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the work of cepezed in detail


the work of cepezed in detail naioio rotterdam 2013


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introduction race planet porsche zentrum wholesale in wheels textile museum westraven jinso pavilion grote markt sint-niklaas embassy rome the outlook chdr ll esic station furnishing pas reform theatre speelhuis ďŹ nca rĂşstica information

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the architecture of details ‘The detail is concentrated architecture. All the ideas about the building come together in that one point’, stated Austrian critic Dietmar Steiner. In Dutch architecture, however, the detail seldom receives the attention it deserves. Connections often form difficult and unsystematic junctions of materials, which people conceal from view with additional interventions. Even within architectural studies, not nearly enough light is shed on the physical implementation of designs. Neither the principles, nor the knowledge and skills required to devise and develop details are covered well in architectural courses. The focus of university studies is certainly primarily conceptual; anyone who is involved there at a basic level with connections, fairly soon strays into the territory of the construction technologist and is allocated an essentially different domain. HBO studies – higher education with an applied emphasis – do admittedly devote rather more attention to the convergence of elements and materials, but there, too, the curriculum remains limited and, just like the programme for the construction technologist at university level, has almost always a purely technical orientation, without any architectural aims whatsoever. There is absolutely no question of integral education in detailing, with on the one hand consideration for concepts, principles and aesthetics and on the other, dedication to the much-needed knowledge of materials, technology and pragmatism.

the work of cepezed in detail

So it hardly comes as a surprise that the detail also gets a raw deal in everyday practice and that literally the nuts and bolts of design are gladly left to the building contractor in question in most cases. It is not uncommon for designs to be provided with only the main details, which the implementing party often has to develop further, by improvising during work planning; hardly a positive situation for the integration of the different building aspects such as the spatial, structural, technical installation and building performance design, to put it mildly. Another prevailing habit is the inclusion of reference details culled from the guides published by the SBR knowledge platform, the architectural standard work Jellema Hogere Bouwkunde, or a professional journal such as the German Detail. In order to fit in slightly better with the actual context, an incidental adjustment does take place, but actually designing details specifically for a particular location within a specific design is a rare occurrence, generally speaking. the crux of designing Designing a building means doing a great many different things at once. The architect works on aspects such as optimum functional or multifunctional lay-outs, figures out the most efficient ratios, logistics and circulation routes, ensures that users can find their way easily, works on the spatial and aesthetic experience of a building, lets the design interact with the direct surroundings and focuses on creating a pleasant space to linger, partly by means of the climate concept and a specific use of colour and materials. But above all,

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the architect brings together elements on paper and the computer screen that together are intended to form the overall unity of the new building. The way in which these elements converge has an unmistakably strong influence on the quality of the final result. And so cepezed considers the detail to be an essential part of every design and the activity of detailing as a fundamental and integral component of every design process. At the bureau, architectural detail originates directly from the total concept for a building and the place it occupies within it. That concept is in turn based on cepezed’s general architectural vision, and also on the framework and opportunities that accompany the specific task and location. In this respect, everything is linked to everything else. architectural vision In general terms, cepezed aims to create light, transparent buildings that allow in a generous amount of natural light; obliging buildings with a high degree of spatial and experiential diversity, which function as a neutral platform and catalyst for their own use. As a result, they are suffused with a spirit of efficiency, ease and visual calmness. People have to feel comfortable there, one of the reasons that ambient conditions are a requirement. Naturally, cepezed also takes account of the fact that wishes and needs change in the course of time. So the buildings designed by the bureau are always flexible and can be arranged and used in various ways. Aesthetics and functionality are directly linked to practical implementation; architecture and technology are entirely interwoven within the designs and methodologies. Clear, well thought-out and visually attractive details are an important characteristic.

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design process In order to realize all of this, cepezed continually designs on various levels of scale at the same time. After studying the programme and the conditions, the bureau makes a start on a base structure and lay-out, focused on optimum functionality and spatial quality within the specified preconditions. In the follow-up phase, this base structure takes a leading role, but quite quickly the designers also consider the various building components out of which the basic design will be realized and, emphatically, the connections between them. Actually more or less how Tadao Ando describes it: ‘The level of detail and craft is something that’s inscribed within the original design concept. And so when I begin to draw, I know what kind of detailing I want the building to have.’

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Accordingly, cepezed definitely does not perpetrate ‘façade architecture’: in other words, starting with a pretty picture of the appearance of the building and making the programme fit in at any cost behind a beautifully designed exterior. Far from it. Without losing sight of the aesthetics of the exterior and how the building will fit into its surroundings, the façades generally represent the final piece in functional terms for cepezed. In spite of all the intensive design attention

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the designers pay to them, in practical terms they ultimately serve mainly as an unavoidable division between inside and outside. Cepezed incorporates technical aspects, such as the choice of floor but also installation technologies, in the very first sketches. The designers also look from the outset for systematization of both the spatial and technical solutions. They group together spatial and structural functions according to type, scale and technical complexity, so that the buildings are permeated with a rational, logical and natural order that is, additionally, easy to build. Once the basic structure has been found, cepezed continues to look for simplification on all fronts. Traditionally, façades are made up of different layers that are each in turn built up in situ from a large number of smaller components. By way of contrast, cepezed façades are built up from single, large, surface-filling prefabricated elements, such as glass plates or sandwich panels. Furthermore, the bureau limits the attachment of these elements to an absolute visual and technical minimum. construction process Radical rationalization and systematization of the building and its realization lead to a completely different design and construction process. The designers divide the building up into easy-to-coordinate components, such as the earthwork, foundations, main structure, floors, façades and infill kit, all of which can be easily and independently controlled and contracted out.

the work of cepezed in detail

For the materialization, cepezed makes use of modular building components that are as standardized and repetitive as possible, with regard to measurements and technology. These components preferably also fulfil as many functions as possible at the same time. Floors and columns, for instance, often double up as plenum airspace or transit space for pipes and cabling for the installations. Acoustic insulation can be integrated into panels to be opened for natural ventilation, rainwater drainage installed behind a closed façade panel or the air overflow system in a structural beam. Minimization of both the number of components used and the dimensioning of the elements that are nonetheless required, not only contribute to an enormous limitation of material use but also to greatly desired simplification and visual reduction. cepezed designs buildings with what the bureau likes to call a ‘high IQ per kilo’. The various components are all prefabricated and only need to be dry-assembled at the construction site, which greatly increases the ease and speed of building compared to traditional ‘wet’ construction methods. What’s more, the fact that they are standardized and produced under controlled conditions makes them less susceptible to faults, which is of essential importance within the methodology. Components

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and materials are specifically matched to their function and use. When the occasion arises, cepezed realizes or further develops building products itself in partnership with manufacturers and/or suppliers, in order to make them suitable or better-suited for a specific application or situation. The designers also regularly deploy light materials that traditionally originate from other sectors than the building industry, such as the shipping or greenhouse industries.

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living in detail cepezed’s vision and methodology mean that the bureau devotes an enormous amount of time and attention to the way in which construction elements come together in their designs; an activity that makes it imperative to fully fathom the link with the basic concept and the various building elements. The details have to be meticulous, natural and in balance, in such a way that their presence is actually hardly noticeable. After all, the designers are supporters of simplicity and visual calmness, and as the British mathematician and process philosopher Alfred North Whitehead (1861-1947) aptly commented: ‘We think in generalities, but we live in detail.’ It takes a great deal of effort not to let the eye cling to the detail; expressive details are only a distraction from the use and spatiality. To increase the level of abstraction, cepezed often makes use of blind or sunken attachments and ‘details without details’. The façades in the majority of the projects are designed and installed as entirely level. ‘Give it just a little longer and cepezed will detail the whole building away’, was the amazed exclamation of a trade journalist recently concerning the detail refinement.

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But not all the details are invisible by any means. The bureau does minimize, certainly, but definitely does not suffer from the architectural anorexia that horrifies Herman Herzberger so much. It’s really not a problem if many things are visible; not everything needs to be masked with additional materials. Just so long as the function and structure are clear and the connections are designed with the technical and aesthetic care they demand and deserve. Connections in the often completely visible main structure are often modelled in such a way that they are related to each other. In the interests of constructability and visual clarity, the assembly connections are generally at some distance from the structurally and geometrically complex junctions, which are welded together in the construction workshop. Assembly then requires only the simple longitudinal connection of identical parts, where the fixing elements, Allen screws for instance, can be easily sunk in the constituent materials.

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Admittedly, cepezed does often hark back to the principles and methodologies devised and developed in other projects, but it designs the details for every project and at every location within the project from scratch. Not only that, in both the drawings and the specifications, the bureau works out

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the details down to the very last screw. As a result, there is little room for tolerance during prefabrication and implementation. Not only is there a need for strict measurements, the number of possibilities for alternative materials and solutions is limited; the integrality of the design means that a modification at one location can have significant consequences for connections elsewhere in the building. If there are any doubts about the feasibility or aesthetics of crucial solutions, cepezed makes projections, mock-ups and test models for verification purposes during the preparatory phase. The results always appear amazingly simple and make cepezed buildings a pleasure to look at, to linger in and to use.

the work of cepezed in detail

the return on detailing Certainly in the current building climate, attention to detail is more relevant than ever. Time and budget are continually under pressure. Many new methods of realization and forms of partnerships and contracts are partly intended to condense the development, design and building processes as much as possible and to speed up the implementation of projects. There is clearly a risk here that the coherence and synergy between the various design disciplines, implementation practices and building elements could suffer. And yet concretization and elaboration of building components and connections in advance is crucial for a good building process and a coherent, high-quality product: the building. When concepts, positioning and connections are chosen, matched and elaborated in a well-considered way, that generates added value on many fronts; aesthetically, but also with regard to building aspects such as speed of construction, implementation efficiency, technical functionality, sustainability and the limitation of material and failure costs. Looked at in this light, attention paid to the detail in fact makes an optimal contribution to all the LEAN methodologies so heavily propagated at the moment. Let’s face it: detailing in advance pays off. Certainly in the case of renovation and transformation projects, which form an increasingly large part of the building process and where the characteristics, state and structure of existing buildings call for a departure from standard solutions. The building performance of construction components, tolerances, the feasibility of solutions and the accessibility of the construction site require, for this type of project in particular, customization, inventiveness and creativity. opportunities Even though the current shifts within realization processes make it seem as if there is hardly any time for good detailing, attention for this aspect is becoming more important. It’s the only way to maintain tempo while retaining quality and flexibility. Fortunately, the new ways of working also provide strong opportunities in this area. For instance, the people responsible for designing and implementing are often involved together at a much earlier stage than before. That gives them the chance to exchange ideas, aims and produc-

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tion knowledge and experience significantly sooner, so that the design can be optimally tuned to the implementation practice as early as the preliminary phase.

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Another development with great potential is the design of projects within a Building Information Model (BIM), an area where cepezed already has a lot of experience. It provides a good three-dimensional image from the beginning design stages of how a project will turn out. Furthermore, the methodology offers extremely refined possibilities for far-reaching engineering of connections and the integration of installations, constructions and building components. Potential conflicts between the various disciplines, concepts and developments can be recognized much more quickly and are more transparent. Additionally, transfer of the model to the implementing parties means that the quality of the solutions found in the design phase can be directly deployed for the production engineering in the realization phase. Working in a Building Information Model can contribute significantly to optimum continuity between the design and execution phases, just like the early involvement of implementing parties.

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This book aims to demonstrate the value of the detail to everyone involved in the building process. It is a plea to all these players to give detailing the attention it deserves and, in so doing, optimize both the quality of the built environment and their own return. Commissioning clients, designers, advisers, producers and builders all have an important role to play. The determining factor every time is the professional skill people can contribute: the expertise and knowledge about how to make something and bring it to fruition.

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the work of cepezed in detail


client sunnergy innoplan bv rotterdam

When former racing driver Michael Bleekemolen decided to realize an indoor go-karting circuit in Delft on a site next to the A13 motorway, he approached cepezed as architect. Besides the programme, the preconditions were primarily determined by the characteristics of the location and the budget. Because a karting circuit has a specific length and the dimensions of the site were limited, it was clear that stacking was going to be required – a drawback that is easy to turn into an advantage because the vertical organization contributes to an extraordinary experience of the building and the track. In addition, the entire project had to be achieved within a relatively limited budget. In fact, there was only enough money for simple accommodation, but the high visibility location alongside the A13 demanded a better quality appearance and a visual relationship between the building and the motorway. So the design process focused on optimum return in terms of functionality, aesthetics and exposure. The choice was made for a compact, simple and relatively inexpensive but still nicely detailed glass box incorporating the circuit storeys, and two separate interior volumes over the full height of the building, containing supporting functions such as the offices, the restaurant and sanitary facilities. The glass façades of the main volume dominated to a large extent the costs and also the appearance and character and received a great deal of design attention as a result. To limit expenditure, they act principally as a jacket against the wind and rain and have no thermal function; after all, the karting track does not need to be fully climate-controlled. However, the façades do create a sight relationship between the circuit and the adjacent motorway, they bring in optimum natural light and, by overlapping the glass panels, provide most of the ventilation for the karting circuit, so less installations are required. Another aspect of cost reduction is the fact that the simple single-pane glass plates that make up the façades have the same, standard factory sizes. No exceptions have been made to this rule, not even at the corners. This was not only cost-efficient for initial purchase, but also for processing and assembly, which could take place at a great pace. Another important aspect is that no expensive window profiles were used; the glass was fastened directly to the steel columns of the main structure using the minimum of brackets. The grid was also matched to the glass size. The columns are mainly simple IPE profiles, but for an attractive, flowing transition, tubular sections were used at the corners. In between the columns, truss standards, which are optically open and preserve the transparency as fully as possible, take up the wind on the glass plates. The steel roof system transmits its load onto the façade columns and an internal column grid matching the one in the outer shell. The interior volumes with their supporting functions have their own construction and are also designed in a cost-conscious way; because they are placed in the covered and protected main volume, they do not need to be watertight, only thermally and acoustically insulated.

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address kleveringweg 18 delft

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race planet

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Floor plan of second storey The majority of the oor surface is reserved for the go-karting circuit with its inclined track. On the lefthand side (the south side) a number of grid sections have been reserved for two internal and insulated boxwithin-a-box constructions that can be individually climatized. These accommodate facilities such as the restaurant and the ofďŹ ces. This solution enabled the implementation of a simple, low-budget external façade with natural ventilation. The racing karts can be easily seen from the A13 motorway.

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View from the east side The façade dimensions are based on the standard factory sizes of the single-pane glass plates, so that no cutting loss is incurred and the façade can be assembled easily and rapidly. The façade, entirely of glass, allows an optimum incidence of daylight.

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Cross-section On the right-hand side: the kart circuit with the incline; on the left: the insulated, individually climatized box-within-a-box constructions accommodate the restaurant and the offices, among other functions.

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Fragment The box-within-a-box constructions are completely insulated and can be individually climatized. This has made it possible to erect the outer façade from single-pane overlapping glass plates. In this way, the karting circuit is naturally ventilated as much as possible and the need for mechanical air-conditioning is limited. The glass plates are easily assembled by means of armatures of two different lengths, which are directly ďŹ xed to the columns and ensure large ventilation slits. 1:140

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the work of cepezed in detail


introduction Structure of the overlapping glass faรงade elements 1 Hardened single-pane glass. 2 Stainless-steel angle iron for glass support. 3 Stainless-steel placeholder and perforated plate as ventilation grid. 4 Stainless-steel mounting. 5 IPE 270, galvanized and coated.

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Structure of the faรงade corner 1 Box beam for the underpinning. 2 Stainless-steel angle iron for glass support. 3 IPE 270, galvanized and coated. 4 Stainless-steel place-holder. 5 Box beam 220, galvanized and coated. 6 Stainless-steel bolt with distance piece. 7 Stainless-steel strip with reversed ends. 8 Hardened single-pane glass. 1: 5

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client dr. ing. h.c.f. porsche ag stuttgart germany

The competition organized by Porsche in the late 1990s for a client centre near the factory in Stuttgart did not just relate to the task itself, but was intended to generate a blueprint for all the other branches worldwide. As a result, recognizability, the image aspect and ease of construction in a broad range of local building cultures were important. The latter in particular demanded a relatively basic and economic set-up. In programmatic terms, there are two main elements: one component that includes showrooms and offices for the sale of new cars and one for servicing existing vehicles. This functional split makes itself felt in the design, which is based on a strict division between the two domains. The representative and externally focused showrooms and offices are grouped around a simple and strongly rational ‘engine block’ in the heart of the building, containing the garage workshop, the storeroom and installation areas. Other important aspects are the urban design assimilation and cepezed’s decision not to implement the showroom as the obligatory full-glass volume, but instead to let the design refer to the Porsche design and create a field of tension between open and closed. An elongated curved façade consisting primarily of clean-cut neutral grey sandwich panels with a transparent plinth underneath as viewing strip contribute simultaneously to various different objectives: the façade gives the centre a stylish and recognizable appearance that matches the allure and language of form of the Porsche brand, it creates a generous building segment with the showroom and offices between the façade and the centrally located workshop volume, it lends the building an attractive and self-evident position within the urban design situation and provides an uninterrupted view at street level of the much-desired sports cars. In the showroom section, everything is oriented towards the greatest possible visual calmness and all the attention is focused on the Porsches. The cars are arranged on the floor and on table constructions with office cubicles underneath. The large free height provides a generous spatial experience. The roof incorporates elongated strip windows so the cars look exactly the same as they do outside on the street. The floors are a dark grey that does not distort the contours of the cars. The transparent viewing strip that makes up the plinth has neither windows nor struts and the upper closed façade is suspended in its entirety from roof joists supported by recessed, tapering columns. The installation facilities for the showroom are integrated as much as possible in the structural elements. For instance, the loadbearing columns also function as rainwater drainage and the air inlet that is fed from the workshop volume is incorporated into the structural steel profiles of the suspended façade. In the purely functional workshop, the lighting situation is the opposite of the showroom. Here the floor is sand-coloured, to reflect the light well and to give a good view under the cars as well. Next to the workshop, there is a luxurious, covered and sheltered car park. The curved façade of the main volume continues along here in perforated steel plate.

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address porschestraße 9 stuttgart-zuffenhausen germany

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porsche zentrum

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Floor plan The showroom, offices and garage workplaces are grouped around the centrally situated warehouses. Large table constructions, on which cars are displayed, have been set up on the ground floor of the showroom. The curved façade reaches upward as a screen front for all the storeys and also runs along the parking lot at the back, integrating the building in its spatial context.

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View from the east side The façade is made of curved stainless-steel sandwich panels above a single-pane glass plinth. This generates a force field in which the transparent plinth offers a view of the much-desired cars behind the relatively closed façade. The elegant curve of the façade ensures a lithe architectural harmony, while echoing the well-formed contours of the cars inside.

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Longitudinal cross-section View of the table construction in the showroom from the front façade, with the offices in the background. The entrance with a view of the parking lot is visible on the left.

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Lateral cross-section The sports cars are distributed over three floors in the showroom. Strip windows in the roof allow natural light from above, so that the cars look exactly the same as they do outside on the street.

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Fragment The columns of the load-bearing construction are slightly set back in relation to the façade, so that passers-by have an optimum view of the cars on display. The hot-bent glass façade has been installed without struts, which gives a vigorous directness to the view. At the bottom, the glass panels are clamped between steel plates with a neoprene inlay, while they have been fixed at the top in a way that allows expansion. The closed façade of stainless-steel sandwich panels distributes its weight via steel crossbeams – which also function as an air plenum or space – to setback, tapering, load-bearing columns which also house the rainwater drainage system.

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introduction Structure of the façade 1 Glass clamped between layers of neoprene and steel plates. 2 Composite steel diagonal. 3 Sand-cement screed floor equipped with underfloor heating, installed on insulation material. 4 Hot-bent, layered and hardened glass. 5 Curved U-profile with expansion joint. 6 Suspended, galvanized, box beam, also air supply duct. 7 Steel H-beam. 8 Box beam with opening for assembly. 9 Ventilation nozzle. 10 Suspended box beam with end plate. 11 Curved, electrolytically polished stainless-steel sandwich panels.

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Structure of façade and roof 1 Curved, electrolytically polished stainless-steel sandwich panels. 2 Z-beam to fix, adjust and assemble sandwich panels. 3 Hardwood tongue, mastic on foam chord. 4 Suspended box beam with end plate. 5 Suspended, galvanized box beam, also air supply duct. 6 Tapering hollow column with integrated rainwater discharge. 7 Steel façade console. 8 Eaves made of stainless-steel mounting. 9 Rainwater discharge (Pluvia). 10 Neoprene bearing, sealed with mastic on foam chord. 11 Insulated UNP beam to support insulated glazing. 12 Glass clamp profile on steel tube.

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client langerak wielen utrecht

The building that cepezed designed for a wholesale business in wheels was for a plot with a smoothly rounded corner. A limited budget and the requirement for a high-quality appearance once again strongly influenced the solutions and detailing here. An extremely simple square two-storey volume was placed against the rear boundaries of the plot. The core activities of the business are located inside: storage, assembly and offices. This building component is concealed behind an elongated curved external façade and immediately establishes a high, representative showroom and client reception area between the façade and the main volume. The offices are situated on both floors on the edge of the base block, directly adjoining the showroom. The core volume has a simple steelsheet façade. The roof consists of entirely prefabricated elements developed earlier by cepezed in partnership with the supplier for a series of distribution centres for the former PTT Post. In addition, the elements function as structural roof girders and are equipped in the factory with insulation, roofing, acoustic muffling, ceiling finish and sometimes integrated rainwater drainage. The offices are separated from the showroom by fully glazed walls; the offices on the first floor are accessed via a steel gallery with a frosted glass floor. This can be reached from the showroom via stairs that also have matt glass steps. Above the gallery, strip windows were installed along its entire length using extremely simple means. The glass of this overhead window was directly glued onto two sandwich-panel supports. The façade follows the contours of the site precisely and uses well thought-out low-tech means to achieve modest yet chic allure, in sharp contrast with the usual appearance of buildings on industrial estates. The façade consists of horizontally articulated glass and stainless-steel sandwich panels. This creates an abstract, scale-free image; the storey heights cannot be distinguished, for example. The sandwich elements function directly as rebates for the glass, rendering supplementary frames unnecessary. The articulation begins at the bottom with a strip of glass, which makes it seem as if the façade is hovering above the ground. The technical key to the façade composition can be found in the most precise, almost tolerance-free stacking of the elements that make it up. To achieve this, the round façade columns were placed at a slight distance from each other and equipped with welded tubular fittings with tapped wire. Vertical steel strips were mounted here with set anchors onto which the sandwich elements were ultimately attached. To attach the panels to the steel strips at the correct height during positioning, a wooden mould was used each time for the glass elements. Only after all the sandwich panels had been fixed and adjusted were the glass panels put into position in between and glued. The seal between the main volume and the external façade consists of glazed fronts with extremely simple detailing. At the point where the building stops, the external façade continues on both sides without glass and flows into an entrance gate to the terrain with the same visual imagery and detailing.

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address krommewetering 131 utrecht

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wholesale in wheels

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introduction View from the south-west The façade continues on from where the building stops, terminating in a sliding gate in similar style. The curved shape ensures that the building has no front or rear side, but presents itself as one elongated entity with a modest but powerful allure.

Floor plan at ground level The simple box-style volume with the storage space and a strip of offices and amenities on the north-west side is concealed behind a tasteful, horizontally articulated façade that follows the contours of the parcel, thus forming a spacious entrance cum showroom between the façade and the box volume.

Cross-section On the right: the transport dock with the storage area, the office and facilities strip, with the entrance cum showroom zone directly adjoining. The gateway in the façade is shown on the far left. Above the gallery, in the double-height entrance, there are strip windows that allow daylight into the entrance and the offices.

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Fragment Entrance cum showroom with, on the left, the gallery extending along the office zone, which enjoys light from an overhead window along its entire length. The glass of this overhead window is directly glued onto two sandwich panel supports. The façade consists of curved stainless-steel sandwich panels between which hot-bent insulated glass panels have been installed. The sandwich panels were first fixed by means of adjustable tubular fittings to the columns that stand at a slight distance from one another. After that, the glass was structurally glued between the panels. 1:100

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Façade fragments The thermal façade is shown on the left, while the external façade structure that extends as fencework with a sliding gate is shown on the right. On both the inside and outside, the façade panels have been fixed in an identical way by means of the same profiles. During the realization, use was made of a wooden mould just a little larger than a glass panel. The method consisted of first fixing one panel, after which the next panel was placed and fine-tuned on the wooden mould. Only after all the sandwich panels had been fixed and adjusted were the glass panels put into position and glued.

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introduction Structure of façade 1 Stainless-steel U-shaped profile. 2 Hot-bent insulated glazing, structurally glued. 3 Stainless-steel curved sandwich panels with mill scale left visible. 4 Steel mounting strip equipped with welded-on tubes with tapped thread. 5 Box beam column with welded-on tubes. 6 Mastic on foam chord. 7 Oak finishing floor on sand-cement screed floor with underfloor heating.

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Structure of the façade corner 1 Insulated glazing. 2 Angle iron with slotted holes. 3 Box beam. 4 T-proďŹ le with slotted holes, welded to box beam. 5 Box beam with welded-on tubes. 6 Steel mounting strip equipped with welded-on tubes with tapped thread. 7 Hardwood tongue, mastic on foam chord. 8 Stainless-steel sandwich panels. 1: 10

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introduction Structure of the façade corner 1 Insulated and extruded aluminium profile. 2 Angle iron with slotted holes. 3 Hollow steel tube. 4 T-profile with slotted holes welded to box beam. 5 Hollow steel column with weldedon tubes. 6 Mastic on foam chord. 7 Insulated glazing.

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Structure of faรงade and roof 1 Curved stainless-steel sandwich panels with mill scale left visible. 2 Hot-bent insulated glazing, structurally glued. 3 Steel mounting strip equipped with welded-on tubes with tapped thread. 4 Box beam met welded-on tubes. 5 Hollow steel tube. 6 Mastic on foam chord. 7 Eaves of stainless-steel mounting. 8 Neoprene glass support with adhesive base. 9 Box beam with end plates. 10 Roof upright with anodized sandwich panels. 11 Prefab insulated roof elements with 14-metre girders of galvanized C-beams.

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client tilburg city council tilburg

Around the start of the new millennium, the Textile Museum in the nineteenth-century Mommers complex was suffering from a shortage of space, an image problem, lack of visibility and a difficult circulation route. Expansion and renovation were planned to solve the practical problems, realize a recognizable contemporary look and strengthen the museum’s image. cepezed placed a striking extension in the open space in front of the historic damask weaving mill. The extension perfects the ribbon development structure and also fulfills the role of characteristic promotion. The building includes a new entrance and various spaces for meetings and education. It is an almost scale-free object that represents the greatest possible contrast with the existing building with regard to form and materialization, but matches it closely in terms of dimensions and elegant detailing. Within a completely transparent shell, a smaller volume seems to be hanging free in space. As a result, storey heights cannot be seen, which further emphasizes the abstract appearance. The steel grid construction has been kept in full view. The pane structure combined with suspension rods refers to the textile technique of warp and woof. The tubular grid elements are minimally sized and also house the cabling for lighting and heat convectors in the façade surface and are attached using half-lap jointing. On the roof, the profiles are consolidated with welded-on fins from which the climate ceilings are also suspended. The glass panels in the façade have been attached as thinly as possible; each is fixed on only two corners and has only luted joints along the sides. This makes the volume optimally transparent. The insulation glass has flexible spacers to give extra slack where it is not attached. To create an optimal free height, the installations are located between large lattice struts in the rear wall of the volume, which provide rigidity and onto which the suspended interior volume also transfers its load. The same principle was applied in this volume: to create a spacious free height, the installations were situated in the side walls. Components such as the stretch ceilings and overhead walkway railings were implemented in textile applications as a reference to the history of the complex. In functional terms, a complete symbiosis has been realized with the damask weaving mill, where the foyer and museum shop are situated. Above an exhibition building behind the mill, cepezed has realized a depository for the Regional Archive with which the museum is merging. The functional, fast-build and costefficiently designed facility is composed from concrete segments for the roof, floor and façades. The volume stands on concrete-filled steel beams above the historic building, to which it is linked in the length for stability. A real eyecatcher is the seamless black ‘raincoat’ made of tarpaulin in yet another textile reference, stretched tautly between spacers, and giving the archive an abstract appearance, like the entrance building. Rainwater drainage is concealed between tarpaulin and façade and discharges into the gutters of the building below. Round the columns, the tarpaulin is attached with velcro and laces.

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Floor plan at ground level The former spinning mill and weaving mill are situated on the ground oor of the renovated buildings that also accommodate exhibition rooms and the Textile Lab. A glass corridor connects the former spinning mill to the newly realized entrance building at the end of the former damask weaving section. Behind the damask weaving section, the new archives building stands on a series of steel portal beams above an existing exhibition building. On the north side, the complex is linked to the former Tilburg School of Music and Dance for which plans to convert it into a historical museum have been formulated. Second oor of the northern building strip On the right: the constellation of archive cabinets in the newly realized archives volume. In the centre: the foyer under the roof of the former damask weaving section. On the left: the auditorium structure in the inner volume of the newly realized entrance building.

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Front view of the Mommers complex On the far left: the former Tilburg School of Music and Dance with, adjoining, the newly realized entrance building with its transparent façade and characteristic steel construction. The building is connected by means of a glass corridor to the former spinning mill, in front of which the former director’s home is situated. On the far right stands the former weaving mill with its characteristic sawtooth roofs and, in front of this, the factory chimney.

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Cross-section of various museum units The cross-section of the entrance building on the left gives a good impression of how the inner volume with its various functions seems to be almost invisibly suspended in its transparent shell. The vertical installation zone along the north façade ensures that no installations are embedded in the floors or ceilings and there is an optimum link to the existing storey heights of the damask weaving section to the rear. On the right: the cross-section of the concrete volume on portal beams, in which the regional archives have been stored.

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Longitudinal section of the northern building strip The central feature in the newly realized entrance building is the inner volume with various functions for meetings and education, with a platform on top offering a panorama of the entire Mommers complex. In the entrance building, to the right, is the fully transparent lift. The damask weaving section in the middle accommodates the museum shop on the ground floor, offices on the first floor, and the foyer on the second floor. A historical building section with exhibition rooms is located under the newly realized archives volume.

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Longitudinal view of the northern building strip The head of the grounds provides scope for an open-air terrace run by the catering establishment in the new entrance building. This building has a transparent skin as well as a characteristic steel construction that has not been hidden away but kept in full view, referring in its structure to the textile production processes of warp and woof. Due to its tautly stretched skin of black PVC-coated polyester, the archives building on the right has a strongly abstract appearance.

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Axonometrics of the steel construction of the entrance building Study model. The construction consists entirely of prefabricated elements that were already equipped with welded-on steel fins to which the glass façade is fixed. The elements were dry-fixed onsite by means of half-lap jointing. The five latticed struts to the rear make a substantial contribution to the rigidity of the building and also form the vertical zone that houses the technical installations wall. The roof and façade surfaces of the uniform, scale-free grid meet precisely and tightly at the corners.

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Fragment End of the entrance building with, on the far left, the frontage as seen from the street side and, on the right, the inner volume with diverse functions. The completely transparent façade is attached to the steel loadbearing construction by means of welded-on fins and clamps at only two vertices of each glass plate. On the inside of the steel construction, convectors with integrated LED lighting have also been attached, for which the water piping and electricity cables have been installed in the inside of the loadbearing structure. The façade can be totally cleaned by means of a rail all around the exterior onto which a cradle can be fixed from ground level. The spaces in the inner volume have been equipped with technical installations walls that link up directly with the services wall of the main volume. The inner volume is clad with Ferrari Batyline gauze, in which a decorative pattern of LED lamps has been incorporated.

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Structure of façade 1 Norwegian slate on sand-cement screed floor with underfloor heating. 2 Steel cover with Norwegian slate to allow access to the technical installations. 3 Stone split and pressed grating. 4 Sun-resistant insulated glazing, fixed diagonally. 5 Black glass clamping plate. 6 Steel mounting fins. 7 Prefab steel construction of tubular beams and tie bars. 8 Convector with integrated LED lighting.

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Façade corner and construction insulated wall 1 Sun-resistant insulated glazing. 2 Black glass clamping plate. 3 Steel mounting ďŹ ns. 4 Prefab steel construction of box beams and tie bars. 5 Rail of window-cleaning installation. 6 Technical installations and storage space. 7 Sandwich panels. 8 Steel lattice struts for the stability of the main supporting structure. 9 Mounting for the cavity sealing. 10 Existing adjacent building. 11 Acoustic insulation. 12 Silver-coloured spanned Ferrari Batyline membrane. 13 Tension spring in aluminium mounting. 14 Silver-coloured spanned Ferrari Batyline fabric with LED lighting. 15 Black steel inner boxes and single-skin interior wall. 16 Audio cabinet.

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Structure of façade and roof 1 Sun-resistant insulated glazing. 2 Prefab steel construction of box beams. 3 Aluminium rail of window-cleaning installation. 4 Lighting. 5 Box beam with ball joint. 6 Insulated construction gutter. 7 Halved I-beam to support the roof and hold wind bracing. 8 Steel roofing plates with insulation. 9 PVC roofing material. 10 Steel cool-climate ceilings.

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Fragment The archives volume, made of concrete prefab elements with a skin of black PVC-coated polyester membrane, rests upon solid portal beams with concrete-ďŹ lled columns above a historical building unit with exhibition rooms. The membrane has been tautly spanned with the aid of winching mechanisms that are also used to tighten truck covers. Rainwater drainage occurs invisibly behind the PVC membrane, and the water is run off into the gutter of the existing building underneath. The membrane has been sealed off with velcro and laces around the columns. 1:140

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Structure of the façade and roof of the archives building 1 Portal construction with concretefilled steel box beams. 2 Zinc gutter of existing building. 3 Spanning mechanism. 4 Fabric attachment around the column by means of velcro and lacing. 5 Polyester fabric with PVC coating. 6 Rainwater drainage. 7 Hollow-core slab with screed floor and resin-bonded covering floor. 8 Prefab supporting wall elements made of concrete. 9 Galvanized and coated auxiliary construction. 10 Set-back gutter with rainwater drainage (Pluvia). 11 PVC roofing material.

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client ministry of infrastructure and the environment the hague

The Westraven project had diverse aims: to give the existing office colossus from the early 1970s a strong quality impulse, provide expansion for its occupant the Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment and contribute to this public body’s new image, where qualities such as professionalism and transparency are particularly important. The clarity and modest distinction of cepezed’s architecture fit in well with these aims. The client appreciates cepezed’s sustainable design and the new-build lay-out. The office bays inside have been ‘folded’ into triangles with rounded tops, and are accessed via elongated conservatories running parallel to the adjacent Amsterdam-Rhine canal, and offering as many users as possible a view of the water. The distinctive large four-storey voids the bureau introduced into the existing tower contribute significantly to orientation, the sense of spaciousness and the generous incidence of natural light in the previously monotonous block. Westraven brings together in a richer and more varied way than other projects all the methods and principles cepezed employs in the area of spatial experience and functionality as well as innovative technical solutions and integral design. An example is the steel construction of the new-build, made mainly from extremely slender steel beams developed specifically for this project, which also function as a channel for installation cabling, or as air supply for maintaining pressure in the air cushions in the roof and the façade of the entrance hall. This profile has been repeated as often as possible to ensure optimal uniformity and visual calmness. The sometimes complicated nodes received a great deal of design attention due to the same desire for clarity. The floor system in the new-build integrates all the cables and pipes for the installations within an extremely low height of only 32 cm. Facilities for acoustic muffling and air overflow from the offices to the conservatories are also incorporated at the edges, completely invisibly and with a level finish on the conservatory side. The limited floor height is not only aesthetically pleasing and functional, it also reduced the façade costs. The bays are enclosed by the high-quality conservatory façades, so a cost-efficient interior wall system was utilized for the office façade. This consists of entirely level detailing as well and is equipped with parallel top-hung panels for ventilation in the adjacent conservatory area. The simple automatic sun-screening system in the conservatory, an idea cepezed borrowed from the greenhouse sector, once lowered, directly constitutes an automatically ventilated cavity to prevent overheating of these large-scale spaces. The steel climate ceilings in the tower have been installed tautly between the common joists of the concrete floors. The tower façades have been replaced with a completely transparent second-skin façade, consisting largely of a tautly spanned, teflon-coated fibreglass membrane. This not only provides protection from the wind to make natural ventilation possible, even on top floors, it functions as a sunscreen and gives the building a chic look with intriguing, transparent, horizontal articulation.

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westraven

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Floor plan at ground level The basic structure of the building consists of the renovated tower block with an elongated four-storey low-rise section at its foot, running parallel to the Amsterdam-Rhine Canal. On the north side (left) two triangularly ‘folded’ office bays have been accommodated in this section, while the south side (right) accommodates three. At the foot, the triangles are connected by a zone with a human circulation corridor and adjoining offices, and at the corners by all-round transparent conservatories that offer as many people as possible a view of the water. On the north side, an auditorium has been inserted between the triangles and, on the south side, the spaces between the office bays have been roofed over transparently, and have been linked to the conservatory with the canteen. Inner gardens, spanned over by gauze, are situated around the tower on the canal side while the land side of the building accommodates a spacious entrance hall with a roof and façade of transparent ETFE air cushions. The building has four different climate zones: all offices are climatized, the largescale conservatories are largely warmed by the air outflow from the low-rise offices, the entrance hall is wind and water-tight but has a raw, passive climate. Finally, the inner gardens are only sheltered by the spanned gauze. Floor plan of the third storey Along the long façades, the tower comprises a total of five large voids immediately adjoining the lift core. These significantly enlarge the spaciousness of the original building, allow the incidence of daylight into the various floors, and contribute considerably to orientation within the building. In the heart of the office bays that have been ‘folded’ into a triangle in the low-rise, there are voids that also generate long sightlines and give a substantial sense of spaciousness.

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Longitudinal view of the entrance side The tower is the central feature, with a second skin of glass panels on the north side, and a second skin of alternating strips of glass and teflon-coated fibreglass membrane on the east side. The entrance hall is at the foot of the tower, with façades of transparent EFTE cushions and the wings of the low-rise building on either side. On the entrance side, these have a vertical articulation of alternating strips of sandwich and glass panels; the latter can be partially opened for natural ventilation.

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4 Longitudinal view of the canal side Just like the east side, the south and west line of the tower also wear a second skin comprised of alternating strips of glass and teflon-coated fibreglass membrane. The west side accommodates three voids. The lowrise façades are wholly transparent on the canal side, which allows a view of the water to as many people as possible. The non-climatized inner gardens at the foot are spanned by the same teflon-coated fibreglass membrane as is used for the façades. The technical installations units for the low-rise, which are clad with profiled glass, are situated above the triangular office wings, and are set back in relation to the façades.

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Longitudinal section on the canal side, and cross-section of the tower The heart of the tower houses the lift core with, on either side, large voids that reach up four storeys and the floor surfaces that can be freely laid out according to the requirements of the occupier. The second skin of teflon-coated fibreglass membrane has been continued over the technical installations areas at the top so that these are kept out of sight. Between the bays on the north side (left) there is also a spacious auditorium.

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Axonometrics of the steel construction of the low-rise building The structure is based on a strongly rational pattern with a maximum repetition of the same type of elements. In front of the beams and columns of the conservatory and atrium roofs, a project-specific, eight-centimetre-wide beam has been designed that has also been applied elsewhere in the complex to ensure a uniform perception, as in the entrance hall and along the glass façades in the tower voids. Various facilities such as electric cables and water-carrying pipes for illumination and convectors have been incorporated into the minimally dimensioned steel beams. The steel construction of the office bays consists of concrete-filled tubular columns and THQ beams, between which the floors lie sunken. Because the construction is ubiquitously visible, the assembly joints are generally at a small distance from the construction and geometrically complicated nodes. For example, the junctions of THQ beams and hollow columns have already been welded together as ‘trees’ in the workplace. By means of longitudinal connections, the THQ beams have been simply assembled between the columns by means of sunken bolts.

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Cross-section of the low-rise building On either side, the water reservoir of the encompassing pond. The conservatory façade is on the far left, and is equipped with an automatically operating sun-screening system of greenhouse gauze. When the gauze has been lowered, a cavity is created that is naturally ventilated along the top. A convector neutralizes the cold downward draught along the façade during colder periods. The office bays ‘folded’ into a triangle are equipped at the top with stability joints and accommodate stairwells and voids in the middle. The toilets, the transport artery and, to the east of this, a strip of offices, are all located at the base of the building. The technical installations units are situated on the roof, screened off by profiled glass. 1: 200

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Structure of exterior façade of the offices 1 Wing floor with concrete core activation. 2 Steel single-flange beam, with fire-resistant coating. 3 Floor hollow with installation ducts and finishing of fibreglass hydrite tiles. 4 Sun-resistant insulated glazing, layered and hardened. 5 Handle. 6 Sun-resistant insulated glazing. 7 Sunbreakers with runners in frameposts. 8 PVC with plastisol-lined cap. 9 Set-back gutter with rainwater drainage (Pluvia). 10 PVC roofing material. 1: 10

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Structure of conservatory faรงade and roof 1 Composite steel tube. 2 Aluminium faรงade system with sun-resistant insulated glazing. 3 Air supply for cavity ventilation. 4 Lighting and convector unit, supply of water and electricity via steel column. 5 Perforated and blank anodized aluminium ceiling. 6 Sun-resistant greenhouse gauze with tube motor. 7 Air exhaust duct for cavity ventilation. 8 Sprinklers. 9 Treadable insulated glazing. 10 Greenhouse gauze as sunbreaker. 11 Insulated construction gutter. 1:15

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introduction Façade fragment of the office wing of the low-rise The flush interior wall system used for the office façades is equipped with parallel expandable panels that enable natural ventilation. The vertical acoustic slats along the transparent façades on the ground floor are rotatable and also function as a privacy screen. Air from the offices seeps through a ventilation baffles embedded in the edges of the floor to the atriums and conservatories and largely climatizes these largerscale spaces. The outflow of used air takes place via ventilation openings at the top of the atriums.

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Exploded 3-D view of the low-rise floors The Wing floor by Betonson (hollowcore slab floor) is an existing product that is currently applied in an optimally efficient way, resulting from intensive test procedures and ongoing engineering. The system elements consist of a concrete broadslab with a simultaneously manufactured, much narrower hollow-core slab on top, running down the middle. In conjunction, the elements form a strong floor system that also allows scope for the integration of cables and ducts. In consultation with the constructor and technical installations advisor, this opportunity has been exploited to the full. The installations have been dimensioned and combined as minimally and purposefully as possible, while the hollowcore sections have been penetrated laterally to enable extra possibilities for feed-through. The broadslab sections are equipped with concrete core activation. The floor sections have been sunken between the THQ beams of the steel construction and covered by a computer floor. The result is a floor package of barely 315 mm thick, housing all the installation technology components for the climate, electricity supply, IT and fire safety, all of which are completely accessible. This has enabled a free height of more than 2700 mm in the office areas. The possibility to regulate the climate of each individual office space has also been integrated in the floor system.

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Structure of the interior façade of the conservatory 1 Acoustic and rotatable privacy panel of blank anodized and perforated aluminium. 2 Lighting of the conservatory in the floor edge. 3 Wing floor with concrete core activation. 4 Floor hollow met installation ducts and finishing of fibreglass hydrite tiles. 5 Parallel expandable acoustic panel with perforated stainlesssteel plating. 6 Concrete-filled hollow steel column. 7 Steel single-flange beam. 8 Acoustic baffle for air overflow, finished with acoustic panel equipped with perforated stainlesssteel plating. 9 Double-skin, glass, modular interior wall.

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Overview of the application of profiled sectional steel Five applications of the same steel profile that was developed specifically for the project. It is only 8 cm wide, with a set-back flange of 30 mm bar-steel and a corpus of 12 mm steel plates. Top: a cross-section of the transparent atrium roof in which the profile functions as a load-bearing beam of an adjustable constructive gutter. Under this: a bird’s-eye view of the profile application as a column along the transparent façade sections in the tower voids. The bird’s-eye view in the middle shows the use of the profile in the façades of the entrance hall, where the columns also function as air-supply modules for the ETFE cushions in the façades and roof. The penultimate picture is also a view from above and shows clearly how the columns in the low-rise conservatories are situated at a slight distance from the façade. This makes it possible to create a ventilated cavity between the façade and the automatically lowered greenhouse gauze. The drawing at the bottom illustrates the steel profile as a beam in the conservatory roof, where the ceiling finishing has been aligned to the setback flange of the profile.

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Fragment of the high-rise The technical installations in the tower are largely housed in climate ceilings between the bridle joists of the concrete floors where they were penetrated to form the four-storeyhigh voids. Along the glass façades of the voids, the same projectspecific column profiles have been applied as in the conservatories and the entrance hall. The thermal façade consists almost entirely of transparent glass with a strip of floor convectors along the inside to combat the cold downward draught. The horizontally articulated image has been generated by means of a second-skin façade with strips of glass at seat height, with a tautly spanned, teflon-coated fibreglass membrane above it. For the construction of the second skin and the spanning of the façade membrane, use has been made of the existing window-cleaning balconies that have been insulated with a sandwich panel that is an integral part of the membrane façade system in order to reduce the effects of the existing thermal bridge. In the new situation, walking grids that can be folded in and out function as a window-cleaning strip at floor level. The spanning mechanism for the membrane façade has been incorporated under these grids.

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Structure of textile second-skin façade 1 Existing cast in situ concrete balcony. 2 Existing concrete floor. 3 Sandwich panel to prevent thermal bridge. 4 Aluminium tube with rafter profile for fixing and spanning fibreglass fabric. 5 Layered and hardened glass, fixed at specified points. 6 Steel auxiliary construction and anchoring for window-cleaning installation. 7 Aluminium frame with clear insulated glazing and a part that can be opened. 8 PTFE (teflon-)coated fibreglass fabric. 9 Steel climate ceiling between concrete beams with integrated induction units, lighting, sprinklers and loudspeakers. 10 Heating pipe to prevent cold downward draught. 11 Data and electricity connection, fed through column.

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client sojin holding amsterdam

When other buildings, including the Heineken Music Hall and the Pathé multi-screen cinema, appeared on the Arena Boulevard in Amsterdam beside the existing metropolitan buildings, the city council managed to interest the owner of the modest Jinso catering pavilion in scaling up his operation. The Asian food entrepreneur asked cepezed to create an extension to the original pavilion the bureau had designed some 10 years earlier. In the same period, research carried out by TNO and BRS Building Systems yielded good results in cold-bending insulating glass, an application in which cepezed directly saw possibilities due to the limited costs compared to curving glass using heat. The bureau designed a large, transparent glass oval structure surrounding the original pavilion. On the outside, this contributes in a soft, natural way to the use and experience of the public space. On the inside, it creates an immense spatial experience. The volume surface area is 30 × 43 m and it is 12 m high. The plinth was made 2 m narrower, creating an overhang and a pleasant scale differentiation on the ground floor. The building has a single upper floor, consisting of a gallery more than 4 m wide running directly along the façade. The rest is space. The original pavilion is now the operational heart of the restaurant and houses the kitchen, bar and distribution area. The various standing and seating places are situated on the floor slab and the ring floor. The upper storey and the roof construction of open, finely detailed delta beams form closed rings and make an important contribution to the structural setup. The façade is suspended entirely on cylindrical columns from the roof ring, which in turn rests on recessed tubular columns; this construction on tensile load allows the columns to be extremely slender, thereby retaining the maximum transparency of the volume. At the ends of the ellipse where the stairs to the upper floor are situated, stability joints have been installed between the columns. The façade is composed of cold-bent insulating glass, bent at the site itself into exactly the right curve using special suckers and then installed; the glass panels were provided with flexible spacers for this purpose. They are connected horizontally to hollow cross-beams over the entire length using frames, vertically attached only at certain points to the columns, that absorb the push and pull of the wind by means of rocking dampers. On the ground floor, a facetted folding wall allows three-quarters of the façade to be opened. The roof surface consists of eight large ETFE cushions with three air chambers per cushion. The EFTE is imprinted with a pattern by means of which the incidence of sun and light can be regulated by altering the air pressure in the inner chamber. The roof cushions have been mounted on a structural gutter above a ring of tubular frames with spanning lenticular trusses. This has been raised above the delta beams with short tubular columns to make space between the delta beams and the roof plane for a strip of adjustable baffles to provide natural ventilation. The air inlets and outlets for the cushions are integrated into the structure of lenticular and hollow beams.

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address arena boulevard 155 amsterdam

introduction

jinso pavilion

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Floor plans of the ground and first floors The new pavilion was built around a two-storey pavilion measuring roughly eight by twenty metres that cepezed previously realized in the 1990s. In the new situation, the kitchens and all auxiliary functions have been incorporated in the pavilion. As much free space as possible has been created around this. The constricted transparent plinth on the ground floor can be opened along a sizable length as a facetted folding wall of which every section has a different radial. The stairs are situated at the ends of the ellipse, where the stability joints have been installed between the steel columns of the load-bearing construction. Various rentable spaces have been created on the north side of the ground floor. The first floor houses an all-round gallery. On the outside, an open-air café has been installed within the contour of an elevation and paved street pattern.

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Longitudinal cross-section of the pavilion The stairs to the gallery on the first floor are shown on either side. In the middle: the previously existing pavilion with the kitchens and all auxiliary functions. Above this: the services patio equipped with the central exhaust system via the roof, which further consists of eight elongated ETFE cushions. Natural ventilation of the public space occurs by means of adjustable-slat grids in the plinth and the eaves.

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Elevation of the pavilion The image shows the transparent and facetted folding wall of which each section has a different radial on the ground floor. Above: the façade is made up of panels of coldbent, insulating double-glass that was installed at the site itself with the aid of a special sucker. The ETFE cushions in the roof have been assembled on a refined construction of lenticular trusses that spread their load to a ring of facetted delta beams. Each cushion consists of four layers of ETFE that jointly constitute three air chambers. The central layers are imprinted with a pattern by means of which the incidence of sun and light can be regulated by altering the air pressure.

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Lateral cross-section of the pavilion The stability joints and the ventilation grids enable natural ventilation at the ends of the ellipse.

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introduction Axonometrics of the steel construction Axonometrics of the steel loadbearing construction with minimally sized connections between the components. The extremely slender steel columns are equipped with stability joints at the ends of the building, and bear the facetted delta beams of the lightweight roof construction from which the entire façade package is suspended. The façade is connected to the gallery on the first floor by means of expansion joints. The gallery also has a constructive function and contributes to the stability of the pavilion.

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Fragment The setback columns carry the delta beams of the lightweight roof construction from which the façade is also suspended. The columns and façade struts are connected by means of rocking dampers that absorb the push and pull of the wind. In the plinth and in the eaves, there are adjustable slat grids for natural ventilation. The ETFE roof cushions have been mounted on air-supplying lenticular trusses with flexible, clear connection tubes. The balustrade of the gallery, just like that of the stairs, is encompassed by a coated gauze membrane between which the air distribution is integrated. Along the edge of the gallery and the façade, project-specific curved convectors have been incorporated to combat downward draughts.

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Structure of the roof and façade 1 4-layer ETFE air cushions, innermost foils with pressure nozzle for air regulation. 2 Aluminium clamp profile. 3 Facetted construction steel gutter equipped with insulation and EPDM layer. 4 Composite hollow steel tubes, enabling split air supply. 5 Flexible clear air ducts, clamped on to welded-on holding tubes. 6 Air-supplying lenticular truss. 7 Louvre system for rainwater drainage and natural ventilation. 8 Facetted delta beam. 9 Sandwich roof elements with slope insulation and PVC roofing material. 10 Rainwater drainage (pluvia). 1:10

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Structure of façade 1 Floor structure, from top to bottom: finishing of natural stone tiles, screed floor with underfloor heating, broadslab floor with kicker, insulation, aluminium ceiling finishing. 2 Supporting box beam with weldedon fixing lips. 3 Steel box girder, attachment lips equipped with slotted holes. 4 Cold-bent sun-resistant insulated glazing, horizontally completely clamped and vertically clamped at specified points. 5 Curved convector troughs, produced specifically for the project. 6 Steel box girder, invisibly attached to façade strut. 7 Rocking damper to distribute windload to the column. 8 Facetted delta beam. 9 Façade strut, suspended from the delta beam. 10 Aluminium roof edging strip. 11 Aluminium mounting and moisture prevention unit.

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Structure of the façade section 1 Vertical mounting of the glass plates; black muffled steel clamping plates at specified points, sealing off the butt seam with black mastic. 2 Cold-bent sun-resistant insulated glazing, horizontally completely clamped and vertically clamped at specified points. 3 Steel box girder, invisibly attached to the façade strut. 4 Façade strut, suspended. 5 Rocking damper for distribution of windload to column. 6 Welded-on lip for attachment of rocking damper to column. 7 Hollow column. 8 Insulated rainwater drainage (Pluvia) with steel outer leaf. 1:10

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client dexia bank brussels belgium

In the Belgian municipality of Sint-Niklaas, cepezed realized two major urban regeneration projects. First, the bureau designed a radical restructuring of the station area. The city council was so happy with the adaptable functionality and the reserved aesthetics of the result that they asked cepezed to tackle the Grote Markt as well. Both projects demonstrate that concept and detailing are not just closely linked at building level for cepezed, but actually on every scale. The Grote Markt is the largest city square in West Europe and has for a long time been a problem zone ruled over by cars. The surrounding roads are part of continually congested routes carrying heavy traffic. The centre of the square is one enormous car park, at odds with its use for the weekly market and various kinds of events. The square is a chaotic, isolated spot in the city centre. cepezed carried out four interventions that encourage people to linger on the square and gave it back its grandeur. To begin with, the bureau ensured a drastic reduction in traffic flows; all through-traffic now follows a different route that connects to the new city ring road. Next, it implemented a clean-cut, lucid and safe restructuring of the periphery, where every type of traffic participant from pedestrians to car drivers and public transport users are allocated their own autonomous zone. The third intervention was the realization of a half-open parking garage under the edges of the square and the fourth was the complete redesign of the public space. The entrances and exits of the parking garage connect directly to the correct zone on the periphery, where, in addition, the traffic always moves in one direction. As a result, cars do not cross a bus lane or cycle path anywhere. The half-open nature of the parking garage means that it is provided with a generous amount of natural light and ventilation, that there are good opportunities for orientation and that the facility is socially safe. Light, slender materialization with features such as set-back columns and a rejuvenation of the structural overhang contribute greatly to the visually open and light character. The transition to the traffic periphery consists of an embankment of green planted gabions, which has a soothing, atmospheric effect on the highly urban environment. The stairs and transparent lifts between the parking garage and surface level are integrated into this embankment. The most important crossing points between the pavement and the square are marked by slender and finely detailed canopies with integral lighting and drainage. The centre of the square is now completely free and paved with Belgian bluestone. Ambiance and the human scale are achieved around the periphery with a wooden promenade with benches, tulip trees and artworks. The water drainage system is concealed under the promenade deck and the square is equipped with electricity points at various places, to be used for the market and events. The design of the central area with items such as light masts, litter bins, bus shelters, terrace partitions and other street furniture breathes a calm uniformity that contributes significantly to making the square a place to linger.

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address grote markt sint-niklaas belgium

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grote markt sint-niklaas

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Ground plan of the square On the left: the Town Hall on the north-west side; on the right: the sculpture entitled Het Woord (The Word) at the south-east point. The centre of the square has been cleansed of all vehicle parking and is wholly available for pedestrian use, various kinds of events, and the weekly open-air market. For these purposes, a series of sunken electricity points has been installed. All sorts of traffic have their own domain along the periphery of the square. Every separate zone has its own materialization and finishing. Cross-section of the square periphery All sorts of traffic have their own domain. From left to right: the pavement along the buildings on the square, with space for open-air cafés and pedestrians. Then a cycle track, a lane for cars, a bus platform, and a bus lane. An elevated hardwood promenade that functions as a walking and relaxing zone lies above the half-open car park with a stepped embankment. The open centre of the Grote Markt directly adjoins this.

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introduction Ground plan of the underground, half-open parking street around the edges of the square Top right: the entrance is situated on the east side. At the bottom: the exit on the south-west side. A double strip with extra bays has been incorporated into the zone in the centre, in front of the Town Hall. Longitudinal section of the car park entrance Around the square a transparent glass safety screen has been installed to mark the transition to the embankment. Entrance to the square from the car park is gained by means of stairs and lifts at a few points. Steel canopies mark the crossings between the square and the pavements. The pedestrian bridges between the square and the periphery have decks of mat translucent glass. The illumination in the light masts has been chosen to give a minimum of light pollution. Cross-section of the entrance zone On the left: the parking strips with the open square above. Stairs to the elevated wooden gallery along the edge of the square have been incorporated in the embankment. The entrance to the car park is shown at the centre of the drawing, and the pavement with open-air catering functions is shown on the far right. The crossing between the square and the pavement is marked by a canopy with a transparent roof.

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introduction Structure of the canopy 1 Concrete pier. 2 Rainwater drainage. 3 Pressed gratings. 4 I-beam column, galvanized and coated, simultaneously rainwater drainage. 5 Asymmetrical end plate with bolted connection. 6 Weld in mitre joint. 7 Steel box beam on I-beam. 8 Gutter with lip attachment. 9 Lighting. 10 Hardened glass. 11 Rubber glass clamps.

Structure of balustrade 1 Prefab concrete oor elements with watertight layer. 2 Angle iron. 3 Wedges with two-component adhesive. 4 Layered and hardened glass. 5 Stainless-steel hand railing. 6 Cumaru hardwood deck. 7 Hardwood joists. 8 Adjustable PVC oor supports.

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client ministry of foreign affairs the hague

When the Dutch embassy in Rome had accommodation problems of various interrelated kinds, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs went looking for another location, but came up against insurmountable issues every time. In the end, cepezed investigated the possibilities for carrying out a radical renovation of the existing embassy, which suffered from bad building performance and had fallen far behind modern standards in terms of aesthetics, functionality and environmental quality. The bureau came up with solutions to make the building representative again, internally and externally, restore convenience and take fundamental action on the functional structure. The embassy is housed in a fatigued 1920s building constructed in neo-Rennaissance style, and given a bland, nondescript extension in the 1960s. Because the combination originally served as a residential home, it has an inconvenient lay-out with a labyrinthine structure that interferes with practical working and communication between the members of staff. Externally, the appearance of the original villa with its unusual details has been restored to its former glory. A shell of CorTen steel has been installed round the rather ordinary extension, which gives the building segment a contemporary appearance and at the same time forms a serene, abstract and neutral background to the original villa. The CorTen steel shell has not only an aesthetic function, it also improves building performance; the skin slows down heating up in the summer and cooling down in the winter. At the façade apertures, it has been implemented as perforated shutters that can open, and so functions as a sun and light screen. When the shutters are closed, they are completely flush with the surface of the façade, while the volume does not have a visible roof overhang. At the corners, the CorTen sheeting fits tightly together. Due to the untidy logistics and the absence of any special details, the properties have been completely stripped and restructured internally. The escape route has been situated outside the renovated building, which allows space on every floor for an office arrangement round a central circulation and meeting zone. A major visual element, centrally positioned, is the fully glazed lift and staircase with a transparent roof covering above that brings daylight deep into the building. Because of the existing situation, every storey has a different height, which demanded special attention for the stairs. Just like the glass elements of the lift shaft, they are suspended from the edges of the floor using tension rods; the stringboards consist of composite strap steel with banisters of safety glass in between. The steps and landings are made of translucent glass sunk in steel frames. The level detailed interior walls also make an important contribution to the clarity and luminance of the interior. On the office side, they have a panel of completely transparent glass, on the hall side a panel of translucent glass. So the work spaces enjoy a pleasant sense of privacy, while through the effect of daylight entering via the façade apertures and the natural light fixture above the stairs, a fresh, agreeable and serene atmosphere is achieved.

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address via michele mercati 8 rome italy

introduction

embassy rome

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Floor plans of the revamped embassy The labyrinthine passages of the original buildings have been completely replaced by an open, clear layout where all functions on each storey have been lucidly arranged around a central hall with a transparent staircase and equally transparent lift. The hall accommodates shared functions such as the photocopying facilities, and members of staff can meet one another easily and informally here. The top storey of the building ensemble provides direct access to the roof garden above the neoRenaissance-style section.

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View of the renovated embassy The exterior of the neo-Renaissancestyle building has been wholly restored. The extension, added in the sixties, has been wrapped in a second faรงade of CorTen steel, which, at the faรงade apertures, has been implemented in the form of perforated shutters that can be opened. This building section has thus acquired an abstract appearance that harmonizes well with the surrounding stone pines in terms of colour, and forms a neutral background to the richly decorated original building.

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4 Cross-section through the staircase Due to the fact that the building has been transparently roofed over, and the stairs and the landings are of translucent glass, daylight is able to penetrate deep into the building. The adjoining two-scale interior walls are transparent on the room sides and translucent on the hall side, which also contributes to the light atmosphere in the heart of the building.

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Fragment The CorTen steel façade around the extension is both aesthetic and functional. The second skin not only constitutes an attractive background to the neo-Renaissancestyle section, but also works as a buffer against overheating in the summer and chill in the winter. At the apertures, the façade has been perforated and implemented as a shutter. The interior walls between the ofďŹ ces and the hall are transparent on the room side and translucent on the hall side, so that a generally light ambience is generated. 134

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Structure of façade and roof 1 Existing cavity panels. 2 Galvanized angle iron. 3 Aluminium extrusion profile for plating attachment. 4 CorTen steel plating. 5 Perforated CorTen steel shutters. 6 Powder-coated aluminium sliding window with sun-resistant insulated glazing. 7 Galvanized slide rail with roller. 8 Powder-coated aluminium mounting. 9 Roof tiles in concrete on insulated sand-cement screed floor. 10 Existing roof decking. 11 Climate ceiling. 1:10

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Structure of the façade corner 1 Perforated CorTen steel shutters. 2 Stainless-steel hinges, electrolytically coloured. 3 Shutter fastening when open. 4 Powder-coated aluminium sliding window with sun-resistant insulated glazing. 5 Powder-coated aluminium mounting. 6 Rail for sunblinds. 7 CorTen steel plating. 8 Aluminium extrusion proďŹ le for attachment of plating. 9 Galvanized angle iron. 10 Existing column and cavity panels, treated with smooth plasterwork.

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introduction Fragment The glass staircase is centrally situated and allows daylight deep into the building through a transparent roof. The stair posts consist of steel strips bolted together with glass plates in between. The translucent steps lie in steel frames. The landings are suspended free of the oor edges by means of tie bars. 1: 140

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Structure of the stairs 1 Power-trowelled concrete floor with transparent coating. 2 Acoustic climate ceiling with steel ceiling finishing, mounted and coated. 3 Landing of sand-sprayed glass with mat foil. 4 Hollow steel tube with welded diagonal seam and neoprene bearing. 5 Composite stringers of steel strips. 6 Stair of layered and sand-sprayed glass with mat foil, with neoprene bearing in coated diagonal. 7 Tie bar for suspended landing and stringers on the floor edge. 8 Hardened and layered glass. 9 Stainless-steel hand rail. 1:15

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client schiphol real estate schiphol

Microsoft wanted to move to Schiphol-Centre after a previous rental contract, and to begin directly with introducing the New World of Work. With the software producer as chief tenant, SRE developed a multi-tenant complex. cepezed planned to make a building with a spacious feel, plenty of natural light, long sight lines and maximum flexibility. However, there were strict preconditions. To ensure an unobstructed view from the air traffic control tower, the buildings have to descend in height. The plot is also wedged in between the Schiphol railway tunnel and a cable duct system, reducing the maximum footprint. Another factor is the high parking burden. Finally, the building had to be realized quickly. As a result, concept, materialization, detailing and implementation practice formed an uncompromising coherent entity. Parking is organized within two underground layers and the plinth, where most of the installations can also be found, due to height restrictions. Above that, a structure has risen in which shorter and longer office wings are linked to a long continuous dock. This dock provides stability and concentrates most of the technically complex elements such as sanitary facilities, the stairs and lifts and installation shafts. As a result, the office wings themselves have hardly any complicated aspects, significantly speeding up the building process. Their load-bearing structure consists of steel beams parallel to the dock, with hollow-core slab floors in between that span no less than 16.20 m. This arrangement yields deep floor bays with a minimum number of columns, making parking without obstacles possible in the lower levels and providing great flexibility in terms of layout and letting capability. At the end of each wing, an overhang more than 5 m deep juts out from the last steel portal beam. In spite of the limited footprint, a large area of useable floor has been realized. Representative stairs have been installed centrally in the longer wings, linking levels visually and physically. The storeys have an optimal free height that contributes greatly to spatial quality. The façades have a horizontal alternation of matt-black strips and ribbon windows above human height. The closed strips consist of project-specific sandwich panels of timber and insulation material between internal steel sheeting and external cladding finished in anodized aluminium. On the longitudinal façades, they span 16.20 m, like the channel sections they run parallel to, contributing significantly to the speed of construction. At the extremities, they are secured to the columns and attached vertically at certain points to the floor edges, which can bend a little and also absorb the push and pull of the wind on the panels. To achieve a panoramic view and optimum penetration of daylight, the ribbon windows do not have posts or frames. The seams are finished with insulating keyed filler strips, which are sufficiently soundproof and airtight to repel nuisance from the vehicles outside. The glass is directly clipped onto the frame profiles of the sandwich panels. On the underside, this frame has a U section that incorporates the sunshades. The cabling is concealed in the sandwich panel.

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Ground plan of the parking area at ground-floor level Just like the office wings, the parking areas have a minimum amount of columns. The grid has been strategically and smartly positioned so that the construction gives a minimum amount of hindrance. The parking areas extend through to the open zone between the longer office wings, while the entrance and exit are centrally positioned along the north-west side on the Evert van de Beekstraat. The smaller volumes between the shorter office wings accommodate the technical installations. Floor plan of a standard office floor To obtain a maximum of flexible rentability, the building has a layout of connected shorter and longer wings, linked by means of a long dock that contains a significant share of the sanitary facilities, staircases, lifts, shafts and other technically complicated programme components. Each floor of each wing is separate and, if necessary, can even be accessed only in part. A floor span of no less than 16.20 metres parallel to the façades ensures that the floor surfaces have a minimum amount of columns and are thus optimally suited to almost any required layout. In the central bay of the longer wings, there are broad, shallow-rise stairways. There are strip windows in the roof of the car park between the central long wings. The roof garden is situated between the two right-most longer wings.

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Longitudinal section and elevation of the complex The car parking facilities are situated in two subterranean storeys and also at ground level. Above these are the office wings that are connected by means of a dock along the full length of the complex. The wings decrease in height from west to east to guarantee an unobstructed view from the air traffic control tower. Around the car park, the plinth consists of a dark-coloured fence that is completely transparent around the heads of the entrances. The façades are made of high strip windows without struts and latticed sandwich panels with a black exterior face, which were especially designed for this project. The panels were largely delivered in units of 16.20 metres and directly installed in the façade, which has been kept separate from the floor edge because of the potential curvature of the hollow-core slab floors.

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Elevation of south-west side and cross section The office wings have a sizable overhang on two sides because the ground floor level could not be built any further outwards. Under the ground there is the Schiphol railway tunnel on one side, and a pipe and duct system on the other. The large, representative and transparently roofed-over shallow-rise steps are shown in the centre of the crosssection. A little to the right of these, with X-braces at the top, there is the connecting dock between the longer and the shorter wings.

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Axonometrics of the steel construction Study model of the steel construction of the connecting dock along the entire length of the complex. The shorter and longer office wings dovetail on either side here, and are thus linked. At the same time, the dock accommodates the majority of the technically complicated elements, such as the (prefabricated) sanitary units, lifts, staircases and shafts, which helped simplify and therefore accelerate the building of the office wings themselves. The construction grid has a minimum of columns in the parking sections and in the office wings in order to ensure optimum flexibility and functionality, as well as rapid and straightforward realization.

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introduction Axonometric node Study model of a construction coupling with various linking options. The assembly points have been shifted in relation to the geometrical node that has been largely welded, which enables the connections to be elegantly ďŹ xed by means of sunken socket-head bolts.

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Fragment At the bottom: the parking facilities, with a connecting awning for the dispatch. The wide, shallow-rise and transparent roofed-over stairs are shown to the left. Connections for data and electricity transport have been cast into the screed floor. The façade is formed by an alternation of sandwich panels specifically designed for the project, and larger-than-life strip windows without struts, which are sufficiently soundproof and airtight to repel nuisance from the vehicles outside due to the careful finishing at the seams. The hollow-core slab floors and façade sections, parallel to one another, span a distance of 16.20 metres. With this construction, the floor edges must be able to give way a little, while the façade surfaces must be able to take the wind load. The point-by-point bonds between the two must therefore allow expansion. At the extremities, however, the façade sections are rigidly fixed to the columns.

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Structure of the façade 1 Insulated glazing, height 2410 mm, horizontally clamped, vertically sealed with EPDM rubbers. 2 Black clamping frame. 3 Electrically powered blinds integrated in project-specific prefab façade panel. 4 Project-specific, prefabricated and insulated sandwich panel with a core lattice truss spanning 16.2 metres. 5 Exterior plating made of galvanized steel plating, XPS plate, and a finishing of black, anodized aluminium. 6 Interior plating of insulated and white powder-coated steel. 7 Concrete-filled box beam. 8 EPDM profiles for soundproofing and expansion between the floor and the façade. 9 Composite steel façade console, equipped with reinforcing junction plates and bolted to an IPBI 340 beam with welded-on mounting plate. 10 Acoustic climate ceiling with integrated lighting, sprinklers and loudspeakers.

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Structure of the façade corner 1 Concrete-filled box beam. 2 Insulated glazing, height 2410 mm, horizontally clamped, vertically sealed with EPDM rubbers. 3 Underlying project-specific prefabricated and insulated sandwich panel with core lattice truss spanning 16.2 metres. 4 Butt seam sealed with EPDM rubber and mastic on foam chord. 5 Tie bar steel construction. 6 Mastic on foam chord for a neat façade corner. 1: 10

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Structure of the façade 1 Insulated glazing, height 2410 mm, horizontally clamped, vertically sealed with EPDM rubbers. 2 Black clamping frame. 3 Electrically powered blinds integrated in project-specific prefab façade panel. 4 Project-specific, prefabricated and insulated sandwich panel with a core lattice truss spanning 16.2 metres. 5 Exterior plating made of galvanized steel plating, XPS plate, and a finishing of black, anodized aluminium. 6 Interior plating of insulated and white powder-coated steel. 7 Concrete-filled box beam. 8 EPDM profiles for soundproofing and expansion between the floor and the façade. 9 Composite steel façade console, equipped with reinforcing junction plates and bolted to an IPBI 340 beam with welded-on mounting plate. 10 Acoustic climate ceiling with integrated lighting, sprinklers and loudspeakers.

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Structure of the roof and façade 1 Insulated glazing, height 2410 mm, horizontally clamped, vertically sealed with EPDM rubbers. 2 Black clamp frame. 3 Electrically powered blinds integrated in project-specific prefab façade panel. 4 Project-specific, prefabricated and insulated sandwich panel with core lattice truss spanning 16.2 metres. 5 Concrete-filled box beam. 6 Insulated roof edging with plastisol cap. 7 Rail of window-cleaning installation. 8 Roof upright made of sandwich elements with roofing material and sealing. 9 Hollow steel tube attached to H-beam 120 by means of welded-on steel plate. 10 Insulated glazing with insulated support on roof joists. 11 H-beam 120 with insulation material and plasterboard for the acoustics, mounted on I-beam 600. 12 Jamb of the perforated acoustic panel. 13 Acoustic climate ceiling with integrated lighting, sprinklers and loudspeakers.

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client centre for human drug research leiden

When the Centre for Human Drug Research (CHDR), which carries out research into the working of medicines and their side effects, grew out of the accommodation cepezed had designed earlier, it had its eye on new quarters on the last available, adjacent plot with modest dimensions and jagged contours. However, the programme was large and diverse, making stacking necessary. Besides requirements for research areas, rooms for test subjects and reception, and training and catering facilities, there was a desire to rent out parts of the building. The terrain also serves as a car park for the old building giving an additional parking burden. cepezed designed a compact eight-storey tower above an underground car park. Parking space is also available on the terrain and at surface level within the building contour. The lay-out, structural arrangement and materialization of the tower are directly linked to logistic and functional aspects and strict conditions applying to some research areas. In addition, the design is strongly focused on creating a pleasant place to be with plenty of light, air and space. The basic structure of the building consists of three unequal strips in the depth. The foremost strip, on the north side, is maximally transparent and houses the more representative and ambulant functions such as the entrance, the auditorium, meeting rooms and the bloodsample clinic. Behind that, there is a strip with stairs and lifts for vertical traffic, contributing to interaction between the building’s users. In the event of fire, the stairs are separated off by means of an integrated fire-resistant cloth; the escape route is a component of spatial quality. The middle zone takes care of stability as well and houses complex components such as the sanitary facilities and installation shafts. The rearmost building strip with two structural wings houses the more private and operational functions. On the first floor there is a staff restaurant with a double-height façade that can largely be opened to give a sense of outdoors. The appearance of the building is clean-cut with almost no detail and took its inspiration from the likes of modern smartphone design. It has a light tone with ribbon windows on the sunny façades and strips of brilliant white enamelled diamond glass. The ribbon windows and enamelled panels are similarly attached within the same curtain wall. The transparent strips have projecting top-hung windows. In order to limit building height, the main ducts of the pipe and cabling systems were integrated into the floor. The constituent channel sections were placed at a distance, the spaces in between contain the ducts and were joined by steel plates with a dovetail joint profile before the finish floor was cast. The rooms for the test subjects are situated on the top floors, where there is also an in-house roof garden and a spacious void under a sawtooth roof oriented towards light from the north. The south-oriented upright roof surfaces have collectors for a solar water heater. The structural hollow sections of the sheds, various cables and pipes and the sprinkler system behind a steel-cassette finish are incorporated into the grooves of the profiles roof slabs.

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Floor plans of various storeys Ground floor with the entrance on the north side (left part of photo), the entrance hall with reception desk, and the auditorium. In the centre: the strip with the lifts, staircase, sanitary units and shafts. On the south side (right), the parking lot at ground-floor level and the embankment with the underlying parking facilities. The first storey with diverse meeting rooms with, on the north side, circulation and access area at the front. On the south side, we see the kitchen with the restaurant and the glass façade, which can be largely opened, at the south-west corner (below right). The sixth storey with the bloodsample desk in the centre on the north side (left) and, on either side of this, the examination rooms. To the right of the zone with lifts, staircases and shafts are the patients’ rooms with the overnight rooms along the east and west façades (above and below), with the sanitary facilities and communal room in the middle. The seventh story with, on the north side (left), the in-house roof garden with the adjoining communal room and, next to the central zone, even more patient rooms along the east and west façades (above and below) with a spacious void in the centre.

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View to the west A horizontal articulation above the car parking facility at ground level and a partly double-height, transparent plinth. The façade surface is completely flush with the parts that can be opened in the transparent strips.

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Longitudinal section In the middle: the stabilizing zone with the lifts, staircases, shafts and sanitary facilities, among other things. On the north side (left), the façade is made entirely of glass; the more operational functions are largely housed here. On the south side (right), there is the canteen, with a façade that can be opened. The upper floors accommodate the patients’ rooms. Right at the top there is a sawtooth roof with an underlying void.

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Cross-section of the southern zone On the far left (west side), there is the contour of the former CHDR building , which was also designed by cepezed. Above, in the middle, we see the sawtooth roof with its underlying void and the patients’ rooms on either side. On the lower level there are the car-parking floors, the canteen and various office functions. An exceptional feature of the floors is their composition of hollow-core slabs that have been placed at a slight distance from one another and are linked by steel plates and a structural concrete topping. Space for the main routes of the various pipe and duct systems has thus been created in the intermediate hollows.

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Fragment On the far left: the stabilizing zone with the lifts, staircases, shafts and sanitary facilities. Adjoining, from bottom to top: the car-parking facilities, the double-height canteen, several office floors and, at the top, the storeys for the patients’ rooms. On the far right: the horizontal façade articulation and, right at the top, the sawtooth roof above a void. The glass of the sawtooth roofs is oriented toward light from the north, while the south-oriented upright surfaces are equipped with collectors for a solar water heater. 1: 300 176-177

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Structure of the façade 1 Concrete-filled box beam. 2 Façade structure from outside to inside: enamelled glass, insulation, plasterboard for soundproofing, and interior finishing of white-coated steel plate. 3 Aluminium strut of the curtain wall. 4 Hung window. 5 Asymmetrically insulated glazing, structurally glued. 6 Blind. 7 Butt seams sealed with EPDM rubber.

Structure of the façade corner 1 Mastic on foam chord. 2 Insulated glazing. 3 View of the parapet. 4 Aluminium strut of the curtain wall. 5 Hung window. 6 Asymmetrically insulated glazing, structurally glued. 7 Butt seams sealed with EPDM rubber. 8 Façade structure: enamelled glass, insulation, plasterboard for soundproofing, and interior finishing of white-coated steel plating.

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Axonometrics of the construction of the floor package The heart is formed by the hollowcore slabs, 260 mm thick, which have been placed upon the steel construction with a gap of 600 mm between them. On the top surface, these have been joined by steel plates with a dovetail joint profile under which the main ducts of the various pipe and cabling systems are housed and between which the wiring to the various floor-pot contact points has been inserted. The entire system has been coveread with a concrete topping of 80 mm sand and cement, finished with a screed layer. The finishing of the underside consists of a fire-resistant layer and a cassette ceiling with sound insulation and a duct system for the climatization (built-in illumination), suspended at a distance of 300 mm. The secondary pipes and ducts are housed between the underside of the hollow core slabs and the metal cassette ceiling. The entire floor package, from ceiling to floor finishing, occupies a total thickness of 640 mm, around 300 mm less than floor packages in common, comparable projects. Within a building height of eight storeys, this leads to considerable savings.

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Fragment Three-dimensional drawing of the cascade stairs in the stabilizing central zone of the building. The stairs form a connecting element between the various storeys in both a physical and a social sense. In the case of fire occurring, firescreens descend automatically, separating the two staircase zones so that there is always a safe emergency exit available. The firescreens are integrated in the UNP profiles of the steel construction. The lighting of the staircase is also integrated into the stringers.

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Structure of the stairs and landing 1 Construction steel U-beam for fixing the stringers and landings; it also accommodates the firescreen. 2 Steel stringers, with lip and sunken socket-head screws fixed to the U-beam. 3 Stairs of the steel casing welded to the stringer and filled with reinforced concrete; self-levelling screed floor as finishing. 4 View of the shaft. 5 Balustrade of hardened and layered glass. 6 Stainless-steel hand rail.

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Structure of the façade and sawtooth roof 1 Concrete-filled box beam. 2 Hung window with asymmetrically insulated glazing, structurally glued. 3 Aluminium strut of the curtain wall. 4 Façade structure from outside to inside: enamelled glass, insulation, plasterboard for soundproofing, and interior finishing of white-coated steel plating. 5 Roof edge with plastisol cap. 6 Façade console with vertical slotted holes fixed to the edge of the concrete roof deck. 7 Rail of window-cleaning installation. 8 Roof structure: PVC roofing material, slope insulation, hollowcore slab with concrete topping for stability. 9 Climate ceiling suspended from C-band grids and equipped with soundproofing and absorbing material. 10 Hard, pressed insulation material on steel roof plates. 11 Construction box beams, sprinklers, cables and ducts in the slots of the steel roof plates; ceiling finishing of white-coated steel cassettes. 12 Solar water heater. 13 Vierendeel beam. 14 Ongoing overlapping lighting.

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client nl development the hague

The European Space Innovation Centre (ESIC) in Noordwijk provides an answer to the demand for affordable accommodation for start-up companies, supported by the nearby European Space Research & Technology Centre (ESTEC). The client wanted a robust and industrial yet elegantly designed building. Because it concerns a so-called business incubator, a sense of community, interaction and opportunities for meeting people play an important role. cepezed paid a great deal of attention to a design that is, on the one hand, as pure and simple as possible in structural terms, whilst also having a high-quality, innovative look. Once again, light, air and long sight lines are important ambitions. The design, construction, climate control and building performance aspects are largely integrated; to do this, the various advisers made intensive use of a three-dimensional Building Information Model (BIM). The building is organized with U-shaped floor slabs around an atrium in entirely transparent materials, which contains shared facilities and provides opportunities for meeting people and joint activities. The upper levels recede stepwise under a curved roof that faces south. To act as a heat buffer and slow down the drainage, it is covered in sedum, which also helps the volume fit in well with the surrounding grassland. The roof ends in a projecting gutter containing PV cells, which provides protection from the sun and also generates energy for a solar water heater. The transparent roof of the atrium is made of coldbent insulated glass. When the atrium heats up, a segmented greenhouse gauze sunblind is automatically lowered; the steel construction in the roof plane functions here as guiding rail. The cavity created enjoys natural ventilation from above. The installations are largely visible, but have the least possible optical load. Supply ducts provide fresh air. Via an acoustically muffled outflow in the edge beams of the steel construction, it can easily flow to the atrium. The installation equipment is located outside on an invisible, sunken installation patio at the top of the building volume. In order to implement the intermediate floors and the roof in the same way, they have all been realized as lightweight steel plate-concrete floors that fit in with the industrial character of the building. The curved roof is also simply built up from profiled steel sheeting covered with concrete. Via a water-carrying system close to the steel, all the floor areas, including the roof deck, are thermally activated. That turns the floor package into a climate ceiling. The façades are both horizontally and vertically articulated, and are completely flush. Horizontal strips of black-coated aluminium cover the floor edges and vertical strips of silver-colour-coated aluminium at the columns and curtain wall posts have sections that can be opened for natural ventilation. On the north side, the rainwater drainage is also integrated behind these strips. The invitingly positioned staircase in the centre has blind steps of elegantly modelled extruded aluminium.

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Floor plan at ground level The floor areas are folded in a U-shape around a centrally situated, transparently roofed-over atrium on the south side, which extends onto a wooden outdoor terrace. The transparent office zones lie on either side of the atrium. The stairs, made of extruded aluminium, are invitingly positioned immediately behind the entrance on the north side and are flanked by the lift, the sanitary units and the pantry. Floor plan of the first storey The floor areas, which are obstaclefree and can thus be given any required layout, on a grid pattern of 1800 mm, retreat step by step under the curved roof and, for this reason, are equipped with voids on the south side that contribute to the incidence of daylight, sightlines and orientation, as well as to spatial variation and experience.

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South elevation of the building At the bottom: the completely transparent plinth, the horizontally accentuated roof gutter cum zone with PV cells and, above those, the curved sedum roof with the transparent roofing of cold-bent insulated glass as the central feature.

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Lateral cross-section Two freely arrangeable office bays lie on either side of the transparently roofed-over, centrally situated atrium that is equipped with an inviting staircase and the corresponding circulation landings. The minimalist, industrially designed air conditioning system nestles under the floor edges.

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East elevation The façade is both horizontally and vertically articulated, is completely flush, and consists of large glass surfaces that are horizontally interrupted by strips of black-coated aluminium and vertical strips of silver-colour-coated aluminium with sections that can be opened. Longitudinal cross-section On the far right: the entrance to the ground floor on the north side, which issues directly onto the centrally situated and inviting staircase at the basis of the U-shaped floor plans. Above the entrance are two office zones and, to the left of the staircase, there is a view of the transparent freely arrangeable floor sections that are separated from the atrium.

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Fragment The cross-section shows the two office bays on the west side and the western part of the atrium. The floor sections, with a grid pattern of 1800 mm, can be laid out in any required configuration and are separated from the atrium by a transparent wall. The façade comprises a structure of glass and horizontally closed strips, while the vertically closed strips are situated at the positions of the columns and façade uprights. The air-conditioning is implemented via supply ducts attached by means of magnets to the curved composite steel decking and an acoustically muffled outflow to the atrium that is integrated in the edgebeams of the steel construction.

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Structure of the façade 1 Sandwich panel, inner sheet of blank, anodized and polished aluminium. 2 Silver-colour-coated aluminium fronting panel for the aesthetic ďŹ nishing of the sectional curtain wall. 3 Aluminium sectional curtain wall. 4 Handle of the part that opens. 5 Part that opens, insulated. 6 Mastic on foam chord. 6

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Structure of the façade corner 1 Closed façade strip with expansion panel. 2 Insulated glazing. 3 Closed façade strip with insulated rainwater draining behind. 4 Aluminium sectional curtain wall. 5 View of aluminium sectional curtain wall. 6 Concrete-filled box beam. 1:10

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Structure of façade and roof of the atrium 1 View of the box beam to the rear. 2 Hollow steel tube for mounting the glass wall. 3 Tie rod to prevent curvature of the hollow steel tube. 4 Hardened and layered glass. 5 Soundproofed air overflow in slot of sectional steel roof, attached by means of magnets. 6 Sectional steel roof with concrete core activation. 7 Roll blinds with mechanism integrated in curved roof beam. 8 Steel curved roof beam with broadened lower flange to support roof floor and to mount the glass wall of the atrium; tubular beams welded on for soundproofing of air outflow. 9 View of UNP beam, which also holds the roll blind. 10 Cold-bent insulated glazing. 11 Hot-rolled box beam with opening at the top for invisible connection to the UNP beam. 12 Sedum roof.

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Structure of the façade and roof of the atrium 1 UNP beam, also roller-blinds holder. 2 Hot-rolled box beam with opening at the top for invisible connection to the UNP beam. 3 Box beam with rubber bearing and clamping strip for glass mounting. 4 Curved steel joist with openings for air overflow and integrated mechanism for the roller blind. 5 Cold-bent insulated glazing. 6 Steel box beam with opening at the top for invisible connection to the UNP beam. 7 Rainwater drainage. 8 Water-resistant layer. 9 Steel fins, equipped with wooden plate material on both sides and by black-coated aluminium finishing underneath. 10 PV cells. 11 Gutter with welded-on rainwater drainage. 12 Electrically opened part for natural ventilation. 13 Curtain wall with insulated glazing.

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Structure of the atrium façade 1 View of hollow column to the rear. 2 Soundproofing air overflow in slot of sectional steel roof decking, attached by means of magnets. 3 End plate slot. 4 H-beam with broadened lower flange to support the floor and to mount the glass wall of the atrium; welded-on tubular beams for the soundproofing of the air overflow. 5 Composite decking with concrete core activation and finishing screed floor. 6 Diagonals welded together and bolted to the floor joist. 7 U-beam to clamp the glass. 8 Hardened and layered glass. 9 Steel box beam fixed to concretefilled hollow column. 10 Strip on steel box beam as stile for mastic-bonded single-pane glass. 11 Interior wall.

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introduction Axonometrics of the composite steel decking The profiled sectional steel plates with a slot height of 210 mm distribute their load to the edge-beams of the steel construction. At the core, these are equipped with welded-on rounded sections for the assembly of the acoustically muffled airoutflow cylinders, which are also attached to the ceiling by means of magnets. The slots are closed off with endplates at the extremities after which the profiled sectional steel plates were filled with concrete. Close to the steel, a watercarrying system that turns the floor package into a climate ceiling has been incorporated into the 70 mm screed floor. Bottom left: a fragment of the flexible air ducts for the air supply. To the right of this: a suspended gutter element with lighting. On the far right: an optional acoustic panel. All these elements have been fixed to the profiled sectional steel plates by means of magnets.

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Structure of the staircase and landing 1 Combined steel diagonal for the support of landing and to clamp the glass. 2 Composite decking with screed floor as finishing. 3 Compound stringer made of strip steel. 4 Aluminium stairs, mounted invisibly. 5 Balustrade of hardened and layered glass. 6 Stainless-steel hand rail.

Fragment of the heart of the building In the centre: the invitingly positioned staircase with blind steps of extruded aluminium fixed to the stringers. The regular floor surfaces have exactly the same structure as the curved roof deck and are made up of composite steel decking equipped with a water-carrying pipe system. The balustrade of the circulation space is wedged between the beam of the steel construction and a steel plate. Ducts for the outflow of air from the offices have been incorporated into the heart of the beams that run along the atrium. The curved atrium roof is built of cold-bent insulated glass. The loadbearing edge-beams of the roof also accommodate the winding mechanisms of the automatic sunblinds, which have been incorporated into UNP construction beams across the width of the atrium.

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client blom & moors design for public space ’s-hertogenbosch

When Prorail started a pilot to improve the quality of station furnishings and facilities, it consulted public space design bureau Blom & Moors, who developed a vision focused on travellers’ perception of their surroundings. For the design of components such as seating elements, litter bins, green space planning and a holder for free newspapers, the bureau collaborated with various designers. cepezed developed a waiting room, a kiosk selling drinks and snacks and a combined wind break and leaning element. The architects focused on transparent design and materialization with a chic look that attracts little attention. The lay-out elements have a modest yet natural presence and a minimalist structure with corresponding detailing. Modular design facilitates quick construction and allows for size variations. The footprints are matched to the dimensions of the platform tiles, which also contributes to visual harmony. The waiting rooms and kiosks belong to the same family and are organized in the same way. The kiosks are also working spaces, so they are insulated and provided with extra installation facilities. The main structure consists entirely of flush assembled glass without intermediate posts. At the bottom, the glass is secured to a modest, recessed supporting steel plinth, which also protects against knocks and facilitates cleaning the platform. Also for the protection of the glass, minimal bar-steel profiles have been included at the corners, sunk into the contours of the volume. The roof package consists of a lightweight prefabricated timber-frame construction and constitutes a plate that lends stability. The attaching lips that connect the glass and the roof are pre-glued to the glass panels in the factory, which helps with fast installation. The roof has a minimal height and incorporates acoustic facilities and cabling for the lighting and intercom. The ventilation grilles are situated above the doors. Because the elements can be located at covered and non-covered stations, they also include rainwater drainage, integrated in the doorposts. The combined wind break and leaning element consists of a stainless-steel frame with uprights, with a sit-support surface and a high doubleglazed panel clamped in between. The uprights do not reach higher than seat level and clamp the glass only at certain points in the height, so it appears to stand largely free in the space and is optically hardly present at all. The clamps used to attach the glass are designed in such a way that they complete the volume of the uprights precisely. The sit-supports consist of a clear unambiguous profile of pre-formed steel with welded end plates and are attached to the uprights with sunken Allen screws. The whole element stands on a steel footplate anchored to the ground with sunken panhead screws. The glass between both panels has an almost invisible dot pattern and an LED element has been incorporated low in the frame so that the glass surface can light up subtly in different colours.

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address ns station leiden centraal ns station amsterdam bijlmer arena

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station furnishing

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Longitudinal and lateral views There are two versions of the volumes: one with a non-insulated roof and implemented in single-pane glass for the waiting spaces, and one with an insulated roof and insulated glass for the station shops. The volumes consist of a construction ring at the top and the bottom, with connected glass panels in-between, without intermediate struts or columns. The top ring is formed by a prefab roof package whereas the bottom one consists of a stainlesssteel mounting that functions as a bearer and a finishing at the same time. The rainwater drainage and pipes have been incorporated into the struts of the door openings. The volumes have been composed entirely from prefabricated components in a very short time, with the attachment lips, for example, having already been glued to the glass in the factory. The glass at the top and the bottom bears a black, screenprinted strip to camouflage the attachment.

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Floor plan of the waiting space Access is gained through a revolving door or via sliding doors for the less able-bodied. The corners have been finished with a stainless-steel bumper integrated in the façade. 1: 100

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Structure of the façades 1 Concrete floor cast on foil and insulation. 2 Construction stainless-steel mounting with reinforcing ribs, grouting with non-shrink mortar. 3 Stainless-steel lip, pre-glued to the glass in the factory. 4 Black screen print at the adhesion points. 5 Wooden bar to support the stainless-steel finishing. 6 Single-pane glass, hardened and layered, structurally glued. 6 Insulated glazing, exterior pane hardened and layered, structurally glued. 7 Stainless-steel end check, and ceiling finishing. 8 Prefab roof element: lower and upper plywood sheet, with a softwood beam layout accommodating insulation material, lighting and loudspeakers. 9 Stainless-steel construction Z-beam with strip steel coupling plates at the butt seams of the roof elements.

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Structure of the faรงade corner and doors 1 Stainless-steel bumper sealed with black adhesive. 2 Single-pane glass, hardened and layered, glued structurally. 2 Insulated glazing, outer pane hardened and layered, glued structurally. 3 Black screen print at the points of adhesion with the doorpost to the rear. 4 Doorpost with integrated rainwater drainage, cables and ducts. 5 Aluminium sliding door frame, with single-pane glass. 5 Stainless-steel revolving door frame with single-pane glass and stainless-steel handle. 1: 10

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Structure of the doors 1 Concrete floor cast on foil and insulation. 2 Box beam door frame. 3 Stainless-steel revolving door frame with single-pane glass and stainless-steel handle. 3 Aluminium sliding door frame with single glazing. 4 Diagonal for attachment of grid. 5 Stainless-steel ventilation grid. 5 Stainless-steel grid with axial-flow fan. 6 Stainless-steel end check, and ceiling finishing. 7 Prefab roof element: lower and upper plywood sheet, with a softwood beam layout accommodating insulation material, lighting and loudspeakers. 8 Rainwater drainage behind, integrated in the doorpost. 9 Stainless-steel construction Z-beam with strip steel coupling plates at the butt seams of the roof elements.

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introduction Rear, side and aerial view of the sit-support element The glass plates are wedged between stainless-steel uprights and angle beads with sunken mountings between which LED illumination has been installed under the glass. To ensure that the LED lighting is effective, the glass has been given a screen-printed dot pattern. 1: 50

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Structure of the windbreak 1 Stainless-steel base plate ďŹ xed by means of sunken cross recessed pan head screws. 2 Sunken socket screws. 3 Rubber inlay. 4 Hardened and layered glass, equipped with dot pattern. 5 LED lighting under glass plate. 6 Sitting element of mounted stainless steel with welded-on end plate, ďŹ xed from the inside to stainlesssteel uprights by means of socket screws. 7 Stainless-steel strut bolted to the base plate.

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introduction Structure of the windbreak 1 Resin anchor socket in existing concrete oor. 2 Stainless-steel base plate with sunken cross recessed pan head screws. 3 Sunken socket screws. 4 LED lighting under glass plate. 5 Rubber inlay. 6 Hardened and layered glass, equipped with dot pattern. 7 Stainless-steel strut bolted to base plate. 8 Sitting element of mounted stainless steel with welded-on end plate.

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client pas reform hatchery technologies zeddam

Pas Reform is an international player in the field of hatchery technology. The company’s products include a large variety of components for hatchery machines. It produces these partly itself, and pays a great deal of attention to user-friendliness and a modest yet carefully fitted design. Based on these shared qualities, the company asked cepezed to design its new accommodation: it wanted a simple but smart building with impact on appearance and image. First, cepezed drew up a phased masterplan for the dual-orientation plot on an industrial estate. Directly afterwards, the bureau realized the first sub-plan, a large transfer and distribution hall. Phase two is an extension to the hall, combined with a metal workshop and tuition rooms, which is in preparation at the moment. For the third phase, a main structure is projected that will also facilitate the establishment of offices at the new location. The distribution hall has a very simple design and materialization, but is nonetheless extremely representative. The design is well thought-through and further developed down to the minutest detail using standard means. Judging by the nominations of the project for various respected architecture awards, the level achieved has not gone unnoticed. The construction of the elongated rectangular hall consists of slender steel columns of only 200 × 200 mm with lattice trusses with large spans in between and a minimal attachment at certain points. The column grid matches the dimensions of standard pallet racks. The foremost section of the space is entirely column-free to allow lorries to manoeuvre. The façades consist largely of insulated interior boxes and an exterior finish of simple profiled sheeting with a black coating. The corners have been welded with mitre joints, making corner strips superfluous and yielding an immaculate appearance. For a pleasant incidence of light and a good outlook, the front and rear façades have been equipped with a high glass strip at the top and bottom respectively, with strong horizontal articulation like the rest of the façades. Close attention has been paid to the façade apertures. The overhead and cargo doors are clad with the same profiled sheeting as the façade; this small investment has a big effect on how the building is experienced. Furthermore, when closed they align perfectly with the rest of the façade. The same is true of a high pivoted door that matches the scale of the building, and where the profile cladding is perforated. The door marks the entrance to the building and also doubles as a fence, sunshade and wind break for the two-storey boxwithin-a-box volume situated directly behind, which contains office space, canteen and sanitary facilities. This also has slender and pure materialization and detailing, including a floor package of perforated sectional roof slab equipped with a floating deck floor with underfloor heating. The air extraction unit and acoustic insulation material have been incorporated into the modest floor height. The lighting armatures are sunk into the grooves of the sectional steel plates. In the rest of the hall, the lighting is tightly aligned to create a calm image.

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address informaticaweg 14 doetinchem

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pas reform

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Floor plan The building consists of a high, elongated and octagonal volume with a minimal, lightweight and prefab steel construction. It has a skin of insulated interior boxes with an exterior finishing of black sectional steel plate: for a pleasant incidence of light, the front and rear façades have been equipped with a high glass strip at the top and the bottom respectively, along the full width of the premises. The front façade accommodates a pivoted entrance door, two overhead doors and four cargo doors, which have all been materialized in the same sectional steel plate as the rest of the façade. When closed, the façade and the doors are perfectly aligned, so that a single optically uninterrupted image is generated. A cargo trench has been sunk in the articulated front court. The south-east corner of the building (bottom left) houses a two-level volume measuring around six by six metres, and contains the office, the canteen, and the prefab toilets and showers. The frontmost 25 metres of the building are completely free of columns, which allows the trucks sufficient room to manoeuvre. The racks with components are situated just behind the free zone. The concrete floor of the hall contains underfloor heating that is connected to a geothermal heating installation, and was completely cast and finished in a single day after the hall had been erected.

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Front elevation At the top: the high glass strip running across the entire width of the premises with, underneath, the façade finishing of black sectional steel plate. For razor-sharp detailing, the corners of this have been welded with mitre joints. The swing door, overhead doors and cargo doors are also made of sectional steel plate and, when closed, align perfectly with the rest of the façade, which generates a tranquil and smooth image. The logo lettering has been applied to the sectional steel plate in sticker form.

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4 Rear view This façade has no openings. The proportion of transparent and open is the same as that at the front, but with the glass placed in the lower part this time.

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Lateral cross-section Planar trusses in the roof zone enable a large span with a minimum of columns. The high racks are shown below.

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Longitudinal cross-section Directly under the roof, large planar trusses enable a large span with a minimum number of columns. The racks are situated between the columns. Far left: the two-level volume with the office, utilities and staff area and the swing entrance door made of profiled sectional steel. The first two grid fields are totally column-free to allow an optimum amount of manoeuvring space for trucks.

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Fragment of the office zone The façade consists of interior boxes built of insulating material resting on the steel construction, finished on the exterior with black-coated sectional steel plates. The upper façade zone consists of three strips of completely transparent insulated glass. Access to both the hall and the office takes place via the swing door whose sectional steel plating is perforated so that the door also functions as a windscreen and sunbreaker for the inner volume. The floor and ceiling are made of perforated sectional steel plates in which the air extraction unit, acoustic insulation material and the lighting have been incorporated between the slots. 1: 50

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Façade fragments On the left: the front façade with, at the top, a zone of completely transparent glass whose plates have been wedged horizontally by means of a strip and whose vertical butt seams are kitted. Underneath, the insulated interior boxes with an exterior finishing of black sectional steel. Also visible are the rail and tension cable of the overhead door, which has been materialized in black sectional steel plate and is completely in line with the rest of the surface when in closed position. The minimally dimensioned columns are bolted to the concrete foundation. The concrete floor area of more than 4,500 m2 was cast and finished without expansion joints in a single day. On the right: the rear façade of the building in which the proportion of transparent and closed is identical to that displayed at the front, but this time inverted. Drainage takes place via gravel basin and a drain along the façade.

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introduction Structure of overhead door and swing door 1 Overhead door equipped with profiled steel plating; flush with the façade when closed. 2 Galvanized runner for the overhead door. 3 I-beam column. 4 Steel inner boxes, filled with insulation and fixed to columns. 5 Omega attachment beams on steel inner boxes. 6 Black-coated façade sectional plates. 7 Swing door of steel frame with perforated profile plating; flush with the façade when closed. 8 Extended doormat. 9 Aluminium frame and door with insulated glazing.

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Structure of the corners Prefab corner of sectional steel plate 1 H-beam column with welded-on steel plating. 2 Steel inner boxes, filled with insulation and fixed to columns. 3 Omega mounting profiles on steel inner boxes. 4 Black-coated façade sectional plates. 5 Steel façade strut.

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Corner seam of glass with steel plate 6 Box beam with steel mounting at the end to fix vertical glass façade beam. 7 Resol foam applied to mounting. 8 Insulated glazing.

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Axonometrics of the floor system The system has been applied in the inner volume with the office, canteen, prefab sanitary units and the changing room. The floor consists of perforated sectional steel plates in which the air extraction unit, acoustic insulation material and the lighting have been incorporated between the slots. The plates have been covered by board, insulation and foil upon which a screed floor with underfloor heating has been laid. This floor also contains floor pots for connection to data and electricity cables. The floor package is borne and bordered by I-beams connected to steel hollow columns.

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Structure of the façade and floor 1 View of hollow steel column. 2 Sendzimir-galvanized U-beam marking the beginning of the perforated composite floor. 3 I-beam as edging beam. 4 Screed floor with underfloor heating and transparent topping. 5 Insulation on plate material. 6 Perforated sectional steel floor with insulation and integrated air exhaust and lighting. 7 Insulated U-beam on I-beam to fix aluminium frame. 8 Aluminium frame. 9 Insulated glazing.

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client helmond town council helmond

In December 2011, the renowned theatre ’t Speelhuis in Helmond, designed by Piet Blom, burned down. The town council opted for a temporary replacement in the Our Lady of the Assumption, a neo-Byzantine domed church near the town centre, which had become disused and was being withdrawn from service. There were three important preconditions for the new theatre facility. The church is a monument, it remains the property of the ’s-Hertogenbosch diocese and the facility is temporary, so interventions must damage the building as little as possible and must be reversible. The theatre also had to be operational very quickly. Due to its location in a residential area and the traffic stream that would be generated by the new function, the main entrance could not be used as such anymore; the approach to the church theatre takes place mainly from the rear. Originally the council was planning to locate functions such as the foyer and dressing rooms in an adjacent school. As an alternative, cepezed suggested situating most of the supporting programme components in compact and contrasting extensions directly next to the church, so that the whole theatre could function autonomously. A structural element with goods delivery area, artist dressing rooms and greenroom occupies a two-storey new-build volume on the southeast side near the apse. The double-height delivery volume is linked to the church via a passageway in the sacristy. The extension with the entrance, box office, cloakroom and toilets is situated on the north side against a side aisle, has a completely transparent frontage, is equipped with roof lighting and is linked to the church via a passageway at the spot of a former confessional. At the spots of the other confessionals, unobtrusive passages have been realized that function as emergency exits. The space inside the church itself contains the theatre auditorium and the foyer, where the physical appearance of the original building dominates. The experience of the church with its rich ornamentation is as fully a part of the ambiance as possible. The auditorium has a good view of the wall and ceiling paintings, various sculptures, the dome, the organ and the stained-glass windows. All the additions, such as the stage, the stage front, the lighting bridge and the stand and balcony have been inserted as loose removable objects, and that is completely discernible. The large stand is founded on footings and secured locally to the brickwork of the original building using U sections for stability. To create an intimate atmosphere, the stand in the complicated and imposing steel structure reaches close to the stage without structural provisions in the front section. The stairs system is suspended from the projecting footbridge on the balcony. The logistics of moving on the stand element is extremely intuitive and all the seats can be reached in a natural way from both the front and the rear. Like part of the acoustic muffling, the lighting for the circulation routes is integrated in the banisters, which also have a structural function. The foyer is situated under the stand, with the box office in a recess that can be closed to create a sonically sealed work area for the staff.

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address kromme steenweg 29 helmond

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Floor plan of ground level The stage area has been situated in the choir with an extension to the crossing. The transept houses the wings of the stage with the fly-system operating unit and a light bridge parallel to the front of the stage. The bar is situated in the narthex. Directly adjoining this, in the nave under the seats, is the foyer area with the stairway to the auditorium balcony. Outside, connecting to the apse and the sacristy, there is a double-height newbuild volume for the dispatch section and artists’ facilities such as dressing rooms and sanitary units. Against the north church wall, a single-storey, second newbuild volume that houses the entrance, cloakroom and toilets is equipped with skylights and connects to the church at the site of the former confession booths. Floor plan of the upper storeys In the church: the ascending field with seats and a location for the technical units. The artists’ foyer is situated in the space reserved for artists’ facilities.

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Elevations and cross-sections Above: the north side elevation with the horizontally articulated newbuild volumes bordering the apse/sacristy and the northern aisle respectively. Adjoining: the front elevation with, on the left, the newbuild block for the entrance, cloakroom and sanitary facilities. In the middle of the page: the longitudinal and lateral cross-sections. At the bottom: the rear view with broad newbuild volumes and a lateral cross-section at the position of the stage wall.

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introduction Longitudinal cross-section of the church theatre The stage with raised y beams in the choir. The stage front with panels to operate the y beams in the crossing, directly under the dome. The light bridge on the other side of the crossing. The gallery with the seats begins in the nave, immediately under the heart of the dome. This extends and rises toward the narthex, and also boasts a sitting gallery, under which the foyer and bar in the narthex are located. The leaded glass windows of the former church are both functional and aesthetic. They are blinded to ensure a completely dark theatre auditorium, but always have illumination between the blinds and the window. In the apse of the church, the blinds have been installed on the inside so that the illuminated windows can radiate outward and are functional for the recognizability and attractiveness of the church theatre from the street and the car parking facilities. In the nave, parallel to the gallery and the balcony, the blinds have been placed on the outside so that the illuminated windows radiate inward and thus form a part of the auditorium lighting and contribute to exceptional features of the theatre location.

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introduction Axonometrics of the steel construction of the sitting gallery The entire construction rests upon piers embedded in the church oor and, to enhance stability, is ďŹ xed to the separating columns of the nave, which otherwise remain totally intact. The balcony and the staircase to the rear are suspended on either side from two centrally positioned hollow steel columns. The landings of the staircases are linked by tie bars. The I-beams of the main sitting area have been reinforced by cross connections. By means of adapted plates, wooden beams have been mounted on the steel construction, upon which wooden plate material, oor covering and chairs have been installed. The balustrades are covered with grey Ferrari Batyline fabric.

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Structure of the gallery 1 Steel box beam. 2 Perforated acoustic panels on wooden framework. 3 Black-sealed mineral wool to improve the acoustics. 4 HEA-beam with welded plate. 5 Steel stability console around existing column. 6 Two layers of plywood on wooden beam construction, finished with project carpet. 7 Balustrade of fibreglass-reinforced gauze, Ferrari Batyline, spanned by means of tension springs. 8 Stainless-steel hand rail with LED lighting. 9 Coated strip steel as balustrade finishing. 1: 10

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introduction Structure trap en tribune 1 Steel box beam 2 HEA-beam with welded plates. 3 HEA-beam welded-on H-beams to attach the wooden frame construction. 4 Two layers of plywood on wooden beam construction, finished with project carpet. 5 Black-sealed mineral wool to improve the acoustics. 6 Perforated acoustic panels on wooden frame. 7 Balustrade of fibreglass-reinforced gauze, Ferrari Batyline, spanned by means of tension springs. 8 Stainless-steel hand rail with LED lighting. 9 Coated strip steel as balustrade finishing. 10 Tie bar for the suspension of landing from trussed joist above. 11 Construction trussed joist embedded in balustrade.

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client confidential

For the owner of an expansive, rocky and sloping domain in North Spain, cepezed designed a finca rústica or country house. On the terrain there are a number of basaltic terrace floors with the ruins of a two-storey building and accompanying shed. Regulations stipulate that new-build may only be realized in characteristic local style, with the incorporation of existing remains. cepezed dealt with these limitations in a creative way and achieved an intriguing result. The country house consists of two building volumes, positioned roughly on the former locations of the ruins. As a result, they are not only some distance apart, but also at different heights; the main building is situated somewhat lower than the volume containing the guest quarters, the garage, storage space and technical area. The two parts are connected by a scenic stone strip of stairs and represent a striking combination of traditionalism and modernity. The main accommodation is built entirely with concrete walls and emanates modern quality and comfort. The interior is the ultimate in contemporary design with a modern kitchen, cleanly-detailed built-in units, stairs and landing made entirely of glass and an opal glass bathroom. However, to achieve the required regional appearance, the houses exterior is clad with local calcareous stones, including material from the old ruin. The property also has a traditional pitched roof with the same gradient as the ruin. The front elevation displays a robust combination of modern design and traditional composition. The thermal façade is set a little back from the edge of the volume and to provide an expansive view over the surroundings is entirely made of glass. To intensify the spatial experience, it has a broad glass border round a portal with sliding doors. The border has no frame; its means of attachment is concealed in the floor and wall slabs. On the first floor, a shallow, transparent balcony has been installed in front of the glass façade with an identical banister that obstructs the outlook as little as possible. At some distance in front of the thermal façade, there is a screen of perforated CorTen steel panels that can be opened gradually and in segments; it fits in well with the colours of the landscape and the stone façades. When closed, it is flush with the surface of the building contour. The panels are more than 6 m in height and are suspended from an overhead rail with only a guide rail below and a gutter for the drainage of rusty water. Each panel can be rotated and in spite of the weight, is easy to push away with one hand. The screen functions as protection against sun and wind, provides privacy and also protects against burglary when closed and secured. The window elements in the other façades are equipped with sun shutters that can be opened. They are also realized in perforated CorTen and close attention has been paid to the balance between the open and closed positions. The entire concrete volume, including the guest quarters, has been partially buried in the slope of the hill; as a result, the roof also forms the terrace of the adjacent swimming pool. Here, too, the front elevation is transparent with perforated CorTen steel in front.

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address garroxta catalonia spain

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Floor plan at ground level The main accommodation contains the living room with the sitting area, the dining table, kitchen, toilet and a workplace. Around these, the volume provides a terrace of natural stone. The walls of the house are entirely made of concrete that is clad with locally acquired stone, including material from the old ruin. For the oor foundation, the block has been internally equipped with a steel construction. Floor plan of the ďŹ rst storey The main accommodation contains three bedrooms, each of which has its own sanitary facilities. The volume on the hill contains the guest accommodation, garage and the technical services unit. This volume is largely sunken; the roof also forms the terrace of the adjoining swimming pool.

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introduction View from the west Bottom right: the main accommodation bearing a classical saddleback roof at the same angle of inclination as that of the old ruin, and CorTen steel screens in front of the windows. Left: on the hill, the sunken volume with guest accommodation, garage and the technical services unit of which the roof functions as the terrace of the adjoining swimming pool. This volume, too, is equipped with a CorTen steel frontage that resists the heat and also gives an agreeable aesthetic appearance.

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Cross-section through the east side Left: the main accommodation at the bottom of the hill, with the rotatable and sliding CorTen steel slats at the front. On the terrace above the guest accommodation, a detached movable awning has been installed to combat the sunshine,. On the far right: a constellation of solar cells next to the swimming pool to heat up the water.

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Fragment Above: the saddleback roof with frame construction. Far right: the CorTen steel façade of rotatable and sliding panels. At the bottom, these slide along a rail sunken in the terrace and, at the top, they slide along a rail in the construction. Between the panels and the thermal façade, which is made entirely of glass, there is the glass and steel balcony on the first floor. The first floor is supported by the internal steel construction. Underfloor heating is embedded in the screed floors. 1: 50

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introduction Positions of the slats Various positions of the CorTen steel front of the main accommodation. In the upper drawing, the rotatable and sliding slats are completely closed and are then in perfect alignment with the surface of the perforated steel panels along the edges of the façade and the fronton of the saddleback roof. The image underneath shows the panels turned at right angles to the façade surface, but not moved in relation to their point of departure when closed. The third drawing displays them perpendicular to the façade surface and collectively shifted to the centre of the façade. In the last drawing, they are again perpendicular to the façade; three panels have been eased to the left flank and three to the right.

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Structure of the balcony and second-skin façade (horizontal) 1 Basalt tiles on composite sandcement screed floor with underfloor heating. 2 Basalt tiles in cement as terrace finishing. 3 Aluminium sliding front with insulated glazing and steel auxiliary construction. 4 Steel single flange beam. 5 Prefab concrete beam and pot floor with composite sand-cement screed floor and underfloor heating, white epoxy topping as finishing. 6 Aluminium cover plate on insulated steel C-beam. 7 Strip steel console and balustrade strut. 8 Balcony floor of clear layered glass with neoprene roller bearing. 9 Rotatable and sliding panels of perforated CorTen steel. 10 Console of CorTen steel panels. 11 Wood-spar roof, finished with plastered gypsum board, on wooden battens. 12 Multi-folded (‘felsed’) roof covering of double-sided pre-oxidized copper plate on a ventilated roof construction. 1: 10

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Structure of the second-skin façade (vertical) 1 Interior wall of concrete with an exterior ďŹ nishing of cement-laid natural stone from own property. 2 Steel U-beam embedded in the wall. 3 Perforated CorTen steel panels. 4 Compound CorTen steel sections. 5 Aluminium sliding front with insulated glazing and steel auxiliary construction. 6 Rotatable and sliding panels of perforated CorTen steel. 7 Locking pin of the panels.

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the office office of technological determinism. The designers are much more concerned with developing total solutions to complex problems. The specific design assignment, along with the given circumstances, always remains the point of departure. Functionality, regulations, programme of requirements, budget, location and the technical possibilities all play a role here. Averse to any over-exuberant form language, cepezed pays great attention to pleasant and possibly changing use; in this context, technology is merely an important aid. In the urge to continue to surprise itself as well as its clients, cepezed has raised the bar pretty high. Although the architects have much experience and routine and the projects display great stylistic recognizability, the designs produced are never standard. Time and again, all aspects of the design and building process are approached with optimum care and attention. In this context, the conceptual framework is just as important as the accurate elaboration at detailed level. cepezed is thus a generalist design office par excellence. At the beginning of 2005, former project leader Ronald Schleurholts became a partner and a member of the Board. Schleurholts soon acquired a growing reputation within the sector and, in 2009, he was pronounced one of the most influential European architects under forty years of age. At the end of 2008, Michiel Cohen retired from the firm. In the subsequent period, despite the credit crisis and defying the general economic malaise within the sector, cepezed continued to expand, by around 25%. At present, the office has around forty members of staff, the majority of whom are highly educated architects who implement and supervise the whole trajectory from draft design to building preparation and operations management. The traditional dividing line between the architect and the draughtsman does not exist at cepezed. The architects produce the drawings themselves and are engaged with the current project right down to the smallest details. In doing so, they frequently collaborate in early stages of the process with experts from other disciplines, such as material, installation, construction and production specialists. cepezed is a horizontally organized, open, flexible and highly automated company with short lines of communication. As a consequence, the project teams can operate as purposefully and efficiently as possible.

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cepezed took its first steps on the road to renown in 1973. Coming architects Jan Pesman and Rob Zee were in their third year of study at Delft University of Technology, and wanted to get to work as quickly as possible. Teacher Hein Hoogerwerf furnished them with an assignment and coupled them to Michiel Cohen, who was already working as an independent architect. Cohen had a great preference for industrial construction. The first few years represented a period of learning, testing and reflecting. Pesman, too, had a leaning toward industrial production technology and, in a lengthy series of smallscale projects such as renovations of and extensions to houses and shops, the partners devoted much attention to the systematics of size and standardization. However, these turned out to be too advanced within the then conservative world of construction. Nevertheless, these attempts lay at the basis of the development of a completely individual design method, and a critical scrutiny of the building process. In 1982 – Zee had already left the office by this time – cepezed publicly announced its stance when Pesman introduced a new discipline in the Items magazine: the Industrial Architect. The Industrial Architect works at the interface of architecture and industrial design. This being the case, his focus is twofold and directed toward the processes of designing and building. In addition, the Industrial Architect develops building components for the businesses that supply the construction industry. In that same year, Cohen and Pesman attracted attention with their design for a lightweight, affordable and quickly mountable modular house for the social sector. It was the first project in which cepezed’s fundamental ideas about building and building methods were combined. In the subsequent decades, the office grew consistently, both in the breadth and in the scale of the projects undertaken. Partly due to its plan-oriented approach and its great attention for the way in which buildings are realized, cepezed evolved into an idiosyncratic and striking architectural firm. The ideas that were developed in the early years were now copiously translated into realizations. This led to the situation that the office even took full charge of the implementation of some projects. cepezed was also at the origin of building-technical innovations such as the development of sandwich panels, the energy-based, climatological application of atriums, and the architectonic integration of constructions and installations, which have all been emulated. Regardless of how important technology might be in the architecture of cepezed, one cannot accuse the

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staff partners ir. Jan Pesman (Utrecht, 1951) studied architecture at the University of Technology in Delft, where he established the cepezed architectural office in 1973. In 1971 he had been one of the founders of Utopia, a magazine for scientific amusement, with which he remained associated as an editor and designer until 1977. Pesman was also a co-founder of the still-existent design magazine Items, and was an editor there in the period 1983-92. During the 1994-95 academic year, Pesman was a professor at the Rotterdam Academy of Architecture. Since 2010, he has been the chairman of the construction section of the Royal Institute of Engineers in the Netherlands, KIVI-NIRIA. Besides his many activities as an architect and spatial designer, he also gives lectures at home and abroad and regularly has a seat in various juries.

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Ronald Schleurholts (Roden, 1972) studied architecture at Delft University of Technology, focussing on architecture, construction methods and interior layout. During his study, he worked for the architectural offices of Claus and Kaan and Koen van Velsen. Since 1999 he has been working for cepezed, where he became a partner and co-director in 2005. Since November 2008, Schleurholts has been a member of the board of the Stichting Integraal Werkende Architecten, IWA (Integrally Working Architects Foundation), which was co-founded by cepezed. In 2009, the European Centre for Architecture, Art, Design and Urban Studies and the Chicago Athenaeum elected him as one of Europe’s most prominent and promising designers under forty years of age. Since 2010, Schleurholts has also been a board member of the Royal Institute of Dutch Architects (BNA), and since 2011 of the Living Daylights Foundation. Additionally, he regularly gives lectures on sustainable and integral design both at home and abroad.

Michiel Cohen (Haarlem, 1946) studied architecture at Delft University of Technology but abandoned this study prematurely to set himself up as an independent architect. In 1973, he was one of the founders of cepezed architects, and importantly contributed to the office’s industrial approach for decades. After cepezed had been awarded the BNA Kubus, the highest honour issued by the Association of Dutch Architects, he withdrew from the office in 2009 to devote more attention to other activities.

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Robert Adema Marja van Adrichem-Zwinkels Debby Alferink Frederique van Alphen Tamara van Amstel Berry van Andel Carlos Apers Irma Arends Monique Ax Pim Baas Roel van Bakel Dick Bakker Robin Bakker Sandra Bakvis Cheryl Baty Monique van den Berg Iwert Bernakiewicz Tom Berkhout Ostara Bes Caroline Bijvoet Tanja Bitzer Roel Bleumink Paul Blonk Jaap Bosch Astrid Bonekamp John Bos Joke Boxmeer Corinne van den Brakel René van den Bulk Willem van de Burg Michiel Burgerhout Petra van de Burgh Nico Buwalda Carles Cabratosa Klaas Cammelbeeck Antonio Cannavacciulo Angel Cerezo Peter Compagne Hans Cool Joanna Coste Lars Courage Vernon Daal Maren Dannien Don van Dasler Christian van Dee Jaap van Dijk Sandra Dijkstra G. Dogan Kiki van Dop Caroline Drukker Thomas Durisch Stefan Duivestein Florian Eckardt Phillip Edwards Edwin van Eeckhoven Delano van den Ende Jos Eras Florentien van Es Patrick Esveld Olga Fiodorova Erwin Fraikin Jan Willem Fransen Escarlata Fuster Duran Joost Glissenaar Steven Goeman Diana van der Gaag Michael van der Gaag

Hugh Geoghegan Rick Gerards Farzaneh Ghorishi Robert Grapentin Remco de Haan Lisa Haenitsch Mark Hanegraaf Kasper Hauschultz Hansen Patricia Haring Mike Heemrood Charlotte van Heesbeen Harry van Heeswijk Joost Heijnis Jeroen Hendriks Marco Henssen Job van den Heuvel Peter van den Heuvel René Hiemstra Olaf Hitz Bart van Hoek Ben Hoek René Hoek Tineke van de Hoek Rob Hoogendijk Birgit Hopff Willem Hoppenbrouwers Stephan van der Horst Jan Houtekamer Ronald van Houten Bas van der Horst Artsje Hylkema Taco van Iersel Miranda IJsselstein Esthel Janssen Marion Janssen Sven Jaspers Linda Jonker Marc Joubert Rogier Kant Ron Keesom Judith de Keijzer Albertien Kers Mark van Kessel Tim Kettler Daniëlle Keukenmeester Glenn King Erwin Kleinsman Christina Kny Simone Koenders Willem Kok Robbert Koole Jeroen Koomen Ferdi Koornneef Marisa Korteland Ricarda Koschany Carlijn Kramer Ansgar Krupp Wouter Kuiper Anne Kuipers Lonneke Kuysten Fiona van der Laan Feike Laane Marion Lamens-Massar Greet Lammerts van Bueren-Zijlstra Anette Lampe Tonko Leemhuis Joris de Leeuw Mieke van Leeuwen L. Lenders Bart van Lieshout

Daam van der Leij Peter Limpens S. van der Linde Thomas Lohse Ankie Loor Anna Lopriore Anja Lubke M. Lukkassen Frank Maas Maria del Mar Carrascal-Uño Thomas Marschall Pim Marsman Gera Martijn René van der Maten Pieter Melis Eugène Meulemans Walter Michels Ruben Molendijk Nazanin Mossafaian Tom Mossel Sander Nelissen Dennis Niemeijer Regina Nieuwenhuijsen Joke Nowee-van der Mast Catelijne Nuysink Paul Oehlers Det van Oers Mandy Olsthoorn Fahrid Omidi Jochem Paauwe Ina Pesman-de Graaff Tom Pesman Roeland-Jan Pijper Johan Pijpstra Lia van der Ploeg Jeen Pot Björn Prins Dolores Puiqantel Dick Purmer Nikele van de Putten Marije Raap Vanessa Ramdin Rob Reintjes René Rijkers Frans Rooijakkers Menno Rubbens

Mia van Spronsen Sebastiaan Steinbach René Straaijer Robbert van de Straat Hugo Stevens Kris Swagers Jolante Sweers Saskia Tan Désirée Tans Suzanne Tersteeg Bert Theunissen Tjeerd Tiersma Corina Timmer-Van der Heide Mirko Todorovic´ Martin van Toorn Anja Traffas Jelle van der Veen Sander Veenstra Roos Venema Tys Verburg Michiel Verrijn Stuart Jan-Willem Visscher Maarten van Vliet Ron van der Vliet Lisette Vollmer Mark Vossen P. Vuijk Manfred Wansink Rosemarijne van der Weide Ameike Weijers Mark Wieringa Maarten Willems Robert Winkel Sebastian Winkler Hans Witte Léon van Woerkom Christiaan de Wolf Menno van der Woude Jeroen Wouters Paul Zandstra Rob Zee Jolanda Zwetsloot

Raymond van Sabben Vincent van Sabben Karen van ’t Sant Irold van der Sar Rik Schijf Sandra Schijf Robert Schipper Hans Schlotter Ludo Schoone Britta Schott Sandra Schuster Ben Schweers Eva Setyabudi Paddy Sieuwerts Amar Sjauw en Wa Trudy Slingerland Owen Slootweg Ron van Sluys Simon Smaczny Jeroen Smit Guy Speelman Edwin Spoor Chris Spierings information

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cooperation race planet client: sunnergy innoplan, rotterdam consultant stability: eccs, hoofddorp consultant installation techniques: croon, rotterdam main contractor: j.p. van eesteren, barendrecht steel construction: vianen steel construction, vianen porsche zentrum client: dr. ing. h.c.f. porsche ag, stuttgart consultant stability: leonardt andrä & partner, stuttgart main contractor: kilian & hagmann, stuttgart wholesale in wheels client: langerak wheels, utrecht consultant stability: van der vorm engineering, delft consultant installation techniques: andriessen installations, houten main contractor: bouwteam general contractors, delft steel construction: vianen steel construction, vianen façades: hermans-astrawall, tienen

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textile museum client: tilburg municipality, tilburg consultant stability: abt, velp consultant installation techniques: sweegers en de bruijn, ’s-hertogenbosch consultant construction physics: cauberg huygen, ’s-hertogenbosch main contractor: bvr bouw, breda steel construction: smulders steel works, helmond & brs group, moerkapelle façades: brs group, moerkapelle westraven client: government buildings agency, the hague consultant stability: abt, velp consultant installation techniques: grontmij technical management, amersfoort consultant construction physics: dgmr consultatory engineers, arnhem main contractor: construction combination westraven steel construction: nagelhout bakhuizen, bakhuizen façades: aks, grubbenvorst / oskomera, deurne / polyned, steenwijk jinso pavilion client: sojin holding, amsterdam

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consultant stability: dhv, rotterdam consultant installation techniques: putman installations, noordwijk & mobius consult, delft consultant construction physics: mobius consult, delft main contractor: bouwteam general contractors, delft steel construction: meijers groep, serooskerke façades: brs group, moerkapelle grote markt sint-niklaas client: dexia bank, brussel consultant stability: derveaux engineers, gent consultant installation techniques: arcadis gedas, antwerpen-berchem main contractor: cordeel, temse embassy in rome client: ministry of foreign affairs, the hague consultant stability: dhv, the hague consultant installation techniques: mark blankestijn i.c.w. de blaay van den boogaard, rotterdam main contractor: alba costruzioni, marino steel construction: metalmontaggi, perugia the outlook client: schiphol real estate, schiphol consultant stability: dhv, the hague consultant installation techniques: dhv, the hague consultant construction physics: peutz, zoetermeer main contractor: construction combination j.p. van eesteren, barendrecht & voormolen bouw, rotterdam steel construction: smulders-duscon, bladel façades: scheldebouw, middelburg chdr II client: centre for human drug research, leiden consultant stability: smitwesterman engineers, gouda consultant installation techniques: deerns, rijswijk consultant construction physics: dgmr consultatory engineers, arnhem main contractor: duprie construction and development, leiden steel construction: oskomera, deurne façades: oskomera, deurne esic client: nl development, noordwijk


consultant stability: smitwesterman engineers, gouda consultant installation techniques: arup, amsterdam consultant construction physics: arup, amsterdam main contractor: bouwteam general contractors, delft steel construction: kpk steel, winterswijk façades: vebru, schiedam station furnishing client: blom & moors public space design, ’s-hertogenbosch consultant stability: smitwesterman engineers, gouda main contractor: jan kuipers, nunspeet pas reform client: pas reform hatchery technologies, zeddam consultant stability: uniq consultancy, hattem consultant installation techniques: uniq consultancy, hattem main contractor: bouwteam general contractors, delft steel construction: kpk steel, winterswijk façades: dijkema, doetinchem theatre speelhuis client: helmond municipality, helmond consultant stability: smitwersterman engineers, gouda consultant installation techniques: linssen engineers, amsterdam consultant construction physics: scena, uden main contractor: hurks, eindhoven steel construction: verbruggen smithy, mierlo

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finca rústica client: confidential consultant stability: imd, rotterdam consultant installation techniques: mobius consult, delft consultant construction physics: mobius consult, delft main contractor: constresp, castellfollit de la roca steel construction: cabratosa, gerona

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books cepezed architecten – architects 1993 60 pages dutch-english editions: isbn 90 6450 171 8 catalogue the work of cepezed 2006 248 pages dutch edition: isbn 90 6450 606 x english edition: isbn 90 6450 595 0 prototypes the work of cepezed 2007 264 pages dutch edition: isbn 978 90 6450 613 0 english edition: isbn 978 90 6450 533 1 westraven ofďŹ cebuilding for rijkswaterstaat 2007 184 pages dutch edition: isbn 978 90 6450 660 4 english edition: isbn 978 90 6450 659 8 catalogue 2 the work of cepezed 2008 (dutch edition) 2009 (english edition) 252 pages dutch edition: isbn 978 90 813792 1 2 english edition: isbn 978 90 813792 2 9

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catalogue 3 the work of cepezed 2012 296 pages dutch edition: isbn 978 90 6450 778 6 english edition: isbn 978 90 6450 777 9

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credits texts architectenbureau cepezed bv: jeroen hendriks, willem kok image documentation and drawings architectenbureau cepezed bv: willem kok photography architectenbureau cepezed bv: 16, 133, 167, 189, 197, 258, 263, 264, 268-269 gerlo beernink: 206, 212-213, 246 fas keuzenkamp: 10, 15, 19, 20, 24-25, 28-29, 32-33, 34, 46-47, 50, 54-55, 114-115, 116, 120-121, 124-125, 126, 130-131, 136, 140-141, 142, 146-147, 222, 228-229, 232, 236, 238-239 luuk kramer: 162, 172-173, 178-179 jannes linders: 39, 42-43, 62-63,66-67, 70,74-75, 78-79, 83, 86, 90, 93, 96-97, 108-109, 110, 156-157, 180, 184-185, 186, 192-193, 200-201, 204-205, 220-221, 240, 248-249, 251, 252-253, 256-257 harold pereira: 160-161 henk schuurmans: 98, 105 image processing marc gijzen translation christine gardner, rotterdam george hall, groningen design reynoud homan, muiderberg i.c.w. robbert zweegman, malden printed by drukkerij mart.spruijt bv, amsterdam Š 2013 architectenbureau cepezed bv, delft nai010 uitgevers, rotterdam

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isbn 978 94 6208 060 7 dutch edition isbn 978 94 6208 061 4 english edition

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architectenbureau cepezed bv phoenixstraat 60b postbus 3068 2601 db delft t +31 15 215 00 00 f +31 15 213 09 08 post@cepezed.nl www.cepezed.nl



the work of cepezed - in detail