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volume 32 number 01 | february 2014

Written & Compiled by Catherine Gibson

New Zealand String Quartet and The Forbidden City Chamber Orchestra with Director, Liu Shun

TALES FROM THE FORBIDDEN CITY Cross-cultural collaboration like no other ‘Tales from the Forbidden City’ is an amazing cross-cultural collaboration and exchange on many levels. It spans educational institutions, organisations, world renowned ensembles, and has internationally established and emerging composers working and performing together in China and New Zealand.

The project is a programme of newly commissioned compositions for the combined forces of the New Zealand String Quartet and the Forbidden City Chamber Orchestra, specially written by New Zealand and Chinese composers and curated and produced jointly, by conductor Liu Shun in China and composer Jack Body in New Zealand, with the help of commissioning funds from Creative New Zealand. The Forbidden City Chamber Orchestra, based at the China Conservatory in Beijing, consists of classically trained musicians playing traditional Chinese instruments including 2-stringed fiddles called erhu, plucked instruments such as the zheng zither, the 3 stringed sanxian, and the ruan (described as a ‘moon-shaped lute’), the multi-pipe sheng ‘mouth organ’, and various percussion instruments and flutes. It has been hailed as ‘one of the most influential chamber orchestras in the world’.

The works to be performed include a major new music and video collaboration by Michael Norris and David Downes, paired with a concerto for piano and traditional instruments by the extraordinarily talented Chinese composer/pianist Gao Ping (well-known to many from his time in New Zealand at the University of Canterbury). Other New Zealand works are by Jack Body and outstanding younger composers Tabea Squire and Dylan Lardelli. Chinese countertenor, Xiao Ma, also joins the ensemble as a soloist in a seductive work by senior Chinese composer, Gao Wei-Jie. Developed in a series of workshops in China in mid-2013, the project was rehearsed and recorded in Beijing during December, and premiered at the prestigious Forbidden City Concert Chamber to an enthusiastic audience of over one thousand people. Continued page 2


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From the Chief Executive © Robert Catto | All rights reserved

Tales from the Forbidden City (continues from page 1)

Welcome back for another terrific season of chamber music that begins with three concerts all on Sunday 9 March! Two string quartets, a piano trio and an orchestra of traditional Chinese instruments. The dynamic Kelemen Quartet promise to excite us with their Hungarian flair and passion as they open our Kaleidoscopes Concert Season in Dunedin before they make their way throughout the country, including a concert in the New Zealand Festival. I heard them perform live several years ago and still remember their energy, commitment and communication, especially with Hungarian music. Tales from the Forbidden City also features in the New Zealand Festival. This unique blend of music, instruments, virtuosi and cultures will definitely stimulate any jaded palates. This project is the culmination of a cultural exchange that has enabled Kiwi and Chinese composers, musicians and now audiences to celebrate, explore and fuse traditions. If you are unable to make it to one of their concerts then I encourage you to tune in to Radio New Zealand Concert and follow our online coverage of their tour. Rangitoto Trio kick-off their Encompass regional tour in Gore. This talented young ensemble first performed together in the 2001 Chamber Music Contest while at Rangitoto College. Since then they have toured for us in various combinations. String players, Amalia and, Callum Hall and pianist, John-Paul Muir are outstanding musicians and well worth a trip to hear them perform together. We are delighted that Helene Pohl, Doug Beilman and Rolf Gjelsten were all awarded NZ Honours in the New Year’s list. This makes it a full house for the New Zealand String Quartet as Gillian Ansell had already received her Award previously. They are such superb ambassadors for chamber music in our country. You will be able to congratulate them in person as they tour for us next month with the Forbidden City Chamber Orchestra from Beijing and then again in May with Canadian clarinettist James Campbell. It’s not too late to subscribe; by mail, online or by calling us. We guarantee that 2014’s line-up will inspire and entertain you and your friends. So, as always there are plenty of concerts to look forward to this year and we can’t wait for the music to begin.

Director of the FCCO, Liu Shun and NZ Producer and composer, Jack Body at rehearsal in Beijing

Jack Body as one of the driving forces behind this incredible venture has shared his thoughts on the project and its process. Most inspiring “It’s very satisfying when an idea as complex as this one can come to fruition, when the funding is forthcoming from the various sources, the timing works, the promoters are willing, the composers create such an array of inspired pieces, oh, and the musicians really get off on stepping outside their comfort zones and exploring new worlds....” Most challenging and rewarding in terms of the international collaboration “Communication is not always easy – as English speakers we arrogantly expect that the whole of the rest of the world to understand English, but this is not the case. And so talking to each other required care, time and patience. But what was clear from the beginning was that both parties – Chinese and Kiwi – were passionately committed to making this project work.” On the recent performance in Beijing “We were blown away by the fabulous venue, and the rapt attention of the thousand strong audience.” What can audiences expect to experience from this performance and from the music? “I think the programme is a marvellous smorgasbord, the works so different from each other, and yet so beautifully complementary in a way that couldn’t have been anticipated in advance.” Most unexpected soundscape discovered as part of this project “The two major works in programme will transport the audience into completely new sound worlds – Gao Ping’s piano concerto accompanied by the Chinese Ensemble (the NZSQ have a rest in this one!) produces a delicious mix of sounds, not least because the soloist also claps, whistles, sings and chants, while Michael Norris and David Downes’s combination of translucent musical textures and astonishing visuals will stun the audience with it exquisite beauty.” Supported by Victoria University of Wellington, the Ministry of Culture of China, The VUW Confucius Institute, the China Conservatory of Music, Beijing and the Asia New Zealand Foundation. Presented in association with the New Zealand Festival. Click here for more programme details. 9 Mar, 6.30pm

Wellington

Michael Fowler Centre

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11 Mar, 7.30pm

Christchurch

Aurora Centre

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Euan Murdoch

13 Mar, 7.30pm

Hamilton

Gallagher Academy

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Chief Executive

15 Mar, 8pm

Auckland

Raye Freedman Arts Centre

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CMNZ Team Day 31 January 2014

2014 CMNZ’s

YEAR OF THE VOLUNTEER Boris Johnson, Mayor of London, is on record as saying that the success of the 2012 London Olympics could be laid squarely at the feet of the thousands of volunteers who gave their time and skills freely to this event. In fact he was so gratified by this outpouring of volunteer help that he has just launched the 2014 Telegraph Year of the Volunteer. Likewise CMNZ think it’s high time we sang the praises of our volunteers, and to that end began our recent 2014 Team Day with an inspirational talk by Heidi Quinn, DOC’s Community Engagement Manager, avid supporter of Forest & Bird and a would-be cellist when she’s not saving the world. Heidi really made us think about the value of our wonderful volunteers. If you put dollar values on the combined wealth

Once a year all our Concert Managers from around the country come together for a Team Day in Wellington, joined by the national office staff and Chief Executive Euan Murdoch and hosted by Chairman of the Board, Roger King. This year many of our Branch Chairs also joined us. Heidi Quinn, Dept. of Conservation’s Senior Community

Engagement Advisor, started the day off and you can read more about this below.

of experience, expertise and time, our volunteers are CMNZ’s most valuable asset!

are so busy, we simply forget to take the time to stop and appreciate the people that help us along the way. We plan on changing that from now on, so be prepared for many grateful pats-on-the-back in future!

So why do you volunteer? See if you can relate to any of the following: • Volunteers want to have fun – I mean, honestly, if you’re going to do something for free you’ve got to enjoy it, right? • Volunteers want to give back and make a positive difference – we all want to keep the music going! • Volunteers want to learn from their volunteering experiences and meet new people • Volunteers want to share their knowledge and experience and have that energy to give • Volunteers have a passion for the organisation they support So how can CMNZ harness all that energy, knowledge and passion? We can start by saying a huge THANK YOU to all those volunteers who work so hard for us behind the scenes and have done so for many years to keep this wonderful organisation going. Often everyone’s lives

We were very fortunate to have Michael Houstoun join us to share his perspective as a touring artist. We spent the rest of the day exploring our season, sharing ideas and information so that we can bring the very best concert experience to you in 2014!

“I can no other answer make, but thanks, and thanks.” William Shakespeare If you’re keen to help us out, there are many ways in which you can contribute, from networking and helping to promote events, through to providing support at our concerts or driving some of our less mobile concertgoers on the night. Check out our website for more info on volunteering or to lend your support by signing up right now: www.chambermusic.co.nz/volunteer Sue Jane Business Support


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The

The Kelemen Quartet (left to right): Barnabás Kelemen (violin), Dóra Kokas (cello), Katalin Kokas (violin/ viola), Gábor Homoki (violin/ viola).

STRING QUARTET Second violinist, Siegmund Nissel from the Amadeus String Quartet reportedly compared the string quartet to a bottle of wine, suggesting that ‘the first violin is the label, the cello the bottle, and the middle parts the wine itself - the character of music, the quality, the colour, flavour and reliability’ (The Guardian, 2008). Each quartet reflects both the individual and the combination of personalities within; generating their own particular dynamic and energy, and creating the sound palette and musical interpretation we associate with them. It is a fascinating combination of personalities, cultural heritage and musicality that gives us, the audience, the many different ‘bottles of wine’ to enjoy, from a crisp sparkling sauvignon blanc through to the rich, dark and mellow pinot noir.

Cellist, Dóra Kokas on the Kelemen Quartet

“We are open for the inspiration of the moment – that’s how I would describe our quartet.” We begin 2014 with the charismatic and brilliant Kelemen Quartet, who bring the very finest of the Hungarian music tradition to their performances. They are presenting a programme that combines the classics of Mozart and Haydn alongside the great Hungarian repertoire of Bartók, Ligeti and Kurtág. The Kelemen Quartet is a family affair; they have been playing music together

for almost as long as they can remember. Barnabás Kelemen first met Katalin Kokas when they were schoolchildren at the Franz Lizst Academy in Budapest. The musical relationship soon developed into a romance and they ended up marrying at 18. Katalin’s younger sister by fourteen years, Dóra, began playing with them when she was as young as six and gradually became one of the group. The final member of the quartet Gábor Homoki was a student at the Franz Liszt Academy. Gábor caught the attention of Barnabás and Katalin, because of his like ability in playing the violin and viola with equal dexterity. As cellist, Dóra Kokas is the constant in the Quartet. She talks about what it is like to have three upper players moving between the violin and viola parts: “All of them are playing the violin and the viola equally well and all 3 of them are playing the parts differently because of different personality. However we all speak the same language of music so it doesn’t affect the style of playing in the quartet and we all react to each other differently compared to who is playing which part.” On deciding who plays violin I, violin II or the viola: “Sometimes it is obvious which part goes to whom, but there are moments when they have little fights. They all love every part and the beauty is that even if we learn it one way, later we can learn it the other way around.”

And from the perspective of the cellist: “It’s always a big difference for me too. When they change parts something else can be heard, different things can be heard, our ears opens up to different ideas. When they switch parts, my attention grows as well, because I have to react differently on certain things. Out of all these reasons it’s very useful for everyone, we get to know the parts better and we will know more about the piece, not just them, me too as the cellist. And of course it’s very exciting and a lot of fun!” Interestingly the Kelemen Quartet does not record in the studio. All their recordings are live and in performance they enjoy interacting with the audience. Before coming to our shores in March, the Kelemen Quartet are performing for Musica Viva in Australia. In a recent interview with Music Viva, Dóra comments ‘We play differently when hundreds or thousands of people are listening. They have such an energy, and we feel it on stage – it can’t be the same in an empty studio, where we would play for microphones. We need to see the faces of our audiences. Because it’s important how they react. ‘When we go onstage, immediately there is an atmosphere created by the audience. And once we start to play, after a few bars, we know how the audience reacts and how we will perform.’ Since the original publishing, due to an injury cellist Dóra Kokas has been replaced by guest Hungarian cellist Ákos Takács for the New Zealand tour.


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Going one better String Quartets however, do not exist in a vacuum; there are many wonderful works that require the addition of an extra player. In May, we are delighted that the New Zealand String Quartet returns to the stage with their long-time colleague and friend, clarinettist James Campbell. Described as “Canada’s pre-eminent clarinettist and wind soloist”(Toronto Star), James Campbell and the New Zealand String Quartet will perform some of the most loved chamber works of all time – the Mozart and Brahms Quintets alongside the fiery and virtuosic Weber Quintet. James Campbell is no stranger to the repertoire; he’s given more than 300 performances of the Mozart Quintet with over 35 different string quartets, the first time being with the Guarneri String Quartet. His recording of Brahms’s Clarinet Quintet with the Allegri Quartet was voted the “Top Choice” by BBC Radio 3 and The London Times. James holds a teaching position as Professor of Music at the highly acclaimed Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University and has given master classes all around the world. Since 1985 he has been the Artistic Director of the Festival of the Sound, Parry Sound, Ontario and this is where he and New Zealand String Quartet first performed together. Since then the musical relationship has continued to flourish!

When four becomes five… Interview with James Campbell What it is like as wind player to work and perform with a string quartet? ‘String quartets work on a very high musical level, imagine living daily with the greatest music ever written by the greatest composers who ever lived. Being so close to such greatness feeds the soul and constantly inspires the players to be the best they can be in every way. When music lovers attend a string quartet concert they are watching and hearing music played by four musicians who are rich in ways few can understand. When I perform with string quartets I feel privileged to be part of this special world.’ On the New Zealand String Quartet: ‘The New Zealand String Quartet feel like family to me, there is a comfort that can only come with long association and respect. I must quickly add that the comfort we feel is not always comfortable, the Quartet

members are all very lively and intelligent individuals and this of course leads to vibrant, passionate discussions and yes, arguments! Democracy at its most messy rules the rehearsals but harmony, unity and above all spontaneity rule the performances. In rehearsals I am reminded sometimes of a tour I did with the Amadeus Quartet many years ago. A discussion over the tempo of the last movement of the Brahms Quintet turned into one of their famous battles. I of course kept quiet, (at that time they had been together longer than I had been alive) but I did wonder about the sanity of it all. The rehearsal eventually ended, the battle forgotten, and we all went out to dinner. They were like brothers who felt comfortable enough to say what they felt needed to be said.’

“Campbell met the quartet on its own high-energy, lushly romantic ground in the Brahms Quintet for Clarinet and Strings in B minor, Op. 115. His mellow, penetrating sound meshed elegantly with the strings.” Chicago Sun Times James Campbell with The Colorado String Quartet

There have been many ‘string quartet plus another wind instrument’ works written, but somehow those with the clarinet seem to have a special quality about them. When Mozart was writing his quintet, the clarinet had only recently been invented and was

still in the early stages of development. Mozart was fascinated with the clarinet’s sonority and wide range, from its mellow alto voice to the highest bright reaches. The main characteristics of the clarinet come from a combination of the single reed, where the reed vibrates against a non-vibrating surface (the mouthpiece) and the shape of the main body of the instrument – it is a cylindrical tube. In comparison, double reed instruments such as the oboe and bassoon, have two sides of reed vibrating against each other and a conical shaped tube. In simple acoustic terms, this makes a difference to the way the air column vibrates within the tube and creates the particular tonal qualities we associate with each instrument. What is it about the clarinet that makes the particular combination with string quartet work so well? ‘The blend of clarinet and strings is one a few magical combinations of instruments, flute and harp is another. Clarinettists love to play with strings because the mixture of sounds adds a warmth to the clarinet tone and allows the clarinettist to explore the full range of colours naturally found in the clarinet.’ The works you are presenting are some of the all-time favourites of any chamber works written and will be familiar to many of our audience members. Why do you think these works are in the “top ten”? ‘The three works we are performing on this tour are considered “the big three” among clarinettists and it is significant to note that they were all inspired by the playing of a particular player: Mozart wrote for Anton Stadler, who was an early master of the newly invented clarinet, Weber wrote for the virtuoso Heinrich Baermann, and Brahms for the rich, singing sound of Richard Muhlfeld. Some works transcend all explanation and every sensitive listener intuitively recognized their greatness. These works take a lifetime for musicians to learn, but they also take a lifetime for listeners to hear. I am sure there are many in the audience who have been listening to these works for their entire life and can perhaps remember how they “heard” them at different stages in their life. Great music is a lifelong companion, slowly revealing her secrets as we mature.’ The New Zealand String Quartet will also be performing four ‘gems’ by New Zealand composers Karlo Margetic, Tabea Squire and Natalie Hunt from the new and innovative set of short pieces for string quartet ‘The Travelling Portmanteau’.


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Sound Bites Radio New Zealand Concert’s Kate Mead flew to Beijing in December 2013 and collected interviews about and music from those involved with ‘Tales from the Forbidden City’. She was at the performance in Beijing and has shared her experiences of her trip in several places. Short films and photos are on her Facebook page: www.facebook.com/kate.mead.37 Kate’s blogs are here www.blog.festival.co.nz and here www.katemead.co.nz

New Zealand String Quartet: Congratulations to Helene Pohl, Doug Beilman and Rolf Gjelsten who received recognition as Members of the New Zealand Order of Merit (MNZM) for their services to music in the New Year Honours list, joining previously awarded Gillian Ansell.

Auckland Chamber Music Society

Congratulations to Contest Alumni

The Society was established in 1929 by a group of Auckland music lovers, led by Roger and Julia Fenton. After an initial concert season, contact with similar societies around the country grew, enabling them to share the costs of bringing overseas artists to New Zealand. During the early days of Chamber Music New Zealand, member societies were independent and run by volunteers, so Auckland Chamber Music Society chose its own subscription series from the national roster of artists, organised the concerts, and did its own marketing. In 1988 the Auckland branch of Chamber Music New Zealand was established, but the Auckland Chamber Music Society remained as a parallel entity, using its accumulated funds to provide a prize for the best student chamber music group at Auckland University each year.

Salina Fisher, winner of the 2013 NZSO TODD Corporation Young Composers Award. NZCT Chamber Music Contest National Winner in 2007, 2008 and 2010, as both a violinist (Felix Octet, Bedrich Quartet) and pianist (The Genzmer Trio). Edward King (cello), who has been selected for the finals of the Australian Cello Awards, to be held in Sydney on 30 March 2014. NZCT Chamber Music Contest National Winner 2005 (Czechpoint). Trinity Trio, sibling musicians Stella (violin) and Sally Kim (cello) and Tina Kim (piano) of Auckland, winners of the 8th Annual Pettman/ROSL Arts International Scholarship for a New Zealand Chamber Ensemble. All three have been regulars on the NZCT Chamber Music Contest National Finals stage in the past, with Sally Kim being a member of Geist Quartet (2011 and 2012 National Winners).

Some of Kate’s observations about China: • The Chinese are kind, generous and warm with a natural sense of humour • They’re rightly proud of their extraordinary cultural history and are keen to share it • Western instruments can mimic Chinese instruments (see film 039 for Helene Pohl and Doug Beilman imitating Shen Cheng’s erhu) • The qin is one of China’s most ancient, and quietest, instruments (see film 041 for Wu Na giving a demonstration, sitting on the bed in Jack’s hotel room) Tokyo String Quartet musicians Martin Beaver and Clive Greensmith have joined forces with pianist Jon Kimura Parker to form a major new piano trio – The Montrose Trio. Brentano String Quartet have been named as new Quartet in Residence at Yale School of Music following a 15 year tenure at Princeton University.

Matthias Balzat (cello), who has been selected for the finals of the National Concerto Competition to be held in Christchurch on 8 March. NZCT Chamber Music Contest National Winner 2013 (Sollertinsky Trio).

Around CMNZ... Karen Carter is stepping down as our Concert Manager in Palmerston North. We would like to sincerely thank Karen for all her hard work and commitment to CMNZ over the past five years. We are delighted to introduce her successor, Virginia Warbrick, who comes to this role with a wealth of experience in the arts.

....and in the National Office Congratulations to Jessica Lightfoot, our Operations Co-ordinator, who became engaged to her partner James Graham, on Xmas Eve 2013!

The Auckland Chamber Music Society has handed over to Chamber Music New Zealand the role of running their annual prize for the best chamber music group at Auckland University’s School of Music.

Chamber Music New Zealand is honoured to take on this role, which fits well with our other activities. Many of the musicians competing for the prestigious Auckland Chamber Music Society prize will have already taken part in the NZCT Chamber Music Contest as school students prior to entering tertiary study. Competing for such prizes forms part of the essential career pathway for emerging chamber ensembles and offers vital performing opportunities to grow and develop musically.

Inaugural International Chamber Music Competition Celebrating 120 years of the City of Wollongong Eisteddfod, in conjunction with the Wollongong Conservatorium of Music, Australia. This chamber music competition is open to musicians between the ages of 20-30, and will be held from 8-13 September, 2014. Entrants must be an ensemble, consisting of 3-5 members, and entries are currently being accepted up until 30 April 2014. If you, or anyone you know are interested in being a part of this competition, please visit the website www.chambermusicwollongong. com.au for further information.


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On TOUR Kelemen Quartet

Core Funder Creative New Zealand

Presented in association with the New Zealand Festival

Supporters

9 Mar, 5pm

Dunedin

Glenroy Auditorium

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10 Mar, 7.30pm

Invercargill

Civic Theatre

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12 Mar, 7.30pm

Nelson

Old St John’s Church

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14 Mar, 7.30pm

Wellington

Michael Fowler Centre

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15 Mar, 7.30pm

Palmerston North

Regent Theatre

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16 Mar, 5pm

Napier

MTG Century Theatre

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18 Mar, 7.30pm

Hamilton

Gallagher Academy

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19 Mar, 8pm

Auckland

Auckland Town Hall

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21 Mar, 7.30pm

New Plymouth

Theatre Royal

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22 Mar, 7.30pm

Christchurch

Charles Luney Auditorium Buy tickets

New Zealand String Quartet with James Campbell

ABRSM • ASB Community Trust • Base Two Canterbury Community Trust • Carolyn & Peter Diessl Community Post • Community Trust of Southland Deane Endowment Trust • Dunedin City Council Eastern & Central Community Trust Endeavour Community Foundation Farina Thompson Charitable Trust • IHC Foundation Infinity Foundation • Invercargill Licensing Trust Johnston Lawrence • KBB Music • KPMG • Mainland Foundation Marie Vandewart Trust • McDermott Miller Strategies New Zealand Community Trust • Otago Community Trust Pelorus Trust • Phantom Billstickers • Positively Wellington Venues Royal Over-Seas League • SOUNZ • Sparks • THE EDGE The Lion Foundation • The Southern Trust • The Stout Trust Trevkel Music Trust • Trust Aoraki • TSB Community Trust Turnovsky Endowment Trust • Wallace Arts Trust Wellington City Council Accommodation Suppliers Crowne Plaza Auckland Nice Hotel, New Plymouth • County Hotel Napier InterContinental Wellington Coffee Supplier: Karajoz Coffee Company Chocolatier: de Spa Chocolatier Floral supplier: Global Living

5 May, 7.30pm

Palmerston North

The Speirs Centre

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6 May, 7.30pm

Wellington

Michael Fowler Centre

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7 May, 7.30pm

Christchurch

Charles Luney Auditorium Buy tickets

9 May, 7.30pm

Invercargill

Civic Theatre

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Level 3, 57 – 61 High St, PO Box 1425, Auckland Tel (09) 358 3589

11 May, 5pm

Dunedin

Glenroy Auditorium

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Email info@chambermusic.co.nz Website www.chambermusic.co.nz

12 May, 8pm

Auckland

Auckland Town Hall

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14 May, 7.30pm

Hamilton

Gallagher Academy

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15 May, 8pm

Napier

MTG Century Theatre

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17 May, 7.30pm

New Plymouth

Theatre Royal

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18 May, 5pm

Nelson

Old St John’s Church

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CHAMBER MUSIC NEW ZEALAND Level 4, 75 Ghuznee Street, P.O. Box 6238, Wellington Tel (04) 384 6133 Fax (04) 384 3773

BOARD Roger King (Chair), Paul Baines, Michelle van Gaalen, Peter Diessl, Helen Philpott, Lloyd Williams, Gretchen La Roche, Peter Walls BRANCHES Auckland: Chair, Victoria Silwood; Concert Manager, Ros Giffney Hamilton: Chair, Murray Hunt; Concert Manager, Gaye Duffill New Plymouth: Chair, Joan Gaines; Concert Manager, Susan Case

Have you subscribed to the 2014 Kaleidoscopes season? Save money and guarantee your seats for intense music experiences FULL SEASON and FLEXI PASS packages are still available. Subscribe today! Online: www.chambermusic.co.nz/subscribe Or Phone: 0800 CONCERT (266 2378)

Keep in touch Follow us on:

twitter.com/ChamberMusicNZ facebook.com/ChamberMusicNZ

Hawkes Bay: Chair, June Clifford; Concert Manager, Liffy Roberts Manawatu: Chair, Graham Parsons; Concert Manager, Virginia Warbrick Wellington: Concert Manager, Jessica Lightfoot Nelson: Chair, Henrietta Hannah; Concert Manager, Clare Monti Christchurch: Chair, Colin McLachlan; Concert Manager, Jody Keehan Dunedin: Chair, Terence Dennis; Concert Manager, Richard Dingwall Southland: Chair, Shona Thomson; Concert Manager, Jennifer Sinclair For all Concert Managers phone 0800 CONCERT (266 2378) Regional Societies located in: Blenheim, Cromwell, Gisborne, Gore, Hutt Valley, Kaitaia, Motueka, Rotorua, Taihape, Tauranga, Te Awamutu, Upper Hutt, Waikanae, Waimakariri, Waipukurau, Wanaka, Wanganui, Warkworth, Wellington, Whakatane and Whangarei. © Chamber Music New Zealand 2014 No part of this publication may be reproduced without the prior permission of Chamber Music New Zealand.


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www.chambermusic.co.nz

Buz Bryant-Greene

2014 NZCT Chamber Music Contest Supporting Tomorrow’s Musicians Today 2014 entries are now open. Ensembles and composers can apply online at our website: www.chambermusic.co.nz/contest Entries close: Monday 31 March 2014

Regional Showcase for the Central Region of New Zealand Wanganui, Saturday 21 June

Contest dates for 2014 Make a note in your diary, we would love to see you there! District Contests 3 June

Whangarei

4 June

Nelson

4 June

New Plymouth

5 June

Palmerston North

5-8 June

Auckland

6 June

Invercargill

6 June

Wanganui

8 June

Wellington

9-11 June

Christchurch

10 June

Tauranga

11 June

Hamilton

12 June

Timaru

13 June

Gisborne

13-14 June

Hawkes Bay

14-15 June

Dunedin

National Finals – Christchurch 1 August

Semi-finals

2 August

Final

Charles Luney Auditorium St Margaret’s College, Merivale.

For the winning ensemble, plus one other ensemble chosen from each district contest held in Wellington, Palmerston North, Wanganui, New Plymouth and Hawkes Bay. This pilot showcase is part of the lead up to our 50th anniversary celebrations in 2015, when we hope to have in place Regional Finals across the whole country, as part of the selection process for the National Finals.

Join the Alumni List The 50th anniversary of the NZCT Chamber Music Contest is approaching! The event reaches the milestone in 2015 and Chamber Music New Zealand will be celebrating with wonderful events, concerts and festivities! Have you, or anyone you know ever been involved in the Contest in any way? Whether as a participant; music tutor or teacher; parent or guardian; or a volunteer helper, and at any time since its establishment? If so, please go to our website to join the Contest Alumni and get the latest information on how we’ll be marking the 50th as well as insider scoop, special offers and more.

2014 ENCOMPASS SERIES The Rangitoto Trio, with brother and sister team, Callum (cello) and Amalia (violin) Hall are joined by pianist, John-Paul Muir, to be first up on the 2014 Encompass Series. Their tour takes them to both ends of the country, beginning in the far south in Gore on 9 March and with the final concert in Kerikeri on 23 March. Close on their heels are Wellington jazz band, The Troubles whose engaging and eclectic programmes have caught the imagination of many of our Regional Presenters. They begin in Gisborne on 9 April and then perform around the country at various times throughout the year. In May emerging New Zealand pianist, Buz BryantGreene is on the road with a programme that includes the #llamadrama by Robbie Ellis. #llamadrama follows the plight of a llama who escaped on to one of Melbourne’s busiest freeways in 2010. The story first broke on twitter, and proved to be a popular distraction for a long Friday afternoon. As both a narrative and a musical portrayal of the “twitterverse”, #llamadrama is a lot of fun and audiences warm to its humour and originality. See the full Encompass season here: www.chambermusic.co.nz/whats-on Rangitoto Trio: Amalia Hall (violin), John-Paul Muir (piano), Callum Hall (cello).

www.chambermusic.co.nz/contest-alumni

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Chamber Music New Zealand Theme February 2014  

THEME is Chamber Music New Zealand's quarterly subscriber newsletter. Full of behind-the-scenes information, insight into upcoming concerts...