October/November 2014

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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2014

Showcasing The Renaissance City Of The South ®

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2014 VOL. 24, NO. 5 www.chattmag.com

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20 Years of Saving Historic Places Get the Online Walking Tour

Henry Luken’s Golf Gamble

Be the Bride You Want to Be Volume 24, No. 5

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EDITORIAL

CHATTANOOGA

Why Pursue Preservation?

ED ITO R / PU B L ISH ER

Deborah Petticord

Unlike Berlin, a city completely rebuilt after being devastated during the second world war, our city has an assortment of architectural and historic gems still standing. Some are in danger of being demolished, others have already been lost, and yet, several have successfully entered the 21st century with new life and purpose. Much of the credit for that work goes to a remarkable nonprofit—Cornerstones, Inc. Celebrating 20 years of working to protect Chattanooga’s urban fabric, the organization has developed a walking tour of historic buildings showcasing 20 reasons we should continue to support its efforts. Representing a variety of styles, the buildings reflect some of the history of our region, with the oldest structure dating from 1870. That building, once the Southern Railroad passenger baggage building, is now the Urban Stack Burger Lounge. Built in the vernacular style, its rustic nature is apparent and in perfect harmony with the restaurant’s graphics. It adds to the development of tourism and to our own pleasure. From food service to entertainment to government work, developers find new vocations for these old properties. The newest of the 20 properties is the Development Resource Center, built in 2001 as an infill development in an established National Register historic block. The new building is modern and energy efficient, but of the correct scale and proportion to fit into the urban streetscape. This city-owned building houses all departments dealing with construction— from permits to engineering, planning and public works. What if the Tivoli had not been preserved and modernized? Architect R.H. Hunt designed the theater, which is said to be an exact, though smaller replica of the Tivoli in Chicago. It cost $750,000 to construct in 1921, has a 2,300-seat theater and was the first public building in the South to install air conditioning. In this issue, two of our bridal photo sessions took place at notable historic properties in the city. The Joel W. Soloman Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse is a perfect example of the Art Moderne style popular in the 1930s. Its astonishing detail is often overlooked in the heart of midtown. Just across the street is the Stone Fort Inn, revitalized by Harry Phillips and now owned by Mark Oldham. The Inn’s picturesque interior served as the backdrop for Melody Hood’s lovely photographic work. All of these vintage properties remind us that we weren’t the first to arrive on the scene. Pursuing preservation sensibly, is claiming our heritage, even earning it a little bit. Following the work of Cornerstones is a great way for newcomers to learn about Chattanooga and for all of us to refresh our memories and keep the conversation going about the future development of the city.

ED ITO R IA L A SSISTA NT

Lindsey Mitchell A RT D IR ECTO R

Peggy Boyd Petrey CO NTR IB U TING WR ITER S

Miles Baker Jennifer Hoff Sarah Kramer Lindsey Mitchell Dick Morel Deborah Petticord Nathalie Strickland Melissa Turner Sam Woolwine P H OTO G R A PH IC CO NTR IB U TO R S

Big Lentz Studio Brad Cansler Ron Harr Melody Hood Garrett Nudd Deborah Petticord And Courtesy of Bachmann CC Cornerstones, Inc. Emerald Coast CVB Events & Staffing MAAC Olsen Law Firm Dr. Shelley Prevost Signal Mountain Playhouse Tyler Tangalin UTC School of Business CIR CU L ATIO N M A NA G ER

Linda Cadwallader ED ITO R IA L O F F ICE

Deborah Petticord 423-285-7600 debbie@chattmag.com

—Deborah Petticord, debbie@chattmag.com

A D V ERTISING SA L ES D IR ECTO R

Sally Cole 423-240-7903 sally@chattmag.com SA L ES R EPR ESENTATIV E

LETTERS From the web: Having visited the Chattanooga area last July 2013, my husband and I have relocated here. The Chattanooga Magazine was a super enjoyable way to learn something about the area we might have missed, like the peach fest at the market. It wasn’t the big things of Chattanooga, but the small things that really drew us here. Thanks for a great magazine! —Ginger Venturini

JUNE/JULY 2013 VOL. 23, NO. 3 www.chattmag.com

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Meet Mayor Berke The 2013 Sterling Profiles

“The Unretired” Growing Longer— Chattanooga’s South Chick Creek Greenway Celebrating Summ er Produce at the

Peach Festival

See the Chattanooga Magazine web site at www.chattmag.com Join our Networks JOIN OUR NETWORKS 2

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Marie Mossbeck 423-400-8698 marie@chattmag.com

Showcas ing The Renaissa nce City Of The South ®

Chattanooga Showcasing the Renaissance City of the South is a registered trademark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Chattanooga is published bi-monthly by New Leaf Media, 633 Chestnut Street, Suite 600, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37450. © 2014 by New Leaf Media All rights reserved. No material in this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from the publisher. News information should be addressed to the attention of the editor. Annual subscriptions are available for $18 The viewpoints and opinions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of New Leaf Media.

2014

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OCT/NOV Volume 24, No. 5

F E AT U R E S

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Echoes From the Past

Cornerstones, Inc. celebrates the preservation of historic properties and the inspiration of their new purposes.

D E P A R T M E N T S

Contents

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Editorial

Why Pursue Preservation?

38

Getaway

Coasting Into Fall Emerald Coast offerings in the off-season

The area’s largest owner of commercial property, Henry Luken, is refurbishing aging golf properties.

17

Fall Bridal Favorites

18 All You Need is Love 22 Cottage Garden Style 33 Elemental Teamwork 36 Gifts

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Great Retail Expectations

Onward Reserve opens a men’s specialty retail shop in Warehouse Row.

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The Art of Cultural Exchange

Area immigration attorneys promote cultural and educational exchanges that lead to trade.

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Mountain Arts

This mountaintop village promotes the arts in a variety of ways that engage the larger community.

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Empowerment for the Next Step

The UTC Women’s Leadership Series supports professional development and personal branding.

Currents

Events and opening around the city and beyond

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Closure Bon Appétit

D E P A R T M E N T S

10 The King Henry of Golf in Chattanooga

D E P A R T M E N T S

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38 64 Showcasing The Renaissance City Of The South ®

On the cover–

The doorknob to room 28. Historic Stone Fort Inn served as a backdrop for CM wedding photos, and is an excellent example of preservation success. JOIN OUR NETWORKS

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$4.00

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2014 VOL. 24, NO. 5 www.chattmag.com

Warehouse Row’s Newest PopUp Shop

Cornerstones— 20 Years of Saving Historic Places

Henry Luken’s Golf Gamble

Be the Bride You Want to Be

Cover- Design by Peggy Boyd Petrey Photography by Big Lenz Studio

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Echoes Past: from the

20 Years, 20 Reasons CORNERSTONES, INC. IS BECOMING A MODEL FOR THE NATION.

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Story by Deborah Petticord Photography courtesy of Cornerstones, Inc.

E C H O E S

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T H E

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C Wine Over Water celebrates and raises funds for preservation.

ornerstones, Inc. is celebrating 20 years of rescuing and inspiring new purpose in Chattanooga’s historic architectural treasures. From the Italian Renaissance Revival style of the Dome Building to City Hall’s neoclassical edifice—20 structures have been saved and more are in line. The collection of buildings creates a downtown jewel box making up the new Cornerstones’ anniversary walking tour. Visitors and home folk will be able to print out a map from the organization’s web site and enjoy the tour this fall. This track record of successes may make the work of the urban historic preservation organization seem easy, but interacting with a variety of multilevel government entities, property owners and institutions is no small task. Just ask Cornerstones’ Executive Director Ann Gray, in the aftermath of the organization’s biggest fundraiser, Wine Over Water. The annual event shows off the impetus for the Cornerstones organization—the Walnut Street Bridge. The bridge was probably the most high profile restoration project in the history of the city. “It isn’t just raising the money,” says Gray. “Wine Over Water is an outdoor celebration of the city and its preservation success.” The new walking tour highlights these accomplishments. continued on page 8

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Architecture of all the arts is the one that acts the most slowly, but the most surely, on the soul. — Ernest Dimnet, 1932

Preparing for Wine over Water 2014, River City Company’s Jim Williamson frequently works with Cornerstones’ Ann Gray to find solutions for vintage properties. The Ross Hotel, shown here, is the latest project.

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Along with the walking tour, Cornerstones will be sponsoring an online contest with local architecture and history questions. Correct answers will allow participants the opportunity to win an imported wine aerator and decanter by Travaso, which was on display at the Wine Over Water event. In 20 years, Cornerstones, Inc. has received over $1.5 million in outside funding from the Lyndhurst and Tanya Foundations, as well as the National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP). The NTHP named it one of only three community partners in the state of Tennessee.The organization has earned over $3 million from the Wine Over Water series, annual campaigns and project development.

A COLLABORATION OF DESIGN CONTINUES

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In 2011 Cornerstones, Inc. began a collaboration with the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga under the direction of Dana Moody, associate professor and head of the Interior Design (I.D.) Department, to present an immersion class for students focusing on a Cornerstones property. “We did it as a test—as an elective for all the juniors and seniors,” says Moody. They picked a familiar building—the St. George Hotel on Market Street. This Cornerstones property has ranked high on its “to do” list for many years. Although the property is still awaiting rescue, it received a great deal of exposure from being the first subject of the Interior Design Department’s project. Set up as a competition, the project included the Historic Structure Report that considered how the property had been used in the past, an illustration or historic archive material showing it as it existed, and a presentation of the student’s ideas for its adapted re-use. Each student had a mentor and there were several of these student/mentor teams. “They really delved into the project’s community impact,” says Moody. “Deeper than I thought they would go.” This creative approach to learning gave students an understanding of the property and the process, but Moody learned a lot, too, she says. Having just completed another competition in the 2013-2014 academic year, she hopes to repeat the success again this year. The Department has absorbed and restructured the project and it is now a required senior thesis. All I.D. senior students will gain exposure to this multi-layered project. Last year’s teams chose from three different properties. Two were on the National Register of Historic Places. One of the reasons they were chosen was simply that Cornerstones, Inc. had access to them. However, Gray and Moody believed all were viable and wonderful properties for adaptive re-use. “The spaces [in each] really speak to you,” says Gray of the properties that were chosen. They were— O CT/ N O V

The Mayfield Annex UTC’s Dana Moody with Ann Gray

Hannah Durham

Sally Morrow and Amy Williams

THE TEAMS OF STUDENTS AND MENTORS JOHN ROSS HOTEL Amy Williams* Mentor: Sally Morrow at Duality Studio Emily Priest Mentor: Trey Wheeler at TWH Architects Melissa Birdwell Mentor: Sandy Hausler at DHW MAYFIELD ANNEX Stacie Wolfford Mentor: Jennifer Cain at TVA Hayley Oertling Mentor: Terry Barker at River Street Architecture TADLEY BUILDING Hanna Durham* Mentor: Christian Rushing at Studio C Rushing Meredith Feira* Mentor: Arch Willingham at TU Parks Brittni Endsley Mentor: Eric Myers at Elemi *top winners

2014

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E C H O E S F R O M T H E P A S T : 2 0 Y E A R S , 2 0 R E A S O N S • P A G E   4   O F

the Mayfield Annex, the Tadley Building on MLK Boulevard and the courthouse square on the west corner. Almost all the offices have John Ross Hotel on Patten Parkway,where Yesterday’s was located, relocated, leaving this impressive building underused. Originally it now owned by River City Company and under contract by an inter- was built to house a fraternal lodge and has unusual amenities that ested developer. might make it possible to repurpose as condominiums or a boutique “These properties have been made accessible to Cornerstones. They hotel. are in good condition and have interesting histories,” Gray says. Jim Williamson, vice president of Planning and Development for The properties are still useful. In order to satisfy the demand for River City Company, works with Cornerstones and private developmiddle-income housing ers to repurpose and revitalcited by a 2013 River City ize Chattanooga’s vintage Company study, apartproperties. He believes the ments will be developed in UTC/Cornerstones collaborathe space. Student Amy tive work is especially good Williams and her mentor, for developers. Sally Morrow of Duality “It’s wonderful that we’re Studio won 1st Place in the getting some fresh creative design competition for this thought in how to repurpose property. these properties,” says The Tadley Building is Williamson. “It can inform owned by Richard Williams, redevelopment.” and along with the rest of Gray and Moody contend the block, is being redevelthat what makes Chattanooga oped by Reggie Ruff. Built interesting is new developby Dr. J.C. Tadley in 1928, ment within its historic the hotel once had retail on boundaries. Chattanooga’s the ground level, offices on renaissance and Cornerstone’s the middle floors and a targeted preservation efforts ballroom on the top floor Left to right, Developer Reggie Ruff, UTC Student Meredith Feira and T.U. are being enhanced by the that was home to the Silver Park’s Arch Willingham in front of the Tadley Building. new curriculum created for Slipper Dance Club. Ruff hopes to maintain the ballroom for an event the Interior Design Department at UTC. space and update the office space to the more popular loft style. “We have a passion for our city,” remarks Ann Gray. “These buildStudent Meredith Feira and T.U. Parks’ Arch Willingham comprised ings are part of the fabric of Chattanooga.” the team that won 2nd place. Visit cornerstonesinc.org for more information about the contest and to The Mayfield Annex at 7th and Walnut Streets is a classic structure owned by Hamilton County government that seems to anchor the access the walking tour map.

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5 P A G E   1   O F • C H A T T A N O O G A I N G O L F O F H E N R Y K I N G T H E

The King Henry of Golf in Chattanooga Story by Sam Woolwine Photography by Big Lenz Studio

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T H E K I N G

HENRY LUKEN’S MANAGEMENT STYLE IMPROVES OPPORTUNITIES FOR GOLFERS.

H E N R Y O F G O L F I N C H A T T A N O O G A • P A G E   2   O F

Henry Luken

The view from the 18th hole at Valleybrook Golf and Country Club

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S

ince multi-millionaire businessman, Henry Luken, moved to Chattanooga from Virginia in the late 1990s, he has lived on a golf course. That course was Montlake in Soddy-Daisy, a public course built on Montlake Mountain in the mid-1980s by Earl Spears. Luken purchased the course and adjacent property on Montlake in 1999 and built the home he now lives in on the golf course. He moved to the Chattanooga area soon after selling his TelCo Communications Group, a company based in Chantilly, Virginia, for between $175 and $180 million before taxes. “I had offices in Dallas, the D.C. area and a home in Florida, but I decided to move to the Chattanooga area because of the tax incentives in East Tennessee,” Luken says. “That part of the state was very tax friendly then. Unfortunately, unless you are a huge corporation such as Volkswagen, those benefits don’t exist today.” There was irony in Luken’s decision to purchase property on a golf course since he didn’t even play the game when he moved here. Even today he doesn’t consider that his principal avocation. But, he is playcontinued on page 12

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ing more than in the past. His wife Kelly has only recently taken up the game. That was way before the Kentucky native decided to build a golf course empire in Chattanooga. When Luken purchased Valleybrook Golf and Country Club, located in Hixson, for a mere $975,000 at auction this past summer, the course became the fifth acquisition of his holdings in golf-related properties. In the last two years he has purchased Battlefield Golf and Country Club in Ringgold, Georgia, Champions Club at Hampton Creek in Ooltewah, and Eagle Bluff in Harrison. So Luken, who owns more commercial property than anyone else in Hamilton County (approximately two million square feet), has become the biggest owner of golf courses in the history of the game in the greater Chattanooga area (including the counties of Hamilton, Bradley, Marion, Polk, Grundy, Rhea in Tennessee and Walker, Catoosa, Chattooga and Whitfield in Georgia and Jackson in Alabama). In golf circles, he could just be called King Henry.

“This thing is a business decision for me, I wanted to make this affordable for anyone who likes the game.” —HENRY LUKEN While there have been multiple owners of golf courses in the area, no individual has owned more than two at a time. When Battlefield first opened in the 1970s, Gene Abercrombie and Bill Hall were part-owners in it and Creeks Bend. Dan Tribble Sr. and Dan Tribble Jr. owned Concord and Hickory Valley at the same time in the late 1960s and early ‘70s. But Concord was an executive course and Hickory Valley, now the home of the First Tee of Chattanooga and the UTC golf program’s practice facility, had only nine holes. More recently, Tim and Wes Gilbert owned WindStone Golf and Country Club on the Tennessee-Georgia state line, and the former Rolling Hills Golf Course in Cleveland. They bought WindStone in 1993 and Rolling Hills in 1999. They sold Rolling Hills in 2007 and it no longer exists as a golf facility. WindStone, 1 2

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T H E K I N G H E N R Y O F G O L F I N C H A T T A N O O G A • P A G E   4   O F 5

however, has the largest the cartpaths,” he adds. membership of an individ“We are getting new ually-owned course in the members because they area. see what Henry is “I was surprised when doing,” says Leonard Mr. Luken bought that Fant, a well-known many courses,” says Wes Chattanooga area busiGilbert. Of the five courses nessman and longtime owned by Luken, three are Battlefield member. private, two are public. But “He has really done a there is a novel twist to the great job with the private courses. In a first for course and clubhouse.” Southeast Tennessee and Luken has taken perhaps for the state, advantage of a golf members of the three downturn nationally, private courses may play at enabling him to any other Luken course for purchase the courses at a nominal fee. While a what basically is a member at Valleybrook bargain price. While he may play more often at that paid just $950,000 for course, since it is his princiValleybrook just a few pal course, he/she may tee months ago, he paid it up at Battlefield for just just over $1 million for $3.28 if they are on a cart the other three courses. plan, or $16.39 if they Eagle Bluff and aren’t. Battlefield were bought Valleybrook manager Chris Chambers with Henry Luken. Chambers helps “This thing is a business in 2012, the other two coordinate renovation efforts. decision for me,” Luken this year. says. “I wanted to make this affordable for anyone who likes the game. According to the National Golf Association’s latest statistics, in There are several reasons why I think it can be profitable for me.” 2011 there were 25.7 million people playing golf in the U.S., down Luken plans to invest $7 to $8 million on course and clubhouse from 30.6 million in 2003. In 2010, 18-hole courses averaged 33,000 improvements over the next few years. He has already completed rounds a year. In 1990 that figure was 40,000 rounds. Perhaps more clubhouse renovation at Battlefield and is working on updating the telling is the number of new courses built in 2012, only 13. During Valleybrook clubhouse. that year, 154 closed. “We are punching the greens now at Battlefield and have done “But the way he is doing this is a definite asset for golf in the substantial improvements to the clubhouse. We have also repaved Chattanooga area,” says Mickey McCamish, a man who once served continued on page 14

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“UNIQUE”

Your Personality

Our Expertise

Laney Interior Design

The Design Company, Inc. Jim Laney, ASID Peggy Laney, ASID 423-821-2111 www.laneydesign.com

We can prote this.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4 Volunteer for Tennessee River Rescue

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18

Get involved at www.trgt.org.

Hike to our new Bird Banding Lab

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21

Visit lukenholdings.com/PropertyHoldings/ AdditionalHoldings.aspx for more information.

PHOTO: KEVIN LIVINGOOD

Lunch ‘n’ Learn at the Trust office

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1 Enjoy Symphony on Stringer’s Ridge

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as the president of Golf Holiday, the organization in Myrtle Beach which puts together packages for hotels, courses and restaurants along the Grand Strand. When McCamish served in that position, there were more than 125 courses along the Grand Strand, and there are still approximately 100 or more. A Chattanooga native, he resigned from his Myrtle Beach post and returned home in 2009, becoming executive director of the Chattanooga Classic and an employee of Friends of the Festival. “This is a strong asset to those who are members of the courses he purchased,” says McCamish. “We had a similar situation in Myrtle Beach, but through partnerships. Clay and Matthew Brittain and Cecil Brandon owned several courses and there were recipient agreements with each of the courses they owned.” According to Lynn Howde, a veteran Tennessee Golf Association employee, nobody in the mid-state area owns five courses, nor anyone in Memphis. “Marty Myers owned several in the Nashville area,” she says, “But I don’t think it was five. And Bill and Russ Garner owned two in the Memphis area. Now, the Garners have a lot of holes because Windyke has 54.” According to the Memphis Business Journal, the Garners purchased Plantation Golf Club in Olive Springs, Mississippi this year. Plantation is an 18-hole course. At one time Myers owned four courses in the Nashville area and he still owns three. Luken feels his courses can be profitable because of the membership advantages he can offer and the money he saves with bulk orders, as well as buying used equipment from Ebay. “When we have to buy supplies, we can get better deals because we are buying in bulk. I own a contracting company, so much [of what] we need in renovation, I am buying from myself. We are continuing to seek memberships, but we’ve seen an increase in memberships after I bought the golf courses.” With the opportunity to play at five courses for a pittance, chances are those memberships will continue to grow. Long live the king.

1214 Dartmouth St., Chattanooga, TN 37405

Sam Woolwine is a former sports editor for the Chattanooga Times Free Press. This is his 50th year of journalism, having started in Huntington, West Virginia before entering Marshall University on an academic scholarship. He was recently inducted into the Tennessee Sports Writers Hall of Fame.

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— Christmas on Titanic —

Time to visit Titanic Museum Attraction in Pigeon Forge “I thought it would be hokey. It wasn’t.” Find Out Why 2.5 Million Visitors have seen us since 2010

5

✔ Walk the $1 million exact replica of the Grand Staircase ✔ Touch an Iceberg ✔ Steer the ship ✔ Many interactive exhibits ✔ Over 400 artifacts ✔ Receive a boarding pass

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ADVISORS

Emily Goodin Boutique Couture

Delores Murphy Monica’s

Criss Skinner, Makeup Artist

Elizabeth Renshaw Hair A GoGo

Becky Glover Fischer Evans

Catharine Daniels Plum Nelly

Victoria Love, Events and Staffing

Garret Nudd, Cobblestone Rue

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e v o L

All You Need is

VICTORIA LOVE BLENDS OLD-FASHIONED HARD WORK WITH A NATURAL SENSE OF FUN AND FANCY TO CREATE A PERFECT WEDDING OR CORPORATE EVENT Story by Sarah Kramer Photography by Brad Cansler and courtesy of Events and Staffing

I

love meeting people and hosting events,” says thirty-two-year-old Victoria Love. Sparkling eyes and a ready smile seem to confirm the statement. It’s little wonder that she is Bob and Elizabeth Corker’s favorite party planner. Victoria Love Events and Staffing was recently voted the WeddingWire Couples Choice Award for 2014. Once the bar manager for Easy Bistro, she was recruited by Siskin Steel President Paul Loftin, as a sales representative, and was quickly relocated to help grow the expanding Greenville, South Carolina territory. That part of her career would last only a short time. When her mother became ill with ovarian cancer, she came home to Chattanooga to help care for her. Victoria’s mom passed away in 2012, leaving her with the realization

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that life was indeed short and that she wanted to fill it doing something she enjoyed. Being part of life’s happy occasions and helping make them successful was what she seemed to be best at. With $1,000 in savings, she started her business doing private parties. Early clients like Doctors Cromie and Patel were satisfied customers whose catered events, both non-profit and private, only spread the word among their associates. Families who are planning and underwriting the cost of bridal festivities, long for the assurance that the special event is in good hands. Friends say when people meet Love, they are dazzled by her energy and native charm. Brides especially feel comfortable and confident in Love. “They get so comfortable with her, they want her in the wedding photos,” says Stephanie Valencia, Love’s operations manager. “Brides are hyper sensitive, they are under pressure,” says the perpetually smiling Victoria Love. “They want everything to be perfect.” Events are rarely, if ever perfect, so Love thinks it’s important to know a few things that must be really, really good. “People remember the food and the dancing, so the music matters,” says Love. From specialty cocktails to themed food, she chooses vendors who will work well with clients at the appropriate price point. She also loves to do tie-ins, where she supplies the staffing needs of the caterer from her seemingly endless network of competent bartenders and servers. Love joins families together in different ways to include everyone. She will stage engagements that are memorable— plus brunches, luncheons, plated reception dinners, buffets and late night afterparty snacks. “I’ve used food trucks for that,” says Love. She also enjoys helping newcomers make their mark. “I found Monkey Town Doughnuts at the Chattanooga Market. “And they’re wonderful for after-party food.” The doughnut makers name refers to their location in Dayton, Tennessee where the historic Scopes Monkey Trial was held. From unusual food to out-of–the-box venues like The Crash Pad, variety appeals to Love. “Everybody wants to stand out, and there are a thousand ways to do it!” And attention to the tiniest details makes the difference, says Love. She will go to fittings, pick up dresses, hire photographers and videographers and post short videos to websites and social media. Her timelines adhere down to the minute and if one thing fails, she seems to be able to produce an alternate idea on the fly. For example, Love recently coordinated an Indian wedding lasting four days with an average of 500 people in attendance at each of several events. It had a significant budget and the families flew friends and relatives in from all over the world to attend. The caterer was actually from the west coast and the planner was from Atlanta. On the day of the wedding, the bridegroom was to come to the wedding venue in a procession known as a baraat, a North Indian Hindu tradition. Relatives from the groom’s and bride’s sides greet

each other at the destination ceremony. This usually begins with the two fathers, followed by the two mothers, then the siblings, uncles, aunts and cousins. Even distant relatives are included, which symbolizes the unification of the two clans. The planner had scheduled a horse and carriage for his presentation, but when the time came it didn’t show up and Victoria was asked to find a replacement. She discovered the carriage had been scheduled for the wrong day.

Love leading the parade Quick thinking paid off when Love found a smart little convertible to perform the task of delivering the groom. She had it decorated and drove it herself. The family was grateful and included her in their celebration. “It was so beautiful,” she adds. Love isn’t limited to wedding celebrations, however. She believes corporate events are less emotionally charged and the profit margins are a bit higher. She has coordinated all the Chattanooga Whiskey events and festivals, as well as assisting with the last two Gig Tank Demo Days. This year Love coordinated the Community Foundation’s 50th anniversary celebration that included an adventure race involving 11 nonprofit organizations and will be coordinating the 2nd Annual Chattanooga Film Festival. She goes to SunDance in January to experience a similar event first hand. Love says the city needs more venues, even though she’s not averse to improvisation. She recently held an anniversary party on a rooftop overlooking the city. Planning events that are as distinctive as the organization or individual she is working for is her primary focus.

for a Impromptudpinagracdere em ony ed w u d in H

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10Things She Loves 7

Patterns. Patterns. Patterns. From invitations, to fabric table runners. “Patterns are making a huge statement, and no one does this better than Mariah Mayfield from Shadow Box in Warehouse Row.”

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Custom/seasonal signature cocktails. “I create a favorite for the bride and groom which really showcases their personalities.”

Slow motion photo booths. Love says these are just making their way to Chattanooga. “They are so fun, and really add an interactive aspect to your event. “

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Family heirlooms incorporated into the decor. Simple pieces like family wedding photos, vases, or even chairs for an intimate barside lounge, can make a wedding feel so personal and charming.

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Seasonal, family-style dinners, with specialty food stations at the reception. Brides are wanting a more casual dining style as opposed to the formal weddings of the past. “This trend is starting to catch on, and I couldn’t love it more. You can really up the awe factor at your wedding with a shrimp and grits station or a mashed potato bar. I love caterers who make everything from scratch!”

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Back yard/barn receptions. Less ballroom, more family home or farm. With all of the breathtaking scenery we have in and around Chattanooga, your All things GOLD. With metallics, choices of venues are plentiful. you can keep it simple with just a few touches, or really dress it up and go over the top. “I can’t get enough.”

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Yoga with the bridal party. “It is super fun to bring in a yoga teacher to start the wedding weekend off relaxed. You can contact Blaire at Hot Yoga Plus to schedule a private session.“

Late night snacks or food trucks. “After all that dancing, your guests are sure to be hungry! Bring in the gelato cart from Milk & Honey, or Taqueria Jalisco taco truck for savory authentic Mexican. But if you want my advice on curing every late night craving; always have something salty and something sweet.”

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Less formal flowers. Think less roses, and more roadside wildflowers. “I love when a bouquet looks artisan and handpicked, and with the right florist, you can create the perfect flawless combination. I carried a bouquet of lavender at my own wedding.“ 4

Speaking of gold, designer Laura Bicego introduces Nanis Italian Jewels at Fischer Evans, on December 3rd from 12:00 - 5:00 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY? CELEBRATE YOUR EVENT At

“...true passion on a plate.” —The Pulse Magazine

CALL 423.710.2925

to speak with our events coordinator

Make Your reservations todaY

TERRAMAECHATTANOOGA.COM | 122 E 10TH ST | 423.710.2925 OC T / N OV

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Cottage Garden Style

For romance in rose—this two-piece dress by Watters, is made of silk with a 60-meter tulle overlay. The choker is by Malis Hendersen. Available at Monica’s

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Lindsey’s hairstyle was created by Amberjil White of Hair-a-Go-Go and her makeup was by Criss Skinner, also with Hair-A-Go-Go.

Location: Sue Chamberlain’s cottage garden, Lookout Mountain, Tennessee. Sue is a stylist for The Barn Nursery.

Photography: Garrett Nudd, Cobblestone Rue, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

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Lindsey is wearing a lace v-neck dress by Watters Encore with an embroidered veil by Malis Henderson, and shoes by Salon. 2 4

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Mary Halley’s ivory dress is by Watters Encore with a pearled veil by and earrings by Malis Henderson. Her shoes are by Dycables. Bouquet by Christie May, proprietor, May Flowers, Chattanooga Tennessee

Her hairstyle was created by Amberjil White of Hair-a-Go-Go and her makeup was by Criss Skinner, Hair-A-Go-Go. Photography: Garrett Nudd, Cobblestone Rue, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

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All styles are available at Monica’s North Shore owned by Steve and Delores Murphy.

ennedy JEWELERS

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Suit Up

And Be the Bride You Want to Be The independence and reserved sophistication of the Art Moderne period of the 1930s inspired our “Be the Bride You Want to Be” photographic spread. The photography is by Garrett Nudd, proprietor of Cobblestone Rue. Our bride is wearing an Albert Nipon suit from Neiman Marcus, Atlanta. Her vintage birdcage headpiece was adapted by Carol Schaffeld, milliner and owner of Peaches Fine Millinery in Chattanooga’s Coolidge Park shopping district. Her necklace is by This and That Jewelry from Monica’s on Chattanooga’s north shore and her shoes are by Kate Spade from Embellish in Warehouse Row, Chattanooga.

Model, Becky Ribeiro, does actually play the trumpet and often sings at weddings.

About the Location The Joel W. Solomon Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse stands in the central business district of Chattanooga and is a notable example of the Art Moderne architectural style popular in the 1930s. The details of the interior recall the classicism of earlier architecture but it takes a stylized form seen in sleek lines and a vertical emphasis with plant, animal and geometric decorative motifs. The building was constructed in 1932-1933 as the U.S. Post Office and Courthouse. Designed jointly by Shreve, Lamb and Harmon and Chattanooga’s, Reuben Harrison Hunt, it was Hunt’s last major work, coming at the end of a career that spanned more than five decades. The preeminent Southern architect, Hunt designed every major public building constructed in Chattanooga between 1895 and 1935. He designed many local churches, hospitals and private office buildings, too, plus similar public and private buildings throughout the South. In 1938 the building was recognized by the American Institute of Architects as one of the 150 finest buildings constructed in the previous twenty years in the United States, and it was featured in an AIA photographic exhibit in America and Europe. The U.S. Post Office and Courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, as part of a thematic nomination of the most significant buildings of Reuben Harrison Hunt. The U.S. General Services Administration assumed ownership of the building in 1981 and renamed it in honor of Joel “Jay” W. Solomon, a Chattanooga native and Administrator of GSA from 1977 to 1979. Although the main Chattanooga Post Office was relocated to Shallowford Road, the building still houses the downtown branch, plus federal courts and offices. 2 8

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Makeup

Anna Belle and Criss Skinner, representing Hair-A-Go-Go salon at Two North Shore worked with our Art Moderne “bride� to achieve a 1930s-era look.

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rom weddings to theatrical events, area makeup artists supply talent for enhancing the face. Trends in makeup vary as much as any other fashion statement. Talented local make-up artists can add drama to an event. They take the pressure off the bride and allow her to relax, even though she may be tempted to do her own makeup. Often hair stylists and makeup artists work in teams, either in a spa or salon setting or at the wedding venue. These were the Chattanooga Magazine teams who created our Cottage Garden, and Art Moderne looks for fall 2014.

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For the Cottage Garden scenes, a young fresh look was created through the efforts of Amberjill White and Criss Skinner (Hair-AGo-Go) with models Lindsey Mitchell and Mary Halley Magee.

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A Boutique Hotel Wedding Model Emily is wearing a tealength ivory lace and tulle gown by Justin Alexander, a bird-cage veil by Belaire Bridal Veils, necklace by Peace, Love and Bling and shoes by Benjamin Adams...all available at Boutique Couture. Derek is wearing a charcoal grey suit with skinny black tie and suspenders by Twilight. All wardrobe provided by Boutique Couture

Hair by Genia Church, owner of Epiphany Day Spa and makeup by Angela Folmar, owner of Luminous Beauty Boutique. Stylist: Emily Goodin Photographer: Melody Hood

About the Location

Chattanooga’s Stone Fort Inn, on East 10th Street, is the perfect scene for a boutique hotel wedding. The historic Stone Fort Inn was originally built on a site that was once part of Fort James, a stone fortification that provided security to Chattanoogans and was of strategic importance to the military during the Civil War.

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Genia Church

Elemental TeamWork WEDDING INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS MAKE UP BE COUTURE AND WORK COLLABORATIVELY TO CREATE A RICH SENSE OF DRAMA FOR SPECIAL EVENTS, ADVERTISEMENTS AND MEDIA CONTENT. Story by Lindsey Mitchell Photography by Melody Hood OC T / N OV

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Shop owner and stylist Emily Goodin has always had a keen sense of what prospective brides and partygoers want, but may not say they want. She is putting this skill to good use along with three business associates who have been working together to create a unique service for ad agencies, businesses and individuals in Chattanooga. They have a method worked out to give their clients what they really desire—“a bit of drama!” The women include Angela Folmar, owner of Luminous Beauty Boutique, a spa and salon for makeup, Genia Church, owner of Epiphany Salon and Day Spa and Melody Hood, owner of Innamorata Photography, specializing in fashion, events and portraiture, as well as Goodin. Together, the women market themselves as Be Couture, a one-stop shop for promotional, advertising and personal photo shoots. The women first starting thinking of ways they could work together in a more official capacity one evening after Church, Hood and Goodin collaborated on a photo shoot for Goodin’s store, Boutique Couture. “We just had a great time working together. We started discussing ways we would like to expand our own personal portfolios and individual industries,” says Church. “It made sense for us to work together to provide a service that fulfilled all of a client’s needs in one place. Emily is the stylist, Melody is the photographer, I do hair and Angela came on board Emily Goodin as the makeup artist.” “The service we can offer to companies, magazines, and ad agencies is unique in the fact that they can hire one team to complete their project from start to finish instead of dealing with the stress of having to hire multiple people for a shoot,” explains Hood. In addition to providing convenience, the women are also hoping their creative backgrounds will appeal to clients who want something unique. “Maybe a client comes to us with a preexisting idea in their mind. Be Couture would love to help them take that idea to the next level,” says Goodin. Working together came very naturally, as the four women are friends and have collaborated in various professional and personal capacities over the years. Folmar worked with Church at Epiphany Salon and Day Spa as an aesthetician in the early 2000s and as a makeup artist for some of Goodin’s bridal shows. “I even bought my wedding dress from Emily in 2008 and Melody was my wedding photographer,” says Folmar. Recently Be Couture completed a project aimed to showcase their 3 4

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artistic and creative abilities: a themed photo shoot called the “4 Elements.” Each of the women took on the persona of earth, wind, fire or water based on their personalities and used their individual skills and talents to create the looks. “Each one of us is really one of the four elements. We all bring something to the table in terms of business and styling skills,” explains Folmar. “We took this shoot a little further artistically to showcase our more thought-provoking and creative side. It shows clients that we can create all kinds of looks, from very natural to a much more dramatic and artistic.” On top of pushing their creative boundaries, the photo shoot also

made the professionals swap roles for the day. “I thought that it would be beneficial for us to be in the role of our clients—sitting in those seats having our hair and makeup done, being styled, being in front of the camera. We now know every side of what our clients experience and we know each other on a much deeper level,” says Hood. “It was interesting because I had never really been on that side of the camera before,” adds Church. “We were actually taking ourselves out of our own element and relying on the others more.” Genia Church is definitely most in her element when working with hair. As a Lead Technical Hair Color Educator for Schwarzkopf Professional with over 16 years

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of experience, Church has styled hair for two New York Fashion Week events, working with designers Betsey Johnson and Alice and Olivia. Photographer Melody Hood has also received national and international attention for her photos. In addition to opening her own photo studio over 10 years ago, Innamorata Photography, she has won several awards, has photos printed in a variety of magazines, blogs and ad campaigns and speaks annually at WPPI, the world’s largest photography convention. Church and Hood aren’t the only ones who have excelled so notably in their careers. After years of working as a licensed aesthetician and make-up artist, Angela Folmar opened Luminous Beauty Boutique in 2009 and creates custom mixes of mineral make-up products to perfectly match every woman’s skin tone. Finally, Goodin has owned Boutique Couture, an upscale event and eveningwear shop on Market Street, for eight years. She helps coordinate the annual Go Red for Women fashion show event to bring awareness to heart disease and is the Style Watch reporter for Hits 96 radio and News Channel 9. To say that this group of women is qualified is clearly an under-

statement. Because each artist involved in Be Couture has already experienced a high level of personal success in her own respective field—photography, hair, beauty and styling—working together provides exciting challenges. “We each have our own niche that we excel in,” explains Genia. “When we come together, we push each other creatively to make new looks we wouldn’t be able to create otherwise. We also are able to bounce business ideas off each other, as we are all women business owners and face similar challenges and circumstances. It is very helpful and reassuring to know that you have partners.” To learn more about Be Couture and view some of their work, visit www.becouturegroup.com.

Angela Folmar

Photographer Melody Hood fires up her photoshop skills.

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Gracious Gifts FISCHER EVANS “In a world of mass production, handmade is the true luxury.” —Beatriz Ball Becky Glover sells fine gifts at her Fischer Evans shop in downtown Chattanooga. One of her favorite gift recommendations is Beatriz Ball fine metalware. Glover says these elegant designs are made of 100 percent recycled aluminum, using the ancient Greco Roman method of sand casting. Molten aluminum alloy is poured into individual molds, at the company’s foundry in Mexico. After the pieces are cast, they are hand polished to a high luster. The process creates a handsome piece of tableware with a one-ofa-kind appeal that has substantial weight and will not tarnish. These serving pieces may be heated or chilled, going from a 350 degree-oven to refrigerator, safely serving food. They should simply be hand washed after each use, dried and put away. The Beatriz Ball collection is a three-time winner of the prestigious ARTS award in the Tabletop Category and its founder Beatriz Ball was honored in 2014 as product designer of the year. The metalware is made for modern brides who enjoy entertaining, but prefer versatile easy-care serving pieces that last a lifetime. Fischer Evans carries distinctive luxury gifts and jewelry for any of life’s special occasions. Check out the easy-to-use online gift registry

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with their 50 top wedding and bridal gifts, complete with descriptions, photos and prices. 801 Market Street Chattanooga, TN 37402 fischerevans.com/registry.cfm 423-267-0901

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MIA CUCINA Culinary devotees will be thrilled with the selection of gift items at Mia Cucina, located on the ground level of The Terrace on Frasier Avenue. Owner Marcy Kelch stocks top-of-the-line cookware, bakeware and cutlery brands. From Lodge to Cusinart, the best in cooking craft is represented here, says Kelch. The store also hosts cooking demonstrations and runs a fully scheduled calendar of cooking classes. The cooking school has classes for novices and experienced cooks as well and hosts popular cookbook authors and notable professional chefs throughout the year. Mia Cucina’s talented staff is on hand to assist with useful gifts for the bride. Whether shoppers are looking for bar tools, tea kettles or mixers and bowls, “there is something for every kitchen.” Items may be personalized and special blends of spices and gift baskets may be created for the wedding party. Shop online or in-store.

345 Frazier Ave #103 Chattanooga, TN 37405 theplaceforcooks.com 423-265-4474

PLUM NELLY Proprietor Catherine Daniels says her shop on the North Shore specializes in distinctive gifts and offers exceptional regional pottery, hand-crafted jewelry—and glassware by celebrated local artisans, Thomas Spake and Prentice Hicks. The shop also carries flatware by Vietri, kitchen linens, placemats and napkin rings. Working with family-owned and operated factories throughout Italy, VIETRI has become a significant importer of handcrafted Italian tableware and home decor products. Imported Portuguese pottery and place settings by Skyros Designs, one of Daniels’ newest vendors, are displayed at Plum Nelly. Daniels is determined to offer the most original luxury gift items from the region at Plum Nelly. A convenient online store and bridal registry is being developed and the shop is easily accessible from Coolidge Park or Frasier Avenue. 330 Frazier Ave, Chattanooga, TN 37405 plumnellyshop.com, 423-266-0585

Eighth & Market, Chattanooga, TN - 267-0901 Hours: 10:00AM - 5:30PM, Monday - Friday Complimentary parking is available at the corner of MLK and Broad Street

DANCING IN THE RAIN collection www.nanis.it

Skyros

Meet Laura.

Please join us for a Trunk Show featuring NANIS ITALIAN JEWELS and one-time only special appearance by acclaimed Italian designer, Laura Bicego

Tuesday, December 3rd 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

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3 P A G E   1   O F •

Story by Nathalie Strickland Photography by Tyler Tangalin

C O A S T I N G

I N T O

F A L L

Coasting intoFall

Above, the Emerald Grande Condominiums and the newly expanded Harborwalk Village serve as the gateway to the boat docks. 3 8

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Oyster Bar. near AJ’s Seafood and

Destin began as a sleepy fishing village in the 1830s and the town’s many activities still revolve around the docks in Destin Harbor. Year round, a parade of fishing boats traverse the harbor at twilight and pass through its narrow entrance as they make their way into the Gulf of Mexico in search of a fresh catch of red snapper, amberjack and grouper. In October, saltwater anglers aboard private and charter boats head out in search of the Destin Fishing Rodeo’s biggest catch. More than 30,000 anglers try their luck at deep sea fishing in the monthlong event and they can be seen weighing in their prize gamefish – everything from marlin, sailfish and king mackerel to amberjack and grouper—all day long on the docks at AJ’s Seafood and Oyster Bar. Harborwalk Village, a newly expanded collection of boutiques and restaurants that sit just below Emerald Grande Condominiums on the water’s edge, is the gateway to the fishing docks and many of the area’s water adventure outfitters. Jackacuda’s, Destin’s best sushi restaurant and arguably one of the best overall, opened in Harborwalk Village earlier in this year.

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docks Fishing boats line the

WORLD’S LUCKIEST FISHING VILLAGE

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ach summer, beach bound families flock to the sugary soft sand and crystal clear blue-green surf of Florida’s Emerald Coast seeking fun and a lifetime of memories. But when the tourists retreat in early fall and the fishing villages return to their roots, there is an unforgettable beauty and tranquility to the barrier islands along the northern Gulf of Mexico in the Florida panhandle. The unique pleasures along the beaches that stretch from Fort Walton eastward through Okaloosa Island and on to Destin in the fall are one of the coast’s best kept secrets. And for those who’ve have fallen in love with the Emerald Coast in the off season, it’s a secret worth keeping.

C O A S T I N G

FALL IN LOVE WITH THE EMERALD COAST IN THE OFF SEASON

PEEK BELOW THE SURFACE In early autumn, the summerlike temperatures and coastal breeze are ideal for a natural escape aboard a standup paddleboard or kayak. Boats and boards are a great way to cruise the harbor and Choctawhatchee Bay, visit waist deep Crab Island, or just hang out on a sandbar. Both are available for rent from outdoor adventure companies, like GUSU Paddlesports, which launches from the docks in Destin Harbor and provides instruction and guided tours. Some paddleboard and kayak outfitters offer eco-tours, fishing tours and lessons. The Choctawhatchee Bay, where saltwater and freshwater converge, has a rich and diverse ecology. The unique ecosystem is teaming with a diverse bounty of marine species, including fish and shellfish, and is a playground for dolphins. Fishermen who wet their line in the bay may catch redfish, speckled trout, shrimp and oysters. Kayakers, paddleboarders, snorkelers and fishermen can launch from the Gulf Islands National Seashore on Okaloosa Island, which runs between Destin and Fort Walton Beach. Land lovers will find miles of coastline for nature hikes and birdwatching among the picturesque sea oat topped sand dunes. continued on page 40

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continued from page 39

On the Gulf side of Okaloosa Island, well-timed kayakers can enjoy paddling alongside a pod of dolphins trolling for a meal in the early morning or evening hours. The social creatures have been known to engage in a game of chase or dance in a private Gulfarium-like show for lucky water adventurers.

REST AND RELAXATION The waterparks, go-kart tracks and amusement parks are closed by fall, but that means fewer distractions from the relaxation and memory making that beckon families to return each year. With toes deep in the sand and waves lapping gently, generations of families reunite on the lightly populated beaches and while away hours visiting, splashing in the surf, building sandcastles and getting lost deep in the pages of a novel. Of course, golfers know that the lush courses along the Emerald Coast—with its sunny skies, warm gulf breeze and tropical vegetation—are a paradise for players. The area is home to eight championship golf courses, including Regatta Bay, which is nestled among nature preserves along the Choctawhatchee Bay. Golfers navigate seaside bunkers on the 6,894-yard, par-72 course that was named one of Golf Digest’s “Top Places to Play in North America.” The course was designed by Robert C. Walker, former lead architect for Arnold Palmer.

of the best brunches along the Florida panhandle. The owners of Mama Clamenza’s serve up scratch-made family recipes and European delicacies for breakfast on weekends. Their lunch and dinner menu features wood-fired pizzas, Italian classics and desserts expertly paired with wines and cappuccinos. The restaurant has a demonstration kitchen where they host events and sell-out classes based on their award-winning recipes. Quaint, historic buildings make up the downtown shopping district of Fort Walton Beach. The smattering of locally-owned shops includes A Cupcakery By The Sea, a gift shop and confectionary that is as beautifully decorated as its sweet treats. A couple of doors down is 3 Dogs and a Chick, a one-of-a-kind pet store whose “top dog” is passionate about bettering the lives of animals, which is apparent in the selection of delicious treats for dogs and quality gear for people. The Boardwalk on the west end of Okaloosa Island, the barrier island located between Fort Walton Beach and Destin on US Hwy. 98, is home to several gift shops and restaurants. Chief among the

Uncle Bucks offers ind oor bowlng and is a Bass Pro Shop pro perty.

FINE FINDS AND FRESH CATCH Good Morning America named the area one of the “Top 10 Most Beautiful Places in America,” but there’s more to do along Destin, Fort Walton Beach and Okaloosa Island than check out the scenery. Eclectic shopping and cutting-edge eateries await those who visit the charming tourism-centric towns of the 24-mile Emerald Coast in the off season. Tucked in the corner of Fort Walton’s Uptown Station, a revived mid-century shopping plaza, is an Italian restaurant that offers one 4 0

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reasons for stopping here is The Black Pearl Woodfired Grill, whose open-air beachfront dining room offers one of the coast’s most breathtaking views of the sunset over the Gulf of Mexico. The award-winning restaurant offers inventive takes on in-season seafood favorites. On the south end of the Bay Bridge is Destin Commons, an openair lifestyle center filled with national brand premier retailers and locally-owned shops. The complex opened another avenue of shops and restaurants this season, including fashion retailer H&M and a dining and entertainment complex called Uncle Buck’s Fish Bowl and Grill. Uncle Buck’s is a Bass Pro Shops concept that expertly combines a restaurant, bowling alley and private party facilities into one destination for everything from private parties to rainy day fun. With so many new attractions and hidden gems, even regular beachgoers will find a variety of exciting new activities and interests along the popular stretch of Florida’s panhandle coastline. But visitors in the off-season will enjoy a quieter pace, a deeper tranquility, a closer look, and a little something the locals like to call “Emerald Coasting.”

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The curtain rises on another day

in historic Abingdon.

How will you spend iT? Catch a performance at

bArter theAtre. pedal along the scenic

VirginiA creeper trAil. sample the cuisine including

locAl beer And wine.

888.489.4144 路 visitabingdonvirginia.com

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Cohutta Banking Company saw the value of my business. They gave me the confidence to move forward despite

the challenges of the economy.

Debbie Richman, Steak ‘n Shake Franchisee

Setting the table for success at Steak ‘n Shake. For Debbie Richman, it wasn’t just about keeping the doors of her restaurants open during the great recession, it was about keeping them open 24-hours a day. Because, that’s what you do when you are a Steak ‘n Shake franchisee. Fortunately, Debbie found one bank that believed, Cohutta Banking Company. With the help of Gale Williams and the experienced team at Cohutta, Debbie had a financial partner that provided the resources she needed to meet her unique needs, from expanding marketing efforts to adding additional parking. The result, more customers. It’s a taste of success made possible by the hard work of a business owner and the belief of a bank. Today, Debbie continues to see the growing value of her business and her relationship with Cohutta. Contact Cohutta Banking Company at 423-648-2265 or visit us online at www.cohuttabank.com.

Loan products subject to credit approval. Cohutta Banking Company is a division of Synovus Bank. Synovus Bank, Member FDIC, is chartered in the state of Georgia and operates under multiple trade names across the Southeast. Divisions of Synovus are not separately FDIC-insured banks. The FDIC coverage extended to deposit customers is that of one insured bank.

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Great Retail Expectations

T.J. Callaway

MEN’S SPECIALTY RETAILER T.J. CALLAWAY BRINGS ONWARD RESERVE TO WAREHOUSE ROW

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he buzz from every source says bricks and mortar stores are suffering in the brave new world of Internet shopping. Maybe all the suffering has given birth to a new beast. Shopping has become more social, more interactive and just plain more fun.

Story by Miles Baker Photos by Deborah Petticord

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Southern menswear shops. “Onward Reserve is catering to those heightened expectations.” Established in 2012, Onward Reserve Gifts and Apparel is enjoying a four-month gig as the newest popup shop in Warehouse Row. This men’s store spins culture extravagantly and caters to fantasy—stocking gifts that appeal to golfers, hunters, homegrown chefs and storytellers. Callaway has opened stores in Athens, Atlanta, Charlotte and Nashville, but he says, “We never want to be perceived as a chain store.” Onward Reserve’s rustic vibe belies the comfort of these fashions—100 percent cotton shirts and pants under S.R.’s own label, plus other regional and international sources. From locally made tee shirts to stylish and substantial boots by DuBarry of Ireland, things are looking good for manly style. Originally from Thomasville, Georgia, Callaway studied business at the University of Georgia and later went to work as an investment banker in Atlanta. So, why retail? “Truthfully, I just had an entrepreneurial itch to scratch while I was an investment banker. Getting into the Onward Reserve’s interior storefront retail world was just lucky timing,” says Callaway. “I was looking for an oppor“There is a shift in what customers expect in a retail experience,” tunity and the men’s specialty retail world needed some improvesays T.J. Callaway, entrepreneur and cofounder of a new brand of ment.” In fact, there aren’t many exclusively men’s shops in down-

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AVAILABLE

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team that makes our fast, quality growth possible and we are adding people all the time. Chattanooga store manager Kathy Patten says, “The interest in the store has been good. It has been well received.” “In five years I would like to see us have a strong network of stores throughout the country that serve our customers in a friendly and fun environment,” he adds. “We also want to continue to have the best online experience in the men’s specialty market and we pride ourselves in always finding the best new gift ideas first.” While the store sources unique gifts and merchandise, it is cultivating its own apparel line. Each season more items are added under the Onward Reserve label. Rich checked shirts in crisp fall colors, made of 100 percent cotton, line the WR store among flasks, tumblers and coozies. Books on golf and wing shooting nest alongside Big Tom’s Bloody Mary Mix. This may be the best opportunity to find the newest standout gifts for the Chattanooga man, but Callaway suggests you bring a few friends and enjoy the experience.

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town Chattanooga. Especially those that would appeal to guys under, say 50. Callaway does seem to have a knack for it and patrons can take one look at the visual merchandising in each store and see his hand. Everything is assembled to showcase the rugged durability of well made products and enhance the shopping experience for—well, mostly men. Girl friends, wives, sisters and moms are welcome, too. Although Callaway enjoys playing golf and goes hunting, occasionally, he says, “I pretty much just work all the time, but I’m also at the age where most of my friends are all getting married. If I’m not working, I am relaxing with my new wife Catherine or attending a wedding of one of our friends. When presented with the opportunity to stage a popup store in Warehouse Row, Callaway was ready. “We are thrilled to be in Chattanooga and Warehouse Row is a great place for Onward Reserve,” he says. In terms of growth, Callaway believes Onward Reserve is right on schedule and has plans for a continued quick pace. The brand has grown very fast and he says his management group is constantly trying to improve. “We are not satisfied easily,” Callaway says “We have an amazing

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Cultural Exchange

The Art of

Above, National Chung Hsi ng University Vice Preside nt, Yau-Heiu Hsu, Ph.D explore s a Taiwanese market with Olsen. Below, the entrance to Jiaj an Tea Company.

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Story by Melissa Turner

Photography Courtesy of Olsen Law Firm T H E A R T

AS CHATTANOOGA FURTHER EMBRACES ITS ROLE ON THE GLOBAL STAGE, LOCAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES ENTER INTO A NEW MODEL CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAM.

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During a 2013 trip to Taiwan, Olsen, center, met with black tea industry companies in an effort to lay a foundation for cultural and educational exchange that would lead to future trade.

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imple exchanges can break down walls between us, for when people come together and speak to one another and share a common experience, then their common humanity is revealed. …And that’s where progress begins.” –President Barack Obama

Since the global divisions drawn during the Cold War, cultural exchange programs have played an important role in United States diplomacy and economic development. Today as the United States’ economy becomes increasingly more globalized, “cultural literacy” is emerging as a crucial entry-level skill for graduates and the businesses they serve as the 21st Century workforce. While only 10 percent of U.S. college and university students currently study abroad, demand is rising for graduates who have traveled or studied on a global scale and especially for those who are fluent in highly employable languages such as Arabic, Russian, and Chinese. According to the recently released Open Doors Report published by the Institute of International Education, just in the past three years, the number of students enrolling in exchange programs between U.S. and foreign schools is beginning to steadily increase.

Meanwhile, there is a steep learning curve for local businesses that step up and learn how to do business internationally. And Chattanooga is now once again on the forefront as leading higher education institutions—the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Chattanooga State Technical Community College, and Southern Adventist University join a model public-private collaborative for cultural exchange and economic development.

BRIDGING THE CULTURAL DIVIDE IN CHATTANOOGA’S NEW GLOBAL ECONOMY It seems the world is watching Chattanooga to see if it will adapt from its storied industrial past to a creative, new global economy of the future. Headlines have captured the entrepreneurial imagination from Volkswagen of America choosing the mid-sized Southern city for its U.S. operations to the “Gig City” technology that has garnered national acclaim. But the question remains: will Chattanooga’s college and university graduates be prepared to join the city’s emerging global workplace? And another question looms: will Chattanooga’s startup and tech business entrepreneurs be prepared to expand their concept of international economic development from the Volkswagen success story to new stories waiting to be told? continued on page 48 OC T / N OV

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“THE CHATTANOOGA WAY” REVISITED

when he served as chairman of the World Trade Society of Chattanooga to serving on the board for the British American Business Group to leading Some years ago Bill Stacey, former trade delegations to Taiwan and orgaChancellor of the University of nizing delegations for China. Tennessee, coined the term “The “It is important that we get knowlChattanooga Way” for the powerful edge of how to work internationally,” method of combining public input Olsen says. “And it is important that with public-private partnership people from other countries get knowlemerging from Chattanooga Venture edge of how to work in the United and Vision 2000. States.” Olsen and his staff have spent As an attorney specializing in Left to right, Legal Assistant, Bess Rystrom, Immigration the last ten years developing a playimmigration law and an adjunct Attorney, Terry Olsen and Associate Attorney, Eliza Epps. book for a model cultural exchange lecturer at several of Chattanooga’s program that could be replicated higher education institutions, Terry Olsen realizes the importance of across schools, engaging local businesses, and partnering with differpreparing Chattanooga’s college and university graduates for work in ent countries. the new global economy. “We have a Chamber of Commerce with an international program, Olsen also sees a crucial gap needing to be filled—cultural exchange we have Sister Cities, and so on, but most of these organizations work programs that will build public-private delegations of students, as silos,” Olsen says, “And that’s not how business works in the interprofessors, attorneys, bankers, startup entrepreneurs, and seasoned national business community. It has to be higher education working business leaders to visit other countries like Taiwan and the United with businesses and local government. It has to be more wholistic.” Kingdom and learn from one another about creating a truly global economy. “We’ve always seen Chattanooga as a ‘local’ place,” Olsen says. A NEW STORY BEGINS WITH TAIWAN “Now we need to see it as an ‘international’ place. Here in Chattanooga, we think of ‘international’ at the end instead of the beginning.” Earlier this year, the momentum picked up speed as Olsen faciliOlsen’s law firm has taken this issue on as a cause, from the early days tated the official formation of an educational collaborative with two

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universities in Taiwan. For a week in February, “We see this as an important part of our Ching-Ying Lin, Ph.D, an assistant professor at role as a metropolitan university and an interNational Pingtung Institute, traveled to national institution,” says Lucien Ellington, Chattanooga to visit officials at Chattanooga UTC UC Foundation Professor of Education State Technical Community College and and Director of Asia Program/Center for Southern Adventist University. Reflective Citizenship. Ellington oversees the Dr. Lin specializes in storytelling as a means Asia Program at UTC, which has been named of teaching English as a Second Language. “In a Taiwan Point of Contact under the Taipei my childhood, my mother read storybooks to Economic & Culture Office. “We are offering me every day. Learning to read from a storybook a teacher outreach program to better underis different because it has pictures so people stand Taiwan and its role in larger East Asia,” focus on content and details and this helps them Ellington says. “We have also developed an be able to retell the story and increase commu- CSTCC’s Dr. Jim Catanzaro presents institute for teachers on Taiwan and its history nication skills,” Dr. Lin says. “With iPhones and Dr. Ching-Ying Lin with an award at a with guest lectures. We are in the initial stages, iPads and media today, we have lost the art of recent lecture. but we are looking forward to preliminary storytelling.” Reclaiming the art of storytelling as she teaches college visits with university representatives and members of the two greater and university students new languages in Taiwan, Dr. Lin looks communities.” forward to applying this technique in her upcoming cultural exchange with Chattanooga State Technical Community College and Southern UPSCALING “THE CHATTANOOGA WAY” Adventist University. “At first I didn’t think college students would like it, but they loved As Chattanooga resets its public-private model to engage new it,” Dr. Lin says. “It helps them share culture and overcome difficul- growth opportunities on a global level, Olsen sees private enterprise ties. If we want globalization, our students must understand other leading the way. It’s a big vision for positioning Chattanooga to meet cultures and countries so their business is successful.” the demands of a global economy. It’s an international business stratSince National Pingtung Institute signed on earlier this year, that egy that no longer focuses just on recruiting companies to relocate success story has expanded to include another university partnership here, now it’s about Chattanooga finding its synergistic sweet spot. between National Chung Hsing University and the University of Visit tlolaw.com for more information. Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) starting this fall.

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From the SMP summer production of the King and I, the king was played by Seth Carico and Anna by Jennifer Arbogast.

MountainArts Story by Dick Morel Photography courtesy of MACC, Bachman CC and the Signal Mountain Playhouse

A MOUNTAINTOP COMMUNITY CREATES AN ARTISTIC ENVIRONMENT TO ENGAGE THE CHATTANOOGA AREA.

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The Signal Mountain Playhouse, Bachman Community Center, and Mountain Arts Community Center provide a broad palette of activities and culturally enriching experiences that brighten and enrich the lives of people from the very young to seniors. The Playhouse received rave reviews for last summer’s presentation of “The King and I.” Seth Carico returned home from his professional opera tour to perform in the role of the king — as part of a stellar cast. He first performed in the same play as a nine year old. That’s when he encountered Rob Inman, an outstanding talent and iconic figure at the Playhouse who has contributed in countless ways to the enterprise as an actor and creative advisor. “From my first encounters with the Playhouse I looked up to Rob and wanted to be like him,” says Carico. Inman loves being on stage, but has fond feelings for the mountain community. “The hope is that I have contributed to the genesis of lifelong interests in theater and the arts among the young people in the Playhouse community,” says Inman. From its beginnings Glenn Showalter has been a major force in the evolution and history of the Playhouse. “Glenn was there from the start and has continued to design and build sets, create program artwork (pen and ink drawings), act in shows, and serve as an inspiration for the other Playhouse workers. His contribution has been inestimable,” says Playhouse publicist Anne Rittenberry. The Signal Mountain Playhouse has evolved over its 42 years (1972 to 2014 and counting) from shows mainly produced by kids with the help of adults on a hillside at St. Augustine’s Catholic Church to a Broadway blockbuster-producing outdoor theater hosting crowds in the thousands in its upgraded amphitheater on the corner of James Boulevard and Rolling Way. The Playhouse winter shows, which started in 1983, are produced at the Mountain Arts Community Center. “These productions have a huge impact on the community of Signal Mountain and more than ever, the surrounding area,” she adds. Others echo that sentiment. Greg Glover, news anchor at WRCB-TV who has appeared in “Brigadoon” and “The Music Man,” believes the Playhouse provides a powerful sense of community that extends well beyond Signal Mountain. Eighteen-year-old Signal Mountain native Jordan Alexander, began as a player in “Beauty and the Beast” four years ago and has been in every play since. “What’s best about the SMP is that they are family oriented, in fact they choose musicals based on the amount of activity that children will have in each performance,” he says. Thanks to the Playhouse, many young people have become involved in theater and enjoy hands-on experience, building a life-long affection for the performing arts, and perhaps even pursuing careers along

those lines, just as Seth Carico has. Being involved in theater can mean much more than acting. “ Playhouse is more than its actors,” says Rittenberry. “It incorporates readers, set builders and painters, costume builders, prop gatherers, make-up artists, orchestra conductors and members, sound and lighting techs, ad sellers, publicity workers and more. If these many workers didn’t do their jobs, there would be no set, costumes, music, or props, for the actors to work with. The love that generated this organization back in 1972 is stronger than ever, and the Playhouse is expanding to thrill thousands more in the Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama area.” In this format, members of the community young and old, on the mountain and beyond, can enjoy popular theatre in an outdoor setting. As bright as it is, the Playhouse doesn’t shine alone. The Mountain Arts Community Center (MACC) and the Bachman Community Center are two other beacons located in historic buildings. The building that is now home to the Mountain Arts Community Center was constructed in 1926 using native rock harvested from the south face of the mountain during the construction of Signal Mountain Road. Originally, it served as a grammar school and meeting place for civic groups. The school was scheduled to be closed in 1999. The good news was that this led to the birth of MACC when a group of citizens began renting it as an arts center. In 2001 the building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and in 2009 it was gifted to the Town of Signal Mountain by the Hamilton County Department of Education. MACC’s mission is, “…to provide and facilitate artistic, cultural,

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ignal Mountain is home to three beacons of community and a family-friendly creative spirit that bring people who live on and off the mountain together to enjoy and participate in performing arts, crafts, culinary arts, and many other popular events.

The Mountain Arts Community Center has opened a new gallery and increased it’s offerings.

civic, and educational activities that foster personal growth and benefit the community.” The MACC has served that mission since 1999 by providing a variety of classes and activities for both children and adults and offering opportunities for art-related performances, exhibitions, and community activities. According to the center’s director, Barbara Storm, since 2009, the Town of Signal Mountain has made great strides to restore the building and increase the creative arts classes and other offerings. The MACC currently averages 300 registered students per session of classes. A sampling from its fall course announcement reveals the breadth continued on page 52

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of its treasures—art, pottery, dance, musical instruments, drama, puppetry, and more. There are lots of choices for kids. “Sprouts Cooking…” says Storm, “…offers young chefs basic cooking skills, the chance to learn about nutrition and explore exciting tastes in an engaging way.” The building that is home to the Bachman Community Center, like the MACC, opened its doors as an elementary school, and its classic 1930’s 300-seat auditorium is still fully operational. The thrift shop and community library have been perennial favorites. In September the completely renovated shop opened as, “Bachman Bargains.” Bachman’s community garden rents thirty

Cooking classes and presentations at Bachman include the “Saucy Sicilian”—Benedetto and Sarah Cate Scaduto.

plots and provides one more—free and just for kids. As the summer progresses children experience plant growth and food production close up. Families can enjoy harvesting and eating their own homegrown food. The Center’s director Dawn Sayles points out that an exciting new adventure will begin when “Saucy Sicilian” Chef Benedetto Scaduto and his wife Sarah begin presenting Italian style cooking classes in the kitchen/ cafeteria at Bachman. They will be teaching Italian favorites, such as homemade pizza and pasta, sauces, meat dishes and side dishes. These bright lights in the mountain arts community welcome audiences and participants from the greater Chattanooga area as they develop strong community attachments and promote a lasting support for the arts. Visit Signal Mountain Playhouse at smph. org, MACC: http://www.signalmacc.org/ and Bachman Community Center: 423-886-4842 (Their web site is being revised.) Dick Morel lives in Chattanooga and writes for science and biology journals and textbooks.

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Empowerment for the Next Step

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This campus-wide initiative is focused on exposing UTC’s female students to a variety of successful female professionals in the community who can provide real-world advice on succeeding and thriving in the professional world. “In the College of Business we have a vision to create an alliance with every student from day one to help them explore career options, connect with the business community, engage through experiential learning opportunities, and transition into careers that are successful and satisfying,” says Sue Culpepper, director of the Student Success Center in the UTC College of Business. “The Women’s Leadership Series provides a great networking opportunity for students to meet female professionals in the community who are successful.” Since coming to UTC in 2012, Culpepper has spearheaded a variety of initiatives in the College of Business to support professional and personal development for students, including a Global Women program geared toward the unique challenges and opportunities

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avigating the transition between the academic and business world can be a challenge—especially as the job market becomes increasingly competitive. To help women at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) prepare for career success, the UTC College of Business has partnered with the UTC Women’s Center and UT Alumni Association Women’s Council to launch the Women’s Leadership Series this fall.

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Story by Jennifer Hoff Photography courtesy of UTC College of Business and Dr. Shelley Prevost

UTC WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP SERIES SUPPORTS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND PERSONAL BRANDING. women face in the business world. The program featured several successful female leaders in the community, including June Scobee Rogers, author, speaker, and educator; Kim White, president and CEO of River City Company; and Stefanie Crowe, director of Wealth Services for CapitalMark Bank. The new Women’s Leadership Series is an outgrowth of the Global Women program and will feature several dynamic speakers throughout the 2014-15 academic year. The co-presenters of the Women’s Leadership Series, the UTC Women’s Center and UT Alumni Association Women’s Council, also offer programs focused on empowering and developing female leaders. The new partnership will create a more robust program for women continued on page 56

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Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium December 18, 2014

Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium January 27, 2015

GET THEM TICKETS TO THE SHOWS THEY WANT TO SEE! Your source for tickets to Chattanooga’s Tivoli, Memorial, and Community Theatre:

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on campus and expand the impact of their work. The UT Alumni Association Women’s Council offers the Aspire series, which seeks to equip collegiate women with the skills to take into post-collegiate professional and volunteer careers. Founded in 2008, the UTC Women’s Center provides advocacy and support for victims of sexual abuse, community education and awareness on gender equity and social justice issues, and leadership and empowerment programs to help women on campus reach their full potential. “Our motto in the Women’s Center is ‘creating community, empowering women’,” says Casandra Nice, assistant director of the UTC Women’s Center. “We are big on leadership programming and collaborating with other organizations and offices on campus to raise awareness for women’s issues and to empower our female students.” The Women’s Leadership Academy, sponsored by the Women’s Center each fall, provides training on the principles of feminist leadership and allows students to develop collaborative leadership skills. The Women’s Center also offers the Elect Her program, a training program funded by the American Association of University Women that educates UTC women about the need for more women in student government and guides them through the campaign process. Nice will crosspromote all of the Women’s Center programs at Women’s Leadership Series events to reach a broader segment of the campus and, ultimately, help ensure female students across campus are connected with the services and support of the Women’s Center. “One thing we find is that women struggle with confidence in their abilities more than our male students do,” says Nice. “So if any of these programs can give them that nudge that they need to take that next step and to see their potential, we have succeeded in my mind.” The first program to be offered in the series, “Individually You,” will focus on a discussion of personal branding, led by Dr. Shelley Prevost. The event is free and open to the public and will take place on October 29, 2014 at 3:30 PM in the UTC University Center, Chattanooga Room. Dr. Prevost is a co-founding partner and director of Happiness at Lamp Post Group, a venture capital incubator located in Chattanooga. She received her Doctor of Education in Counseling Psychology in 2010 but soon left her therapy practice in order to join the world of startups as a mentor and investor. As a psychologist-turned-investor, Dr. Prevost helps founders and their teams navi-

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gate through the emotional side of starting a company. In 2012, she saw an opportunity for capitalizing on an untapped market in the South—women entrepreneurs. Along with a group of six other women, Dr. Prevost co-founded the JumpFund, an angel fund investing in female-led startups with high growth potential. She speaks to audiences on the need for more women business leaders and the value of creating a culture of happiness where all stakeholders can thrive. She writes about her work on her blog—Glad Lab—and also shares her ideas on purpose, happiness, and leadership in columns for Inc. and The Huffington Post. Her work has also appeared in Time, Yahoo Business, Fast Company, LifeHacker, and Business Insider.

“These experiences help students make the translation between what they are learning in the classroom and how it is applies in the workplace.” —MONIQUE BERKE “If we have someone like Shelley Prevost coming to speak on campus, it makes sense to expose her to everybody because she appeals to everyone,” says Culpepper. “I feel like it is so important that we give support to women so they are able to navigate successfully in the world, as well as expose them to the encouragement of other women in Chattanooga.” Monique Berke, vice president of Investment Operations for Unum, served as one of the first speakers of the Global Women series two years ago and has worked closely with the College of Business on a variety of programs, including the Unum Scholars internship program. She has seen the value and impact of bridging the transition between the university and business world through networking and professional development opportunities. “Sue Culpeper in the UTC College of Business has done a spectacular job connecting with resources in the business arena in our community and finding ways to partner with other UTC departments and professors to compliment the academic experience,” says Berke. “These experiences help students make the translation between what they are learning in the classroom and how it is applies in the workplace.” Visit utc.edu/college-business to learn more about the Women’s Leadership Series. Also see American Association of University Women at aauw.org Jennifer Watts Hoff is a frequent contributor to Chattanooga Magazine.

UTC Women’s Leadership Series “Individually You: Personal Branding” Featuring Dr. Shelley Prevost, Co-Founder and Director of Happiness, Lamp Post Group October 29, 2014 at 3:30 PM UTC University Center Chattanooga Room The event is free and open to the public.

This is my school.

Visit to see if it’s your school too!

G I R L S P R E PA R AT O RY S C H O O L www.gps.edu • 423.634.7644 Dr. Shelley Prevost

Girls Preparatory School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in any of its policies, practices or procedures.

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ChattaJack River Race Set

New Fashion Label

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Chooses Chattanooga as Launch Market

hattaJack 31 is distinguished from similar standup paddleboard races by its length. The distance calls for athletes who have committed to training and to the pursuit of endurance. The course is one that requires preparation, but “a fun, rewarding experience,” say participants. ChattaJack is comprised of a community of people who come together “to commemorate a true love for this sport.” The race commences on October 25, 2014 at 8:00 a.m. with a water start from downtown Chattanooga (Surf Ski division—8:30 a.m.), ending at Hales Bar Marina. A mandatory pre-race meeting will take place at Coolidge Park the morning of the race at 7:30 a.m., on the lawn. Visit chattajack.com for more information. Ron Harr Photo

OTHER OUTDOOR CHATTANOOGA FALL EVENTS OCTOBER 19 25

7 Bridges Marathon Triple Crown Bouldering Competition—Stone Fort Chattajack 31 Signal Mountain Pie Run

NOVEMBER 1 15 22 27

Upchuck 50K Head of the Hooch Alzheimer’s Association 5K Run to Remember Pangorge: The TN River Gorge Adventure Race Sports Barn Turkey Trot

DECEMBER 14 20

Lookout Mountain 50 Miler Wauhatchie Trail Run

See outdoorchattanooga.com

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ienna & Bellini, a new fashion label based in Atlanta, Georgia has chosen Chattanooga as its launch market. The company will open the first store inside Hamilton Place Mall in October 2014. The company will provide high-end, European styles at affordable prices. “We believe that fashion should be attainable. We want to provide an affordable style option and help support and grow the fashion culture in any market where we open stores,” says Valentina Pou, co-owner and lead designer for Sienna & Bellini. On their selection of Chattanooga, Co-owner and designer Thali Gottesman adds, “We’ve spent a lot of time in Chattanooga and we love it. With the influx of entrepreneurs, young professionals, and design-oriented people, it feels like the timing is perfect to launch our brand here.” The new store located upstairs in Hamilton Place Mall, next to JC Penny, will have 3,100 square feet of floor space to display its designer line of one-size-fits-most apparel. Sienna & Bellini will open a second store in Rome, GA in the coming months. Visit siennabellini.com

CGLA Earns SACS CASI Accreditation

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xecutive Director Dr. Elaine Swafford announced recently that Chattanooga Girls Leadership Academy (CGLA) has been awarded initial Accreditation with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (SACS CASI), an accreditation division of AdvancED. As an accredited institution, CGLA is among 10 schools in the Hamilton County District that have earned accreditation. SACS CASI provides nationally-recognized accreditation, the purpose of which is continuous school improvement focused on increasing student performance. To earn accreditation, schools must meet SACS CASI’s high standards, be evaluated by a team of professionals from outside the school and implement a continuous process of school improvement. “Accreditation demonstrates to our students, parents and community that we are focused on raising student achievement, providing a safe and enriching learning environment, and maintaining an efficient operation staffed by highly qualified educators,” says Dr. Swafford. Visit cglaonline.com for more information.

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TEDxUTChattanooga

Top 100 Best Reviewed

Names Speakers

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he organizers of the first TEDxUTChattanooga are proud to announce the slate of speakers for this year’s event. TEDxUTChattanooga will be held Saturday, October 25, 2014, at the Dorothy Hackett Ward Theatre at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

Selected to speak at TEDxUTChattanooga 2014 are: Nathan Adams, Poet and Cultural Reformer, Evensville, Tennessee-Mastered to Master: Restoring the Power of Words Linda Frost, Hannah Turcotte and David Levine

Kevin Bate, Muralist and Curator, The McCallie Walls Project, Chattanooga, Tennessee-McCallie Walls Mural Project: The World’s First Drive Through Gallery

Victoria M. Bryan, Instructor, Cleveland State Community College, Chattanooga, Tennessee-Higher Education in Prison: What’s Next for Chattanooga’s Incarcerated Population James Chapman, Entrepreneur-in-Residence, Causeway, and Founder, ChangeN-Go, Chattanooga, Tennessee-Create a Culture of Selflessness Hill Craddock, Professor of Biological and Environmental Sciences, The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and Director, Chattanooga Chestnut Tree Project, Chattanooga, Tennessee-The Return of the Chestnut: A Tree Crop Archetype Marcus Ellsworth, President, Tennessee Valley Pride, Host, Wide Open Floor at Barking Legs Theater, Chattanooga, Tennessee-Art as Activism Jason Michaels, “The CardShark,” Nashville, Tennessee-You Can Do the Impossible, Too Lyn Miles, Professor of Anthropology, The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and Director, Project Chantek, Chattanooga, Tennessee-Chantek, the First Orangutan Person Lesley Scearce, President and CEO, On Point-Direction For Life, Chattanooga, Tennessee-A Failure of Imagination-Changing the Conversation about Chattanooga’s Youth Kim White, President and CEO, River City Company, Chattanooga, TennesseeNow What…in the Life of Our City

The campus and community will be involved in the independently organized and officially licensed public event based on TED: Technology, Entertainment, Design conferences. Please visit http://tedxutchattanooga.com/ for more information or follow on Twitter @TEDxUTChatt.

mbassy Suites Chattanooga, Hamilton Place has been named 152nd in the world and 63rd in the United States on the Expedia Insiders’ Select list for 2014, Ken DeFoor, Paul Mezick and Blake DeFoor with an annual ranking Expedia official. of the best reviewed hotels as determined by one of the world’s largest full-service online travel sites. Pulling from nearly two million annual verified guest reviews, the Insiders’ Select list recognizes the top 650 ranked hotels available worldwide on Expedia. The award, presented by Expedia to hotel owners, managers and guest services staff, is bestowed on the property in its first year of operation. Visit expedia.com/insidersselect for more information.

The Curve Scoliosis is the Official Chapter in Tennessee

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he Curve Scoliosis announced that they have been named as the official Tennessee chapter of the National Scoliosis Foundation. Scoliosis is a lateral curving of the spine, which affects one in every 40 people. The Curve Scoliosis currently operates two groups, one in Chattanooga under the leadership of Kaitlyn McAfee and Hillary Potts, and one in West Tennessee under the leadership of Breanca Gregory. All three girls were diagnosed with scoliosis and all three have had spinal fusion surgery. Both groups are open to anyone that has been diagnosed with scoliosis and their families. The groups meet monthly. In addition to support meetings, the group is involved in hands-on activities to help others dealing with a scoliosis diagnosis. The Curve Scoliosis is raising funds to donate scoliometers to local schools because currently Tennessee schools are not required to screen students. The Curve Scoliosis hosts Color the Curve® annually in Chattanooga, Tennessee. This is a 5K and one-mile color run to raise scoliosis awareness. For more information, please contact Jennifer McAfee, info@thecurvescoliosis.com OC T / N OV

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Hunter Museum’s Spectrum Gala Set

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he Hunter Museum of American Art will host Spectrum, the black-tie fundraising gala featuring dinner, silent and live auctions on Saturday, November 8. The gala, presented by the First Tennessee Foundation, is chaired by Matthew & Nicki Brock and John & Jane McSpadden, who are working with a diverse and creative committee to plan the gala and its related events. Spectrum events include a preview cocktail party October 30, and a Sunday brunch November 2. “With an eye to Spectrum’s deep heritage, the Gala Committee has a lot of great ideas this year that will take the event to a new level, give the evening a fresh face, and provide a renewed focus,” says Matthew Brock. “I believe everyone in attendance will have a phenomenal time. I hope to see even more members and friends of the Hunter there as we raise crucial funds for the great exhibits and programs that are planned for the year ahead.” The art for both the live and silent auctions will feature a variety of styles, prices and media. The committee for art selection, chaired by Brad Brewer & Christian Caceres, are visiting galleries cross the U.S. to select works for the auction. Preview Party – Thursday, October 30th: The Preview Party features a reception and an opportunity to view and bid on the auction items. The chief curator of the Hunter and the art selection committee will be available to discuss the art. Preview Party tickets are $30 per person.

Spectrum Brunch – Sunday, November 3: Now in its fourth year, the Spectrum brunch is hosted by Avant-Art, the Hunter’s contemporary group. It offers the opportunity to view and bid on items in the live and silent auctions. Tickets are $15 per person for Avant-Art members, $20 for non-members. Spectrum Live Auction and Gala – Saturday, November. 8, beginning at 6 p.m. The Spectrum Gala and Live Auction is a black tie event that includes dinner as well as a live and silent auction. Gala tickets are $200 per person, and also include a ticket to the Spectrum Preview Party. Sponsorships are also available.

For more information and prices visit huntermuseum.org.

Fall Fun, Maize 2014

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ock City’s Enchanted MAiZE design for 2014 is an all-new, outof-this-world symbol! The maze at Blowing Springs Farm is in the shape of a mysterious crop circle, open Thursdays through Sundays beginning September 25! Follow the attraction’s social media pages for an upcoming contest related to this sighting! www.facebook.com/EnchantedMAiZE, www.facebook.com/RockCityhaunt, www.instagram.com/seerockcity, www.twitter. com/seerockcity

Make a Wish Donation

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r. Gary Gesualdi of Affordable Botox of Chattanooga recently presented a $10,000 donation check to the Make-A-Wish® Foundation of East Tennessee. Stephanie Wilkins, Director of Development for Make-A-Wish® of East Tennessee, accepted the check on behalf of the organization. Affordable Botox was the title sponsor for the annual Superhero Race, a fundraising event for Make-A-Wish® of East Tennessee. This year’s race took place on August 23rd in partnership with the Chattanooga Track Club and was held at Enterprise South Nature Park. According to Wilkins, the donation was used towards organizing the event and will also go towards granting wishes for children diagnosed with life-threatening medical conditions. For more information about Make-A-Wish® Foundation of East Tennessee visit etn.wish.org. 6 0

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Among the group are Make A Wish® East Tennessee Superhero Race committee members (from left: Chris Berryman, Casey Knox, Dr. Gary Gesualdi, Stephanie Wilkins and Stacey Malecky.

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Boost Your Company’s ROI ‌

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Fastest WiFi Available Free in Miller Plaza

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Celebrating 25 years of serving Hamilton County students – join us for Public Education Night at the Lookouts on Saturday, May 3 at 7:15 pm.

PEFCHATTANOOGA.ORG facebook.com/pefchattanooga or 668-2430 for info and tickets

iller Plaza is streaming ahead with the fastest WiFi Internet available, courtesy of EPB Fiber Optics. This new WiFi service is free for those enjoying the plaza, and provides enough bandwidth so that people gathered for events have the connectivity they want. Located at 850 Market Street, Miller Plaza and the Waterhouse Pavilion (open from 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.) are privately owned by River City Company, but operated as public spaces for the enjoyment of Chattanooga’s residents and visitors.

World of Beer Taps Chattanooga

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It’s time to FALL INTO HEALTH! It’s time to fall into a healthy lifestyle at the Y. For 143 years the Y has been helping improve the health of our community.

The Y brings families closer together, encourages good health and fosters connections through fitness, sports, fun and shared interests.

The Y continues to expand its reach by impacting lives through programs that target chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes, Parkinson’s, and obesity. The Y encourages good health habits and offers a variety of programs that promote healthy decisions for the entire family.

As a result, millions of youth, adults and families are receiving the support, guidance and resources needed to make healthier decisions for their spirit, mind and body.

Our dynamic variety of FREE classes makes the Y a great place to get & stay fit, while enjoying a family friendly atmosphere. We have classes and programs for every level of health seeker. YMCA OF METROPOLITAN CHATTANOOGA ymcachattanooga.org

Support your local Y. Stop in today and see why we are more than a gym… we’re a cause.

Join Be f Octobe ore r 31st & Pay N JOININ O g Fee!

SAVE U P $125! TO

Stop in at our FREE HEALTH FAIR at all of our branches!

Saturday, October 18th • 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. FREE health screenings & wellness assessments, facility tours & program demonstrations.

eaturing the best local craft beers and widest selection of brews from around the globe, World of Beer Franchising, Inc. (WOB) and owners Wayne Farmer and Frank Hudson celebrated the opening of the franchise’s 60th tavern in August at 412 Market St., Chattanooga. This is the third tavern for Farmer and Hudson and the first in Tennessee. WOB partners with many local breweries, including McHale’s Brewhouse, Big River Brewing Works, Chattanooga Brewing Co., and in Nashville, Blackstone Brewery, Cool Springs Brewery, and Tennessee Brew Works. The 6,400-square-foot tavern boasts the world’s most extensive collection of craft beers bottled and on tap—over 500 bottles and 60 rotating taps—inviting guests into a journey to discover the best in local and international beers. Visit worldofbeer.com for more information.

Chattanooga Market Sets Oktoberfest 5k Run

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here will be a 5K Race & 1 Mile Fun Run/ Walk on Saturday, October 18, 2014. Registration at First Tennessee Pavilion begins at 6:30 a.m. The 5K race begins at 8:00 a.m. at 1826 Reggie White Blvd. Chattanooga, TN. There will be age group awards for both men and women. At 8:05 a.m. a 1-mile Fun Run/Walk commences. See chattanoogaoktoberfest.com/5k for more information

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THE APPOINTMENT OF CHEF JOHN DURHAM DEMONSTRATES AN ATTENTION TO CULINARY DETAILS AT DOUBLETREE.

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he sudden profusion of full service restaurants in Chattanooga’s downtown has caused hotel dining to undergo a promising evolution. With hotels almost 100 percent filled this fall to accommodate visitors here for events like Ironman, Three Sisters Bluegrass Festival, Wine Over Water, AQS QuiltWeek and Head of the Hooch rowing regatta (just to name a few), thousands of people will be looking for a meal at the same time. Hotel restaurants, including the one in Vision Hospitality’s DoubleTree by Hilton, have noted the challenge and are seizing the opportunity. DoubleTree’s Eleven restaurant, occupying the mezzanine of the Chestnut Street hotel, has named Executive Chef John Durham to revamp its entire menu with a fresh selection of small plates, salads and flatbread delights. Chef Durham trained at the Art Institute of Houston culinary school and has lived in a number of U.S. cities. “Chattanooga reminds me of Portland,” he says. “I love this area.” He most recently moved from Florida, with his wife of 27 years, Denise. Durham is excited to work with General Manager Bill Mish to present the new restaurant format. “John has an incredible food and beverage background, and his passion for the job draws you in immediately,” says Mish. “Having him lead our culinary efforts at the Doubletree Hotel is an honor for all of us, and we are so very pleased to have him on our team.” His specialty is northern Italian cuisine and he is busy planning a new Chef’s Table series to be held in the Hospitality Suite for 10-15 people. The seven-course meal including, anti pasta and an aperitif, will explore Tuscan country dishes, Appalachian seasonal recipes and even American southwest specialties. Fresh local foods play a big role in the new menu. “Eighty percent of our business happens at breakfast and lunch,” says Durham. Within the new format in-room dining makes up most of the rest. “Eleven is open for breakfast, lunch buffet and dinner from six to 10:00 p.m.,” says Chef Durham. “The food is wonderful and the prices are great.” The full service bar, H20, is also available to guests. As the season progresses, Chattanooga’s hotel industry will continue to grow, although finding a room on the weekends may be still be challenging. But, Chef Durham says, duck into the DoubleTree for his tasty small plates and you’ll feel better about the whole thing. —Sarah Kramer

Vision Hospitality Group owns and operates 31 branded hotels, employing about 1,000 people. Visit vhghotels.com for more information.

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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2014

Showcasing The Renaissance City Of The South ®

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2014 VOL. 24, NO. 5 www.chattmag.com

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Warehouse Row’s Newest PopUp Shop

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20 Years of Saving Historic Places Get the Online Walking Tour

Henry Luken’s Golf Gamble

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