CFUF 2021 Impact Report

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2 02 1 IMPACT RE PO RT

ALL IN ALWAYS


WE USE THE RESOURCES WE HAVE—OUR VOICE, OUR CENTER, OUR PARTNERS, AND OUR COMMUNITY—TO DRIVE POSITIVE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL CHANGE

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


IN THE WA KE OF T H E O N GO IN G R ACIAL INJUSTICES A ND S OCIOECO N OMIC D ISPAR ITIE S EXACER B ATED BY T H E COV ID -19 PAN D E MIC, THER E HAVE B EEN N U ME R O U S E F F O R TS TO CLOSE THE R ACIA L W E ALTH GAP. AT CF U F, TH E FOUNDATION OF O U R WO R K H AS ALWAYS B E E N TO ACHIEVE SOCIAL AN D ECON OMIC EQU IT Y F OR OUR MEMB ER S BY GE N E R ATIN G W E ALTH, TH E TA NGIB L E A ND INTAN GIB LE ASSE TS, TH AT GIV E THEM THE FR EED OM AN D O PPOR TU N IT Y TO L IVE THE L IVES TH E Y D E SIR E . A N EVOLUTION WITH IN O U R WO R K IS CR E ATIN G AVENUES FOR INTER GE N E R ATIO N AL W E ALTH TR A NSFER IN COM MU N ITIE S OF COLOR AN D TH E L EGACY IMPACT OF D OIN G S O. IN O R D E R F OR THIS KIND OF WEA LTH TR AN SF E R TO H APPE N SUCCESSFUL LY, A L L PL AYE R S IN TH E S YS TE M— COR POR ATE INSTI TU TION S, GOV E R N ME N T, A ND PHIL A NTHR OP Y—MU S T U N D E R STAN D THE SY STEMIC ISSUE S AT PL AY S O TH AT W E CA N COMMIT TO BE IN G PAR T O F IN N OVATIV E SOLUTIONS THAT WO R K TOWAR D GE N E R ATIN G EQUITA B L E WEA LT H F OR ALL.

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WE ARE THE CENTER FOR URBAN FAMILIES A

leading voice in the national conversation

on responsible fatherhood. A

support network for Baltimore’s most

vulnerable citizens. A

staunch advocate for child support reform

in Maryland. A

respected leader in workforce programming

that transforms lives through education, training, and wealth creation. A

trainer that helps non-profits across the

country strengthen low-income families.

OUR M I S S I O N I S TO S T RE NG TH EN U R B A N CO M M U N I TI ES BY HE LPI N G FAT H ER S A N D FA M I L I ES AC H I EV E S TAB ILI T Y A N D ECO NO M I C S U CC ES S .

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


With another passing year of continued uncertainty, I am fueled now, more than ever before, by our commitment to dismantling poverty. As an organization committed to working alongside residents of Baltimore City, our obligation to address the structural inequalities across systems is acutely clear—we must end poverty. It’s a bold goal, as many people tell me, but it is not unachievable.

" C RE AT I N G I NT E RG EN ER ATI O N A L W E A LT H I N FA M I L I ES OF CO LO R I S C R I T I C A L I N T H E LO N G -TER M T RA NS F O R M ATI O N O F U RB AN CO M M U N I TI ES ."

There have been a series of events during this past year and a half that have made me step back and really look at who we were before and who we are now. Who the Center was pre-pandemic, pre-storming of the nation’s Capitol, pre-racial reckoning, and the influence that those events have had on who we are today. I’ve reflected on who we were prior to the creation of our ALL In strategy, and how it has helped us formalize our comprehensive approach to tackle the cycles of inequity, accelerate social justice and economic opportunity, and advocate for policies that promote an inclusive and equitable economy for all. ALL In has been a catalyst in our ability to help fathers and families work.

The similarities are not lost on me between this perspective and the transformation that our members go through after completing our programs. In fact, one member’s transformation in particular helped define a critical component of the Center for Urban Families' strategic direction moving forward. As you will read in this year’s Member Feature Story on David Anderson, David was a CFUF Member and Alumnus who started his journey with us by graduating from our STRIVE® program in 2006. David went on to become the founder of his own pest control service company and, shortly thereafter, he added homeowner to his list of accomplishments with the help of our Homebuying Assistance Program. In April 2021, after battling a rare stomach cancer, David passed. A month prior to his transition, David and I were sitting on his daughter’s front porch, and he told me that he didn’t have anything set up to transfer his assets to his daughter. I went into response mode reaching out to my network to ensure that David’s affairs were in order, and all that he had worked so hard to create for his family would translate into intergenerational wealth. This experience made me realize the next layer of CFUF’s responsibility to our members. Creating intergenerational wealth in families of color is critical to the long-term transformation of urban communities. It’s equally important to recognize that wealth in communities of color goes beyond money, and the investment that an individual makes to enhance his or her social capital plays a crucial role in overcoming both social and economic barriers. Transferring David’s investment in himself changed the trajectory of his family—he passed on the resources, ideas, experiences, love, and support so that his children and grandchildren have the freedom to choose their own paths in life. With more transformations like David’s, entire communities can begin to change directions. Our recently completed five-year strategic plan, as summarized on the next two pages, confirms our commitment to the Baltimore community and to those residents, like David, who seek brighter futures for themselves and their families. We are excited for what the future holds and invite you to go ALL In with us.

Joseph T. Jones, Jr. Founder, President & CEO

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FORWARD THINKING & FUTURE FOCUSED In 2019, we launched ALL In, as our service delivery model, to dismantle poverty in Baltimore. Since its launch, we have sought to better understand the organizational implications associated with achieving this vision for our members. In February of 2021, CFUF engaged Wellspring Consulting to lead a strategic planning process to define the programmatic components of ALL In; address programmatic gaps; ensure alignment and integration across programs; and clarify needed organizational and financial requirements (e.g. staff, infrastructure, funding). The strategic plan builds on our deep commitment and connection to community; our knowledge and distinctive experience working with men and fathers; and our commitment to equity, and racial and economic justice. The plan charts the course for our next five years of supporting members to achieve social and economic mobility.

A strategic plan for the next five years Our five-year strategic plan projects staffing to grow from 35 to 55 FTEs, and our budget to grow from $4.3 million to $7.8 million. The plan centers on four strategic plan goals outlined on the next page.

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


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PR OVID E D IFFE R E N T T YPE S O F ON E-ON-O N E S U PPO R T TO ENCOUR AG E PR O GR AM E N R OLLME N T, CO MPLE TIO N, A ND ACHIEVEME N T OF ME MB E R GOALS The evolution of ALL In recognizes that not every member seeks long-term support. Going forward, ALL In will enable members to engage with CFUF in ways that make sense for them either through our “gateway” programs and holistic services, memberdriven networks that provide mutual support, by-request and time-limited case management, and intensive and long-term coaching.

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ENHA NCE OUR PR O GR AM POR TF OLIO AN D PA R TNER SHIPS TO PR OV ID E H O LISTIC S U PPO R T F OR MEMB ER FA MILIE S We will enhance our programming, both in-house and in collaboration with partners, so that available programs and services align with a clearly-defined set of mobility outcomes: workforce development, family strengthening, adult education, financial management, housing, health, social support, and social change.

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EMPLOY CA PACIT Y B U ILD IN G AN D ADVOCACY TO A DVA NCE R ACIAL AN D ECON OMIC J U S TICE IN B A LTIMOR E A N D B E YO N D We will employ capacity building and advocacy to advance racial and economic justice in Baltimore and beyond, by pursuing strategies to leverage our distinct knowledge; by disseminating that knowledge throughout the human services field; and by formalizing our advocacy approach on critical issues that impact members’ ability to achieve social and economic mobility.

4

STR ENG THEN DATA S YS TE MS TO F OS TE R IN N OVATION, CONTINUOUS IMPR OV E ME N T, AN D IMPACT We will remain a data-driven organization by defining and tracking program-specific outcomes, mobility outcomes, secondary metrics that measure members’ progress toward self-sufficiency, and additional data for purposes of improving CFUF’s effectiveness over time.

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TRANSFORMING FATHERS, FAMILIES & COMMUNITIES Since our founding in 1999, CFUF has remained at the forefront of addressing Baltimore’s most pressing issues, including poverty, unemployment, father-absence, and family disintegration. We maintain an unwavering commitment to assisting individuals in regaining the personal power needed to benefit their families and communities.

MEMBERS’ HOURLY WAGES HAVE INCREASED TO:

$14.29 $14.19 AV E R AGE WAGE

69,729 CH ILD R E N’ S LIVES IMPACTED

5,126

F U LL-TIME J O B S SECU R E D

IN TRANSPORTATION AND WAREHOUSING

$14.22

IN ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPPORT

$14.84 $15.92

IN MANUFACTURING

32,204

MEN’S AND WOMEN’S LI VE S TR A NSFOR MED

Data represents: 1/1/2020 – 12/31/2020

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT

292

JOB PLACEMENTS IN 2020

IN CONSTRUCTION


In a year like no other, CFUF provided…

$105,000

IN COVID-19 R E LIE F GIF T CAR D S THR OUG H AN AN ON YMO U S D O N OR

$10,000+

IN EMER G ENCY F IN AN CIAL AS S ISTAN CE , F OR GENER A L EMER GEN CIE S AN D R E N TAL AS S ISTAN CE

MORE THAN 100

COVID G IFT B AGS CO N TAIN IN G PPE , F OOD, SCHOOL SUP PLIE S, AN D LE AR N IN G GAME S

150 CHILDREN

FR OM 48 FA MIL IE S W ITH PR E SE N TS TH R O U GH L A MA R JACKSO N’ S F O U N DATIO N

MORE THAN 80

T HA NKSG IVING B A SKET S D ISTR IB U TE D D IR ECTLY TO ME MB E R S

5 FAMILIES

WITH $500 A MA ZO N CH R IS TMAS GIF T CAR D S OR WISH L ISTS THR OU GH AN E ME R ITU S B OAR D ME MB E R

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WE’RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


For self. For family. For future.

ALL IN IS CFUF’S COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGY TO TACKLE THE CYCLES OF INEQUITY, ACCELERATE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY, AND ADVOCATE FOR POLICIES THAT PROMOTE AN INCLUSIVE AND EQUITABLE ECONOMY FOR ALL. ALL In leverages two decades of applied learnings to: Address the serious challenges of chronic underemployment and family instability. AND Link individual accountability, person-centered case management, and supportive networks with workforce development training, education, and civic engagement.

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OUR CORE PROGRAMS STRIVE® Baltimore

Back to Business

An intensive 3-week workshop that combines tangible

A 3-day job readiness training that focuses on

skills, such as resume writing and interviewing, with

refreshing the soft skills and job search skills of

attitudinal training that prepares individuals to obtain

individuals with prior work experience who are seeking

and retain employment.

employment.

Baltimore Responsible Fatherhood Services

Baltimore BOOST (Boosting Opportunities for Social and Economic Mobility for Families)

A 4-week training integrated into STRIVE® Baltimore and other CFUF initiatives that utilizes CFUF's

A partnership between CFUF and Baltimore City

Developing All Dads for Manhood and Parenting

Community College (BCCC) that provides individuals

(DAD MAP) curriculum to assist non-custodial

with low incomes, access to work and life skills

fathers with low incomes, to increase and build

training, BCCC job training certification programs, job

their fatherhood knowledge and skills.

placement and retention support, and other supportive services to accelerate social and economic mobility.

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


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BALTIMORE COMMUNITIES ASSISTING AND ADVANCING NEIGHBORS + BALTIMORE 2GEN ECOSYSTEM: ALIGNING INITIATIVES FOR GREATER OUTCOMES With over two decades of experience in human

Wealth goes beyond dollars and cents. It is about the

services, the Center for Urban Families has fine-tuned

tangible and intangible assets that give an individual

our support strategies and programmatic design

the freedom and opportunity to live the life he or she

serving Baltimore’s most marginalized populations

desires. Similarly, poverty is not just about a lack of

living in high crime and high poverty communities.

money; it is also about a lack of power. According to

We’re driven to help our members fully exit poverty

the US Partnership on Mobility from Poverty, although

and sustain themselves and their families inclusive of

measures of economic success such as income and

fathers—ultimately strengthening urban communities

assets are foundational to upward mobility, they do not

by addressing the real systematic barriers that prevent

fully capture people’s experiences. Consideration must

neighborhoods of color from growing.

be given to one’s intangible assets, such as their unique

In the wake of the ongoing racial injustices and socioeconomic disparities exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, there have recently been numerous efforts to close the racial wealth gap. In order to successfully do so, however, requires understanding a fundamental component of wealth inequality often void in the dialogue of these efforts: the definition of wealth and poverty in communities of color.

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT

skills and talents, educational opportunities, emotional and mental well-being, relationships and networks, their sense of belonging within their community, and their sense of control over the trajectory of their lives to enhance both their social and material capital—the true representation of one’s overall wealth.


So how do we enhance one’s social and material

generations) simultaneously, the application of 2Gen

capital? The Center for Urban Families’ latest

practices will impact a parent’s education and social

undertaking, Baltimore Communities Assisting and

and economic stability, while simultaneously impacting

Advancing Neighbors (BCAAN), tackles this head on.

the overall health of a child’s learning and development

BCAAN is a three-year initiative funded by the Robin

trajectory. The outcomes on children’s education and

Hood, Harry and Jeanette Weinberg, and Bill and

healthy development are powerful catalysts to drive

Melinda Gates Foundations. BCAAN is supporting

parents’ own well-being, thus increasing the potential

residents to access economic and social pathways,

of the whole family to thrive.

and gain leadership and gain leadership and advocacy skills, in order to co-create new solutions to sustainably, lift families out of poverty, and create pipelines of next-generation leaders of local community-based organizations. Focused on the Greater Penn-North Community in Baltimore, BCAAN is constructing an economic mobility ecosystem using a multi-generational approach that will assist community residents with working toward economic success, power and autonomy, and being valued in the community.

Recognizing the synergies across the BCAAN and 2Gen projects, CFUF is aligning the work as The Baltimore Social and Economic Mobility Collaborative to position greater outcomes for both initiatives. Coupling a multigenerational approach to advancing social and economic mobility for adults and their children (Baltimore 2Gen) with a place-based approach to enhancing residents’ skills while building next-generation organizational leaders (BCAAN), the Collaborative will create a vibrant network of community organizations,

Complementing the BCAAN initiative work is the

service providers and West Baltimore residents to

continuation of the Baltimore 2Gen Ecosystem

ensure families inclusive of fathers have access to a

Framework that CFUF launched last year. Aimed at

seamless network of services and opportunities that

addressing the needs of adults and children (two

enable adults and children to thrive.

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MEET OUR MEM

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


MBERS

MEMB E R S AR E TH E D R IV IN G F OR CE B E H IN D C F UF. THE IR PE R S E V E R AN CE AN D ACCOMPLIS H ME NT S B R IN G TO LIF E TH E IMPACT OF TH E CE N TE R A ND TH E SU PPOR T OF OU R PAR TN E R S. OU R GOA L IS TO EQU IP O U R ME MB E R S W ITH TH E R ES O U R CE S TH AT E MPOW E R TH E M TO B ECOM E CHA N GE AGE N TS W H O TR AN SF O R M TH E IR LIV E S, FA M ILIE S, AN D COMMU N ITIE S. E V E RY DAY, AS A ME MB E R SECU R E S F U LL-TIME E MPLOYME N T, A YO U TH IS ACCE PTE D IN TO CO LLEGE , AN D A COU PLE STAB ILIZE S A H E ALTH Y R E L ATIO N S H I P A ND H OME , W E AR E R E MIN D E D OF TH E H O PE A ND PR O MISE TH AT LIE S W ITH IN TH E M.

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CREATING INTERGENERATIONAL WEALTH IN COMMUNITIES OF COLOR

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


Anita Dinkins says there is no telling how long it will

looking for a fresh start, not long after completing drug

take her daughter to stop referring to her new home

and alcohol treatment. He was able to then land a job

as “Pop Pop’s house.”

with a pest control company and, after a few years,

Dinkins’ late father, David W. Anderson, bought the

Anderson decided to strike out on his own.

rowhouse on Clifton Avenue in the West Baltimore

He founded DWA Pest Service, LLC, and with the help of

Penn-North Community with the help of the Center

the CFUF team, he passed the licensing and certification

for Urban Families nearly a decade ago, and it became

exams. He would say the Center was “like a family that

the place the patriarch gathered his family for Sunday

doesn’t give up on you.” (He was also fond of telling

dinners, holidays, and celebrations.

stories about how Ms. Forrest and Ms. Pitchford made flashcards to help him study, and stopped to quiz him

When he died in April 2021, Anderson left the home

randomly in the hallways of the Center.)

as a stepping stone for his children and grandchild to get ahead in life. Now, Dinkins’ 25-year-old daughter—

Soon after passing the exams, Anderson’s company

DeAsia, Anderson’s eldest grandchild—will move into

was providing pest control to dozens of homes

the home with her children. There, the young mother

and businesses each month, including fellow CFUF

will find an affordable and secure place to live while

members Marcus and Bobbi Collick. Another one of his

she works to shore up her own future, just as Anderson

clients was CFUF itself, where Facilities Manager Lloyd

had wished.

Wright said other than being a “good guy, a really good guy,” Anderson did a great job and was always teaching

“That is the best part for him: He was able to help his

and learning.

family,” Dinkins said of her father. “That was all that mattered to him.”

“He showed me some things I didn’t know,” Wright said. “I truly miss him right now. I saw David go through

When Anderson came to CFUF, he could never have

his journey to become an entrepreneur. His story is one

predicted all the ways his life would change, his

of the highlights of what we do here to promote the

daughter said. He graduated from STRIVE® in 2006

potential of people who come into the facility.”

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Anderson added homeowner to his list of

Brown said he was deeply moved by Anderson’s story

accomplishments with the help of CFUF’s Homebuying

and for help assisting him, he tapped Brett F. Baldino,

Assistance Program. Once homeless, Anderson was

an Associate in his firm who specializes in estate

amazed by the life he built by grabbing hold every time

planning. The attorneys happily offered to represent

CFUF extended an opportunity, Dinkins said.

Anderson pro bono and had the opportunity to speak

“They made all his dreams come true, every last one of his dreams,” Dinkins said. “They were a cut above. He couldn’t have gone to a better program.” The Center’s support continued through the end of his life. When Anderson was diagnosed with a rare stomach cancer and given six months to live, Joe Jones reached out to his network to ensure Anderson’s affairs were in order and all he worked so hard to create for his family would translate into intergenerational wealth. Jones called Jamar R. Brown to ask for help with Anderson’s estate planning. A Partner in the litigation group at Rosenberg Martin Greenberg, LLP, Brown said Jones is a mentor and a friend, and whenever he reaches out, “you know he is doing something to impact someone’s life for the better, and I wanted to be a part of that.”

with him on multiple occasions to learn more about him, his family, and the legacy he intended to leave them. Baldino then prepared an advance directive and a will for Anderson to help ensure that his wishes would be honored upon his passing. “He could not have been more appreciative of us for the work we had done,” Brown said. “He was just a great personality, really funny. I was in stitches for most of the time. What I came away with most was the pride he had to be able to leave something to his family. That was critically important to him." “He was a man who had clearly worked hard to overcome a lot to get where he was.” Anderson, 62, died about two weeks after their final visit. Monica Mitchell, Vice President of Social Impact and Sustainability for Wells Fargo Bank, said Anderson “had a magnetic personality” and the two instantly clicked. Wells Fargo provided the down payment for his home as part of its NeighborhoodLIFT initiative, and she got to know Anderson as a result.

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


“I count it as a privilege and an honor to know David,”

She says she was “always a Daddy’s girl”—even if her

she said. “He was the perfect embodiment of someone

father affectionately called her by the nickname “Boy.”

I look up to.

He had a single tattoo: her name on his arm.

“David’s life has not been a storybook by any

She says he would be thrilled to know his family’s legacy

description, but through the collaboration of a

will be continued in the home he provided for them.

committed and interconnected partner like CFUF and programs like Wells Fargo’s, you have the perfect demonstration of what it means to give people a hand up and not a handout.”

“I know he is excited, saying, ‘I left them something,’” Dinkins said. “That’s all he kept thinking about, him leaving us stuff. I just didn’t want him to leave me.”

Mitchell said Anderson also went on to provide pest control for the charter school for girls that she founded in Northeast Baltimore, the Lillie May Carroll Jackson School. Anderson took great pride in the work he did in service of the students, and he became part of the school family. “There are so many lessons to be learned from David’s life,” Mitchell said. Dinkins said she hopes to continue what her father started in his pest control company, although she says, “I am not into bugs. I am not into rodents. I’m going to do it because that is what my Dad wanted. I want to fulfill the rest of his dream.” She says for her father, however, the company was always much more than bugs and rodents. It was his chance to connect with others and help improve their quality of life—and as the owner of the business, he could do so on his terms. “He didn’t want to work for nobody else,” Dinkins said. Anderson grew up in Baltimore City and attended Forest Park High School before enlisting in the Army. Dinkins said her father was eventually kicked out of the service and spent years on a destructive path before committing to turning his life around.

IN ME MO RY OF

David Wesley Anderson 19 5 8–2 0 2 1

For much of her early childhood, Dinkins said her father was incarcerated. She visited him as often as she could, and the two cemented a bond that was profound. While in prison, he made her a simple wooden jewelry box with a drawer lined in blue fabric, her favorite color. She’s kept it for almost 40 years.

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C FUF M E M B E R

DEVIN LEE “THIS IS SOMETHING THAT IS IN MY NAME. I CAN LEAVE IT TO MY DAUGHTER…IT’S A GLORIOUS THING.”

"Don’t blame anybody else. What

The most important thing I learned

My neighbors—including

are you doing? You can’t point

was, you have to look into yourself

David Anderson [his next door

the finger nowhere else." That’s

as far as finding out what’s holding

neighbor]—had all been through

what Mr. Jones says. It’s one of

you back. To me, that was the

STRIVE®, and we brought a different

his protocols.

most important thing. You have to

kind of energy to the community.

humble yourself.

We were not tolerating the trash.

Being released from one of my

We call when people illegally dump

jobs led me to STRIVE®. I’m not a

I was finishing STRIVE® when they

religious person, but some stuff

asked me if I would be interested

happens because it is supposed

in homeownership. I said, "Sure."

to happen, and this was what was

Then I forgot about it. I was

supposed to happen for me and

working in a new job when they

This is something that is in

my family.

came to me again and asked how

my name. I can leave it to my

my credit score was. They gave

daughter. If I decide to buy another

me tips on how to boost my score

piece of property, she can have

and showed me some houses

this. It is a glorious thing.

I had set goals for myself to reach by the time I turned a certain age. But it was getting released from that job that I was able to meet my goals of becoming a homeowner and owning a motorcycle, because it led me to CFUF.

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT

down the street from Penn and North. I was able to buy one of the rowhomes that was gutted and fixed up.

or when the grass needs to be cut. We say, "Let’s get rid of the rats and the riffraff."


Delivering medical equipment for

We are in a good community

When we say we are a CFUF

Johns Hopkins during the peak of

with strong schools and the kind

family, we are a CFUF family.

COVID, Marcus could come home,

of neighbors who will put your

Since moving to Baltimore from

stop in our finished basement

trash can out if you forget. But the

the Eastern Shore, we’ve been

to change clothes and keep our

real comfort is knowing we have

through the STRIVE® and Back

children safe from the virus. He

something of our own that someday

to Business programs, and two

even had a comfortable space

we can leave to our children.

of our children have completed

when he needed to quarantine that we would not have had if we were still in our old apartment.

CFUF training and I am now the At CFUF, the Homebuying

Associate Accountant and the

Assistance Program wasn’t just

Financial Case Manager at CFUF.

about finding a property and

We bought our home just a few

getting a loan. The team gave

months before the pandemic

us support and mentorship and

hit, after we completed CFUF’s

helped us think through what we

Homebuying Assistance Program.

needed to set ourselves up for

It’s a semi-detached house in

success, like a savings account to

Northeast Baltimore off Harford

cover future repairs. They were

Road and Northern Parkway with

with us when we were searching

four bedrooms, two bathrooms

for a house. They were there when

and a backyard deck. We pulled

we did the inspection, and they

up the old green carpet to reveal

celebrated with us at closing.

We did this later in life, but we know now how to help our children do it earlier. We’re proud, as parents, that we can guide them in the right direction. CFUF gave us the tools to build a legacy.

original hardwood floors, and we didn’t have to ask permission from a landlord to change the light pink walls to a modern gray and white.

CFUF MEMBERS

MARCUS AND BOBBI COLLICK “CFUF GAVE US THE TOOLS TO BUILD A LEGACY.”

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The place I live at now is mine.

Having this stability during the

At STRIVE®, I learned how to

I did not see myself being a

pandemic, you realize the power

make myself more marketable

homeowner. It wasn’t in the plans

of owning your home. No one is

to employers. It wasn’t just a job

for me, or so I thought. But the

going to take it from you. I never

program—they deal a lot with the

Center for Urban Families has a

had to worry about rent increases

individual. Their training is tailored

program. I signed the papers about

or anything of the sort. And I am

to people like me who have been

a week after my 34th birthday, and

building equity with the money I

born and raised in Baltimore and

it felt good at the time. But it has

am paying for my mortgage.

have been through some things.

really made a difference in the two years since.

I have been a member at the Center for about five years since I signed up for STRIVE®. After I

CFUF MEMBER

ERIC SMITH

They take all of that into account. They train you, sure, but they also establish a relationship with you.

completed the program, I was

If I never joined the Center, I would

able to go through a job training

have been more dependent on

boot camp at The Foundery in

other people during the pandemic.

South Baltimore for metalwork and

Right now, I am mostly dependent

fabrication. The combination of

upon myself. I am in a position that

those two opportunities set me up

I turn down more work than I can

with the skills I use today.

take on. Multiple people have played a role in my success, and the Center for Urban Families has been a big part. At the end of the day, you have to commit. But, it’s like CFUF says, “we are not giving you anything; we are helping you get what you earn.”

“LIKE CFUF SAYS, 'WE ARE NOT GIVING YOU ANY THING; WE ARE HELPING YOU GET WHAT YOU EARN.'"

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


C FUF M E M B E R S

SANTORIO MARTIN AND CHAUNA BROWN “ TO G ETHER , WE AR E CHAN G IN G THE N AR R ATIVE FO R OU R CHIL DR EN AN D OU R CHIL DR EN’ S CHIL DR E N. ”

Through CFUF, we’re not just

Leading us down the path to

to connect me, with a career,

building generational wealth, we’re

homeownership is the latest way

not only a job, and I am now a

breaking generational curses.

CFUF has touched our lives. I

superintendent at The Whiting-

signed up for STRIVE® as I was re-

Turner Contracting Company.

We bought our home in Northeast Baltimore in August 2018 with the help of CFUF’s Homebuying Assistance Program. It is a split-level with a backyard, room for our kids and the dogs, a home office, a loft

entering society following a lengthy incarceration, battling Hodgkin’s lymphoma and learning to walk again after the cancer attacked my vertebra. One day, Mr. Jones caught

CFUF is our support system. If we need a push, they give us one. They are with us for those talk-us-off-theledge moments.

me walking out of the program,

This home and life we’ve built so far

spun me around and gave me a

is just the start of the goals we will

big promise: If I completed the

attain individually and collectively.

It feels good to come home, and it

program, I would never be alone. I

Together, we are changing the

is a blessing for our children to have

would always have a family.

narrative for our children and our

and a finished basement with a kitchenette.

this stability. CFUF made sure all our ducks lined up—our credit was good, accounts were in order—so we could move forward.

This is one of the most powerful statements a person could hear, and it was genuine. A dozen years later, CFUF continues to keep that promise. Also, Joe helped

children’s children. The things we have gone through, the history embedded in our fiber, what we saw as the norm, will not be the norm for our kids.

25


CF U F M EM BER

DONELL THOMAS It was about 10 years ago when I came home and found a flyer for the Center for Urban Families hanging on the knob of my front door advertising a program I had never heard of: STRIVE®. I had so much on my mind—I felt like I had lost everything over a period of several years, a job, a marriage, all my possessions, even custody of my children. At one point, I had also lost my house and was living in my mother’s basement.

And here’s what the people at the

I look at the house, we’re trying to

Center did: They have a heart.

make it feel like heaven in there. It

Regardless of what is going on,

is so quiet and peaceful. The kids

they want to help. When my family

are real relaxed.

I was struggling hard, so when I

needed groceries, they connected

saw the door tag, I pulled it off

me to food. They showed me how

the knob and didn’t pay it no

to improve my resume and linked

mind. For months, it just sat there.

me up with job opportunities. They

I knew I needed to get my life on

provided Thanksgiving dinner and

track, so eventually I went down

gift cards to help make things a

to the Center to register myself

little easier. The lessons I learned

for the program.

in the Fatherhood program help me when I am trying to teach

Over the years, I worked hard

responsibility to my kids, who are

to make my way and eventually

now teenagers.

regained custody of my kids. I became a certified nursing

Earlier this year when I was looking

assistant and worked in the

to buy a house, Ms. Marilyn helped

field before starting my career

me get a $10,000 grant. I closed

at Johns Hopkins delivering

on my new home in Northwood

medical equipment.

on June 6. When my girlfriend and

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT

I appreciate what I’ve been through. I am definitely stronger today. You have to look adversity straight in the face and deal with it.

“YOU HAVE TO LOOK ADVERSIT Y STRAIGHT IN THE FACE AND DEAL WITH IT."


CFUF B EL IEVES IN TH E POW E R O F INTER GENER ATIONAL W E ALTH AN D TH E COMPOUNDING R OLE IT PL AYS IN TR AN SF O R MIN G COMMUNITIES OF COLOR . CR E ATIN G S OCIAL A ND MATER IA L WE ALTH F O R MAR GIN ALIZE D POPUL ATIONS R EQ U IR E S ACCE SS TO R E SO U R CE S, ID EA S, EXPER IENCE S, AN D SU PPOR T TH AT PR O MOTE A N INCLUSIVE A ND EQU ITAB LE ECON OMY F OR A L L . IF WE CA N CO LLECTIV E LY D O TH IS, W E B EL IEVE THAT FUTU R E GE N E R ATIO N S W ILL B E TH E MA NIFESTATION O F TH IS R E ALIT Y—TH AT AN YO N E , R EG A R DL ESS OF R ACE , E TH N ICIT Y, OR GE N D E R , CA N R ECOG NIZE T H E IR POTE N TIAL AN D R E ALIZE THEIR D R EA MS.

27


CHAMPIONS OF CHANGE Over twenty years of impact has been fueled by a group of people that have been ALL In since the beginning. A collection of dynamic individuals with infinite optimism, quiet steadfastness, and an unwavering belief in the potential of all people. They have been, and continue to be, the perfect embodiment of everything CFUF stands for.

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


C FUF PART N E R

BETH HARBER

SEN IO R P R O G R AM O F F IC ER F O R CO MMU N IT Y DEV ELO P MEN T AN D EN V IR O N MEN T, ABEL L F O U N DAT IO N

“ONE HOMEOWNER CAN CONTRIBUTE TO THE COHESION AND STABILITY AND INVESTMENT IN A COMMUNITY.”

The Abell Foundation was long

Joe saw that the first members

would look up to, as they strived

invested in Center for Urban

who took part in a pilot program

to achieve the same stability and

Families and its work helping

to buy homes on Pennsylvania

financial benefits.

people rise above difficult

Avenue became beacons of hope

situations when Joe Jones came

and emissaries for other members.

to us with another barrier their

Along with buying property, they

members continued to face:

experienced a change in mindset

finding affordable housing.

that comes with the comfort and

Their graduates had success

pride of owning a home.

Much of CFUF’s success in taking on this new program was due to their Director of Development, Marilyn Aklin. She held the members' hands, connecting them to resources like financial

landing jobs and staying in them,

Then, he came to us and said, "I

management, lenders and realtors.

but Joe saw another opportunity.

want to incentivize people," and the

She was with them whenever there

Through homeownership, they

Abell Board agreed to help do that

was a setback and helped manage

could overcome the insecurity and

by providing grants for members

the inspection process. She went

disrespect they’d experienced in their

who worked with local counselors

ALL In from beginning to end.

lives by grabbing hold of a chance to

to build credit and complete a

build intergenerational wealth.

homeownership program.

With CFUF in their lives, owning a

CFUF stepped outside of its

other members, but also the

home was the next step for their

comfort zone to take on a program

neighborhoods. It is one person,

members to transform their lives

like this. They had to be deeply

one household, one step at a time.

and fulfill their potential. (Now, they

involved in people’s lives to be

One homeowner can contribute

were working, finding themselves

helpful to them. The vision was that

to the cohesion and stability and

to be creditworthy, and they were

the homeowners would become

investment in a community. That

saving money. Homeownership

mentors whom other members

is powerful.

In the end, the impact is not only on the families themselves and

was the next step.).

29


CFUF PARTNER

CHRIS SWEENEY MARYLAND VOLUNTEER LAWYERS SERVICE’S WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT COORDINATOR When we first started offering expungement clinics with CFUF, we would see as many as 30 clients in one night. People could sign up in advance or walk in to get an appointment with an attorney that was completely free. One of our volunteer attorneys would sit down with a client they never met, look up their cases and provide advice right on the spot. The attorneys would do an immediate analysis, print the

life on track. It can be the thing

CFUF is able to maintain such

documents and get them signed so

that gets them over the hump and

a strong relationship with their

everything would be taken care of.

ready for success.

members, in part, because they

I have seen people get emotional and even cry. Sometimes it is as if this dark cloud hanging over them is being removed.

Working with CFUF, we are able to coordinate services in a way that most benefits people. And it helps our attorneys to work with clients

While we have not been able to

who trust CFUF. We are sometimes

have a clinic since the pandemic,

seen as outsiders. There isn’t

I stay in regular touch with CFUF

always a lot of trust with the judicial

program managers so we can

system, and we can seem to be a

continue to offer expungements

part of that.

to anyone who is interested.

The trust the community has in

Our partnership has been hugely

CFUF also helps our attorneys

impactful, and it goes beyond

make sure the legal work stays

expungements. My coworkers

on track. Our partnership lets

help CFUF members with issues

us increase engagement and

related to taxes, deeds and

communication that might

homeownership. Legal services

otherwise fall off when a person is

can be that final piece of a puzzle

facing so many pressing issues in

when someone is trying to get their

their life and they need to prioritize.

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT

offer such a warm and welcoming environment. They have really great energy. In my experience, everyone is so positive, and that rubs off on the people who are coming in.

“ S O M ETIM ES IT IS AS IF THIS DARK CLO UD HAN G ING OVER THEM IS BEIN G R EM OVED. ”


C FUF B OAR D M E M B E R

CHRIS R. ROCKEY SVP, NORTHEAST TERRITORY EXECUTIVE, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BANKING AND PNC-CERTIFIED WOMEN’S BUSINESS ADVOCATE AT PNC BANK

“IF YO U’ R E G O IN G TO R EPAIR AN D IM PROVE CO M M UN ITIES, YO U HAVE TO STAR T AT THE CO R E WITH IN DIVIDUALS AN D FAM IL IES.”

The way I think about CFUF is, the

foster healing. I didn’t know what

Brown communities. Like we

team has a double bottom line

to do, but I knew we needed to

did following the uprising, PNC

impact—they increase economic

do something. I also knew what

is again investing in Joe and his

opportunities for their graduates

Joe and his team are capable of.

team. This time, we are providing a

and their families while expanding

We ended up funding a series of

grant to help their pursuit of social

the tax base and reducing the

community conversations with

justice in the face of the systemic

need for services. Their success

topics like racism, community

racism that has long enabled the

starts by meeting people exactly

policing and economic

conditions that led to COVID’s

where they are and developing

development. We had speakers

disparate impact.

holistic programs to serve

lined up and open mics so we

them. If you’re going to repair

could listen to the community and

and improve communities, you

draw on their wisdom.

have to start at the core with individuals and families.

Serving this organization is my honor and privilege. As a Navy veteran, and now in my current

CFUF operates with intention.

role, I have spent my life serving

Whether you’re talking about

our country and our community.

It was with all of this in mind, on

STRIVE®, the fatherhood initiative

And when I see the success CFUF

the day after the uprising in 2015

or their efforts around workforce

creates in the lives of so many, I

following Freddie Gray’s murder,

development, this mission is

know I am also serving the child

that I picked up the phone to call

more important than ever as we

I was once, the son of a single

Joe. I was in my office at Pratt

consider the ways the pandemic

parent living in poverty, and all the

and Light streets searching for the

has widened the racial wealth

children in similar situations.

best way to invest grant money to

gap and pummeled Black and

31


C FUF B OAR D M E M B E R

VERNĀ MYERS

For many of us who are doing well, we wake up with this idea that the future is bright, or that we have control over our lives. There are

VP, INCLUSION STRATEGY, NETFLIX

also people who are waking up understanding that they have to try again to find a job or explain to their manager once more why they need time off to take care of their kids, and convince their manager that they shouldn’t fire them for doing right by their kids. It is a lot to expect someone to hope in a situation where there are so many barriers. CFUF is trying to be that safety net, to create that hope. They understand that a lot of things have to go right for people to keep moving forward. Housing costs are ridiculous and wages are too low. Families do not have wealth because of the inequities and circumstances that preceded them. This is what people mean when they say structural inequality. There are ways to overcome the obstacles, but it is almost

You need a squad. You need

inequities. Whenever I have a

impossible for individuals to

people who are surrounding you,

problem, I think, "Who do I know?"

do this alone. Families do this.

plugging the holes until you can

No one is successful without

Communities do this. Schools and

get some running room. CFUF is

having those types of connections.

governments do this—sometimes.

the squad.

“ T H E RE A R E WAY S TO OVERCO M E T HE OBS TAC L ES , B UT I T I S A L M O S T IMPO S S I B L E F O R IN DIVID UA L S TO DO T H I S A LO N E.”

create networks. And when one

to believe that their situations can

member sees another having

improve by giving the skills and

success they think, "Maybe I can

social capital needed to thrive. So

do that."

many people don’t know anybody who knows anybody. So when they aspire to a goal, they think, "I don’t know how to do this, and I don’t know anybody who I can get to show me." The lack of social capital is completely linked to social

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT

CFUF works with its members to

They are giving people a reason

Joe says his goal is to end poverty. It is so bold to say something like that. The thing I love about CFUF is, they are willing to take on such a seemingly insurmountable and knotty problem and do the concrete things needed to unravel it.


CFUF B OARD MEMBER

PATRICK SISSMAN PRINCIPAL AT REDWOOD CAPITAL INVESTMENTS

up to be on solid ground after

The CFUF Board and leadership

they finish the programs, so

team meet regularly and get

they are ready to continue their

into the weeds with the data to

upward trajectory.

understand the significance of

Like Joe says, the work is all about disrupting the cycle of poverty. That is a big goal, and CFUF is going after it in a smart way. The people who graduate from their programs come out on the other side, not just with a job but a

CFUF is all about doing the hard

career path.

the work CFUF is doing. I’ve been so impressed by how the team holds themselves to really high standards. For CFUF it’s not just, "Did a member find a job?" But, "Can we help them become a homeowner? How is their family doing? How can we further help with their career?" It’s that level of

work, and the impact it makes is

The question isn’t just how many

engagement that allows CFUF to

really impressive to me. I’ve been

people enroll in a program,

have an outsized impact.

on the Board for about three years,

but also how many of them

but I have known for a long time

find sustainable jobs with the

this is an organization I wanted to

opportunity for further mobility.

be involved with.

They need to be able to build

Working at an investment firm myself, I like that a big part of the mission of CFUF is on economic security. The focus is not just on the members, but also on their families. The Center sets people

wealth and provide for their family—and that can create a ripple effect throughout the city. I am a new dad, and it means a lot to me to see their focus on fatherhood and the importance of family.

As a Board, we try to look for any ways we can help build the employment pipeline for CFUF members and make sure folks are aware and excited about all of the good work that is going on at the Center. Once people get to see it in an up-close and personal way, they are hooked.

“ T HE WO R K I S A L L A B O UT DIS RU P TI N G T H E C YC L E O F POVE RT Y. T H AT I S A B I G G OAL , AN D C F U F I S G O I N G A F TER IT I N A S M A R T WAY.”

33


“WHEN OUR MEMBERS REACH THEIR GOALS, THEY CHANGE THEIR WHOLE TRAJECTORY. EVERY THING WE DO CAN LEAD TO GENERATIONAL WEALTH.”

C FUF S TAFF

TYLER YUTZY INTAKE & RETENTION SPECIALIST/ ALL IN CASE MANAGER Our members know we stick with

important. I try to let them know

this was an organization I wanted

them each step of the way. They

right from that first day that we are

to get involved with. I started at

know that because after we tell

a support system for them. And I

the Center as a GED tutor, then I

them, we show them.

am continually reaching out—daily,

volunteered and became an intern

weekly, I am staying connected.

and eventually was hired as an

The bond you form with them is

Intake & Retention Specialist.

I first meet our members when they sign up for STRIVE® or another one of our programs, or because

life-lasting.

When our members reach their

they need help managing their

We are the Center for Urban

goals, they change their whole

child support debt or finding

FAMILIES. We are going to embrace

trajectory. Everything we do can

housing they can afford. I try to

you. That is what makes people

lead to generational wealth. If

find out whatever their needs are,

stick with us. They are family, and

you’re a kid, and you see mom

and then we start setting goals.

we treat them like it.

and dad get dressed every day

We’re here to break down walls,

I was born in Baltimore but moved

but before we can do that, we

to Garrett County when I was in

need to gain people’s trust. Doing

elementary school. I came back

that varies from person to person.

to Baltimore after college, and my

Sometimes people will come in

girlfriend heard Ms. Kate speaking

and understand they’re coming

about CFUF at an event. I have

to a safe environment. Building

always wanted to help people

that relationship off the bat is so

overcome barriers, and I knew

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT

wearing a suit, grabbing their lunch pail, you learn what is possible. We are all about empowering these hardworking, beautiful men and women so they can keep on being awesome human beings.


CFUF S TAF F

LLOYD WRIGHT FACILITIES MANAGER

I tell our members finishing our Homebuying Assistance Program and searching for that perfect property: "Make sure the roof and the plumbing, heating and electrical are all sound. Those are the dealbreakers." They know they can turn to me, and I try to give them the truth. I want them to benefit from the knowledge I’ve learned over the years. I’ve been the Facilities Manager at CFUF since 2009, and my job is to maintain the facility— the mechanical systems, the engineering, making sure the building is secure and enhancing our filters and ventilation to better catch viruses and spores. But more than that, for each person who comes through our doors, I want

“PEOPLE SEE YOUR LIGHT SHINE, AND THEY REALIZE THEIR LIGHT CAN SHINE IN THE SAME WAY.”

them to find a clean, professional space where they feel comfortable and safe. The condition of the building and the way people feel

things that go wrong. Now you

they realize their light can shine in

inside helps set the tone for the

are the landlord, so you have to do

the same way.

relationships our members form

preventive maintenance to take care

here. This helps them achieve what

of your house."

they need to achieve.

Sometimes, it is overwhelming to see how much good comes

Of course, our work goes so much

from the work we do. Watching

What I do with this facility is plan,

deeper than the home you live in

our graduates throw their hats up

inspect, and prevent. And I tell our

or the car you can afford. I tell our

in the air outside this building that

future homeowners to do the same,

members, "Always keep your family

stands as a signal of hope and

"First thing in owning a home, you

first, stand on your principles and

opportunity in West Baltimore, it

will always have stuff. Even if you

work hard." That is what I try to do.

touches my heart and makes me

live in an apartment, you have some

People see your light shine, and

feel connected to the mission.

35


FINANCIAL SNAPSHOT The Center for Urban Families is proud to report another year of strong support from our amazing donors. As we look ahead toward growth and deeper involvement in our communities, we remain committed to fiscal prudence to ensure sustainability and high-quality programming for every individual and family we serve.

STAT E M E NT OF FINA NCIA L PO S ITIO N (CO N S OLIDATE D ) 2020

2019

ASSETS Cash and Cash Equivalents

$

2,589,641

$

1,278,455

Grants and Contributions Receivable, Net

372,025

416,086

Pledges Receivable, Net

922,860

986,230

Prepaid Expenses and Other Assets

15,255

55,109

Property and Equipment, Net

3,927,193

4,077,158

Total Assets

7,826,974

6,813,038

Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses

480,868

357,962

Note Payable

647,576

161,621

1,128,444

519,583

Without Donor Restrictions

4,790,327

5,123,923

With Donor Restrictions

1,908,203

1,169,532

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Liabilities

Total Liabilities Net Assets

Total Net Assets

6,698,530

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$

TOTAL R EVENUE

14% 21% 65%

6,293,455 $

6,813,038

TOTAL E XPE N S E

Government Contracts Grants Contributions Investment Income

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT

7,826,974

61%

Program Services Support Services

39%


STAT E M E NT OF ACTIVITIES (CO N S OLIDATE D ) 2020

2019

CHANGES IN UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS Revenue and Support Government Grants

$

660,284

$

920,361

Grants

3,097,540

1,327,696

Contributions and Special Events

1,012,931

1,108,239

Investment Income

267

(508)

Total Revenue

4,771,022

3,355,788

Net Assets Released from Restrictions

1,023,324

1,432,792

Total Revenue and Support

5,794,346

4,788,580

Workforce Development

953,384

1,153,718

Training and Technical Assistance

345,306

345,387

Responsible Fatherhood

633,362

829,565

Expenses Program Services

Families Client and Alumni Services Total Program Services

79,454

232,238

641,499

633,006

2,653,004

3,193,914

Support Services Management and General

893,645

550,267

Research and Evaluation

101,355

293,135

Development and Special Events

716,869

611,036

Total Support Services

1,711,868

1,454,438

Total Expenses

4,364,872

4,648,352

Change in Net Assets Without Donor Restrictions

1,429,474

140,228

1,127,370

1,147,503

(1,023,324)

(1,432,792)

CHANGES IN NET ASSETS WITH DONOR RESTRICTIONS Grants Satisfaction of Restrictions Change in Net Assets With Donor Restrictions

104,046

(285,289)

Changes in Net Assets

1,533,520

(145,061)

Net Assets, Beginning of Year

6,293,454

6,438,515

Net Assets, End of Year

$

7,826,974

$

6,293,454

37


THE POWER OF PARTNERSHIP Thank you to our partners for always being ALL In. With your support, our work is possible.

KEY EMPLOYE R PAR TN E R S:

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT


KEY COMMUNIT Y, AGE N CY, AN D GOV E R N ME N T PAR TN E R S:

KEY CO R PO R ATE PAR TN E R S:

Oprah Winfrey

Charitable Foundation

39


CFUF BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF F I C E RS

D IR ECTOR S

Henry D. Kahn

Daman C. Blakeney

Chairman Partner, Hogan Lovells US LLP

Managing Director/Senior Portfolio Manager, Brown Capital Management

Joseph T. Jones, Jr.

Nancy Brennan

Founder, President & CEO Center for Urban Families

Development Consultant

David L. Warnock Partner, Camden Partners

Chair, Governance Committee Counsel, Miles & Stockbridge, P.C.

Vice President, Head of Global Consultant Relations, T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc.

Alicia Wilson Peter Bowe

Swata Gandhi

William (Chip) F. Wendler, II

Founder, The Peter Bowe and Barbara Stewart Foundation

Vice President for Economic Development, Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Health System

Ronae Brock Chris Rockey Chair, Development Committee SVP, Northeast Territory Executive, Community Development Banking and PNC-Certified Women's Business Advocate at PNC Bank

Ben Seigel

Interim Chief Operating Officer, Baltimore Urban Leadership Foundations (t/a The Door)

E ME R ITU S James R. Calvin

Kenneth Jones, II Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Professor of Practice, The Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Guy E. Flynn

Chair, Program Quality Committee Principal, Economic Mobility Consultants

John G. McLean, Jr.

Scott Soffen, CFA, CAIA

Vernā Myers

Chair, Finance & Audit Committee Senior Investment Officer, American Trading & Production Company

Vice President, Inclusion Strategy, Netflix

Terry Owens

Bill Norris Senior Manager, RSMUS LLP

Director of Communications, District of Columbia Department of Transportation

Rodney Oddoye

Scott Sherman

Senior Vice President of Governmental and External Affairs, Baltimore Gas & Electric

Retired, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives, T. Rowe Price

Partner, DLA Piper US LLP Senior Director of Finance, RocketDocs

Jamie McDonald CEO, UpSurge Baltimore

Robin Williams Wood Brandon Scott Mayor, Baltimore City

Patrick Sissman Principal, Redwood Capital Investments

CFUF 2021 IMPACT REPORT

Community Leader


CFUF TEAM E XECU T I VE LE ADE RSHIP

Thomas Mayfield

OPE R ATIO N S

Employment Specialist/ALL In Case Manager

Arielle Forrest

Joseph T. Jones, Jr.

Mark Smith

Founder, President & CEO

Brian S. Lyght Chief Operating Officer

Nicole Jordan Manager of Special Projects & Executive Support

STRIVE® Trainer/ALL In Case Manager

Eddie White ALL In Case Manager

Sha-Tia White ALL In Case Manager

Michael Williams Employment Specialist/ALL In Case Manager

SE N I OR L EA D ER SHIP Sabree Akinyele

Operations Specialist

Gregory Smith Security Coordinator

Helena Wise First Impressions Specialist

Lloyd Wright Facilities Manager

Manager of Program Coordination

Tyler Yutzy

Marilyn Aklin, D.P.A.

Intake & Retention Specialist/ALL In Case Manager

R E SE AR CH & E VALUATIO N Zachary Alberts

Bryant Jeffers Director of Finance & Administration

Wanda Liggins

Kate Wolfson

Director of Programs

Director of Development

Operations Manager

Data Analysis & Performance Manager

D EVE LOPME N T Amanda Ellis

A LL I N P ROG R A MS:

Development Specialist

FA M I LY S TAB I L I T Y & ECO N O M I C S U CC E S S

Rachel Kassman Grants Manager

Rosalind Bynum ALL In Case Manager

Wayne Cooper

FINAN CE

Intake & Retention Specialist/ALL In Case Manager

Bobbi Collick

Lavatte David

Associate Accountant

STRIVE® Trainer/ALL In Case Manager

Lenora Davis ALL In Case Manager

HUMAN R E S OU R CE S

Bessie Griffith

Jasmine Roberts

ALL In Case Manager

Human Resources Manager

Fatima Lewis ALL In Case Manager

41



TOGETHER, WE CAN DO SO MUCH MORE Our goal is to provide each and every single person who walks through our doors with equal opportunity to transform their lives. You too can ignite change, dismantle poverty, and empower our members to live the life they desire..

VISIT US.

CO N TR IB U TE .

Stop by our state-of-the-art

Your support and invested

facility to see our programs, members,

resources help increase the impact of

and teammates in action.

our work for our shared community.

VOLUNTEER .

BECOME A CORPORATE PARTNER.

We’re always looking for inspiring mentors to work directly

We’ll work with you to figure out the

with our members and make a

best opportunity for your group.

lasting impact on their lives.

F O LLOW U S. @centerforurbanfamilies

For more ways to get involved, email maklin@cfuf.org or call 410.246.1415

43


2 2 0 1 N ORT H M ON ROE S T RE E T B A LT IM ORE , M A RY L A N D 21217 T E L: 410.367.5691 WEBS IT E : W W W.C FUF.ORG S OC I A L : @ C E N T E RFORURBA N FA M ILIE S


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