__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

DOES A KID-ATHLETE IN ANOTHER CULTURE PLAY YOUR FAVORITE SPORT?


KID-ATHLETES OF THE WORLD

Meet six kid-athletes who rock at their sport while living (and playing) with character.

PHINETTE, 13

JETT, 13

AMANDA, 14

AKIRA, 12

RINO, 14

PATIENCE, 14

Phinette and the Brooklyn Comets are leading the future of women’s basketball in America. She plays with never-quit spirit and the dream to become a scholar-athlete in college.

Living just one block from the Australian coast, Jett is always out exploring. He scuba dives, spearfishes, and even rides dirt bikes in the bush.

In the soccer-crazed country of Brazil, Amanda plays on one of the elite girls teams in her city. She’s quiet, calculated, and has a mean left foot!

The captain of his Tokyo baseball team, Akira plays yearround as the pitcher and center fielder. He’s also the tallest on his team by almost one foot.

Rino lives just outside of Laxx, Switzerland, the best mountains in the world for trick skiing. You can find him skateboarding, windsurfing, and, of course, snowboarding.

Patience lives in Iten, Kenya, the best place in the world for professional marathon runners to train. She’s fast, has grit, and knows what it takes to finish a challenging race.

Brooklyn, New York, USA

2 > > >

Sydney, Australia

Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Tokyo, Japan

Laax, Switzerland

Iten, Kenya

3 > > >


KID-ATHLETES OF THE WORLD

Meet six kid-athletes who rock at their sport while living (and playing) with character.

PHINETTE, 13

JETT, 13

AMANDA, 14

AKIRA, 12

RINO, 14

PATIENCE, 14

Phinette and the Brooklyn Comets are leading the future of women’s basketball in America. She plays with never-quit spirit and the dream to become a scholar-athlete in college.

Living just one block from the Australian coast, Jett is always out exploring. He scuba dives, spearfishes, and even rides dirt bikes in the bush.

In the soccer-crazed country of Brazil, Amanda plays on one of the elite girls teams in her city. She’s quiet, calculated, and has a mean left foot!

The captain of his Tokyo baseball team, Akira plays yearround as the pitcher and center fielder. He’s also the tallest on his team by almost one foot.

Rino lives just outside of Laxx, Switzerland, the best mountains in the world for trick skiing. You can find him skateboarding, windsurfing, and, of course, snowboarding.

Patience lives in Iten, Kenya, the best place in the world for professional marathon runners to train. She’s fast, has grit, and knows what it takes to finish a challenging race.

Brooklyn, New York, USA

2 > > >

Sydney, Australia

Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Tokyo, Japan

Laax, Switzerland

Iten, Kenya

3 > > >


where the Comets become a team. And this is where the coach, Coach Phree, who is actually Phinette’s father, challenges the team to get better, work together, and have fun. Because for the Comets, basketball is about teamwork.

If you stroll the bustling New York City neighborhoods, you’ll find a park every few blocks. Some parks have jungle gyms, some have open grass and swings, but nearly every park has one thing—a basketball court. This is where kids in New York City develop a strong love for basketball, and it’s where Phinette, our first kid-athlete, first picked up a ball and started dribbling. Phinette is 13 years old and plays for the Brooklyn Comets, a competitive all-girls team. She plays Point Guard, which means she dribbles the ball down the court each play. When the other team tries to take the ball, she has to dribble around them, pass to her teammates, or make the shot. SWISH! Phinette and the Comets practice twice a week at an old elementary school. The gym has giant glass windows and shines yellowy light onto the dark wooden floors. This is

CHARACTER PLAY

Every year the NBA team the Brooklyn Nets hosts a basketball camp called “DRIBBL.” Guess what it’s focused on? Yep, teamwork. www.dribbl.com

4 > > >

DID YOU KNOW?

The Comets also practice at Brooklyn Bridge Park, right under the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. From the park you can see the East River, the Manhattan skyline, and the Statue of Liberty.

B R O O K LY N NE W YOR K,

USA

TEAMWORK IS ALL ABOUT USING OTHER PEOPLE’S STRENGTHS TO WIN TOGETHER. All of the Comet players show teamwork, but Phinette might be the best at it. Because she’s the Point Guard, she has to know what makes each player special. For example, her friend Nat is very tall, very good, and likes the ball passed on her right side. So, Phinette would need to dribble, dribble, then pass to Nat’s right. Nat would then catch the ball and make an easy shot over the other team’s head. SWISH! The Comets travel all over the northeastern United States, playing the best girls teams out there. Because each Comet player hopes to play basketball for a long time—in high school, in college, and some even have dreams to play in the WNBA! Phinette and the Comets have big dreams, but they also know that when the games get hard, when traveling is tiresome, they are a team. In fact, they are a family. Coach Phree has a saying every time the girls huddle up and put their hands in—“If you ‘aint touching, you ain’t family.” The girls crowd a little closer and shout, “Go team!” PHINETTE WINS WITH TEAMWORK.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

Phinette’s nickname is “Buckets.” In basketball, a “bucket” means you scored.

WORLD WORDS

Phinette’s favorite slang word is “yeet.” It’s short for “yeah, right.” As in, “I shot the basketball from across the street and made it!” “Yeet” (yeah, right).

CHARACTER QUESTIONS 1. What teams are you a part of? 2. As a class, how do you work together as a team?

5 > > >


where the Comets become a team. And this is where the coach, Coach Phree, who is actually Phinette’s father, challenges the team to get better, work together, and have fun. Because for the Comets, basketball is about teamwork.

If you stroll the bustling New York City neighborhoods, you’ll find a park every few blocks. Some parks have jungle gyms, some have open grass and swings, but nearly every park has one thing—a basketball court. This is where kids in New York City develop a strong love for basketball, and it’s where Phinette, our first kid-athlete, first picked up a ball and started dribbling. Phinette is 13 years old and plays for the Brooklyn Comets, a competitive all-girls team. She plays Point Guard, which means she dribbles the ball down the court each play. When the other team tries to take the ball, she has to dribble around them, pass to her teammates, or make the shot. SWISH! Phinette and the Comets practice twice a week at an old elementary school. The gym has giant glass windows and shines yellowy light onto the dark wooden floors. This is

CHARACTER PLAY

Every year the NBA team the Brooklyn Nets hosts a basketball camp called “DRIBBL.” Guess what it’s focused on? Yep, teamwork. www.dribbl.com

4 > > >

DID YOU KNOW?

The Comets also practice at Brooklyn Bridge Park, right under the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. From the park you can see the East River, the Manhattan skyline, and the Statue of Liberty.

B R O O K LY N NE W YOR K,

USA

TEAMWORK IS ALL ABOUT USING OTHER PEOPLE’S STRENGTHS TO WIN TOGETHER. All of the Comet players show teamwork, but Phinette might be the best at it. Because she’s the Point Guard, she has to know what makes each player special. For example, her friend Nat is very tall, very good, and likes the ball passed on her right side. So, Phinette would need to dribble, dribble, then pass to Nat’s right. Nat would then catch the ball and make an easy shot over the other team’s head. SWISH! The Comets travel all over the northeastern United States, playing the best girls teams out there. Because each Comet player hopes to play basketball for a long time—in high school, in college, and some even have dreams to play in the WNBA! Phinette and the Comets have big dreams, but they also know that when the games get hard, when traveling is tiresome, they are a team. In fact, they are a family. Coach Phree has a saying every time the girls huddle up and put their hands in—“If you ‘aint touching, you ain’t family.” The girls crowd a little closer and shout, “Go team!” PHINETTE WINS WITH TEAMWORK.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

Phinette’s nickname is “Buckets.” In basketball, a “bucket” means you scored.

WORLD WORDS

Phinette’s favorite slang word is “yeet.” It’s short for “yeah, right.” As in, “I shot the basketball from across the street and made it!” “Yeet” (yeah, right).

CHARACTER QUESTIONS 1. What teams are you a part of? 2. As a class, how do you work together as a team?

5 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN - SELF MANAGEMENT TRAITS AND SKILLS

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN LIFE SKILLS AND ATTITUDES

Even when Phinette’s team gets tired from traveling or is discouraged because they’re losing a game, they know it’s important to control their emotions and focus on putting the team first.

Coach Phree, Phinette’s coach, reminds the players before each game that they are a family. This family attitude helps remind the girls that they support one another, always working together for the benefit of the group.

Students demonstrate self-management skills to channel and control their emotions in a manner that helps them achieve school and life success.

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN SOCIAL & RELATIONSHIP TRAITS & SKILLS

Students demonstrate emotional intelligence and employ interpersonal and social skills to guide appropriate behavior and maintain positive relationships with classmates, peers and adults and meaningful connections to their teachers and school. In order to be an effective point guard, Phinette has to build a strong relationship with each player on her team. She knows each player’s strengths and uses their skills to make the team work together.

6 > > >

Students develop and demonstrate social and emotional attitudes and skills to achieve personal happiness and school and life success.

CHARACTER DOMAIN TRUSTWORTHINESS

Students recognize both the moral and practical significance of trustworthiness as an essential ingredient in meaningful and lasting relationships and career success. They strive to earn and maintain the trust of others by consistently demonstrating the ethical virtues of integrity, honesty, promise-keeping and loyalty. Phinette’s team trusts her to control the offensive strategy. She’s the one that initially handles the ball and makes decisions that are best for the team, like whether to pass, shoot, dribble, or call a play. The team knows it’s important to trust each player and focus on their role. This trust makes the entire team better.

7 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN - SELF MANAGEMENT TRAITS AND SKILLS

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN LIFE SKILLS AND ATTITUDES

Even when Phinette’s team gets tired from traveling or is discouraged because they’re losing a game, they know it’s important to control their emotions and focus on putting the team first.

Coach Phree, Phinette’s coach, reminds the players before each game that they are a family. This family attitude helps remind the girls that they support one another, always working together for the benefit of the group.

Students demonstrate self-management skills to channel and control their emotions in a manner that helps them achieve school and life success.

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN SOCIAL & RELATIONSHIP TRAITS & SKILLS

Students demonstrate emotional intelligence and employ interpersonal and social skills to guide appropriate behavior and maintain positive relationships with classmates, peers and adults and meaningful connections to their teachers and school. In order to be an effective point guard, Phinette has to build a strong relationship with each player on her team. She knows each player’s strengths and uses their skills to make the team work together.

6 > > >

Students develop and demonstrate social and emotional attitudes and skills to achieve personal happiness and school and life success.

CHARACTER DOMAIN TRUSTWORTHINESS

Students recognize both the moral and practical significance of trustworthiness as an essential ingredient in meaningful and lasting relationships and career success. They strive to earn and maintain the trust of others by consistently demonstrating the ethical virtues of integrity, honesty, promise-keeping and loyalty. Phinette’s team trusts her to control the offensive strategy. She’s the one that initially handles the ball and makes decisions that are best for the team, like whether to pass, shoot, dribble, or call a play. The team knows it’s important to trust each player and focus on their role. This trust makes the entire team better.

7 > > >


There’s no place like Australia. Australia is the only country in the world that is also its own continent. But that is just the beginning of how different it is from everywhere else. It is home to the most poisonous snakes in the world and a strange animal only found in Australia—the kangaroo. As a giant island, Australia is surrounded by oceans filled with colorful fish, whales, and sharks. And if you travel to the beach just south of Sydney, Australia, you might meet our second kid-athlete, Jett, putting on his wetsuit to scuba dive. At age 13, Jett is a young scuba diver. Scuba diving is being able to stay underwater a long time by breathing air through a tank, instead of holding your breath. Because it can be dangerous, kids can’t scuba dive until they are 11 or 12 years old. That’s why Jett goes scuba diving with his uncle Scott, a master diver, and his best friend Hugo—it’s safer and a lot more fun. Under the clear blue water, Jett and Hugo use their flippers to search for and film weird looking fish with underwater cameras. They’ve seen some crazy creatures. First, a nurse shark—a shark that has big teeth sticking out of its mouth! They look scary,

but they won’t bother you. They’ve also seen, a purple flounder that let’s Jett and Hugo pet it like a dog!

A U S T R A L I A

Each time the boys encounter a new fish they race back home to learn more about it, because JETT IS CURIOUS. He loves to learn about new, exciting things by digging through books and watching documentaries. That’s why scuba diving is perfect for him. The ocean is a vast world to be discovered. In fact, Australia is perfect for him too. At every turn, Australia is busting with adventure. It has wild bush land, miles and miles of forests that stretch across the country. And Jett and Hugo love exploring it on dirt bikes near Jett’s grandmother’s house. They fly down dirt trails in their dirt bike gear, looking for areas to explore. The boys turn over rocks and find kangaroo tracks in the orange dirt.

CHARACTER QUESTIONS 1. Name an animal, person, or place you’ve always wondered about? 2. How can you discover more about that thing?

For Jett, being curious means being outside. To ask questions about things, he needs to find them first. And he can’t find new things inside his house. So, Jett and Hugo are always outside, either playing sports, planning their next dive, or jumping off of “slipperies,” giant rocks that slide into the ocean. So, say to your TV, “I gotta jet,” and go be like Jett in Australia—get outside, ask questions, and explore the answers. It’s a big world. JETT LIVES WITH CURIOSITY.

CHARACTER PLAY SYDNE Y AU STRALIA

8 > > >

A lot of curiosity is trying something new. Try a new sport, food, or book to get started.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Pixar film “Finding Nemo” was based in Sydney, Australia. Remember this? “P. Sherman 42 Wallaby Way, Sydney.”

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

Curiosity is cool. Jett and Hugo built a potato launcher that rockets a potato, well, a LONG way. Jett’s parents provided the potatoes.

WORLD WORDS

A “walkabout” is an Australian Aboriginal concept that means to go on a journey through the bush to learn and think.

9 > > >


There’s no place like Australia. Australia is the only country in the world that is also its own continent. But that is just the beginning of how different it is from everywhere else. It is home to the most poisonous snakes in the world and a strange animal only found in Australia—the kangaroo. As a giant island, Australia is surrounded by oceans filled with colorful fish, whales, and sharks. And if you travel to the beach just south of Sydney, Australia, you might meet our second kid-athlete, Jett, putting on his wetsuit to scuba dive. At age 13, Jett is a young scuba diver. Scuba diving is being able to stay underwater a long time by breathing air through a tank, instead of holding your breath. Because it can be dangerous, kids can’t scuba dive until they are 11 or 12 years old. That’s why Jett goes scuba diving with his uncle Scott, a master diver, and his best friend Hugo—it’s safer and a lot more fun. Under the clear blue water, Jett and Hugo use their flippers to search for and film weird looking fish with underwater cameras. They’ve seen some crazy creatures. First, a nurse shark—a shark that has big teeth sticking out of its mouth! They look scary,

but they won’t bother you. They’ve also seen, a purple flounder that let’s Jett and Hugo pet it like a dog!

A U S T R A L I A

Each time the boys encounter a new fish they race back home to learn more about it, because JETT IS CURIOUS. He loves to learn about new, exciting things by digging through books and watching documentaries. That’s why scuba diving is perfect for him. The ocean is a vast world to be discovered. In fact, Australia is perfect for him too. At every turn, Australia is busting with adventure. It has wild bush land, miles and miles of forests that stretch across the country. And Jett and Hugo love exploring it on dirt bikes near Jett’s grandmother’s house. They fly down dirt trails in their dirt bike gear, looking for areas to explore. The boys turn over rocks and find kangaroo tracks in the orange dirt.

CHARACTER QUESTIONS 1. Name an animal, person, or place you’ve always wondered about? 2. How can you discover more about that thing?

For Jett, being curious means being outside. To ask questions about things, he needs to find them first. And he can’t find new things inside his house. So, Jett and Hugo are always outside, either playing sports, planning their next dive, or jumping off of “slipperies,” giant rocks that slide into the ocean. So, say to your TV, “I gotta jet,” and go be like Jett in Australia—get outside, ask questions, and explore the answers. It’s a big world. JETT LIVES WITH CURIOSITY.

CHARACTER PLAY SYDNE Y AU STRALIA

8 > > >

A lot of curiosity is trying something new. Try a new sport, food, or book to get started.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Pixar film “Finding Nemo” was based in Sydney, Australia. Remember this? “P. Sherman 42 Wallaby Way, Sydney.”

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

Curiosity is cool. Jett and Hugo built a potato launcher that rockets a potato, well, a LONG way. Jett’s parents provided the potatoes.

WORLD WORDS

A “walkabout” is an Australian Aboriginal concept that means to go on a journey through the bush to learn and think.

9 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! ACADEMIC DOMAIN - MOTIVATION TO LEARN AND GRADUATE

Students value education and enjoy learning and are motivated to do well in school and graduate by the belief that developing learning and intellectual skills and earning their high school diploma will improve their lives and increase their success in college, career and life. Jett and Hugo are motivated to learn as much as they can about the ocean and marine life. Living with this type of curiosity will not only make them better at scuba diving but the hunger for selfeducation translates into lifelong learning.

ACADEMIC DOMAIN - GROWTH MINDSET

Students approach their education with a growth mindset, believing that with effort and persistence they can get better at anything, including subjects they find difficult or uninteresting.

CHARACTER DOMAIN RESPONSIBILITY

Students display responsibility by: doing what they are required to do and what they should do; accepting responsibility for the consequences (i.e., being accountable) for what they say, do and think; and using critical thinking and decision-making skills to avoid rationalizations and excuses and make rational, prudent choices. Students display responsibility by: doing what they are required to do and what they should do; accepting responsibility for the consequences (i.e., being accountable) for what they say, do and think; and using critical thinking and decision-making skills to avoid rationalizations and excuses and make rational, prudent choices. Scuba diving and riding dirt bikes can be dangerous, so it’s important that Jett makes responsible decisions—like always diving and riding with a buddy, and learning safety from a master diver. It’s the responsible thing to do.

There’s still so much about scuba diving and the ocean that Jett doesn’t know yet. But he still believes that it’s important to learn new things every day.

10 > > >

11 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! ACADEMIC DOMAIN - MOTIVATION TO LEARN AND GRADUATE

Students value education and enjoy learning and are motivated to do well in school and graduate by the belief that developing learning and intellectual skills and earning their high school diploma will improve their lives and increase their success in college, career and life. Jett and Hugo are motivated to learn as much as they can about the ocean and marine life. Living with this type of curiosity will not only make them better at scuba diving but the hunger for selfeducation translates into lifelong learning.

ACADEMIC DOMAIN - GROWTH MINDSET

Students approach their education with a growth mindset, believing that with effort and persistence they can get better at anything, including subjects they find difficult or uninteresting.

CHARACTER DOMAIN RESPONSIBILITY

Students display responsibility by: doing what they are required to do and what they should do; accepting responsibility for the consequences (i.e., being accountable) for what they say, do and think; and using critical thinking and decision-making skills to avoid rationalizations and excuses and make rational, prudent choices. Students display responsibility by: doing what they are required to do and what they should do; accepting responsibility for the consequences (i.e., being accountable) for what they say, do and think; and using critical thinking and decision-making skills to avoid rationalizations and excuses and make rational, prudent choices. Scuba diving and riding dirt bikes can be dangerous, so it’s important that Jett makes responsible decisions—like always diving and riding with a buddy, and learning safety from a master diver. It’s the responsible thing to do.

There’s still so much about scuba diving and the ocean that Jett doesn’t know yet. But he still believes that it’s important to learn new things every day.

10 > > >

11 > > >


Even though Brazil is green with trees, when the Brazilian soccer team plays, all people can see is yellow—the bright yellow of the fans’ jerseys. In Brazil, the people are crazy about soccer. Homes fill with friends crowding around the game on the TV. Streets stream with people. Restaurants overflow with fans. It’s crazy (in a fun way). And this is where our third kid-athlete, Amanda, grew up learning to play soccer.

In Brazil, even if kids don’t have a soccer ball, they make one. They’ll roll up socks or paper, or even use cans. They’ll use shoes as goal posts and will challenge each other one-on-one all the time to see who’s the best. Most kids want to play whenever they can. For Amanda, she’s fortunate to have a soccer goal next to her home. With an older brother and a younger sister who both love soccer too, the three siblings take turns hour after hour, learning new moves and trying them out on each other. Her little sister plays goalkeeper, diving sideways, stretching out to block shots. Her brother is the best player and challenges Amanda to competitions. Passing, shooting, dribbling, defending—they practice it all. At dinnertime, their parents either join them or call them in to eat and send them out again after schoolwork is finished.

She’s hoping to yell that same cheer when her favorite team, the Gallos (the Roosters), play against their big rivals, Crucero (the Crosses), the other team in her city. Her family will gather at her grandparents’ house, the entire group wearing their striped black and white jerseys. They’ll eat, drink coffee and soda, and stay on their toes hoping to scream at the top of their lungs . . . “GOL-AZ-OOOOOOOOOOOOOO!” AMANDA SCORES WITH PRACTICE.

SO, WHAT HAPPENS WHEN AMANDA PRACTICES SOCCER OVER AND OVER AGAIN? SIMPLE: SHE GETS BETTER AND BETTER AND BETTER. Now, Amanda plays forward for her school on one of the elite girls’ soccer teams in her city. She’s a top scorer because of how much she’s practiced. And what does it sound like when you score a goal in Brazil?

CHARACTER QUESTIONS

The fans cheer, “GOL-AZ-OOOOOOOOOOOO!”

1. What’s your favorite thing to practice? 2. What activity do you want to improve in the most, and what can you do to get better?

CHARACTER PLAY

It takes 10,000 hours to become an “expert” at something but just one practice session to get better.

B ELO HORIZO N TE BRA ZIL

12 > > >

DID YOU KNOW?

Brazil has the most men’s World Cup wins with 5. Germany and Italy are tied for second with 4 each.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

In addition to soccer, Amanda also plays basketball and volleyball for her school.

WORLD WORDS

From the trees around Amanda’s school, small monkeys (macaquinhos) will peer into classrooms. For short, students will call them mee-koos, as in, “A mee-koo stole my homework.”

13 > > >


Even though Brazil is green with trees, when the Brazilian soccer team plays, all people can see is yellow—the bright yellow of the fans’ jerseys. In Brazil, the people are crazy about soccer. Homes fill with friends crowding around the game on the TV. Streets stream with people. Restaurants overflow with fans. It’s crazy (in a fun way). And this is where our third kid-athlete, Amanda, grew up learning to play soccer.

In Brazil, even if kids don’t have a soccer ball, they make one. They’ll roll up socks or paper, or even use cans. They’ll use shoes as goal posts and will challenge each other one-on-one all the time to see who’s the best. Most kids want to play whenever they can. For Amanda, she’s fortunate to have a soccer goal next to her home. With an older brother and a younger sister who both love soccer too, the three siblings take turns hour after hour, learning new moves and trying them out on each other. Her little sister plays goalkeeper, diving sideways, stretching out to block shots. Her brother is the best player and challenges Amanda to competitions. Passing, shooting, dribbling, defending—they practice it all. At dinnertime, their parents either join them or call them in to eat and send them out again after schoolwork is finished.

She’s hoping to yell that same cheer when her favorite team, the Gallos (the Roosters), play against their big rivals, Crucero (the Crosses), the other team in her city. Her family will gather at her grandparents’ house, the entire group wearing their striped black and white jerseys. They’ll eat, drink coffee and soda, and stay on their toes hoping to scream at the top of their lungs . . . “GOL-AZ-OOOOOOOOOOOOOO!” AMANDA SCORES WITH PRACTICE.

SO, WHAT HAPPENS WHEN AMANDA PRACTICES SOCCER OVER AND OVER AGAIN? SIMPLE: SHE GETS BETTER AND BETTER AND BETTER. Now, Amanda plays forward for her school on one of the elite girls’ soccer teams in her city. She’s a top scorer because of how much she’s practiced. And what does it sound like when you score a goal in Brazil?

CHARACTER QUESTIONS

The fans cheer, “GOL-AZ-OOOOOOOOOOOO!”

1. What’s your favorite thing to practice? 2. What activity do you want to improve in the most, and what can you do to get better?

CHARACTER PLAY

It takes 10,000 hours to become an “expert” at something but just one practice session to get better.

B ELO HORIZO N TE BRA ZIL

12 > > >

DID YOU KNOW?

Brazil has the most men’s World Cup wins with 5. Germany and Italy are tied for second with 4 each.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

In addition to soccer, Amanda also plays basketball and volleyball for her school.

WORLD WORDS

From the trees around Amanda’s school, small monkeys (macaquinhos) will peer into classrooms. For short, students will call them mee-koos, as in, “A mee-koo stole my homework.”

13 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS!

ACADEMIC DOMAIN - ENGAGEMENT IN LEARNING

Students accept and demonstrate personal responsibility for their education and are fully engaged in all aspects of the learning process. Amanda wants to become a great soccer player but her team doesn’t practice every night. So instead of waiting until the next practice to improve, she practices every night with her brother and sister. Amanda has learned that she needs to take personal responsibility for achieving her goals.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - FAIRNESS Students strive to be fair and just in all their actions by 1. taking turns; 2. playing by the rules; 3. giving due credit to others; 4. asking for and taking only their fair share (i.e., what is due them) They never: 1. cheat;

ACADEMIC DOMAIN CREATIVITY SKILLS

Students demonstrate creativity and ingenuity by being original (creating something that is new or novel), flexible (willingness and ability to shift perspective), open-minded (ability to “think outside the box” and embrace new experiences and fresh and unique ideas) and practical (ability to put creative ideas into action). In Brazil, not everyone lives near a soccer field. So, some kids make goal posts out of shoes. These kids are using creativity to find a way to play soccer.

2. claim credit for the work of others; 3. recklessly or falsely blame or accuse others; or 4. take advantage of another’s mistakes or ignorance (even when they think they can get away with it or that the other person deserves it). Each night Amanda and her brother and sister take turns practicing different soccer skills. It would be easy to leave the youngest sister out but instead they choose to split up time with the ball fairly.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - RESPECT

Students treat every individual with respect and judge others on their character and ability without regard to race, religion, sexual orientation, political ideology, gender, age, or other physical or personal characteristics based on the belief that all individuals are worthy and that their well-being and dignity is important simply because they are fellow human beings. Sometimes boys and girls are treated differently in sports, but Amanda’s brother treats her with respect and practices with her every night. 14 > > >

15 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS!

ACADEMIC DOMAIN - ENGAGEMENT IN LEARNING

Students accept and demonstrate personal responsibility for their education and are fully engaged in all aspects of the learning process. Amanda wants to become a great soccer player but her team doesn’t practice every night. So instead of waiting until the next practice to improve, she practices every night with her brother and sister. Amanda has learned that she needs to take personal responsibility for achieving her goals.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - FAIRNESS Students strive to be fair and just in all their actions by 1. taking turns; 2. playing by the rules; 3. giving due credit to others; 4. asking for and taking only their fair share (i.e., what is due them) They never: 1. cheat;

ACADEMIC DOMAIN CREATIVITY SKILLS

Students demonstrate creativity and ingenuity by being original (creating something that is new or novel), flexible (willingness and ability to shift perspective), open-minded (ability to “think outside the box” and embrace new experiences and fresh and unique ideas) and practical (ability to put creative ideas into action). In Brazil, not everyone lives near a soccer field. So, some kids make goal posts out of shoes. These kids are using creativity to find a way to play soccer.

2. claim credit for the work of others; 3. recklessly or falsely blame or accuse others; or 4. take advantage of another’s mistakes or ignorance (even when they think they can get away with it or that the other person deserves it). Each night Amanda and her brother and sister take turns practicing different soccer skills. It would be easy to leave the youngest sister out but instead they choose to split up time with the ball fairly.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - RESPECT

Students treat every individual with respect and judge others on their character and ability without regard to race, religion, sexual orientation, political ideology, gender, age, or other physical or personal characteristics based on the belief that all individuals are worthy and that their well-being and dignity is important simply because they are fellow human beings. Sometimes boys and girls are treated differently in sports, but Amanda’s brother treats her with respect and practices with her every night. 14 > > >

15 > > >


When you think of Japan, you may think about ancient tradition, beautiful robes, and people bowing when they greet. But do you think of baseball? You should now. Because in Japan, people are crazy about baseball.

In fact, Japan has their own major league baseball teams, and some of the best players who play in America are Japanese. Plus, their Little League teams have won the Little League World Series nine times. The next American division, California, has only won it seven times. And one of the players who keeps the Japanese baseball tradition strong is our fourth kid-athlete, Akira. It’s early on a Saturday morning in Tokyo. Akira and his team, the Giants, step onto a flat elementary school play area for practice. They’ll practice from 9am to 5pm. The gray dirt crunches under their shoes like sand, and the players start to play catch. Apartment buildings rise high above the field, and sleepy people look over their balconies to watch the team warm up. The Giants are practicing for a tournament. Akira slowly throws the ball back and forth with his coach, loosening up a recovering shoulder. He hurt it weeks ago and was very upset because he couldn’t play. Now, though, he’s actually grateful. Why? BECAUSE WHILE HE WAS HEALING HE LEARNED SOMETHING SPECIAL—HE LEARNED HUMILITY.

During his injury, he could only sit on the bench and watch the games. But instead of having a bad attitude or not showing up to the games at all, he decided to help his team in the only way he could. AKIRA, THE CAPTAIN OF THE TEAM, WASHED BASEBALLS, PICKED UP BATS, AND CHEERED ON HIS TEAMMATES. Most captains don’t do that. He realized that other people were serving and cheering for him while he played, so he should do that for others when he’s healing. When something went wrong, Akira kept a winning attitude. He put his team first, humbled himself, and made a difference. There’s strength in humility. Now, the captain is back at practice. And he’s getting stronger every day, in more ways than one. AKIRA PLAYS WITH HUMILITY.

CHARACTER QUESTIONS 1. Do you remember a time when at first you felt like showing a bad attitude but instead showed a good one? TO KYO JA PAN

16 > > >

2. Say your team just won a game. At the end of the game, what could you do or say to show humility?

CHARACTER PLAY

To help have the proper attitude with others, the Japanese language has nine ways to address someone out of respect. English has one way—Mr. or Ms. (also Miss or Mrs.)

DID YOU KNOW?

In Japanese baseball and in professional soccer, the captain always wears number 10.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT Akira’s favorite food isn’t sushi—it’s spaghetti.

WORLD WORDS

How do you say “homerun” in Japanese? Hōmuran.

17 > > >


When you think of Japan, you may think about ancient tradition, beautiful robes, and people bowing when they greet. But do you think of baseball? You should now. Because in Japan, people are crazy about baseball.

In fact, Japan has their own major league baseball teams, and some of the best players who play in America are Japanese. Plus, their Little League teams have won the Little League World Series nine times. The next American division, California, has only won it seven times. And one of the players who keeps the Japanese baseball tradition strong is our fourth kid-athlete, Akira. It’s early on a Saturday morning in Tokyo. Akira and his team, the Giants, step onto a flat elementary school play area for practice. They’ll practice from 9am to 5pm. The gray dirt crunches under their shoes like sand, and the players start to play catch. Apartment buildings rise high above the field, and sleepy people look over their balconies to watch the team warm up. The Giants are practicing for a tournament. Akira slowly throws the ball back and forth with his coach, loosening up a recovering shoulder. He hurt it weeks ago and was very upset because he couldn’t play. Now, though, he’s actually grateful. Why? BECAUSE WHILE HE WAS HEALING HE LEARNED SOMETHING SPECIAL—HE LEARNED HUMILITY.

During his injury, he could only sit on the bench and watch the games. But instead of having a bad attitude or not showing up to the games at all, he decided to help his team in the only way he could. AKIRA, THE CAPTAIN OF THE TEAM, WASHED BASEBALLS, PICKED UP BATS, AND CHEERED ON HIS TEAMMATES. Most captains don’t do that. He realized that other people were serving and cheering for him while he played, so he should do that for others when he’s healing. When something went wrong, Akira kept a winning attitude. He put his team first, humbled himself, and made a difference. There’s strength in humility. Now, the captain is back at practice. And he’s getting stronger every day, in more ways than one. AKIRA PLAYS WITH HUMILITY.

CHARACTER QUESTIONS 1. Do you remember a time when at first you felt like showing a bad attitude but instead showed a good one? TO KYO JA PAN

16 > > >

2. Say your team just won a game. At the end of the game, what could you do or say to show humility?

CHARACTER PLAY

To help have the proper attitude with others, the Japanese language has nine ways to address someone out of respect. English has one way—Mr. or Ms. (also Miss or Mrs.)

DID YOU KNOW?

In Japanese baseball and in professional soccer, the captain always wears number 10.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT Akira’s favorite food isn’t sushi—it’s spaghetti.

WORLD WORDS

How do you say “homerun” in Japanese? Hōmuran.

17 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! ACADEMIC DOMAIN - DECISION MAKING AND PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS

Students demonstrate the ability to employ logic, reason, analytical ability and other critical thinking skills to make ethical and effective decisions that produce the best possible result. When Akira injured his shoulder it would have been easy for him to be upset and not show up to games. But instead he saw the value of the captain always being present, and he helped his team however he could. Akira knew what was best for his team, and he did it.

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN SELF AWARENESS

Students demonstrate self-awareness by and recognition of the importance of “know thyself” by: 1. identifying, labeling, and understanding the nature, source, intensity and impact of their emotions, feelings, moods, impulses, mindsets and values; 2. accurately assessing their personal attributes; and 3. maintaining a well-grounded sense of self-confidence and self-esteem.

18 > > >

Rather than ignore his disappointed feelings about being injured, Akira decided to channel his emotions into serving his team by washing the baseballs, picking up bats, and encouraging his teammates.

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN LIFE SKILLS AND ATTITUDES

Students develop and demonstrate social and emotional attitudes and skills to achieve personal happiness and school and life success. Akira makes a great team captain because he has a humble attitude. His humility has also helped him be a great teammate, player, and person.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - RESPECT

Students treat every individual with respect and judge others on their character and ability without regard to race, religion, sexual orientation, political ideology, gender, age, or other physical or personal characteristics based on the belief that all individuals are worthy and that their well-being and dignity is important simply because they are fellow human beings.

CHARACTER DOMAIN CHARACTER AND ETHICS

Students understand the important role that character plays in all aspects of their lives and accept personal responsibility for building, improving and protecting their character by consistently making ethical choices and developing the moral dispositions, traits and virtues of a person of character. When Akira hurt his shoulder and couldn’t play, he had a choice to make—does he get upset and not show up to games anymore, or does he show character and travel with and serve the team even though he can’t play? He chose to show character and continue being the leader of his team no matter what.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - RESPONSIBILITY Students display responsibility by: doing what they are required to do and what they should do; accepting responsibility for the consequences (i.e., being accountable) for what they say, do and think; and using critical thinking and decision-making skills to avoid rationalizations and excuses and make rational, prudent choices. Students display responsibility by: doing what they are required to do and what they should do; accepting responsibility for the consequences (i.e., being accountable) for what they say, do and think; and using critical thinking and decision-making skills to avoid rationalizations and excuses and make rational, prudent choices.

When Akira became the captain of his team, he knew that his coach expected more from him than just being a good player—he also wanted him to set a good example for the team. It’s the captain’s responsibility to set the tone for the team.

CHARACTER DOMAIN CITIZENSHIP

Students recognize and seek to fulfill their civic and social responsibilities by doing their share to contribute to the well-being of the communities in which they are a member (including their school, neighborhood and country). Even when he couldn’t contribute on the baseball field, Akira contributed to the team—he fulfilled his role as the captain by serving his teammates and maintaining his status as an active member of the team.

After every game, win or lose, Akira’s team shows the other team respect by bowing to them. Akira and his teammates know how it feels to lose, and they believe the other team deserves their respect.

19 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! ACADEMIC DOMAIN - DECISION MAKING AND PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS

Students demonstrate the ability to employ logic, reason, analytical ability and other critical thinking skills to make ethical and effective decisions that produce the best possible result. When Akira injured his shoulder it would have been easy for him to be upset and not show up to games. But instead he saw the value of the captain always being present, and he helped his team however he could. Akira knew what was best for his team, and he did it.

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN SELF AWARENESS

Students demonstrate self-awareness by and recognition of the importance of “know thyself” by: 1. identifying, labeling, and understanding the nature, source, intensity and impact of their emotions, feelings, moods, impulses, mindsets and values; 2. accurately assessing their personal attributes; and 3. maintaining a well-grounded sense of self-confidence and self-esteem.

18 > > >

Rather than ignore his disappointed feelings about being injured, Akira decided to channel his emotions into serving his team by washing the baseballs, picking up bats, and encouraging his teammates.

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN LIFE SKILLS AND ATTITUDES

Students develop and demonstrate social and emotional attitudes and skills to achieve personal happiness and school and life success. Akira makes a great team captain because he has a humble attitude. His humility has also helped him be a great teammate, player, and person.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - RESPECT

Students treat every individual with respect and judge others on their character and ability without regard to race, religion, sexual orientation, political ideology, gender, age, or other physical or personal characteristics based on the belief that all individuals are worthy and that their well-being and dignity is important simply because they are fellow human beings.

CHARACTER DOMAIN CHARACTER AND ETHICS

Students understand the important role that character plays in all aspects of their lives and accept personal responsibility for building, improving and protecting their character by consistently making ethical choices and developing the moral dispositions, traits and virtues of a person of character. When Akira hurt his shoulder and couldn’t play, he had a choice to make—does he get upset and not show up to games anymore, or does he show character and travel with and serve the team even though he can’t play? He chose to show character and continue being the leader of his team no matter what.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - RESPONSIBILITY Students display responsibility by: doing what they are required to do and what they should do; accepting responsibility for the consequences (i.e., being accountable) for what they say, do and think; and using critical thinking and decision-making skills to avoid rationalizations and excuses and make rational, prudent choices. Students display responsibility by: doing what they are required to do and what they should do; accepting responsibility for the consequences (i.e., being accountable) for what they say, do and think; and using critical thinking and decision-making skills to avoid rationalizations and excuses and make rational, prudent choices.

When Akira became the captain of his team, he knew that his coach expected more from him than just being a good player—he also wanted him to set a good example for the team. It’s the captain’s responsibility to set the tone for the team.

CHARACTER DOMAIN CITIZENSHIP

Students recognize and seek to fulfill their civic and social responsibilities by doing their share to contribute to the well-being of the communities in which they are a member (including their school, neighborhood and country). Even when he couldn’t contribute on the baseball field, Akira contributed to the team—he fulfilled his role as the captain by serving his teammates and maintaining his status as an active member of the team.

After every game, win or lose, Akira’s team shows the other team respect by bowing to them. Akira and his teammates know how it feels to lose, and they believe the other team deserves their respect.

19 > > >


CHARACTER QUESTIONS

POOF!

Rino falls into a giant pit filled with big foam squares. Just seconds before, he was sailing down a ramp on a skateboard, went off the jump and did a backflip into the foam pit, for fun. Rino is at an indoor practice facility called the Freestyle Academy, high in the mountains of Laax, Switzerland. It’s full of jumps, ramps, trampolines and foam pits to help skaters land softly. He’s practicing. Not just for skateboarding but for snowboarding too. Because Rino, our fifth kid-athlete, lives at the base of one of the best mountains for trick skiing and snowboarding in the entire world. Cedi, one of Rino’s coaches, shouts across the pit, “Nice, Rino. But spin a little more at the end!” Rino crawls out of the pit, grabs a snowboard and climbs the stairs to the top of the ramp to try another trick. Tomorrow Rino will go up the real mountain and try a new trick he’s been working on with his coaches—a 180° on and 180° off a down rail— and he’s a little scared to try it. Snowboarders and skiers can fall and hurt themselves trying tricks, so how does Rino gather the courage to try something new? He’s confident. But his confidence didn’t come all at once. RINO’S COACHES HELPED HIM DEVELOP CONFIDENCE BY ENCOURAGING HIM TO START SMALL. Instead of trying the entire trick at once, they tell Rino to work on the spin first, then the rail, then the landing. If he puts the small steps together,

CHARACTER PLAY

Every great snowboarder and skier started on the “bunny slopes,” the easiest part of the mountain. Confidence starts by being good at the smallest challenges.

20 > > >

DID YOU KNOW?

Laax Ski Resort in Switzerland has the largest half pipe in the world.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

Rino loves board sports. He snowboards, skateboards, wakeboards and windsurfs (in the summer, of course).

1. Name an activity you already have confidence in. What is it? 2. Name a hard or challenging activity. Now, how can you make that big challenge easier by starting small?

he’ll land the trick. Plus, in snowboarding, falling isn’t failing. In fact, snowboarders learn from their mistakes and try the trick again. That’s why Rino trains at the Freestyle Academy—so he can fall again and again and again into the foam pit. Each time he gets a little better, and each time he becomes more confident in himself. On the mountain the next day, Rino peers over the edge of his snow-covered board, and looks at the ramp and rail below him. He breathes out and his breath puffs white in the cold. The mountains are massive and majestic around him. Everything is quiet until Cedi yells, “So, are you ready?” Rino breathes one more time and jets down the hill. He curves his board back and forth like a shark, cutting and gliding as he approaches the jump. Leaning back he’s lifted into the air, his board leaving the ground, spinning (a 180°!). GRIND! His board lands hard onto the rail, and he picks up speed downhill. As he balances his board, he jumps and spins one last time just before he’s carried off the rail (a 180°!). As he spins he stares forward to see where he’ll land and . . . SSKKKKKKK the snow scrapes on his board and he sticks the landing! Rino throws both hands up and sails down the rest of the mountain, his confidence a little bigger.

See you at the bottom, Cedi! RINO RIDES WITH CONFIDENCE.

WORLD WORDS

Switzerland has 4 official languages: Swiss German, French, Italian, and Romansh (the original Swiss language). How do you say “snow” in Swiss German? Schnee.

LAAX SWITZE R LAND

21 > > >


CHARACTER QUESTIONS

POOF!

Rino falls into a giant pit filled with big foam squares. Just seconds before, he was sailing down a ramp on a skateboard, went off the jump and did a backflip into the foam pit, for fun. Rino is at an indoor practice facility called the Freestyle Academy, high in the mountains of Laax, Switzerland. It’s full of jumps, ramps, trampolines and foam pits to help skaters land softly. He’s practicing. Not just for skateboarding but for snowboarding too. Because Rino, our fifth kid-athlete, lives at the base of one of the best mountains for trick skiing and snowboarding in the entire world. Cedi, one of Rino’s coaches, shouts across the pit, “Nice, Rino. But spin a little more at the end!” Rino crawls out of the pit, grabs a snowboard and climbs the stairs to the top of the ramp to try another trick. Tomorrow Rino will go up the real mountain and try a new trick he’s been working on with his coaches—a 180° on and 180° off a down rail— and he’s a little scared to try it. Snowboarders and skiers can fall and hurt themselves trying tricks, so how does Rino gather the courage to try something new? He’s confident. But his confidence didn’t come all at once. RINO’S COACHES HELPED HIM DEVELOP CONFIDENCE BY ENCOURAGING HIM TO START SMALL. Instead of trying the entire trick at once, they tell Rino to work on the spin first, then the rail, then the landing. If he puts the small steps together,

CHARACTER PLAY

Every great snowboarder and skier started on the “bunny slopes,” the easiest part of the mountain. Confidence starts by being good at the smallest challenges.

20 > > >

DID YOU KNOW?

Laax Ski Resort in Switzerland has the largest half pipe in the world.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

Rino loves board sports. He snowboards, skateboards, wakeboards and windsurfs (in the summer, of course).

1. Name an activity you already have confidence in. What is it? 2. Name a hard or challenging activity. Now, how can you make that big challenge easier by starting small?

he’ll land the trick. Plus, in snowboarding, falling isn’t failing. In fact, snowboarders learn from their mistakes and try the trick again. That’s why Rino trains at the Freestyle Academy—so he can fall again and again and again into the foam pit. Each time he gets a little better, and each time he becomes more confident in himself. On the mountain the next day, Rino peers over the edge of his snow-covered board, and looks at the ramp and rail below him. He breathes out and his breath puffs white in the cold. The mountains are massive and majestic around him. Everything is quiet until Cedi yells, “So, are you ready?” Rino breathes one more time and jets down the hill. He curves his board back and forth like a shark, cutting and gliding as he approaches the jump. Leaning back he’s lifted into the air, his board leaving the ground, spinning (a 180°!). GRIND! His board lands hard onto the rail, and he picks up speed downhill. As he balances his board, he jumps and spins one last time just before he’s carried off the rail (a 180°!). As he spins he stares forward to see where he’ll land and . . . SSKKKKKKK the snow scrapes on his board and he sticks the landing! Rino throws both hands up and sails down the rest of the mountain, his confidence a little bigger.

See you at the bottom, Cedi! RINO RIDES WITH CONFIDENCE.

WORLD WORDS

Switzerland has 4 official languages: Swiss German, French, Italian, and Romansh (the original Swiss language). How do you say “snow” in Swiss German? Schnee.

LAAX SWITZE R LAND

21 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! ACADEMIC DOMAIN - MOTIVATION TO LEARN AND GRADUATE

Students value education and enjoy learning and are motivated to do well in school and graduate by the belief that developing learning and intellectual skills and earning their high school diploma will improve their lives and increase their success in college, career and life. Snowboarding has taught Rino that it takes motivation and hard work to improve at anything. Rino values his practice time at the gym because he knows it will pay off when he snowboards on the mountain.

ACADEMIC DOMAIN GROWTH MINDSET

Students approach their education with a growth mindset, believing that with effort and persistence they can get better at anything, including subjects they find difficult or uninteresting. Rino’s coaches teach him that learning new tricks requires small improvements. At first, learning something new is difficult, but with effort and patience, Rino can master things he never thought possible.

22 > > >

ACADEMIC DOMAIN - COGNITIVE AND CRITICAL THINKING TRAITS AND SKILLS

Students develop and demonstrate progressively complex intellectual traits and cognitive competencies to permit them to achieve their academic potential. Before Rino can learn a new trick, he has to listen to his coaches and understand what’s required. Rino and his coaches have to decide how much he should practice at the gym before he tries it out on the ski slopes. Each new trick he learns builds his snowboarding competencies and becomes the foundation for newer, more complex tricks.

ACADEMIC DOMAIN CREATIVITY SKILLS

Students demonstrate creativity and ingenuity by being original (creating something that is new or novel), flexible (willingness and ability to shift perspective), open-minded (ability to “think outside the box” and embrace new experiences and fresh and unique ideas) and practical (ability to put creative ideas into action). A good snowboarder has a style. They’re creative and express themselves by stringing together various tricks. And each new run down the mountain opens up new creative possibilities. The more tricks Rino learns, the more creative he can be.

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN SELF-MANAGEMENT TRAITS AND SKILLS

Students demonstrate self-management skills to channel and control their emotions in a manner that helps them achieve school and life success. Learning a new trick can be scary. Rino has fallen plenty of times. But Rino knows that it’s important to stay calm when trying or retrying a trick. Rino recalls the time he’s spent practicing, and it helps him stay focused.

23 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! ACADEMIC DOMAIN - MOTIVATION TO LEARN AND GRADUATE

Students value education and enjoy learning and are motivated to do well in school and graduate by the belief that developing learning and intellectual skills and earning their high school diploma will improve their lives and increase their success in college, career and life. Snowboarding has taught Rino that it takes motivation and hard work to improve at anything. Rino values his practice time at the gym because he knows it will pay off when he snowboards on the mountain.

ACADEMIC DOMAIN GROWTH MINDSET

Students approach their education with a growth mindset, believing that with effort and persistence they can get better at anything, including subjects they find difficult or uninteresting. Rino’s coaches teach him that learning new tricks requires small improvements. At first, learning something new is difficult, but with effort and patience, Rino can master things he never thought possible.

22 > > >

ACADEMIC DOMAIN - COGNITIVE AND CRITICAL THINKING TRAITS AND SKILLS

Students develop and demonstrate progressively complex intellectual traits and cognitive competencies to permit them to achieve their academic potential. Before Rino can learn a new trick, he has to listen to his coaches and understand what’s required. Rino and his coaches have to decide how much he should practice at the gym before he tries it out on the ski slopes. Each new trick he learns builds his snowboarding competencies and becomes the foundation for newer, more complex tricks.

ACADEMIC DOMAIN CREATIVITY SKILLS

Students demonstrate creativity and ingenuity by being original (creating something that is new or novel), flexible (willingness and ability to shift perspective), open-minded (ability to “think outside the box” and embrace new experiences and fresh and unique ideas) and practical (ability to put creative ideas into action). A good snowboarder has a style. They’re creative and express themselves by stringing together various tricks. And each new run down the mountain opens up new creative possibilities. The more tricks Rino learns, the more creative he can be.

SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DOMAIN SELF-MANAGEMENT TRAITS AND SKILLS

Students demonstrate self-management skills to channel and control their emotions in a manner that helps them achieve school and life success. Learning a new trick can be scary. Rino has fallen plenty of times. But Rino knows that it’s important to stay calm when trying or retrying a trick. Rino recalls the time he’s spent practicing, and it helps him stay focused.

23 > > >


At 8,000 feet above sea level, high in the Great Rift Valley of western Kenya, lies a little town called Iten. Iten, with its pastures full of grazing cows and goats, is known for one thing—running. But there are many cities that are great for running, so what makes Iten so special? Two things: the people and the air.

I TEN K E N YA

CHARACTER QUESTIONS 1. Do you remember a time when you wanted to quit and give up but you needed to finish? 2. What are some ways to find the strength to keep going?

The people in Iten love to run. In fact, the kids grow up running. They race up and down the long dirt roads, getting from home to school. Their school uniforms are flashes of color as they run by. And the air is very thin in Iten because it’s so high up. Runners get used to breathing the thin air, so when they come down the mountain to lower cities with air with more oxygen, they don’t get as tired as quickly when they run. Plus, Iten has a long tradition of creating the fastest runners in the world. So much so that the Queen of England built a track for the local people to run on. And that track is where our sixth kid-athlete, Patience, races. A few times a year, Patience’s school participates in an inter-school championship—a race day that feels like Field Day in the U.S. but is all about running events. From sprint races up to three-mile distance runs, students from all over Iten come to this big race day. Each school wears a different color. There are reds, blues, oranges, and yellows. Patience is wearing yellow, and lines up at the starting line for two races. Though the runners wear different colors, all the runners are barefoot. In Kenya, kids normally run without shoes. Their bare feet kick up dust as they rocket around the track.

CHARACTER PLAY

The world record for the longest run without stopping was done by Dean Karnazes in 2005. He ran 350 miles in three-and-a-half days. Now that’s endurance! 24 > > >

DID YOU KNOW?

In the entire Summer Olympics, Kenya has medaled in two sports—running (79 medals) and boxing (7 medals). They are all in on running!

Patience runs in long races—up to 3 miles—so she must win through endurance. Speed is important, but she must outlast the other runners. THE KEY IS TO KEEP RUNNING EVEN WHEN SHE GETS TIRED AND WANTS TO STOP. If she pushes through, she’ll find the strength to finish strong. And Patience is used to doing difficult things. In Iten, Kenya, life is simpler but harder than it is in other parts of the world. Patience lives on a farm, grows vegetables, has a cow and a cat, and has chores that most American kids don’t have. She fetches water from a well and gathers firewood for outside fires to cook her food. Like Patience, many Kenyans have dreams to become fast, famous runners where they’ll be able to make a better life for themselves. And there is one famous runner named Lornah who is helping people like Patience achieve that dream. Lornah, who is a four-time world record holder, is building a training facility for the kids of Iten. There they can train after school and give them a chance to achieve their running dreams. So, don’t stop running, Patience! PATIENCE RUNS WITH ENDURANCE.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

Patience has one brother and five sisters. But they don’t like to run as much as she does.

WORLD WORDS

How do you say “run” in Swahili? Kukimbia.

25 > > >


At 8,000 feet above sea level, high in the Great Rift Valley of western Kenya, lies a little town called Iten. Iten, with its pastures full of grazing cows and goats, is known for one thing—running. But there are many cities that are great for running, so what makes Iten so special? Two things: the people and the air.

I TEN K E N YA

CHARACTER QUESTIONS 1. Do you remember a time when you wanted to quit and give up but you needed to finish? 2. What are some ways to find the strength to keep going?

The people in Iten love to run. In fact, the kids grow up running. They race up and down the long dirt roads, getting from home to school. Their school uniforms are flashes of color as they run by. And the air is very thin in Iten because it’s so high up. Runners get used to breathing the thin air, so when they come down the mountain to lower cities with air with more oxygen, they don’t get as tired as quickly when they run. Plus, Iten has a long tradition of creating the fastest runners in the world. So much so that the Queen of England built a track for the local people to run on. And that track is where our sixth kid-athlete, Patience, races. A few times a year, Patience’s school participates in an inter-school championship—a race day that feels like Field Day in the U.S. but is all about running events. From sprint races up to three-mile distance runs, students from all over Iten come to this big race day. Each school wears a different color. There are reds, blues, oranges, and yellows. Patience is wearing yellow, and lines up at the starting line for two races. Though the runners wear different colors, all the runners are barefoot. In Kenya, kids normally run without shoes. Their bare feet kick up dust as they rocket around the track.

CHARACTER PLAY

The world record for the longest run without stopping was done by Dean Karnazes in 2005. He ran 350 miles in three-and-a-half days. Now that’s endurance! 24 > > >

DID YOU KNOW?

In the entire Summer Olympics, Kenya has medaled in two sports—running (79 medals) and boxing (7 medals). They are all in on running!

Patience runs in long races—up to 3 miles—so she must win through endurance. Speed is important, but she must outlast the other runners. THE KEY IS TO KEEP RUNNING EVEN WHEN SHE GETS TIRED AND WANTS TO STOP. If she pushes through, she’ll find the strength to finish strong. And Patience is used to doing difficult things. In Iten, Kenya, life is simpler but harder than it is in other parts of the world. Patience lives on a farm, grows vegetables, has a cow and a cat, and has chores that most American kids don’t have. She fetches water from a well and gathers firewood for outside fires to cook her food. Like Patience, many Kenyans have dreams to become fast, famous runners where they’ll be able to make a better life for themselves. And there is one famous runner named Lornah who is helping people like Patience achieve that dream. Lornah, who is a four-time world record holder, is building a training facility for the kids of Iten. There they can train after school and give them a chance to achieve their running dreams. So, don’t stop running, Patience! PATIENCE RUNS WITH ENDURANCE.

ATHLETE SPOTLIGHT

Patience has one brother and five sisters. But they don’t like to run as much as she does.

WORLD WORDS

How do you say “run” in Swahili? Kukimbia.

25 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! SOCIAL EMOTIONAL DOMAIN SELF-AWARENESS

Students demonstrate self-awareness by and recognition of the importance of “know thyself” by: 1. identifying, labeling, and understanding the nature, source, intensity and impact of their emotions, feelings, moods, impulses, mindsets and values; 2. accurately assessing their personal attributes 3. maintaining a well-grounded sense of self-confidence and self-esteem. Even when Patience got tired during her race, she didn’t slow down. She knows she is capable of pushing through fatigue, and that self-awareness helped her win the race. In the future, Patience can remind herself that strength and success is on the other side of being tired, yet moving forward.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - CARING Students demonstrate caring by:

1. Displaying sincere concern for the well-being of others. 2. Displaying compassion for those in pain or need. 3. Being kind and sympathetic to everyone (even those who don’t seem worthy of kindness). 4. Giving time, service and money to charitable organizations and individuals to help those in need. Lornah showed she cared about Patience by mentoring her and helping her become a better runner.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - CITIZENSHIP

Students recognize and seek to fulfill their civic and social responsibilities by doing their share to contribute to the well-being of the communities in which they are a member (including their school, neighborhood and country). For Lornah, being a part of her community meant establishing an athletic complex for local runners. She felt that it was important to contribute her skills and resources to benefit others.

26 > > >

27 > > >


CHARACTER

COUNTS! SOCIAL EMOTIONAL DOMAIN SELF-AWARENESS

Students demonstrate self-awareness by and recognition of the importance of “know thyself” by: 1. identifying, labeling, and understanding the nature, source, intensity and impact of their emotions, feelings, moods, impulses, mindsets and values; 2. accurately assessing their personal attributes 3. maintaining a well-grounded sense of self-confidence and self-esteem. Even when Patience got tired during her race, she didn’t slow down. She knows she is capable of pushing through fatigue, and that self-awareness helped her win the race. In the future, Patience can remind herself that strength and success is on the other side of being tired, yet moving forward.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - CARING Students demonstrate caring by:

1. Displaying sincere concern for the well-being of others. 2. Displaying compassion for those in pain or need. 3. Being kind and sympathetic to everyone (even those who don’t seem worthy of kindness). 4. Giving time, service and money to charitable organizations and individuals to help those in need. Lornah showed she cared about Patience by mentoring her and helping her become a better runner.

CHARACTER DOMAIN - CITIZENSHIP

Students recognize and seek to fulfill their civic and social responsibilities by doing their share to contribute to the well-being of the communities in which they are a member (including their school, neighborhood and country). For Lornah, being a part of her community meant establishing an athletic complex for local runners. She felt that it was important to contribute her skills and resources to benefit others.

26 > > >

27 > > >


Profile for Character Counts Service Corp

Big World Recess - CHARACTER COUNTS! Edition  

Follow along with six student athletes from across the world as they demonstrate the importance of character within their lives.

Big World Recess - CHARACTER COUNTS! Edition  

Follow along with six student athletes from across the world as they demonstrate the importance of character within their lives.

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded