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New Music Teacher Mentoring: How to Make the Most of Your Situation

Should You Start an Elementary School Band Program?

PRELUDE to the 2020 CONFERENCE December 2019

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Advertiser Index

The Florida Music Director is made possible by the participation of the following businesses whose advertisements appear in this issue. They make it possible to provide you with a high-quality publication, and we gratefully acknowledge their support of our mission. We hope you will take special notice of these advertisements and consider the products and services offered. It is another important way you can support your professional association and the enhancement of Florida music education. The publisher does not endorse any particular company, product, or service. The Florida Music Education Association (FMEA) is not responsible for the content of any advertisement and reserves the right to accept or refuse any advertisement submitted for publication. Information for advertisers (rate card, insertion orders, graphics requirements, etc.) can be found at FMEAMediaKit.org. ADVERTISERS Florida Gulf Coast University.................................................................. IFC Smoky Mountain Music Festival.................................................................. 41 University of Florida................................................................................... BC Yamaha Corporation of America................................................................. 28 Advertisers shown in bold provide additional support to FMEA members through their membership in the Corporate and Academic Partners program. These advertisers deserve your special recognition and attention.

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Direct correspondence regarding subscriptions to: Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education, 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL, 32301-2757. Subscription cost included in FMEA membership dues ($9); libraries, educational institutions, and all others within the United States: $27 plus 7.5% sales tax. CIRCULATION: 4,500 educators. Published eight times annually by The Florida Music Education Association, Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education: 402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757. FMEA reserves the right to approve any application for appearance and to edit all materials proposed for distribution. Permission is granted to all FMEA members to reprint articles from the Florida Music Director for non-commercial, educational purposes. Non-members may request permission from the FMEA office. SUBMISSIONS: Article and art submissions are always considered and should be submitted on or before the 1st of the month, one month prior to the publication issue to: D. Gregory Springer, PhD, dgspringer@fsu.edu.

All articles must be provided in digital format (e.g., Microsoft Word). All applicable fonts and images must be provided. Images must be at least 300 dpi resolution at 100% of the size. All submissions must be accompanied by a proof (color, if applicable). Ads may be submitted via email to val@fmea.org. Florida Music Director reserves the right to refuse any ad not prepared to the correct specifications OR to rework the ad as needed with fees applied. 2019-20 FMEA Membership: You are eligible for membership in the Florida Music Education Association if you are an individual engaged in the teaching, supervision, or administration of music in elementary and secondary schools, colleges, or universities within the state. Visit FMEA.org/membership to learn more about the benefits of active membership.

INSPIRE | CREATE | PERFORM

CHANGING LIVES THROUGH THE POWER OF THE ARTS 2019-20 ADMISSION AND SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS February 1, 2020 • March 14, 2020 • April 4, 2020 BACHELOR DEGREES OFFERED

Performance • B.A. in Music Music Education • Music Therapy An All Steinway School

10501 FGCU Boulevard South Fort Myers, FL 33965-6565 (239) 590-7851

fgcu.edu/cas/music

GENEROUS SCHOLARSHIPS AND OUT OF STATE TUITION WAIVERS AVAILABLE FOR TALENTED UNDERGRADUATES

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Music Director


Executive Director Florida Music Education Association Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education

402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844 or (800) 301-3632 (kdsanz@fmea.org)

Editor-in-Chief

D. Gregory Springer, PhD Florida State University College of Music 122 N. Copeland Street Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-2925 (office) (dgspringer@fsu.edu)

Contents December 2019

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TIN

Volume 73

Number 5

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Editorial Committee Terice Allen (850) 245-8700, Tallahassee (tallen1962@hotmail.com) Judy Arthur, PhD Florida State University, KMU 222 (850) 644-3005 (jrarthur@fsu.edu) William Bauer, PhD University of Florida, Gainesville (352) 273-3182; (wbauer@ufl.edu) Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD College of Music, FSU, Tallahassee (850) 645-1438; (aadarrow@fsu.edu) Jeanne Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Largo (727) 588-6055; (reynoldsj@pcsb.org) John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College, Fort Pierce (772) 462-7810; (johnsouthall@fmea.org)

Advertising Sales Valeria Anderson (val@fmea.org)

Director of Finance and Client Relations

Richard Brown , MBA, CAE, CMP (richard@fmea.org) 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844

Official FMEA and FMD Photographers

Bob O’Lary

Debby Stubing

Art Director & Production Manager

Lori Danello Roberts, LDR Design Inc. (lori@flmusiced.org)

Circulation & Copy Manager

Valeria Anderson, (800) 301-3632

Copy Editor

Susan Trainor

How do I get to the conference?. . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Prelude to the 2020 Professional Development Conference Registration Information and Fees / 11

President’s Concert / 22-23

Contracted Hotels / 14

Mini-Concerts / 24-25

Policies / 12-13

Student Leadership Workshop / 15

All-State Rehearsals & Concerts / 16 College Night / 18

FMEA Preconference / 19

Tri-M Conference Experience / 20

Student Conference Experience / 21

Wednesday Concerts / 23

Thursday Concerts / 26-27

New Security Procedures / 29

General Membership Sessions / 30 Friday Concerts / 31

All-State Conductors / 32-33

New Music Teacher Mentoring: How to Make the Most of Your Situation . . . . . 35 Should You Start an Elementary School Band Program?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 D E PA R T M E N T S Advertiser Index. . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Academic Partners. . . . . . . . . . . 39

Officers and Directors.. . . . . . . . 3

Component News.. . . . . . . . . . . 41

President’s Message. . . . . . . . . . 4

Committee Reports. . . . . . . . . . 46

Corporate Partners. . . . . . . . . . 6-7

Research Puzzles. . . . . . . . . . . . 49

2019-20 FMEA Donors. . . . . . . 8-9

Executive Director’s Notes. . . . . . 50 December 2019

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President’sMessage

Steven N. Kelly, PhD President Florida Music Education Association

Get Ready! It’s Time to Celebrate at the 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference

G

reetings to everyone! I know you have been very busy working with your students this semester. I have seen many excellent music programs from Pensacola to Miami. It is exciting

to see what you do, the diversity of activities, the energy of your students, and the level of musicianship they exhibit.

Now is the time to plan to celebrate your achievements. I am looking forward to seeing you at

the upcoming FMEA Professional Development Conference, January 8-11, 2020, in Tampa. There has been so much work to create the largest conference in our history, which happens to be the second largest state music conference in the country! There is something for everyone and for every area! More than 250 sessions will be presented including clinics, master classes, and concerts … so many concerts!

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« Performances include the Florida State University Wind Ensemble, Dillard Here are some of the highlights:

Center for Arts Jazz Ensemble, Treble Voices of Lake Nona Middle School,

Niceville High School Wind Ensemble, flute/violin duo Sonic Escape, Eau Gallie High School Chamber Orchestra, Dr. Phillips High School Wind Symphony, West

Orange High School Chorus, Florida Southern College Chamber Jazz Ensemble, Manatee Steel, Gaither High School Percussion Ensemble, Gotha Middle School

Concert Choir, The First Academy Royals Steel, Avant Garde Academy of Broward Concert Choir, and the DePaul Symphony Orchestra. These are in addi-

« Our keynote addresses will be by composer/educator Libby Larsen and the always thought-provoking Anne Fennell. « We will have our Student Leadership Workshop, Student Conference Experience, and Tri-M Conference Experience. « Clinics will include music educator wellness, steel pans, guitar techniques, music tion to our 22 all-state ensemble performances!

and special populations, jazz techniques, literature selection, and digital music,

« We will present awards and recognitions to members, programs, and special guests. « Exhibitors from across the country will be on hand to demonstrate their products and services. « The FMEA Preconference will be held on Wednesday afternoon. among other topics.

Our theme is Celebrating Musical Excellence: Past, Present, & Future. During our

conference we will recognize our retirees who have done so much for our profession. We will recognize the programs and individuals who are doing the terrific work in our schools today. And we will recognize our Tri-M members and collegiates, who are our future.

Of course, a tremendous reason to attend is to reconnect with your friends and

colleagues. The FMEA conference is our annual homecoming, an opportunity to renew and recharge, to meet new people, to learn new ideas, to experience outstanding music, and to be inspired. There is truly something for everyone. You will never have so many varied opportunities at one time. Bring a friend, an administrator, and

a parent. They will be amazed. Our conference is a huge reminder of all the excellence and opportunity in Florida music education!

I look forward to seeing you in Tampa, to share your energy, to experience your

students, and to celebrate all our successes.

Steven N. Kelly, PhD, President

Florida Music Education Association

December 2019

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GOLD

SILVER PARTNERS Music is Elementary Music Man, Inc. The Horn Section, Inc. Partners as of November 1, 2019.

*Please visit FMEA.org/partners for partnership details or call 850-878-6844.

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Florida Music Director


Please take time to thank and support our 2019-2020 Corporate Partners.

PARTNERS

BRONZE PARTNERS Cadence Music Carl Fischer Music Excelcia Music Publishing Head’s House of Music J.W. Pepper & Son, Inc. MakeMusic, Inc. Music & Arts

National Concerts Noteflight Romeo Music Spring Hill Music Academy Tampa Bay Institute for Music Therapy Tampa Music School West Music Company

December 2019

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FLORIDA MUSIC EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 2019-2020 DONORS

Thank you to all of the donors who have shown their dedication to the improvement of music education in Florida by supporting our Mission through financial contributions.

Our donors support specific causes by donating to the FMEA funds of their choice: FMEA Scholarship Fund

June M. Hinckley Scholarship

Music Education Advocacy

Professional Development for Members

General Fund

Mel & Sally Schiff Music Education Relief Fund

The following have graciously donated to FMEA from April 1, 2019, through November 1, 2019.

ARTIST’S CIRCLE

MAESTRO’S CIRCLE

($1,000 – $9,999)

($10,000 and up) No current donors at this time

All County Music, Inc. Clifford Madsen Russell Robinson

SUSTAINERS ($100 – $999)

Artie Almeida In Memory of June Audrey Grace Lucinda Balistreri In Memory of June Hinckley Shelton Berg Anthony Chiarito Alice-Ann Darrow In Memory of Mr. & Mrs. O. B. Darrow Virginia Densmore In Memory of Shirley Kirwin

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Cynthia Heidel Dennis Holt In Memory of Dr. Gerson Yessin Llewellyn Humphrey Steven Kelly Carlton Kilpatrick Sheila King In Memory of John W. King Cathi Leibinger In Memory of Linda Mann; In Honor of Ken Williams

Music Director

Jason Locker In Memory of June M. Hinckley Angel Marchese Carolyn Minear Edward Prasse On Behalf of Nancy Masters Mary Catherine Salo In Memory of Gary Rivenbark & Wes Rainer

Steven Salo In Honor of John Jamison & Dr. Bill Prince Kathleen Sanz In Memory of June M. Hinckley J. Mark Scott In Honor of Judy Arthur & Judy Bowers Karen Smith In Memory of Retired SFC Alfred C. & Nita Greening D. Gregory Springer

Harry Spyker In Honor of Fred J. & Marleen Miller Jeannine Stemmer In Memory of Barbara Kingman & Lauren Alonso Leiland Theriot Robert Todd In Memory of Gary Rivenbark Richard Uhler David Williams Kenneth Williams


PATRONS ($25 – $99)

Carlos Abril Judy Arthur In Memory of Ray Kickliter Shawn Barat In Memory of Duane L. Hendon Jessica Blakley In Memory of John Rose Karen Bradley In Memory of Harold Bradley Jamie Bryan In Memory of Wes Rainer Katarzyna (Kasia) Bugaj Dana Burt Stanley Butts Carol Casey Shelby Chipman

Dale Choate Don Coffman Dayna Cole In Memory of Linda Mann Erin Cushing Virginia Dickert In Memory of Lindsay Keller & Debbie Liles Jason Dobson Michael Dye Judith Evans Melanie Faulkner Bradley Franks In Memory of Gary W. Rivenbark Mark Goff Louise Gore Sharon Graham

John Henderson Stanley Hoch Marsha Juday Pauline Latorre Joseph Luechauer Kevin Lusk Cak Marshall In Memory of Sylvia Perry of Peripole, Inc. Stephen Mayo Robert McCormick Kim Miles Ree Nathan John Nista Mary Palmer Harry “Skip” Pardee On Behalf of Quinn & Vivienne Pardee

Galen Peters David Pletincks In Honor of Alexis & Jonathan Pletincks Edward Prasse C. William Renfroe In Memory of Herb Beam, Past FVA President Jeanne Reynolds Rollins College Department of Music Alicia Romero-Sardinas In Honor of John Rose Cristyn Schroder Thomas Silliman In Honor of Dr. Thomas Silliman, Sr. John Southall

Timothy Stafford In Honor of Olive Stafford Jesse Strouse Sharon Tacot John Watkins John Weaver Howard Weinstein In Memory of Barry Weinstein Farryn Weiss Donald West In Honor of Melvin Maxwell Anonymous (5) In Memory of Elliot Tannenbaum

FRIENDS (up to $24)

Carmen Aquino Ernesto Bayola Richard Beckford Jessica Calandra Ella Carr Renee Cartee Kelly Chisholm Blair Clawson In Memory of Shirley Kirwin David Cruz Richard Dasher

Matthew Davis In Memory of Robert Morrison Debbie Fahmie Jenny Freeman Tina Gill In Memory of Gary W. Rivenbark Lise Gilly Gerry Hacker Harold Hankerson Cheryce Harris Angela Hartvigsen

William Henley Ashton Horton Aisha Ivey Jason Jerald Rolanda Jones In Memory of June M. Hinckley Adina Kerr Catherine Lee Anthony Lichtenberg Claudia Lusararian In Honor of Sue Byo

Deborah Mar In Memory of Mrs. Barbara Kingman Matthew McCutchen In Honor of John C. Carmichael Kristy Pagan Hank Phillips Marie Radloff In Memory of Charles F. Ulrey Emma Roser Stacie Rossow Edgar Rubio

Melissa Salek Jack Salley John Sinclair Thomas Stancampiano Phil Tempkins Gary Ulrich Billy B. Williamson Matthew Workman Richard Yaklich Anonymous (6) In Memory of Tom Damato

DONATE TODAY FOR A STRONGER TOMORROW. With your support, FMEA will continue to grow its programs for teachers and students, strengthen united advocacy efforts, and improve your professional development opportunities. Visit FMEA.org to learn more information about each fund and to make a donation.

December 2019

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How do I get to the conference? Making your case to attend the 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference

G

etting approval to attend the Florida Music

Education

Association

Professional Development Conference may require developing a proposal. Due

to tight budgets in today’s economy, school principals and district officials

carefully scrutinize requests to attend professional development. That does not mean you shouldn’t give it your best

effort by showing your administrators

how your attendance will benefit the stu-

dents in your school. Rather than assuming your administrators are aware of the

critical importance of you professionally benefitting from content-specific sessions, consider submitting a formal proposal.

Through this proposal you can demon-

strate how your participation directly

relates to the strategies and the objectives of your school (including those beyond

the classroom). This will allow you to

personal contributions to the attain-

funding you will need, detail your case

education and how it will benefit your

and make note of the clinicians and

download the conference schedule, list

ment of those goals and strategies,

articulate the need for your continuing

others you will be able to observe

students, your school, and you.

« Write

and/or with whom you will be able

Develop Your Case

to interact while at the conference. List the high-quality performances

down three of the most

you will observe and from which you

important goals and strategies being

« Think about how you personally con-

will learn. You can download the con-

addressed in your school’s plan.

tribute to those three goals and strate-

gies. How does your work as a music educator affect the overall mission of

your school? Make a list of your per-

ference app from the FMEA’s website

« Write

and bookmark your sessions.

attending the FMEA Professional Development Conference and meet-

ing the people there will help you

sonal contributions to your school’s

« Review the conference’s professional

contribute to your school’s goals and

goals and strategies.

strategies, and use this case with your administrators when making your

development schedule to better under-

request to attend the conference.

stand how the information provided will support your school’s goals. Mark meetings that relate to your list of

10    F l o r i d a

down your case for how

When you create your proposal, in

addition to providing a summary of the

Music Director

for attending. List your school’s goals, the sessions and the clinicians and presenters who will be there, and list the spe-

cific sessions you plan to attend. Also, list the performing groups you will have the opportunity to observe during rehearsals with national clinicians as well as the performances by these well-known conductors (from whom you can gain program-

ming and conducting ideas). Additionally, let your administrators know that this conference has more than 10,000 teachers, administrators, students, and parents in

attendance, the second largest music education conference in the nation.

Finally, ask your administrators to sup-

port you to attend the FMEA Professional Development Conference in Tampa, January 8-11, 2020.


2020 FM E A Professi ona l Development Conference E CEL

B

IN R AT

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J a n u a r y 8 -1 1 , 2 0 2 0 Ta m p a C o n v e n t i o n C e n t e r 3 3 3 S o u t h F r a n k l i n , S t r e e t , Ta m p a , F l o r i d a All registration information must be entered online at flmusiced.org/flmusicapps/conference/

REGISTRATION FEES Description

Preregistration Rates: Now- Dec. 6

On-Site Rates:

Director/Member

$138

$168

Collegiate Member

$58

$88

Retired Member

$0

$0

Non-Teaching Spouse

$73

$98

Non-Teaching Spouse of Retired Member

$0

$0

Paid Chaperone

$53

$73

Free Chaperone

$0

$0

All-State Student

$63

$93

Tri-M Student

$38

$38

Preconference Workshop

$58

$68

we ask that you please provide the ACTUAL,

Preconference Workshop (First-Year Teachers)

$25

$25

for each of your students and chaperones and

Concert Tickets

$15

$15

VIP Member

$0

$0

VIP Preconference Workshop

$0

$0

Leadership Workshop Student

$38

$38

Leadership Workshop Chaperone

$0

$0

Student Experience - Student

$38

$38

Student Experience - Chaperone

$38

$38

register. At the end of the online form, you will have the opportunity to print an invoice to send

in with a check until one week before the prereg-

istration deadline or to pay online instantly with a credit card until the preregistration deadline on December 6, 2019.

Please Note: To assist our members, their stu-

dents, and chaperones as they visit exhibit booths,

all badges will have a barcode encoded with contact information. Attendees will be able to allow exhibitors to scan their badges rather than

manually writing information on contact cards or mailing lists at their booths. In order to maintain

a positive relationship with our exhibitors who can benefit your students through scholarships,

new equipment, sheet music, software, and more, CORRECT MAILING ADDRESS and EMAIL do NOT simply enter your school address or other incorrect information.

To take advantage of early discounted rates,

you must register and pay before the deadline. If you are mailing a check to the FMEA office to

pay for your registration, it must be postmarked

SEVEN DAYS BEFORE the preregistration deadline.

December 2019

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REGISTRATION POLICIES 1. All participants—directors, students, chaperones, and guests— must be registered for the conference.

2. Only directors may register their groups or pick up registration materials if preregistered.

3. All participating students must be chaperoned. As required by

FSMA, at least one chaperone, other than a director, is required for

every 10 students or fraction thereof; however, FMEA policy allows for one free chaperone for every six students or fraction thereof. 4. An additional paid chaperone may be registered for (a) each six students registered or (b) for each all-state rehearsal site where registered students are performing.

5. If a participating student is not accompanied by the director from that student’s school, then the principal from that school must

furnish a letter designating the person from the school or school district who is to be in charge of that student. The letter should be addressed to the FMEA executive director, must explain the

extenuating circumstances preventing the director from attending, and must be submitted with registration materials. The school will be notified of approval. This does not release the director from the requirement that he or she must be registered for the conference. If approved, the person designated in the letter will pick up the

director’s preregistration packet and supervise the student at all times.

6. Student observers are not allowed to attend the conference. If any student observers are brought to the conference, the offending school’s participation in the conference may be eliminated the

following year. Tri-M students or those approved for the Student Experience program who are registered and participating in

sessions or working for the all-state concerts are exempt from this rule. Chaperones or other attendees are not allowed to bring

children who are not participating in an all-state ensemble. Only

registered students, teachers, and chaperones wearing a conference badge are allowed in and around the rehearsals and conference

areas. Please make child care arrangements before attending the conference.

CHAPERONE REGISTRATION Chaperone registration is based on the following rules:

« For each elementary student registered, one ELEMENTARY STUDENTS

free chaperone and one paid chaperone

« Any additional attendees must purchase a may be registered.

guest pass at on-site registration for entry into the convention center.

MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

« For every six students registered, one free chaperone and one paid chaperone may be registered. No other chaperones may

be registered until the seventh student is

« Any additional attendees (chaperones registered.

or guests) must purchase a guest pass

at on-site registration for entry into the convention center.

« If you have students in more than one EXCEPTIONS

performing ensemble, you may pay for a

chaperone for each performing ensemble in

« If you have students from different schools, which you have registered students.

you may pay for a chaperone for each school for which you have registered

7. All Florida school music teachers must register for the conference

as FMEA directors and be current members of FMEA and NAfME.

students.

This includes directors of all-state students, invited performing

Chaperones are not allowed to bring children

from Florida schools, colleges, or universities must also be FMEA

ensemble. Only registered students, teachers,

Collegiate students must be collegiate members of FMEA and

are allowed in and around the rehearsal

members of NAfME. Attendees who live outside of the United

chaperones are aware of this policy before

groups, mini-concerts, and session presenters. All-state conductors

who are not participating in an all-state

members. No current music teacher may register as a chaperone.

and chaperones wearing a conference badge

NAfME. Attendees who live outside of Florida must be current

areas. Directors are asked to make sure their

States may contact our office for registration instructions.

agreeing to serve as a chaperone.

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Music Director


ALL-STATE TICKET POLICY 1. Registered (BADGED) attendees do not require

tickets to attend any all-state concert. This includes directors/members, directors’ non-teaching

spouses, performing all-state students, registered chaperones, collegiate student members, retired

members, and VIP guests that you entered as part of your conference registration.

2. All nonregistered attendees (NONBADGED)

attendees (parents, family members, guests, etc.) are

required to purchase tickets for any all-state concert they wish to attend at $15 per ticket.

3. There are no free or allotted tickets. All concert

attendees must either wear their conference badge or purchase a ticket.

4. A director who preregisters online may reserve and prepay for all-state concert tickets for nonregistered attendees for concerts in which he or she has

registered all-state students. If paid for online,

these tickets will be preloaded into the director’s registration packet.

5. A director who registers on site may purchase all-

state concert tickets for nonregistered attendees for concerts in which he or she has registered all-state students during the on-site registration process.

6. A director with all-state students may purchase additional concert tickets for nonregistered

attendees for concerts in which he or she has

ALL CONCERT TICKET SALES ARE FINAL.

NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. EXCHANGES Please make sure you know the exact name of the all-state

ensemble for which you need tickets before approaching the ticket sales window

performing students at the conference on-site

registration desk or at a designated ticket sales location at any time.

7. General ticket sales for all-state concerts will begin at 11 am on Thursday at the FMEA registration desk. There is no requirement that the director

or any other registered attendee be the person to purchase tickets after this time.

8. All ticket sales are final. Concert tickets are nonrefundable.

9. For entrance, ticket, and concert purposes, a

concert is defined as the pair of ensembles that

are performing in the same venue in a common,

defined block of time. An example of a concert for

REFUND POLICIES 1. Full registration refunds are available for cancellation requests made through December 15, 2019.

2. No registration refunds will be made for cancellations made after December 15, 2019, except for emergency

situations. These will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. 3. Refunds must be requested in writing (email is acceptable). 4. All requests for refunds must be received no later than

January 31, 2020. Requests received after that date will not be processed.

purposes of entrance, ticketing, etc., is the 2 pm

5. All refunds will be issued after the conference is

and the All-State SSAA Chorus.

6. Concert tickets are non-refundable.

concert on Saturday for the All-State TTBB Chorus

completed.

December 2019

13


2020 FM E A Professi ona l Development Conference

Hotels Contracted for 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference HOTEL — Cutoff date: 11/9/19

Group Code: FMEA unless otherwise noted

ROOM RATES PHONE

Single

Double

Triple

Quad

Barrymore Hotel Tampa Riverwalk 111 West Fortune Street, Tampa, FL 33602 Comp. internet; $10 parking

(813) 223-1351

$143

$143

$143

$143

Courtyard by Marriott Downtown Tampa 102 East Cass Street, Tampa, FL 33602 Comp. internet; $20 valet only

(813) 229-1100, ext. 1

$154

$154

$154

$154

DoubleTree by Hilton Tampa Airport Westshore 4500 West Cypress Street, Tampa, FL 33607 Comp. internet & parking

(800) 514-3959, ext. 1

$157

$157

$157

$157

Embassy Suites Downtown 513 South Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL 33602

(813) 769-8300, ext. 1

$249

$249

$259

$269

Embassy Suites Tampa Airport Westshore 555 North Westshore Blvd., Tampa, FL 33609 Group Code: FME or FMEA 2020

(800) EMBASSY

$193

$193

(up to 5 in room)

(up to 6 in room)

Four Points by Sheraton Suites Tampa Airport Westshore 4400 West Cypress Street, Tampa, FL 33607 Comp. internet

(800) 368-7764

$142

$142

$142

$142

Hampton Inn Tampa Downtown Channel District 1155 East Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602, Group Code: FME Comp. internet & breakfast; $15 parking

(813) 525-9900, ext. 1

$185

$185

$185

$185

Hilton Downtown 211 North Tampa Street, Tampa, FL 33602 $9.99 internet (Comp. for HH); $24 valet

(800) 445-8667, ext. 1

$208

$208

$208

$208

Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore Airport 700 North Westshore Blvd., Tampa, FL 33609 Group Code: FMA, Comp. internet & parking

(800) 465-4329

$124

$124

$124

$124

Home2 Suites Tampa Downtown Channel District 1155 East Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602, Group Code: FMA Comp. internet & breakfast; $15 parking

(813) 525-9900, ext. 2

$215

$215

$215

$215

Tampa Marriott Water Street (formerly Marriott Waterside) 700 South Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL 33602 Comp. internet for Bonvoy members; $27 overnight valet & $15 daytime valet

(888) 789-3090, ext. 3

$205

$205

$205

$205

Residence Inn 101 East Tyler Street, Tampa, FL 33602 Comp. internet; $17 self-parking

(813) 221-4224

$176

$176

$176

$176

Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel 200 North Ashley Drive, Tampa, FL 33602 Comp. internet

(888) 236-2427

$199

$199

$219

$219

Westin Tampa Waterside 725 South Harbour Island Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602 Comp. internet; $30 valet

(800) 937-8461

$199

$199

$199

$199

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Music Director

$203

$213


Student Leadership Workshop The keynote speaker and clinician for the 2020 Student Leadership Workshop will be…

Fran Kick. Mr. Kick will bring his high-energy, interactive presentation style to FMEA in this humorous, informative, educational, and entertaining workshop. The workshop is designed for high school student leaders. All participants will be actively involved through activities, examples, and valuable information. students will be exposed to the following:

• • • • • •

Setting High Standards of Excellence Fundamentals of Self-Discipline Effective Communication Principles Value of Risk Behavior Modification vs. Motivation Dealing With Insecurities

Students who are not in an all-state ensemble can receive a one-day exhibit pass for Thursday, but are expected to travel home on Thursday afternoon with a chaperone. Students may not stay for the rest of the week if they are not in an all-state ensemble. Students who ARE in an all-state ensemble or who are also attending the conference as a Tri-M student or are attending the Student Conference Experience must also be registered for the conference. Chaperones who will be attending for the remainder of the week must also be registered for the conference. Wednesday, January 8, 2020, 1 pm–4:30 pm Tampa Convention Center, West Hall A The cost for the workshop is $38 per student. Chaperones are free. Register as part of your FMEA conference registration. go to: flmusiced.org/FLMusicApps/Conference/Register/

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All-State Rehearsals & Concerts At-A-Glance ALL-STATE CONCERT BAND

ALL-STATE ELEMENTARY CHORUS

ALL-STATE INTERCOLLEGIATE BAND

RESEATING AUDITIONS: SR, Riverwalk Ballroom Thursday.............................................. 9am-11am

REHEARSALS: TCC, 14 Wednesday........................................ 12noon-1pm Wednesday.............................................1pm-6pm Thursday.............................................. 8am-11am Thursday..................................11:45am-12:45pm

RESEATING AUDITIONS: DW, Lake Forest Ballroom Wednesday..............................11:30am-12:45 pm

REHEARSALS: SR, Riverwalk Ballroom Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................ 9am-12noon CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE CONCERT CHORUS REHEARSALS: TMWS, Grand Ballroom Thursday.........................................8am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm

CONCERT: Thursday, January 9, 2020, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE ELEMENTARY ORFF ENSEMBLE REHEARSALS: TCC Thursday................ 10am-11am, TCC, West Hall A Thursday..................11am-6pm, TCC, West Hall A Friday 8:45am-10:15am............................TCC, 14 Friday 10:45am-1pm....................TCC, Ballroom A CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 1pm TCC, Ballroom A

REHEARSALS: DW, Lake Forest Ballroom Wednesday.........................................1pm-4:30pm Wednesday................................... 6:30pm-9:30pm Thursday........................................8:30am-12noon Thursday.......................................1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................8:30pm-9:15pm TCC, room TBA CONCERT: Thursday, January 9, 2020, 9:30pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL BAND RESEATING AUDITIONS: HD, Palma Ceia Thursday.............................................. 9am-11am

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 11am TCC, Ballroom A

REHEARSALS: TMWS Tuesday.................................. 7pm-9pm, TMWS, 8

ALL-STATE CONCERT ORCHESTRA

Wednesday........................................8:30am-5pm, TMWS, Florida Ballroom, Salons 1-3

REHEARSALS: HD, Palma Ceia Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................ 9am-12noon TCC, room TBA

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TMWS, rooms TBA Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am

Thursday...........................8:30am-12noon, TMWS, Florida Ballroom, Salons 1-3

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

REHEARSALS: TMWS, Florida Ballroom, Salons 5-6 Thursday (Registration)................... 8am-8:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday.................................................4pm-5pm

CONCERT: Thursday, January 9, 2020, 12:30pm TCC, 20

ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL JAZZ BAND

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 6pm TCC, Ballroom A

ALL-STATE GUITAR ENSEMBLE

ALL-STATE HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ BAND REHEARSALS: TCC, 30A Wednesday....................................... 2pm-5:30pm Wednesday.............................................7pm-9pm Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday........................................... 8:30am-12noon CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 7:30pm TMWS Grand Ballroom

REHEARSALS: WTW, Conch Room Wednesday....................................... 2pm-5:30pm Wednesday.............................................7pm-9pm Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday........................................... 8:30am-12noon CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 7:30pm TMWS, Grand Ballroom ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL MIXED CHORUS REHEARSALS: HD, Bayshore Ballroom, 1-3 Thursday................................... 12:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday........................................8:45 am-11:30am Friday.......................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Saturday................ 6:30am-8am, TCC, Ballroom A CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 8:30am TCC, Ballroom A

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KEY DW = Doubletree Westshore

HD = Hilton Downtown

TCC = Tampa Convention Center

ESD = Embassy Suites Downtown

TMWS = Tampa Marriott Water Street

WTW = Westin Tampa Waterside

SR = Sheraton Riverwalk

ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL ORCHESTRA

ALL-STATE SYMPHONIC BAND

HIGH SCHOOL HONORS BAND

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TMWS, rooms TBA Thursday.........................................9am-11:30am

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TCC, rooms TBA Thursday....................................9:30am-11:30am

RESEATING AUDITIONS: SR, Bayshore Ballroom Thursday.............................................. 9am-11am

REHEARSALS: TMWS, Meeting Room 8 Thursday................................................8am-9am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday........................................10am-12:30pm

REHEARSALS: TCC, 22 Thursday................................... 12:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................ 9am-12noon

REHEARSALS: SR, Bayshore Ballroom Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 6pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE MIDDLE SCHOOL TREBLE CHORUS REHEARSALS: HD, Bayshore Ballroom, 5-7 Thursday...................................... 12noon-4:15pm Thursday..................................... 6:15pm-8:45pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:15am Friday...........................................1:15pm-4:15pm Saturday................ 6:30am-8am, TCC, Ballroom A CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 8:30am TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE READING CHORUS REHEARSALS: ES, Gandy Meeting Room Thursday.........................................8am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm Saturday...................................... 8:30am-9:30am CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 6:30pm TCC, Ballroom A ALL-STATE SSAA CHORUS REHEARSALS: WTW, Oasis Ballroom Thursday.........................................8am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.......................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 11am TMWS, Grand Ballroom

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

HIGH SCHOOL HONORS ORCHESTRA

ALL-STATE SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA

RESEATING AUDITIONS: ESD, Skyway Ballroom Thursday (Registration)................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm

RESEATING AUDITIONS: TCC, rooms TBA Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am REHEARSALS: TCC, 24 Thursday (Registration)................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday................................................ 9am-12noon Friday.......................................... 1:30pm-5:30pm Saturday.................................................1pm-3pm

REHEARSALS: ESD, Skyway Ballroom Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................... 9am-10am CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 2:30pm TMWS Grand Ballroom

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 6pm TCC, Ballroom A

MIDDLE SCHOOL HONORS BAND

ALL-STATE TTBB CHORUS

RESEATING AUDITIONS: HD, rooms TBA Thursday.............................................. 9am-11am

REHEARSALS: ESD, Bayside Ballroom Thursday.........................................8am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm

REHEARSALS: HD, Esplanade Suite Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 11am TMWS, Grand Ballroom

CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 6:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

MIDDLE SCHOOL HONORS ORCHESTRA REHEARSALS: SR, Riverview Room Thursday (Registration)................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday............................................... 9am-10am

CONCERT: Friday, January 10, 2020, 9pm TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 11, 2020, 2:30pm TMWS, Grand Ballroom

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COLLEGE NIGHT Join us for FMEA’s College Night!

FREE event open to all high school music students

Students and parents have the opportunity to meet with representatives from premier universities and colleges located in Florida and throughout the country. Badge/participation in the FMEA conference is not required to attend.

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6:30 - 8:00 PM

FRIDAY th JAN. 10

Tampa ConvenTion CenTer WesT Hall B


SNEAK PEEK: FMEA PRECONFERENCE

Diversity in Music Education: Past, Present, & Future WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020 (1 PM-5 PM) Tampa Convention Center, 18 Shelby Chipman, Coordinator

Keynote Address

Dr. Shelby Chipman President-Elect, Florida Music Education Association

Building and Sustaining Inspiring Music Programs:

Keeping Your Vision Relevant

Vision 2020 to the Future

Dr. Jeffery Redding

Dr. Kathleen D. Sanz

2019 GRAMMY Music Educator Award Recipient

President, National Association for Music Education

Director of Choral Activities, West Orange High School

Executive Director, Florida Music Education Association

Panel Discussion:

The Importance of Diversity in Music Education

Why Vision 2020:

A Look Back at Florida’s Music Education from 2000-Present Ms. Devan Moore Doctoral Student, Florida State University

Mr. David Cruz Music Teacher, South Miami Senior High School

Dr. Dakeyan “Dre” Graham 2020 Florida Teacher of the Year, Director of Instrumental Studies, King High School

Mrs. Beth Cummings Director of Fine Arts, School Board of Polk County

Past President, Florida Music Education Association December 2019

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2020 Tri-M Conference Experience

T

he purpose of the Florida Music Education Association Tri-M Conference Experience is to provide students with experiences that will build their leadership and advocacy skills, as well as expose them to the experienc-

es available at the annual conference. Participating students will interact with amazing clinicians and educators, college representatives, and incredible performing groups. These students will have memorable experiences they can take back and share with their high school music programs.

Schedule January 9-10, 2020 Thursday 9 am 10 am 12:15 pm 1:45 pm 3 pm

Opening Session, Fran Kick, TCC, 18 FMEA Opening General Session, TCC, Ballroom A Exhibits/Lunch (on your own) All-State Rehearsal Observations Concert, Gotha Middle School Concert Choir, TCC, Lobby

(Students may attend another session on the program if accompanied by chaperone.)

4 pm

Concert, FSU Wind Ensemble, TCC, Ballroom A

5:15 pm

Dinner (on your own)

7:30 pm

Concert, Sonic Escape, TCC, Ballroom A

Friday 9 am

FMEA Second General Session, TCC, Ballroom A

10:15 am

Digital Music Showcase, Tampa Marriott Water Street, Florida Ballroom,

11:45 am

Exhibits/Lunch (on your own)

2:45 pm

Salons 1-3

Wrap-Up, TCC, Ballroom D

4 pm

Concert, DePaul Symphony Orchestra, TCC, Ballroom A

5 pm

Dinner (on your own)

6:30 pm

FMEA College Night, TCC, West Hall B

More details are available at https://fmea.org/conference/tri-m-experience/. 20    F l o r i d a

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T

2020 FMEA Student Conference Experience

he purpose of the Florida Music Education Association Student Conference Experience is to expand access to the annual conference to students from throughout the state. Participating students will interact with amaz-

ing clinicians and educators, college representatives, and incredible performing groups. These students will have memorable experiences they can take back and share with their high school music programs.

Schedule January 8-10, 2020 Wednesday 7 pm

Meet and Greet, Holiday Inn Westshore Hotel

Thursday 9 am 10 am 12:15 pm 1:45 pm

SCE Opening Session, Fran Kick, TCC, 18 FMEA Opening General Session, TCC, Ballroom A Exhibits/Lunch (on your own) All-State Rehearsal Observations

3 pm

Music Advocacy and Leadership, Scott Evans, TCC, 1

4 pm

Concert, FSU Wind Ensemble, TCC, Ballroom A

5:15 pm

Dinner (on your own)

7:30 pm

Concert, Sonic Escape, TCC, Ballroom A

Friday 9 am

FMEA Second General Session, TCC, Ballroom A

10:30 am

Careers in the Arts, Katherine Attong-Mendes, Florida NAfME

11:45 am

Exhibits/Lunch (on your own)

2:45 pm

Collegiate, TCC, 1

SCE Wrap-Up, TCC, Ballroom D

4 pm

Concert, DePaul Symphony Orchestra, TCC, Ballroom A

5 pm

Dinner (on your own)

6:30 pm

FMEA College Night, TCC, West Hall B

More details are available at https://fmea.org/conference/student-experience.

December 2019

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President’s Concert Wednesday, January 8, 2020, 7:30 pm Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A Melissa Nelson, Coordinator

Niceville High School Wind Ensemble Daniel Wooten & Thomas Singletary, Directors The Niceville Wind Ensemble has a long tradition of successful and significant performances. The group has performed twice at

Carnegie Hall, at Atlanta’s Symphony Hall, twice at the CBDNA/ NBA Divisional Conference (2008, 2014), and at the 2019 National Sousa Festival on stage at the Kennedy Center. The ensemble has

received superior ratings at district and state music performance assessments for the past four decades.

Treble Voices of Lake Nona Middle School Courtney Connelly & Ashley Majka, Directors The Treble Voices of Lake Nona Middle School is a choral ensemble composed of students in the seventh and eighth grades who have had at least one year of choir. Founded in 2009, the Treble Voices meets once daily to focus on skills such as tone building, music literacy, and sight reading. With the support of their administration, students have participated in state and national honor choirs, have partnered with state universities across the

Southeast, and have collaborated with other middle school choral programs to build community and connec-

tion. They have earned consistent superior ratings at music performance assessments and have performed at the 2014 Florida ACDA Conference.

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Dillard Center for the Arts Jazz Ensemble Christopher Dorsey, Director Since 2004, Christopher Dorsey has developed the Dillard

Henry, Louis Hayes, Sean Jones, Wycliffe Gordon, Victor

programs in the country. His intent is to give students the

at the 66th Midwest Clinic Demonstration Band for Wynton

Center for the Arts Jazz Program into one of the premier

opportunity to compete on a national level and to provide opportunities for students to pursue careers in music. His

main mission is to teach life skills through the music. DCA

Goines, and Jon Faddis, to name a few. The ensemble performed Marsalis in December 2012 and at the 67th Midwest Clinic in

December 2013. The ensemble has been invited to perform at the 73rd Midwest Clinic in December 2019. Band members have

Jazz Ensemble, under Mr. Dorsey’s direction, has accomplished

participated in GRAMMY Band, Jazz Band of America, Next

Competition finalists (2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017,

Band, and FBA District 15 All-County Jazz Band. DCA Jazz

the following: Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band 2018, 2019), Essentially Ellington first place winners (2011, 2012,

2018), and Swing Central Jazz Competition and Workshop first place winners (2010, 2011, 2012). DCA Jazz Ensemble has performed with notable guest artists Nat Adderley, Jr., Nicole

Generation Jazz Orchestra, NYO Jazz, FMEA All-State Jazz

graduates have been awarded scholarships to major schools in the United States including Juilliard, New School, Manhattan School of Music, Michigan State, and Berklee College of Music, among others.

Wednesday Concerts JANUARY 8, 2020 (5 PM-7 PM) Tampa Convention Center, West Hall A David Williams and Melissa Nelson, Coordinators

FMEA Crossover Music Festival Large Ensembles —TCC, West Hall A Small Ensembles —TCC, 31

The Crossover Music Festival celebrates stu-

dents as makers of music from popular music genres such as rock, alternative, blues, pop,

R&B, hip hop, funk, folk, indie rock, electronic dance music, country, rap, punk, soul, metal, Southern rock, Latin, new age, reggae, etc.

December 2019

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Mini-Concerts THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 2020 Tampa Convention Center, Lobby Stage Melissa Nelson, Coordinator 1 pm-1:30 pm

Avant Garde Academy of Broward Concert Choir Marcos J. Rodriguez, Director The Concert Choir at AGA of Broward is the most active and most diverse program at the Avant Garde Academy. With the

representation of more than 80 nations, the Concert Choir within its short four-year history is an award-winning, superior-rated

music program. The group has been invited to perform at the Disney Candlelight Procession and at Carnegie Hall, has performed with the Miami-Dade College Symphony Orchestra, and was the feature performance for the Broward County Teacher

of the Year ceremony. Regardless of the various cultures and

languages spoken at the school, the students and faculty use the world language of music to unite and to bond as one family.

3 pm-3:30 pm

Gotha Middle School Concert Choir Bret Carson, Director The Concert Choir is the top choral ensemble at Gotha Middle School. Concert Choir is a mixed-gender ensemble and has

received straight superiors at MPA choral assessments each of the last two years, and has received an overall superior at Festival Disney the last two times the group competed there.

Concert Choir has performed the national anthem for the Orlando Magic, has sung at a local Relay For Life, and has performed at Fun Spot USA, Gaylord Palms, and various other locations around Central Florida.

5 pm-5:30 pm Manatee Steel Edwin L. Anderson, Director Manatee Steel is the steel drum performance ensemble of

Triangle Elementary School in Mt. Dora, Florida. The group is composed of 24 young ladies and gentlemen selected through an

audition process. In 2019, the group received above expectations

for all categories in the FMEA Steel Drum Festival. In May 2019, the ensemble performed at the Music USA Festival at Universal Studios, Orlando.

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Mini-Concerts FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2020 Tampa Convention Center, Lobby Stage Melissa Nelson, Coordinator 12:30 pm-1 pm

Gaither High School Percussion Ensemble Kristy Dell, Director The Gaither High School Percussion Ensemble was formed

during the 2005-06 school year. The ensemble was invited to perform at the 2007 Music for All National Percussion Festival in

Indianapolis, the FMEA Professional Development Conference in 2008, 2010, and 2012, the Florida PAS Day of Percussion in

2012 and 2013, and the USF Marimba Festival in 2007 and 2010. In addition, the Percussion Ensemble consistently earns supe-

rior ratings at both the district and state FBA Solo & Ensemble Festival.

2 pm-2:30 pm

Florida Southern College Chamber Jazz Ensemble Jeffrey Benatar, Director Dr. Jeffrey Benatar will lead a combined faculty/student ensemble from Florida Southern College in original compositions by

the legendary jazz pianist Hank Jones. Selections may include Peedlum, Passing Time, A Darker Hue of Blue, Bangoon/Alison’s

Uncle, Angel Face, Sublime, Lullaby, and/or Interface. This performance highlights the compositions of the late, great pianist who is known more as a sideman in the jazz world (especially compared to his composer brother, Thad Jones).

3 pm-3:30 pm

The First Academy Royals Steel James McKey, Director The Royals Steel ensemble is one of six ensembles and is the

advanced grouping. The group performs various music styles including classical, jazz, and rock/pop as well as traditional

calypso. The ensemble members use their talents for various programing including the Snowball Express, military functions, and opening for local and regional artists.

December 2019

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Thursday Concerts JANUARY 9, 2020 Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A Melissa Nelson, Coordinator 8:30 am-9:30 am

Combined Concert Eau Gallie High School Chamber Orchestra Erik J. Bryan, Director The Eau Gallie High School Chamber Orchestra

consists of 40 of Melbourne’s finest young musi-

cians. The ensemble is devoted to pursuing deep friendships and the love of classical music. The

group’s members believe in making sacrifices in pursuit of beauty and community. They strive to connect deeply with history, music, and their audience with every performance.

Dr. Phillips High School Wind Symphony Charles Watford, Nicole Nasrallah, & James T. Patrick, Directors The Dr. Phillips High School Wind Symphony consists of 94 members, is a vital part of the Performing

Arts Magnet, and has had the honor of receiving the Otto J. Kraushaar Award for the past 12 consecutive years. Many students in the ensembles at Dr. Phillips High School participate annually in district and state solo and ensemble and are selected for all-county, all-state, and national honor bands.

4 pm-5 pm

Florida State University Wind Ensemble Patrick Dunnigan, Director This graduate student wind ensemble with flexible instrumentation performs large chamber works

and also features guest soloists. The group tours

occasionally and performs on and off campus at conferences and special events.

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7:30 pm

Sonic Escape Shawn Wyckoff, Flute; Maria Millar, Violin Shawn Wyckoff and Maria Millar founded Sonic Escape in 2009. Armed with flute and violin,

their game plan—use hyper-instrumentals to fill hearts with indescribable joy—has landed them

on hundreds of stages across 40-plus North American states, provinces, and beyond! Maria and Shawn push themselves to the brink—singing, dancing, telling stories, and above all, playing their hearts out with a “wonderfully imaginative … anything goes sense of fun” (The Washington Post).

They met at The Juilliard School. A love of blading the streets of New York (and a spring break

in Ireland) forged a romance powered by fun. But playing the flute and violin together? No way! Too shrill, hard to tune. Temptation kicked in, though, and Shawn and Maria gave it a go. Tuning

took two years; matching breath and bow took even longer. Composing music that amplifies the virtuosity, range, and emotion of the flute and violin—that’s when the real fun began. They knew they’d arrived when an audience exclaimed, “Hurry, lock the doors! Don’t let them leave!”

Performing arts centers such as Lincoln Center (NYC), Chautauqua Institution (New York), Irish

Arts Center (NYC), Oxnard Performing Arts & Convention Center (California), and the Imperial

Theatre (Sarnia, Ontario) have provided formidable stages for Sonic Escape’s larger-than-life

sounds and moves. Concerts and workshops at the University of Missouri (St. Louis), University of Wisconsin (Whitewater), Penn State (Erie), Hofstra University (Hempstead, N.Y.), and The Juilliard School (NYC) have enabled them to share with audiences and students alike. Then there’s festivals … whether thousands camp without running water or gather in idyllic town squares,

Sonic Escape loves them all and has performed at the Summer Arts Festival (Huntington, N.Y.), Blue Skies Music Festival (Clarendon, Ontario), Elora Festival (Ontario), and the Cherry Blossom Festival (Philadelphia, Pa.). Lastly, the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Arts Council,

Chamber Music America, and the Puffin Foundation have generously funded Sonic Escape’s compositions, travels, and the creation of a five-day community residency. So, look out! When you

see that green minivan rolling into town, make way for the two nomads (and maybe even two traveling cats) that are Sonic Escape: good times and superb music are sure to follow!

December 2019

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DON’T IMITATE. INNOVATE. THE NEW YVN. When it comes to violin making, it was pencils down for centuries. Until Yamaha started asking big questions. Like, “how can we build a more high-quality student violin, with better sound and greater durability, in a more eco-friendly, sustainable way?” Discover how the new Yamaha YVN Model 3 nails all the right notes at www.yamaha.com/us/yvn/.

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NEW SECURITY PROCEDURES The Florida Music Education Association is working with the Tampa Police Department and Allied Universal Security at the Tampa Convention Center (TCC) to enhance the conference experience for the students and attendees. GREAT NEWS! In order to help keep attendees safe, there will be a heightened security presence throughout the Tampa Convention Center and at various hotels. All entrances to TCC will be patrolled by uniformed officers of the Tampa Police Department and uniformed Allied Universal Security personnel. They will be patrolling the Tampa Convention Center as well. The Tampa Police Department will be at the crosswalks between Marriott Tampa Water Street and TCC, at concerts, and patrolling some of the downtown hotels during rehearsals. All attendees (this includes members, chaperones, and student participants) must wear their conference badge during the conference once the authorized registrant obtains the conference packet. Please be prepared for random bag and/or purse searches. It is encouraged, if at all possible, to use a clear bag, similar to those used at sporting events, for entrance.

ENJOY THE CONFERENCE EXPERIENCE.

December 2019

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FMEA General Membership Sessions Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A Steven Kelly, Presider John Southall and Melissa Nelson, Coordinators

… g n i r u t Fea

FMEA FIRST GENERAL MEMBERSHIP SESSION THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 2020, 10 AM

Performance by Florida State University Wind Ensemble (See description on page 26.)

Keynote by Libby Larsen

Concert by Sonic Escape (See description on page 27.)

FMEA SECOND GENERAL MEMBERSHIP SESSION FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2020, 9 AM

… g n i r u t a Fe

Hall of Fame Induction Mary Palmer Hall of Fame Presenter

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Annual FMEA Awards Presentation Debbie Fahmie Awards Committee Chairwoman Music Director

Performance by the West Orange High School Concert Choir, directed by Dr. Jeffery Redding

Keynote by Anne Fennell “The Transformative Value of the Whole Musician”


Friday Concerts JANUARY 10, 2020 Tampa Convention Center, Lobby Stage Melissa Nelson, Coordinator 10:15 am-1 pm

Digital Music Showcase Tampa Marriott Water Street, Florida Ballroom, Salons 1-3 David A. Williams, Coordinator The Digital Music Showcase is designed to encourage musical

creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration by students in K-12 schools. FMEA member teachers nominated students to submit their compositions in three categories: Live Performance, Fixed Media, and Music With Video

4 pm-5 pm

DePaul Symphony Orchestra Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A Cliff Colnot, Director The DePaul Symphony Orchestra has been a significant part of the School of Music for over 65 years and is the leading orchestra of DePaul University. Personnel consist of undergraduate and graduate music majors at the school. Professionalism and orchestral fundamentals are emphasized in three weekly rehearsals while school is in session. Students receive regular instruction from members of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Lyric Opera Orchestra, and DePaul’s distinguished instrumental faculty.

December 2019

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Meet the 2020 All-State Conductors

Ms. Sarah Ball

Mr. David Brunner

Ms. Lynn Gackle

Dr. Lori Hetzel

Middle School Honors Orchestra

All-State Reading Chorus

All-State Middle School Treble Chorus

All-State SSAA Chorus

Dr. Gail Barnes

Dr. Matthew Denman

Mr. Michael Garasi

Dr. William LaRue Jones

All-State Middle School Orchestra

Dr. Leslie Blackwell All-State TTBB Chorus

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All-State Guitar Ensemble

Mr. Jody Dunn

High School Honors Band

Music Director

All-State Middle School Band

Mr. Gary Green

All-State Intercollegiate Band

All-State Concert Orchestra

Ms. Robyn Lana

All-State Elementary Chorus


Dr. Mark Laycock

Mr. Bob Phillips

Mr. Josh Southard

Mr. Cleve Maloon

Dr. David Ragsdale

Ms. Lisa Sullivan

Dr. Martha Shaw

Mr. Mike Tomaro

All-State Symphonic Orchestra

All-State Middle School Jazz Band

Dr. Jacob Narverud All-State Middle School Mixed Chorus

High School Honors Orchestra

All-State Concert Band

All-State Concert Chorus

All-State Elementary Orff Ensemble

All-State Elementary Orff Ensemble

Dr. David Waybright All-State Symphonic Band

Ms. Calista Zebley

Middle School Honors Band

All-State High School Jazz Band

December 2019

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Ne w Music Teache r Mentoring:

How to Make the Most of Your Situation

I

by Rachel Sorenson

It is no secret that the teaching profession

challenges encountered by new music

we are losing talented professionals at an

particularly helpful (Conway, 2006).

Smith (2003), between 40% and 50% of

additional level of support added for new

the first five years of teaching, and almost

however, standards for induction pro-

profession are due to job dissatisfaction

state (Ingersoll, 2012). According to the

Add to this the unique challenges faced

no state-mandated guidelines pertaining

lar workloads, added financial responsi-

induction and mentoring policies. That is

tion—and it is easy to see why the rates

for mentorship programs. Every county

better than for general education teachers

ble for creating and implementing its own

For decades, researchers and policy

rently no requirement that school districts

new teachers as a way to reduce early

gram. Therefore, mentorship programs

ponents of successful new teacher induc-

comprehensive to practically nonexistent

for the novice teacher (Goldrick, 2016;

As music teachers in the state of

teachers, the provision of a mentor can be

is a difficult one—and one from which

Research has shown that with every

alarming rate. According to Ingersoll and

teachers will leave the profession within

teachers, the attrition rate is lowered;

half of all departures from the teaching

grams are not consistent from state to

and the desire to pursue a better job.

New Teacher Center, Florida currently has

by music teachers—heavy extracurricu-

to the implementation and oversight of

bilities, inventory, and feelings of isola-

to say, there is no single statewide policy

of attrition for new music teachers are no

and school district is therefore responsi-

(Gardner, 2010).

mentoring program. In fact, there is cur-

makers have searched for ways to support

in Florida even have a mentoring pro-

career attrition. One of the primary com-

vary widely across the state, ranging from

tion programs is the inclusion of a mentor

(NTC Florida State Policy Review, 2016).

Ingersoll, 2012; Wong et al., 2005). Mentors

Florida, how do we make sense of all of

many ways, including serving as confi-

I have several tips for making the most

acclimating mentees to the school envi-

more experienced teacher looking to sup-

trict policies. Because of the many specific

teachers in the state of Florida, there are a

provide support for young teachers in

this? If you are a first-year music teacher,

dantes, offering instructional guidance,

of your mentoring situation. If you are a

ronment, and providing insight on dis-

port and guide a new generation of music few pieces of advice for you as well!

Continued on page 36

December 2019

35


New Music Teacher Mentoring Continued from page 35

N ew

Mu sic Teac her s …

If you were not given a mentor, go find one!

you let them know you need it!

your first year with feelings of isolation,

the reward of receiving support from a

Bottom line: you may need to advocate

If you find yourself struggling during

for yourself more than you expected. But

confusion over school and district admin-

veteran teacher and finding out you are

istrative policies, classroom management, or curriculum design, you are not alone!

not alone will be worth the effort!

same feelings. Some first-year teachers

Take advantage of your non-music mentors.

from a more experienced teacher who

paired with mentors who do not teach

Every first-year teacher experiences the

are fortunate enough to receive guidance can successfully guide them through the common issues encountered during the

early days of teaching. As mentioned above, however, there is no guarantee

that this service will be provided to every

new teacher in Florida, either through the district or the school.

If you find yourself without a school-

or district-assigned mentor, search for one (or more!). Other teachers at your

school may be housed in different buildings on campus, so if you want to com-

municate with them, chances are you

will have to leave the comfort of your classroom and seek them out. If this feels awkward or uncomfortable, consider ask-

ing an administrator to pair you with a teacher at your school who he or she believes will be a good match.

Also consider reaching out to your

component organizations such as FBA, FOA, FVA, and FEMEA. Many of these

organizations have a member specifically

assigned to mentorship concerns within

each district. If your component organization does not have an active men-

torship program in your district, reach out to your district chairperson and see

if he or she can help you find a mentor. Without a doubt, there are other music

teachers in your district who would be more than happy to offer guidance—if

36    F l o r i d a

In many school districts, new teachers are

music. As people who teach such a specialized subject, this can be frustrating for

us. Although music teachers might prefer to be paired with like-content mentors,

they should not discount the valuable

advice their general education mentors can provide. If you have a school-based, non-music mentor, he or she may not be able to help you with advice on which

instruments to buy or how to manage a

classroom of 70-plus students. This teacher could, however, help you with your

school’s evaluation system, attendance procedures, how to request a substitute,

or how best to communicate with the parents in your new community. Take good advice where you can get it!

Meet with your mentor regularly and often.

All teachers are busy. It is a fact of life.

There never seems to be enough time in

the day to accomplish all of our goals, but taking time to foster your growth and mental health as a new teacher is essen-

tial to the longevity of your career. Many district mentorship programs set guide-

work of a district-sponsored mentorship program, you will have to work a little harder to structure time to meet with

your mentor. Ask your mentor or person of support if you can set up a regular-

ly scheduled time for meetings and/or

phone calls, and then make it a firm part of both of your schedules.

Ask your mentor to observe you teach ... and observe him or her teach, too!

Researchers agree that one of the primary components of effective mentorship programs includes opportunities for observation (Southern Regional Education

Board, Educator Effectiveness, 2018). Both

mentors and mentees benefit when the novice teacher can be seen in his or her

own environment. Conversely, new music

teachers should be given the opportunity

to watch more experienced teachers as well. Some well-structured mentorship programs provide dedicated release time for observations. Others do not. If you

think you would benefit from getting out of your classroom to observe your

mentor, discuss this with your administrators. They may be more willing than you think to assist by providing funds for

a substitute to cover time you are away. If leaving campus to observe an off-site

mentor is out of the question, take a plan-

ning period to observe other teachers at your school. And don’t just observe other

music teachers who might be down the hall. Find out who the superstar teachers are on your campus, regardless of

content area, and ask to observe them. Remember, many non-content-specific teaching skills are transferrable!

If you don’t believe these are enough, ask

Utilize virtual communication technology for mentoring.

you are not working within the frame-

ings with mentors are not possible. In

lines for how often teachers and mentors should meet and engage in observations. your mentor if you can set up more. If

Music Director

Sometimes frequent, face-to-face meet-


this case, don’t be afraid to experiment with Skype, Facetime, or other virtu-

al communication tools to interact with your mentor. If you have a “problem”

class, consider asking your mentor to

virtually sit in on the class to observe your teaching habits and the general

classroom environment. As discussed before, observation is a key element to the

successful mentorship process. Allowing

your mentor to see your circumstances is invaluable. Similarly, consider observing your mentor in action through the same means.

Trust your instincts.

When it comes to the relationship between you and your mentor, do you feel as if it is not a match made in

heaven? That’s OK! Personalities and teaching philosophies factor a great deal into mentor-mentee relationships. Just

because you were assigned a particular mentor by your school district or school does not mean it will be a perfect fit. In

this case, take your mentor’s advice, but

E x per ienced

Teac her s  …

If you are teacher with a few more years under your belt, consider acting as a mentor

seek out other counsel as well. It is your

for a less experienced music teacher near you. Research shows that the optimal level

both challenges you and gels with your

but there is no need to wait this long to serve as a mentor! Don’t be afraid to jump

career. It is possible to find a mentor who

of teaching experience for mentors is between eight and 15 years (Zembytska, 2016),

personality.

in and share the knowledge you have acquired so far.

receiving advice that goes against your

Want to help? Know your options.

Although you still have a lot to learn as a

see if you can serve in this position in an official capacity. Although it varies from

feedback, growth, and change—chances

addition, let your school administration and component organization (FBA, FOA,

do. As with many things in life, there is

tact person for new teachers at your school and district. They will not know you are

Similarly, if you find that you are

inner teaching code, trust your instincts.

There are many ways to serve as a mentor. Check with your school and district to

new teacher—and you should be open to

place to place, some programs even offer compensation for serving as a mentor. In

are you know more than you think you

FVA, and FEMEA) district chairperson know you are willing and able to be a con-

often more than one way to arrive at a

willing to help unless you tell them!

situation is different and may require dif-

You’re a mentor, now what?

Mentors, although more experienced, are

and/or professional development credit for your role. Make sure you are prepared

desired outcome. That is, every teaching

ferent strategies to achieve certain goals.

Inquire as to whether or not your school or district offers compensation, training,

still fallible. Their advice may not always

and rewarded for your efforts.

their feedback into consideration and

relationship. How often will you meet? How often will you communicate? How

be right for your exact situation. Take

Meet with your mentee as soon as possible and set up the expectations for your

weigh it against your other options.

Continued on page 38

December 2019

37


New Music Teacher Mentoring Continued from page 37

in new teacher mentoring, check out some of the references below. And remember, it takes a village!

Rachel Sorenson is pursuing the PhD in music education from Florida State

University, where she serves as a graduate teaching and conducting assistant in the

band department. Prior to pursuing her graduate studies, Rachel taught band in the public

school system of Florida. Rachel holds the BME from Stetson University and the MME from Florida State University. References Conway, C. M. (2006). Navigating through induction: How a mentor can help. Music Educators Journal, 92(5), 56-60. doi:10.2307/3878504

provide your personal phone number?

Not an “official” mentor? You can still help!

to this relationship. New teachers will

in an official capacity, don’t forget that it

should your mentee contact you? Will you Try to be organized with your approach appreciate the structure.

Go observe your mentee as soon as

possible and as regularly as possible.

Seeing your mentee’s classroom situation

firsthand will help guide your feedback. Conversely, see if your mentee can come observe you teach.

Guide your mentee through many of

the content-specific responsibilities of

being a music teacher, such as working with a parent booster organization, bookkeeping, maintaining a music library,

instrument inventory, fund-raising, put-

ting on concerts, and navigating MPA online.

Remind your mentee throughout the

year of important deadlines and due dates for district paperwork.

Find and collaborate with other men-

tors. If you are feeling ill-prepared or unsure of how best to help your mentee

with a certain situation, seek out someone who has done this before!

38    F l o r i d a

If you don’t end up serving as a mentor never hurts to reach out to new teachers from time to time anyway. New teachers

Gardner, R. D. (2010). Should I stay or should I go? Factors that influence the retention, turnover, and attrition of K-12 music teachers in the United States. Arts Education Policy Review, 111(3), 112-121. doi:10.1080/10632910903458896 Goldrick, L. (2016). Support from the start: A 50-state review of policies on new educator induction and mentoring. Santa Cruz, CA: New Teacher Center. Retrieved from https:// newteachercenter.org/wp-content/uploads/ 2016CompleteReportStatePolicies.pdf

can become so inundated with the duties

Ingersoll, R. M. (2012). Beginning teacher induction: What the data tell us. Phi Delta Kappan, 93(8), 47-51. doi:10.1177/003172171209300811

have time to reach out for help, or are too

Ingersoll, R. M., & Smith, T. M. (2003). The wrong solution to the teacher shortage. Educational Leadership, 60(8), 30-33. Retrieved from https://www.gse.upenn.edu/pdf/rmi/ EL_TheWrongSolution_to_theTeacherShortage.pdf

of their new position that they either don’t nervous to do so. Check in with the new

orchestra teacher down the hall to let this

colleague know how to book the audito-

rium for a concert. Email the new chorus teacher in the county to make sure he or

she knows when the all-state application

deadline is. Call your new elementary music feeder just to see how this teacher is doing.

Conclusion

Being a music teacher is an incredible

privilege, but it doesn’t come without its challenges. New teachers and veterans alike should make every attempt to support each other in the profession. If you are a new music teacher, a veteran, or somewhere in between and are interested

Music Director

NTC Florida State Policy Review (2016). State policy review: New educator induction: Florida. Retrieved from https://newteachercenter.org/wp-content/uploads/SPR-florida2016-v2.pdf Southern Regional Education Board, Educator Effectiveness. (2018). Mentoring new teachers. A fresh look. Retrieved from https://www. sreb.org/sites/main/files/file-attachments/ mentoring_new_teachers_2.pdf Wong, H. K., Breaux, A., & Klar, T. (2005). Induction: How to train, support, and retain new teachers. Paper presented at National Staff Development Council New Orleans, LA. Retrieved from http://newteacher.com/ NSDCNewOrleansHandout.pdf Zembytska, M. (2016). Mentoring as the core element of new teacher induction in the USA: Policies and practices. Comparative Professional Pedagogy, 6(2), 67-73. doi:10.1515/ rpp-2016-0021


Please take time to thank and support our 2019-2020 Academic Partners.

GOLD PARTNERS

SILVER PARTNERS

University of North Florida

BRONZE PARTNERS Cannon Music Camp - Appalachian State University Florida College Florida Gulf Coast University Holy Cross Lutheran Academy Infinity Percussion Kent State University School of Music Mercer University

Palm Beach Atlantic University Rollins College Department of Music Stetson University Union University University of North Texas Valdosta State University West Virginia University School of Music

Partners as of November 1, 2019.

*Please visit FMEA.org/partners for partnership details or call 850-878-6844.

December 2019

39


Should You Start an Elementary School Band Program? by Christy Stump

Y

ou may have noticed that the title of this article begins

Should You, not How to. An elementary band program

should meet certain criteria to be a good fit for your school

tion to their facilities. Be aware, though, that there will

be additional parental costs involved with these outside programs.

and to complement your students’ future band programs.

2. Meet with the band director of the school your students

be a richly rewarding experience for you, your students,

grated. If possible, avoid teaching any major concepts

If these criteria are met, an elementary band program can your school, and your community:

1. First and foremost, there must be a qualified teacher who has had training and/or experience play-

ing and teaching all of the band instruments you choose to incorporate in your program. This could

will attend next to ensure your programs are well intein contradiction to each other. In my situation, we conferred on practically everything: instrument assembly,

practice expectations … even reed placement! Our only

major difference is that we chose to use different method books to give our students some variety.

be the elementary music teacher or even the middle

3. Create a handbook and a contract, stipulating strong

allow. Otherwise, embouchures, hand positions, and

attendance, required supplies, and behavior. High

school band director, should this teacher’s schedule techniques could be inadvertently taught incorrectly, severely hindering your students’ later development.

responsibilities for practice (we use practice records),

expectations are a must! An introductory parent meeting is highly recommended.

2. You will need the support of your administration,

4. Choose a pared-down instrumentation to keep it sim-

tor. Funding, scheduling, and transportation must

reeds.) Having an instrument selection night to ensure

colleagues, community, and middle school direcbe planned well before a program like this can be

launched. The middle school director in my community was invaluable in making sure I had access to larger

instruments and music stands that I could not afford at

the outset. Nonprofit groups and grants can also help with start-up funding.

If your prospective program meets the above criteria, it’s

time to begin planning!

1. A minimum of two rehearsals per week will be needed.

ple. (For example, I left out French horns and double

you have a balanced instrumentation is imperative.

The try-on process can be accomplished quickly with

the help of a qualified team from your local music store (under your direction) and can be scheduled the same night as your parent meeting. You will also need

to consult with the middle school director and your local music store to make sure any future instrument

switching will not be an undue financial burden on the parents.

Have fun! If done well, this can be a grand adventure for

If possible, rehearsing sections on different days can be

you and your students.

walkers from band rehearsals, but some students may

Christy Stump is the music teacher at Gulf

local sports/child-care centers may provide transporta-

Florida.

extremely helpful. Many students will be car riders or be able to go to your school’s aftercare program, and

40    F l o r i d a

Music Director

Breeze Elementary School in Gulf Breeze,


ComponentNews T

FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Ernesta Chicklowski, President

is the season! This festive time of year

Them Off! Breathing Life Into Forgotten

everywhere. While preparing students

Words: Exploring Innovative Teaching in

is also the busiest for music educators

to take the stage for a winter concert or production, creating amazing music edu-

Resources,” and “Teaching Without

complaint we receive every year is that

Elementary Music.”

ing at the same time. Many of our clini-

Boyer-Alexander (sponsored by Peripole)

moment, it is so important to take time to

Cincinnati’s College Conservatory of

reflect, breathe, and enjoy all of the merri-

ment you create for others. You create the

joy of the season for so many. The magical learning opportunities you provide for

your students create a lifetime of mem-

ories and musical connections for life. Thank you for your commitment to caring about others and spreading holiday cheer through music.

After all of the concerts have ended,

and look forward to making our state conference a great experience for all who

attend. Congratulations to all of the stu-

ning session, “Black Light Thursday,” following the FEMEA Annual Business

Meeting on Thursday. Come sing, play, and dance with your friends in the amaz-

for her work in multicultural and urban

ing black light! Participants will learn

music education, her 2020 conference ses-

pieces involving drumming, dancing

sions will be “Sigamé Mis Amigos/Follow

with props, and performing body percus-

Me My Friends,” “Hook, Line, and Sinker:

sion. Wear dark clothing to maximize the

The Power of Rhythm and Rhyme in the

black light effect.

Classroom,” and “Jazz Beginnings in the

In addition to these outstanding clini-

General Music Classroom.”

Cutting-edge multicultural, Orff, and

cians from far and wide, remember that

liners Karen Howard and Roger Sams

rehearsals for the All-State Elementary

(sponsored by Music Is Elementary).

been busily preparing for the conference

and Gretchen Wahlberg will lead an eve-

ers. Known nationally and internationally

the 2020 FMEA Professional Development

FMEA and FEMEA executive boards have

throughout the conference. Sandy Lantz

Music as one FEMEA’s conference headlin-

choral sessions will be presented by head-

Conference, January 8-11 in Tampa. Our

cians will be scheduled in repeat sessions

will join us from the University of

the decorations have been put away, and

the tinsel has been tossed, it’s time for

there are too many good sessions happen-

Esteemed music educator Dr. Rene

cation lesson plans for your students, and making the most of each musical magical

A common post-conference comment/

These

distinguished

music

your registration badge gets you into the Chorus and the All-State Orff Ensemble, the exhibit hall, and the Curriculum Fair.

educa-

This year’s conference will be outstand-

tors will present sessions titled “World

ing. Your FEMEA Board of Directors and

Music Pedagogy in Elementary School,”

I look forward to seeing you soon in

“Collecting and Arranging Folk Songs for

Tampa!

Children,” and “Is It Orff or Choir?”

dents and teachers participating in the

2020 All-State Chorus and All-State Orff

Ensemble. We look forward to having the All-State Chorus open this year’s con-

ference with the national anthem. It is time to finalize your travel plans, hotel

arrangements, registrations, and schedule to join us for the best conference yet.

We are delighted to have these world-

class clinicians for FEMEA’s conference sessions:

Matthew Stensrud (sponsored by West

Music) will join us from Sidwell Friends Lower School in Washington, D.C. This

innovative and energetic music educa-

Elementary, Middle, and High School Band, Choir, and Orchestra 2020: April 3 April 17 April 24

2021: April 9 April 16 April 23

2022: April 8 April 22 May 6

tor will present powerful and engag-

www.SMMFestival.com

Using Playful Improvisation to Prepare

or call:1-855-766-3008

ing sessions titled “Improvise Now!

Students for Meaningful Notation,” “Dust

December 2019

41


ComponentNews

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

Katherine Attong-Mendes, President

by Katherine Attong-Mendes and Julian Grubb

Website: http://flnafmecollegiate.wixsite.com/home Instagram: flnafmecollegiate

T

he Florida NAfME Collegiate Fall

Dr. Tremon Kizer, as well as the two key-

in Florida. Anyone who is interested in

The weekend was jam packed with pro-

Fennell and Libby Larson. You can find

to a current executive board member and

Conference 2019 was a huge success.

fessional development, and we were so

excited to see more than 115 collegiates from around the state learn to improve themselves and to benefit their future

note speakers for the conference, Anne the times published in the conference schedule as collegiate sessions; we hope to see you there!

Additionally, we will be holding our

running for a position should reach out

be on the lookout for an email detailing

the application process and election procedures.

Don’t forget to check out our new web-

students. If you missed it this year, make

two annual business meetings in January:

site and Instagram!

conference! We have received some great

pm and the second on Saturday, January

Julian Grubb is a junior

we will be holding elections for next

tion major at Florida Gulf

sure to be on the lookout for next year’s

feedback we will be using to ensure next year’s conference is even better than previous years.

Now that Fall Conference 2019 is over,

we are excited to be preparing for January’s upcoming FMEA conference. Florida

NAfME Collegiate is sponsoring sessions by Professor Douglas McCullough and

42    F l o r i d a

the first on Thursday, January 9, at 5:30

11, at 10:15 am. At our Saturday meeting, year’s state executive board. Serving Florida NAfME Collegiate at the state

level is an extremely rewarding endeavor. You are able to assist and encourage

NAfME chapters across the state and further the development of music education

Music Director

instrumental music educa-

Coast University. Julian is a founding member of the

FGCU NAfME Collegiate chapter. He is a clarinetist and has played in the FGCU Wind

Orchestra, Symphonic Band, Clarinet Choir, and Basketball Band.


FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD, Advisor

Matthew Davis, President

C

ongratulations! You’ve just about made it to the end of the

semester. As we work on producing this edition of FMD,

H

most of you will be preparing for end-of-semester performance

appy holidays and warm greet-

juries, concerts, and final exams. Hang in there! Soon enough, you’ll be lounging

ings! As you prepare for a

on your couch back home, eating your mom and dad’s fine cooking, and enjoying

well-deserved winter break, please

some much-needed Netflix time. That said, when you lose control of the remote

make sure you have registered for the

and someone flips to the Hallmark Channel to watch Santa Paws for the eleven-

2020 FMEA Professional Development

ty-frillionth time, use the time to download the FMEA app and begin planning

Conference. The preregistration dead-

your experience for the January Professional Development Conference.

line is December 6. We hope you will

Conference sessions are available to view on the FMEA website (fmea.org/

have time to observe our conductors

conference) as well as in the FMEA app. Many thanks to Dr. Josh Bula and the

and ensembles as they prepare for

entire team in the FMEA office for providing such an efficient and functional

their performances. We are very excit-

resource. Just view the conference schedule, and click the title of a session for

ed about our 2020 all-state conduc-

details. From the session details page, you will be able to create a bookmark (so

tors: Mark Laycock, William LaRue

you can find the session easier the next time you need to review it), or you may

Jones, Gail Barnes, Bob Phillips, and

choose to add the session directly to your calendar with just a couple of clicks.

Sarah Black Ball. It’s so inspiring to

Here are a few sessions you don’t want to miss:

watch our guest conductors work

with our students and to witness

Thursday, January 9 10 am

FMEA First General Session: Libby Larsen, Keynote Presenter (TCC, Ballroom A)

3 pm

Advice for Future Music Educators (TCC, 9)

4:15 pm

Music for All: Music That Reflects Society Through Repertoire Selection (TCC, 37)

5:30 pm

Florida NAfME Collegiate Business Meeting (TCC, 12)

the musical transformations from the first rehearsal to performance.

Attending various sessions is a

good way to get new ideas and to walk away feeling renewed energy

for our profession. We have a lot of great clinicians presenting sessions this year! I hope you will gain inspir-

Friday, January 10 7:45 am

Building Your Program: Quality and Quantity and How They Relate (TCC, 7)

9 am

FMEA Second General Session: Anne Fennell, Keynote Presenter, The Transformative Value of the Whole Musician (TCC, Ballroom A)

11:45 am

ing ideas to take back to the classroom from our FMEA conference ses-

sion presenters: Soo Han, Annalisa Chang, Judy Evans, Dakeyan Graham,

Cheri Sleeper, Catherine Michelsen,

Robert Saunders, Jason Jerald, Sarah

Gen Z Teaching for the Next Unknown (TCC, 9)

Morrison, Rob Lambert, Christopher

12:30 pm Research Poster Session (TCC, West Hall B) 1:30 pm

Meet the Supervisors (TCC, 12)

2:45 pm

Interview Strategies for Preservice Music Teachers (TCC, 12)

4 pm

School District Exhibit (TCC, 12)

Allen, Kayla Lisa, and David Cruz.

In the midst of all the exciting

sessions and concerts the conference has to offer, please make an effort to connect with your fellow teachers.

Saturday, January 11 10:15 am

I’m always amazed by the incredible

Florida NAfME Collegiate Business Meeting (TCC, 11)

wisdom that can be gained through

casual conversation. As we finish the

In addition to the above list, there are lots of other wonderful sessions being

first half of this year, I wish you the

provided this year. Check the conference website or the FMEA app for the full

best in your performances. Have a

conference schedule. I wish you much peace and joy in this season, and I look

safe and restful winter break. Take

forward to seeing you in Tampa next year.

time for yourself and your family.

December 2019

43


ComponentNews H

FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION

Cathi Leibinger, President

arland David Sanders started a

for a few years, I was hesitant and told

bands were always some of the best in

old. In a few years, Kentucky Fried

assured me it was just for fun and urged

positive and encouraging. Our first public

restaurant when he was 65 years

Chicken was one of the largest restaurant chains in the world.

Peter Mark Roget first published his

Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases (Roget’s Thesaurus) at the age of 73.

In 1940, Grandma Moses had her first

solo art exhibition, just two years after she started painting at age 78.

In 2019, I began my “rock band career”

her it wasn’t really in my skill set. She

me to go for it. When I showed up for the first rehearsal, I noticed the drum set in

her living room. When she told me that was what she would be playing, I was confused. Me:

brain to keep learning new things. So, I’m going to learn drums, and you’re going to learn bass. We’re

Too Late.

going to have fun, and it’s going to

In April of this year, I got a text from

be AWESOME!

longtime band director colleague and

was starting a rock band and wanted me to play bass. While I’ve played at church

played drums.

Michele: I don’t. But I think it’s good for your

by playing bass in a band called Never

friend Michele Fernandez-Denlinger. She

But Michele, I didn’t think you

And so Never Too Late came to be.

It’s been fun, and I now have a deep,

intimate understanding of why Michele’s

the country; she pushes us but is always

performance was the annual Rock 4 Relief

concert at my school (benefiting hurricane relief in the Bahamas), and a week later,

we played a full set at a party hosted by one of my school colleagues. Friends have

told me they’ve been inspired to resurrect musical endeavors from their school days because of our enthusiasm for this new

adventure. I challenge you to find something you’ve always wanted to try and just go for it. It truly is never too late.

Sometimes, it’s never too early for

things. In the book The 7 Habits of Highly

Successful People, Stephen Covey uses the time management matrix to illustrate

how spending time in the “important/

not urgent” quadrant helps to plan and manage your workload, provide a work/

FLORIDA COLLEGE MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

A

Stacie Rossow, DMA, Immediate Past President

huge thank you to those who made it out to the Fall Conference. It was a great time to talk through some issues that face all of us in the college and

university scene in the state. If you were not able to be there, start thinking now

about attending next October. The date will be determined once all of the football schedules are set. Also, thank you to Florida Southern College for hosting the event.

In the coming month, all registered members will be sent the provisional

bylaws being proposed that will be voted on at the January business meeting. In addition, we will be electing a new president-elect. Circumstances forced our president, John Ash, to resign, and we would like to thank him for his service. In the

interim, I as immediate past president will get us through the January conference. After that, Marc Decker, president-elect, will take over as president. The general

business meeting will take place on Thursday, January 9, in the afternoon. Please consult the conference program for the exact time and location. I encourage every-

life balance, and get more accomplished. Now is the time to begin planning for

spring music performance assessments.

Looking for music, contacting accompa-

nists, checking the calendar for rehearsal conflicts, and clearly communicating with parents and students about expectations become less urgent when started early

enough in the process. If the logistics of

MPA season often cause you to consider a new career, I encourage you to start the preparation process earlier than you have in the past. If you need help or have questions, please contact your district chair-

person, a mentor teacher, or me directly at president@fba.flmusiced.org. We all want nothing but success for you and your students.

We are in the final stretch of the semes-

one to attend as we have a number of issues and initiatives that are important to

ter, and I am looking forward to our

I hope to catch up with many of you at sessions, in the Halls of Ivy, or in the

Conference in January as a way to

all of us working in two- and four-year schools, both public and private.

conference hall. And please feel free to reach out if you have any concerns or initiatives that you believe would be appropriate for this organization to take up.

44    F l o r i d a

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2020 FMEA Professional Development recharge for the next semester. If you hav-

en’t made plans to attend, it’s never too late. I look forward to seeing you there.


FLORIDA MUSIC SUPERVISION ASSOCIATION

Harry “Skip” Pardee, President

G

reetings, music educators!

I hope this note finds you in the

holiday spirit. This time of year is filled

What better way to ring in the holiday

may be of interest. Our organization

Florida’s students! I can think of no better

way to build a school and district community than through our beloved art form.

In October, our organization was

so pleased to participate in the annu-

al Collegiate Fall Conference, where we

sessions!

For our collegiate music educators, the

Florida Music Supervision Association

season than with music performed by

seeing you on Friday, January 10, for these

was a great way to recharge the batteries.

with joyous concerts, events, and celebrations featuring your talented students.

respective districts. We look forward to

exactly midway through the school year

As always, if our organization can be of

will be providing three sessions that

any assistance to you in the field, please

will be hosting “Meet the Supervisors,”

work of many to ensure a well-rounded

do not hesitate to contact us. It takes the

arts education is provided for our state’s

“Interview Strategies for Preservice Music

students. Don’t underestimate the impor-

Teachers,” and a new “School District

tance of your role in your community!

Exhibit” aimed at providing special time

You are making a tremendous difference

to hear from supervisors about anticipat-

in the lives of our students.

ed job openings and applying in their

spent time with nearly 100 future music educators in varying stages of their bac-

FLORIDA VOCAL ASSOCIATION

calaureate degrees in music education. We had a delightful time connecting with the future of music education in our state.

A special thank you to Katherine Attong-

Mendes (UM) for her tremendous leadership during the course of the weekend.

Amidst all the celebrations and beau-

tiful music we enjoy this month, we can-

not help but be reminded of all of the goings-on in a school during this sea-

son, whether it be mid-term exams, the grading period ending, holiday parades, and of course preparing our ensembles

for upcoming music performance assess-

ments just around the corner. The daily checklist for teachers outside the actual music making seems to grow each year.

Prioritizing your time and talents takes planning, follow-through, and reflection. I think there is nothing better than keeping your saw sharp and learning about best practices in our field by attending our

annual conference. This year’s conference theme is Musical Excellence: Past, Present, & Future, and it is sure not to disappoint. The Conference Planning Committee has been working diligently over the course of an

entire year to help ensure the best possible conference experience. As a music

educator, I always thought attending our

professional development conference

Jason Locker, President

D

ecember is my favorite month! The excitement of holiday gatherings with

family and friends, the beautiful sights and sounds of the season, and the

Florida winter with temperatures in the frigid 50’s can only mean one thing. It’s almost time for the FMEA Professional Development Conference!

Nationally, the Florida Music Education Association puts on one of the largest

and most comprehensive professional conferences in our field. We are so fortunate to have the opportunity to network with colleagues, to observe world-renowned

choral conductors rehearse with our students, to attend professional development

sessions and performances featuring respected pedagogues and ensembles, and

to have access to a wide array of exhibitors representing every sector of the music

education industry. I sincerely hope that none of us ever takes for granted the access we have every year to this remarkable event.

This year’s conference theme is Celebrating Musical Excellence: Past, Present, &

Future. Twenty years ago, leaders in our profession, guided by MENC President

June Hinckley, produced Vision 2020, a document whose purpose was to chart the course of music education for the following 20 years. Now, as we enter 2020, we

reflect upon the many significant changes that have had an impact on us during those 20 years and once again imagine how the future may look for music educa-

tion in Florida and beyond. This is an exciting time that invites us to examine the challenges and possibilities facing our profession and to contemplate the ways in

which we will strive to maintain our excellence and relevance in the years to come.

As you attend the fantastic sessions, rehearsals, concerts, and other conference

activities planned for this year, I hope you will join me in considering the past,

present, and future of our professional practice and that you will return to your classroom with a renewed sense of purpose—not just for 2020, but for the next 20 years to come. I can’t wait to join with you at the FMEA Professional Development

Conference for this important conversation. It really is the most wonderful time of the year!

December 2019

45


CommitteeReports

DIVERSE LEARNERS COMMITTEE Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD, Chairwoman

2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference Sessions:

Addressing Diversity in the Music Classroom

T

his month I am happy to preview the following 2020 FMEA

sessions and the speakers who will present on important

topics of diversity and inclusion. The topics will address music

ming, and movement lessons that work while keeping meaningful music experiences at the heart of instruction.

students with disabilities and the role of music in advocating for

Aaron Lohmeyer, PhD

presenting and returning to Florida from Minnesota, Aaron

and special education music in a Florida

social justice. We are happy to have numerous Florida teachers Lohmyer and Tesfa Wondemagegnehu. Music and Diverse Learners:

Tips, Tricks, and Tools for Your Classroom Thursday, January 9, 2020 1:30 pm-2:30 pm TCC, 11

This session is for music educators who are teaching students

with disabilities, particularly those with intellectual disabilities. Adaptive strategies and lesson ideas and materials will be presented.

After recently teaching band, guitar,

high school, Dr. Aaron Lohmeyer is an assistant professor of music education at

Winona State University. He has present-

ed at the local, state, and national levels on Orff pedagogy and creativity in the instrumental classroom. As a saxophonist,

he has served as a clinician for young jazz

ensembles and has fulfilled guest artist residencies from North Carolina to Alaska. His publications have appeared in Florida Music Director, General Music Today, and Orff Echo. Voices of Experience: Music Educators

Shane Swezey

Shane Swezey is the music teacher and music therapist at Oak Park School in Sarasota, Florida. He has presented at

the national, state, and local levels with an emphasis on music therapy, music in

special education, positive behavior man-

agement, self-care, and adaptive technology. Mr. Swezey had the honor of being selected as one of the finalists for the 2020 Florida Teacher of the Year award.

With Disabilities

Friday, January 10, 2020 1:30 pm-2:30 pm TCC, 11

Learn from the collective wisdom of former music students

with disabilities to now music educators with disabilities. A panel of subject matter experts will share what they wish

their teachers had known about them as students, and what

they have learned as teachers with disabilities. Disabilities represented by panel members are hearing loss, vision loss, learning disability, and physical disability.

Orff and Dalcroze for Secondary

Laura Meehan, Panel Moderator

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Caminiti Exceptional Center, a self-con-

Students With Disabilities 2:45 pm-3:45 pm TCC, 12

Traditional elementary pedagogies can be used to motivate secondary students by developing community and by promot-

ing movement and opportunities to be heard. An elementary turned high school general music teacher will present ideas that worked for students with intellectual and physical disabilities. Presented will be practical body percussion, drum-

46    F l o r i d a

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Laura Meehan is the music specialist at tained setting for special learners in

Tampa, Florida, and she is certified to teach in music and ESE. She attends the

University of South Florida for doctor-

al studies in educational leadership. Her research interests include music in special

education, educational equity for students

with severe disabilities, and mentoring music teachers in the area of ESE.


Edward Ercilla

Robin Morris

music at Doral Academy Preparatory in

Central Middle School in West Melbourne,

Edward Ercilla is director of instrumental Miami, Florida. His teaching responsibil-

ities include band, orchestra, guitar, and music theory. Mr. Ercilla also serves as

adjunct professor at Doral College, where he teaches music appreciation. Outside

of school, Mr. Ercilla serves as music director for the South

Florida Youth Symphony, where he conducts the String Consort Ensemble.

Skip Pardee

Skip Pardee serves as district coordinator,

Robin Morris is director of orchestras at

Florida. She received the BME from Florida State University in 2011. She has

written lesson plans for Brevard County first-time orchestra teachers, is the point

person for recruitment and retention for

middle school orchestras and the mentor teacher for new orches-

tra teachers, and has presented about teaching orchestra for non-

orchestra teachers. She has also guest conducted for the Brevard Elementary Music Festival, the Mel-Gallie Music Festival, and Creative Young Artists.

fine arts for the Collier County Public

Real Talk on Diversity and Social Justice

City, and Immokalee), overseeing all

Friday, January 10, 2020

Schools (Naples, Marco Island, Everglades aspects of curriculum and instruction for music, visual arts, theater, and dance,

K-12. He also serves as the liaison for nonprofit arts organizations and their

involvement with the public schools and their faculties. Mr. Pardee is president of the Florida Music Supervision Association, a component of FMEA.

in the Music Classroom 2:45 pm-3:45 pm TCC, 11

This session will be a nuanced dive into social justice conversations with students in K-12 music classrooms. Participants

will receive information on how to initiate a Justice Choir and

how to obtain the free songbook provided by the Justice Choir movement.

Matt Weihmuller

Tesfa Wondemagegnehu

teaches saxophone and jazz at the Patel

ductor of the Viking Chorus and the

Matt Weihmuller is a saxophonist who Conservatory at the Straz Center in

Tampa, Florida. He is also a composer utilizing specialized music technology

for the blind. He has spoken around the

United States, including as a guest lecturer at the Peabody Conservatory at Johns

Hopkins. His goal is to champion the cause of increasing Braille music literacy for blind musicians. Charles Kelly

Charles Kelly is director of bands at Eau Gallie High School in Melbourne, Florida. He received the BME from Florida State

University. Prior to teaching at Eau Gallie High School, he was director of bands at

J.R. Arnold High School in Panama City Beach, Florida.

Tesfa Wondemagegnehu serves as conChapel Choir at St. Olaf College. He is also the guest artistic director of one of

North America’s largest LGBTQ+ choirs,

Minnesota’s One Voice Mixed Chorus. He maintains an active voice studio and

teaches music and social justice with the

goal of helping to bridge the gap of social

injustice through music, dialogue, and inspiring participants to take action in their communities. He cofounded the Justice

Choir movement with noted composer Abbie Betinis. In sum-

mer 2018, Mr. Wondemagegnehu served as guest conductor of the children’s choir at the Aspen Music Festival, leading the

group in a weeklong journey on the Justice Choir Songbook. Most recently, he completed an extended music and social

justice residency with Dr. Andrew Clark and the Harvard University Glee Club.

December 2019

47


CommitteeReports PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

Scott Evans, Chairman

A

ttention, all life-long learners! Once again, the Florida Music Education

Association has curated a fantastic collection of professional development

opportunities for the 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference. If you are a seasoned teacher looking for a boost or a brand new teacher looking for a lifeline,

you will see that the Conference Planning Committee has selected sessions designed

just for you. The process for choosing these sessions is rigorous and done with great care and attention. As a result, with careful planning and review, you can learn a great deal by attending this 76-year-old conference. I suggest taking the time to look

through the schedule and session descriptions in advance to maximize your expe-

rience. Pick an area of focus this year and hone in on any opportunities for growth you discover out of the vast array of sessions.

I want to highlight two sessions this year that I think will be of interest to many

of our members. The first is titled “Wondering How You Made It Through Your First Semester of Teaching; This Session Is for You!” The focus will be on teachers new to

MULTICULTURAL NETWORK Bernard Hendricks, Chairman

W

ell, December is upon us, meaning winter concerts, hol-

iday celebrations, performances, and parades are just days (or hours) away. Another great opportunity for all of

us to show off the diversity in our programs and in our communities.

As you are preparing for these joyous events, make sure you continue to

keep your performance fundamentals at the forefront. Be careful when it

comes to programming literature that

is appropriate for your students’ playing ability. Ask colleagues for input, especially in areas about which you

may feel a little timid. Have fun and enjoy the season.

The FMEA Professional Devel-

the profession and takes place on Thursday, January 9, from 1:45 to 2:45 pm in TCC,

opment Conference is just around

to pick the brains of music educators who have survived those first few years of

always looking forward to catching up

37. During this time, teachers just starting in their careers will have the opportunity teaching and lived to tell about it. Topics to be discussed will include items such as

standards-based instruction, process and procedures, monitoring progress, assessment, mental health, and finding balance. There will be stations around the room

for you to visit that support specific music content areas, grade levels, and topics of

interest. You are also encouraged to bring your own concerns or challenges to the table to discuss with one of our more experienced educators.

The second session is called “Attention, All Retired Music Educators: We Need

You!” This session will provide the opportunity for our retired members to share

their experiences with each other and to showcase examples of how some continue to give back to the profession. Whether it’s coaching young teachers, leading an advo-

cacy campaign, or helping out at concerts, the expertise of our retired colleagues is a

valuable commodity underutilized in most communities. Our goal will be for retired members to leave the room with some great ideas for staying involved without getting in the way of beach time, fun adventures, or time with the grandkids.

Florida is a great state in which to be a music educator, and our professional devel-

opment conference is one of the best in the country. Come prepared to learn, grow, and bask in the brilliance of our collective. See you in January!

48    F l o r i d a

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the corner (January 8-11), and we are with music educators from around the

state. This year there are even more opportunities to get students involved

who may not be participating in one

of the all-state ensembles. Please take some time to visit the FMEA website

to learn about the multiple ways more students can have the experience of

attending a music education confer-

ence of this magnitude. You could easily be inspiring the next generation of music educators here in the great state of Florida.

I wish all of you a blessed and

relaxing holiday season. Make sure

you get in that quality family time. I

look forward to seeing everyone in Tampa come January.


ResearchPuzzles FOR MUSIC TEACHERS This on-going column seeks to stimulate awareness of research issues for FMEA teachers and researchers.

RESEARCH COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN

Don D. Coffman, PhD University of Miami

What do we know about the students in high school music ensembles across the country?

F

our years ago (October 2015), I pre-

50:50 ratio observed in the entire sample

a 2011 report by Ken Elpus and my UM

no music in their coursework, these gen-

sented this question, summarizing

colleague Carlos Abril (Elpus, K. & Abril, C. R., 2011). In June 2019, they published

a follow-up replication study, based on a newer data set (Elpus, K. & Abril, C. R.,

Their 2011 paper reported that 21% of

the seniors in 2004 self-reported partici-

pating in school music ensembles during

their senior year. Their 2019 study indicates that 24% of students in the class

of 2013 were in a high school ensemble

(choir, band, orchestra) during any of their high school years, based on analyzing

student transcript data. The slight difference in percentages may not signify an

tar (3%), or keyboard (3%) classes during high school.

Their 2004 data indicated that 61.1% of

music students were female, but that data

set could not be disaggregated by ensem-

bles. Their 2013 data set could reveal enrollments by ensemble and showed the

female-to-male ratio was most pronounced in choir (70:30), followed by orchestra (61:39) and band (48:52). Compared to the

research. This is an instance, too, where persistence in music enrollment may make a difference. It is

possible, for example, that students

(dual-parent/single-parent), standardized

who persist for multiple years in

math test score, and eighth-grade math

choral music are more similar aca-

grade. Their statistical analysis revealed

demically to their instrumental

that choir students were not significant-

peers than students who only enroll

ly different from non-choir students for

in one year of choir to perhaps fill a

any of the other characteristics, but band

needed arts requirement.

and orchestra students had statistically

Their article has many more results

significant differences compared to non-

band and non-orchestra students on every

than I can present, so I encourage you to

Observing that school choir students

both articles cited in this column by log-

give it a read. NAfME members can view

characteristic.

the researchers comment that, “This is

and choir (11%) than in orchestra (2%), gui-

raises further questions for future

achieving parent), family composition

spanned four years, not just the final in this class of 2013 were in band (13%)

able than their peers is a result that

status (SES), parental education (highest

are more similar to non-choir students

senior year. Proportionally more students

are, on average, more academically

dents with the entire sample: race/eth-

increase, but rather a difference in how the data were collected and that the data

mental groups attract students who

Elpus and Abril examined other fac-

nicity, native language, socioeconomic

school year.

similarly advantaged. That instru-

the non-music students’ gender ratio.

nationally representative longitudinal who were ninth graders in the 2008-09

of choir, however, do not seem to be

statistically significant differences from

tors to compare the profile of music stu-

study that follows the cohort of students

eventually enroll in at least one year

der ratios in music ensembles reflected

2019). The data are from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2009 (ELS), a

never enroll in band. Students who

of students, which included students with

ging into the NAfME website.

and yet are overwhelmingly gendered,

References

perhaps a curious and puzzling artifact

Elpus, K. & Abril, C. R. (2011). High school music ensemble students in the United States: A demographic profile. Journal of Research in Music Education, 59, 128-145. https://doi. org/10.1177/0022429411405207

of the feminization of singing in a culture

that still manages to celebrate and idolize singers of all genders.� They also note:

Elpus, K. & Abril, C. R. (2019). Who enrolls in high school music? A national profile of U.S. students, 2009-2013. Journal of Research in Music Education, 67, 323-338. https://doi. org/10.1177/0022429419862837

Taken together, the disaggregated

results regarding prior academic achievement suggest that students who eventually enroll in the

Email your questions and feedback to d.coffman1@miami.edu with a subject heading Research Puzzles. Your questions, if selected for publication, will remain anonymous.

instrumental ensembles of band and orchestra are, on average, performing better academically prior to

high school than are their peers who

December 2019

49


ExecutiveDirector’sNotes FMEA Executive Director Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

The mission

of the Florida

Celebrate Musical Excellence Throughout the Holidays and Into the New Year Holiday Collaborations

Music

The holiday concert season is upon us, and this is an opportune time to form collaborations with your com-

Association is to

your area to the concerts and schedule performances in the community where you can advocate for music

Education

munity members to enjoy holiday music and the spirit of the season. Invite the people who live and work in

promote quality,

education and show your audience members how music makes a difference in everyone’s lives.

music education

Government Relations and Advocacy

comprehensive in all Florida schools.

FMEA is working on a bill that focuses on the development of a Florida Seal of Fine Arts for high school

graduates who attain a high level of fine arts course work. For more information, please see Jeanne Reynolds’ Advocacy Report in the November issue of FMD.

Stay tuned for upcoming advocacy and government relation updates. If you are interested in serving, you

can go on the FMEA website and ask to be on the Government Relations Committee. Musical Excellence: Past, Present, & Future

The 2020 FMEA Professional Development Conference is an experience you do not want to miss. If you have

not yet made your case to your school administrator to attend, we included some helpful hints for doing this in this issue; see “How do I get to the conference?” on page 10. Don’t miss the early registration!

There will be heightened security at the 2020 conference. Please see the new procedures posted on page 29.

Student Leadership: Fran Kick will present sessions for student leaders beginning on Wednesday, January 8,

so make plans to bring your students to this annual event. NAfME All-National Honor Ensembles

In November I had the opportunity, along with Dr. Steve Kelly, Dr. Shelby Chipman, and many other

Florida music educators, to attend the concerts of the All-National Honor Ensembles at the Gaylord Palms in Kissimmee. They were fantastic performances. Forty-plus of the student performers were from Florida schools.

Enjoy the many opportunities to attend holiday concerts in our schools. Take time to celebrate musical

excellence with your students and colleagues as you look forward to spending quality family time during the winter break.

See you in January! All the best,

Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

50    F l o r i d a

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F LO R I DA M U S I C E D U C AT I O N A SSO C I AT I O N

Officers and Directors

EXECUTIVE BOARD President

Steven N. Kelly, PhD

Florida State University; College of Music, KMU 330 Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-4069; skelly@admin.fsu.edu Past President

Kenneth Williams, PhD

Douglas Anderson School of the Arts 2445 San Diego Road; Jacksonville, FL 32207 (904) 346-5620; kenwms@flmusiced.org President-Elect

Shelby Chipman, PhD

Florida A&M University, Department of Music Foster-Tanner Music Bldg., Room 318 Tallahassee, FL 32307; (850) 599-8165 shelby.chipman@famu.edu FBA President

Cathi Leibinger

Ransom Everglades School 2045 Bayshore Dr.; Miami, FL 33133 (305) 250-6868; president@fba.flmusiced.org FCMEA Immediate Past President

Stacie Rossow, DMA

Florida Atlantic University Schmidt College of Arts and Letters 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 297-4230; srossow@fau.edu FEMEA President

Ernesta Chicklowski

Roosevelt Elementary School 3205 S. Ferdinand Ave.; Tampa, FL 33629 (813) 272-3090 ernesta.chicklowski@sdhc.k12.fl.us Florida NAfME Collegiate President

Historian/Parliamentarian & Executive Director....................................................Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793; kdsanz@fmea.org

FVA President

Jason Locker

Orange County Public Schools 445 W. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; jason@fva.net Member-at-Large

Edgar Rubio

Silver Trail Middle School 18300 Sheridan St.; Pembroke Pines, FL 33331 (754) 323-4321; merenguesax@aol.com

Past President...............................................................Jennifer Luechauer jennifer.luechauer@browardschools.com

FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Committee Council............................................................... Debbie Fahmie fahmied@yahoo.com

President..................................................................... Ernesta Chicklowski Roosevelt Elementary School; 3205 S. Ferdinand Ave.; Tampa, FL 33629 (813) 272-3090; ernesta.chicklowski@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Conference Planning Committee.............................John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College; 3209 Virginia Ave.; Fort Pierce, FL 34981 (772) 462-7810; johnsouthall@me.com

Past President...............................................................Rosemary Pilonero rosemary@femea.flmusiced.org

Contemporary Media................................................... David Williams, PhD University of South Florida; 4202 E. Fowler Ave., MUS 101 Tampa, FL 33620; (813) 974-9166; davidw@usf.edu

Executive Director............................................................. Jennifer Sullivan 1750 Common Way Rd., Orlando, FL 32814 (321) 624-5433; slljenn@aol.com

Diverse Learners.....................................................Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD Florida State University, Music Education and Music Therapy 123 N. Copeland St.; Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 645-1438; aadarrow@fsu.edu

FLORIDA MUSIC SUPERVISION ASSOCIATION President.....................................................................Harry “Skip” Pardee Collier County Public Schools; 5775 Osceola Trail; Naples, FL 34109 (239) 377-0087; pardeh@collierschools.com

Emerging Leaders............................................................ Mary Palmer, EdD 11410 Swift Water Cir.; Orlando, FL 32817 (407) 382-1661; mpalmerassoc@aol.com

Past President............................................................................Scott Evans scott.evans@ocps.net

FMEA Corporate & Academic Partners....................................Fred Schiff All County Music; 8136 N. University Dr.; Tamarac, FL 33321-1708 (954) 722-3424; fredallcounty@aol.com

Treasurer......................................................................................... Ted Hope Hillsborough County Public Schools, School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Government Relations..................................................Jeanne W. Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Administration Bldg. 301 4th St., SW, P.O. Box 2942; Largo, FL 33779-2942 (727) 588-6055; reynoldsj@pcsb.org

FMSA President

Harrison School for the Arts 750 Hollingsworth Rd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 499-2855; matthew.lawson.davis@gmail.com

President............................................................ Katherine Attong-Mendes University of Miami; kxa395@miami.edu

Budget/Finance, Development.................................. Steven N. Kelly, PhD Florida State University, College of Music, KMU 330 Tallahassee, FL 32306; (850) 644-4069; skelly@admin.fsu.edu

Secondary General Music.............................................................Ed Prasse Leon High School; 550 E. Tennessee St.; Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 617-5700; prassee@leonschools.net

Matthew Davis

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

Awards.................................................................................... Debbie Fahmie fahmied@yahoo.com

Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD

FOA President

Immediate Past President.......................................... Stacie Rossow, DMA Florida Atlantic University; Schmidt College of Arts and Letters 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 297-4230; srossow@fau.edu

FMEA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS

Florida NAfME Collegiate Advisor

Collier County Public Schools 5775 Osceola Trail; Naples, FL 34109 (239) 377-0087; pardeh@collierschools.com

FLORIDA COLLEGE MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

FSMA President................................................................Craig Collins, EdD College of Arts & Media, Southeastern University 1000 Longfellow Blvd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5657; cscollins@seu.edu

Professional Development........................................................Scott Evans Orange County Public Schools; 445 S. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; scott.evans@ocps.net

Harry “Skip” Pardee

Business Manager..................................................................Jo Hagan, CPA 8975 San Rae Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 379-2245; Fax: (904) 379-2260; jo@barefootaccounting.com

Editor-in-Chief.....................................................D. Gregory Springer, PhD FSU College of Music; 122 N. Copeland St.; Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-2925; dgspringer@fsu.edu

Katherine Attong-Mendes

Southeastern University 1000 Longfellow Blvd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5104; mabelfast@seu.edu

Executive Director......................................................................Neil Jenkins Florida Bandmasters Association P.O. Box 840135; Pembroke Pines, FL 33084 (954) 432-4111; Fax: (954) 432-4909; exec@fba.flmusiced.org

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS

Multicultural Network...................................................Bernard Hendricks Ocoee High School, 1925 Ocoee Crown Point Pkwy.; Orlando, FL 34761 (407) 905-3009; bernard.hendricks@ocps.net

University of Miami; kxa395@miami.edu

FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION President................................................................................Matthew Davis Harrison School for the Arts; 750 Hollingsworth Rd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 499-2855; matthew.lawson.davis@gmail.com Past President...........................................................................Jason Jerald jason.jerald@sdhc.k12.fl.us Executive Director............................................................. Donald Langland 220 Parsons Woods Dr.; Seffner, FL 33594 (813) 502-5233; Fax: (813) 502-6832; exdirfoa@yahoo.com

Research...................................................................... Don D. Coffman, PhD University of Miami; d.coffman1@miami.edu

FLORIDA VOCAL ASSOCIATION President.................................................................................. Jason Locker Orange County Public Schools; 445 W. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; jason@fva.net

Student Development.............................................. Michael Antmann, EdD Freedom High School; 2500 W. Taft-Vineland Rd.; Orlando, FL 32837 (407) 816-5600; michael.antmann@ocps.net

Past President.....................................................................Tommy Jomisko tommy@fva.net Executive Director....................................................................J. Mark Scott 7122 Tarpon Ct.; Fleming Island, FL 32003 (904) 284-1551; exec@fva.net

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE Exhibits Managers................................................ Byron and Bobbie Smith 4110 Tralee Rd.; Tallahassee, FL 32309 (850) 893-3606; fmeaexhibits@fmea.org

Business Manager..................................................................Jo Hagan, CPA 8975 San Rae Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 379-2245; Fax: (904) 379-2260; business@fva.net

Local Co-Chairpersons Ted Hope—(813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us Melanie Faulkner—(813) 272-4461; melanie.faulkner@sdhc.k12.fl.us Hillsborough County Public Schools, School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602

CENTER FOR FINE ARTS EDUCATION

402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793

FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION

Executive Director....................... Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD (kdsanz@fmea.org)

President.............................................................................. Cathi Leibinger Ransom Everglades School; 2045 Bayshore Dr.; Miami, FL 33133 (305) 250-6868; president@fba.flmusiced.org

Director of Finance & Client Relations...............................Richard Brown, CAE (richard@fmea.org)

Director of Operations........................Valeria Anderson, IOM (val@fmea.org)

Technology Director......................................Josh Bula, PhD (josh@fmea.org)

Past President........................................................................Jason Duckett Bartram Trail High School; 7399 Longleaf Pine Pkwy.; St. Johns, FL 32259 (904) 343-1999; pastpresident@fba.flmusiced.org

Public Affairs & Communications Coordinator..............................................Jenny Abdelnour (jenny@fmea.org) Marketing & Membership Coordinator................................. Jasmine Van Weelden (jasmine@fmea.org)

December 2019

51


2020

Florida Teacher of the Year C. Leon King High School | Hillsborough County

Dr. Dakeyan Chá Dré Graham BMUE ‘07, MM ‘09

INCOMING FRESHMEN AUDITION DAYS Saturday, January 18, 2020 Saturday, January 25, 2020 Sunday, January 26, 2020 TRANSFER AUDITION DAY Saturday, March 14, 2020

SCHOOL OF MUSIC APPLICATION

arts.ufl.edu/music

Profile for Center for Fine Arts Education, Inc

Florida Music Director December 2019  

The official publication of the Florida Music Education Association. Featured in this issue: New Music Teacher Mentoring, Should you Start a...

Florida Music Director December 2019  

The official publication of the Florida Music Education Association. Featured in this issue: New Music Teacher Mentoring, Should you Start a...

Profile for cfaefl