Page 1

Spring/Summer 2017

A Flair for Flavour

Taste trends and flavourful suggestions for flavour hungry customers

p. 13

Cutting Costs What's the true cost of proteins on your menu?

p. 39

Go Fish Amazing seafood recipes

p. 51


“Great tasting soups start with natural scratch flavour.” John Coletta, Executive Chef, Chicago Only Knorr® Liquid Concentrated Bases deliver closest-to-scratch flavour.

Find out more at UFS.com Find out more at UFS.com

©2017 Unilever Food Solutions, Trade-mark owned or used under license buy Unilever Food Solutions, Toronto, Ontario M4W 3R2.


THIS ISSUE

D E PA R TM E N T S 2

President’s Letter

8

Great Advice

10

Staying Ahead

22

Inspired Menus

34

Taste Nation

51

Recipe Central

FE AT U R ES

13

13

IN SEASONS Thrilla on the Grilla

19

WHAT’S UP! Brand Points Plus

25

OPEN MENU Romancing the Dessert Menu

31

MARKETING 101 What’s Your Brand?

39

COST CHECK What’s the True Cost of Proteins?

43

GOOD BUSINESS Succession Planning for Restaurant Owners

Look for Brand Points PLUS qualifying products throughout the magazine!


waste not want not

GREAT ADVICE

FOOD WASTE IS ONE OF THE BIGGEST DRAGS ON RESTAURANT PROFITABILITY. REDUCING FOOD WASTE MEANS IMPROVING YOUR BOTTOM LINE. More than $30 billion worth of food is wasted in Canada each year, and more than half of that waste happens as it is produced, processed, transported, sold, prepared and served, according to Ontario-based consulting firm Value Chain Management International’s (VCMI) annual “Food Waste in Canada” report. But by reducing food waste, businesses can reduce operating costs by 15 to 20 percent and increase profitability by the equivalent of 5 to 11 percent. Remember that no piece of food needs to become waste. With creative thinking and some ingenuity, you can minimize losses and improve efficiency and profitability.

Plan ahead to reduce waste “Spend time to plan the amount you intend to purchase based on factors including weather, events, proximity to your restaurant, and historical purchasing patterns,” advises John Placko, culinary director at Modern Culinary Academy in Toronto. By cooking with the seasons, chefs can reduce food waste. “Buying produce seasonally is a great way to ensure that your menu is on-trend and it lowers costs and maximizes the life of produce,” says Kyla Tuori, corporate chef, Canada, Unilever Food Solutions. Ingredients that are out of season have made a longer journey and have a higher risk of spoilage. Consider frozen, dried, bottled or canned goods instead of fresh if comparable quality can be achieved. Kyla recommends using scales to measure out ingredients as well as portions. “Your recipe should always be the basis for your selling price. It’s not unusual for an over-service of more than 40 percent to occur.” 8

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

Use all the trimmings “Especially with the increased popularity in plant forward diets, utilizing all parts of the vegetable is more important than ever,” Tuori says. “Roasting carrots and using the greens to make pesto or pickling beets and using the tops for salad greens is a great way of reducing waste.”

Reuse leftovers Use extra meat and vegetable trimmings to enhance stocks, soups, and sauces. “This will also ensure that your recipes have a more robust and flavourful quality,” Kyla says. “Try preparing smaller batches, and freezing or refrigerating,

CHEF’S TIPS: • CONSIDER TURNING YOUR LEFTOVER PAR-COOKED RISOTTO INTO ARANCINI FOR AN APPETIZER SPECIAL • TURN OVERRIPE FRUITS INTO PURÉES FOR SAUCES AND DRESSINGS • TOSS LONG STRIPS OF CARROT PEEL IN OIL AND SEASONINGS, OR BAKE THEM UNTIL CRISP AND THEN USE AS A SALAD GARNISH • ZEST YOUR CITRUS FRUITS BEFORE JUICING AND USE THE ZEST TO MAKE CITRUS SUGAR OR TO INFUSE FLAVOUR INTO HONEY OR VINEGAR


GREAT ADVICE

then re-heating as needed. This will ensure that there is minimal waste at the end of the day and you are only using what’s needed.” If it’s a vegetable, you can cook the excess, purée it and freeze it for use in a soup, sauce, dip or other application for your menu, John Placko says. If it’s a fruit, purée it and pack it into a small bag and freeze it down for a specialty cocktail or dessert sauce. Excess food can also be sliced thinly, dried in a dehydrator and used as a wafer on selected dishes. Toronto-based chef and culinary consultant Kira Smith recommends keeping a keen eye on ingredients and their lifecycle to manage usage and considering innovative culinary opportunities. “Think about how you can change the form of leftover ingredients or prep waste to maximize use,” she says.

Break bread

Before you throw out your stale bread, consider how bread can enjoy a (profitable) second life as…

Tuscan bread soup Casseroles Panzanella salads Bread pudding Stuffing Croutons

Although some people will take home their unfinished meal, what about those who don’t? What about the resulting plate waste? “Encourage your servers to take note of plate waste,” Kira Smith suggests. “Is there any consistency in the items that result in ongoing waste, and is there an option to offer a ‘half portion’ of these items on the menu?” Plus you may be able to price half portions higher than one-half of the full price. “Investing in back-of-house staff with a slightly higher skill set will enable them to prepare items that can drastically reduce food waste,” Kyla says. “Vegetable trimmings can enhance convenience stocks, meat trimmings can be made into sausages, and fruit/vegetable trimmings can be made into condiments or jams.” Track and reduce your food waste, including the waste that doesn’t even make it to the plate, and compost unusable leftovers whenever possible.

RESOURCE

There’s no reason to put your bread in the bin when there are so many ways to think outside the bread box, says Rachel Winters, regional sales manager – Eastern Canada for Boulart. “Cutting back on food waste is as important as it’s ever been. Not just for your bottom dollar, but also for the greater good.”

Keep an eye on plate waste

CORNER • The true cost of waste: http://vcm-international.com/newreport-annual-food-waste-in-canada-is-31-billion/) • 20 Waste-Cutting Tips Every Foodservice Chef Should Know (http://www.leanpath.com/)

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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going global

STAYING AHEAD

Creative chefs looking to add zest and excitement to their menus are finding inspiration with seldomused ethnic flavours. Here are some other hot, hot, hot flavour trends and ways you can work with them on your menu:

Plancha and peppers Espelette peppers come from the Basque region of Spain. They are distinctively smoky, sweet and mildly hot – perfect as the lead flavour in a zesty rub with Mediterranean herbs to enhance grilled meats and seafood. Chef Juriaan’s top tip

Mongolian, guava and coriander topped Technomic’s MenuMonitor as fastest-growing flavours in 2015/16. For 2017, Technomic is forecasting that “newcomers from across the globe will bring with them exotic recipes and ingredients, spurring fresh inspiration for chefs. Looking at the year to come, specialties like Filipino pancit (noodles) and sinigang (soup), Pakistani roadside bun kebabs and Iranian gheimeh (stew) will flourish.” One of the hottest trends continues to be Sriracha. Its spicy, sweet and savoury essence of Southeast Asian cuisine with a touch of heat awakens taste buds – and menus. Even McDonald’s is testing Sriracha. Prickly pear is a prominent ingredient in Mexican cooking, often found in salads and entrées. Piri piri is an African chili pepper that has been brought into the spotlight by Nando’s, Technomic reports. 10

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

• For a dazzling Basque-inspired Plancha grill, McCormick Canada executive corporate chef Juriaan Snellen suggests a zesty sandwich topping using Espelette pepper, finely chopped shallot, lime juice, lemon juice, sherry wine vinegar, mayo, salt and pepper.

Vivacious Verde Mojo Verde is a vibrant Spanish green sauce with cumin, cilantro, parsley and green chilies. It can be used to add complex flavour profiles to starters, dips/condiments, and cocktails, and on the Plancha grill it comes alive. Chef Juriaan’s top tip •

Try some Mojo Verde on crispy potato chips, tortilla chips, or sweet potato fries; use it with guacamole; mix it with mayonnaise for a Spanish or Basque style dipping sauce or sandwich topping.


STAYING AHEAD

Healthier Eating Canadian diners are becoming more conscious of healthy eating habits, and they are looking to you for healthier menu items. It’s no surprise that plant-based alternative ingredients are gaining in popularity, the Canadian Health Food Association (CHFA) reports. Flax seeds, hazelnuts and cashews are great sources of calcium and vitamins A, D and E with virtually no saturated fat or cholesterol. CHFA expects this to be a big year for mushrooms, sprouts, digestive enzymes and new and exciting carb foods made from fibrerich beans. Check out the complete CHFA 2017 Natural Health Trends Report at http://www.multivu. com/players/English/8006151-canadian-healthfood-trends/docs/natural-health-trends-reportof-2017-1443853418.pdf

A Versatile Condiment Skhug Sauce is a popular Middle Eastern condiment that brings spice to the table in a hot sauce form. Traditional ingredients including cumin and cardamom combine with the heat of Thai bird chilies, freshly chopped herbs, olive oil and tangy lemon juice to create a versatile topping for many menu items.

ADD SOME

HEAT

Chef Juriaan’s top tip •

Use Skhug sauce as a condiment for Middle Eastern dishes such as falafel and shawarma. Top hummus with Skhug sauce for added heat and flavour complexity. Mix Skhug sauce with reduced or non-fat Greek yogurt for a delicious low-fat dip or sauce for vegetables. Spoon some Skhug sauce into pasta dishes, soup and bean dishes to create deeper layers of flavour.

For more useful flavour ideas, and to get the most out of the McCormick® Flavour Forecast® 2017, visit www.clubhouseforchefs.ca CHEFCONNEXION.CA

11


ToGo! Carryout Packaging

Packaging Choice and Sustainability Contact your -PDBM%F-VYFSales Representative PS$BMM ]%FMVYF4BMFT!OPWPMFYDPN


IN SEASONS

Thrilla by Lawrence Herzog

Here comes summer and it’s time to get your grill on. This year’s hot trends include flat plate grilling, high-end buns, layering, non-meat grilling, and sauces and spices that take old favourites and present them in new and exciting ways. ➤

Grilla CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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IN SEASONS

There’s nothing like cooking over live fire to really ignite the taste buds

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SPRING/SUMMER 2017


IN SEASONS

There’s nothing like cooking over live fire to really ignite the taste buds, says RockWood Urban Grill corporate chef Lloyd Frank. “It brings out the natural flavours of anything you put on that broiler. We choose triple-A steaks, fresh salmon, and top quality ingredients, and when you throw them on that fire, it’s amazing what it does.” Stu Rathwell, president of Rock Creek Tap & Grill and RockWood Urban Grill, says they devised the concept around the wood-burning grill. “It’s an open grill design we sourced from Texas just like a barbecue or an open fire pit with a grate over it.” The concept has been a big hit with customers at their locations in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and soon Alberta looking for comfortable dining with home-cooked flair. “Our guests want a casual and friendly experience with the absolute best quality taken to a higher level than they would get on their backyard barbecue,” Rathwell says. Different wood burns at different temperatures – be it hickory, oak or maple – and affects the flavour profiles of the various proteins and vegetables, Chef Frank says. “We still tweak it a little bit here and there to get the optimum temperature and burning time. You don’t want it to go to amber too quick, otherwise you lose your flavour.” Brisket is a big trend this year, and Rock Creek and RockWood smoke their own, along with chicken wings,

Big on burgers Nearly four in 10 Canadians eat at least one burger a week, and men eat even more burgers than women, according to data from Weston Bakeries, which studies burger-lovers’ habits. Here’s what really turns on burger lovers looking for a premium burger experience:

The patty (63%) The bun (21%) Toppings (6%) Seasonings/spices (5%) Condiments and cheese (3% each) For many Canadians, a burger is naked without cheese. Not surprisingly, cheddar is the cheese champion at 47%, followed by mozzarella at 35%, Swiss at 33%, and Monterey Jack at 25%. Sliced is chosen by 63% and shredded by 17%.

AT LEADING FULL-SERVICE RESTAURANTS, BOTH SPECIALTY AND CHICKEN BURGERS ARE ON TREND RESEARCH

All fired up

pork ribs, cheddar and garlic, and then finish them on the broiler. Customers love their beef brisket sliders with peanut butter bacon chili jam, and also their smoked brisket grilled cheese. Comfort food meets the grill!

SAYS*

Specialty burgers are the leading and fastest growing burger variety Guacamole is the fastest growing burger condiment.

And to top it off... Meat-topped burgers are trending…and going beyond bacon. Beef burgers are getting piled high with pulled pork, ham and beef brisket for a really meaty experience. They’re marketed as an indulgent, and ultra-savoury meat-onmeat combination. ➤

TOP CONDIMENTS 1. Mayonnaise 2. Barbecue sauce 3. Relish 4. Mustard 5. Guacamole

© 2015 Technomic Inc.; Canadian Burger Consumer Trend Report CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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IN SEASONS

SMOKY, SWEET AND MILDLY HOT A-bun-dance Most Canadians like it simple and classic when it comes to buns, however new

and

are

adding

exciting abundant

formulations new

bun-

opportunities. Here’s what Canadians traditionally look for:

Sesame seed buns (31%) Cheese buns (22%)

HIGHLIGHT YOUR GRILL MENU TO CUSTOMERS

Onion buns (18%) Whole wheat and multigrain buns (16%) Innovation is certainly coming to According

to

Technomic,

which collects data from the Top 500 restaurant chains, the fastest growing buns are potato buns, sesame seed buns, and brioche. Even ciabatta buns are beginning to have their moment on the grill. Beef still reigns as burger king followed by chicken, fish and turkey. Eight out

RESEARCH

of 10 prefer a grilled beef patty. But

16

SAYS*

SPECIALTY BURGERS HAVE SEEN 33.2% GROWTH ON MENUS

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

easily be used with meats, seafood and vegetables, paired with bold sauces, rubs and glazes.

Spice thrills

Garlic bread buns (19%)

buns.

flat-out grilling, is coming on strong with grill-happy diners. Hailing from Spain, France’s Basque region as well as Mexico, the plancha (a thick, flat slab of cast iron) creates a sizzling, smoky sear and flavour crust. Plancha can

new grill contenders are ready to take their place. Think seafood skewers and grilled fish.

Say Plancha! Even the method of grilling is changing. As McCormick’s noted in its 2017 Flavour Forecast, “plancha,” or

Salt and pepper remain the most popular seasonings, however garlic salt, Worcestershire, peppercorn, and Cajun flavours are all gaining in popularity. Diners love barbecue, and that’s helping to propel burnt, charred and toasted flavours, Technomic reports. Smoky flavours are no longer limited to just meats and cheese but are also being paired with contrasting flavours such as sweet and spicy to add complexity. The espelette pepper, originating from the Basque region of France, helps deliver that smoky, sweet and mildly hot flavour that makes plancha-grilled food an exciting new trend. The fastest growing condiments are chipotle aioli, garlic mayonnaise, honey, marmalade and jam, especially savoury flavours like bacon jam and pepper marmalade.


IN SEASONS

Basque-Inspired Rub with Espelette Pepper Try these plancha recipes www.flavour.ca/McCormick-Gourmet/ Recipes/Gourmet/Basque-InspiredRub-with-Espelette-Pepper

Crusted Fish and Ratatouille a la Plancha

Try these plancha recipes www.flavour.ca/Club-House/Recipes/ Entertaining/Crusted-Fish-andRatatouille-a-la-Plancha

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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We Have The Mix to Match Customers can choose from a wide selection of the finest and freshest nuts, chocolates, dried fruits, baking ingredients and candy. If you want the best, always look for the David Roberts brand. For close to 30 years David Roberts has built their name by offering only the freshest and finest quality products.

davidrobertsfood.com


UR

S E LF

INTS PLUS PO

RE W RD Y A

O

BRAN D

true stories

WHAT’S UP?

Meet Kelly Andreas Executive chef, Diversity Food Services, Winnipeg, Manitoba Has just started collecting points Kelly Andreas oversees the operation of seven food outlets including a catering department, three standalone restaurants and three outlets at the University of Winnipeg. He manages operations, food ordering, recruitment and training for more than 80 employees.

BPP program advantage: “We’re excited to begin using it as a reward program for our staff. We’re running internal competitions and staff will win the chance to select their own prizes. Right now we’re asking for their entries to choose a name for our new golf course restaurant, and be eligible for gifts through Brand Points PLUS. It’s a great way for us to reward our employees for their performance and participation.”

Checking points on BPP.ca: “I check our points all the time, and I’ve reviewed the catalogue many times. The variety of rewards basically reaches out to everybody. No matter who you are, you can find something in there that will benefit you or is useful to you.”

Redeeming points: “The program is extremely reasonable with its rewards structure, especially compared to some programs where you have to get thousands of points just to get a small reward.”

Receiving rewards: “It’s very easy to use and the turnaround is quite quick, and that will be important to our staff who are waiting for their rewards to arrive.”

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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S E LF

INTS PLUS PO

UR

BRAN D

WHAT’S UP

O

RE W RD Y A

Meet Lori Rice Kitchen manager at Slemon Park Hotel & Conference Centre, Slemon Park, PEI Collecting points since March 2016 Lori Rice runs a multi-function kitchen with a restaurant and bar that serves the Atlantic Police Academy three meals a day and caters weddings, meetings, retirement parties and other events in-house and off-site.

BPP program advantage: “I think it has been about a year since we started collecting Brand Points and to tell you the truth, I forgot about them until my rep reminded me. I always read the flyers that came to me with the products that were featured, and it sometimes gave me good ideas for specials and I earned points at the same time. I just never thought they would build up so quickly.”

Checking points on BPP.ca: “I am looking forward to building my points up again and getting more rewards. There is so much to choose from and many things I have my eye on.”

Redeeming points: “I found it very easy to redeem points, and my order arrived well before I expected it to, maybe 10 days and I expected 4 to 6 weeks. The iPod was the first item I redeemed to get, and I can’t wait to redeem more.”

Receiving rewards: “The BPP site quotes 4-6 weeks for delivery, but it has never taken more than 2 weeks.”

Lori’s payoff so far: “I recently traded in my Brand Points for an Apple iPod to use in the kitchen. Our radio is always just static, so I downloaded a radio app and we now have a perfect non-static radio to listen to.”

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LOYALTY

HAS ITS REWARDS OUR BRANDS

OUR PROGRAM

YOUR REWARDS

Brand Points PLUS is supported by over 50 national brands. We offer over 4000 products that you use every day. We have carefully selected our supporting brands for the quality of their products and the service they provide to you, our customer.

The Brand Points PLUS rewards program is as simple as 1, 2, 3. Sign up with your customer number, and purchase qualifying Brand Points PLUS products. There is no commitment required and it is 100% FREE as long as you choose to participate.

As you purchase eligible products from our distributor members, you automatically earn points that can be redeemed at any time for great rewards. Earn points toward equipment for your operation, employee incentives, or that ipad you’ve always wanted.

It’s about time you reward yourself BrandPointsPLUS.ca

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inspired menu CANADA’S LEADER IN FARMING AND PROCESSING CRANBERRY AND BLUEBERRY PRODUCTS Fruit d’Or offers a wide range of dried cranberry and blueberry products. If you are looking for cranberry or blueberry products, Fruit d’Or is the perfect choice. Grown in Quebec Fruit d'Or cranberries are known around the world. Fruit d’Or prepares their berries and berry byproducts in an ecologically conscious manner to reduce their environmental footprint.

STIRLING CREAMERY™ FLAVOURED MEDALLIONS Simple, elegant, and versatile, Sterling Medallions are perfect for back-of-the-house use as a protein or vegetable topper. Standard flavours are: Salted (15g) Lemon Dill (15g) Herbes de Provence (15g) Lemon Pepper Tarragon (15g) Garlic & Parsley (15g and 25g)

NEW INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED CIABATTA BITES You won’t have to worry about biting off more than you can chew. Boulart’s pre-packed original flavour ciabatta bites are vegan, parve, non-gmo project verified and contains no preservatives, additives or added sugar. Product can be scanned and heated in packaging. Boulart”s individually wrapped ciabatta bites are ideal for use in schools, institutions, hospitals and cafeterias where freshness, convenience, and quality are important. 22

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GET

FRESH

77%

of consumers are more likely to purchase items described as “Fresh�. Technomic Brand Restaurant Research Metrics-Generation Z

FreshCut Russet Fries

With Skin On and Sea Salt Discover how these premium extra long skin on fries can help satisfy your customers growing demand for real food. No washing or cutting required, just fry and serve.

cavendishfarms.com For a FREE sample, call your Cavendish Farms representative at 1-800-561-7945.


Today, savvy operators are shaking up milkshake memories by serving this classic in retro milkshake glasses, milk bottles or even Mason jars. Gourmet milkshakes have taken the traditional shake to a whole new level. Bartenders are also creating grown-up milkshakes reviving memories of oldschool diners and malt shops. Delicious syrups for milkshakes are a Lynch Foods trademark. Generations of people all across Canada have enjoyed the unbeatable and unforgettable flavour of milkshakes made with our unique syrups.


OPEN MENU

Romancing the dessert menu

Understanding the psychology of the end of meal 4 ways to get your diners to end their meals on a sweet note ➤ By Alison Kent

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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OPEN MENU

And don’t forget: no dessert is complete without a wonderful specialty coffee, tea or after-dinner drink – more opportunities to increase your per-meal profit.

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SPRING/SUMMER 2017


OPEN MENU

Whether an over-the-top sweet indulgence or an exquisite

The Eyes Have It

piece of cheese, dessert can take on different interpretations

“I believe that we eat with our eyes first,” says Carmen. “A beautiful picture can do wonders and entice customers to think about dessert as part of their entire meal.”

depending on diners’ tastes. And yet, there are many other factors that can influence the decision-making process. Make the last course an integral part of the overall experience – not merely an afterthought – and help increase sales and your overall meal profit (as high as 20% if you add drinks) with these valuable tips from Carmen Mak, Bakery and Culinary Specialist for Rich Products of Canada.

Sweet Tip Consider a professional photographer and stylists, or if DIY-ing it, ensure proper lighting and composition. As well, keep props and background simple in order not to detract from what’s most important – creating a tempting, luscious-looking dessert image. If photography doesn’t suit your style, having desserts on display can be just the enticement needed. “We are led by our senses,” Carmen says. “I have seen people change their minds as to what they’re ordering because they see a server walking to another table with something appealing.”

Social Media-Worthy Treats People are heavily influenced by social media. “Before, a dessert’s job was simply to be delicious and be the perfect end to someone’s dining experience,” says Carmen. Nowadays, it’s a different story. “People will go to a place and order something so they can show the world that they were there and experienced it,” Carmen explains. “If something is “Instagrammable,” others will be enticed to experience it for themselves.”

Sweet Tip Help fuel this trend by delivering on picture-perfect, buzzworthy desserts. Let diners promote your place while attracting others to come experience the same. ➤ CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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OPEN MENU

WHITE CHOCOLATE AND CARDAMOM BREAD PUDDING

SUPER SPECIAL SWEETS

QUICK

Dessert-focused concepts remain hot – a trend driven by restaurants devoted to refining classics such as decorated softserve cones, decadent doughnuts and artisan ice cream. Specialty flavours, indulgent toppings and eye-catching preparations will continue to generate excitement. And expect to see more ethnic specialties like Mexican paletas, Taiwanese shaved ice and Japanese-style cheesecake begin to move from innovative indies to chain restaurants and retailers.

FACTS

A slight majority (57%) of consumers in Canada indulge in dessert at least once a week

Technomic’s 2016 Canadian Dessert Consumer Trend Report.

Get Servers On-Board Servers are your best salespeople. “Servers are better equipped to sell something they’ve experienced,” says Carmen. “If the server has tried a dessert or dessert beverage and they love it, they are more likely to persuade their customers to try it.” He adds, “Customers can be easily influenced by server suggestions if they sense that there is honesty, education and interest backing it up. As a diner, I would be more excited about eating a dessert if my server was enthused about it.”

Sweet Tip Hold educational tasting sessions so they can describe dishes to customers with knowledge and interest.

Share and Share Alike Sharing is ideal for customers who are interested in dessert but perhaps feel a whole serving is too much. “I think ‘shareables’ are a great way to sell desserts,” says Carmen. “This is effective if everyone is close to full but they still want to have a bite of something sweet, or if someone doesn’t want to be the only person ordering dessert.”

Sweet Tip Turn dessert into a sharing occasion by bringing multiple forks or small spoons. Alternatively, offer an array of mini-desserts, which could include individual small bites and dessert beverage sips. Either way, encouraging servers to pitch desserts early on in the meal ensures the idea is already front of mind.

• Only half (51%) of consumers eat dessert at the same restaurant where they ate their meal. • Desserts are more likely to influence younger than older diners’ restaurant choices. • 3 in 10 (31%) consumers and 37% of women say they’d be more likely to order dessert if a mini-portioned option were available. 28

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OPEN MENU

WHITE CHOCOLATE AND CARDAMOM BREAD PUDDING INGREDIENTS SERVES 8-10 2

eggs

½ cup

brown sugar seeds from 6 cardamom pods, crushed

2 cups

whipping (35%) cream

2 cups

whole milk

4 cups

bread cubes from Raisin and Walnut Ciabatta Miche (day-old)

2 oz

white chocolate, chopped

1/3 cup

almonds, chopped

CAR A MEL SAUCE INGREDIENTS ½ cup + 2 tbsp heavy cream 2 tsp

finely grated fresh ginger

1 cup

sugar

1 tsp

fresh lemon juice

BAKING INSTRUCTIONS 1. In a large bowl, beat eggs, brown sugar and cardamom seeds. Stir in cream and milk. Add bread cubes and mix well. 2. Preheat oven to 350°F. Transfer mixture to a 9” square cake pan or 10–12 four-ounce ramekins. Sprinkle with white chocolate and almonds. 3. Bake in 9” pan for 55–60 minutes or bake in 10–12 four-ounce ramekins for 20 minutes. Serve piping hot or warm. If you prefer your pudding on the sweet side, try adding a little of our favourite caramel sauce. CARAMEL SAUCE 1. In a small saucepan, simmer ½ cup of the heavy cream with the ginger for about 10 minutes. Set aside. 2. In another small heavy saucepan, cook the sugar with the lemon juice over low heat, stirring frequently, until the sugar caramelizes to a light brown colour, 10–15 minutes. Stir in the remaining 2 tbsps of heavy cream. Remove from heat. 3. Strain the cream into a bowl and whisk in the caramel until smooth. Serve warm. CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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Gay Lea Longlife Soft Serve mix starts with 100% Canadian farm fresh milk. Our aseptic process ensures freshness for the customer and longer shelf life for you.

• No refrigeration required • Ensures food safety • Extended shelf life

For more information visit www.gaylea.com/foodservice or call 905-283-5222 (toll free: 1-888-268-0508)


MARKETING 101

By Kate Engineer IT WON’T COME AS NEWS TO ANYONE THAT THE RESTAURANT INDUSTRY IS EXTREMELY COMPETITIVE, WITH UNIQUE CONCEPTS OPENING DAILY. THAT’S WHY A MARKETABLE BRAND IS SO IMPORTANT TO ENSURING SUCCESS.

BUT HOW DO YOU DETERMINE WHAT YOUR UNIQUE BRAND IS?

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MARKETING 101

what’s my competition doing?

First you need to understand what your point of difference (POD) is, and why diners would choose to spend their money at your restaurant over an eatery with a similar offering.

PERFORM A COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS

COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS: Branding Communications Target market Location Restaurant design Menu Pricing Website Marketing Social media RESOURCE

• • • • • • • • • •

CORNER Take these two examples: • RockWood Urban Grill – Great Food Fired Up • Chambar – Civilized Debauchery Their brand taglines are bold and inviting, and their websites reinforce the branding.

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SPRING/SUMMER 2017

WORK YOUR CORE Now you need to reinforce your PODs in your restaurant operations, branding and marketing. For example, if one of your competitive advantages is that you source all of your produce from a local farmer, you should:

Look at restaurant concepts you aspire to and determine what sets them apart.

Display images on your website of your team picking produce at the farm

Review the competitor analysis to pinpoint what your competitors are excelling at and the opportunities that your brand can win on.

Add social media content images of produce being made into menu items with hashtag #farmfresh

Feature team apparel with messaging like “this lettuce was in the ground yesterday”

Work your menu to include a brief description of the local grower

Message your takeout packages with “straight from the farm to your plate”

Almost every client we meet says their signature dish is THE BEST in the city, and no doubt it is! But if your competitors have a similar signature dish, then it’s to your advantage to create a unique menu item that is going to set your restaurant apart.

TAG IT! Once you’ve defined your unique dining proposition, the next step is to develop your brand tagline and key messages, followed by your logo.

A competitive advantage only becomes an advantage when it motivates guests to spend their money at your restaurant. One of the biggest oversights restaurants make is not communicating enough or demonstrating their uniqueness.


MARKETING 101

Instagram is the most effective social media platform for restaurants, as guests can share images of the menu and restaurant décor with their followers while tagging your location. Your team should also be posting and sharing content to keep your following growing, and guests engaged.

USE ALL YOUR (DIGITAL) TOOLS The two most effective tools to market your brand are your website and social media. According to research by Ryan Pinkham at Constant Contact:

• More than 80% of consumers have searched for a restaurant on a mobile app and 92% through a web browser, and 75% say they often choose a restaurant based on those search results • 80% of consumers think it’s important to see a menu before they dine at a restaurant • 84% of consumers are likely to look at more than one restaurant before choosing where to dine • 70% of consumers think it is important to be able to read the menu of a restaurant on a mobile device • 62% of consumers are less likely to choose a restaurant if they can’t read the menu on a mobile device To use these tools successfully you need to ensure your website is an eye-catching representation of your indining experience. Enticing menu photography, up-todate menu descriptions, and positive guest reviews are critical to a browsing experience that generates sales. Invest in an attractive website design that is mobilecompatible and links to your social media platforms. Kate Engineer is the Director of Communications for Fervid Communications, Restaurant Marketing and PR www.fervid.ca CHEFCONNEXION.CA

33


TASTE NATION

Ethnic Sparks Menu Creativity By Lawrence Herzog

34

SPRING/SUMMER 2017


TASTE NATION

UNITED NATIONS The chefs in the kitchens at PEGASUS HOSPITALITY GROUP’S seven Toronto food operations in three different kitchens are a United Nations of ethnic culinary influences. They are, as corporate executive chef Steffan Howard puts it, “telling a real Canadian story with their cuisine.” He challenges them to be proudly creative with recipe development, cooking for “authentic flavours – not necessarily recipes – to reflect the spirit of authentic ethnicity in our cuisine.” Many of the dishes and flavours have influences from multiple chefs who have built on the initial recipes by adding their background knowledge to create something even better. They utilize ingredients that are “freshest, nicest and closest” to build flavour profiles authentic to the ethnicity of the dish with a uniquely Canadian twist. “My chef at the Grand Luxe will send me all over Ontario looking for the exact right spice,” Chef Stefan says. “He

won’t sway: he wants it to be the way his mother did it. This just makes us all better at what we do.” Across Canada, chefs are melding global influences into regional cuisine, celebrating ethnic influences brought by waves of immigrants across the breadth of our 150-year history as a nation. Forget poutine; this invigorating mélange of flavours from around the world could be the more accurate definition of the essence of today’s Canadian cuisine. “By celebrating ethnic influences, and using the freshest and most local product available, we are creating food that has a level of comfort, is innovative, forward-thinking and worldly,” he says. “And it’s a lot of fun.”

EMBRACING ETHNIC CREATIVITY Philman George, chef/culinary manager for HIGH LINER FOODS, says it’s important to get out and explore the international aisle of your local grocery store, or better ➤ CHEFCONNEXION.CA

35


TASTE NATION

CHEF’S TIP: EMBARK ON A SPICE QUEST. BE CURIOUS, EXPLORE, AND EXPERIMENT! yet, visit different ethnic communities and experience their cuisine first hand. “There is a world of imported curry pastes of East India and Thailand and a wide variety of spices, condiments and sauces from almost every region.” Chef Phil loves finding and working with the wide variety of curry paste from East India. “I have the flexibility of controlling the amount of paste I add to the recipe. To create a tandoori tilapia I simply combine the tandoori paste with yogurt and allow the tilapia to marinate in this mixture. I can further customize it by adding in more ginger, garlic and spice blends like garam masala.”

36

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

MAYO-NICE

SLIM AND TRIM

Mayo and yogurt can be your best friends when it comes to creating simple and approachable ethnicinspired dipping sauces and drizzles. By simply mixing various sauces, pastes and spices with mayo/yogurt you can create some “cool” (on-trend and literally cool) stuff for customers to dip their French fries in.

Working efficiently is key to making profits, Chef Phil says. “I’m a big fan of menus that are trimmed down and scaled back in order to focus on quality and freshness. Say, for example, you’re using our beer battered haddock fillet for your fish and chips. That same haddock can be creatively flipped for an appetizer and sandwich section of the menu.” (See Crispy Mini Haddie Sammie recipe.)

Chef’s tip: Perfect a flavourful mayo recipe and use it in sandwiches, burgers and wraps.

The end result? “Your cooks get really efficient working with haddock and you’re turning over the inventory faster, thereby reducing waste and maximizing profits,” he says.


TASTE NATION

On Your Radar New ethnic trends are sparking menu creativity, according to Technomic’s 2017 Canadian Trends Forecast: Mainstream cuisines such as Chinese and Mexican are making way for more intriguing global fare. Newcomers from across the globe will bring with them exotic recipes and ingredients, spurring fresh inspiration for chefs. Looking at the year to come, specialties like Filipino pancit (noodles) and sinigang (soup), Pakistani roadside bun kebabs and Iranian gheimeh (stew) will flourish in Canada’s diversifying ethnic food landscape.

THE PURSUIT OF AUTHENTIC FLAVOURS East meets west on the menu at THANDI, a family-owned restaurant in Saint John, New Brunswick. With choices from Indian curries to oriental stir fry, filet mignon to cedar salmon, co-owners Holly and her chef partner Kenny (Bakhtawar) Singh make sure there’s something for every palate. “When we opened in 2006, it was a gamble, and we weren’t sure how the Indian dishes would go over,” Holly says. “We’ve tripled our sales in the 10 years, and our clientele has become more adventurous, especially the university students. We make every dish to order and so our guests know they can have exactly what they want.” Kenny is originally from the Punjab village of Thandian, and he and his team of Indian-born chefs are dedicated to the pursuit of authentic flavours. “We love to put a twist on some traditional dishes – like our version of Pad Thai, which uses tamarind sauce. It’s the second biggest seller on our menu.” Chef’s tip: There’s no replacement for authenticity. Hire experienced chefs who know the cuisine and spices.

Thandi offers two specials every week – one “Canadian” and one “fusion” – to tempt regular patrons with new and exciting choices while keeping the creative juices flowing in the kitchen. “It’s also a great way to reduce

food waste,” Holly says. “Kenny is very creative, and he doesn’t waste anything. We buy lamb and use it for vindaloo and then we grind up the rest and make kebabs. Our food costs are really good because we are efficient.”

CRISPY MINI HADDIE SAMMIES Beer Battered Haddock | Jalapeño Tartar Sauce | Smoked Cheddar Cheese | East Coast Apple Slaw | Mini Brioche Butter Toasted Buns

EAST COAST APPLE SLAW

JALAPENO TARTAR SAUCE

3 cups 1 cup 2 cups 1 cup ½ cup 1½ tbsp

1 cup mayo 1 jalapeño seeded and finely diced 2 tbsp san marcus verte sauce (Mexican sauce) 1 tbsp sweet relish puréed jalapeños (desired heat level)

east coast apples matchstick cut carrots matchstick cut black kale julienne red cabbage shredded poppy seed dressing chipotle hot sauce

Combine all of the above ingredients and refrigerate. Slaw should be made daily

Combine above ingredients and refrigerate CHEFCONNEXION.CA

37


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COST CHECK

What is the true costs of proteins?

BY LAWRENCE HERZOG

Centre-of-plate proteins are some of the most expensive ingredients. Implementing strategies to lower food costs without sacrificing quality and presentation can help your bottom line while feeding creativity and inspiration in the kitchen. Selecting less expensive cuts, marinating with interesting new sauces, creating soups and stews, and choosing sides that complement well while providing exceptional value are just some of the ways to tame the food cost beast. ➤

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

39


COST CHECK

Understanding Contribution to Margin

IT'S A NICKEL AND DIME BUSINESS. YOU MAKE DOLLARS BY ACCUMULATING NICKELS. IF YOU MAKE DOLLARS BY GRABBING DOLLARS, YOU WILL NEVER SURVIVE.

Think like a stock broker – buy low, sell high.

CONTRIBUTION TO MARGIN Rather than deciding what proteins to use based solely on food cost percentage, consider contribution to margin by subtracting food cost from your selling price. “By working from a contribution to margin calculation, operators can more clearly see how customers might choose one item over another if the value isn’t strong enough on price point,” says James Keppy, national culinary chef, Maple Leaf Foods. “It also illustrates how paying attention to pricing can make the difference between making a sale or not, and to your overall sales and profit margin.” “Do you go to a lower grade or a smaller portion?” he asks. “Does it have to be a 10-ounce steak or could it be an eight-ounce? If you go to a smaller cut, then you can add protein with chick peas and lentil options. And by keeping your sides flexible, you add ability to respond to food cost pressures.”

FRESH vs FROZEN “If the product comes in fresh, the clock is ticking,” says Duane Ellard, 40

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

Canada director, marketing and business development, Canada Beef. “If a case comes in frozen, you can take out a bag of three or six. Frozen helps address back end turns and improves capacity to forward buy or commit to your purveyor of choice. For some operators, fresh will always be their choice and they will market the differentiation that fresh brings.” Remember that markets dictate price, and by understanding the fluctuations, operators can gain maximum pricing advantage. Supply and demand pushes steak prices up during grilling season; hips and chucks begin to rise in August based on future bookings for delivery in October. “Think like a stock broker – buy low, sell high,” Ellard recommends.

THE AAAs HAVE IT “A well-aged AA program in my opinion will produce a higher value steak than from a lesser-aged AAA program,” Ellard says. “Proper aging is the key to a quality product. If you age AA and AAA beef the same, the AAA will offer a consistent, flavourful and juicy product.” ➤


COST CHECK

create soups and stews Asian Mandalay marinade This marinade works great on cuts like flank or skirt steaks as the coarse grain allows the marinade to penetrate the meat and add flavour. This recipe will provide enough marinating for up to 5 lbs or 2.5 kg of raw product. 1 cup 1 cup 4 tbsp 2 tbsp 2 tbsp 2 tsp 2 tbsp

soy sauce fresh lime juice crunchy peanut butter brown sugar curry powder minced garlic Sambal Oelek (Indonesian pepper sauce)

METHOD Combine ingredients. If using a flank steak, carefully create cross hatch cuts across the grain of both sides to help the marinade penetrate, pour the marinade over the steak, and refrigerate overnight. Before grilling, pat meat dry to ensure caramelization. CHEFCONNEXION.CA

41


COST CHECK

Understanding Contribution to Margin Using food cost % as a decision process when choosing menu items and sell prices has begun to move to determining the Contribution to Margin for each dish individually. The prices of ingredients have risen to a level that requires operators to focus on the money you get after the cost of food.

QUICK TIPS Build a feature menu item. Try offering a mix grill with three smaller servings of protein like a three-ounce chicken breast, a small dinner sausage, and threeounce piece of steak. Work your seasonings. A cheaper cut marinated and seasoned properly can show off your talents as much as a top cut.

TEST FOR YIELD

flavour, he says. “It is the sign of a good cook who can prepare tougher cuts. Depending on your operation, a value-added product may be the best answer because of the staff savings, portioning and hold times that can balance off a raw product with labour, cook time and waste.”

Do your due diligence and carry out a proper yield test on your raw chicken breast to see cooking loss against a competitor, Chef James Keppy recommends. “The loss can be significant if you are buying an inexpensive frozen chicken breast. Protein is reduced by the amount of water that is added and that water is purged out leaving a smaller cooked product.”

CELEBRATE THE STORY Canadian meats are among the best in the world. By proclaiming place of origin on menus, operators can build pride and customer loyalty. “Our product is recognized globally for its premium quality and taste,” Duane Ellard says. “Market the story of your Canadian beef selection regardless of grade, cut or region. It’s a pretty powerful marketing approach.”

LESSER CUTS CAN MEAN MORE PROFIT Offering a skirt steak or top sirloin in place of tenderloin, or a chicken thigh instead of chicken breast can make a great meal with even more

While controlling food cost % is important, operators must also be conscious of the dollars being taken to the bank, by selling certain products. Rib Dinner B may have a higher food cost %, but selling this main vs the chicken fingers takes an extra $6.72 to the bank each time. You can’t take food cost % to the bank, but you can take dollars to the bank. 42

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

Rib Dinner A

Rib Dinner B

Chicken Fingers

Menu Cost (FC*/FC%)

$31.81

$26.00

$12.53

Food Cost (SP*/FC%)

$10.50

$10.50

$3.75

Food Cost % (FC/SP)

33%

40%

30%

$21.31

$15.50

$8.78

CTM (SP-FC)

Food Cost % is good but priced too high against competition.

Food Cost % is lower but priced well.

*FC/Food Cost *SP/Sell Price CTM/Contribution To Margin

Food Cost % is low but contribution to margin is much lower than ribs.


Skirt Steak Tacos

INGREDIENTS 2 lbs

skirt steak, trimmed of excess fat salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tsp cooking oil 2 cups loosely packed shredded lettuce 2 tomatoes, diced 2 tbsp finely minced cilantro 1-2 avocado, pitted and sliced 1 cup shredded cheese of your choice 1 lime cut into wedges 8 flour or corn tortillas

DIRECTIONS 1. Season the skirt steak with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat a skillet or grill pan over high heat. When hot, swirl in the cooking oil. Add the skirt steak to the pan and sear for 2-3 minutes each side. If the skirt steak is very thin (about 1/2 inch thick), it should be medium-rare at this point. If the skirt steak is thicker, turn the heat to medium and cover to cook for an additional 2-3 minutes. 2. Let the meat rest for 5 minutes before slicing. Slice the skirt steak across the grain into very thin ribbons. 3. Assemble tacos by layering steak, lettuce, diced tomatoes, cilantro and avocado slices. Top with cheese and serve with lime wedges.


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good business

Succession planning tends to focus on technical aspects like tax and estate, while insufficient attention is paid to planning for lifestyle balance and building a new identity post-succession.

ARE

FAMILY! Family-owned businesses possess many strengths, such as their ability to look at the long-term development of their operation and align interests between management and owner. By Mike Jaczko CIM® This is especially true of “owner-operator” structures often seen with independent restaurant operators. However, restaurant owner/operators also face some challenges, such as how to objectively evaluate performance and capabilities and how best to ensure talent development within the family. ➤ CHEFCONNEXION.CA

45


GOOD BUSINESS

In some cases, families – despite having a common base to build on and often working together day-to-day – find it difficult to conduct conversations among themselves about important financial issues. It’s very hard to disconnect emotions and be fact-based and objective in a family business. Therefore, obtaining some external impartial support can be a source of great assistance.

QUICK

Canada boasts 38,072 independent family-owned restaurants (NPD Group 2015). But, according to the Family Firm Institute, 70% of family businesses will not survive into the second generation and 90% will not survive to the third generation. As well, a Canadian Business Insights study from 2014 found that just 17% of family-run businesses have a formal succession plan in place.

FACTS

Succession planning for family-owned restaurants need not be a frightening prospect. Here’s how you can plan for success:

17%

JUST OF FAMILY-RUN BUSINESSES HAVE A FORMAL SUCCESSION PLAN

Not a one-off The first thing to understand about succession planning is that it is not a oneoff exercise, but rather a way of managing the family business professionally during the business’s lifetime. In addition, this is not only about succession at the top, but throughout your entire operation. The same issues appear across the business on all levels. Having adequate processes in place is necessary for all family-owned businesses.

Start early

Canada boasts

38,072 independent family-owned restaurants.

46

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

Engaging family members to determine their personal aspirations and wishes is no small feat. It takes time and rarely proceeds in a straight line. It’s important to start early so the family’s collective goals and values can percolate over the years and lead to a broadly accepted family vision. In multi-generational family businesses involving various branches, it’s crucial to encourage full participation of the entire family or representatives of the various family branches. Family meetings can be a productive way to promote communication, cooperation, and, most importantly, trust. Creating a board of family advisors might be a good idea. Emotions can run high when dealing with family issues. Holding regular “check-ins” can help manage the emotions around succession planning.

Prepare for your business transition Comparing internal factors that a family can control versus external factors that are beyond a family’s control helps the decision-making process. Internal factors within the control of the family are: the corporate structure (including the current shareholders agreement), culture, employees, business profitability, and access to financing. External factors include changes in competition, technology, market demand, and public policy. By blending both internal and external analysis with family member communication, it should become clear whether your family should keep the business in the family or consider selling. The family should set out steps and milestones within the framework of a strategic plan. ➤


GOOD BUSINESS

of family businesses will not survive into the second generation CHEFCONNEXION.CA

47


QUICK

GOOD BUSINESS

TIPS

Quick tips to plan for transition • Establish timelines to keep on track. • Set milestones for achieving goals. • Keep your succession plan up to date. • Review your plan at least once a year to reflect changes. • Prepare a communication plan to notify your successors, staff, suppliers and customers of your succession plans. • Work with professional advisors.

LEARN MORE Here’s an in-depth look at succession planning: Considerations for Family Business Transitions www.bdc.ca/EN/advice_centre/articles/Pages/ family_successions.aspx?ref=related-articles http://canadabusiness.ca/business-planning/ succession-planning/ Mike Jaczko is a portfolio manager and partner of KJ Harrison, a Toronto-based private investment management firm serving individuals and families across Canada. For more information on this topic, email mjaczko@kjharrison.com 48

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

Prepare for your personal transition Succession planning tends to focus on technical aspects like tax and estate, while insufficient attention is paid to planning for lifestyle balance and building a new identity post-succession. Only in hindsight do many owners realize the impact that succession of the family business creates. Inevitably, leaving the business can create a void. Some owners even haunt their former restaurant, never quite yielding control to the next generation, and, in some extreme cases, may actually disrupt the succession plan they put in place. Take the time to create your personal post-succession life plan.

Work with the right team of advisors Given the generation-to-generation nuances of a family-owned business, choosing the right type of support is critical. Typically, succession planning issues appear across generations, so it’s useful if you already work with a trusted advisor, with that trust spanning across multiple generations of family members. Your trusted advisor can head up a larger team of specialists (such as an accountant, lawyer, banker and insurance broker) skilled in succession planning itself, but also in related key areas such as talent and career planning, skills development, governance, communications, and role definition across the generations.


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WRAP UP HAPPINESS

IT’S TIME TO CELEBRATE SEAFOOD Delighting today’s consumer takes innovation. That’s why we’ve evolved. For years, we’ve been an expert in sourcing quality seafood from around the globe. Now, we’re your trusted partner in delivering new dishes that keep your customers smiling. We’re High Liner Culinary, and we’re here to make seafood the hottest thing on your menu. highlinerculinary.com

50

SEAFOOD IS BETTER™ SPRING/SUMMER 2017

© 2017 High Liner Foods. All rights reserved.


RECIPE CENTRAL

Get in the swim with fish and seafood dishes By Alison Kent

Consumer interest in fish and seafood dishes continues to be on the rise. Exceed expectations by offering a seafood lovers’ bounty of dishes as part of your menu and as daily specials. From appetizers to mains and soups to salads, here are four deep sea dishes that are sure to “reel” in more customers. ➤

SWEET SESAME SOY GRILLED SALMON p.53 CHEFCONNEXION.CA

51


recipe central

RECIPE CENTRAL

Mini Broiled Seafood Appetizers

Lemon Garlic Cream Sauce: 1 cup

alfredo sauce

1 tbsp butter 1 tbsp all-purpose flour 1 tbsp dry white wine 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice 1 tsp

puréed garlic

Panko Parmesan Crumble: 3 tbsp panko 2 tbsp coarsely grated parmesan cheese 1 tbsp olive oil

METHOD: 1.

Lemon Garlic Cream Sauce: Heat alfredo sauce; keep warm. In separate saucepan, make an aromatic roux by melting butter and whisking in flour, then wine, lemon juice and garlic. Whisk in alfredo sauce; bring to boil. Strain through a sieve, discarding any solids. Let sauce cool.

2.

Season haddock to taste; sauté with garlic until 75% cooked. Deglaze pan with wine and lemon juice. Transfer to bowl; flake fish. Let cool completely. Toss with parsley, chives and shrimp (squeezed of any excess water and chopped, as necessary). Stir in Lemon Garlic Cream Sauce.

3.

Panko Parmesan Crumble: In small bowl, combine panko, parmesan cheese and olive oil. Top each bowl with some of the crumble. Refrigerate until service time, if not using right away.

4.

Heat to order on tray in hot, preheated oven until bubbling hot and crumble layer is golden brown.

Brimming with fish and shrimp, individual bowls of creamy herbed dip are delectable as appetizers served piping hot and golden. Accompany with flatbreads or crackers for spreading and dipping, or garnish with hot Sea Watch Country Crispy Breaded Clam Strip Surfers, if desired.

INGREDIENTS: Serves: 7 2 each High Liner Haddock Loins 1 tsp

puréed garlic

1 tbsp dry white wine 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice 1 tbsp each chopped fresh parsley and chives 2 oz 52

thawed High Liner Cold Water Cooked Ice Shrimp

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

TIP: In Lemon Garlic Cream Sauce, if no Alfredo sauce, replace with 35% whipping cream and increase butter and flour to 2 tbsp each. Recipes provided by Philman George, Corporate Chef and Culinary Manager at High Liner Foods.


RECIPE CENTRAL

SWEET SESAME SOY GRILLED SALMON Packing a sweet and zesty punch of flavour, this Asianinspired marinated and grilled salmon entrée is ideal served over jasmine rice with steamed edamame and garnished with enoki mushrooms.

Tandoori Tilapia Skewers An East Indian inspired appetizer for sharing or serve as a main course.

INGREDIENTS: Serves: 6 6

High Liner Signature Atlantic Salmon Portions (4 oz each)

½ cup

sesame oil

½ cup

low sodium soy sauce

½ cup

honey

1 tbsp

hot chili flakes

METHOD: 1.

2.

3.

Whisk together sesame oil, soy sauce, honey and chili flakes. Lay salmon in single layer in insert pan; pour in half of the marinade, turning fish to coat. Let marinate for 30 minutes. Grill presentation side of the salmon; transfer salmon, grilled side up, to parchment paperlined oven tray. Refrigerate until service time, if not using right away. When ready to serve, brush salmon with some of the reserved sesame soy mixture; bake in preheated 400°F oven to finish cooking.

INGREDIENTS: Serves: 6 12

High Liner Signature Tilapia Fillets, thawed 3 - 4 oz

3.

Mix yogurt and tandoori paste, add water if mixture is too thick.

½L

Greek style plain yogurt

4.

3 tbsp

Tandoori paste

½ cup

water

Place skewers into an insert and pour in tandoori marinade. Ensure that all skewers are submerged in the marinade.

5.

To order, season, spray with oil, char on the grill and finish in the oven @ 350 F(180 C) for approximately 10 minutes or until done.

6.

Serve with biryani rice

METHOD: 1.

Cut each fillet width-wise into 3/4 inch strips.

2.

Fold each piece in half and spike onto skewer (see prep tips).

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

53


RECIPE CENTRAL

HEARTY MUSSEL CHOWDER Made with seasoned fish stock, white wine, tender corn and cream, this make-ahead soup base is finished to order with plump mussels and fresh herbs. It’s a creamy, thick and hearty chowder served piping hot as is, or garnish with herbed croutons, if desired. INGREDIENTS: Serves: 10 – 12 4 lb

High Liner Foodservice Signature Cooked Mussels

1½ cups

dry white wine

METHOD:

3 tbsp

minced garlic

1.

3 tbsp

chopped shallots

3

baking potatoes, peeled and coarsely grated

Heat large heavy-bottom soup pot over medium-heat; add mussels, wine, garlic and shallots. Cover and bring to boil; reduce heat and simmer for about 5 minutes.

8 cups

fish stock

2.

4 cups

35% whipping cream

1

bouquet garni made with 4 sprigs thyme, 1 bay leaf and 1 tbsp black peppercorns

1 cup

corn kernels

Using tongs or slotted spoon, remove opened mussels from pot. Take 80% of Mussels from shells, discarding shells. Reserve remaining mussels in shells as garnish. Let mussels cool. Lightly toss in enough olive oil to coat; cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

½ cup

diced sweet red peppers

½ cup

peeled and diced celery

3.

2 tbsp

each chopped fresh parsley and chives

To soup pot, add grated potatoes, fish stock, cream and bouquet garni; bring to boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer until potatoes have thickened soup base, about 20 minutes.

4.

Remove and discard bouquet garni. Stir in corn, sweet peppers and celery; simmer until crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Let cool, then refrigerate until service time.

5.

When ready to serve, heat to order desired amount of creamy soup base. Add some of the shell-removed mussels and a sprinkle each of parsley and chives. Bring to simmer to thoroughly warm through. Garnish with reheated shell-on mussels, adding additional herbs, if desired.

54

SPRING/SUMMER 2017


Refresh Spring with Cottage Cheese Blueberry Ginger Cottage Cheese Topper Try this delicious recipe and pair it with fresh fruit!

Instructions

Makes 3 cups (750 mL) | Total Prep Time: 40 minutes

Nordica Cottage Cheese

2 cups / 500 mL

Liquid Honey

2 tbsp / 30 mL

Ginger, minced

1 1/2 tbsp / 7 mL

Blueberries

1 cup / 250 mL

Flaxseeds (optional)

2 tsp / 10 mL

Walnuts, chopped

1/4 cup / 50 mL

Vanilla Extract

1/2 tsp / 2 mL

Cottage cheese with berries is a scrumptious breakfast combination that will energize your morning. So good, and good for you, you’ll never skip breakfast again.

1. Flatten blueberries in a small bowl with the back of a fork. 2. Stir blueberries with cottage cheese, walnuts, honey,

flax seeds (if using), ginger and vanilla until well combined.

3. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 24 hours before serving.

4. Serve with fruit salad or over warm oatmeal.


Elevate Your Menu

Raised Without Antibiotics

Hormone Free

Sodium

Reduced

Humanely Raised

Vegetable Grain Fed RWA Crate Gluten Free Antibiotic Free All Natural Free

Canadian Farm Raised

High Protein

Patrons are demanding more‌ deliver menu choices that address the surging demand for claims.

Halal

Better Meat for Better Living Contact Maple Leaf Foodservice for information on what products are available to address your menu claims.

18326RZ


Spring/Summer 2017 Chef Connexion is published twice a year by Greenbridge Foodservice in partnership with the following distributor members: ADL Foods 400 Read Drive Summerside, Prince Edward Island C1N 5A9 888-235-6455 adlfoods.ca AOF Service Alimentaire 2150 rue Sigouin Drummondville, Québec J2C 5Z4 819-477-5353 aof.ca

N ex t Issue: FALL/WINTER 2017 For the upcoming Chef Connexion, we’ll once again take the pulse of the Canadian restaurant industry to bring you plenty of practical information. You can look forward to carefully researched, lively articles about topics that mean the most to you and your profitability. What’s more, we’ll shine the spotlight on the many great ways you can take advantage of Brand Points Plus.

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Georgia Pacific

We welcome your comments and suggestions. Material chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and fit. Please direct all correspondence to: Greenbridge Foodservice, 1373 Victoria Street N., Unit 201, Kitchener, Ontario N2B 3R6 or info@greenbridgefoodservice.ca

Capital Foodservice 10 MacNaughton Avenue Caledonia Industrial Park Moncton, New Brunswick E1H 3L9 800-561-7026 capitalfoodservice.ca Flanagan Foodservice 145 Otonabee Drive Kitchener, Ontario N2C 1L7 519-748-2190 flanagan.ca Multi Plus DM Inc. 10389 Côte de Liesse Dorval, Québec H9P 2Z3 866-745-8881 multiplusdm.com Pratts Food Service (Alberta) 291196 Wagon Wheel Road Rocky View County, Alberta T4A 0E2 403-476-7728 pratts.ca Pratts Food Service (Manitoba) 101 Hutchings Street Winnipeg, Manitoba R2X 2V4 204-949-2832 pratts.ca Pratts Food Service (Saskatchewan) 1450 Park Street Regina, Saskatchewan S4N 2G2 306-546-6522 pratts.ca Yen Bros. Food Service 1988 Vernon Drive Vancouver, British Columbia V6A 3Y6 604-255-6522 yenbros.com Copyright 2017 Greenbridge Foodservice. All Rights Reserved.

CHEFCONNEXION.CA

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THE PERFECT CANVAS TO EXPRESS YOUR CREATIVITY Made with 5 simple ingredients and Non-GMO Project Verified, our Classic or Small Pre-sliced Artisan buns and Thin Sandwich Bun will hold up to any tasty meaty or saucy filling. And with their thin, golden crust and soft, melt-in-your-mouth crumb, they offer the best taste experience on the market today. Get the freshness, quality and consistency BOULART is known for.

Ask your sales representative for a sample case today.

Classic Artisan Burger (Pre-sliced) Product code: 13607

Thin Sandwich Bun (Pre-sliced) Product code: 12211

Small Artisan Burger (Pre-sliced) Product code: 13713

For more information about our products and where to find them, or for sale inquiries, contact Rachel Winters at 647-339-3011 or visit boulart.com

Chef Connexion Spring / Summer 2017  

English version

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