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1794

winter 2015 | volume 1 | issue 1

ON THE COVER Taken by recent Cheshire Academy alum , Minh Le ’15, this photograph was a part of our advanced digital photography class. This striking image

HEAD OF SCHOOL

shows the apple, which has become an icon for education, nestled in snow.

John D. Nozell

In this issue of the magazine, we address what it means to be student centered as a school, and also highlight faculty members who have left indelible marks on the community at large.

CHAIRMAN Richard Cerrone ’67

VICE CHAIR Howard Greenstone P ’12

TREASURER Michael Mauro P ’11

SECRETARY Richard A. Katz, Esq. ’64

Monterey, Massachusetts

San Rafael, California

Harrison, New York

Ronald Feinstein ’64

Andy Moss P ’14 P ’15

Suzanne Fields P ’12

Donald Rosenberg ’67

Michael Freedman P ’15

Armando Simosa P ’08

David G. Jepson ’59

Lendward Simpson, Jr. ’68

Graeme M. Keith, Jr. P ’11

Mark F. Testa, Ph.D. ’68

Weston, Massachusetts Westport, Connecticut Westport, Connecticut

Glastonbury, Connecticut Charlotte, North Carolina

STRATEGIC MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE

Stacy Jagodowski Caitlin Garzi Leslie Hutchison Cody Barbierri Alyssa Dillon

Board of Trustees Stamford, Connecticut

THE MAGAZINE OF CHESHIRE ACADEMY

Westport, Connecticut

Snowmass Village, Colorado Miami, Florida

Knoxville, Tennessee

DEVELOPMENT & ALUMNI RELATIONS OFFICE

Barbara Davis Christian Malerba ’04 Maureen Madden-Tardy Christopher Ferraro Barbara Vestergaard Leonardo Hiertz Bevan Dupre ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTORS:

Chip Boyd Shiva Carey ’19 Diane Cook Cori Dykeman Tom Gilpin Erin Gleason Minh Le ’15 Laura Longacre John Muldoon Photography Leah Stancil

Carrboro, North Carolina

Patrick K. McCaskey ’68 Lake Forest, Illinois

OVERSEERS Michael A. Belfonti ’76 Hamden, Connecticut Dan Gabel, Jr. ’56 New York, New York Douglas N. Morton ’58 Englewood, Colorado

EX-OFFICIO John D. Nozell, Head of School Cheshire, Connecticut

Frank Motter ’61 P ’97 Stowe, Vermont

COMMENTS? QUESTIONS? SUGGESTIONS? NEWS?

Brett Stuart ’68, P ’09, P ’09, P ’10

If you have feedback on 1794, contact Stacy Jagodowski at stacy.jago@cheshireacademy.org.

East Hampton, Connecticut

If you have alumni news or updates for 1794, send them to Christian Malerba '04 at christian.malerba@cheshireacademy. org. Photos should be submitted in high resolution (300 dpi) for publication. Admission inquiries may be directed to the Admission Office at admission@cheshireacademy.org or 203-439-7250. © 2016 Cheshire Academy


IN THIS ISSUE ACADEMY ARCHIVES 4 Timeline 1784 - 1897 6 Founding Father: Seabury 8 An Institution within an Institution 14 Dress for Success ON CAMPUS 18 Student-Centered School 22 Train Your Brain: Cogmed Success Update 24 Passing the Staff 26 Convocation 2015 28 It All Adds Up: Sue Eident New Dean of Academics

Tory Verdi ’92 celebrating a team victory. Read more about him on page 44.

30 Autumn Brings Artistic Endeavors 32 Tournament Times Two

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An Institution within an Institution

A look at the life and legacy of Arthur Sheriff, former head of school.

Student-Centered School

What does it take to be a Student-Centered School? A look into the educational philosophy that has set the foundation for the Academy.

42 Alumni in Academics

ALUMNI 36 Homecoming 2015 42 Alumni in Academics 48 Events 50 Class Notes 65 ANNUAL REPORT OF GIVING 2014-2015 79 Cat Scratch Crossword Puzzle 80 Last Look: Student Photography Feature

An exploration of four alumni who are impacting the education world through their careers: Emily Brock Barcel ’05, Mandy Grass ’04, Tori Verdi ’92, and Joseph Calabro ’71.

Check out the new digital magazine at http://magazine.cheshireacademy.org/

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STRAIGHT FROM BOWDEN HALL

a message from head of school john d . nozell

I’m honored to unveil our newly redesigned and rebranded magazine, “1794.” Named after the founding date of Cheshire Academy, it reflects our storied history and showcases all that makes this school a special place for all who pass through campus. As you browse the pages of this inaugural issue, you will see a new identity throughout the piece. We’ve honored the tradition of the printed magazine and paired it with a vibrant digital companion. This interactive and fully searchable online magazine contains even more engaging content, including photos and videos, that you can share with friends. We developed an entire section of the magazine dedicated to the history of our school. Digging through more than 200 years of history, we have uncovered details about the founding of the Academy, learned more about key educators and traditions, and discovered hidden and surprising stories. Since we can’t fit everything into the printed magazine, the digital version of the magazine holds even more historic treasures.

This magazine is a homage to our beloved school. In this first issue, we focused on the heart of Cheshire Academy: the studentcentered education. We delved into the history of Samuel Seabury, the founder of our school, and shared Arthur Sheriff ’s legacy. We highlighted the education model here at the Academy, and how alumni have gone on to illustrious careers in academia.

Of course, the past isn’t everything, so in our On Campus section, we endeavor to transport you to our present day campus. Here you will find articles that let you experience our students’ lives today, as well as receive insights into our thoughts for the future.

I hope you enjoy reading this new magazine, and I welcome your comments on this issue and the many more issues to come.

The Alumni Network section was enhanced, with more stories and class notes for you to enjoy. We’ve also added a digital version of class notes so you can read news about classmates and leave each other messages. These dynamic updates will be live online throughout the year, so you don’t have to wait for your next issue to arrive. We invite you to share your story with us, and perhaps you’ll be the subject of our next alumni profile.

Happy reading! Sincerely,

John D. Nozell Head of School

“This magazine is a homage to our beloved school.” 4

the magazine of cheshire academy


academy archives

T h i s p h o t o i s f r o m t h e 19 73 y e a r b o o k w h e r e student s are furiously finishing up final exams.

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academy archives

Cheshire Academy the timeline PART I: 1784-1897

179 4 – C om m it tee s f rom Che sh i re , Wa l l i ng ford , a nd St r at ford , v ie to have t he Ac ademy loc ated i n t hei r tow n. Che sh i re is c hosen, i n pa r t , bec ause re sidents r a ised £ 702 (or $1, 077 i n U. S. dol l a r s) to pu rc ha se a n ac re of l a nd for Che sh i re Ac ademy ’s f i r st bu i ld i ng, Bowden Ha l l . Tod ay t hat wou ld equ a l $23, 0 0 0.

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1784 1796 178 4 – S a mue l S e a bu r y b e c ome s t he f i r s t Epi s c op a l bi shop i n t he Un ite d St ate s . 1792 – T he id e a for t he e s t a bl i sh me nt of a n Epi s c op a l A c a d emy i n C on ne c t ic ut i s for m a l l y discussed.

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1796 – B ot h g i rl s a nd b oy s a r e a d m it te d a s s t ud e nt s w he n t he s c ho ol op e ne d . 18 01 – Gid e on We l le s e n rol l s at t he A c a d emy. He l ate r b e c a me S e c r e t a r y of t he Na v y for P r e s id e nt A br a h a m L i nc ol n 18 0 2 – H a r t ford , Nov emb e r 1 5. L e g i s l at i v e R e c ord : G e ne r a l A s s embl y of t he St ate ap prov e s f u nd i n g. “A lot te r y w a s g r a nte d to Che sh i r e Epi s c op a l A c a d emy to r a i s e 1 5, 0 0 0 dol l a r s a s a f u nd of t he p u r p o s e of promot i n g t he obje c t s of t he i n s t it ut ion .”


1857 – Mor e t h a n 2 0 y ou n g me n f rom Cu b a e n rol l i n t he A c a d emy a f te r f r ie nd sh ip s a r e for me d b e t w e e n Cu b a n a nd lo c a l f a r me r s . C or n g row n i n Che sh i r e b e g i n s it s jou r ne y to Cu b a i n b a r g e s t h at t r a v e l dow n t he Fa r m i n g ton Ca n a l i n Che sh i r e to t he Ne w H a v e n h a r b or.

1857

Fe b r u a r y 1897 – T he a lu m n i me e t i n g of t he Epi s c op a l A c a d emy of C on ne c t ic ut i s he ld at t he Wa ldor f A s tor i a Hote l i n Ne w York Cit y. T he e v e nt i s a n nou nc e d i n t he B o s ton D a i l y O b s e r v e r, t he S pr i n g f ie ld R e p u bl ic a n , t he Ne w H a v e n Ev e n i n g R e g i s te r, a nd t he Au g u s t a (G e or g i a) Ch ron ic le .

1897 1862

1862 – R e v. S a n ford Hor ton i s n a me d he a d m a s te r a nd t r a n s for m s t he A c a d emy i nto a m i l it a r y s c ho ol . 18 71 – E i ghte e n s t ud e nt s e n rol l i n s u m me r te r m . 188 4 – I n Ne w L ondon t he 10 0 t h a n n i v e r s a r y c om memor at ion i s he ld to honor Bi shop S a mue l S e a bu r y a s t he f i r s t Epi s c op a l bi shop of t he Un ite d St ate s . T he S e a bu r y St a f f, n a me d for h i m , i s m a d e for t he c e nte n n i a l a n n i v e r s a r y a nd i s pr e s e nte d to e a c h s u b s e q ue nt Epi s c op a l bi shop i n C on ne c t ic ut .

1891 – A b a s e b a l l te a m i s for me d w h ic h w a s c a l le d a “ b a s e b a l l n i ne .” S e pte m be r 1896 – Me d a l of Honor r e c ipie nt E . D Wo o d bu r y, t he f i r s t e duc ator not a f f i l i ate d w it h t he Epi s c op a l c hu rc h , i s n a me d pr i nc ip a l a f te r s e r v i n g a s c l a s s ic s te a c he r a nd v ic e pr i nc ip a l . T he H a r t ford C ou r a nt note d , “ M r. Wo o d bu r y c ombi ne s f i r m ne s s a nd g e nt le ne s s , s c hol a r sh ip, a nd s y mp at hy.”

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f o u n d i n g fat h e r o f c h e s h i r e a c a d e m y

SEABURY I

t’s notable that Cheshire Academy’s founding father, Bishop Samuel Seabury, was a British loyalist whose plan to build an Episcopal Academy in Connecticut was financially successful due to the support of colonists who fought against Britain in the Revolutionary War.

Seabury was so notorious for his outspoken loyalty to Britain that he was jailed for his actions against the colonists. The offense was a steady stream of pamphlets Seabury wrote about the dangers of supporting the revolution. Written anonymously by “A.W. Farmer,” Seabury’s publications protested the actions of the First Continental Congress. After several unsuccessful attempts by colonist soldiers to capture Seabury, he was eventually subdued in 1775 by a militia in Westchester, New York and brought 70 miles to New Haven. The soldiers paraded him through town as a prisoner of war, and, as he was brought to the jail, cannons were fired to herald Seabury’s imprisonment. When he was released six weeks later, Seabury and his family took refuge with British troops in New York. While in hiding, he drew maps of the area to help British army scouts on their reconnaissance missions. Soon after, Seabury was appointed chaplain of the British regiment and received a royal pension for the rest of his life.

By 1784 Seabury had weathered the revolution and returned as the rector of St. Peter’s Church in Westchester, according to a book called, “Samuel Seabury, The First American Bishop,” by Shirley Carter Hughson. In March of that year, the book states, he and about 10 Episcopal priests met in Woodbury, Connecticut to plan how to approach the Church of England to request an ordination for a bishop to serve in the United States. Seabury was chosen by the local clergy to travel to London for what Hughson considered, “more trial than honor,” to secure a consecration from one of the leading bishops of England. After 16 months of effort and no results, Seabury turned to the Scottish church. He was ordained in Aberdeen in November 1784. His return to the United States was announced in New York newspapers when Seabury made a stop in Halifax, Nova Scotia on April 23, 1785. “The Right Reverend Doctor Samuel Seabury, Bishop of the state

of Connecticut (arrived); from whence he would in a very short time embark for New London.” In a nearly parallel time frame to Seabury’s rise in the church hierarchy, the founding of an Episcopal Academy in Connecticut was taking shape. Residents in Cheshire, Wallingford, and Stratford all expressed interest in having the state’s first Episcopal school located in their town. Cheshire was selected, in no small part, due to the promise of £702 (or $1,077 in U.S. dollars) from supporters to pay for about an acre of land and a building. In today’s dollars it would equal about $23,000. Half of the 30 supporters who helped finance the venture fought against the British and are buried at Cheshire’s Hillside Cemetery, about a block away from the Academy. A book written in 1912 by members of the Lady Fenwick Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution notes that the proprietors made financial sacrifices


clerical reto rt During the winter of 1785, when Bishop Seabury and his clergy were meeting to discuss the formation of an Episcopal Academy in Connecticut, a guest was late arriving. According to the “Clerical Anecdotes” column in an 1858 issue of the “Albany Journal,” the clergyman, cold from his travels, approached a table to pour a glass of wine to warm him. The latecomer said to Seabury, “… permit me to avail myself of the to support the school. “Hearing of her husband’s subscription (payment),” the book states, “the wife of one of these proprietors said she thought he ought to buy some windows for his house first.” Seabury died in 1796, after serving as bishop for 11 years. He did not live to witness the laying of the first cornerstone for Bowden Hall which is named for the school’s first principal, Rev. John Bowden, who served from 1796 to 1802. The Washington National Cathedral in the District of Columbia holds an annual event each November called the “Kirking

of the Tartans,” to honor the anniversary of Seabury’s ordination and to observe St. Andrew’s Day, the patron saint of Scotland. On the 150th anniversary of Seabury’s consecration in 1934, bishops of the Episcopal Church in Scotland gathered at St. Andrews Cathedral in Aberdeen to honor the first American bishop. The celebration recognized, “Seabury’s faith and courage in introducing Episcopacy to the United States,” according to “The Charlotte Observer.”

advice of St. Paul to Timothy, and take a little wine …” In response, the bishop said, “Brother, you don’t read the passage as I do. I read it as a little wine, as little as you please.”

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AN INSTITUTION WITHIN

AN INSTITUTION


A look into the life of Ar thu r She r if f a s an in spiration fo r the Aca demy.


academy archives

BELOVED EDUCATOR Arthur N. Sheriff spent more than half his life at Cheshire Academy. During his 52-year career as teacher, dean of students, and headmaster, Sheriff ’s deft ability to guide students’ individualism was the impetus for the Academy’s studentcentered educational model. Perhaps Sheriff ’s skill as a mentor and leader can be traced to his childhood in Chicago. Records from the 1910 U.S. Census show Sheriff, his mother, and his three younger siblings were supported by his father Arthur G., who worked as a selfemployed china painter. A 1909 article about the 21-year old Sheriff from the “Marietta (Georgia) Journal” contains the headline, “Poverty a Spur to Education.” The article noted that when he was just 15 years old, Sheriff left school and went to work as a messenger boy for the “Chicago Examiner” newspaper. His shift was from 6:00 pm to 2:00 am.

Just four years into Sheriff ’s tenure, Arthur S. Wolff enrolled at the Academy. Wolff was the father of two famous writers, Tobias and Geoffrey Wolff, both who wrote biographies about their childhoods. The 1979 book, The Duke of Deception, written by Geoffrey Wolff mentions the “venerated headmaster” at Roxbury School. A passage notes that Sheriff wrote to Wolff ’s father about his son, noting Arthur, “has not studied, but now means to get to work.” Despite Wolff ’s dwindling grades, Sheriff was still optimistic about the student’s abilities.

The article from the Journal states that Sheriff was in the newspaper office one day when an editor saw a bulletin that a young man from Chicago had won a scholarship to Yale. When asked, “who is Arthur N. Sheriff ?” the future headmaster replied, “that is I.” Sheriff then asked for a few minutes off so he could go home to tell his mother the news.

“Arthur’s instructors, in general, report that he has a good mind, woefully lacking in training. His understanding of original thought are good ... I have found also that the mistakes he has are due more to thoughtlessness than to premeditation.” Arthur Wolff did graduate from Roxbury School in 1928 and was accepted to the University of Miami.

Moving to New Haven in 1909, Sheriff enrolled at Yale University and in 1913, he received a bachelor’s degree in education. A master’s degree in English followed in 1915. While at Yale, he tutored students at what he called the “Roxbury Apartment” on College Street. The name was to become synonymous with the Academy.

The building blocks of a student-centered education are evident as early as 1928 when Sheriff wrote an article in the “Roxbury Record” that the school should focus on “the development of character—self reliance, self knowledge, self respect; a willingness to work to win and an unwillingness to win meanly.” In an early 1930s essay from the “The Academy Review” entitled, “The Headmaster Explains Cheshire Educational Policy,” Sheriff enumerates key points of his educational model:

In a 1966 interview with the “Sunday Republican Magazine,” Sheriff said it was while tutoring at Roxbury that he first heard of the boys school in Cheshire. When he graduated in 1915, Sheriff joined the Academy as an English, chemistry, and physics teacher. Some of the tutors from the Roxbury group affiliated with Yale formed a for-profit organization in 1917 and changed the Academy’s name to The Roxbury School (sometimes called the Roxbury Tutoring School). It began operating as a college preparatory school for Yale and other leading institutions. Only 36 years old when he was named headmaster in 1922, Sheriff said in the magazine interview that the first years were not easy. “I traveled all over the country interviewing parents and enrolling students. Cheshire was a tiny village when I 12

arrived. You had to take a trolley to get to Waterbury or New Haven and there were only a few buildings on campus,” he said. The atmosphere created by the faculty allowed for “a flexible curriculum, small group instruction,” Sheriff noted in the interview. His quote that. “education by contact of personality, and painstaking encouragement for the individual potentialities of each boy,” describes the emerging model of a student-centered education that is the core of the Academy’s mission today.

the magazine of cheshire academy

. Flexibility of organization . Opportunity for self expression . Healthful activity . Persistent discipline . Friendship between teacher and student By the 1930s, Sheriff ’s philosophy of teaching was reaching far beyond the Northeast. An article in the Greensboro [South Carolina] Record highlighted the headmaster’s insight. “The modern boy does not assume a pose because he thinks it is the right thing to do. He lacks the sheep-like quality of former generations and has more independence, less hypocrisy, and more real honesty.”


HE WAS A PEOPLE PERSON AND A FRIEND. HE WOULD SEE YOU STRUGGLING AND HE’D HELP YOU. - LOU RICCIUTI ’52


REMARKABLE HUMAN BEING A major change at the Academy came in 1937 when the school received a new charter from the state legislature. It was allowed to revert back to a non-profit entity and the name was changed to Cheshire Academy. As part of the charter, the school was required to provide four, one-year scholarships annually to a Cheshire resident. So began the “Town Scholar Program,” which was later altered to provide one, four-year scholarship annually. Presently, partial scholarships are also awarded. In the late 1940s, Sheriff allowed returning WWII soldiers to finish their high school education utilizing the GI Bill. Horton Hall was donated to the school by the government as housing for returning soldiers. Under an accelerated program, which lasted until the early 1950s, a number of former soldiers studied at the Academy. Many classes had students ranging in age from 16 to 23 years old. Lou Ricciuti ’52, whose family co-owned the Waverly Inn on Maple Avenue for about 50 years, remembers how kind Sheriff was to students. “He knew what you were trying to accomplish and he would help you academically with guidance,” Ricciuti said. “He was a people person and a friend. He would see you struggling and he’d help you.” Sheriff enjoyed dining at the Waverly Inn and arranged for the restaurant to stay open late on prom nights, Ricciuti said. “So the students wouldn’t get in trouble; they had a safe place to go.” Thomas J. Dodd Jr. ’53, a former U.S Ambassador to Uruguay and Costa Rica, remembers Sheriff as a “remarkable human being.”


In a 2001 interview with the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training, Dodd said his interest in Latin America began at the Academy when he was assigned a roommate from Cuba. Neither student spoke the other’s language at first, he said, but within a few months, they were conversing easily. Current events were discussed at weekend gatherings at Sheriff ’s House on the church green. The “headmaster was always interested in international affairs ... He always seemed to create an environment with a lot of students from abroad, from all over the world,” Dodd said. Former U.S. Sen. Christopher Dodd, of Connecticut, Thomas’ brother, entered a proclamation into the Congressional Record in 1994, to commemorate the bicentennial of Cheshire Academy. Mentioning Sheriff in the document, Christopher Dodd said the school “has never lost its dedication to excellence in education. But it is important to remember that the school’s mission is not only to educate men and women of Connecticut, but also to instill in them a sense of personal worth and character.” A University of Connecticut professor, Albert E. Waigh, was the 1958 commencement speaker at the Academy. In his personal journal entry from that day, Waigh mentioned his meeting with Sheriff in the headmaster’s office in Bowden Hall. “It is a pleasant, long, narrow office … with a fireplace and many chairs and bookcases.” Waigh had lunch with Sheriff and then attended a garden party at the headmaster’s home on the church green before returning to Bowden Hall. “I found [Sheriff ] interesting. He has had one or two operations and seems to me rather weak, but mentally he is very alert,” Waigh wrote.

In 1966, Sheriff began letting colleagues know that he planned to retire. In a letter from November of that year, he wrote “I have seen the campus evolve through many stages from what to begin with in 1917 could be termed a small tutorial camp to the school of today, with a larger student body, although continuing to concentrate on close attention to all boys in small classes.” During Sheriff ’s tenure, the Academy built Bailey Hall, the Alumni Memorial Building, the Alumni Auditorium (at the former south campus at the current Watch Factory Shoppes), Hurley Hall, the Richmond Infirmary, and Von der Porten Hall. Despite having decades during which he could have given the commencement address, Sheriff waited until 1966, the year he retired as headmaster, to be the keynote speaker. He delivered the speech in the newly finished Arthur Sheriff Field House which was built to honor him. An excerpt from that address sums up his 52 years at the Academy and his path to retirement. “Memories we shall carry with us wherever our destinies may bring us—and I know from my experience with thousands of alumni that this may be far and distant in time. We may not always be aware that these memories are with and us and as great a part of us. But often we are reminded. A brief glimpse of an almost forgotten scene, a face in a crowd in a distant place, the sound of music in the air, the touch of another’s words, will again enliven the past and you will again return for a brief, but happy few minutes to a scene you will never forget.” See more photos online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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STUDENT-CENTERED

EDUCATIONAL MODEL

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

FLEXIBILITY OF ORGANIZATION

OPPORTUNITY FOR SELF EXPRESSION

HEALTHFUL ACTIVITY

PERSISTENT DISCIPLINE

FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN TEACHER AND STUDENT


academy archives

DRESS FOR

SUCCESS A LOOK INTO FORMAL DRESS AT THE ACADEMY

Generations of Cheshire Academy students have worn what is known as formal dress: a pressed, crisp, white shirt; gray slacks; and a blue blazer. Perhaps the most timeless tradition in Cheshire Academy’s history, formal dress is an experience that ties all graduates together. No matter what a student’s initial opinion of the dress code may have been, long after the blazer has been folded up and stored away, most alumni find themselves reflecting fondly on their days of blue and gray at Cheshire Academy. Read on as we delve into the history of the dress code and talk to members of the community about its place in our past and our future.

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C

heshire Academy’s former Senior Master Bevan Dupre ’69 participated in the formal dress code requirements at the Academy during his 50-year tenure as both a student and faculty member. As a student, Dupre recalls a healthy disdain for the formal dress code, which students were required to wear seven days a week, even following afternoon sports practices and during sit-down dinners. “We would shower after practice and put our blazers right back on for supper,” he noted. While the warmer weather brought a change in rules and allowed students to wear Bermuda shorts rather than long pants, blue blazers, white collared shirts, and ties were still required even during Saturday classes and Sunday Chapel services. “It’s the idea of civility—giving up a certain amount of freedom to make others feel comfortable,” Dupre said. “It also speaks to

i believe that the dress code adds a level of civility that enhances the educational

experience. at first, i

complained; however, it quickly became routine and actually fun. maybe sans the

tie, but jackets and trousers for sure.

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- Richard Natrillo ‘85

the magazine of cheshire academy

our long history. Blue and gray represented unity during the Civil War, between the North and the South, and first occurred on campus when we were a military school.” Reverend Sanford Horton, who was hired as the headmaster in 1862, established the Academy as a military boarding school for boys. “We had students attend from both sides of the war, Union and Confederate,” said former Academy Archivist Ann J. Moriarty. “Many families in the south— wealthy plantation owners—sent their boys to school in the north at the time. The blue and gray cadet military uniform that was ushered in during this time was certainly a unifying statement.” In 1896, the school hired its first principal, E.D. Woodbury, who was not affiliated with the Episcopal church. The institution became a non-sectarian

school yet the formal dress code—complete with blazer—persisted. Today, many private schools—and even a growing number of public schools—cite multiple reasons for issuing a formal uniform or dress code. It provides a sense of community, improves the classroom environment, and limits distraction. Other attributes include fostering self-esteem in young people and preparing students for life beyond high school. Read more online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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ON

MPUS A

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on campus

ent-Centered School d u t S e h T For nearly 100 years, Cheshire Academy has prescribed to the educational model which places students at the center of learning. The teaching philosophy was introduced by Arthur N. Sheriff, who tutored students while attending Yale. Rather than lecture, Sheriff, who became headmaster in 1922, encouraged teachers to provide topics and ideas for discussion and invite students to respond and expand on the subject.

The student-centered educational model introduced by former Headmaster Arthur N. Sheriff in the 1920s is not only practiced at Cheshire Academy, it’s woven deeply into the culture of the school and remains its foundation for teaching. “Meeting students where they are and taking them beyond where they imagined possible,” a motto based on Sheriff ’s views, remains the pinnacle of the school’s pedagogy more than a half century after the headmaster’s tenure. The model begins in the Academy’s classrooms where students are encouraged to be active learners. Associate Head of School for Academic Affairs Julie Anderson notes, “The students are experienced in the nature of self-directed learning.” Studentcentered learning means an active learner rather than a passive learner, Anderson said. Teachers don’t provide a “stand and deliver” method, she added. “It’s not an all-knowing teacher.” Science Teacher Lauren Kelly, who was chosen for the D. Robert Gardiner Excellence in Teaching Award for the 2014-2015 school year, said she has pushed problem-solving back to the students. “We have more conversations, less classroom lecturing.” She no longer gives lab handouts, but instead, lets students choose their experiments. “You take away the required assignment, and it’s amazing what they come up with,” Kelly noted. She asks her students to pick something they’re interested in and explain why. “I often hear, ‘I can’t wait to do this.’”

Being active is the key: active in inquiring knowledge

In a majority of the classrooms, the Harkness teaching method is applied. The method utilizes a large, central table where the teacher and students sit. There are no individual desks, no front of the room. “It allows for more interaction between students,” Anderson 20

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said. Being active is the key: active in acquiring knowledge,” she added. “They are problem solvers and reflective.” All students learn differently, said Roxbury Academic Support Program Director Leslie Barry. “We get to the crux of what makes them tick and how they best learn.” Roxbury instructors look at what are the strengths and barriers, she added, and figure out what gets in the way of their learning. The process begins, Barry explained, by asking how students think of themselves as learners. Teachers gauge the confidence level through discussion and questionnaires. One example is an online survey called “VARK,” which measures visual, auditory, reading, and kinesthetic strengths. From those results, students learn strategies and how to approach learning. A key skill which is improved by the Roxbury program is what’s known as executive function. This mental process helps students connect past experiences with present action. Strengthening this process allows students to improve in planning, organizing, and remembering details. Overall, small classes and individual attention creates a process in which learning becomes part of the student, Anderson said. “They are involved in the acquisition of knowledge. They are self-directed, independent learners. Teachers work to provide clear expectations about the desired outcomes, about what they will master.” The Eighth Grade Program at Cheshire Academy is a dynamic, project-based interdisciplinary program. Designed to elicit wonder and broaden horizons, the program creates confidence and expands a world of possibilities for middle school students. The semesterlong projects feature two journeys of inquiry that are learning partnerships among students, faculty, peer mentors, and leaders in the field. Classroom experiences are supported by special events, speakers, and field trips to provide rich educational and recreational curriculum beyond the classroom. Over 30 faculty members are


BELOW Brie Bavaro ’20

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assessment

is a reflection on the part of the student and teacher, ‘how did it work, were the outcomes achieved?� - Julie Anderson, Associate Head of School for Academic Affairs


LEFT Tingting Qian ’16

involved with teaching and supporting the Eighth Grade Program. They bring a wealth of knowledge and cultural diversity to Cheshire Academy. Students in the program are able to focus on a chosen topic, explore the theme in multiple ways, and nurture their interest through hands-on tasks, projects, labs, and challenges. Eighth graders discover great books, articles, and websites while strengthening their skills to prepare for success in programs including the International Baccalaureate® Diploma. To enhance classroom instruction, the Academy’s “Learning Management System,” or “LMS,” allows students to learn at their own pace. Physics Teacher Ray Cirmo said the online system lets students, teachers, and parents to see and share the same information. “A student could open an assignment page at any time and see all of the materials I have posted for a lesson, as well as the objectives of the class.” The “MyCheshire” software program allows students to submit their assignments online, and in turn, provides tools for the teacher to add comments and grades. “The Learning Management System, or LMS, provides teachers with a way to deliver content outside of the classroom, enriching the student experience. It’s a valuable classroom management tool,” said Associate Director of Digital Marketing Caitlin Garzi. “I love the portal. It’s so much better than an agenda we had to write in,” said National Honor Society member Fatimah Farid ’16. “I can see the curriculum for the whole month, and assignments are posted two weeks in advance. My teachers’ notes are online,” she added. Senior Class President Ben Buchmeier is also a big fan of the LMS. “Resources and class materials are there. I’d be lost without the portal. It has a lot of extras to help with assignments,” he said. “The teacher is the content expert,” said Anderson. “It is direct instruction, not lecture.” This approach puts the student in the center of learning and it’s a model which requires a lot of forethought and planning, she said. “Assessment is a reflection on the part of the student and the teacher, ‘how did it work, were the outcomes achieved?’” At Cheshire Academy, each student works toward goals set by the instructor, and then they come together as an ensemble. “It’s much like a symphony which engages not only the musicians and the conductor, but also the broader audience of supporters,” Anderson noted.

Senior Master Chip Boyd has taught English and other subjects at the Academy for 28 years. “The focus is discovery, exploring and learning. The process is rigorous and flexible. It allows students to pursue questions that interest them. Rote learning has been invalidated.” Student-centered learning involves not only small classrooms with an average size of 12 students but also significant support with extra help periods provided each school day for major subjects. It’s also not uncommon for students to just drop by a classroom during a teacher’s free period to ask a question or review an assignment.

It’s much like a symphony which engages not only the musicans and the conductor, but the broader audience of supporters - Julie Anderson, Associate Head of School for Academic Affairs

Advisor meetings are held as soon as school begins to welcome and introduce students to one another. Faculty members, who serve as advisors, meet in the small groups once a week to discuss progress, concerns, and time management as major test dates and other curriculum deadlines approach. The newly expanded Center for Writing now has a full-time director, Wendy Swift, and five student tutors: Anna Rosen ’16, Grace Greene ’17, Paola Fortes ’16, Rachel Wallace ’16, and Regina McCoy’ 17. Located in Room 223 of the Humanities Building, the center is open Monday - Friday from 8:00 am - 5:00 pm and by appointment for evening or weekend tutoring. The center’s mission is to cultivate confident writers who enjoy writing as an integral aspect of their everyday life. We focus on supporting writers in all genres including research, academic, creative, and informal texts. The depth of the commitment to student-centered education at the Academy is illustrated by this statement from Arthur Sheriff, who said, “We are willing to make use of any educational method, whatever its novelty, which has shown its capacity for improving the quality of our work” with students.

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TRAIN YOUR Cheshire Academy’s Cogmed grant proves successful

The numbers are in and the conclusion is clear; juniors who enrolled in Cheshire Academy’s cognitive training program during the 2014-2015 school year improved their college test scores by a significant margin. Based on the scores achieved on their 2014 PSATs, compared with their 2015 SAT results, 71 percent of the students who took the training increased their scores. In addition, those students were 57 percent more likely to have improved their percentile ranking on the SAT relative to the PSAT. Nearly 20 members of the Class of 2017 completed the rigorous Cogmed Working Memory Training sessions last year, which were offered exclusively to Academy students by Frankenberger and Associates of Branford, Conn. The sessions were held each day for six weeks last winter following a daily classroom schedule. “A key goal was for students to understand the role that their own motivation and investment play in improving their abilities,” said Caryl Frankenberger of Frakenberger Associates, who serves as an educational consultant and Cogmed coach. The exercises enabled students to retain increasingly larger pieces of information, such as strings of random numbers. The sessions focused on improving memory processing speed and abilities with the aim of seeing quantifiable increases in reading and math skills. The training program was provided by an anonymous donor through a $60,000 grant. “I’m pleased to see how the students benefitted from the program,” said Leah Stancil, the founder of the Roxbury Academic Support Program at the Academy. “The intensity of the training is unique to the process which helps change neural pathways,” she added. Recent research has shown that the brain’s intellectual ability isn’t static, as had long been thought, but instead, is malleable, said Ted Backes of Frankenberger Associates, the program supervisor. The sessions provided a series of online memory exercises which targeted auditory, spatial, and visual systems in the brain. In a post-training questionnaire, students reported these key improvements: . Ability to Recall Facts 94% . Ability to Follow Complex Instructions 83% . Being Less Distracted 78% . Ability to Read and Understand 72% . Overall Confidence 66%

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BRAIN


on campus 26

PASSING THE

STAFF

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ROBERT “CHIP” BOYD NAMED NEW SENIOR MASTER It’s akin to passing the torch, but at Cheshire Academy, it’s the passing of the Senior Master’s historic wooden staff that marks a change in leadership. With the retirement last June of Bevan Dupre ’69, English Teacher Robert “Chip” Boyd joins Senior Master Karen Smith as Boyd marks his 28th year at the Academy. In inheriting his new position, Boyd said he looks forward to expanded mentoring opportunities with students and teachers. “The faculty are really good at empowering students. The school has a responsibility to understand human value, to realize it, and provide support,” he said. “The focus is discovery, exploring, and learning,” Boyd said. “The process is rigorous and flexible, and it allows students to pursue questions that interest them. “Gillian Reinhard ’16 is enrolled in Boyd’s Theory of Knowledge class, a core requirement of the International Baccalaureate® Diploma Programme. She said the assistance she receives from teachers, such as Boyd, has helped her grow. “I was shy but I’m not now. I’m still quiet, but I’m not afraid to be myself.” Boyd believes that’s the key to supporting students. “What’s most important is to help them find potential in their own way. There are very compelling stories about that. To allow students to embrace who they are.” He said Reinhard is very bright, a very inquisitive young woman. “She is highly valued by teachers and her friends and she is recognized for that.”

L E F T: T h e C h e s h i re A c a d e my h i s to r i c w o o d e n s t a f f i s c a r r i e d by a S e n i o r M a s te r d u r i n g t h e p ro c e s s i o n a l a n d re c e s s i o n a l p o r t i o n s o f C o nvo c a t i o n a n d C o m m e n c e m e n t to m a r k t h e beginning and ending of the s c h o o l yea r. T h e s t a f f, w h i c h w a s g i ve n to t h e A c a d e my i n 1917, i s u n i q u e i n t h a t t h e h a n d l e i s m a d e f ro m w o o d t a ke n f ro m t h e C u m b e r l a n d , a C i v i l Wa r s h i p u s e d by t h e U n i o n N av y. Em b e d d e d i n t h e h a n d l e i s a d e s ig n of a h o r s e s h o e m a d e f ro m m e t a l t a ke n f ro m t h e C o n f e d e r a te ship the Merrimac.

As a resident faculty member, Boyd lived for 17 years in Horton Hall. He and his wife, Shelley, now reside in the Borden House, a historic structure built in 1740 which flanks the main entrance to the Academy. “Many faculty members like the lifestyle of living at an independent boarding school,” he said. New teachers who are experiencing their first year of campus residency can look to Boyd for guidance. “I’d like to help younger faculty in the process as they begin to feel this is their calling,” he said. Boyd wants to see those who began teaching in 2015 build years of tenure and provide stability for the Academy.” I want to cover bases and provide wisdom and experience,” he added.

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CONVOCATION 2015

GROWTH AND EXPERIENCE THEME OF EVENT

The route of the processional from Cheshire Academy to the Convocation site is less than a half mile. For returning students, the distance traveled is measured not in length, but in educational and individual growth. For new students, the walk symbolizes opportunities and tangible achievement. The first formal ceremony of the 2015-2016 school year brought together more than 500 students and faculty who gathered on August 31 in St. Bridget Church on Main Street. The speeches given at the evening event followed a theme of challenge and courage. Cheshire Academy experienced its most competitive admission cycle ever leading into this year, Head of School John D. Nozell told the audience. Records show there were 200 more applicants than the previous year for a total of 418 students enrolled.

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From diversity to individuality, Nozell enumerated the foundations of success at the Academy: classroom and dorm life, success in athletic life, and a solid education. Students will “receive a broad perspective from their peers from all over the world,” he said. Associate Head of School for Academic Affairs Julie Anderson shared her belief that the Academy is inherently magical. “The lesson of experience is developing skills that will help you. Don’t let your failure be your ending, let it be your beginning,” she said. Class of 2016 President Ben Buchmeier has attended the Academy for seven years, beginning in the sixth grade. He told his fellow students that when he considered where the time had gone, he realized it was spent in many ways. “It went to homework and playing hard, the learning of book knowledge, and life skills,” he said.


R I G H T: R o b e r t “C h i p” B o y d (r i g h t ) p i c t u r e d w i t h Co -Senior Mas ter Karen Smith L E F T: K a - R o n J o n e s ’16 s m i l e s a s h e m a k e s h i s way to St. Bridget Church.

Buchmeier acknowledged faculty members who challenge students but unfailingly support them in success and heartbreak. Buchmeier exhorted the student body to “challenge yourself to expand your horizons and be courageous. Make your year count; don’t be a spectator,” he said. This year’s students represent more than 30 countries including Mongolia, Mexico, Vietnam, Venezuela, and Finland. Students from 20 states attend the Academy.

See more photos online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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IT ALL ADDS UP FROM ANALYST TO ACADEMIC

Balancing the responsibilities of a classroom teacher and tennis coach has helped former Math Department Chair Susan Eident prepare for her new role as Associate Dean of Academics. It is a challenge for which she is more than equal. “I really enjoy the academic environment,” Eident said. Eident has taught at Cheshire Academy for more than 20 years, following an early career as an analyst on Wall Street and for the energy industry. She began teaching at the university level, but Eident decided the independent school culture was a better fit. She admires how the close-knit community at a boarding school provides direction and support for students. “The dorm parents live right next door,” Eident said. Her path to teaching came after being deeply involved with the PTA while staying at home for 10 years with her three children. Eident’s middle child, Kelly, is a Class of 2002 alumna and all three attended Cheshire Academy’s former middle school. While she’s taught every class offered by the math department, Eident said statistics was her favorite course. “We worked with real data which teaches the students how to think, an ability to make connections between topics,” she said. Research projects have included a survey of gas prices and income levels and a comparison of Olympic track and field results. “Research gives students the ability to make connections between topics and daily life,” Eident noted. Athletics is also a connection Eident has with students. Along with fellow coach Ed Banach, she was instrumental in leading the girls varsity tennis team in 2014 to their first quarterfinal action in school history.

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SUE EIDENT NAMED NEW ASSOCIATE DEAN OF ACADEMICS

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AUTUMN BRINGS ARTISTIC ENDEAVORS N ove m b e r w a s a d e l ig h t f u ll y b u s y m o n t h f o r t h e a r t s a t C h e s h i re A c a d e my. Fro m t h e p e r f o r m a n c e o f “Pe te r Pa n” by t h e Va r s i t y Pl aye r s , to a re c e p t i o n f o r t h e “C a p t u r i n g t h e B e f o re” p h o to g r a p hy e x h i b i t , a n d t h e C o l e m a n G ro u p’s Sy m p o s i u m o n w o m e n i n t h e a r t s , i t w a s a m o n t h w i t h t a l e n t o n d i s p l ay a n d l ea r n i n g a t t h e f o re f ro n t .

NEVERLAND TAKES FLIGHT

On the stage in the Black Box Theater, Peter Pan written by J.M. Barrie was true to the darker and more troublesome original script than the Disney version of the story. Student directors Rachel Wallace ’16 and Anna Rosen ’16 said they both were struck by the script which reflects the English language as it was in 1904.

Several students played dual, and starkly opposite, characters. For instance, Charlotte Leser '16, portrayed both Mrs. Darling and Captain Hook; William An '16, had the roles of Nana and Tootles. Three faculty members took on the role of pirates with gusto. They were: History Teacher Christine Monahan, Language Teacher Caroline Brown, and English Teacher Corin Porter. The next performance by the Varsity Players is “Once on This Island.” It will be staged February 26-28 in the Black Box Theater.

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PHOTOS OF PAST GUIDE FUTURE

About the time Cheshire Academy turned 50 years old, the Ball & Socket factory began making metal fasteners. Now the historic factory on West Main Street is the focal point of a restoration project which will house an expansive arts center. Academy students were invited to an opening reception on November 5 to hear from photographers about their photos of the 150-year old building.

The exhibit of nearly 40 photos, called “Capturing the Before,” was shown in the Academy’s Kohn-Joseloff Gallery through January 5. One of the contributing photographers is Tom Hearn P’12 of Cheshire, who has four pieces in the show. “Being inside the factory, you can feel the deep Cheshire history,” he said. The next opening reception in the gallery is January 14 from 5:30-7:00 pm with an exhibit of artwork by Jennifer Davies.

COLEMAN GROUP SYMPOSIUM

Four women spoke to students about starting and fostering artistic careers; including Melinda Van Der Beek P’95

THE FLAIR OF DANCE

With titles such as “Superman,” and “Fun,” the Fall Dance Concert on November 18 provided a moving palette of rhythm, color, and talent from more than a dozen members of the Academy’s dance troupe. Student-choreographed pieces, both solos and duets, were interwoven with ensemble dances to a variety of musical themes. Both the opening ensemble dance, “Heard it Through the Grapevine,” and the closing number were choreographed by Dance Coaches Caroline Brown and Nathalie Michiels. Get more articles and photos on the arts online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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TOURNAMENT TIMES TWO GIRLS VOLLEYBALL EYES CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE

The Cats pounced all season in an effort to capture a repeat of the 2014-2015 championship title for the girls varsity volleyball team. They dominated the league with 12 shutouts for a season record of 17-3, advancing for the third straight year to the NEPSAC Class C volleyball finals.

assists, 14 kills, and 2 aces. Alexis Holmes ’18 made 16 kills and 2 blocks, and Des Parker ’18 contributed 15 kills and 3 blocks.

The quarterfinals tournament game on November 18 set the stage for two strong victories with the Cats defeating Gann Academy 3-0, followed three days later by a win in the semifinals. While playing Gann, the team had 23 aces totaling nearly one-fourth of all the points the Cats scored in the match.

The tournament final was held the following day against the undefeated King School. Dave Dykeman, Dean of Students & Athletics, praised the team for their remarkable season despite a loss of 0-3 (1725, 11-25, 18-25) in the matchup. He wrote, “CA volleyball played their hearts out today. Our seniors have so much to be proud of.”

In the tournament’s semifinals on November 21, the Cats scored 3-2 against the Winchendon School. The team was led by Andrea Crespo Zalduondo ’16, who combined for 51

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OV E R A L L S TAT I S T I C S W L T % 17 3 0 8 5 L E AG U E S TAT I S T I C S W L T % 17 3 0 8 5

See photos from the season at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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O n e W o r d: Tr a n sf o r m at i o nal

Your suppor t for t he Annual Fund helps transform each and ever y student at Cheshire Ac ademy. This transformation happens not just in the classroom , but in ever y aspect of life on c ampus . Our student- centered program encourages all student s to push their own boundaries , explore new areas , and grow as individuals . Thus , many of our student s change in ways they never expected .

GIVE TODAY! w w w . c h e s h i r e ac a d e m y . o r g /g i v e


SOCIAL MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS!

VIA THE BOARDING SCHOOL BLOG R ANKING THE BEST BOARDING SCHOOLS IN THE WORLD

FACEBOOK.COM/ CHESHIREACADEMY

We h a v e m o r e s n a p s h o t s f r o m C o n v o c a t i o n o n l i n e!

IS A PG YEAR RIGHT FOR YOU?

@CHESHIREACADEMY J o h n D. N oz e l l a n d B a r b D a v i s met with current parent s in S e o u l, t h e c a p i t a l o f S o u t h Ko r e a , a t t h e J W M a r r i o t t . Va r s i t y f i e l d h o c ke y s e n i o r s hit ting the tur f for their # S e n i o r N i g h t g a m e! C o n g r a t s a n d g o o d l u c k! @CAFightingCat s

TOP REASONS TO GO TO BOARDING SHOOL

VIA SOCIAL MEDIA TEEN BLOG Where there is light, there i s h o p e ... # l i g h t s o f h o p e #campuslife @ Cheshire Academy

IS MY TEEN USING SNAPCHAT? THREE WAYS YOUR SCHOOL CAN USE T WIT TER POLLS INSTAGRAM TESTS CURATED VIDEO STREAMS

B i e n v e n i d o! St u d e n t s p r a c t i c e S p a n i s h i n M r. H e r n a n d e z - C o b o class this morning. #ThisIsCA

VIA THE SCRATCH UP

@CHESHIREACADEMYTV H a v e y o u s e e n o u r “C h e s h i r e A c a d e m y - A V i s u a l i z a t i o n” v i d e o y e t? I t h i g h l i g h t s s o m e o f t h e b e s t p a r t s o f C h e s h i r e A c a d e m y!

GOODBYE FALL! - NANCY JIANG ‘17

AN INSIDE LOOK AT PL ANNING CHESHIRE ACADEMY’S HOMECOMING -TAR A LYNCH ‘18

FAMILY WEEKEND: A REVIEW - MIA LEKO ’18

@CHESHIREACADEMY #happyhalloween

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# fallfestival


ALUMNI E V EN T S A N D A LU M N I S H A PI N G O U R W O R L D

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HOMECOMING 2015 Che sh i r e A c a d emy ho s te d it s a n nu a l Home c om i n g We ek e nd i n O c tob e r a nd w e lc ome d b a c k a lu m n i to p a r t ic ip ate i n t w o - d ay s w or t h of a c t i v it ie s , i nc lud i n g t he i nduc t ion of t he 19 6 4 u nd e fe ate d fo ot b a l l te a m i n t he K e v i n S l au ghte r Memor i a l A t h le t ic H a l l of Fa me . T he w e ek e nd k ic k e d of f w it h t he A c a d emy ’s t h i rd a n nu a l Che sh i r e C onv e r s at ion s e v e nt , a n op p or t u n it y for ju n ior s a nd s e n ior s to he a r f rom a p a ne l of a lu m n i a b out t hei r c u r r e nt c a r e e r s a nd how t he y g ot t he r e . O n S at u rd ay, a lu m n i g at he r e d i n B owd e n H a l l ’s Blue R o om for t he 19 6 4 te a m a nd c l a s s m ate s d i n ne r. Tw e l v e of t he 19 6 4 te a m memb e r s r e t u r ne d to t he A c a d emy for t he d i n ne r a nd c e r emony. Fol low i n g t he d i n ne r, t he honor e e s l i ne d up on Si mo s a F ie ld a nd w e r e pr e s e nte d w it h a c om memor at i v e pl a q ue for t he te a m’s a c c ompl i sh me nt s . T he c e r emony to ok pl a c e b e for e t he Va r s it y Fo ot b a l l te a m w e nt up a g a i n s t Av on Old Fa r m s S c ho ol . I n a show i n g of t r eme ndou s at h le t ic dom i n a nc e , t he te a m ne v e r le t t he c omp e t it ion g a i n a sh r e d of mome nt u m , e nd i n g w it h a f i n a l s c or e of 42-14 . A f a v or ite t r a d it ion du r i n g Home c om i n g We ek e nd i s t he a l f r e s c o of fe r i n g of “ Ch i l i a nd Chowd e r ” w h ic h s e r v e s to w a r m up not ju s t t he b o d y, but lon g- e s t a bl i she d f r ie nd sh ip s a s w e l l . T he e v e nt , s p on s or e d b y t he D e v e lopme nt a nd A lu m n i R e l at ion s O f f ic e , h a s b e e n a f a v or ite at t he A c a d emy for mor e t h a n a d e c a d e . Mor e t h a n 50 0 g ue s t s s top p e d b y t he outdo or d i n i n g a r e a ne a r Si mo s a F ie ld to s a mple t he he a r t y f a r e . T he s te a m i n g b ow l s w e r e p a r t ic u l a rl y w e lc ome on t he e a rl y O c tob e r e v e n i n g w it h temp e r at u r e s i n t he 4 0 s a nd w i nd s g u s t i n g up to 29 mph .


alumni

HAL L OF FA ME Handshakes, jokes, and guffaws greeted members of the undefeated 1964 varsity football team at the 2015 homecoming celebration dinner on Saturday in Bowden Hall’s Blue Room. Twelve of the players returned to the Academy to be inducted as a team into the Kevin Slaughter Memorial Athletic Hall of Fame. Dean of Students & Athletics and Head Coach of Varsity Football Dave Dykeman presented a plaque to the team members as the 2015 Fighting Cats prepared to take on Avon Old Farms at Simosa Field. He noted that during the 1964 season, the team had victories over such prep school rivals as Deerfield and Andover Academies as well as winning scores against Harvard University and the University of Connecticut’s freshmen programs. The victorious team outscored their opponents by 206 to 54 during their seven games that season. Following the presentation, the honorees lined up to welcome the 2015 team onto the field. Asked if the uniforms were different now, one alumnus joked, “sure, we had leather helmets.” The 1964 team consisted of 40 members, many of whom went on to play at the collegiate level, including Frank Quayle ‘65 who spent a season with the Denver Broncos. “It was an honor to celebrate the 1964 team’s success,” said Director of Development and Alumni Relations Barbara Davis.“The recognition was long overdue and well deserved. They had such stories to tell; they remembered every play from every game.”

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The team’s plaque is installed in the Arthur Sheriff Field House where it will be on display near one presented to Quayle who was honored as an individual player in 2012. To top off the homecoming festivities, the Cats had a strong win over their opponents, scoring 42-14 against Avon Old Farms school despite a cold and windy evening with a temperature of about 43 degrees. Stand-out plays came from CJ Lewis ’17 who had three passing touchdowns, and CJ Holmes ’17 who rushed for 105 yards and added 85 yards receiving. Michael Dunn ’16 had a 48-yard touchdown run and a 45-yard interception return for a second touchdown.

A LU M N I I N DU C T I O N PA R T I C I PA N T S ( FR O M L EF T TO R I GH T )

Ric ha rd C a s s e ll o ’6 5 C h u c k Fe r r i s ’6 5 Pa ul B rea u ’6 5 Ja c k C u r re n ’6 5 D e n ni s M a r ro n ’6 5 Fr a n k Q uay l e ’6 5 Ed w a rd M c M a h o n ’6 5 Ha r r y Wr ig h t ’6 5 Jo e Wei n d l ’6 5 C h r i s t y Haye s ’6 6 Ro b e r t Tro c o l o r ’6 6 Way n e Pa ull ’6 5

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Q

&

A

A QUESTION AND ANSWER SESSION WITH THREE ALUMNI WHO SHARED THEIR CAREER KNOWLEDGE AT THE THIRD ANNUAL CHESHIRE CONVERSATIONS

T

he Third Annual Cheshire Conversations seminar was held during Homecoming Weekend on October 3 with three alumni participating in a panel discussion about their professional careers. Junior, senior, and postgraduate students attended the program to get real-life answers.

Callison said her small business, which is in its fifth year, has been successful through the use of social media, marketing plans, and her ability to learn while doing. Her company is the United States partner with a manufacturer in Italy which designs compression garments for medical uses.

Head of School John D. Nozell said the event, “gives students a chance to hear from alumni who are out in the world doing very cool stuff. Today, there are three people from very different walks of life. They will intrigue you.”

O’Connell has lived temporarily in more than 10 states in six years. He provides campaign strategy for candidates, plans election advertising, and meets with supporters. His assignments have taken him from Alaska to Mississippi and California to Kansas.

The alumni who participated in the program are:

Rasmussen was a postgraduate student who played on the varsity basketball team that won the New England Prep School Championship in 1990. He believes a strong knowledge of mathematics is the key skill for a career in finance.

• Susan Hurwitz Callison ’89 is the founder and CEO of Solidea • •

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Medical in West Hartford, Conn. David O'Connell ’02 of Madison, Conn. is a political campaign manager. Christian Rasmussen ’90 of Fairfield, Conn. leads secured funding business for UBS.

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Excerpts from the question and answer session follow:

Q

: You launched your business and then did a research and marketing plan later. Would you do that differently today?

A

: Callison - When I started the company, I tried to market directly to the medical field. Social media wasn’t as robust when I started. Now, I run the business online and market to individuals.

Q A

: What do you look for in a campaign volunteer?

: O’Connell - Volunteers have to be motivated. It’s important for them to have consequential things to do. I try not to turn people away. I created relationships in college that still help me today.

Q A

: You work more than 60 hours a week. How do you find time to relax?

: Rasmussen - I have four children. The word “relax” is foreign to me. To be home more, I recently asked my boss to allow me to go home early two days a week. I still hit my metrics required for the job.

Q

: You are a cancer survivor and work with privacy issues. How do honor it with clients?

A

: Callison - I Skype with a client, or do online seminars I call “Blabs.” I help people make small shifts in their life.

Q

: How did an Academy teacher’s suggestion lead you to choose your career?

A

: O’Connell - Mr. [Butch] Rogers gave my father information about a history seminar in Washington, D.C. I didn’t want to go. It turned out the whole week was fun.

Q A

: How did enrolling as a postgraduate help you prepare for college?

: Rasmussen - The faculty opened my eyes to the option of not settling on a specific path. I realized the importance of studying and always pushing yourself along different avenues.

Fo r m o re i n f o r m a t i o n o n C h e s h i re C o nve r s a t i o n s , o r to f i n d o u t h o w to b e i nvo l ve d , e m a i l t h e D e ve l o p m e n t a n d A l u m n i Re l a t i o n s o f f i c e a t a l u m n i @ c h e s h i re a c a d e my.o rg

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alumni in academics

A LO O K AT F O U R A LU M N I W H O A R E U S I N G T H E I R CH E S H I R E

AC A D EM Y E X PER I EN CE S TO S U PP O R T T H E E D U C AT I O N W O R L D.

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FROM SUPPORT ED TO SUPP ORT ER EMILY BROCK BA RCEL ’05 A ND M A NDY GR AS S ’0 4 From Instagram posts to ScratchUp blogs, Cheshire Academy students share their thoughts and experiences in myriad ways. For alumni, social media also provides an outlet to tout the benefits of attending the Academy. “In life, we are all given a certain set of strengths. However, some individuals may need support … My goal is to assist those in need, to apply their strengths in order to lead the most self-determined lives possible.” - Emily Brock Barcel ’05 – LinkedIn Barcel (pictured top right) is unabashedly earnest in her goals as a teacher and how her education at the Academy directed her to choose special education as her career. She was enrolled in the Roxbury Academic Support Program and points to the skills she learned there as her foundation for success in college; “The Academy added a supportive environment. I felt confident, and my outlook totally changed,” Barcel said. A similar success story is told by Mandy Grass ’04 (pictured bottom right), who teaches special education math classes at Old Saybrook Middle School in Connecticut. “As a senior, I was ready for college, but without Roxbury, I would not have been. I can’t stress enough the support I received,” she said. “My whole family was worried that I would never make it through college,” Grass said. However, after learning organizational skills and executive function applications, she said the educational support she was given through Roxbury

allowed her to not only receive a bachelor’s degree, but to earn a master’s degree in special education, and a sixth year certificate in mathematics education leadership. Both alumnae list Leah Stancil and Leslie Barry, the former and current directors of Roxbury, respectively, as providing encouragement, insight, and even strictness, as the foundation for their success. “Mrs. Stancil told me ‘you’re on an elevator and you can only go up,’” said Barcel. Grass met with Stancil once a day, each week, for two years. “Everything was in a three-ring binder. That was a big help to me. I still use them,” she said. Barry helped Barcel with the task of reading, “Beowulf ”. “She took no prisoners. It was the first time I had been called out and recognized for not working to my ability,” she added. Barcel is the second generation from her family to attend Cheshire Academy, following her father, Raymond Blakeslee Brock ’74 P’05; her uncle, Peter Brock ’71; and her aunt, Sharon Brock ’71. Barcel chose to attend the Academy after she took a campus tour. “The student who gave us the tour knew every single person we passed. It was so different than public school,” she said. The success Grass realized at the Academy gave her a life-long goal to provide the same support for others. “My intention is to help the students learn skills to be independent and to lead self-determined lives.”

TO P: Em i l y B ro c k Ba rc e l ’ 0 5 B OT TO M: Mandy Grass ’04

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alumni

S T UDEN T AT HLE T E BECOMES COACH T ORY V ERDI ’92 The postgraduate (PG) program at Cheshire Academy has produced a number of successful student-athletes. Salvatore “Tory” Verdi Jr. ’92 is a strong example of a PG who took full advantage of the student-centered education at Cheshire Academy to achieve success as a teacher and then a collegiate coach.

“ I PU T M YSELF OU T T HERE TO BE T HE HARDES T WORKING PERSON ”

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“I grew up that year, it allowed me to mature,” Verdi said of his time at the Academy. “I will be forever thankful for the life lessons it taught me.” Now the head women’s basketball coach at Eastern Michigan University, Verdi said he wasn’t ready for college after graduating from high school. “I couldn’t write essays or papers. At the Academy I received positive reinforcement and started growing.” After attending Keene State College where he received a bachelor’s degree in elementary education, Verdi went on to get a master’s degree in computer science from the University of Hartford. He became an elementary school teacher in his hometown of New Britain, Conn., and in Hartford. Verdi then moved into a collegiate coaching career when he returned to Keene as an assistant coach. He has since coached 12 teams, ranging from the University of Nebraska and Kansas University, to the WNBA’s Connecticut Sun which won the Eastern Conference when Verdi was an assistant coach.

He sees the basketball court as an extension of a classroom. “I prepare the team members for life after basketball. I work to instill values and help players make an impact in society. I try to help them grow and develop,” Verdi said. A tried and true method of student guidance has worked for Verdi: he leads by example. “I put myself out there to be the hardest working person,” he said. “As a classroom teacher, I created a structured environment. I now bring energy, excitement, and elements of fun to the team as well,” Verdi added. Coaching collegiate basketball can mean long days, lots of travel, and little down time. Verdi said he stays balanced through the support of his wife, family, and staff, who are his sounding boards. The Verdi name is still familiar at the Academy as the next generation of studentathlete is enrolled. Hunter Verdi ’17 has been a starter on the varsity football team since his freshman year. He is Tory Verdi’s nephew and the son and grandson of educators. “My uncle is a likable person. He relates to students,” said Hunter Verdi. “He’s energetic and he does things that help students feel comfortable so they like him.” The junior said his uncle, “takes charge but in a manner in which the team wants to follow him. He


is a great leader who guides them and has a lasting effect on their futures.” Teaching could be considered the Verdi family career. Tory Verdi’s parents were both teachers in New Britain and Todd Verdi, Hunter Verdi’s father, is the principal of Slade Middle School, also in New Britain. His mother, Heather, is an assistant principal at Platt High School in nearby Meriden.

”I understand how important it is to have the ability to shape the future of children,” Tory Verdi said. That knowledge was formed at the Academy. “With the combination of the Roxbury Academic Support program and extra help periods, students achieve tremendous results. Some excel at an unbelievable level as individuals,” Tory Verdi said. “It makes the Academy attractive. It’s a special place and always will be.”

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38-Y E AR T E ACHING CAREER JO SEP H CA L A BRO ’71 Success as a teacher begins not only with a strong education, but also with strong examples of the best-in-classroom instruction. Recently retired teacher Joseph Calabro ’71 soaked up the expertise of Academy faculty and is able to recall the names of his favorite instructors as if he had just left their classrooms last week. “Bob Gardiner taught me a love for English; Doug Rehor got me through math,” Calabro said. “Carl Weber taught me Latin for three years, and John Corpaci was our yearbook advisor. What a mind that man had,” he added. Calabro integrated what he learned at the Academy into his 38-year career as an English teacher at Pomperaug High School in Southbury, Conn. What many may not know is he began his teaching career at Cheshire Academy where he taught English in the 19761977 school year. “I’m delighted he became a teacher, and I was delighted to have him as a student,” said his mentor, former Senior Master Bob Gardiner, who was chair of the English department while Calabro was a student. “Joe was never satisfied with just what we did in class. He read more, wrote more, and was a curious guy,” Gardiner said. “When we had a discussion in class, I could count on him to participate and figure things out with his own thoughts,” Gardiner said. “He was ready to think more. It’s a real joy to me that Joe became a teacher,” he added.


“I owe what I am to this place,” Calabro said. “I had a chance to try all these opportunities.” And try them he did. The day student from Waterbury was involved in 15 clubs and activities, served as president of the biology club, was a member of the National Honor Society, and worked as both the art editor and co-editor of the Rolling Stone yearbook. Athletics were also part of Calabro’s broad experience at the Academy. He was on both the track and cross country teams and taught karate to fellow students. At graduation, he was honored with the Parents Association Award which is presented to a student who, for at least three years, has given the most of himself for the good of the Academy. “He took full advantage of the small classes. He made a name for himself,” said Calabro’s daughter, Lisa Calabro. “When I was growing up, he would come home with thank you notes or plates full of cookies. I always noticed that students were so thankful,” she said. At Calabro’s retirement party in June 2014, Lisa Calabro said her father gave a farewell speech about his teaching philosophy. “He made a point of putting students first; he put in an effort to get to know them,” she said. Looking back at his time at the Academy, Calabro remembered the support he received. “Teachers helped me love education and encouraged my interest,” he said. “There was individual attention and small classes.” Despite having taught at a public high school, with large class sizes and regimented curriculum, Calabro still applied student-centered teaching methods in his own classroom. “I was teaching like I’d been taught. Seminar style. Sitting down with students,” Calabro said. He would put four tables together to create a Harkness table-like setting. “Teachers shouldn’t be on a pedestal but should be part of the community.” When he went to college, Calabro said he had already learned to raise his hand and talk to teachers. He was not shy to offer up a

point on the topic. “You can’t leave Cheshire Academy without having a positive attitude about education,” he said. Calabro said he learned the skill of discussion and organization at the Academy and how to take a large task and break it down into small components. He was a quiet student in grammar school, Calabro said, but once he became a student at the Academy, he learned public speaking and presentation skills. “People who become teachers love school,” Calabro noted. When he began his profession, Calabro said he noticed students were much more inclusive than when he was in public elementary and middle school. Still, Calabro said, teaching can be chaotic. Students have up and down moods, he added, and teachers often work within a system that’s disorganized.

“ I OWE WHAT I AM TO T HIS PL ACE ”

Calabro considered becoming a high school counselor and received a second master's degree in humanistic education to explore the possibility. He remained an English teacher, but he said he used a fusion of both degrees to teach. Calabro joined the National Association of Peer Programs and became certified to teach students how to support their fellow teens by learning to listen and respond. After nearly 40 years in education, Calabro said he’s seen students become more comfortable with teachers. “They talk to you and bring up issues. You develop an honest relationship,” he said. During his tenure, Calabro taught two generations of students, and now his daughter Lisa, is teaching the children of a third generation. “I have a sense of pride that I’m carrying on his tradition,” she said. Know of an alum who is making a difference in their respective field? Let us know! magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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EVENTS J O I N H E A D O F SC H O O L J O H N D. N OZ E L L A N D S PE C I A L C H E S H I R E AC A D E M Y G U E S T S AT O N E O F O U R U P CO M I N G R E C E P T I O N S N E W YO R K R A N G E R S VS . B OS TO N BRUINS Monday, January 11, 2016 Madison Square Garden; Luxury Lounge, Please note that this is a donor only event, Cost: $100 – includes access to lounge, food, and drinks N E W YO R K C I T Y A LU M N I A N D PA R E N T R E C E P T I O N Hosted by Trustee Howard Greenstone P’12 Tuesday, January 26, 2016 Jams, 1 Hotel Central Park, 1414 Avenue of the Americas, Cost: $25 – includes food and drinks

PU E R TO R I CO FA M I LY W E E K E N D A N D G O L F FU N D R A I S E R El Conquistador, Fajardo, Puerto Rico March 10 -13, 2016 CO L L E G E V I S I T S Beginning in spring 2016 Boston University, Boston College, Northeastern University, University of Connecticut REUNION May 13-14, 2016 Highlighting class years ending in 1s and 6s.

SLEEPING GIANT GOLF OUTING JULY 2015 Followed by Aunt Chilada’s Reception

Visit us online to register for these events and view more photo at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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1

2

3

4 W H E R E W E’ V E B E E N 1 NEW YORK CITY Christian Malerba ’04 with Justin Markin ’96 2 BOWDEN HALL Chris Motter ’97 caught up with Trustee Ron Feinstein ’64 3 DELRAY, FLORIDA Head of School John D. Nozell and Mark Goodman ’64

5

6

4 MALERBA ’04 WEDDING Keith Bushey ’04, Jake Blasini ’04, Sydney Wickey ’04, Kayla Edwards ’04, Anthony Laudano ’04, Mike Vanhaafen ’04, Doug Wayne ’04, Brittany Jennings Laudano ’06 5 MADISON SQUARE GARDEN Christian Malerba ’04 and Adam Squinto ’11. Squinto works in the ticket office specializing on inside sales. 6 MADISON SQUARE GARDEN Christian Malerba ’04 and Alex Case ’99. Case is the Training Center Operation Director for the New York Rangers.


class notes

from the archives

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1940s

1950s

J o s e p h J. J a c k l e r looks back at his time at CA, stating, “It has been a long time. Arthur Sheriff was still Headmaster, no girls, and we had Sunday tea with Mrs. Sheriff pouring. Great education. I retired at age 59. Went to Syracuse as a premed student and came out with a master’s degree in business where I earned physics and accounting honors. I wore out all my Cheshire clothes and would love to buy a Cheshire Alum shirt.”

S h e p a r d Fo r e s t is enjoying his life playing golf all year round in New York and Boca Raton, Florida.

’47

L e w i s E . H o l l a n d e r trained for and completed the 2014 Hawaii Ironman. He is in the Guinness Book of World Records as the oldest person in the world, at age 82, to finish the Hawaii Ironman; he is now 85. Hollander is also in the Hall of Fame for the American Endurance Ride Conference and is a four-time World Champion ITU triathlete. He is a scientist with many patents and publications. Check out his web page: www.lewhollander.com.

’50 ’50

L . B a r r y T i n ko f f says, “After attending NYU (University Heights) from 1950 to 1953, I transferred to Boston University and obtained a JD degree. I served in the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force. I then practiced law in Massachusetts from 1960 to 1989, and from 1964 to 1972 I served as an Assistant District Attorney. I retired in 1989 and lived in Florida for 14 years. I then moved back to Massachusetts. I married and have two sons who are software engineers in the San Francisco, California area.”

’ 52

I . Tu l l y S c h u s t e r recently returned to Boca Raton, Florida. He is now retired.

A B OV E F o r m e r S e ni o r Ma ste r B o b G a rd in e r m a d e a sto p ba ck a t th e A c a d e my th i s fa ll .

’ 53

J u l i o A . M e s t r e updates us saying, “I spent the last 13 years living in Miami, Florida then Cuba, the country where I was born. I worked for three years in Washington D.C. with the OAS. After that, for about 30 years I lived in Venezuela, the country where I married and had a daughter and son.

P H OTO C R E D I T: T H E T E L E G R A P H

’47

LE W IS E . H O LL A N DE R i s in th e G u inn e ss B o o k o f Wo rl d R e co rd s a s th e ol d e st p e r so n in th e w o rl d , a t age 82 , to f ini sh th e Haw a ii Iro nm a n .

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R i c h a r d F. Pa l l e r i a was recently elected vice president and director of alumni relations of The New Haven Gridiron Club.

’ 59

T h o m a s W. M a n n i o n has been living in Florida for 14 years and decided to take up real estate. He writes, “I love the activity, it keeps me young.” He also served as the former director/officer of the Bonita Estero Association of Realtors. He loves Southwest Florida where golf and fishing offer a great lifestyle.

’58

S TATH IS OR PH A N OS w a s g i ve n h i s f i r s t c a m e r a by h i s f a t h e r

w h e n h e w a s a s e n i o r a t C h e s h i re A c a d e my. T h e g i f t l e d to a c a re e r a s a p h o to g r a p h e r a n d t h e n p u b l i s h e r o f w o r l d re n o w n e d a u t h o r s . H i s p r i ze d c o ll e c t i o n o f b o o k s , m a n u s c r i p t s , a n d a u t h o r s’ l e t te r s w a s re c e n t l y p u rc h a s e d by t h e L i b r a r y o f C o n g re s s . To h ig h l ig h t t h e n e w c o ll e c t i o n, w h i c h i s h o u s e d i n t h e Ra re B o o k a n d S p e c ia l C o ll e c t i o n s D i v i s i o n, t h e L i b r a r y o f C o n g re s s i nv i te d O r p h a n o s to g i ve a l e c t u re t h i s p a s t J u n e a b o u t h i s 3 0 yea r p u b l i s h i n g c a re e r w i t h h i s L o s A n g e l e s - b a s e d c o m p a ny c a ll e d Sy l ve s te r & O r p h a n o s . I n h i s p re s e n t a t i o n i n Wa s h i n g to n D.C ., O r p h a n o s s h o w e d a n a e r ia l p h o to o f t h e C h e s h i re A c a d e my c a m p u s a n d n o te d h o w t h e s c h o o l h e l p e d g u i d e h i m i n to t h e w o r l d o f f i n e a r t a n d l i te r a t u re. “I m e n t i o n t h e A c a d e my i n my b i o g r a p hy b e c a u s e I w e n t t h e re f o r f i ve yea r s . I l i ve d i n Ph i ll i p s H o u s e a n d a t te n d e d t h e A f te r n o o n Tea s w i t h H ea d o f S c h o o l A r t h u r S h e r i f f a n d h i s w i f e.” A m o n g t h e i te m s p u rc h a s e d f o r t h e c o ll e c t i o n a re s ig n e d l i m i te d e d i t i o n s b o o k s by C h r i s to p h e r I s h e r w o o d , G o re V i d a l, a n d N o b e l Pr i ze W i n n e r s N a d i n e G o rd i m e r a n d V. S . N a i p a u l.

Learn more about Orphanos’ presentation in the next issue of 1794.

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1960s

’62

Fr e d S . M a c a r y re t i re d i n J u l y 2 0 0 9 a f te r 4 0 yea r s of prac ticing engineering, i n c l u d i n g n i n e yea r s o f tea c h i n g m a t h a n d p hy s i c s at a local engineering c o ll e g e. H e s e n d s h i s b e s t re g a rd s to f e ll o w a l u m s , c u r re n t s t u d e n t s , a n d s t a f f.

’62

J e f f r ey B . L o n g i s re t i re d a f te r 3 6 yea r s o f tea c h i n g h ig h s c h o o l a n d 21 yea r s s e r v i n g a s a n a t h l e t i c s d i re c to r. H e h a s b e e n m a r r i e d 49 yea r s to h i s w i f e, D o n n a, a n d h a s t w o s o n s , Pe te a n d Bi ll. J e f f re y g r a d u a te d f ro m N o r w i c h U n i ve r s i t y i n 196 6 a n d s p e n t t w o yea r s i n t h e U. S . A r my. H e s p e n d s t i m e e n j oy i n g h i s grand kids.

’6 3

H OWA R D W. N E W K I R K

’60

s t a te s , “M y w i f e o f 4 8 yea r s a n d I to o k o u r b o a t a n d d i d t h e G rea t E a s te r n L o o p. We s t a r te d i n N o r t h e r n M i c h ig a n w h e re w e l i ve, w e n t t h ro u g h t h e l a ke s , a n d u p t h e St . L a w re n c e p a s t N ov a S c o t ia. We t h e n w e n t d o w n to M a i n e, Massachuset ts, Connec ticut, and N e w Yo r k C i t y, a n d f i n i s h e d u p t h e H u d s o n a n d b a c k o n t h e Er i e C a n a l: 3 ,910 m i l e s , 8 s t a te s , a n d 5 p rov i n c e s . Fu n!”

T h o m a s E . Ro o t t u r n e d 71 t h i s yea r, i s i n g rea t h ea l t h a n d p l ay s a l o t o f te n n i s . H e h a s o n e s o n, o n e d a u g h te r, a n d t w o g r a n d d a u g h te r s . H e h e l p s o t h e r s to m a i n t a i n g o o d h e a l t h a n d f i n a n c ia l s e c u r i t y a s a d i s t r i b u to r w i t h Ag e l En te r p r i s e s . H e j u s t c e l e b r a te d h i s 51s t w e d d i n g a n n i ve r s a r y to M a u d e Ro s s e r Ro o t o n S e p te m b e r 3 . Ro o t w r i te s , “ W i l l i a m B o o n e Va n H o f f w a s o u r b e s t m a n, a n d t h e BE S T i s ye t to c o m e. B e b o l d a n d l i ve yo u r l i f e to t h e f u ll e s t!”

’64 ’6 4

Allen L . Simmons r a n t h e 2 014 B o s to n Marathon and finished in f o u r h o u r s a n d 10 m i n u te s . B e f o re t h e B o s to n e ve n t , h e r a n t h e Prov i d e n c e M a r a t h o n.

’6 4

C a r y A . Pa l u l i s h a d a m a j o r h ea r t a t t a c k o n A u g u s t 2 3 , 2 014. T h e a r te r y c a ll e d “w i d o w m a ke r ” w a s 10 0 p e rc e n t b l o c ke d , b u t h e m a d e i t to t h e e m e rg e n c y ro o m q u i c k l y, to o k a s p i r i n, a n d w a s s ave d by d o c to r s . He is doing, “fine and d a n d y” n o w – a n d w a s g i ve n a c l ea n b i ll o f h ea l t h. I n S e p te m b e r h e w e n t o n his first vacation since the incident.

’6 6

J o n a t h a n Va u g h n i s re t i re d . H e s p e n d s h i s w i n te r s i n A r i zo n a a n d s u m m e r s i n t h e Pu g e t S o u n d a rea w i t h h i s f a m i l y.

“ Be bold and live life to the f ullest ”

TH OMA S E . RO OT ’6 3 the magazine of cheshire academy

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( P i ct u re d le f t to r igh t) Tr u ste e s R i ch a rd C e r ro n e ’67, Mi ch a e l Ma u ro P ’ 11, a n d D a v i d Je pso n ’ 59 ce le b ra te Je pso n’s ga lle r y o p e ning w ith He a d o f S ch o ol Joh n D . No z e ll .

DAV E J E PSON

’59

Pr a c t i c i n g t h e a r t o f s ke tc h i n g w i t h p e n a n d i n k b e g a n w h e n B o a rd o f Tr u s te e m e m b e r Dave J e p s o n w a s s t u d y i n g a t C h e s h i re A c a d e my. O n e o f h i s f i r s t f o r m a l s ke tc h e s o f a n o l d m i ll b u i l d i n g w a s d r a w n w h e n h e w a s a s o p h o m o re i n 195 7. J e p s o n i ll u s t r a te d t h e 1959 Ro ll i n g Sto n e yea r b o o k a n d s ke tc h e d s o m e G re e k my t h o l o g y i m a g e s f o r H o r i zo n s , t h e l i te r a r y m a g a z i n e. I n S e p te m b e r, J e p s o n h a d h i s f i r s t p u b l i c e x h i b i t o f s ke tc h e s a t a s h o w i n t h e Ko h n - J o s e l o f f Ga ll e r y. C a ll e d , “Re t ro s p e c t i ve i n I n k ,” t h e s h o w h ig h l ig h te d n ea r l y 5 0 yea r s o f w o r k . T h e e x h i b i t c o n t a i n e d a c o m b i n a t i o n o f w o r k J e p s o n c rea te d

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f o r J C J A rc h i te c t u re i n H a r t f o rd , w h e re h e w a s a p r i n c i p a l a rc h i te c t . O t h e r s w e re d o n e w h i l e h e w a s a t C h e s h i re A c a d e my, i n c o ll e g e a t Re n s s e l a e r Po l y te c h n i c I n s t i t u te, a n d i n t h e N av y. J e p s o n s a i d p e n a n d i n k d r a w i n g s f i t h i s s t y l e. “I t ’s my p e r s o n a l i t y, i t ’s p re c i s e. O n c e I d r a w a l i n e, I d o n’t s h a d e i t o r g o b a c k ove r a n d c ove r i t . T h e s e d r a w i n g s a re o n e - s h o t d ea l s . I ’m a n i n k g u y,” h e s a i d . “A s t i m e g o e s o n, I h o p e to f u r t h e r my i n te re s t i n s ke tc h i n g t h e p hy s i c a l e nv i ro n m e n t a n d e x p e r i m e n t i n g w i t h n e w te c h n i q u e s i n b l a c k a n d w h i te l i n e, a n d d o t i n k s ke tc h i n g ,” h e a d d e d .


1970s ’ 71

St eve n S m i t h a S o u t h B ro n x rea l e s t a te d e ve l o p e r, h a s m a d e re c e n t h ea d l i n e s d u e to h i s s u s t a i n a b i l i t y e f f o r t s i n O a k Po i n t , N e w Yo r k . Ta k i n g ove r t h e 2 8 a c re s o f l a n d — a o n c e n o to r i o u s i ll e g a l g a r b a g e d u m p m o u n d e d w i t h d e b r i s a n d l o o te d w i t h c r i m i n a l i t y — S m i t h i nve s te d i n t h e l a n d , t u r n i n g i t i n to a f re s h - f o o d d i s t r i b u t i o n c e n te r a n d s o o n - to - b e t h re e - a c re n a t u r a l p re s e r ve a n d f a r m e r s m a r ke t .

’ 71

Ke n n e t h L . S o l a r z i s t h e e xe c u t i ve p ro d u c e r o f, “H a w a i i F i ve - O” a n d w o r k s f o r Pa r a m o u n t St u d i o s .

’ 72

G a r y J. G r a h a m c a tc h e s u p w i t h To m C r o c ke r, s t a t i n g , “C e l e b r a t i n g o u r l o n g ove rd u e f r a te r n i t y re u n i o n (S ig m a C h i ) a t T h e U n i ve r s i t y o f M ia m i. To m C ro c ke r a n d I f i n a ll y h o o ke d u p f o r t h i s re u n i o n; i t h a d b e e n a b o u t 37 yea r s s i n c e w e h a d s e e n ea c h o t h e r. I t w a s g o o d to s e e o l d f r i e n d s a g a i n. We h ave s c h e d u l e d a n o t h e r A c a d e my re u n i o n.”

’ 75

N i e l s P. A a b o e i s a s e n i o r e d i to r a t S k y h o r s e Pu b l i s h i n g i n N e w Yo r k , w h e re h e m a n a g e s t h e S p o r t s Pu b l i s h i n g i m p r i n t . H e re c e n t l y p u b l i s h e d , “A B o w l Fu ll o f M e m o r i e s: 10 0 Yea r s o f Fo o t b a ll a t t h e Ya l e B o w l,” by Ri c h M a r a z z i. T h e b o o k h ig h l ig h t s t h e Ya l e B o w l ’s c e n te n n ia l a n n i ve r s a r y, w h i c h w a s c e l e b r a te d i n t h e f a ll o f 2 014. I t f ea t u re s a s e c t i o n o n L a r r y Ke ll e y, w h o w o n t h e H e i s m a n Tro p hy a t Ya l e i n 19 3 6 a n d la te r t a u g h t a n d s e r ve d a s a l u m n i d i re c to r a t C h e s h i re A c a d e my.

’77

Pa u l W. D a n i e l s o n h a s re t i re d a f te r p r a c t i c i n g l a w f o r 3 0 yea r s . H e s p e n t t h e la s t 2 0 yea r s h e l p i n g m i l i t a r y ve te r a n s a ro u n d t h e c o u n t r y i n m e d i c a l m a l p r a c t i c e c a s e s a g a i n s t VA h o s p i t a l s a n d h a s l i t ig a te d i n 21 d i f f e re n t s t a te s . H e i s n o w t h i n k i n g a b o u t w r i t i n g a b o o k a b o u t a s m a ll p re p s c h o o l d e e p i n t h e N e w En g l a n d w o o d s ...

TO DD & CLI NT Z E I DE N B E RG To d d (p i ct u re d le f t) re ce iv e d th e 2 015 F iv e S ta r We a lth Ma n age r Aw a rd

’79

’ 78

L e e M . C o h e n s ay s , “ T h e rea l e s t a te m a r ke t i s g rea t i n Tu l s a. We n o w h ave e ig h t of f i c e s a n d a l m o s t 4 0 0 a g e n t s!”

’ 79

To d d Z e i d e n b e r g re c e i ve d t h e 2 015 F i ve St a r Wea l t h M a n a g e r A w a rd a n d w a s re c o g n i ze d i n t h e D e c e m b e r i s s u e o f “ T h e C o n n e c t i c u t M a g a z i n e”. H i s b ro t h e r, C l i n t Z e i d e n b e r g, h a s p u rc h a s e d a C ro s s f i t f r a n c h i s e i n G u i l f o rd n a m e d , “G u i l f o rd C ro s s f i t .”

57


alumni

from the archives

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the magazine of cheshire academy

’72


CAPTION THIS These guys are obviously s m i l i n g a b o u t s o m e t h i n g! I f you know the contex t behind t h i s p h o t o, o r w h o t h e t w o m e n a r e, l e t u s k n o w. E v e n i f y o u d o n’ t , t a ke a g u e s s a n d g i v e u s a caption.

c o m @ c h e s h i r e a c a d e m y.o rg


1980s ’80

SUSA N B. H U RW IT Z C A LLISON C a lli so n sp o k e th i s fa ll a t th e 3rd a nn u a l C h e sh i re C o nv e r sa t i o n s Pa n e l .

G u s t a vo Pe r e z u p d a te s u s s ay i n g , “I ’m tea c h i n g En g l i s h i n C a r a c a s , Ve n e z u e l a. Tr y i n g to ke e p my s e l f u p d a te d i n t h e f i e l d of ELT. M y w i f e Ja c q u e l i n e i s h ea l t hy a n d l i ve s o n h e r re t i re m e n t b e n e f i t . M y p a re n t s a re h ea l t hy, s t i ll yo u n g i n s p i r i t! I h ave a p l a n to w o r k i n t h e f i e l d o f ELT o r i n a n o t h e r f i e l d; s u c h a s c u l i n a r y, o n M a rg a r i t a I s la n d . I t g i ve s m e j oy to ke e p i n to u c h w i t h yo u p e o p l e, t h e f a m i l y f ro m C h e s h i re A c a d e my, w h i c h w a s my s c h o o l h o u s e f o r a yea r i n 19 8 0. I ’m a b i t n e r vo u s a b o u t my p la n s f o r t h e f u t u re, b u t I ’m p o s i t i ve. H o p e yo u ke e p o n ro c k i n g . W h o k n o w s , I m ig h t p e r s o n a ll y b e v i s i t i n g yo u. L o t s of b l e s s i n g to yo u a ll!”

’83

A n d r e a C . M o r r i s i s t h e f o u n d e r a n d d i re c to r o f t h e I n te r n a t i o n a l L ea r n i n g C e n te r o f To g o i n We s t A f r i c a.

’89

’85

O s c a r Pe r e z g o t m a r r i e d f o r a s e c o n d t i m e i n O t t a w a, C a n a d a.

’85

K i m b e r l y C o t t o n H oy t te ll s u s , “M y h u s b a n d a n d I a re i n t h e p ro c e s s o f p l ay i n g g o l f to g e t h e r i n a ll 5 0 s t a te s . We a re a t 3 9 s t a te s n o w. T h e l a s t 11 a re g o i n g to b e m o re c h a ll e n g i n g t h a n t h e f i r s t 3 9. T h e ea s t , s o u t h, a n d w e s t c o a s t w e re ea s y. T h e c o l d n o r t h e r n s t a te s a n d t h o s e l a rg e r o n e s i n t h e m i d d l e a re g o i n g to b e t h e to u g h o n e s .” T h e y h ave p l aye d a t ove r 3 0 0 d i f f e re n t c o u r s e s , w i t h a g o a l o f 5 0 0 b e f o re t h e y ’re d o n e!

’89

Looking for a class note? Find more online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

17 94

S u s a n B . H u r w i t z C a l l i s o n o w n s S o l i d ea M e d i c a l i n C o n n e c t i c u t w h e re s h e g i ve s h e l p a n d h o p e to p e o p l e w h o h ave l y m p h e d e m a a s a re s u l t o f c a n c e r t rea t m e n t s . S o l i d ea M e d i c a l o f f e r s a u n i q u e s o l u t i o n f o r c h ro n i c l y m p h e d e m a, a c o m m o n l i f e - a l te r i n g s i d e e f f e c t f ro m c a n c e r t rea t m e n t s . S o l i d ea M e d i c a l t a ke s o n l y m p h e d e m a, o n e o f t h e m o s t d rea d e d s i d e e f f e c t s o f c a n c e r t rea t m e n t s a n d o f f e r s w ea r a b l e, m a s s a g i n g c o m p re s s i o n g a r m e n t s to h e l p s l o w d o w n t h e p ro g re s s i o n a n d a ll e v ia te t h e s w e ll i n g a n d d i s c o m f o r t a s s o c ia te d w i t h l y m p h e d e m a. C a ll i s o n re c e n t l y to o k t i m e to s p ea k to C h e s h i re A c a d e my s t u d e n t s d u r i n g t h e 3 rd A n n u a l C h e s h i re C o nve r s a t i o n s Pa n e l.

’89

A m a n d a E . Pe t t y tea c h e s P.E. a n d h ea l t h a t a p r i m a r y s c h o o l i n B e r m u d a. S h e h a s b e e n m a r r i e d f o r s i x yea r s to h e r h u s b a n d , Ba r r y. T h e y h ave a s o n, F i n b a r, w h o i s 5 yea r s o l d a n d a d a u g h te r, M i r a b e ll a, w h o i s 4 yea r s o l d . S h e h o p e s t h a t a ll h e r o l d s c h o o l f r i e n d s a re h av i n g a w o n d e r f u l l i f e – a n d m i s s e s t h e m a ll.

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’81

K E N FE R R ITE R W h i l e m a ny C h e s h i re A c a d e my s t u d e n t s w e re t a k i n g t h e P S AT o n O c to b e r 2 8 , t h e p o s tg r a d u a te s w e re t a k i n g a s p e c ia l t r i p to M e t l i f e St a d i u m. C h e s h i re A c a d e my a l u m n u s Ke n Fe r r i te r ‘ 81 i s t h e V i c e P re s i d e n t o f C o r p o r a te S p o n s o r s h i p a t M e t L i f e St a d i u m a n d i nv i te d t h e g ro u p n o t o n l y f o r a V I P to u r o f t h e f a c i l i t i e s , b u t a l s o to d i s c u s s s p o r t s m a r ke t i n g a n d h i s d ay to d ay a c t i v i t i e s . “This was an amazing oppor tunit y for o u r p o s tg r a d u a te s t u d e n t s ,” s a i d D ea n o f St u d e n t s & At h l e t i c s Dav i d D y ke m a n. “N o t o n l y d i d t h e y re c e i ve a n a ll a c c e s s to u r o f M e t L i f e St a d i u m, b u t m o re

i m p o r t a n t l y, t h e y w e re a l s o a b l e to h ea r f ro m a C h e s h i re A c a d e my a l u m n u s d o i n g s o m e t h i n g m a ny o f t h e m a s p i re to d o, w h i c h i s s p o r t s m a r ke t i n g . I t i s c e r t a i n l y a d ay m a ny o f t h e m w i ll n o t f o rg e t .” “I t ’s a l w ay s re w a rd i n g to s e e o n e o f o u r o w n C h e s h i re A c a d e my a l u m s , o n e who is successful and in a position of p o w e r, g i ve b a c k to o u r c o m m u n i t y,” s a i d D i re c to r o f A l u m n i Re l a t i o n s a n d S p e c ia l E ve n t s C h r i s t ia n M a l e r b a ’ 0 4. Fo r m o re i n f o r m a t i o n o n C h e s h i re A c a d e my ’s Po s tg r a d u a te p ro g r a m, p l ea s e v i s i t w w w.c h e s h i re a c a d e my.o rg /p g .

61


’91

DAV E SH E R M A N Dave re c e n t l y a p p ea re d i n “St y l e M a g a z i n e,” w h i c h f ea t u re d h i s l a b o ro f- l ove h i t re s t a u r a n t C a f é C i to l o c a te d i n Ba l t i m o re, M a r y l a n d . S h e r m a n, w h o re c e i ve d h i s t r a i n i n g a t T h e C u l i n a r y I n s t i t u te o f A m e r i c a, h a s s w i f t l y p u t h i s re s t a u r a n t o n t h e m a p w i t h h i s f a m e d “ d r i p py e g g s a n d w i c h,” s i n c e a d d i n g s i x m o re v a r ia t i o n s o f t h e p o p u la r b rea k f a s t d i s h to t h e m e n u. Dave w a s a l s o re c e n t l y n a m e d “B e s t O w n e r ” by Ba l t i m o re M a g a z i n e. P H OTO C R E D I T: C I T Y PA P E R

TH A I L A N D

1990s ’93

C o u r t n ey E v a n s S a c c h e t t i m a r r i e d J o e S a c c h e t t i l a s t yea r i n M a m a ro n e c k , N e w Yo r k . H e r b ro t h e r, G e o rg e E v a n s ‘ 9 7 s e r ve d a s o n e of t h e g ro o m s m e n. I t w a s a b ea u t i f u l n ig h t , m a d e e x t r a s p e c ia l by t h e a t te n d a n c e o f G re g g D i G e n n a ro ‘ 9 2 a n d M a r k L e c u ye r ‘ 9 2!

’ 95

J a m e s Va n D e r B e e k , “C SI: Cy b e r ” s t a r a n n o u n c e d i n t h e f a ll t h a t h e a n d h i s w i f e, K i m b e r l y, a re e x p e c t i n g t h e i r f o u r t h c h i l d! T h e t w o a l rea d y h ave d a u g h te r s O l i v ia, 5 , A n n a b e l, 21 m o n t h s , a n d s o n J o s h u a, 3 , to g e t h e r.

’ 95

R a j e ev Pa h u j a la n d e d a l ea d ro l e w i t h H o ll y w o o d f i l m s u p e r s t a r, f i l m p ro d u c e r, a n d m a r t ia l a r t e x p e r t We s l e y S n i p e s o n t h e H o ll y w o o d f ea t u re f i l m s e t o f “M a s te r Da d d y.”

’97

N i s h a n R . H a l i m re c e n t l y b o u g h t a d e n t a l p r a c t i c e o n C a p i to l H i ll a n d m ove d to t h e Wa s h i n g to n, D.C . a rea. On Tuesday, November 3, Head of School John D. Nozell and Director of Development and Alumni Relations Barbara Davis met with a small group of Thailand alumni in Bangkok at the Sake Room located in the J.W. Marriot. The event was hosted by Kingkavn (Nat) Bongsadadt ’97. Also in attendance were: Nakin Sukcharoenphen ’96, Wannasini (Belle) Laosirichon ’03, and Porapol Adireksarn ’93. “We truly enjoyed meeting with a few of our amazing international alumni. It was a fun night full of many Cheshire Academy stories!” -Barb Davis

PUERTO RICO Golf Tournament March 2015


’97

R i c a r d o G r e e r re c e n t l y j o i n e d t h e U n i ve r s i t y o f C e n t r a l Fl o r i d a a s t h e i r D i re c to r o f Ba s ke t b a ll O p e r a t i o n s . G re e r b r i n g s w i t h h i m a w ea l t h o f b a s ke t b a ll e x p e r i e n c e to U CF, h av i n g p laye d c o ll e g ia te l y a t Pi t t s b u rg h f ro m 19 9 7-2 0 01, f o r t h e D o m i n i c a n Re p u b l i c n a t i o n a l tea m f ro m 19 9 9 -2 0 0 9, a n d p ro f e s s i o n a ll y i n Eu ro p e f o r t h e l a s t 14 yea r s . “I t ’s a n i n c re d i b l e o p p o r t u n i t y. I ’m rea ll y e xc i te d to c o m e h e re a n d h e l p t h e te a m, h e l p t h e p ro g r a m, h e l p t h e u n i ve r s i t y,” G re e r s a i d . “I ’m f o r t u n a te C o a c h J o n e s g ave m e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y a n d I ’m l o o k i n g f o r w a rd to i t .”

’98

A s h l ey Po o r Tr a n t h a m a n d h u s b a n d Ja m e s a re t h e p ro u d p a re n t s o f a n e w b a by d a u g h te r, Ru by L a n e, b o r n o n Ja n u a r y 2 2, 2 015 . S h e j o i n s a s i s te r n a m e d C a n n a n.

’99

M a r k A . G o r d o n g r a d u a te d w i t h h i s m a s te r ’s i n Po l i t i c a l S c i e n c e f ro m V i rg i n ia Te c h. H e l i ve s i n C h a r l o t te, N o r t h C a ro l i n a.

B E LOW A large group of Cheshire Academy alumni celebrated the wedding of Anthony Laudano ’04 & Brittany Jennings Laudano ’06 on October 2, 2105 Stephen ‘07 & Lexi Rodriguez Wheeler ‘07, Cassandra Slauson Piroli ’07, Chelsea Cianciolo ’06, Karissa Masotta ’06, Anthony Laudano ’04 & Brittany Jennings Laudano ’06, Douglas Brown ’82, Leora Bezahler Simon ’06, Michael Carabetta ’06, Corey Blank ’06, Amanda Abbagnaro Gratton ’06, Megan Roman ’06, Michael Vanhaaften ’04, Doug Wayne ’04, Keith Bushey ’04, and Christian Malerba ‘04

the magazine of cheshire academy

63


2000s ’02

J e r e my Ta n n e n b a u m re l o c a te d f ro m C o n n e c t i c u t to Te x a s a f te r g e t t i n g a n e w j o b. H e i s a te c h n i c a l c o o rd i n a to r d o i n g c a r p e n t r y a n d r ig g i n g a t t h e AT&T Pe r f o r m i n g A r t s C e n te r i n Da lla s . H e e n j oy s l i v i n g a n d w o r k i n g i n a la rg e c i t y a n d i s a d j u s t i n g to t h e m o i s t u re d i f f e re n c e b e t te r t h a n e x p e c te d .

’02 ’02

J a ke T h o r t o n a n d A s h l e y W h i te h o u s e w e l c o m e d J P T h o r n to n o n M ay 1, 2 014.

A n t h o ny Ta t a p a r t i c i p a te d i n t h e 2 014 M a s s a c h u s e t t s St a te St ro n g m a n C h a m p i o n s h i p s o n A u g u s t 9, 2 014. Competitions included the Log Clean and Pre s s , C a r D ea d l i f t , T i re Fl i p/S l e d D r a g , At l a s Sto n e to S h o u l d e r, a n d m o re.

’04

B e n n e t Wa t s o n a n d h i s w i f e M e re d i t h w e l c o m e d t h e i r d a u g h te r, L e i l a, i n to t h e w o r l d o n D e c e m b e r 5 , 2 014.

’05

B r i d g e t T h o r n t o n m a d e a m ove to B o s to n f o r h e r n e w j o b a s a C a re S e r v i c e C o o rd i n a to r f o r t h e M a s s a c h u s e t t s C h a p te r o f t h e A L S A s s o c ia t i o n.

’06 ’02

K r i s t e n Wa l l e n i u s - Pa r k and her husband Mat thew w e l c o m e d t h e i r d a u g h te r, K ay a E ve l y n o n J u n e 2 0, 2 014.

G i n a R i c c i s ay s , “I a m c u r re n t l y w o r k i n g to w a rd s c o m p l e t i n g a C u l i n a r y A r t s a s s o c ia te s d e g re e a t H u d s o n C o u n t y C o m m u n i t y C o ll e g e. I a m s c h e d u l e d to g r a d u a te i n 2 016 a n d h o p e to p u r s u e a b a c h e l o r ’s a f te r, p e r h a p s f o c u s i n g o n f o o d s c i e n c e /n u t r i t i o n.”

’03

’02

Nick Manginello and his w i f e L a u r a b e c a m e t h e p ro u d p a re n t s o f a s o n, N i c h o l a s D u r a n te M a n g i n e ll o o n J u l y 10, 2 014. 64

the magazine of cheshire academy

M A R L A S TA N CI L married Dan Holly on June 7, 2014 in Newport, Rhode Island.


’12

A . J. Zu t t a h w a s n a m e d f i r s t tea m A ll I v y - L ea g u e f o r t h e s e c o n d s t r a ig h t yea r a s a d e f e n s i ve t a c k l e f o r t h e Da r t m o u t h f o o t b a ll tea m. H e p l aye d i n a ll 4 0 g a m e s t h ro u g h o u t h i s c a re e r a t Da r t m o u t h a n d s t a r te d t h e l a s t 3 0. A . J. l e d a ll I v y L ea g u e l i n e m e n w i t h 4 4 t a c k l e s , s e ve n o f w h i c h w e n t f o r a l o s s , i n c l u d i n g 3 . 5 s a c k s . O n N ove m b e r 21, 2 015 , Da r t m o u t h c a p p e d of f a n i m p re s s i ve 9 -1 s ea s o n a n d c o ll e c te d a s h a re o f t h e I v y L ea g u e c h a m p i o n s h i p w i t h a 17-10 c o m e - f ro m - b e h i n d w i n ove r Pr i n c e to n, A . J. re c o rd e d 9 t a c k l e s , 1 s a c k , a n d a f u m b l e re c ove r y!

’12

M a l i k G o l d e n w a s f ro n t a n d c e n te r i n S e p te m b e r, a s h e l e d h i s Pe n n St a te f o o t b a ll tea m o n to t h e f i e l d i n f ro n t of 93,0 0 0 fans at their first home g a m e. T h e N i t t a ny L i o n s to o k o n t h e U n i ve r s i t y o f B u f f a l o a t B eave r St a d i u m i n U n i ve r s i t y Pa r k , PA , d e f ea t i n g t h e m 2 7-14. G o l d e n f i n i s h e d t h e g a m e w i t h 2 t a c k l e s a n d 1 k i c k re t u r n f o r 18 y a rd s .

’15

’14

E MM A GA I LE Y i s

c u r re n t l y a t te n d i n g St . L a w re n c e U n i ve r s i t y and is a member of the s o f t b a ll tea m. I n h e r Fre s h m a n yea r, Em m a s a w a c t i o n i n 14 g a m e s a n d l o o k s to b e a ke y c o n t r i b u to r to t h e St . L a w re n c e 2 016 s o f t b a ll tea m a s a s o p h o m o re.

E m m a n u e l Po k u c a m e b a c k f o r a v i s i t i n O c to b e r f ro m C o l g a te C o ll e g e to h e l p c o a c h t h e b oy s v a r s i t y s o c c e r tea m d u r i n g a g a m e a g a i n s t M a r ia n a p o l i s Pre p. H e w a s t h e s e n i o r c l a s s p re s i d e n t i n t h e 2 014 -2 015 s c h o o l yea r a n d w a s a m e m b e r o f t h e N a t i o n a l H o n o r S o c i e t y. Po k u i s p u r s u i n g h i s g o a l o f b e c o m i n g a n e u ro s u rg e o n.

’12

65


IN MEMORIAM

W E G I V E O U R D E E PE S T CO N D O L E N C E S TO T H E FA M I L I E S O F T H E FO L LOW I N G :

1950s

1930s Mr. Spencer H. Douglas ‘36 Mr. John H. Adams, Jr. ‘37 Mr. Gaetano F. Miranda ‘39

1940s Dr. Douglas M. Dunbar, D.D.S. ‘42 Mr. Martin D. Siegel ‘44 Mr. James T. Duffy III ‘44 Mr. John P. Furey ‘45 Dr. Lee R. Sataline ‘46 Mr. John M. Jannitto ‘47 Mr. Kenneth H. Hall ‘48 The Hon. Malcolm Jones ‘48 Mr. Thomas J. Lyons ‘49 Mr. Irving G. Ogilvie ‘49 Mr. Bernard West II ‘49

Mr. Richard C. Baker ‘50 Mr. Robert J. Perugini ‘52 Colonel Harold J. Phelan ‘56 Mr. William B. Lable ‘58 Mr. Sydney L. Pascal ‘59 Mr. Peter B. Strongwater ‘59 Mr. Donald J. Papesh ‘59

Mr. Peter J. Gimbel ‘73 Mr. George G. Olear II ‘73

1980s

Ms. Kabibi C. M’Poko ‘84 Mr. Enrique Cortes ‘89

1990s

1960s Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr.

1970s

Ms. Katey J. Lilliendahl ‘92

John M. Cavanaugh ‘60 Charles M. Ritter ‘62 Wallace T. Fabian ‘66 Stephen Z. Lizak ‘67

Former Faculty & Staff

Mr. Austin Nadeau Mr. Frank Roberts

class notes

N E W S? U PDAT E S? M A R R I AG E? B I R T H?

66

Whether your connec tion to Cheshire is as a graduate, facult y member, or parent, we want to hear about the exciting things happening in your lives. We can also help you get in touch with old friends.

Write to Christian Malerba ’04 at christian.malerba@cheshireacademy.org or visit us online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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69


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Mrs. Carrie Moores

Mr. Jon Patrucco '82

Mr. & Mrs. Dennis J. Libby Mr. Jakob Licht & Ms. Gisella Weissbach-Licht Mr. & Mrs. David M. Licki Mr. & Mrs. Boon Lim Mrs. Faustina Lindsay Mr. Stewart Lindsay, Jr. Mrs. Yun Xian He & Mr. Kai Lie Liu Mr. Richard M. Lofton '53 Mr. & Mrs. John C. Long '42 Mr. Timothy & Mrs. Laura G. Longacre Mr. & Mrs. Tod Lorenzen Mr. John A. LoRicco '77 Mr. Martin J. Loughlin '57 Mr. Greg & Mrs. Emily MacDonald Ms. Maureen Madden-Tardy Mr. Geral Maignan Mr. & Mrs. Aniello D. Malerba, Jr. Mr. Christian J. Malerba '04 Ms. Stephanie Malin Sherman '85 Ms. Alyssa B. Mancinelli '05 Mr. & Mrs. Steven Mara Mr. Michael J. Marcinek '66 Mr. & Mrs. David A. Margolin

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Ms. Rhonda T. Pattberg

Dr. Robert A. Roosa '43

Ms. Keegan Soncha

Mr. Charles E. Peters

Ms. Janet Rosenbaum

Ms. Celia Spiess

Mr. Theodore Peterson

Ms. Cynthia A. Ruggeri

Mr. Richard & Mrs. Leah Stancil

Mr. Frank H. Phipps, Jr. '67

Mr. Edward A. Ruisi '50

Mr. George J. Stavnitski, Jr. '53

Mr. Daniel J. Pierelli '65

Mr. John R. Rumery '36

Mr. Michael M. Stein '53

Mr. Louis D. Pietig II '04

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Ryan

Dr. Sheldon I. Strauss '52

Mrs. Shelby Pocius

Mr. Arnold L. Sabin '44

Mr. Edward M. Stuart '61

Mr. Jacob S. Pohn II '59

Mr. Eric M. Sacco '03

Mr. Jeffrey J. Susla

Mr. & Mrs. Francois Poisson

Mr. Eric Sachse '15

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Swan

Mr. Corin Porter

Mr. Peter Sandler '87

Dr. David W. Sweetkind '48

Mr. Marc N. Potenza

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Sansbury

Mrs. Wendy J. Swift

Mr. Darrick Potter

Mr. Averell W. Satloff '65

Ms. Kallie E. Taylor '10

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Presser

Mr. Praveen R. Savalgi '06

Mr. Nicholas C. Taylor '06

Atty. Pedro J. Pumarada '59

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Scalise

Mr. Randolph M. Taylor '64

Rev. Charles F. Pye '70

Mr. Jonathan K. Scalise '03

Mr. Chip & Mrs. Shelley Taylor-Boyd

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Rafferty

Mr. Robert Schlieman

Mr. Jonathan M. Tendler '64

Mr. Colin P. Raymond '15

Mr. John M. Schloss, Jr. '50

Ms. Bridget Thornton '05

Mr. William H. Rees '52

Mr. Monroe Schulder

Mr. John P. Thornton '02

Mr. Charles W. Rehor '71

Mr. Ralph J. Schupp, Jr. '65

Mrs. Jennifer L. Tirillo

Mr. Barry Reinhard & Ms. Hope R. Milligan

Mr. Robert G. Shamroth '59

Mr. Steven A. Tobin '61

Ms. Glory L. Reinstein

Mr. & Mrs. Jerold Shanok

Ms. Jessica M. Tomaszewski Fowler '01

Ms. Samantha Reuss

Mr. David G. Silverman '80

Mr. Carlos Torres

Ms. Melinda Reuter

Mr. S. Robert Silverton '51

Mr. & Mrs. Brett Torrey

Mr. & Mrs. William H. Reuter

Ms. Wesley Simon

Mr. Matthew Torrey '14

Mr. William A. Reynolds, Jr. '48

Dr. Richard R. Simone '50

Mr. Scott A. Tripp '68

Mr. & Mrs. Louis A. Ricciuti, Sr.

Mrs. Jaimie M. Goodrich Skultety '86

Mr. Ramon J. Valentin Moltalvo

Mr. Phillip L. Ricciuti '87

Mr. Robert L. Slauson '08

Mr. & Mrs. James A. Van Der Beek

Mr. Wilson Rivera

Mr. Curtis & Mrs. Karen J. Smith

Mr. Michael Van Haaften '04

Mr. Gregory S. Rizzolo '03

Mr. Tarik Smith & Mrs. Myrlange Guillaume

Mr. & Mrs. James M. Van Hoose

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Snow

Mr. Rafael V. Vassallo Collazo, Esq. '82

Ms. Jennifer Robinson Mr. Antonio E. Rodriguez '92 Mr. James C. Rogers

Mr. Matthew Socia Mr. Stephen B. Sokolow '58

Mr. Jonathan Van Hoose '97 Ms. Emma Velcofsky

75


Mr. Kenneth'77 & Mrs. Barbara Vestergaard

Mrs. Angela Zikherman Leo '93

Mr. & Mrs. Ron Bergamo

Mr. & Mrs. David Villecco Sr.

Dr. Robert M. Zimmerman '50

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Bonneau

Dr. & Mrs. Pedro Vincenty Ms. Lauren Wainman

Mr. & Mrs. Jason Bradwell Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence D. Bradwell

Mrs. Kristen A. Wallenius Park '02

GIFT S T O S CHO LARS HIPS O R EN DO WM EN T

Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. Wallenius

Mr. Myron Arakaki

Mr. & Mrs. Steven Braverman

Mr. Yun Wang & Mrs. Liqing Nan

Mr. Jeffrey A. Blum, Esq. '64

Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Brown

Mr. & Mrs. Mark Wasilefsky

Mrs. Debra C. Bond

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Cavaliere

Mr. Douglas G. Wayne '04

Mr. John F. Dichello, Jr. '59

Mr. & Mrs. Steven Clarkson

Mr. D. Thomas Wellman, Jr. '60

Mr. Mark Goodman '64

Mr. Steve Crawford

Ms. Theresa P. West

Mrs. Claudette M. Hovasse

Mr. Daniel Crespo

Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey White

Mrs. Kimberly Cotton Hoyt '85

Mr. & Mrs. William Daniel

Mr. Robert P. White '07

Mr. Douglas N. Morton '58 & Ms. Marilyn Brown

Mr. & Mrs. Mark Decherd

National Honor Society

Mr. & Mrs. Roberto Delmoral

Mr. Alan Whittemore Ms. Sydney L. Wickey '04 Mr. William Wiehl Jr. Mr. Joseph C. Wiendl '65 Mr. Gary Will Ms. Deena Williamson

Mr. Gregory L. O'Connell '66 Dr. William A. Petit, Jr.

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Mr. Joseph Del Sindaco Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Douglas

Mr. Anthony D. Raccio '79

Dr. Darius Dziuda & Dorota Knyszewska-Dziuda

Mr. Donald N. Rosenberg '67

Mrs. Susan S. Eident Mrs. Lydia Figueroa

Mrs. Patricia E. Willis Mr. & Mrs. Scott F. Wing

Mr. & Mrs. Melvin L. Bradwell

Mr. & Mrs. William Fitzgibbon

Mr. Frank C. Wisinski '52

GIV ING T REE O R RES T RIC T ED GIFT S

Mr. Donald J. Wisk '48

Ms. Valentin Adames

Mr. & Mrs. Ansel J. Wright Sr.

Mr. & Mrs. Boone Almanza

Mrs. Rachel Wright

Ms. Grace Ames

Ms. Barbara Wrzosek

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Annatone

Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Freedman

Mr. & Mrs. Louis Yanac

Anonymous

Mr. Victor M. Yanguas '91

Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Bajohr

Mr. Kevin Gahwyler & Mrs. Laura Williams-Gahwyler

Dr. Joseph R. Zaientz '56

Ms. Ramona Barnett

Mrs. Marife Zalduondo

Ms. E. Morgan Barry

Ms. Roxanne Zazzaro

Mrs. Leslie A. Barry

Mr. Todd M. Zeidenberg '79

Mr. David Bechtel & Dr. Kirsten Bechtel

the magazine of cheshire academy

Mr. & Ms. Peter Fleischmann Mr. Dale Fogel & Mr. Bennett Fogel Mr. & Mrs. Robert Forst Mr. & Mrs. Gary J. Fox

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Gailey Mrs. Cornelia Gallo Mr. & Mrs. Arnold Gans Mr. Hector E. Garcia Ms. Caitlin V. Garzi


Mr. & Mrs. Jamaal Gill

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Pettit

Mr. John J. Cherney '84

Ms. Arline M. Harkness

Mr. & Mrs. John Ponthempilly

Mr. Alfred W. Cooke '69

Mrs. Diane F. Hassell

Mr. & Mrs. John Pritchard

Mr. Francis T. Corcoran, Jr. '82

Mr. James & Mrs. Marie Hastie

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Proto

Mr. Alexander R. Daly '10

Mrs. Nora Holmes

Mr. Anthony D. Raccio '79

Mr. Young P. Dawkins III '68

Mr. Jerome Holmes

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Rafferty

Mr. Adam T. Demuth '98

Mr. John Browning Holmes Jr.

Ms. Melinda Reuter

Mr. Dariusz Z. Domanski '98

Ms. Stacy Jagodowski

Mr. & Mrs. William H. Reuter

Ms. Jennifer E. Dupre '02

Mr. Lawrence H. Janos

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Sansbury

Mrs. Kristin I. Dupre Flores '96

Mr. Ross Jessup

Mr. Robert Schlieman

Mr. James F. Elliman, Jr. '85

Mr. Timothy Kane

Mr. Monroe Schulder

Mr. Miles J. Felton '63

Mr. Richard A. Katz, Esq. '64

Mr. Jerold Shanok

Ms. Francisca Fenton

Mr. & Mrs. Brandon Ketchum

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Smerczynski

Mr. Leigh L. Guarnieri, Jr. '93

Mr. & Mrs. Kamil Khoury

Southridge Technology Group

Lisa Tomasetti Holmes & Will Holmes

Mr. Steven Kranish

Ms. Celia Spiess

Mr. Travis A. Hurd '10

Mr. & Mrs. Larry Foley

Mr. Huigen Sun & Mrs. Lili Zhu

Ms. Amy S. Kaufman Yacullo '07

Ms. Jennifer Leedham '05

Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Tiernan III

Mr. Michael J. Kaufman '69

Ms. Margaret Leeming

Mr. Ramon J. Valentin Moltalvo

Mr. Andrew P. Kreshik '82

Mr. & Mrs. James H. Leonard

Mr. & Mrs. James A. Van Der Beek

Mr. John A. LoRicco '77

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Levey

Mr. & Mrs. David Weiner

Mr. Thomas A. LoRicco '74

Mr. & Mrs. Steven Mara

Mrs. Marife Zalduondo

Mr. Robert J. Macchio '81

Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Mastoloni

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Zuckert

Mr. & Mrs. James M. McArdle

Mr. Richard P. Mastoloni Mr. Patrick McGowan Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Nehls Mr. Gregory L. O'Connell '66

Mr. Richard D. McGowan, Jr. '64 I N H O N O R O F T H E RE T I RE M E N T O F B E VA N D U P RE ' 6 9

Mr. Sean P. McNamara '89 Mr. Steven M. Milligan '62 Dr. John E. Mott '69

Ms. Emma Pacilli

Mr. Russell Allen '79 & Mrs. Marie Allen '80

Ms. Rhonda T. Pattberg

Mr. James H. Beattie '75

Mr. Andrew Newhouse '05

Mr. & Mrs. Greg Peters

Mr. Michael A. Belfonti '76

Mr. Brian Otis '89 & Mrs. Gail Otis '90

Mr. Charles E. Peters

Mr. Alexander G. Bell '14

Mr. Jon Patrucco '82

Mr. & Mrs. Andy Peterson

Mr. & Mrs. Alexander L. Bell '76

Mr. Anthony D. Raccio '79

Mr. Theodore Peterson

Mrs. Heather Brown '94

Mr. William M. Raccio, Esq. '76

Mrs. Brenda K. Mulligan '95

77


IN HONOR OF THE RETIREMENT OF BE VAN DU P RE ‘6 9 RETIREMEN T. CONT.

Mr. Charles W. Rehor '71 Mr. Edward J. Richardson, Sr. '60 Mr. Gregory S. Rizzolo '03 Mr. Neil A. Rousso '76 Mr. Jonathan K. Scalise '03 Mr. David B. Sherman '91 Mr. John P. Thornton '02

IN HONOR OF ANDREW NEWHOUSE '05

Mr. & Mrs. P. Britt Newhouse

IN HONOR OF BR E T T T O R R E Y

Mr. Nicholas J. Deshais '15 Mr. Zachary B. Holmes '15

IN HONOR OF JAIME PETTIT '15

Mr. Colin P. Raymond '15

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Pettit

Mr. Matthew Torrey '14

IN HONOR OF ROXBURY ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAM

IN HONOR OF JO E Y W R IG H T ' 19

Mr. & Mrs. Ansel J. Wright Sr.

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Calistro Jr. IN HONOR OF Z H E C H E N W U ' 17

IN HONOR OF SPEN CER BERMAN '0 5

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Berman

IN HONOR OF 1965'S 50TH REUNION

Mr. Anping Wu & Mrs. Yongqing Li

Mr. Abram I. Bluestein '65 IN MEMORY OF DO ME NIC BA L O G H ' 52

IN HONOR OF DONAVEN BIAN CHI '1 8

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Bianchi IN HONOR OF GWEN DOLYN DOUGLASS '01

Ms. Glory L. Reinstein

IN HONOR OF MICHAEL SANDLER '05

Mrs. Ann Balogh

Mr. & Mrs. Cary Sandler

Mr. Christopher Ferraro Mr. Rich & Mrs. Rosanne B. Ferraro '74

IN HONOR OF LEAH STANCIL

Ms. Grace Ames

IN MEMORY OF A L E X C H E R NIC K ' 10

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Berman

Ms. Irene Luria

IN HONOR OF COREY STEFANIK '15

IN MEMORY OF F R E D C L A R K

Mr. & Mrs. Joe Stefanik, Jr.

Mrs. Amy Clark Frederick '82

IN HONOR OF NICHOLAS SUSLA '48

IN MEMORY OF JA ME S C O L L INS ' 77

Mr. Jeffrey J. Susla

Colonel Thomas N. Collins '74

IN HONOR OF BRIDGET THORNTON '05

IN MEMORY OF JA ME S E BE R G ' 01

Anonymous

Ms. Jessica M. Fowler '01

IN HONOR OF CARLOS TORRES'15

IN MEMORY OF R O BE RT DAW N ' 52

Mr. Ramon J. Valentin Moltalvo

Mr. William S. Dawn '53

IN HONOR OF COACH DYKEMAN

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Forst IN HONOR OF D. ROBERT GARDINER

Mr. Jeffrey A. Blum, Esq. '64 Ms. Veneta S. Nikolova '01 In Honor of Jiwon Jung '15 Mr. Hoi Yong Jung & Mrs. MiSook Lee IN HONOR OF DERYCK '1 3 & EVAN '1 7 LA NGFORD

Mr. & Mrs. Bryan Langford

78

the magazine of cheshire academy


IN MEMORY OF TO D D ER I C K SO N ' 7 3

Mr. Chip Namias '73 IN MEMORY OF WI L L I AM H ASSEL L

Mrs. Diane F. Hassell

I N T R O DUC I N G O UR N E W G I V I N G SO C IE T IE S : PHILANTHROPISTS CABINET:

Platinum Cabinet Members ($25,000+) Cabinet Members ($10,000 to $24,999)

IN MEMORY OF Y O O N EE H UAN G ' 5 0

1794 SOCIETY:

Ms. An L. Huang

Gold Society Members ($5,000 to $9,999) Silver Society Members ($2,500 to $4,999)

IN MEMORY OF M AUR I C E L EVY, J R . ' 4 4

Society Members ($1,794 to $2,499)

Mrs. Joan Levy ACADEMY CIRCLE: IN MEMORY OF J O SE “ PEPE” M I L L AR ES

Dr. Jeffrey A. Rosenblatt '73

IN MEMORY OF M R S. J EN N PETI T &

Benefactors ($1,000 to $1,793) Ambassadors ($500 to $999) Friends (<$500)

T HE GIRLS

Dr. William A. Petit, Jr. Ms. Rachel Cohn

IN MEMORY OF TED SAVED O FF ' 5 8 & R OGER RECHLER ' 5 9

Mr. Jacob S. Pohn II '59 IN MEMORY OF J O H N WH I TE ' 3 8

Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey White Mrs. Virginia White IN MEMORY OF ER N EST WI EH L

Mr. William Wiehl Jr.

W E S I N C ER ELY T H A N K YO U F O R S U P P O RT I N G C H ES H I R E ACA D EM Y T H I S PA S T Y E A R . W E H O P E YO U W I LL CO N T I N U E A T R A D I T I O N O F G I V I N G BAC K T O T H I S I N S T I T U T I O N B Y PA RT I C I PAT I N G I N C U R R EN T A N D F U T U R E F U N D R A I S I N G EF F O RT S. T H A N K YO U !

79


The Harwood Society

for Planned Giving

Students and faculty of future generations are the beneficiaries of the Mahans’ vision and generosity of their Charitable Remainder Trust, which Roger Mahan ’50 and his wife Mary established prior to Roger’s passing.

Like Mary Mahan (pictured right) you spur on the legacy of Cheshire Academy. Learn more about planned giving and supporting the Academy by visiting us online or by contacting Barb Davis, Director of Development and Alumni Relations at 203-439-7228

CHESHIREACADEMY.ORG/GIVINGPROGRAMS 80


CAT SCRATCH Find out the answers online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

17 94

AC R OSS 2 . Cool school swag is available here 10 . The unof ficial term for driving slowly and looking at fall leaves 11. Your Friday clothing wardrobe requirement 12 . What is a family of big cats? 14 . Main website url 18 . Of ficial name for ‘The Por tal’ 2 0 . What “Give Now” request suppor ts 21. Headmaster who ser ved for 44 years 2 3 . A mystical cat in literature 2 5 . Cheshire Academy’s newest social media app 2 8 . Local cof fee shop of choice

D OW N 1. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 12 . 13 . 14 . 15 . 16 .

Where ar t exhibits are displayed How to watch games live from your couch How many athletic championship wins since 20 04 (spelled out) The church denomination which founded Cheshire Academy Under the lights Community ar ts event to suppor t Syrian refugees Formal meeting room in Bowden Hall Name of building where classes were held in the 1950s Name of this school year’s fall play Large Fair in Massachusetts Author of “I Know This Much Is True” Undefeated 1964 Football Team was induc ted into what? First Episcopal Bishop in United States was?

17. 19. 22. 24 .

One Word Of ficial athletic twitter account Current Head of School Name of state highway on which Cheshire Academy is located. (with number) 2 6 . Boast for running the hardest par t of cross countr y trail 2 7. International student debate organization 2 8 . Of ficial school twitter account


last look This photo, taken by Shiva Carey '19, is part of a digital photography assignment to capture the essence of fall.


REUNION

’01

’66

’86

Whether you come back ever y year or haven’t made it back to c ampus since Commencement, we invite you to come home. We would love to see you honor the memories of Cheshire Ac ademy at this year ’s reunion celebration .

m ay 13 & 14 , 201 6

w w w . c h e s h i r e ac a d e m y . o r g / r e u n i o n


10 MAIN STREET, CHESHIRE, CT 06410 203-272-5396

Cheshire Academy is bringing you immersive storytelling with a new interactive digital component to 1794, the Academyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rebooted magazine. Each story that appears in print has special web-only content such as video content, quotes, and photo galleries. From beautiful, full-width historical images to video interviews of your favorite teachers, the online magazine adds more to every story. MAGAZINE.CHESHIREACADEMY.ORG

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1794: The Education Issue  
1794: The Education Issue  
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