to rise and fall in popularity – there’s always the hot variety of the moment,” Dianne explains. “Honey Crisp is trendy right now. It flies off the shelf, even at $32 for a 10lb bag. It’s hard to grow, doesn’t store well, and produces bi-annually, but boy does it taste great.”

Fall isn’t truly underway until the first bush of apples has

The pandemic has been a blessing and a curse for the farm. 2020 was a record year which Dianne attributes to people being wary of shopping in grocery stores, craving local produce, and embracing any safe outdoor activity available. But for Campbell’s Orchards it also meant investing heavily in an online store front, difficulty finding staff, and a myriad of other hurdles. “We were so focused on making it all work, on creating a great experience, that we almost didn’t feel the stress last year,” Dianne explains. “Our focus, as always, is on our customers and ensuring they enjoy their visit here.” There’s a lot to love about Campbell’s Orchards. Wagon rides, a playground and barn yard animals to entertain children, a bucolic setting under wideopen County skies, and a store laden with delights.

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Fields at Campbell’s Orchards are dotted with plump orange pumpkins, ready for transformation into Jack-o-Lanterns.

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been picked. For many, a trip to Campbell’s Orchards is a sweet annual tradition.

Dazzling colours and late-season sun are two of the autumn season’s greatest rewards, and where better to experience it than at a farm?

Not surprisingly, there’s freshpressed sweet apple cider (“pressed on-site by our daughter Amelia, and her husband Matt,” explains Dianne), as well as home-baking, preserves, locally milled flour, and vegetables. Son John has created a small sugarbush, and the maple syrup he makes when not flying Hercules transports for the Royal Canadian Air Force can be purchased here as well.

been a remarkable one for Campbell’s Orchards. I ask Dianne the secret to the farm’s success. “We offer apples you won’t find in a grocery store and a fun day outside in a wonderful setting – that’s the appeal of going to an apple orchard,” explains Dianne. “But the real secret is our focus on creating memorable experiences. ‘Go the Extra Smile’ is my motto, and we live by that.”

From a picnic table by the side of the road to the County’s premier orchard, the last half century has

Location: 1633 County Road 3, Carrying Place campbellsorchards.com 613 962 3751

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Chestnut Park’s New Uxbridge Office

A Successful Grand Opening Celebration! BY LESLEY WILKINS PHOTOGRAPHY BY TAYLOR NULLMEYER

Following an absolutely torrential downpour at midday on September 9, 2021, the clouds parted, the skies cleared, and the folks from Chestnut Park went to work setting the stage for the grand opening celebration for the new Chestnut Park Uxbridge office.

Uxbridge Mayor Dave Barton performs the ribbon cutting, proudly welcoming Chestnut Park to Uxbridge. Also pictured Chestnut Park Director of Marketing Maria Neves, Chestnut Park Uxbridge Realtors® Leah Sprott, Jennifer Caron, Maureen Gilleece and Angela Wood, Chestnut Park CEO and President Chris Kapches, Chestnut Park Uxbridge Realtor® Sorrelle Golomb, Uxbridge Deputy Mayor Willie Popp, Ontario Ward 3 Councillor Bruce Garrod, and Rochelle Rondon of Chestnut Park Toronto.

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roving to this quietly sophisticated town that matching extraordinary homes with exceptional people isn’t their only talent, at 4:30pm on the dot the Chestnut Park team pulled out all the stops and the libations began to flow – featuring locally brewed craft beers and small batch ciders from the Second Wedge Brewing Company and Slabtown Cider, paired with an array of artisanal cheeses from The Passionate Cook’s fromagerie. Admired restaurateurs Don Andrews and Niki Filntissis were there, ready to ensure that guests were well fed and enjoyed a true taste of what makes dining in Uxbridge special. Andrews treated guests to a taste of Tin Restaurant’s original bruschetta blend of seasonal herbs and fresh vegetables, paired

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with white or red wine, and finishing with his famous carrot cake. Across the patio Filntissis served up a duo of flavourful canapés from Urban Pantry’s catering menu - poached shrimp and lemon habanero aioli with soya glaze on a skewer for easy eating, and seared yellowfin tuna on Montgomeryshire Orchards cucumber slices topped with guacamole, pickled ginger mignonette, and Hulshof Farm purple kalahari microgreens. Set to the perfectly matched instrumentals of local musician Brian Wride, attendees were invited to tour the welcoming new office space – generously decked out in works by Uxbridge Studio Tour artists and designed to provide Chestnut Park clients and agents with the privacy and comfort they need when focusing on the business of buying and selling prime properties.

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Delightful hand crafted bird sculptures by Uxbridge Studio Tour artist Anja Kooistra. Always proud to support artists, Chestnut Park is the 2021 Title Sponsor of the ever popular Uxbridge Studio Tour annual art event.

Chestnut Park’s newest office opened this September in downtown Uxbridge.

Chestnut Park’s Chris Kapches LLB, President and CEO, and Broker of Record was on hand to meet locals and celebrate this newest chapter in the ongoing expansion of the Chestnut Park family. Asked why Chestnut Park is a great fit for Uxbridge, Kapches points to the extraordinary growth that Uxbridge has seen over the past decade - not only in the number of fine homes but also in the community’s transformation from a sleepy rural town to an increasingly sophisticated hub for people looking to live in a beautiful setting equipped with outstanding equestrian facilities, urban style shops and eateries, world-class golfing, ski hills and access to a stunning network of trails – all within an easy commute to Toronto. Mayor Dave Barton performed the evening’s ribbon-cutting, pronouncing the new office open and warmly welcoming the Chestnut Park team to town. “When Chestnut Park came to me, I knew right away that they were a perfect fit for Downtown Uxbridge. Their community focus, expertise and style will be a great addition to the real estate landscape - matching our area’s finest homes and properties with buyers who will appreciate everything this vibrant community has to offer.”

Peerage Realty Corporate Development Associate Luis Prozzo, Chestnut Park COO Nicolle Scavuzzo, Chestnut Park CEO and President Chris Kapches and Peerage Realty CEO Gavin Swartzman chat with guests and enjoy local art , food and drinks, while celebrating the grand opening of Chestnut Park’s new Uxbridge office.

chestnutpark.com 9 Main St. S. Uxbridge, Ontario homes@chestnutpark.com 905 852 0002 @chestnutparkhomes

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Blue Heron Books

A Passion for Books That Goes Beyond Four Walls BY LESLEY WILKINS PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY BLUE HERON

For booklovers and casual shoppers alike, walking in to Blue Heron Books in the heart of historic downtown Uxbridge is like falling into a warm and comforting embrace.

The Handmade Market is held at Blue Heron each holiday season, allowing locals to shop beautiful handcrafted gifts created by local artists.

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ith its comfy leather chairs and creaky wooden floors, the relaxed traditional vibe could lure you into believing you had stepped back into a time before the emotionally draining days of covid lockdowns and online retail therapy.

You won’t encounter any high-pressure sales tactics here. The carefully curated selection of books is beautifully arranged on handcrafted shelves that span the length of the store, quietly inviting visitors to take their time and browse. While happy to give visitors the freedom to explore the store at their own pace, Blue Heron’s staff are always on-hand to answer questions, or suggest a great read if leisurely perusing the shelves isn’t on your schedule. Blue Heron Books offers visitors a relaxed and thoroughly enjoyable experience.

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But if charming ambiance and outstanding selection are the cornerstone of this booklover’s paradise how did Blue Heron Books manage to ride the storm of covid shutdowns that kept devoted customers shut outside in the cold? The secret may just be the boundless resourcefulness, creativity and sheer bull-headed determination of owner Shelley Macbeth and her team of dedicated staff. When lockdown meant closing Blue Heron’s doors, Macbeth dug her heels in, rallied her team and got to work wrapping, mailing and driving books from one corner of the township to the other as online sales flooded in. Even Uxbridge’s Mayor, Dave Barton, signed up as part of the team, dropping off deliveries across the area.

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/ UXBRIDGE LIVING //

Macbeth’s ability to meet challenges head-on and find creative solutions isn’t something new that emerged with covid. In fact, she has always had a knack for thinking outside of the traditional bookseller’s box - a skill that has twice won her beloved store the Canadian Booksellers Association’s Libris Award for ‘Best Bookseller in Canada.’ While on the surface Blue Heron Books may appear to be simply a charming local bookshop with an unusual passion for local legend Lucy Maud Montgomery, there is a vast and complex machinery in action behind the scenes that has everything to do with Macbeth’s passion for books and little to do with the store itself. Recognizing long before covid that being an award-winning bookseller required more than a beautiful store, Macbeth and her team embarked on a multifaceted bookselling adventure that would take Blue Heron Books far outside the four walls of the store into schools, libraries, theatres, restaurants and event venues across Durham region, Toronto, York and beyond.

Shelley Macbeth Blue Heron Books – Award-winning bookseller and owner of Blue Heron Books.

Supporting authors as they travelled through the area promoting their books, providing invaluable insights into the latest children’s and YA books to teacher librarians, as well as hosting and co-hosting live events with some of the world’s most admired writers - including Jane Urquhart, Michael Ondaatje, chef Michael Smith and children’s favourite Dav Pilkey - soon became as much a part of Blue Heron Books as the store itself. In 2019, Macbeth and her right-hand woman Rebecca Sanger launched their inaugural Book Drunkard Literary Festival, an unprecedented success that featured live sellout events as varied as an evening with John Irving and a Skinnamarink singalong with Sharon and Bram, to name just two. Undeterred by 2020’s covid restrictions, Macbeth and Sanger took The Book Drunkard Literary Festival online to the delight of book lovers across Canada and once again turned a challenge into an opportunity to reach an even greater audience. Now, having seen 2021’s summer event season draw to a close with Newfoundland’s phenomenally successful Writers of Woody Point Music and Literary Festival, where Blue Heron Books holds the prestigious role of official event bookseller, Macbeth is back in her beloved store and up to her elbows in novels and bookings as she and Sanger charge ahead with the finishing touches for this fall’s Book Drunkard Literary Festival. This year’s festival, featuring Lucy Black, Alice Hoffman, Chris Hadfield, Linden Macintyre, Michelle Good and many more, promises to be as much a success as the previous two years.

Blue Heron’s children’s section is an inviting space for kids of all ages to browse and find the perfect book.

blueheronbooks.com 62 Brock Street West, Uxbridge, Ontario shelley@blueheronbooks.com 905 852 4282 @blueheronbooks @bookdrunkardfest

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// KINGSTON LIVING //

History Squared BY MATT DRISCOLL PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARRET ELLIOTT PHOTOGRAPHY

Springer Market Square has served Kingston for more than 200 years.

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here are few markets in North America that can boast a history as lengthy and lively as Springer Market Square in Kingston. Records indicate the site was used as a marketplace as far back as 1800, and today the site remains a linchpin of social life and community spirit in Kingston.

Located at the corner of King and Brock Streets, the waterfront area beside Springer Market Square is known to have been a regular stopping point for both First Nations people and early settlers. The first known structures situated in the Square vicinity date from the French occupation of the area in the 1700s. Military earthworks associated with Fort Frontenac extended east to west across the centre of the Square during the period of the Seven Years War (1756-63). The Market Square was included in the original town plans, which were created in 1784. On July 8 1792, the market was the site which Lieutenant-Governor Sir John Graves Simcoe chose as the location to proclaim the Constitutional Act which established Upper Canada as a separate jurisdiction. By 1811 a list of market regulations had been published and the square became a centre of commerce for the Kingston area. At that time Kingston was home to roughly 1,000 residents in addition to the British garrison. Virtually all of the commerce in town was conducted at the market square. Starting in 1812, the market was also home to the town sentinel, a t-shaped barracks which

Springer Market Square has been enjoyed as a

was dismantled in 1831. According to first-hand accounts recorded from those early days, the market was something of a ramshackle affair with vendors operating out of flimsy wooden structures known as shambles. Goods for sale included everything from venison shot by local hunters, to freshly caught fish, wood for heating, and iron nails. The Market Square was ravaged by fires twice in the 19th century - once in 1840 as part of a larger fire that destroyed much of downtown Kingston including City Hall, and again in 1865. During the mid-1900s, activity at the market slowed down as more space was needed to accommodate bigger roads, grocery stores won over consumers and health regulations created stumbling blocks for vendors. The market was redeveloped in 2008 and at that time it was renamed Springer Market Square to recognize the donation of $1 million to the city of Kingston by the Springer family to help pay for the revitalization of the square.

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The Market remains a hotbed of commerce in the region and is open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from April through November.

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// KINGSTON LIVING //

marketplace in Kingston for more than 200 years.

Skating is free at the outdoor ice rink at Springer Market Square with a limit of 25 skaters on the ice surface at one time.

It has continued to grow and evolve over the years but many of the items on sale 200 years ago, including everything from pottery to poultry and produce, are still being bought and sold at the market. The market is open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, April through November.

The Square is so versatile and historic that it’s even established itself as something of a film and television star, appearing as turn-of-the-20thcentury Buffalo in the film Crimson Peak (2015), a Russian city in a 2013 episode of The CW’s Nikita and 1890s New Orleans in Vendetta (1999).

The Square has also taken on a number of community functions that could never have been imagined in its early days.

While the market has changed and flourished in recent years, the story of generations of vendors and their customers lingers in historic Springer Market Square.

On summer nights it often serves as an outdoor movie theatre and when winter hits the square boasts a skating rink with Kingston City Hall as a backdrop.

cityofkingston.ca/explore/springermarket-square 216 Ontario St, Kingston, Ontario specialeventsoffice@cityofkingston.ca 613 546 4291 ext. 1805

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CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL Chestnut Park®'s Global Partner Curated Network of Real Estate Specialists Representing:

138

Affiliated Brokerages

49

900

Countries & Territories

11,000

Numbers of Luxury Properties Worldwide

32,000

Offices

US$43B

US$500B

Value of Luxury Properties Worldwide

Properties by price (number of properties)

Real Estate Professionals

Real Estate Sales Over the Last Five Years

Properties by region (value of properties) 18.7

9.6%

44.9%

26.8%

US$1M-$3M US$3M-$5M US$5M-$10M US$10M-$20M US>$20M

Europe, the Middle East & Africa United States & Canada Latin America & Caribbean Asia & Australia

OUR EXCLUSIVE AFFILIATION

Only the most accomplished and trusted brokerages are invited to become Affiliates of Christie's International Real Estate. Chestnut Park has proven to be a leader in our local luxury markets. It is a prestigious and coveted designation to be a part of the exclusive Christie's International Real Estate network that spans the globe. Chestnut Park’s position as a luxury leader locally has attracted attention and garnered respect globally. Our affiliation with Christie’s International Real Estate is an exclusive relationship afforded to our agents and their clients, allowing them access to international reach through the premium marketing programs of this global luxury leader.

GLOBAL BRAND RECOGNITION

The influential Christie’s name evokes confidence and assures clients of impeccable service, integrity and discretion. Dedicated specifically to the marketing of luxury properties, Christie’s International comprises brokers who demonstrate consistent success in luxury home sales and excellence in customer service.

GLOBAL MARKETING REACH

We present our finest properties to the world via Christie’s International Real Estate website, numerous international syndicated websites, and their magazine. Our properties stand side by side with the world’s most luxurious and unique properties. With Christie’s elite global presence and reach, Chestnut Park properties are marketed to discerning buyers through a vast sales network that reaches around the world.

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Our association with Christie’s differentiates Chestnut Park in the Ontario luxury real estate market place. Chestnut Park clients are drawn to the global platform we are able to provide through our relationship with Christie’s. The international referral network afforded to us with our exclusive connection to this long established luxury brand and access to the best real estate agents in the world gives us a crucial competitive edge in today’s luxury marketplace. — CHRIS KAPCHES Chief Executive Officer & President Chestnut Park Real Estate Limited, Brokerage

AFFILIATE OF THE YEAR 2015

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// SOUTHERN GEORGIAN BAY LIVING //

Andrew Hind is a freelance writer specializing in travel, food, lifestyle and history. His work has appeared in dozens of periodicals, and he is the author of 25 books. Andrew lives in Bradford, Ontario.

Basel Miami/Positions 2019 Project Native Informant by Kenneth Bergfeld.

Buying Art:

How to Find Up-and-Coming Artists When it comes to collecting the work of emerging artists, it pays to do your homework, and know your hashtags, say gallerists and the experts from Christie’s auction house CONTENT PROVIDED BY CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE

I

f you’re considering buying art, the next piece you purchase may already be in your pocket. Providing, of course, you have an Instagram account on your smartphone. Search #Artist and you’ll have access to a mind-boggling 186 million posts, with something in every genre, from painted landscapes and portraits, to political illustrations and still lifes.

Be a little more targeted, with #CollectibleArt, for example, and that number comes down to a more manageable 16,000. Clearly, emerging artists are using the platform to get their work seen, and logically, many gallerists—and savvy art investors—are using it to scout for the next stars of the art world.

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// LUXURY DEFINED //

Buy what you love, and only what you love. You’ll be left with something you always enjoy seeing on your wall. —Emmanuelle Chan

“I check Instagram regularly,” says Cem Angeli, of CA Contemporary

3am by Jonathan Chapline, a Brooklyn-based artist who often features his work on Instagram. His paintings “explore a space where reality, our imagination and 3D rendering programs collide,” says Christie’s Marcello Kwan.

gallery in Vienna. “I’ll see what they’re about , and if I like the look of them, I’ll reach out to them.” Marcello Kwan, Vice President , Senior Specialist , and Head of Sale of Contemporary Asian Art at Christie’s Hong Kong, agrees: “ Try finding art-related hashtags to find not just artists to follow, but galleries and museums, new trends, and new names.” But don’t stop at hashtags. Both Angeli and Kwan stress the importance of doing some homework when you begin collecting the work of up-andcoming artists. “Look at their resumé, where have they exhibited, if anywhere, and what kind of shows?” counsels Angeli, who opened his space in 2016. He also advises looking at the beginning of an artist ’s career—where did they study, did they get good grades at art school, what was their degree show like? “Go to graduate shows!” he adds.

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Chapline combines the aesthetics of early computer-generated and computer-appropriated imagery, using color gradients to represent spatial relationships between forms, shown in this work, Still Life with Painting.

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// LUXURY DEFINED //

Art-related hashtags can help you find artists to follow, as well as galleries and museums, new trends, and new names. —Marcello Kwan

Roy’s by Hilary Pecis, based in Los Angeles. “A friend who runs a gallery in the Hamptons introduced me to her work,” says her gallerist Rachel Uffner. “I paid a visit to her studio and just thought she was amazing.”

Away from smartphones, Kwan points would-be investors to art fairs. Either online or, when the time comes, back in the real world, believing fairs to be a good way to explore new talent. “It ’s always best to view artworks in person, but virtual tours are a good preparation.” Rachel Uffner has been showing emerging and mid-career artists in her eponymous New York City gallery since 2008, and spots new talent at shows—both individual and group—and sometimes through recommendation. “I’m looking for something new, something that pushes whatever medium the artist is working in: sculpture, painting, photography, in a direction that I find new and interesting.” Once someone has piqued her interest , she will pay a visit to the artist ’s studio to see if they connect. “Starting a relationship with an artist is a big commitment from both sides, so there has to be something about the artist , their rigor, their personality, their thinking, that I’m going to want to work with.”

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Pecis debuted new interiors, still lifes, and landscape paintings at her recent exhibition, Come Along With Me. “Hilary paints these really wonderful, very soulful interiors,” says Uffner.

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// LUXURY DEFINED //

Cem Angeli met Letizia Werth at one of her shows, having spotted the Italian’s work on Instagram. “We went to visit her in her studio and suggested working together—the rest is history.” Pictured is Mountain from 2017.

Gallerists, of course, are happy to arrange meetings between their artists and potential clients, at private views and hosted dinners, and can also arrange studio visits. Both gallerists and auction house experts advise taking a long view when it comes

Patrons helped artists throughout history: without the Stein family, we probably wouldn’t know the names Picasso and Matisse today. —Emmanuelle Chan

to investing in emerging artists. “Art is a medium-term investment ,” in Angeli’s view. “ You are not going to buy a young artist one month and expect them to sell for huge prices a few months later.” “Buy what you love, and only what you love,” says Chan. “If the price goes down, at least you’re left with something you actually enjoy seeing on your wall. And don’t flip too soon, it ’s killing the market and people will lose respect for you.” Uffner recognizes that every art buyer wants to see their investment appreciate, but reminds would-be buyers, “when you’re investing in an artist you’re investing in a person. It ’s not like real estate where you might buy with a view to selling it for profit in a couple of years. Collecting should be a long-term relationship.” Kwan agrees that you should collect with your heart , but adds, “Remember, all big artists start small. No one could have known in the early 2000s that SpaceX would send a rocket into space.”

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// A PEEK AT LUXURY LIVING AROUND THE WORLD //

PRICE UPON REQUEST

Cascade Villa, Providenciales, BWI Turks And Caicos Islands

Beds:6 // Baths: 6 full | 1 partial // Sq. Ft: 9,800 // Exterior: .79 Acres // Property Type: Villa/Townhome

Cascade is an architectural gem designed to deliver the ultimate Caribbean lifestyle. Stunning turquoise water as far as the eye can see welcomes you as you first step through the door. This grand villa’s name was inspired by one of the island’s most splendid private pools. Waters from the upper pool cascade into pools below, including a wading pool for children and pool for adults, complete with a swim-up bar. Cascade’s unique 9,800 square foot floor plan of multiple levels offers getaways for sun lovers and shade seekers alike. There will be no dispute over bedrooms at this villa, which features 6 master bedrooms with King beds (twin options in two of the bedrooms), outdoor showers and baths and private terraces with panoramic ocean views. Enjoy local cuisine in the comforts of home, dining indoors or outdoors with ample seating for 12. The modern chef’s kitchen, coupled with an outdoor grill and wet bar, equips guests with the perfect setting to prepare freshly caught fish. Snorkel, kayak, or paddle board in Caribbean blues surrounded by one of the world’s largest barrier reefs. Of special interest to water enthusiasts, Cascade is located within Princess Alexandra National Park, featuring some of the best snorkeling in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Cascade sits on over 100 linear feet of pristine beachfront. On the villa’s secluded beach area, relax in one of the hammocks shaded by towering palms or escape beneath a tiki umbrella with a good book. Retire at sunset to the fire pit deck just steps above the white sands of Babalua beach. Against the backdrop of the waves and stars, the fire’s glow adds drama to an already dramatic setting. Villa Cascade creates an unparalleled Caribbean experience.

Christie’s International Real Estate

One Season Plaza Suite 7 Grace Bay, Providenciales, B.W.I Turks And Caicos Islands Robert Greenwood +1 (649) 432 7653

Christie’s International Real Estate

One Season Plaza Suite 7 Grace Bay, Providenciales, B.W.I Turks And Caicos Islands Rick Moeser +1 (561) 805 7327

Green Gables - The Estate Woodside, California,. Listing on page 96 WWW.CHRISTIESRE ALESTATE .COM // WWW.CHESTNUTPARK .COM // C H E S T N U T PA R K R E A L E S TAT E L I M I T ED, B R O K ER AG E // WWW.INVESTINST YLE .CA

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PRICE UPON REQUEST

Sui Generis on the Manasquan River, Brielle, New Jersey Beds:9 // Baths: 15 full | 4 partial // Sq. Ft: 31,281 // Exterior: .2.75 Acres // Property Type: Estate

A magnificent luxury residence is a work of art...which the owners have the good fortune of calling ‘’home’’. When brought to its highest level, it is a masterpiece, combining the vision of its creators with the beauty of its natural setting. In this case...the Manasquan River is the backdrop for the home known since its inception as: ‘’Sui Generis’’. Translated from Latin...’’Of its own kind...in a class by itself...unique’’ Although it is among the most impressive estates on the East Coast, Sui Generis succeeds at the seemingly impossible combination of pure opulence and functionality, without any nod towards unnecessary pretentiousness. With design and lifestyle hints from Beverly Hills, Palm Beach County, and Southampton, this home captures the true spirit of casual elegance.

FEATURES AND AMENITIES • • • • • • •

31,000-plus-square-foot residence on two acres Nine bedrooms and 15 full bathrooms Home theater, wine cellar with tasting room, & billiards room Two deep-water docks on the Manasquan River Exceptional landscaping including Japanese gardens and koi ponds Resort style amenities including outdoor kitchen, spectacular freeform pool and tennis court Only a few miles away from the area’s finest beaches and within one hour of New York City

Christie’s International Real Estate

20 Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York, 10020 United States Kathleen Coumou +1 212 468 7140

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Christie’s International Real Estate

20 Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York, 10020 United States Brian Church +1 732 449 3200

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PRICE UPON REQUEST

Magnificent Lyford Cay Beachfront Estate, Bahamas Beds:14 // Baths: 15 full | 5 partial // Sq. Ft: 15,00 // Property Type: Single Family

Serendip Cove is a magical home tucked into the corner of Clifton Bay, Lyford Cay with 361 feet of private beachfront; this estate encompasses over 3.4 acres and is filled with character and charm. Purchased in the early 1970s by the legendary Henryk de Kwiatkowski, Serendip Cove was considered the jewel of the self-made millionaire sportsmans real estate holdings. A polo-playing society figure and owner of the prestigious horse-breeding estate Calumet Farms in Kentucky. Henryk enjoyed entertaining, notable guests at Serendip Cove have included Prince Philip, Lord Louis Mountbatten, Margaret Thatcher, Mick Jagger, the Millers and the von Furstenbergs. Henryk de Kwiatkowski served under the Viceroy of India, Lord Louis Mountbatten, during the partition of India. They were very close friends and Lord Louis Mountbatten often spent Christmas with the de Kwiatkowskis. He studied humanities in a Himalayan monastery, where his teacher urged him to travel the world. In compliance with that advice, de Kwiatkowski eventually came to know many countries and their cultures firsthand. He spoke 12 languages and met numerous dignitaries and business leaders, forging many relationships that would last for decades. He flew for the Royal Air Force during of World War II. This is one of the reasons for him going into aviation. He designed helicopters with Igor Sikorsky, and made his first fortune by brokering the sale of an unprecedented number of commercial airplanes while playing backgammon with the Shah of Iran.

Christie’s International Real Estate

Lyford Cay Shopping Plaza Eastern Road Lyford Cay, Bahamas Philip Hillier +1 242 322 1041

Christie’s International Real Estate 313 1/2 Worth Avenue, Suite 4B Palm Beach, Florida, 33480 USA Rick Moeser +1 561 805 7327

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PRICE UPON REQUEST

Green Gables - The Estate, Woodside, California Beds:32 // Exterior: .74 Acres // Property Type: Estate

An Architectural Masterpiece in Nature’s Finest Setting Green Gables is truly an extraordinary estate. The combination of man’s and nature’s best are brilliantly on display throughout this 74-acre Woodside, California, property which has remained intact since its inception in 1911. The creation of Mortimer Fleishhacker, banker and founder of Anglo California Bank and the Great Western Power Company, at the heart of Green Gables rests its magnificent main residence and gardens that remain home to this day for the Fleishhacker family. Designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene, leading figures of the early 20th century Arts and Crafts movement, the main house’s rooms are oriented to maximize the spectacular views of the property’s celebrated gardens and grounds. The estate also includes six other dwellings, each nestled in its own private setting. Noteworthy among them is a lovely 1930s home designed by acclaimed Modernist architect William Wurster. The estate is also home to three swimming pools, a tennis court, orchards, and a glorious vegetable and flower garden.

Christie’s International Real Estate

336 North Camden Drive Beverly Hills, California, 90210 United States Zackary Wright, Executive Director +1 310 385 2690

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MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS

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// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // TORONTO //

There’s no one size fits all approach when it comes to real estate… Whether you are buying or selling a home, the personalized service that Helen and Michelle provide is what sets them apart. With an unwavering commitment to excellence, they actively listen to their clients’ needs to ensure a seamless experience and successful results. Helen’s expertise in the luxury market and Michelle’s experience in condo development make them the perfect team to help you attain your real estate goals.

www.hbrealestate.ca Helen Braithwaite, BROKER

Chairman’s Award Winner, 2017–2020 helenbraithwaite@chestnutpark.com Office: 416 925 9191 Direct: 416 561 3114

Michelle Phillips, SALES REPRESENTATIVE

President’s Award Winner, 2020 mphillips@chestnutpark.com Office: 416 925 9191 // Direct: 647 261 3655

Julia is a first-class Broker with nearly 10-years of experience buying and selling in Toronto. Below are a few of the things that set Julia a tier above: • Professional staging provided for all Seller Clients • Strong online presence bringing additional exposure to listings • Opportunity for Buyer Clients to find off-market properties through expansive industry network • Extensive International contact list, cultivated while working with luxury brands abroad Call or Text Julia to set up an introductory meeting!

LOVE COMING HOME

Julia Campbell, BROKER

Direct: 647 981 2250 juliacampbell@chestnutpark.com

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*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER


// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // TORONTO //

In today’s fast moving and unpredictable market, you can rely on Erica Anne’s 30 plus years of real estate experience and global network of clients and investors to produce successful transactions from start to finish. For those looking to convert equity or bond capital into an investment in real estate, you can trust Erica Anne’s data driven, knowledgeable approach. A consistent top producer, positive and patient, Erica Anne’s ability to efficiently achieve results through communication and transparency has earned her the respect of her clients.

THE REALTOR THAT REALLY CARES! SHE WELCOMES YOUR CALL!

Erica Anne Cook, B.P.H.E, B.A., B.Ed. SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Christie’s International Real Estate Luxury Specialist 2019 Chairman’s Award Winner 2020 Direct: 416 903 3132 // Office: 416 925 9191 homes@ericaannecook.com

Comprehensive research and a consultative approach inspire confident, fully informed decisions Before entering the world of real estate, Katherine, a fully qualified actuary, spent years working as a consultant in the pension industry in Toronto. Parental leave took her to Ireland where her family grew to include four boys. After returning to Toronto, Katherine committed herself to chairing a non-profit board where her discretion, as well as her straightforward, ethical, and reliable leadership ensured the organization’s success. Katherine passionately studies the real estate market and its drivers daily, watching trends closely. Her personalized approach and innate tendency to nurture ensures that her clients make confident, strategic, fully informed decisions.

Katherine Devlin, BROKER

Direct: 647 239 1001 katherine@katherinedevlin.com

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER

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// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // TORONTO //

Award-Winning Toronto Real Estate Advisors Providing Luxury Service For Every Client. With over 18 years of deep knowledge, our results-driven success continues to grow with our referral-based business, as we personally invest in our partnerships with our clients. The expertise, innovation and seamless approach that clients associate with our brand translates to record-breaking results. We would welcome the opportunity to assist you in your real estate journey!

Recommended For a Reason. Charlene Kalia, SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Chairman’s Award Winner 2021 Office: 416.925.9191 | Direct: 416.953.1226 Charlene@CharleneKalia.com www.CharleneKalia.com

Bringing the most desired homes to Toronto's most discerning buyers. Tailored high-quality service is what I delivered to my clients as an award winning personal shopper at Holt Renfrew. This type of service is now woven into the fabric of how I help you buy and sell real estate. With my fingers on the pulse of Toronto’s most desirable neighbourhoods, you’ll be the first to know about market shifts and where to buy. As a seller, your property will rise above the competition with my innovative marketing techniques that expose your property to local, national and international markets. The combination of my bespoke service, global reach and innovative use of technology is the reason why I sold over $100 million in real estate in the last three years and a Chairman’s award winner.

wwwjeffknight.ca

Jeff Knight, SALES REPRESENTATIVE

jeffknight@chestnutpark.com Office: 416 925 9191 // Direct: 416 579 1154

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*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER


// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // TORONTO //

Providing Concierge Level Service. Supporting you every step of the way. Achieving record breaking results. #1 Team Chestnut Park Real Estate 2020 www.eileenlasswell.com Eileen Lasswell **

Chairman’s Award Winner 2016-2020

Catherine Mortimer **, Kate Buck *, Alexandra Sandler *, Ann MacNaughton*, Alisha Woodman* EileenLasswell@chestnutpark.com Office: 416 925 9191 Direct: 416 875 8338

Marianne is a Toronto Broker with a long list of loyal clients. She brings an expert touch to each negotiation, handling every detail personally to provide seamless, individualized service. Relentless dedication to her clients, extensive market knowledge, sharp negotiation skills, and creative marketing strategies have elevated her to the top of the industry for 10+ years. For this, she’s earned the honour of consecutive Chairman’s awards. Uniquely, Marianne is known for her thorough understanding of construction and often helps her clients orchestrate renovations. Marianne’s client-focused approach is founded on trust and integrity.

www.mariannemiles.com Marianne Miles, BROKER

Chairman’s Award Winner 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 mariannemiles@chestnutpark.com Office: 416 925 9191

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER

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// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // TORONTO //

What drew me to real estate is my love for our city, its many distinct and beautiful neighbourhoods, and the people who shape them. Buying and selling property is a balance between emotion and hard data. I enjoy helping my clients weigh the many factors that come into play, to make informed, logical decisions resulting in for them, the right choices. I bring experienced objective advice and negotiation skills to maximize value. I am keenly focused on my clients and my track record is solid. “Cathy was instrumental in helping me purchase my dream home in Forest Hill. Her thorough understanding of Toronto’s luxury market and careful negotiation skills helped me secure an incredible property (during a pandemic!). The home and neighborhood have exceeded my expectations - all because of Cathy’s talent and skill.” - Erin Elofson, Head of Pinterest Canada Chairman’s Award Winner 2020 Direct: 416 894 2389 Office: 416 925 9191 cathy@cathypark.com

Beyond The Transaction: Guiding you home every step of the way As a full-service, end to end real estate team, we are here to sell your home in less time, for greater value, and help you get settled into your new home.

www.debbiepenzoteam.com Debbie Penzo, SALES REPRESENTATIVE Natasha Penzo, BROKER Graeme McIntosh, SALES REPRESENTATIVE Luca Penzo, DESIGN & BUILD CONSULTANT Luci McIntosh, CLIENT CARE hello@debbiepenzoteam.com Direct: 416 520 1828

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*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER


// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // TORONTO //

It is no secret that I love architecture and real estate, as well as the great city of Toronto and the rolling hills of Mulmur, Ontario. I have lived in Toronto my entire life, and my family has roots in the Mulmur area dating back to the early 1800’s, both places where I will be focusing my efforts. Since launching in late April, I have helped clients in both locales - representing sellers listing their properties and with buyers finding something new. I would be pleased to discuss your real estate needs and look forward to working with you on your next purchase or sale. “Mark assessed my needs to ensure there was a clear understanding of what properties would be of interest. This focused approach enabled us to quickly zero in on a unique situation. Mark’s analysis of the market and recommendation for a purchase strategy yielded a terrific outcome – I’m very pleased.” – Robert M.

Mark Robert, SALES REPRESENTATIVE mark@chestnutpark.com Direct: 416 704 6678

A CARING APPROACH BACKED BY WALL STREET EXPERIENCE It takes time to understand and define your vision and your needs. I take that time to find you the best property. I take that time to sell your home or investment using a precise strategy and a team of experts to best present and market your property. My business background brings a structured and strategic approach to each transaction and my artistic side brings a true appreciation for architecture, art and history. My understanding for the market and its segments is driven by passion and inquisitiveness. “Veronika took the time to listen to our needs for our home and real estate portfolio. She presented analysis and derived strategies. She tracked the market and showed us opportunities, all with an attentive ear.” – F&P, Toronto

Veronika Roux-Vlachova, SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Direct: 416 830 7335 // veronika@chestnutpark.com

VERONIKAROUX.COM

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER

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// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // MUSKOKA //

TRUST • INTEGRITY • KNOWLEDGE • DISCRETION Maggie Tomlinson has one simple goal: to give the best possible service to her clients. She understands the luxury Muskoka real estate market, and provides the guidance and support needed for a positive outcome for both buyers and sellers. Maggie offers specialized training, a proven track record, and extensive experience that enable her clients to make smart and economically sound real estate decisions. Maggie has been involved in Muskoka real estate since the 1980s, and she has successfully been actively marketing and selling cottages, homes, vacant land and commercial properties for years. She warmly welcomes your inquiries.

FOR EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE AND PROVEN RESULTS

Maggie Tomlinson, ASA, ABR, SRS, CSA, BROKER Accredited Senior Agent | Accredited Buyer’s Representative Seller Representative Specialist | Certified Staging Advocate Christie’s International Real Estate Luxury Specialist

Choose Wisely … Choose Maggie

Direct: 705 644 9283 (cell/text) TeesRus@Muskoka.com www.ChooseMaggie.com

// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // UXBRIDGE //

Rolling hills, hiking trails, horse farms, golf courses and fresh air are some of the many ways to describe Uxbridge and surrounding areas. For 15 years Angela and Maureen’s clients, family and friends have successfully trusted the Wood Team with their next move. Both Angela and Maureen have invaluable experience representing many facets of real estate including farm properties, vacant land, residential, condo sales (new and resale) and estate homes. This duo has collaborated directly with developers, creating in depth sales and marketing platforms for new condominium and townhome projects. The Wood Team has successfully sold-out entire projects. Their sales accomplishments have been recognized with multiple industry awards throughout their real estate careers.

For unparalleled service Angela and Maureen welcome the opportunity to move you forward with the Wood Team

Angela Wood, SALES REPRESENTATIVE Maureen Gilleece, SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Angela: 416 817 9575 // angela@woodteam.ca Maureen: 416 895 2255 // maureen@woodteam.ca woodteam.ca

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*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER


// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // LAKE OF BAYS // BAYSVILLE //

The Muskoka Lifestyle. It’s how I grew up, how I live today, what I love. Local area knowledge. Award winning service. The real world skills to get the job done. Combined with hard work & professionalism, I have the experience & genuine interest to help you achieve your real estate goals in Huntsville, Lake of Bays, Dorset & surrounding areas. Confident, personable, competent representation in all price ranges/types of properties. Ready to talk Muskoka real estate? This is one of the best places in the world to live or retreat to. I know it well & I am ready to help. Let’s chat. Find me online or at our Lake of Bays office in Baysville.

Elissa Boughen, BA, SALES REPRESENTATIVE Direct: 705 787 5463 sold@lovemuskoka.com www.lovemuskoka.com

// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // HUNTSVILLE // LAKE OF BAYS // ALMAGUIN //

Having moved from the GTA over 20 years ago, to the Muskoka area, I get the need for a change of pace! My decision to move was completely fueled by a desire for a certain type of lifestyle. To create a life I love surrounded by nature and community. Working alongside like-minded people who also want this change in lifestyle, is what I love to do. Whether it’s a cottage or fulltime home you’re searching for, I appreciate the time and effort it takes to help you feel at ease with your decision. Understanding that everyone has different “must haves,” there is something that everyone has in common: the need for confidence in your decision and one that you feel good about. I can help you with that. Let’s get you here!

Kim O’Grady, BROKER Direct: 705 788 4894 kim@kim-ogrady.com www.kim-ogrady.com

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER

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// MEET SOME OF OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS // HUNTSVILLE // LAKE OF BAYS // ALMAGUIN //

THIRTY+ YEARS OF EXCEPTIONAL CLIENT SERVICE AND PROVEN RESULTS! “I just want you to know how easy you made it for me to sell my cottage. You stood by me every step of the way and offered great advice and guidance. What I really appreciated, more than anything else, is you answered your phone right away no matter what you were doing. If you couldn’t answer immediately, you called back asap. Thanks for a great experience.” — Linda

Serving the Huntsville/Lake of Bays area since 1990 Susan Brown, B.A., MVA, SRES®, BROKER Direct: 705 788 4176 susanbrown@vianet.ca www.lakeofbayscottages.com

Teresa has always placed the highest value on striving for excellence in her professional commitments. She achieves success through valuing hard work, organization and a commitment to honesty and integrity. Her enthusiasm and professionalism are manifested in every aspect of her client’s real estate transaction. Understanding her client’s desires and needs as well as building relationships is an integral component of her business. Her personable nature and warm demeanour will guide you through your real estate transaction with confidence and ease.

Teresa Dafoe, SALES REPRESENTATIVE

info@teresadafoe.ca // Direct: 705 380 0295

DAWN, services NORTH MUSKOKA and the east side of the PARRY SOUND District that encompasses many beautiful lakes, waterways, rivers and communities. DAWN specializes in LUXURY PROPERTY SALES in this area with proven results. DAWN’S extensive career also includes 30 years of Marketing and Executive Advertising Sales experience giving her clients’ the edge to sell their property quickly and for TOP $. DAWN’S many Real Estate achievements include: 2020 CHAIRMAN’S AWARD for outstanding sales performance, 2019 &18 Vice Chairman’s Award and the 2017 President’s Award.

Dawn Mashinter, SALES REPRESENTATIVE, ABR®, SRS, RESA® CSA™ Direct: 705 571 2534 // dawnmash@vianet.ca

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*SALES REPRESENTATIVE **BROKER


// OUR CHESTNUT PARK OFFICE LOCATIONS //

Toronto

1300 Yonge Street, Suite 100 Toronto, Ontario M4T 1X3 T: 416 925 9191 E: homes@chestnutpark.com

Muskoka // Port Carling

110 Medora Street Port Carling, Ontario P0B 1J0 T: 705 765 6878 E: cottages@chestnutpark.com

Muskoka // Foot’s Bay

Forest Hill

446 Spadina Road Toronto, Ontario M5P 2W4 T: 647 347 8500 E: luxury@chestnutpark.com

1039 McDonald Road (RR1 Mactierpoc 180) Foot’s Bay, Ontario P0C 1H0 T: 705.375.9191 E: footsbay@chestnutpark.com

Southern Georgian Bay // Collingwood

Huntsville //Lake of Bays (Florence St.)

393 First Street, Suite 100 Collingwood, Ontario L9Y 1B3 T: 705 445 5454 E: collingwood@chestnutpark.com

32 Florence Street East Huntsville, Ontario P1H 1P8 T: 705 789 1001 E: huntsville@chestnutpark.com

Grey Bruce // Owen Sound

Huntsville // Lake of Bays // Almaguin (Main St.)

957 4th Avenue East, Suite 200 Owen Sound, Ontario N4K 2N9 T: 519 371 5455 E: owensound@chestnutpark.com

59 Main Street East, Unit 2 Huntsville, Ontario, P1H 2B8 O: 705 789 1001 Toll-free: 877 789 1003 E: huntsville@chestnutpark.com

Grey Bruce // Wiarton

551 Berford Street Wiarton, Ontario N0H 2T0 T: 519 534 5757 E: wiarton@chestnutpark.com

Baysville // Lake of Bays

2676 Muskoka Road 117 Baysville, Ontario, P0B 1A0 O: 705 767 2121 E: lakeofbays@chestnutpark.com

Grey Bruce // Tobermory

Gravenhurst

7433 Hwy 6 Tobermory, Ontario N0H 2R0 T: 519 371 5455 E: tobermory@chestnutpark.com

181 Bay Street Gravenhurst, Ontario P1P 1X2 T: 705 684 9087 E: gravenhurst@chestnutpark.com

Simcoe County // Barrie // Innisfil

Prince Edward County // Picton

43 Main Street East Picton, Ontario K0K 2T0 T: 613 471 1708 E: princeedwardcounty@chestnutpark.com

T: 705 445 5454 E:barrie@chestnutpark.com

Simcoe County // Barrie // Craighurst // Orillia

Lake Simcoe //North of Markham

2093 Horseshoe Valley Road W., Craighurst, Ontario L4M 4Y4 T: 705 445 5454 E: barrie@chestnutpark.com

T: 289 338 0767 E: lakesimcoe@chestnutpark.com

Kingston

Erin //Caledon // Mono // King

623 Fortune Crescent, Suite 100 Kingston, Ontario, K7P 0L5 T: 613 409 2444 E: kingston@chestnutpark.com

15425 Creditview Road Caledon, Ontario L7C 3G8 T: 519 833 0888 E: country@chestnutpark.com

Northumberland County

Haliburton

4490 Kennisis Lake Road Haliburton, Ontario K0M 1S0 T: 705 754 0880 E: haliburton@chestnutpark.com

46 Pine Street South Port Hope, Ontario L1A 3E9 T: 905 800 0321 E: northumberland@chestnutpark.com

Aurora

Peterborough // The Kawarthas

T: 416 925 9191 E: homes@chestnutpark.com

135 Queen Street, Unit 3, P.O. Box 1293 Lakefield, Ontario K0L 2H0 T: 705 652 5000 E: peterborough@chestnutpark.com

Stratford //Huron-Perth

64 Hillcrest Drive Stratford, Ontario N5A 5J1 T: 289 338 0767 E: stratford@chestnutpark.com

Uxbridge

9 Main Street South Uxbridge, Ontario L9P 1P7 T: 905 852 0002 E: uxbridge@chestnutpark.com

Guelph

28 Douglas Street Guelph, Ontario N1H 2S9 T: 519 804 4095

The 1000 Islands

T: 416 925 9191 E: homes@chestnutpark.com

Waterloo

Unit 50, 75 King Street South Waterloo, Ontario N2J 1P2 T: 519 804 7200

Unionville // North of Markham T: 905 479 8989

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