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1794

t h e m a g a z in e o f cheshire academy

the arts issue


1794

volume 1 | issue 2

on the cover Cheshire Academy encourages students to explore their creative passions both in and out of the classroom, and our cover photo is the result of four students doing just that. In this photo taken by Charlotte Leser ‘16, her sister Hannah Leser ‘14 poses to represent the element of water. Learn more about the photo project and how Charlotte and Hannah worked with Wiebke Leser ‘17 and Bryn Clarkson ‘17 to create this series of photos paying homage to earth, wind, fire, and water.

Board of Trustees Chairman Richard Cerrone ’67

Vice Chair Howard Greenstone P ’12

Treasurer Michael Mauro P ’11

Secretary Richard A. Katz, Esq. ’64

Stamford, Connecticut

Monterey, Massachusetts

San Rafael, California

Harrison, New York

Ronald Feinstein ’64

Andy Moss P ’14 P ’15

Suzanne Fields P ’12

Donald Rosenberg ’67

David G. Jepson ’59

Armando Simosa P ’08

Graeme M. Keith, Jr. P ’11

Lendward Simpson, Jr. ’68

Patrick K. McCaskey ’68

Mark F. Testa, Ph.D. ’68

OVERSEERS Michael A. Belfonti ’76 Hamden, Connecticut

Frank Motter ’61 P ’97

Weston, Massachusetts Westport, Connecticut

Glastonbury, Connecticut Charlotte, North Carolina Lake Forest, Illinois

Dan Gabel, Jr. ’56 New York, New York Douglas N. Morton ’58 Englewood, Colorado

EX-OFFICIO John D. Nozell, Head of School Cheshire, Connecticut

THE MAGAZINE OF CHESHIRE ACADEMY

Westport, Connecticut

Snowmass Village, Colorado Miami, Florida

Head of School

John D. Nozell strategic Marketing & Communications office

Stacy Jagodowski Caitlin Garzi Leslie Hutchison Cody Barbierri Alyssa Dillon DEVELOPMENT & ALUMNI RELATIONS office

Barbara Davis P ’17 P ’18 P ’20 Christian Malerba ’04 Maureen Madden-Tardy Christopher Ferraro Barbara Vestergaard P ’96 P ’02 Leonardo Hiertz Bevan Dupre ’69 P ’96 P ’02 Additional Contributors:

Erin Gleason Laura Longacre John Muldoon Photography Bryn Clarkson ’17 Charlotte Leser ’16 Wiebke Leser ’17 Hannah Leser ’14 Rachel Wallace ’16

Knoxville, Tennessee

Carrboro, North Carolina

Stowe, Vermont

Brett Stuart ’68 P ’09 P ’09 P ’10 East Hampton, Connecticut

Comments? Questions? Suggestions? News? If you have feedback on 1794, contact Stacy Jagodowski at stacy.jago@cheshireacademy.org. If you have alumni news or updates for 1794, send them to Christian Malerba '04 at christian.malerba@cheshireacademy. org. Photos should be submitted in high resolution (300 dpi) for publication. Admission inquiries may be directed to the Admission Office at admission@cheshireacademy.org or 203-439-7250. © 2016 Cheshire Academy


in this issue academy archives 6 Timeline 1897 - 1934 8 Rockwell Kent 12 Kensett and the Academy 16 Music of Our History

on campus 20 Elements: Student Photography Project 26 An Exhibition of Fine Art Skills 28 Art Major Program 30 Arts Reach Perfect Pitch Find out how Jake Blasini ’04 shares the spirit of jazz music. Page 42

34 Stellar Winter Sports Season

alumni

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Rockwell Kent

One of Cheshire Academy’s famed alumni, Illustrator Rockwell Kent, created a legacy of art and a life-long friendship with Arthur Sheriff and family.

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Elements

40 Alumni in the Arts 42 Winter Reception 44 Events 52 Class Notes 62 Cat Scratch Word Search 64 Last Look

A quartet of creative students take on the power of nature in a summer-long project that pays tribute to the four elements: earth, wind, fire, and water.

40 Alumni Artists

From Lincoln Center to Hollywood and “The Today Show,” we catch up with three alumni in pursuit of their artistic passions: Jake Blasini ’04, Rebekah George ’95, and Stathis Orphanos ’58.

Check out more on the digital magazine at http://magazine.cheshireacademy.org/

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letters

I thought the magazine was wonderful. I am

The guys pictured in that photo on page 56-57

hard copy when so many schools have gone to

(L) and Henry Drane (R). They were both

so glad that CA is continuing to publish a digital formats!

The student on the left is Victor Lane and

the student on the right is Henry Drane. My quote would be: “The next verse is yours -

take it away!” The picture was actually one in the 1972 yearbook, which was my first year

teaching at Cheshire. As the two students were seniors, it was easy to identify them from their senior pictures.

Congratulations on the new and much

improved Cheshire mag. I am a 1959 grad

and enjoyed several sessions with Mr. Sheriff during my two years. He was a good and

kind man. I read with interest the story about

David Jepsen, a classmate. I too worked on the yearbook and made a very small contribution to the art work. Keep up the new (high) standard.

P.B. Baldwin '59

I'm glad to have received this first issue and

was so pleased to read about Mr. Sheriff, some school history and current activities. Thanks for what you do. Hank Stromenger '63

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the magazine of cheshire academy

Scott Wing

Former Assistant Headmaster

of the current CA magazine are Victor Lane members of the Class of 1972. Best,

Chip Namias ’73


straight from bowden hall a message from head of school john d . nozell

With the rapidly changing world in which we live, creativity is essential to the advancement of our society. We constantly look for ways to improve our lives and the lives of those around us. As individuals, we strive to be

healthier and happier, to be better at school and our jobs, and to experience all that life has to offer. As a society, we strive to strengthen and improve our local and global communities. These aren’t simple goals. These are

complex aspirations, and we continue to look to the younger generations to carry on and enhance what each generation before has started.

To be successful in these lofty endeavors, we need a world of creative and innovative thinkers. Individuals who are able to look at the world around

us and see possibility, anticipate changing needs, and solve problems in our

everyday lives. Creativity is a skill that we must all possess, and it’s one that we work hard to foster in our students here at Cheshire Academy.

From working in the science lab to create a human-powered helicopter to molding a piece of clay into an elaborate vase, our students live and

learn in an academic environment that encourages creative thinking. Our dedication to fostering artistic expression is constant, and we clearly

demonstrate this through our continued support of the arts. Whether they are learning to play a new instrument or preparing their art portfolios

for college, students of all artistic abilities are encouraged to explore a wide variety of creative outlets. While many schools are forced to reduce their arts offerings, at Cheshire Academy, ours are expanding. From digital photography and animation, to dance, drama, and music, not to mention painting, printmaking, and ceramics, the opportunities available to our students are nearly endless.

Our support of young artists has helped launch many successful careers, and we take pride in knowing that we played a part in their lives. From Hollywood actors and award-winning photographers to mainstream musicians and innovative designers, our alumni base is full of talented individuals whose creative talents were seen, and nurtured, right here in our classrooms.

This magazine pays tribute to the artistic endeavors of our school community. We share stories of esteemed alumni artists of our past and present,

as well as stories about the ways in which arts are embraced on campus today. I hope you’ll find creative inspiration from these stories, and perhaps share some of your own artistic endeavors in the comments within the articles posted on our digital magazine: magazine.cheshireacademy.org. Sincerely,

John D. Nozell, Head of School

“Creativity is a skill that we must all possess, and it’s one that we work hard to foster in our students here at Cheshire Academy. ”


share your academy memories

Whet her you grad uated from Cheshire Academy last year or last centur y, we know that you have many memories f rom your time here on c ampus . We invite you to share those memories with us . Email us at communic ations@ cheshireac ademy.org; include any photos or video you may also have, and we’ll add your contributions to our collection and share them with our communit y on Facebook .

EMAIL US

COM @ CHESHIREACADEMY.ORG


academy archives

(l-r) David Lubowski ’85 and Harold Vincente ’87

’85


academy archives

1898 – T he trustees report, “It is a school with a great history and most honorable

traditions, and no school is doing more honest and thorough work today. A new era of

Cheshire Academy the timeline PART II: 1897-1937

usefulness opened with the second century of the school.”

1898

1897 1901 Ju n e 1897 – For the 108th

anniversary of Cheshire Academy, a

group of alumni called “the New York

delegation” boarded a special alumni rail car at the 42nd Street Depot in New

York City. They arrived in New Haven

where the group caught a special alumni train which brought them to Cheshire.

1897 – “New Haven Evening

Register” noted Cheshire Academy

“ranks with the best preparatory schools, and the student is surrounded by all the influences of a Christian home.”

19 01 – “Hartford Courant” noted: “No better place for a boys’ school could have been chosen, then, nor could be chosen now, for health or beauty than the fair Connecticut hill-town with which the thoughts and affections of school boys for more than a hundred years have been associated.”

19 0 4 – The Academy is leased by alumnus Joseph Harriman who changed the name to “Cheshire School.”

1913 – Article in the “Waterbury American” noted that the Cheshire School “claims J. Pierpont

Morgan, 1851 as one of its most distinguished alumni.” While at the school, Morgan was said to have “performed the usual quota of schoolboy pranks … his most successful one being the carving of his initials on the framework of the old bell which hung for many years in the attic of Bowden Hall.”

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1917 – The Cheshire School (as we were called for 13 years) becomes Roxbury School, a for-profit institution. 1917 – The school is presented with a wooden staff with a handle made from wood taken from the

Cumberland, a Civil War ship used by the Union Navy. Embedded in the handle is a design of a horseshoe made from metal taken from the Confederate ship, the Merrimac.

1932 – “Greensboro (No. Carolina)

Record” Quote from Arthur Sheriff: “The modern boy does not assume a

pose because he thinks it is the right thing to do. He lacks the sheep-like

quality of former generations and has more independence, less hypocrisy, and more real honesty.”

1917

1932 1927

1927 – Alumnus Rockwell Kent (pictured above) announced a

$1 million anonymous donation to support the National Gallery of Contemporary Art in Washington, D.C.

1929 – On October 7, Arthur Sheriff (pictured far right) and six

193 0 s – The Roxbury School purchased the 1785 Hitchcock-

Phillips House on Church Street. It was built by the merchant Rufus

Hitchcock, whose granddaughter married Andrew W. Phillips, a math teacher at the school. It was used as a boys dormitory.

other men invested $50,000 to launch Honey Pot Country Club. The corporation signed a five-year lease for 35 acres. Less than a month

later, the stock market crashed, but the golf club was not affected; in

fact, it soon expanded. Long-term success however, did not follow. The property was foreclosed on in 1943.

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academy archives 10

the magazine of cheshire academy


ROCKWELL KENT

Renowned Artist Rockwell Kent is Related to Former Principal A young Rockwell Kent was welcomed to the Episcopal Academy of Connecticut in 1894 by his uncle, the Rev. James Stoddard, who was the Academy’s principal from 1892-1896. Stoddard helped his nephew receive a scholarship following the death of Rockwell, Sr., a successful lawyer whose demise left the Kent family impoverished.

A lasting legacy of Kent’s fondness for the Academy is his gift in 1947 of original lithographs of Bowden Hall. He donated at least 100 prints to his alma mater, which to this day are presented at special occasions as a gift to recipients of the Bowden Award. The award is given in recognition of outstanding personal and professional achievement.

In his autobiography, It’s Me Oh Lord, Kent wrote about his time at the Academy, from which he departed in 1896 to attend school in New York City. “It was a school of proud tradition, boasting of men among its graduates whose names are written large on the pages of our history …”

Despite those words of praise, Kent was a stubborn student. As described by David Traxel in his book An American Saga: The Life and Times of Rockwell Kent, the young pupil refused to learn Latin while attending the Academy. Determined to see that Kent did study

the language, an unnamed teacher required his student to spend every evening in the instructor’s presence with the Latin book open

to the day’s lesson. “Night after night went by with the teacher and [Kent] locked in a test of wills. It got to be a sporting event, a kind of marathon. Who’d last the longest?” Kent won out, Traxel wrote, “after the teacher decided the victory would not be worth the cost of continuing to give up his evenings.”

Kent visited the Academy twice after he left the school. An alumni note in “The Oracle” of 1908 states, “Rockwell Kent, en route from Tarrytown, New York to New Hampshire on a horseback trip, spent a Sunday in Cheshire in January.” By his second visit in October 1936, Kent was described as “famed alumnus” by the school newspaper. “It is good to think that one receives his secondary education where a man of Kent’s genius received his … (and) he still remembers his school days enough to pay this visit …”

left: self portrait woodcut print, “Books Make the home”

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academy archives

Charlotte Sheriff Visits Kent Family in Adirondacks Two original, typed letters between Kent and Charlotte Sheriff are preserved

When Kent was in his 70s, he offered his entire art and book collection to

Ausable Forks, New York, Kent writes, “We are always delighted to hear from

and built a home. He told the Times in 1960 that the museum director had

see us again.”

house Kent’s work. However, Kent said, the museum reversed direction after

In an earlier letter from January 15, 1960, Kent responds to a review published

portion of his art to the Soviet Union.

topic was his art exhibition in Moscow, which the reviewer described as,

In a 2014 article published in “The American Conservative” magazine, it

Sheriff to forward to the Times editor, states, in part, “The Russians, it is true,

drawings and prints to Soviet Russia, and to this day they repose in the

in the Cheshire Academy archives. In a letter dated February 17, 1960, from

the Farnsworth Museum in Rockland, Maine, a state where he had painted

you and we think again how wonderful it would be if you ... could come and

eagerly accepted the offered donation and planned to build a special wing to

in the “New York Times”, which was sent to him by Charlotte Sheriff. The

he was asked to testify at the McCarthy hearings. Instead, Kent gave a large

“abstract.” The four-paragraph letter from Kent, which he asked Charlotte

was noted that Kent, “defiantly donated 80 paintings and 10 times as many

have little or no use for abstract art. To this, the hundreds of thousands who

Hermitage and Pushkin museums, among others.”

Kent vehemently rejected the depiction that he was an abstract artist. In

Kent’s Works Become Collector’s Items

“scornful of abstractionism in painting, he believes, ‘that art should derive

The largest collection of Kent’s art in the United States is housed at the

visited the exhibition of my realistic painting gave unquestionable proof.”

a 1955 Times review about his autobiography, the writer notes Kent was, from life itself, and in no degree from art.’”

Plattsburgh State Art Museum in Plattsburgh, New York. It consists of 34

The same review describes Kent as, “an eccentric individual and a rebellious

Kent’s travels and the years he lived on his farm in the Adirondacks.

Senator Joseph McCarthy, who in 1939 called Kent before the House Un-

The popularity of Rockwell’s illustrations in the early 1930s were such that

associations. Kent invoked the Fifth Amendment when asked if he was a

artist was given carte blanche to portray the story as he saw fit. The 1930

nonconformist …” His leftist politics attracted the distrusting eye of

American Activities Committee where he was asked to explain his views and

upon agreeing to illustrate a reprinting of Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, the

Communist.

edition, which was published for the Book of the Month Club, is now a

McCarthy tried again in 1950 to rein in Kent’s antiestablishment behavior

to print and a now-famous error was made. While Kent was credited as the

years and a ruling by the United States Supreme Court before Kent’s travel

author was completely missing.

by having the State Department deny the artist a passport. It took eight document was issued.

As the United States was celebrating its bicentennial in 1976, Cheshire

collector’s item. With tremendous anticipation for the book, it was rushed

illustrator on both the dust jacket and the book cover, Melville’s listing as the

Kent died in 1971, just months before his 90th birthday. He is buried on the Kent estate in Au Sable Forks on land he named “Asgaard,” which is Nordic

Academy formed an on-campus museum to display historic documents from

for “farm of the gods.”

Bronson Halls, glass cases placed along the walls are said to have held some of

See more photos online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

its storied past. Located in the room off the passageway between Bowden and Kent’s prints and most likely, his letters to Charlotte Sheriff.

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paintings on permanent display as well as papers and books gathered from

the magazine of cheshire academy

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“Ours is a lovely world, and art can help us realize it.” -Rockwell Kent


academy archives

Kensett and the academy a partnership 200 years in the making The internationally famous landscape artist John Frederick Kensett attended the Episcopal Academy of Connecticut from 1820-1821 when he was just four years old.

Kensett was enrolled at such an early age because he could already read and write. A book by Ruth Levitt of King’s College, London, notes that at the time, Academy students, “were admitted without reference to age, provided they [were] able to read intelligibly, and to write a legible hand …”

Fees to attend the Academy around the time Kensett was a student were $5.10 per quarter for the Classical department, Levitt writes, and $4 per quarter for the Preparatory English department. Instruction included

Latin, Greek, philosophy, composition, and speaking. It cost another $1.50 a week to board with “teachers, [or] respectable families in the village” of Cheshire.

portrait of kenset t by shaung zhou, 2010

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commissioned by friends of cheshire performing and fine arts commission


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views from cheshire turned into landscapes The town of Cheshire was still a farming community when Kensett was

“The delicate texture of his brushwork was concentrated to produce

easily see south to the Sleeping Giant mountain in Hamden. Art experts

Metropolitan Museum of Art. The difference in technique placed Kensett

young. From his home just three blocks from the Academy, Kensett could say his childhood views of the hills and farmland around Cheshire gave

the artist a pictorial memory of the area which he recreated in some of his

pure and exquisite states of light and atmosphere,” according to the in a genre of art called Luminism.

paintings and drawings.

“I like his landscapes. It pushes the limits of an artist,” Everett-O’Neill

As the bicentennial of Kensett’s birth neared in March 2016, the

of the painting to draw your eye in.” Her classmate, Miura Wiley ’17,

Academy and the town of Cheshire began planning a series of events to honor the artist. In the fall of 2015, students in the International

Baccalaureate® (IB) Visual Arts classes each painted a reproduction

of one of Kensett’s masterpieces in honor of the famed alumnus. Fine

& Performing Arts Department Chair Francois Poisson explained the

assignment: “By capturing not just the shapes and colors of the original

painting, but most importantly, the natural light that made these pictures

come alive, you will gain a greater awareness into the relevance and power of art, especially as it relates to its own time period.”

said of Kensett. She noted that his artwork, “puts light on one section recreated a painting called “Sunset on the Sea.” Wiley is also an IB

Diploma Programme candidate, who is enrolled in the two-year long

Theory of Knowledge (ToK) class. They recently explored why something is considered beautiful. “Kensett's landscapes were the first thing that came to my mind,” she said.

Success Both Artistic and Social Kensett traveled and painted in England and Europe from 1840-1847.

“I liked the challenge,” said Sydney Everett-O’Neill ’17, an IB Diploma

Soon after returning to New York City, he was elected as a member of the

landscapes called “Bash Bish Falls,” an area which is now preserved as a

documents, “recognizes artists’ exceptional creative work and contribution

of detail. It’s hard to get it as perfect as Kensett did,” she said.

increased to such a degree that he was involved with the founding, in

Programme candidate. She chose to reproduce one of Kensett’s famous

National Academy of Design, an organization which, according to their

state park in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. “There was a lot

to the arts.” About 20 years later, Kensett’s fame and influence had

Light and Atmosphere Rendered on Canvas Kensett was a student of the Hudson River School of painting which emerged in the 1850s. Fellow artists of the genre included such

luminaries as Thomas Cole, Frederic Edwin Church, and Albert Bierstadt. As Kensett was younger than these founders of the movement, he is often described as being a second-generation member.

1870, of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and named one of its original trustees.

From his early schooling at the Academy, Kensett went on to become

one of art’s most enduring landscape painters. His artwork is owned by museums in 38 states and a number of international institutions. Read more about the student exhibit online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

Students in Francois Poisson’s IB Visual Arts classes painted illustrations of Kenset t’s famed pieces. Among those students who presented pieces are (l-r) Miura Wiley ’17, Sydney Everet t-O’Neill ’17, and Yiyao “Amanda” Yang ‘17

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academy archives

MUSIC OF OUR HISTORY COURAGE AND SPIRIT HIGHLIGHT THE 75 -Y EAR OLD SONG A number of school songs have been written for Cheshire Academy over the years by students

and faculty. But only one has been performed at a recital and then published in the Rolling Stone

yearbook. The lyricist, who asked to remain anonymous, was later revealed to be Arthur N. Sheriff, who served as headmaster for 44 years.

In the 1940 “Student Review” newspaper, an article notes, “the song has been well received by the

boys.” It also mentions the tune to which it was written, “Men of Harlech,” is popular and easier to

sing than earlier school songs. In an April 1942 recital by the Cheshire Academy Glee Club, the song appears to have had its formal debut.

The militaristic theme of the school song can be contributed to the era in which it was written, which was during WWII. It conforms to a patriotic sentiment in the United States which entered the war in 1941.

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ly ric s to the school song On we march, our goal alluring, Spirit s trong and faith enduring, Cour age high and our end a ssuring, Onwar d to the fr ay ! Ne ver back war d falling, Ne ver fe ar appalling, On we pre ss, we ne ver re s t, For vic tory and glory are c alling! Te ammate s fighting, comr a de s cheering, E ach for e ach the pathway cle aring, Vic tory is surely ne aring Glory for CA . Che shire fields with age are hoary, Che shire ways are paths to glory, Prou d tr a dition tell s our s tory, Honor, truth, and light! Ever fighting cle anly, Ne ver winning me anly, Fair to foe and true to friend, In winning or in losing we pl ay k eenly ! School and home, God and nation, Faith to all is our salvation, And in faith is e x altation, Vic tory for the right!

Read more about music at Cheshire Academy at at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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ON CAMPUS

the magazine of cheshire academy

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elements STUDENTS EMBRACE NATURE THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY

charlot te leser ’16 as “earth” photo credit: bryn clarkson ’17


above: hannah leser ’14 as “water” photo credit: charlot te leser ’16

right: wiebke leser ’17 as “fire” photo credit: charlot te Leser ’16 with assistance from bryn clarkson ‘17 and hannah leser ’14

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INTO THE WOODS TO DISCOVER ART The choice to portray the characteristics of water, fire, air, and earth in a photo essay seemed elemental for four Cheshire Academy artists who completed their project in the summer heat last year.

The quartet of creative thinkers is comprised of three sisters: Hannah ’14, Charlotte ’16, and Wiebke Leser ’17, who paired up with their classmate and fellow adventurer Bryn Clarkson ’17 for a student project they call, “The Four Elements.”

As students and hobbyists, the four have been interested in photography for a number of years. “Hannah has always taken photos,” said Wiebke. Charlotte and Wiebke studied

digital imaging at the Academy, and Bryn entered a photo competition while in middle school. The photos on these pages were taken with a Canon Rebel T5i camera.

AN ARTISTIC EDUCATION The Leser family moved to Woodbridge from Germany in 2012. All three of the sisters

have had leading roles in plays at the Black Box Theater. In 2013, Hannah portrayed Velma Kelly in “Chicago,” which she said was her favorite memory from Cheshire Academy.

Hannah is now studying musical theater in Hamburg. She graduated with an International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma in 2014.

Charlotte took on the title role of “Galileo” in fall 2014 in which Wiebke was cast as

Andrea Sarti. Wiebke played Wendy to Charlotte’s Captain Hook in “Peter Pan” in fall

2015. They are both full Diploma Programme students. Photos Charlotte took during her

photography class in 2014 were displayed along with six other students’ work at the nearby Cheshire Coffee house.

Bryn, who hails from Cheshire, is also a full Diploma Programme student who plays

violin in the Cheshire Academy Chamber Orchestra and is a member of the CATS vocal

ensemble. She was the assistant stage manager for the Varsity Players’ 2015 winter musical,

“The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.” Bryn is also known for having traveled to all 50 states before her junior year in high school.

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on campus

qa

FOUR ELEMENTS. FOUR ARTISTS. ONE VOICE. Q: How did you decide to do this project?

Q: Did you use filters, special lighting, or effects?

Hannah, and Wiebke dressed up in costumes as

the pictures was Lightroom. We played with

A: For Halloween a few years ago, Charlotte,

the seasons: spring, fall, and winter. Inspired by

this, Bryn got the idea to do a photoshoot which

would allow all four of us to be involved. The team

chose the following roles: Earth (Charlotte), Water

A: The only program that we used to edit

brightness, contrast, temperature, and shadows. We didn’t put any filters on the pictures with the goal of keeping them as natural as possible.

(Hannah), Air (Bryn), and Fire (Wiebke).

Q: What do you like most about the project?

Q: When did the project begin?

this project. The part that makes us most proud is

A: We started the project during the summer break of 2015, with research on possible costumes and

A: There were a lot of fun challenges involved in that we did everything by ourselves.

makeup. The costumes we used were clothes we

For the fire scene, it was pitch black. We made a

we also used pieces of cloth that we wrapped in

Connecticut. and thought it would be enough to

already owned. For the earth and water costumes, certain ways. We started taking the water shots in late July.

Q: What was your vision for the project?

A: We thought of it as an opportunity to spend time together doing something creative. Q: How many photos did you take?

A: We took anywhere from 500 to 1,000 photos per element with close to 3,000 images total.

small, contained fire in a backyard in Woodbridge, light the subject. We ended up waving sparklers

to make the scenery more mysterious and to add smoke and lights to the photo.

It was a perfectly still day when we did the wind theme. To create the effect of wind, the model

ran and flipped her hair. We used the continuous shutter setting on the camera which gave us astonishingly good results.

Taking the pictures was probably the hardest part

Photographing the earth theme was difficult

we shot were always changing. The water photos on

moved to a spot close to a creek where the ground

of the project because the conditions under which the Sargent River near Bethany, Connecticut, for

example, were difficult because as we were at a river, the sun was reflecting on the water and constantly moving, as were the shadows from the trees.

because the lighting in the forest was too dark. We was muddy and used the mud as an extra earthy effect.

Q: How will you use the photos?

A: We hope to do an exhibit at Cheshire Academy to further share our project with others. See more photos online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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bryn clarkson ’17 as “air” photo credit: Charlot te Leser ’16


an exhibition of fine art skills

F

ine & Performing Arts Teacher Karleen Kubat is dedicated to her

It was good that she let

applied in an entirely different way. While in high school, Kubat

“Working one-on-one

career at Cheshire Academy. That devotion, however, was nearly

wanted to be a missionary. “That’s what I wrote as my senior plans in the yearbook; it didn’t go that way, though,” she noted.

Kubat’s early and continued interest in art won out over plans to pursue a

religious vocation. During her 17 years at the Academy, Kubat has taught students in kindergarten through twelfth grade and works in her home

studio to create artwork which have won numerous regional awards. Her

two daughters also attended the Academy: Cori Hayunga ’08 and Hanna Kubat ‘10.

“I was always interested in art as early as elementary school,” Kubat said. Her middle school art teacher was so impressed with her work that her

father agreed to register her for classes at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. At 13 she enrolled to study life drawing and arc welding.

While heading to classes at the Institute, Kubat often walked through galleries which exhibited modern art. It was the first time she saw the

works by such greats as Helen Frankenthaler and Jules Olitski. “I didn’t appreciate it. I was into realism, I was a purist,” Kubat admits.

us explore,” Weiss said. is the key. There needs to be flexibility in the curriculum. I expose

the students to modern and contemporary

art,” Kubat noted. A recent project called

for shaping the canvas as did artist Frank

Stella who avoided squares and rectangles. To create the base for painting, students cut pieces of foamcore into acute angles or circles to create a

non-traditional shaped surface for painting. “It’s fun and creative. Art is an aspect of every human being. It’s exciting to be touched by art.”

In January, Chloe Qian ‘18 wrote in the ScratchUp student blog that her class with Kubat is her favorite course. “In painting class, the only thing I need to concern myself with is which colors I am going to use in my

artwork. Mrs. Kubat always encourages students and believes that they can become better artists,” Qian wrote.

“In high school, some friends and I turned my parents’ garage into an art

Kubat suggests students take art courses in which they’re interested.

High School in Arlington Heights, Illinois. One of her pieces was entered

perspective, students take field trips to art museums and galleries during

studio and gathered there to draw,” Kubat said. She attended Arlington

in the Scholastic Art Award show where it won a top award and went on

to regional competition. This year at the Academy, in the very same schoolbased national art show, two of Kubat’s students were awarded prizes.

“If you’re good or not, you’ll get good by creating art.” To broaden their the school year and attend the opening receptions of regional artwork shown at the Academy’s Kohn-Joseloff Gallery. “It influences their

thinking and ideas and keeps the process fresh for them,” Kubat noted.

At Michigan State University, where she received a bachelor’s degree

“When I graduated from high school, I never thought I’d be a teacher,

who were famous in their own right such as Allen Leepa, an Abstract

“I found I was good at art through my high school art classes which gave

in fine arts, Kubat focused on printmaking and studied with professors Expressionist. “They introduced me to modern art. They showed us slides of artists’ work which opened my eyes to the exciting genre. The teachers imbued me with enthusiasm that was integral to exploring a life as an artist,” Kubat added.

She passes that enthusiasm on to her students who study printmaking,

painting, drawing, and ceramics. Sophie Weiss ’17 took printmaking from Kubat last fall. “I really, really liked it. She gave us a lot of independence.

but now 43 years later I wouldn’t want to be anything else,” Kubat noted.

me the self-confidence I lacked. When you are successful with one thing it

gives you the confidence to believe you can be successful in other things. So that has become my personal mission at the Academy, to help students find that they are creative, that they can make beautiful and memorable art, and that hopefully they’ll be more confident in themselves because of it. See a full photo gallery online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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above: paola fortes ’16 opposite page: jeong moon lee’16

art major “ Anyone can paint a pretty picture ... but not everyone can be an artist.” -Paola Fortes ’16

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a portfolio of talent in the making

need to be ready to create their own body of work

“Knowing that students to produce works which are typically you created required for art school entrance portfolios. It involves drawing skills and composition plus a concentration something that on individual strengths such as painting, sculpture, or design.The second semester concentrates on has never been preparing three to five pieces for the Art Major Show held in in the Kohn-Joseloff Gallery in May. seen before and Late in the first semester, the Art Major students that will get participate in the National Portfolio Day held annually for this region at the University of people thinking Hartford. Poisson describes it as a college fair for art schools. The Academy students are able to have is almost their portfolios reviewed by about five college representatives who are members of the National magical.” Association of Schools for Art and Design.

the largest he’s taught, Poisson said. “Six to seven is

Paola Fortes ’16 of Jalapa, Mexico, took the Art

year,” he added.

second year as a senior. Her “Self Portrait in Oil”

The Art Major program at Cheshire Academy offers a unique opportunity few other boarding schools provide. A studio room is reserved solely for the

use of art majors who are able to work in a quiet

environment with dedicated space for easel and tools. The year-long program is generally reserved for seniors, but some juniors who show advanced

artistic ability may enroll. “It’s helpful to students who want to go to art school to have classes that

are geared toward creating a portfolio,” said Fine

and Performing Arts Department Chair Francois Poisson.

The program was created over a decade ago to

support a select group of artists. “Students must

have certain skills in drawing,” Poisson said. “They and be dedicated.” This year’s class of 12 students is typical but there is quite a bit of response for next

“Anyone who is interested in art and likes to draw

should take the Art Major class,” said Jeong Moon Lee ’16. “It will help you decide if you want to go

to art school.” With the guidance of Poisson, Lee applied to and was accepted at the vaunted art

program at the Rhode Island School of Design. “I think for our international students, they’re

starting to see the arts as a good alternative to

business or medical professions. They can move

into architecture or design through an arts degree,”

Poisson noted. To meet art college requirements, the

first semester of the Art Major course is focused on

creating a college portfolio. The assignment prepares

-Paola Fortes ’16

Major program as a junior and is enrolled for a

painting received an honorable mention award in the Connecticut Regional Scholastic Art Awards

competition. “She is tremendously talented. She has

an artistic vision and is able to bring in current events and Mexican culture as applied to high level schools of art,” said Poisson.

In a 2015 ScratchUp blog post, Fortes wrote that

art should inform the viewer: “It is meant to make you stop and think, ‘What does this mean?’ Art is

not for decoration, it’s a way to say those things that everyone is too afraid to say. That is what the Art Major program has taught me.” See more photos online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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on campus

arts reach perfect pitch Jazz, Rock, and harmony at Winter Concert The annual Winter Concert, held in mid-December, showcased the musical talent of the Academy’s

performing arts students. The 26-member choir,

Cheshire Academy Through Sound (CATS), opened the show with an international theme of songs

drawing from Jamaica, the Celtic tradition, and the poetry of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

The Academy’s a cappella group, which debuted in

the spring of 2015, brought perfect harmony to the stage with renditions of Billy Joel’s “The Longest

Time” and the seasonal favorite “Jingle Bell Rock.” With three bands and a 30-member orchestra, the audience was also treated to instrumental acumen

from musicians who offered tunes ranging from Led Zeppelin to Quincy Jones.

pulp fiction Artist Jennifer Davies of Branford displayed her handmade paper collages at the opening reception in January of her “Small Immensities” show in

the Kohn-Joseloff Gallery. “Working with (paper) pulp provides me a very physical approach to art,” she wrote in her artist’s statement posted in the gallery.

Davies uses Japanese mulberry bark to produce the pulp, then presses

the mixture into realistic rock-like sculptures or delicate wall hangings.

Davies named a series of multi-colored assemblages “Shifts” because they resemble old-fashioned woman’s slips or dresses.

Art shows at the gallery allow students to learn techniques and receive real-world advice from exhibiting artists.

See more photos and arts events online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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an ensemble of island folklore With a cast and crew of 42, the Varsity

Player’s production of “Once on This Island” was big in scope, ambition, and musical

variety. “This show depends a lot on the

ensemble instead of just individual characters,” said English Teacher Jennifer Guarino, the

show’s director and producer. “Everyone was

on stage for much of the performance to take part in the big song and dance numbers,” she said.

There were nine pit band members for the

three February performances. The musicians

follow a score that calls for plenty of rhythm.

Percussionist Olivia Williamson ’20 often led the cast into the vocal portion of the songs,

which centered on folklore and island culture. She played nine percussion instruments

during the musical, ranging from conga drums to tambourine.

(l-r) Samantha weed ’18, julia raffert y ’18, and Su Seong “Ryan” Kim ‘17


artistic accolades cheshire academy student earns national award Each year, some of the top student artists at Cheshire Academy submit their artwork to the Connecticut Scholastic Art

& Writing Awards. It’s not uncommon for our students to be recognized for their work at the state level, but this year one

student has earned national accolades. Peter Deng ’19 earned a Gold Medal in the Drawing and Illustration category for 2016. This honor is bestowed to the most talented young artists in the nation, and Deng now joins a list of celebrated past winners, including Andy Warhol.

Deng and another art student, Paola Fortes ’16, were recognized for their work in the state level of the 2016 Scholastic Art

and Writing competition earlier this year, where they competed against some 4,000 submitted pieces. Fortes’ "Self Portrait" oil painting received an honorable mention and Deng’s charcoal portrait dubbed "Paola" received a gold medal at the state level before moving on to be evaluated at the national level.

Nearly 320,000 pieces of art and writing were submitted from students in grades 7-12 this year, covering 28 different

artistic categories. Only the top one percent were recognized at the national level this year. Deng has been invited to attend the National Ceremony at Carnegie Hall on Thursday, June 2 in New York City, where he will be acknowledged for his achievement.

Last year, two Cheshire Academy students, Jason Lee ’15 and Cice Liu ’15, were also recognized at the state level for their work. Collectively, students from across America submitted 300,000 original works of art and writing in 2015. Of the total, 68,000 entries were recognized at the state level and just 2,000 at the national level.

Founded in 1923, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards have inspired teens across the country to be bold in demonstrating

their creativity. Each year, more and more students participate in this competitive program. Students can submit art material ranging from architecture, ceramics, and drawing to digital art, film, and video games. The writing category includes scripts, novel writing, and journalism, among others.

See more photos and arts events online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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on campus

stellar winter sports season a tournament spot and an elite eight win The varsity boys basketball team won their last

eight games of the regular season to become the number three seed in the NEPSAC Class AA

Elite Eight Tournament. In nail-biter of a home

game, the Cats battled to the buzzer to win 72-69 against Worcester Academy in the first round of the playoffs. Standouts of the action were Elijah Pemberton ’16 with 22 points; Clayton Le Sann ’16, who scored 14 points; and Tom Huerter ’16

(pictured right), who contributed 12 points. Chol Marial ’20­­­­‐who stands at 7’3”­­­‐had nine points,

including multiple highlight dunks, in addition to six blocked shots.

The team advanced to the semi-finals against

Cushing Academy and in a hard-fought game, lost

by just three points for a final score of 69-72. Proof of the tight matchup could be seen as neither team

had more than a five-point lead during the majority of the game. The Cats finished the season with a

21-10 record in only their second year in the league. Pemberton was named to the AA All-NEPSAC first team. Both Huerter and Ray Jerome ’16

received AA All-NEPSAC honorable mentions. Pemberton was also selected for the Jordan Brand Classic held on Friday, April 15 at the Barclay’s Center in Brooklyn, New York.

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first 1,000 point scorer in over a decade Soon after the opening tip-off of the varsity girls basketball team’s game against Greens

Farm Academy on January 30, Chelsea Dow ’16 scored her 1,000th career point, making her the first student athlete to do so in over a decade at the Academy.

Director of Athletic Operations Ed Banach presented Dow with a game ball and captured

the moment with her coaches Caron Quantick and Jeff Allen (pictured right with Chelsea) Dow’s game stats are impressive; she averaged 14 points, 5 rebounds, 5 assists, and 2.5

steals per game. Dow has had an amazing career at Cheshire Academy, and she ended her Academy career well over the 1,000-point milestone.

In early February, students and faculty gathered for Morning Meeting in the Gideon Welles Dining commons, where updates and announcements are made for the week. In a surprise

presentation, Dow was honored with a commemorative banner that will hang in the Arthur Sheriff Field House to spotlight her accomplishment.

elijah dunks into the finals After officially winning the online slam dunk voting contest and earning a spot at the 2016 American Family Insurance Slam Dunk

Championships in Houston, Elijah Pemberton ’16 has brought home a second place finish in the national competition.

In a nationally televised competition that aired on April 3, Pemberton dominated the first

and second rounds, receiving all nines from the panel of judges for a combined score of

72, advancing him to the final round of the

championships. Going up against top prospect and University of South Florida commit Troy Baxter, Pemberton was unable to hold on to

his final dunk. Baxter then completed his final dunk and went on to win the championship. Pemberton had this to say about the

experience, “I had a great time in Houston.

While I ended up losing in the finals, I met a lot of fans here and the environment was

great. It was definitely something I won’t ever

forget, and I’m glad I got to represent Cheshire Academy on national television.”

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on campus

In the Lane and Up on the Podium The varsity swim team again headed to the NEPSAC

The awards keep coming as J. Molnar also took home

success. The brother-sister pair of Matt Molnar ’17

in the 100 breaststroke. Gawronski was awarded a

championships, where the team saw considerable

and Jenna Molnar ’18 dominated the competition, in which each of the siblings took home the gold in the 100-meter breaststroke event.

a bronze in the 500 freestyle and Cail earned a silver silver in the 200 freestyle and a bronze in the 100

butterfly. Leko earned a silver in the 100 butterfly to round out the podium placings for the team.

First-place medals were also awarded in the 200

The multiple awards set the pace for a fourth place

Molnar, Dia Gawronski ’18, and Courtney Cail ’19.

The season was led by both male and female

medley and 400 freestyle relays to Mia Leko ’18, J. The four swimmers set a pool record in the medley and school records in both.

finish in the tournament against 15 other teams.

underclassmen, guaranteeing a strong team in the 2016-2017 school year.

inaugural year for elite hockey In February, the Elite Hockey teams participated in the Tier 1 Elite hockey league playoffs in Blaine, Minnesota. The U18 team finished with a 1-2 record. They opened the playoffs with a win over the San Jose Sharks,

but fell to their next two opponents: the LA Jr. Kings 2-1, and Boston Advantage 2-4.

The U16 team opened the playoffs with a 1-0 shutout win over the TPH

Thunder program out of Nashville, Tennessee, followed by a 6-3 win over the San Jose Jr. Sharks team. With a berth in the championship game

on the line, the Academy faced the Columbus Jr. Blue Jackets, and came

away with a 3-1 win. In the championship game, the Cats fell to a strong

Chicago team by a score of 1-4. Get more details on the playoffs by visiting magazine.cheshireacademy.org.

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fencing squad isn’t foiled

On the Slopes

Fencing has been compared to a game of physical chess.

Since the varsity ski team was

mind as they finished the season undefeated with a 7-0

shown strong progress in competing

This year’s squad clearly had the goal of checkmate in

record. They even avenged their only loss of the 2014-2015 season with a win this year over Old Lyme High School. A strong showing by four fencers—Patrick Brown ’17,

Ben Buchmeier ’16, Jack Palmer ’18 and David Conaway ’17—provided an invitation for them to compete in the

state championships. Brown and Buchmeier finished the competition in the top third of 92 fencers.

revived in 2014, the skiers have

in the Connecticut Interscholastic Ski League. Kudos this year go to

Carly Fisher ’17, who was chosen as one of the top 12 girls based on her

performances in the league’s races to

earn a position on Team Connecticut. Read more athletic news online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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live streaming Can't make it to campus to watch our athletics games? Catch all the action live online instead.

cheshire aca dem y.org/li v es tre am

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social media Highlights

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS!

via the boarding school blog

facebook.com/ cheshireacademy Februar y 4 was National Signing Day for five senior football players.

THE QUALITIES OF TOP BOARDING SCHOOLS

top 10 boarding school blogs from 2015

N e e d t h a t F o r m a l Fr i d a y g e a r? C h e s h i r e A c a d e m y n o w h a s a n o n l i n e b o o k s t o r e! c h e s h i r e a c a d e m y.o rg / b o o k s t o r e

via social media teen blog 5 SOCIAL MEDIA BLOGS EVERY PARENT SHOULD FOLLOW

WHY YOUR SCHOOL’S FACEBOOK PROFILE IS DOOMED

We l c o m e h o m e t o a l l o u r n e w l y a c c e p t e d s t u d e n t s! We c a n’ t w a i t to see you on campus for the 2 016 -2 017 a c a d e m i c y e a r. Check out the new TR X Tu t o r i a l V I DEO f r o m @ J T i r i l l o & @ s e y o u m s e t t e p a n i! h t t p s: // y o u t u . b e /c W K x K R479 p A #FitnessCenter

what is a boarding school dorm parent?

3 APP FEATURES THAT SHOULD CONCERN PARENTS

@CHESHIREACADEMY

First semester honor roll student s received a sweet treat from the c u p c a ke t r u c k t h a n k s t o a d o n a t i o n f r o m PR I DE, C h e s h i r e A c a d e m y Pa r e n t s A s s o c i a t i o n!

via the scratch up

@CHESHIREACADEMYtv C h e c k o u t El i j a h Pe m b e r t o n’s winning Slam Dunk video in the American High School Slam Dunk Contest.

happy chinese new year! - nancy jiang ‘17

you’re invited to the presidential inaguration -tar a lynch ‘18

once on this island - chloe qian ’18

@CHESHIREACADEMY # teachers

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#campuslife

#CAalumni


alumni e v en t s a n d a lu m n i s h a pi n g o u r w o r l d

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ALU MNI in the arts

Alum n i exp lorin g careers in p u rsu it of their pa ssion s for a rt


alumni

jake blasini

T

’04 // music in lincoln center

he opportunity to build an independent

the Academy made for long-lasting ties. “Everyone loved

Cheshire Academy was the impetus for

athletic.”

senior project focused on music at

Peter “Jake” Blasini ’04 to choose a career in music education.

“Instead of afternoon sports, I was allowed to pursue music recording,” Blasini said. “I gravitated toward

music because of this.” He said that former Fine Arts Teacher Lydia Franks, from whom he took music

theory, supported his goal. “When I wanted to do the

independent study, she was comfortable with letting me

“Jake has a lot of responsibility at his job,” Malerba

said. That could be an understatement. Blasini oversees

musical residencies in 100 public schools in New York.

Schools in Los Angeles, Chicago, and Detroit are also in the mix. Since the educational program began in 1991,

the number of concerts it coordinates has grown from 20 per year to 450.

experiment,” Blasini said.

That growth in programming

“All of the teachers at the Academy were supportive and

to move into his current job.

gave Blasini the opportunity

“I stuck around

“I stuck around until positions

until positions

carve out a role for myself,”

were created. i was

I was doing everything.”

able to carve out a

Blasini is now the Associate of Educational and

The professional of today was

role for myself”

he’s worked since 2010. He was drawn to New York City

yesterday. Blasini’s advice to

they modeled what it is to be professional,” Blasini noted. He attended the school from seventh to twelfth grade

and played varsity soccer and ran track. Blasini was also

a member of the National Honor Society, which requires at least a 3.33 GPA to be eligible.

Community Programs at Jazz at Lincoln Center where

because of its diversity in music and culture. “New York provides a blank canvas. There are so many ways to get involved,” Blasini noted.

A native of New Haven, he often took the train into

were created. I was able to

Blasini said. “In the beginning,

the determined student of

graduating seniors? “Building

relationships is one of the most important things you can do. Professionally and personally. Cultivate relationships with people,” he said.

Manhattan, and once Blasini graduated from college, he

It’s okay to have a good time along the way, however.

without a job but with leads for them,” Blasini said. He

superlative titles: Best Hair and Most Huggable. “My

headed to New York to launch his career. “I moved there worked as a bartender’s assistant, at a booking agency,

and took on internships. “In the meantime, I continued my journey in music.”

“I can’t see a better fitting job for him,” said Director of Alumni Relations and Special Events Christian

Malerba ’04. The two became friends in middle school

and remain close today. Malerba said the small classes at

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Jake, he was a very likable guy. He was both artsy and

the magazine of cheshire academy

His classmates voted for Blasini to have two senior

hair was out of control. It was huge,” he said. “I thought ‘let’s see how long I can deal with it.’ Huggable must be because I was friendly and I like to meet people.”


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rebekah george

R

9 // style in the wardrobe ’95

ebekah George ’95 took to the stage in her junior year to

sparky personality,” said former Academy Theater Teacher Shelley Taylor-

the Down Staircase.” She said that role, as well as others

and went on to be quite successful.”

perform with the Varsity Players as Alice Blake in “Up

she performed in the Black Box Theater, helped her to be more comfortable when making public appearances.

And what appearances she makes! George

Boyd. She noted that George, “was interested in performance and media

“Much of what has made her successful at what she does is something you

can’t capture or quantify,” said Ben George. “I think the Academy cultivates a sense of hard work, which Rebekah really

travels 30,000 miles a year to give interviews

followed.”

about fashion, beauty, and home design. She appears on television programs such as “The

“a career in

George selects a college intern each year and

“Extra.” While it’s a busy career, George said she enjoys every part of it. “I love how each day

fashion and

numerous appearances. Those are booked by

is different. Of course I love being on TV and it’s something I am very comfortable with,” she

beauty was

of cosmetic brands or home design firms.The

something

products on television or through web videos.

Today Show,” “Good Morning America,” and

added. “I also love growing my own brand.”

“A career in fashion and beauty was something

I never expected. It just grew organically,”

i never

social media has changed how she markets

expected.”

George told us in a recent interview. She said

herself. “Instagram replaced magazine articles and Twitter helps me promote my television

her agent who secures contracts with a variety agreements call for George to promote the

George’s knack for down-to-earth advice

is evident on her website, Get Gorge with

Rebekah George. Her uncomplicated attitude is on display as she provides a tip for a simple way to get bouncy curls or what it takes to perfect the smokey eye look. On her eponymous

appearances,” George explained.

website, rebekahgeorge.com, she explains how to turn a bedroom into a sleep sanctuary, and

A day student, George attended the Academy

why small changes to a beauty regimen can add

for six years, from seventh to twelfth grade.

She’s from Wallingford, where her parents still live. Her older brother, Ben

employs one assistant to help her manage her

up to stunning results.

George ’93, said he’s proud of his sister’s success. “She really just dug in

A recent announcement on George’s webpage may have received the most

happen. She is doing something that she loves.”

twins in the spring.

and put a lot of hard work and risk into what she does, Rebekah made it

hearty responses ever. She and her husband, Brian Wornow, are expecting

“At the Academy, my sister played girls’ lacrosse and other sports, but acting

In Nigel Barker’s book, “Beauty Equation,” George provides some expert

dancing,” he added. “She was a lovely, animated young lady with a bubbly,

like no blush or bronzer can.”

was her main love,” said Ben George. “She was always in plays, singing, and

insight. “Beauty is a positive, warm energy, that gives you a radiant glow

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alumni

stathis orphanos

I

’58 // art behind the lens

t's certain that memories of Cheshire Academy are shared and discussed by alumni around the

world. But, likely for the first time, the Academy

was mentioned at the Library of Congress during a formal presentation.

Stathis Orphanos ’58 did the honors at the national library last summer while sharing the history of his publishing and photography career. In a telephone interview soon after the speech, Orphanos said he

mentioned the Academy in his presentation because he was a boarding student for five years and made lifelong

(L-R) R alph sylvester AND stathis orphanos ’58

Sheriff,” he said.

The division had recently purchased books, manuscripts,

“On my first night at the Academy, I was 13 and

company called Sylvester & Orphanos. From 1976

friends. “I lived in Phillips House and had tea with Mrs.

wandering around. I heard the voice of Eartha Kitt

singing on a jukebox,” Orphanos recalled during the

presentation. He found the source of the music, which

was chosen by his classmate Michael Dunaway ’58, and their friendship began. It grew to include the entire

Dunaway family. “They're actually the reason I ended up in California,” he told the audience.

Dunaway’s mother, Virginia Wicks, was a publicist for

Eartha Kitt and many other jazz musicians. The family was such good friends with Kitt, the singer came to

Cheshire Academy in 1956 to visit Dunaway to attend a christening for his little sister at a nearby church. Of course, Orphanos remembers his introduction to the

singer and TV star. “She spoke seven languages. For a

15-year-old boy, it was unforgettable. She would purr up

to 2005, Orphanos and his business and life partner

Ralph Sylvester, published limited-editions books for

such renowned authors as Nobel Prize winners Nadine Gordimer and V.S. Naipaul.

Equally as significant is Orphanos’ photography career in which he captured the images of the elite among the literary and film world. “I photographed over

100 authors,” he said. They include Graham Greene,

Gore Vidal, William Styron, John Updike, and Philip Roth. Hollywood stars also posed for Orphanos, who

photographed his subjects using mostly available light.

Film legends captured by his lens range from actors Claire Blume and Esai Morales to Julie Harris and director John Schlesinger.

at you and run her hands through your curls,” he said.

Orphanos’ work will be housed in the same collection

That tale is just one of many he shared during the event

Susan B. Anthony, along with the author collections of

organized by the national library's Poetry and Literature Center and the Rare Book and Special Collections

Division of the Library of Congress. The event was held in collaboration with Lambda Literary which offered a panel discussion on LGBT publishing.

48

and other ephemera from his Los Angeles-based

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that includes the personal libraries of Harry Houdini and Walt Whitman and Hans Christian Andersen.

See a full photo gallery online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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“I photographed over one hundred authors. They include Graham Greene, Gore Vidal, William Styron, John Updike, and Philip Roth.”

photo of john updike by orphanos

photo of julie harris by orphanos

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winter reception

A

favorite event for many, the Academy’s Annual Winter

The event featured the second annual Giving Tree, which was

and friends for a wonderful evening on December 3. The

various departments. Attendees were given the option to support

Reception brought together more than 200 alumni, parents,

Gideon Welles Dining Commons was transformed into a festive venue complete with holiday wreaths, sparkly table decorations, and delectable hors d’oeuvres. The room was filled with familiar faces, including former Senior Master Bob Gardiner, who was

decorated with ornaments representing the capital requests of specific departmental needs, including items for academics,

athletics, arts, and facilities, as well as make unrestricted gifts to

the Annual Fund. In total, $16,000 was raised in just a few hours.

decked out in his traditional red holiday sweater.

In addition to the Giving Tree, the event featured another

“It’s so great to have a room full of people who love Cheshire

Languages Teacher Nicole Burnett’s brother at his vineyard,

Academy all together for this special event,” said Director of

Development & Alumni Relations Barb Davis P’17 P’18 P’20. “This is one of my favorite nights of the year.”

special centerpiece: Bordeaux Supérieur, a Merlot produced by La Tourbeille, located in the region of Entre Deux Mers in

France. The fragrant wine served as an aromatic reminder of the Academy’s network of friends across the globe.

Indeed, Gideon Welles Dining Commons can feel almost

Attendees were so enjoying themselves that Head of School John

centerpieces, fresh pine greenery, and silvery bistro tables

mingling. The evening ended with all promising to return next

magical during the Winter Reception, with sparkling cranberry throughout.

D. Nozell extended the festivities an extra half hour for further year during the holiday season, if not sooner. See more photos from this and other events online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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s n a p s h ot s 1 WINTER RECEPTION

2 SHARING GOOD CHEER

3 A CAPPELLA GROUP

Tom Smith ’71, Bob Anderson ’72, Gary Anderson ’70, Barbara Vestergaard P’96,’02

Andrew Sacco P’03, Lindsay Sacco, Michelle McBreen P’14, ‘16 and Bob Gardiner E, P’81

Su-Seong Ryan Kim ‘17, Lexi Williamson ‘18, Maggie Guarino-Trier ‘18, Samantha Weed ‘18, Julia Rafferty ‘18, Eun-Kee James Kim ‘17

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events t h e ac a d e m y t r av e l s to a s i a Head of School, John D. Nozell and Direc tor of Development & Alumni Relations Barb Davis P’17 P’18 P’20 traveled to Asia in November to meet with Alumni and current parents.

beijing, china

shanghai, china shenzhen, china thailand

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south korea


1

2

3

4

W h e r e w e’ v e b e e n 1 NEW YORK CITY Alex Case ’99 and Head of School John D. Nozell 2 MADISON SQUARE GARDEN New York Rangers Donor Reception at Madison Square Garden Luxury Lounge

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3 JAMS RESTAURANT Board Chair Richard Cerrone ’67 and Secretary Richard Katz ’64 4 JAMS RESTAURANT Former Senior Master Bob Gardiner, Drew Kevorkian’93 and his wife Sol Rashidi 5 MADISON SQUARE GARDEN Frank Trotta ’05 and his wife Jessica Trotta 6 JAMS RESTAURANT New York City Parent and Alumni Reception hosted by Trustee Howard Greenstone P’12


class notes

from the archives


1940s

’49 Ro b e r t ( B o b) Tr e a t is enjoying retirement in sunny Arizona. He celebrated his 25th anniversar y with his second wife Stephanie af ter 33 wonder ful years with Sally, who passed away in 1986. He will soon be traveling for his family’s annual month-long vacation in Mazatlan, Mexico.

1950s ’ 56

A n d r e w Fr a n k s says, “I have always cherished

my experience at Cheshire Academy even though the grades didn’t show it! The Academy gave me many skills that proved impor tant to me and my career later in life. I remember Ar thur Sherif f with great respec t and fondness.”

’ 59 To m M a n n i o n will be spending the summer months with his family at their home in Stowe, Vermont to escape the Florida summer heat. ’ 59 W i l l i a m T. “ B i l l ” Wo o d was recently elec ted to a three-year term as Chairman of the University of Mar yland Baltimore Foundation, Inc., Board of Trustees. The Board advises the President of the University and marshals the financial assets of the Foundation. He is also the Founder of Wood Law Of fices, LLC, a law firm in Rockville, Mar yland.

1960s

’6 0 Ro n a l d M o o r e retired in 20 08 from his position as the Distric t Sales Manager for a Swedish manufac turing company. He is happily married with three children and now three grandchildren. He is currently living year-round on Mar tha’s Vineyard. ’6 3

M a r c D e s r o s i e r s retired in December 2015. As he

puts it, he is now, “enjoying life in the slow lane.”

’6 3

R i c k K i l ey i s retired and living in Las Cruces, New Mexico. He will be traveling to New York City and Philadephia to visit grandkids on occasion. He has also taken up hiking as a hobby.

’6 3

R i c h a r d “ R i c k ” O l s o n just completed his first

book entitled “Highlights and Turning Points.” It is an autobiographical sketch of his life from growing up in New England to retirement in Virginia, spotlighting highs and lows along the journey. He says, “Cheshire Academy was a highlight and is noted as a turning point in my education and in friendships that have lasted a lifetime.” The book is available on Amazon.

’6 3 St eve S o r e f f, M . D. is the President of Etz Hayim Synagogue, Derr y, New Hampshire, the Chair of “The Forum” online newspaper forumhome.org; President at Education Initiatives, LLC eduinitiatives.com; and teaches at Daniel Webster College.

’59 caption this C o m e d y i n t h e m a k i n g! I f y o u know the contex t behind this p h o t o, o r w h o t h e a c t o r s a r e, l e t u s k n o w. E v e n i f y o u d o n’ t , t a ke a g u e s s a n d w r i t e u s a f u n caption.

Doug c a lc agn i

Head of School John D. Nozell and Doug Calcagni this past March in Florida. c o m @ c h e s h i r e a c a d e m y.o rg

the magazine of cheshire academy

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alumni

1960s cont. ’6 4

B i l l B u s h retired from medical equipment sales in 20 09.

’6 4

D e l l Ke e h n lives on Wollochet Bay in Gig Harbor, Washington. He ser ves on numerous boards both profit and non profit. One company he ser ves, Falah, is a NYSE listed company and EW Brandt is a ver y large fruit company, where Dell is the direc tor of both.

’6 4

R i c h a r d Pa l m e r i has been working and developing

patents for technology. He says, “Mcs patent 8875459 & Elec cap 8768813 are two recently issued utility patents.” You can find his company’s new technology on guidepath1.com

’65

D r. M i c h a e l H e w i t t says, “Af ter completing assignments in South Sudan, Ethiopia, and Nigeria for Medecins Sans Frontiers, I have returned to teaching. I am on the clinical faculty at the University of San Francisco School of Nursing and Health Sciences. It is doubtful that anyone, including myself, would have anticipated the path I have taken 51 years ago.”

photo credit: palm beach post

’64

56

R i ch a r d C . Le v y

A professional toy and game inventor, Lev y has two new board games for 2016. The Velveteen Rabbit, co-created with his wife, Sher yl, and published by Winning Moves, became available in Januar y. This June, Winning Moves will introduce Richard’s Ant Farm board game inspired by the classic Ant Farm that celebrates its 60th anniversar y this year. Richard’s guidebook, “The Toy & Game Inventor’s Handbook,” is now available exclusively as an eBook through Amazon.

the magazine of cheshire academy

’6 6 Ro b e r t G o l d b e r g recently retired af ter 18 years as CFO and Treasurer of a regional central Florida staf fing ser vice. ’6 6

W i l l i a m S a n d e r s o n had the oppor tunity to catch up

’6 6

J o e W i g l ey is in the process of a multi-phase home

with Direc tor of Development & Alumni Relations Barb Davis P’17 P‘18 ‘20 in West Palm Beach, Florida.

development projec t. Phase one of TerraScena, “Home with a natural point of view,” is nearly sold out. He says, “Five more homes should be under construc tion within four months with the remaining 10 scheduled to begin in 2017. Phase two is under consideration at this time.”

’69 Pa u l K l e m o w lives in Lake Wor th, Florida. He is the owner of PowerLegal, P.A., an estate planning and probate law firm. ’69

J o h n Po h n got married on November 8, 2015.


1980s

’ 8 0 St eve A h e r n has opened a new restuarant in Woodbridge, Connec ticut called Cafe Blake.

J ay S h e r i d a n and his wife had their second child, Georgia Greene last Oc tober. In addition he took a new position at Echn, where he is now the Treatment Coordinator for the Older Adult Program.

’97

1990s ’90

’93

M e r e d i t h F i o r i n o N e w m a n and her husband Bruce

welcomed their son, Miles Rober t Newman. He was born on Februar y 21, 2015 and of ficially joined the Newman family on September 27, 2015.

’93

R i c a r d o G r e e r is a former professional basketball player

and current Direc tor of player Development for the University of Central Florida (UCF) basketball team. He just recently had the chance to catch up with former Varsity Boys’ Basketball Coach Billy Casson, his wife Kathy, Alumni & Development Of fice Manager Barbara Vestergaard P’96 & ’02, Kristen Dupre Flores ’96 and her son Charlie, and Jared Pinsker ’97. They caught up in Storrs, Connec ticut af ter UCF played the Connec ticut Huskies.

D r e w Kevo r k i a n and his wife Sol Rashidi became the proud parents of their son Kamran Anthony Kevorkian on May 15, 2015 at 12:20am.

’64 W i lli am Sa n de rson

and Direc tor of Development & Alumni Relations Barb Davis P’17 P’18 P’20 had the oppor tunity to catch up in West Palm Beach, FL in March.

57


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the magazine of cheshire academy


’07

J e ffr e y n e l son Cheshire Academy graduate and Essex, Connec ticut, native Jef frey Nelson ’07 launched issue No. 2 of his comic book “Sons of Yellowstone,” published by Headshrinker’s Press of Cincinnati, Ohio in March. Nelson is the creator and writer of the comic book and is fulfilling his dream of entering the comic book business via independent publishing. “Sons of Yellowstone” takes place af ter the eruption of a super volcano in Wyoming called the Yellowstone Caldera. Those who sur vived the event have adapted; some have developed powers as a result of contac t with “Yellow Mercur y,” a substance coughed out by the volcano. Nelson said the lessons he learned on the first issue were invaluable and carried over to the second. The book is more focused, keeping the reader, new and old, in mind. The same ar tist and colorist returned, and a new letterer is on board. All issues of “Sons of Yellowstone” are available by visiting: http://w w w.headshrinkerspress.com/Sons-Of-Yellowstone

T h e co v e r o f Je f f ’s l a te st re le a se , “ S o n s o f Ye ll o w sto n e .”

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alumni

1990s cont. ’ 95 J a m e s Va n d e r B e e k and his wife Kimberly welcomed their 4th child, Emiliou to the world. ’96

J e n n i f e r B u o n o c o r e D e c a r v a l h o and her

’97

C h r i s t o p h e r M o t t e r and his wife Laura

husband Carl became the parents of Nina Jean born on Januar y 28, 2016.

welcomed a baby daughter, Piper Anne, on Oc tober 29, 2015.

’03

60

E lisa Sa n dle r Fe ldm a n

’ 9 9 Ke l l y B o s t i c H a r t g e r i n k and her husband Dennis Har tgerink welcomed a baby boy, Benjamin Edward, on November 20, 2015. ’99

H a r r y N a d a l had the oppor tunity to grab lunch with Direc tor of Alumni Relations Christian Malerba ‘04 & Bevan Dupre ‘69 in San Juan, Puer to Rico.

’ 9 9 Ke l l y B o s t i c H a r t g e r i n k and her husband Dennis Har tgerink welcomed a baby boy, Benjamin Edward on November 20, 2015.

married Brett Feldman in Oc tober of 2015. Pic tured lef t to right: Brian Goldmeier ’02, Elisa Sandler Feldman ’03, and Sarah (Root) Goodwin ’03

the magazine of cheshire academy


’01

Pa n ay i otis Te r z is

was recently inter veiwed by a radio show called Paper Cuts on Clocktower.org. Panayiotis was described as, “a NYC based ar tist, publisher, and printer who works in a variety of media to collapse the relics of the distant past with the ar tifac ts of our chaotic present in search of future possible narratives for human kind.” Terzis’ work has been widely exhibited nationally and internationally in such venues as Printed Matter, INC; Andreas Melas Present (Athens), The Rober t Rauschenger Foundation and a score of other locations. He has also been featured in a number of publications and books. Terzid presently teaches printmaking and color theor y at Parsons Universtity and School of Visual Ar ts. photo credit: clock tower.org

“ Some of my g reatest f r iend ships began at Cheshire Academy and continue to thi s day ” k a le a e dwa r ds ’ 0 4

2000s ’ 01

Wo Ye o n “A n n e” M i n lives on Long Island,

’04

K a l e a E d w a r d s is now living in beautiful

’05

J e n n i f e r F i n n e r a n wrote to let us know she

New York with her husband and 10‐month‐old son. Anne is a projec t coordinator at Burberr y.

Charleston, South Carolina and working at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) as a licensed mental health therapist. She works within the STAR Nor th day treatment program with adolescents suf fering from severe mental health issues. Her clients’ mental health issues impair their ability to func tion properly within the mainstream school setting. Edwards says, “I feel that I am right where I am supposed to be; encouraging others. I am always reminded of my suppor t system at Cheshire Academy and the struggles that I overcame while attending. I can not thank the staf f, counselors, and fellow students for their unconditional suppor t and belief in my abilities. Some of my greatest friendships began at CA and continue to this day.”

picked up the hobby of knitting during Discover y Week at the Academy. She now has pursued that hobby and opened up her own Etsy shop, Knitpicky Studios. You can check it out at https://w w w.etsy.com/shop/ KnitpickyStudios.

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alumni

2000s cont.

’ 0 7 C h r i s t y B o s l ey has received a master’s in exercise science and health promotion, specializing in exercise physiology. ’08

C o r i Ku b a t H ay u n g a was married in August 2014 to Rober t Hayunga. She will be star ting law school in August of this year at The American University Washington College of Law in DC.

’ 10

Ye d i d y a (J o e) B e n - Av i e stopped in to let us know that he graduated from Brandeis and is working for Jof fee Company, which does emergency preparedness training for schools.

’12

Le ft to Right: Hanna Kubat ’10, France y Fenton (f or me r dean of st udents), A le x Domanski ’08, Ma ckenzie V ile ’08, Cor i Kubat Hayunga ’08, and Jess Sze w czyk ’08

Doug Wa r r i ck

par ticipated in the NFL Regional Combine. The NFL scouting combine is an annual event all 32 teams par ticipate in looking for future talent. He made a great impression as soon as he stepped onto the field. It was said that he was reminiscent of Cincinnati Bengals tight end Matt Lengel. Warrick is a huge target. “The 6 - 6, 220 lb tight end made all hand catches and took of f with power down the field af ter each grab.” photo credit: elonphoenix.com

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the magazine of cheshire academy


’ 10

J u l i a C o u r t n ey is a caseworker in Texas. Her title is Family Based Safety Ser vices Specialist for Texas Depar tment of Family and Protec tive Ser vices. She graduated from University of South Florida in St. Petersburg.

’ 10

N i c o l e E a c u e l l o works as a buyer for leading e-commerce star t-up, Wayfair.com.

’ 14

J e s s i c a W i l s o n is of ficially a PCA on the

Cardiology floor of Har tford Hospital

’ 1 5 I n S e o n g “J a s o n” L e e par ticipated in the fil iLuve as a cinematographer. The film has been selec ted as an of ficial selec tion of Busan International Shor t Film Festival. Jason has also been involved in other the creation of other small films including False Awakening, iLuv and A Bloody Mirror. ’15

Au s t i n N e h l s was induc ted into the 2016 NEC Mens’s Basketball Ball All Rookie team. Austin is a freshman at Central Connec ticut State University.

class notes

n e w s? u pdat e s? m a r r i ag e? b i r t h? Keep your connec tion to Cheshire Academy alive by submitting a class note! Write to Christian Malerba ’04 at christian.malerba@cheshireacademy.org or submit your note to us online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

17 94

jo n ath a n sc a lise

’03

Nav y Diver 1st Class Jonathan Scalise is Naval Submarine School's Sailor of the First Quar ter 2016. Scalise was selec ted on Januar y 12 in award ceremonies sponsored by Branch 20 of the Fleet Reser ve Association. Scalise is a high-risk instruc tor for the pressurized submarine escape facility for the Engineering and High Risk Training Depar tment. Capt. Aaron M. Thieme, commanding of ficer of the Naval Submarine School, praised Scalise noting, "As a Master Training Specialist, he provided the highest level of instruc tion, logging 32 hours of podium time and 62 hours of laborator y instruc tion, leading to the successful graduation of 450 initial accession and fleet level students." Scalise’s superb per formance as diving super visor was instrumental during the super vision of 86 hours of incident-free bottom time, resulting in the safe completion of 30 0 buoyant freeascents and 38 proficiency dives. He also devoted 10 0 hours of of f-duty time mentoring 36 Boy Scouts and 32 hours assisting the Maritime Heritage Festival in New London, Connec ticut." Scalise received the Nav y and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (Gold Star in lieu of Third Award) and was presented with a replica statuette of the Lone Sailor by George Hyland of the Fleet Reser ve Association, Branch 20.


CAT SCRATCH Find out the answers online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org

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ALUMNI NETWORK ANNUAL FUND ARTHUR SHERIFF ART MAJOR BLUE ROOM CHESHIRE CHESHIRE ACADEMY ICH DIEN JJ WHITE JOHN D. NOZELL

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17 94

the magazine of cheshire academy

KENSETT KOHN JOSELOFF GALLERY LIGHTS OF HOPE LIVE STREAM NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY NEPSAC POST GRADUATE PREFECTS PRIDE ROCKWELL KENT

SCHOOL STORE SEABURY SIMOSA FIELD SNAPCAT SUMMER PROGRAM VDP VENTURE GRANT WINTER RECEPTION


The Harwood Society for Planned Giving

The Harwood Society recognizes amazing people like Karen Smith, current Senior Master and longtime faculty member, and her husband Curt, who have made the ultimate investment in Cheshire Academy’s future: a charitable bequest in their will. Through their planned gift, the Smiths join an elite group of Academy supporters who, thanks to their generosity, will forever impact our beloved school.

Learn more about how you can join this coveted Society. Contact Director of Development & Alumni Relations Barb Davis P’17 P’18 P’20, at barbara.davis@cheshireacademy.org or 203-439-7228.

CHESHIREACADEMY.ORG/GIVINGPROGRAMS


last look Rachel Wallace ’16 was one of the recipients of last year’s Rizzolo-Larson Venture Grants. She traveled to Germany, where she studied at a language camp. Learn more about Wallace’s experience online at magazine.cheshireacademy.org


O n e W o r d: Jo y f u l n e ss

G iving is one of t he best invest ment s you ca n ma ke to help create a sense of joy on c ampus . Cheshire Ac ademy ’s student- centered educ ation allows all student s to seek new oppor tunities , grow as individuals , and f ind joy both in and out of the classroom . A gif t to the annual f und helps suppor t ever y aspect of a student ’s educ ation , f rom ac ademic s to the ar t s .

GIVE TODAY! w w w . c h e s h i r e ac a d e m y . o r g /g i v e


10 Main Street, Cheshire, CT 06410 203-272-5396

174 9

ma g a z i ne.cheshireaca dem y.org

1794: The Arts Issue  
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