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G oa l S e t t i n g G u i d e 7 Weeks of Sunrise – Goal Setting Guide | ©7WOS

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To ensure you get the most out of this year, use this guide to help set, plan and achieve your goals. Great things don’t just happen, they are planned and well thought through. Welcome to your 7 Weeks of Sunrise!

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Introduction

The fact that you are even reading this guide indicates there is a desire to make changes in your life. This guide is not the be-all and end-all. It is not designed as a means of giving you all the answers or telling you what to do to make your life whole. This document is exactly as the name suggests a GUIDE. It’s purpose is to illustrate how to capture, identify and manage your goals to be successful in all areas of your life. The following content has been developed using a variety of sources so that you can learn how to get organised and develop a process that works for you. This guide will be divided into the following sections: Day 1

Overview of goal setting What is goal setting? How do I set a goal? Time to reflect!

Day 2

Let’s prioritise

Day 3

Setting the goals

Day 4

Developing action plans to achieve goals

“The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.” – Chinese Proverb

Day 5 Measuring your performance Daily/Weekly planner HARD model Day 6

FB Chat – Get help with questions

Day 7

RELAX

Day 8

Finalise goals ready for week ahead

Week 7

Reviewing and amending your goals Celebrating your achievements Want to learn more?

In addition to this guide, you have also been given a goal setting activity book that you can use to help you set your goals. There are instructions throughout this guide that let you know when to complete each activity. Goal setting is a skill, and like every new skill, it does take time and practice to master the ability to set goals. This guide forms as a basic introduction with information and activities that you can complete that will help you to take the first step into setting goals to make 2017 your best year yet! Don’t forget to have your goal setting activity book handy. You will be using it throughout your journey, hand-in-hand with this guide. 7 Weeks of Sunrise – Goal Setting Guide | ©7WOS

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Overview of goal set ting

Most of us at some point in our lives have felt like we are simply drifting along the river that is life. For some of us, it has been smooth sailing, and for others it has felt like we have been getting dragged along the bottom of the river hitting every branch and stone along the way! To take charge of your life and how you sail through life’s river, it is important that you set personal goals.

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What is goal set ting?

Personal goal setting is the process of thinking about your ideal future and then putting a plan in place to achieve your vision (MindTools, 2016). There are many processes you can follow when setting goals, and there is never one best way- you can decide what works best for you. In this guide, we will be setting goals using the following process: • • • • • •

Reflection time Documenting and prioritising ideas, dreams and aspirations Setting goals Develop action plan Reviewing goals Celebrating achievements

Personal goal setting can inspire and motivate you to do more, achieve more, and become a better person. Many of us spend a lot of time and energy helping others, and sometimes forget about ourselves. It is important that you find the time to invest back into yourself. Allowing yourself time to reflect and set yourself personal goals is time well spent – it will keep you focussed and will help you to achieve more in shorter time frames in the long run.

Successful people have the same amount of hours per day as you do. The difference is that they have goals and a plan of action to guide them.

ALL of us are afforded 24 hours in each day – let’s make them count!

How do I set goals? When you begin setting personal goals for the first time, it can be quite confronting. To have to sit with yourself and truly consider what you want out of life can sometimes be a challenge! Most of us have no idea what we want out of life, what we are doing or where we are going – and that’s ok. Goal setting shouldn’t be a process of tearing your current life apart and thinking about everything that hasn’t turned out how you wanted it to. It should be a motivating experience that helps you to think about where you are now, and where you want to be. The past is the past, and there is nothing you can do to change it. What you can change is how your life will be from this point forward.

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Time to reflect! No-one is perfect, and we all have areas of our life that we want to improve. But where do we begin making improvements? The first part of setting goals is taking the time to think about and document your ideas and dreams. It is difficult to really ponder your dreams in a noisy or crowded space, where people can interrupt you or where you can get easily distracted. You will need to get out of life’s chaos and find yourself a quiet and calming zone. Perhaps you would like to: • • • • •

Imagine yourself standing void of anything that once was. You are looking out into your future and you can see where it is you want to be – That is your goal.

Go to a park Have a warm bath Sit in a quiet room Sit on the beach Put on soothing music

When you are in your chosen quiet zone, allow yourself at least ten minutes to let your mind and thoughts wander. Think about everything you want to achieve and don’t hold back. Let your thoughts go wild and allow yourself the time to think about what makes you happy and what you want. Once you have allowed yourself time to dream, begin documenting your thoughts and ideas.

How to set goals | Tony Robbins youtu.be/gzx3qhEgyZQ

Activity one: Document your ideas using a note pad, piece of paper or any device you feel comfortable with. To try and get your thoughts in order, you may like to start by jotting down various categories of your life. Under your headings, start writing down where you want to be. You don’t have to worry about time frames at this stage, just write, write, write! It can be as neat or messy as you like. The important thing here is to not worry about the presentation or your spelling, just get your words on the page! On the next page is an example of some goals documented using a mind cloud. You may like to use something like this when writing down your ideas.

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activit y one EXAMPLE finance • Want to have $25,000 house deposit • Want to earn $1000+ per week • Want to be able to afford to retire at 50

health • Need to lose 20kg • Want to be able to run for an hour

other • I need a morning routine

mental wellbeing • Want to meditate one hour per week • Need to be happier

7 Weeks of Sunrise – Goal Setting Guide | ©7WOS

nutrition • Need to stop buying takeaway • Need to get more vitamins and minerals in my diet

my goals personal growth • I need to learn more technology skills • I want to learn how to communicate better • I want to learn how to play the guitar • I want to learn how to sew

friends • I need more time with my friends

career • Get a new job this year

rel ationship • I want to find a boyfriend this year

family • I want to spend more time with my brother

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Want to do it ALL right NOW? Let’s prioritise... When you have gotten all your ideas and dreams written down, the next step is to prioritise. Prioritising will help to ensure that you have the focus on what matters the most at this point in time. If you try to make changes to all areas of your life at once, you are setting yourself up to fail. Sure, you can set goals and plans for all areas, but at this stage, just select one.

Prioritising ensures you focus on what matters and helps you to not become overwhelmed

To prioritise, simply mark each of your categories with a number, 1 being your number one priority, 2 being your second and so on. An example of what this may look like has been provided for you below:

3 finance • Want to have $25,000 house deposit • Want to earn $1000+ per week • Want to be able to afford to retire at 50

health 2

• Need to lose 20kg • Want to be able to run for an hour

1

other

• I need a morning routine

mental8

wellbeing

• Want to meditate one hour per week • Need to be happier

nutrition

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• Need to stop buying takeaway • Need to get more vitamins and minerals in my diet

my goals personal growth

4

• I need to learn more technology skills • I want to learn how to communicate better • I want to learn how to play the guitar • I want to learn how to sew

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friends

10

• I need more time with my friends

7

career

• Get a new job this year

9 rel ationship • I want to find a boyfriend this year

5 family • I want to spend more time with my brother

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Based on the example on the previous page, the prioritisation is as follows: P

Category

Wants, dreams and aspirations

1

Other

Morning routine

2

Health

Weight loss and exercise

3

Finance

House deposit, savings and early retirement

4

Personal growth Learn technology skills, better communication, guitar and sewing.

5

Family

Spending time with brother

Nutrition

No eating takeaways and increasing vitamin/ mineral intake

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Career

New job

8

Mental

Meditation and increased happiness

9

Relationships

Get a boyfriend

10

Friends

Spend more time with friends

6

Take a look at page 2 in your work book for blank prioritisation template.

Activity two: On page 2 of your workbook there is a blank template for you to prioritise your goals. How you prioritise is completely up to you. You may want to start with an area that is of most importance, or that you know will get you really motivated when you improve that area. Once you have your areas categorised, the next step is to set your goals. Depending on your preference, you may want to do this for every category, or if this is the first time you have set yourself a personal goal, focus on your top priority.

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Setting goals When you have your area of focus, the next step is to set your goal. A popular goal setting tool that is widely used is the S.M.A.R.T goal setting method. A video introduction has been provided below:

SMART Goals - Quick Overview | DecisionSkills youtu.be/1-SvuFIQjK8

As explained in the video, SMART goals are: Specific The goal should identify a specific action or event that will take place. Measurable The goal and its benefits should be quantifiable Attainable

The goal should be attainable given available resources

Realistic

The goal should require you to stretch some, but allow the likelihood of success.

Timely The goal should state the time period in which it will be accomplished. “SMART goal setting brings structure and trackability into your goals and objectives. Instead of vague resolutions, SMART goal setting creates verifiable trajectories towards a certain objective, with clear milestones and an estimation of the goal’s attainability. Every goal or objective, from intermediary step to overarching objective, can be made S.M.A.R.T. and as such, brought closer to reality.” (Your Coach, 2016)

“Investing in yourself is the best investment you will ever make. It will not only improve your life, it will improve the lives of all those around you.” – Robin S. Sherma

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Example SMART goals: • To enjoy 1 to 2 hours of leisure daily. • To weigh 75kg by April 30 and stay at that weight. • To eat at least 12 nutritious meals each week. • To exercise for 20 minutes 4 times per week to increase strength and stamina. • To take an introductory yoga class this Autumn. • To get my ideal job paying $__ per month and within less than 15 minutes commute time. • To get professional counselling within 3 months to help me with my depression. • To increase my savings $___ every month. • To pay off my car by March 30 of next year. • To take at least 3 new courses on (subjects) by (timing). • To create 12 paintings by December 31 (one per month). • To donate blood every three months.

• To connect with my brother at least once/week. • To get my web site operating by March 31. • To travel to (location) for at least 3 days for a mini retreat. • To upgrade my computer system with a scanner, larger monitor and... by April 30. • To read 2 new books each month, with half of them being self help books. • To meditate for 15 minutes at least 5 times per week. • To cultivate my friendships by connecting with each of my 3 best friends weekly. • To journal 10 min/day, 5 days/ week to identify my blocks to growth and work on reducing the impact of those blocks on my life. • To build up my energy through daily exercise so I can function on just 7 hours of sleep/night. (Higher Awareness, 2016)

Based on the example earlier, the top priority was ‘morning routine’. As it is now, ‘morning routine’ is not in a SMART format. An example of a SMART goal for establishing a morning routine would be: Specific “I will complete all tasks in my morning routine every day, for the next 66 days, to ensure that it becomes a daily habit” “I will complete all tasks in my morning routine every day, for the next 66 days, to ensure that it becomes a daily habit” Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Timely

Activity three: Set your own SMART goals using the template provided on page 3 of the workbook. 7 Weeks of Sunrise – Goal Setting Guide | ©7WOS

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grow

Once you have your SMART goal, it is good to evaluate your current situation to ensure that these SMART goals can be achieved by using the GROW model. Grow

What are your Goals?

Reality

What is the Reality?

Options (or Obstacles)

What are your Options?

Will (or Way forward)

What Will you do?

At this stage, there isn’t a morning routine, so the first action taken to achieve the goal will be to work out what needs to be done in the morning. You wouldn’t need to turn developing a morning task list into a goal, it would be an action you would take to achieve your main goal of doing the daily routine. In addition to developing a morning routine task list, additional actions that may need to be taken to achieve this goal could include: • Allocate times to each task to ensure routine is no more than 1 hour • Set my alarm for 6am every night • Develop a morning checklist to follow

Developing action plans to achieve goals Truth is, it’s much easier to set goals than to actually get them done. Simply saying “I will change my morning routine” isn’t going to change anything. For every goal, you should have a corresponding action plan. Your goal is where you want to be, and your action plan is how you are going to get there. Your action plan should include the series of steps you need to take to achieve your goal. For long term goals, you may need to break them down into smaller goals and then go from there. For example, if your goal is to lose 10kg in six months, a short-term goal could be: “I will go for a walk for 30 minutes every day” The action steps you may need to take for going for a walk everyday could be: • • • •

Get clothes and shoes ready in the morning Plan out where I will be walking Take a timer with me when I walk Download a 30-minute playlist of my favourite songs to listen to while I walk

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You may even have additional smaller goals to help you achieve you losing 10 kg in six months. The table below provides example goals and corresponding action steps that will need to be taken to achieve the main goal. Main Goal: Losing 10kg in 6 months Smaller goals

Actions to achieve the goal

Eat 1200 calories per day

• Develop meal planner • Prep meals for the week every Sunday night • Record what I am eating daily

Drink 2 litres of water every day

• Fill up x4 600 ml bottles each day • Set a reminder to drink more water every hour • Drink one glass of water as soon as I get up • Take a litre bottle of water with me to work

Attend 3 yoga classes per week

• Join a yoga studio • Book and pay for 3 classes at the start of each week • Add class times to your calendar

When you have identified your actions, you can then put them into an action plan. The benefit of using an action plan is that you can clearly identify what needs to be done, when it needs to be done and you can also pre-empt potential barriers that may stop you from achieving your goals. For every SMART goal, you should have an action plan. If you look online, there are hundreds of different action plans that you can choose from. Based on the morning routine example, the next page shows an example of a completed action plan. Activity four: Complete your personal action plan, template on page 4 of activity workbook

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activit y four example Personal action plan Goal

I will complete all tasks in my morning routine every day, for the next 66 days, to ensure that it becomes a daily habit

Goal start date (if applicable)

14/01/17

Today’s date

07/01/17

Review date

21/07/17 Actions Steps

Resources needed

Time frame/due date

1

Develop morning routine

Pen and paper

14/01/17

2

Allocate times to each task to ensure routine is no more than 1 hour

Stop watch to time each activity as I am doing

14/01/17

3

Set my alarm for 6am every night

Phone

15/01/17

4

Develop a morning checklist to follow each day

Computer, and printer

15/01/17

5

Complete morning checklist

Checklist

Daily from: 15/01/17

Other notes

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Achieved y/n

*Make sure I have breakfast foods available for the week

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measuring performance

Ok, so you have your goals set and your action plan in place – now what? You need to get into action! Simply having your plan written down isn’t going to get you achieving anything. Stick to your plan and ensure that you are tracking your progress as you go. Depending on your goal, measuring your performance could be done through: • Completing tasks on your action plan • Facts and figures relating to money saved, the number of fitness classes attended or the number of cigarettes you haven’t smoked each day • Records of your progress from reflection such as how you are feeling, what is working well, what isn’t working so well etc. • Checklists If your goal relates to a daily habit, you could: • Keep a calendar where you can check off each day that you complete your daily goal • Keep doing this every day, and soon you’ll have a chain of days you’ve checked off • Don’t break the chain (Cooper, 2016)

Activity five:

We have provided you with a weekly and daily planner template. These have been provided by Self Journal (https://bestself.co/products/self-journal/pdf) Please fill these out (using your action plan) ready for next week (STARTING Mon 16/01/17) when we implement your action plans for your goals.

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Nearly everything can be measured in one way or another. The article below explains how you can measure various goals. Assign Each Goal a Measurable Unit This might seem obvious, but it’s impossible to measure your goals if they aren’t framed in terms of a measurable unit. Every goal needs to be assigned both a measurable unit (to quantify success) and a unit of time (against which you’ll measure your success). Units of time can be terminal (a “one-time deal”), or they can be recurring. An example of a recurring unit of time goal might be helpful here. Take my clean house example, for instance — I’d first define what a clean house means to me. I might say, perchance, that a clean house is one that is dusted, vacuumed, and mopped. I would make a “chore chart” with all the key chores I felt amounted to a clean house. Then, I would assign a unit of time. I’m not overly zealous here, so let’s go with two weeks. I would know that hitting each of the tasks on my list (or 75% of them, or whatever I deemed a success) in the two-week time period would mean that I’d reached my goal. Two weeks later, I’d measure again. Take another difficult-to-measure goal — spending more time with family. Again, this one first needs to be defined before it can be assigned a measurable unit. I might define success as spending one date night a week with Husband. Or I might do a monthly assessment of how I feel about my efforts to make time in my schedule to spend quality time together on a 1-10 scale. If I had young kids, I might measure success by the number of new things we try together each month. As you can see, there are a variety of different ways to measure the same end goal, and a number of possible units of time. (Osterlind, 2012) Activity six: On page 5 of your workbook there is a template for measuring your goals. Use this at the end of each day or week to track the progress (measure) of your goals.

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HARD

Once you have completed your goals and action plan, it is good apply the HARD goal principles and ensure your goals fall in line with them. HARD is an acronym for: Heartfelt

You’re emotionally attached to it

Animated

You’ve got a vision of its accomplishment

Required

You feel such a sense of urgency that you must act now

Difficult

You must be challenged by it (Yebra, 2014)

“Focused, hard work is the real key to success. Keep your eyes on the goal, and just keep taking the next step towards completing it. If you aren’t sure which way to do something, do it both ways and see which works better.”

Let’s do this!!

— John Carmack

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reviewing and amending your goals

When you are measuring goals, you will have discovered on of three outcomes:

1) 2) 3)

You smashed the goal out the park You achieved the goal You haven’t achieved the goal

Now, you may think that smashing goals is what you are trying to aim for right? Well, no, it isn’t. If you are smashing all of your goals all the time, that may mean that you are not raising the bar high enough. Sure, for a time smashing goals will feel great, but eventually, your goals and the entire goal setting process will become worthless. Your goal needs to be challenging, that’s why it is a goal – if it was easy, you would be doing it already. Goals that are too easy aren’t motivating because they don’t feel important. Goals that are difficult to achieve feel significant so you work harder to achieve them. “Ask yourself if your goal sparks your interest? Does it feel challenging, yet possible to achieve? If it isn’t exciting, try aiming higher. If it seems so hard you feel discouraged, aim a little lower.” (Selfication, 2016) You should set goals so that they are slightly out of your immediate grasp, but not so far that there is no hope of achieving them. If you are not achieving your goals, then you may be setting them too high. When you are just starting out setting goals, it can be difficult to know whether a goal is realistic and challenging, or whether it is too easy. For any goals that you haven’t achieved, you should: • • • •

Determine the reasons why you haven’t achieved your goal Develop a new goal Develop your action plan to meet the new goal Add in review dates so you can regularly monitor your performance

A goal that is too difficult isn’t the only reason why you may not achieve your goal. The table on the next page outlines common reasons you may fail to meet you goals with potential solutions that can be used to get you back on track.

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Common reasons people do not achieve their goals Reason

Description

Solution

1

Creating Vague Goals

When you don’t know where you are going, it is really hard to get there. Many people set themselves up for failure when they set goals that are unclear. “I want to lose weight” sounds like a great goal but the people who set this kind of goal will never reach it.

Set SMART goals by being Specific, making sure they are Measurable, Achievable and Realistic, and last but not least — give yourself a Time deadline.

2

Lacking a Higher Purpose

Goals can be set on any topic imaginable but if you don’t have a higher purpose, it makes it is easy to give up once the initial motivation and excitement wears off. Understanding how your goal is relevant to you allows you to persevere even when the going gets tough.

When setting your SMART goal, ask yourself how the goal is relevant to your life and what you want to achieve.

3

Procrastinating

Even when you have SMART goals that are relevant to your purpose, if you don’t get started, you’ll never achieve your goal. One of the most dangerous phrases is “I’ll do it later.”

Make sure the goal has been broken down i nto manageable pieces and then start right away.

4

Not Taking Responsibility

Things will go wrong. That’s a fact of life. When something comes up and you don’t achieve your goal, who do you blame? Your boss who kept you at work late so you couldn’t work on your book or maybe the horrible weather that stopped you from going to the gym. If it’s not your fault, there is nothing you can do, right?

Own up to not reaching your goals. When you take responsibility, you’ll become resourceful knowing that you have control over the attainment of your goals.

5

Listening to People Who Discourage You

When you go for your goals, especially the big ones that really count and fit in with your purpose in life, it is inevitable that people will discourage you. There are many reasons for this: concern, jealousy, ignorance, etc. How many goals have already been given up on because other people decided they were not worth pursuing?

This one is easy. As long as you know the purpose for your goal, ignore the naysayers. You can take what they are saying into consideration but make sure you make the final choice.

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6

Starting Too Many Projects

When you start too many things, you don’t end up finishing many of them.

Understand that you have a limited amount of time and that you can’t do everything.

7

Being Negative

If you think you’re not going to make it, then you’re probably not going to make it. If you don’t believe you’re going to reach your goal, then when you fail, it is expected which makes it easy to stop trying. When you are optimistic and a setback occurs, you focus your energy on finding solutions because you truly believe there is one.

Consider the idea that optimism and pessimism are both expectations of the future. Each are equally likely to be true but which belief will help you lead a happier more fulfilled life? Instead of wasting your energy on complaining, spend that energy on learning.

8

Surrounding Yourself with People Who Don’t Reach Their Goals

You are who you associate with. This may be hard to swallow for some people and there are always exceptions to the rule but for the most part, we act in accordance with the people around us. This comes from the strong ad natural desire to belong and to be accepted (think of all the dumb things you did in high school just to fit in).

Associate with people who always reach their goals.

9

Watching Too Much TV

Not all TV is bad but if you are watching TV then most likely you are not doing anything to move one step closer to your goal. The problem with TV these days is that it is captivating. There are programs for all interests and hobbies and the shows keep getting better and better. Those who watch alot of TV usually don’t reach their goals and perhaps people watch TV because they don’t have any goals.

Quick Fix: Shut off the TV. Cancel the cable. Pick up a book that will help you move one step closer to your goal.

(Chen, 2016)

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If you don’t achieve your goals, you will simply need to analyse why you haven’t and then set yourself a new goal. When setting your new goals, remember the HARD acronym. Need a reminder what a HARD Goal is? The acronym stands for heartfelt, animated, required and difficult. Heartfelt

You’re emotionally attached to it

Animated

You’ve got a vision of its accomplishment

Required

You feel such a sense of urgency that you must act now

Difficult

You must be challenged by it (Yebra, 2014)

Don’t give up – you will get there! Sure, you may need to spend some time re-planning, but once you get the hang of goal setting, it will become easier and quicker. When you achieve your goals, it is important that you reward yourself for the efforts and time you have put in.

Activity seven:

On page 6 of your workbook there is a template to revise your goals and create a new action plan if necessary.

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celebrating your achievements

When you achieve your goals, you need to take the time to reward yourself. You have accomplished something that is helping you to do more, achieve more, and become a better person. Often people forget this step, but it is the most important one! Because it can be difficult to pat yourself on the back, the table below outlines ways you can reward yourself. 20 Ways to reward yourself 1

Read a can't-put-it-down novel.

2

Take a hot bath. Infuse the bathwater with calming lavender oil or any oil that has a pleasing scent and effect.

3

Fly a kite. Seriously. If the weather is right, and there's enough open space and little chance of the kite getting entangled in trees or power lines, go for it. See if you don't feel better.

4

Get a massage.

5

Visit a pick-your-own farm or orchard and harvest sunflowers, strawberries, apples and other homegrown treats.

6

Watch bloopers and funny videos on You Tube.

7

Go for a swim. If you really deserve a reward, go swimming in the moonlight.

8

Listen to music that inspires, energizes or relaxes you.

9

Dance, at home to the above-mentioned music, or in a club.

10

Take a day trip to an interesting and fun attraction in your area, like an aquarium, zoo or theme park.

11

Host a game night and play such oldies but goodies as Pictionary, Twister and Charades with friends.

12

Enjoy the blooms at a botanical garden.

13

Take a road trip, even if it's just over a long weekend to a destination a few hours away. Explore a new place.

14

Have coffee or tea with a friend.

15

Lie in a hammock.

16

Play poker or another card game with friends. Caution: Losing money might not feel very rewarding!

17

Meditate.

18

Do an exercise you enjoy.

19

Designate a lazy day and do nothing that falls under the heading of work or responsibility all day.

20

Watch the sunrise or sunset.

7 Weeks of Sunrise – Goal Setting Guide | Š7WOS

(Tatum, 2012)

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Need more?

Don’t delay in pursuing your goals and dreams. Give yourself the reward of living life to the fullest extent possible now! In Summary, when you set your goals, make sure you include all the necessary ingredients for effective goal setting: Clarity

Make it specific and measurable.

Challenge: Make it challenging enough to spark interest without being too hard. Commitment: Make sure it’s something you truly want to do and believe you can achieve. Get some accountability. Feedback:

Measure your daily progress. Do a weekly review and adjust your approach.

Complexity: If necessary break your goals down or lower the difficulty of the goal. Enlist the help of others. Get these elements right and you’ll dramatically increase the chances of accomplishing your goals! We hope you got a lot out of this goal setting guide. For additional reading, you may like to view the resources below: Further reading 6 Morning rituals for successful people

www.lifehack.org/273208/6morning-rituals-healthy-andsuccessful-people-every-day

Craft Your 90 Day Plan to Start Turning Your Dreams to Reality

www.relaxfocusenjoy.com/craftyour-90-day-plan-to-start-turningyour-dreams-into-reality/

Here’s to making 2017 a year to remember – for all the right reasons! Keep in touch with us on Facebook and let us now how you are going.

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References

Chen, R. (2016, December 31). Top 10 Reasons Why People Don’t Reach Their Goals. Retrieved from Life Hacks: http://www.lifehack.org/ articles/productivity/top-10-reasons-why-people-dont-reach- their-goals.html Cooper, B. (2016, March 11). How to Measure Progress in Your Personal Goals: Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Retrieved from BufferApp: https://blog.bufferapp.com/how-to-measure-progress-in-your- personal-goals-daily-weekly-and-monthly Higher Awareness. (2016, December 2016). Sample Smart Goals - A List of Choices. Retrieved from Higher Awareness: http://www. higherawareness.com/personal-goal-setting/sample- smart-goals.html MindTools. (2016, December 231). Personal Goal Setting. Retrieved from Mindtools: https://www.mindtools.com/page6.html Osterlind, J. (2012, July 30). Get It Done: How to Measure Your Goals. Retrieved from Wise Bread: http://www.wisebread.com/get-it- done-how-to-measure-your-goals Selfication. (2016, December 31). The Science of Goal-Setting: The 5 Principles You Need to Know. Retrieved from selfication: http:// www.selfication.com/goal-setting/the-science-of-goal-setting/ Tatum, C. (2012, May 31). 101 Ways to Reward Yourself - Why Self- Flagellation is Not the Solution to Procrastination, Mistakes and Even Failure. Retrieved from Hub Pages: http://hubpages. com/health/101-Ways-to-Reward-Yourself-Why-Self-Flagellation- Doesnt-Work Yebra, L. (2014, December 8). Are Your Goals Too Easy? Retrieved from Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141208164556- 53205338-are-your-goals-too-easy Your Coach. (2016, December 31). SMART goals. Retrieved from Your Coach: http://www.yourcoach.be/en/coaching-tools/smart-goal- setting.php

7 Weeks of Sunrise – Goal Setting Guide | ©7WOS

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7 Weeks of Sunrise - Goal Setting Guide  

Most of us want to make a change in our lives, feel better, be more motivated, inspire others and live life to it's fullest. But we often st...

7 Weeks of Sunrise - Goal Setting Guide  

Most of us want to make a change in our lives, feel better, be more motivated, inspire others and live life to it's fullest. But we often st...

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