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Live. Work. Play. Prosper.

Community Profile


MESSAGE FROM THE

MAYOR CITY OF CHILLIWACK

Welcome to the City of Chilliwack. Chilliwack is one of the fastest growing communities in the Province of British Columbia. With our gorgeous scenery, competitive land prices, low business tax rates, progressive business community and ideal balanced way of life, Chilliwack is a great place to live, work, play, and prosper. The City of Chilliwack is dedicated to our businesses. With a goal to help our economy grow and provide the best business retention and expansion services possible, we have transferred our economic development initiatives to a publicly-funded, private corporation known as the Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO). Combining CEPCO’s abilities with the City of Chilliwack’s commitment to eliminate bureaucracy, limit regulations and restrictions, and ensure speedy permit approvals, and you have the perfect recipe for substantial business growth. We encourage you to explore business, investment and residential opportunities in the City of Chilliwack. Contact CEPCO for all your information and relocation needs. They can provide you with information and statistics, relocation and site support services, business growth and expansion support, and many other services. Whether your business is technology, manufacturing, tourism or agriculture, CEPCO will be there to help you grow your business. Join our growing success! Warm regards, Sharon Gaetz Mayor, City of Chilliwack

The information and data provided in this document has been compiled from a variety of sources. Although Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO) believes that such information was accurate at the time of original publication, it does not provide any representations or warranties as to the accuracy of same or as to the suitability of such information for any purpose. All such information provided is on an “as is” basis, and any reliance on such information is solely at the user’s risk. In no event shall Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation be responsible or liable for any expenses or damages arising out of or in any way connected to the use of this document or any information contained herein. Please send any updates to info@chilliwackpartners.com.

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CONTENTS

Contents TABLE OF

DISCOVER CHILLIWACK • Highlights • Location • Climate • Geography • History

5 5 7 9 10 11

COMMUNITY 13 • Population • Households • Ethnicity • Religion

14 15 16 17

QUALITY OF LIFE

19

• Recreation and Facilities 20 • Community and Social Organizations 25 • Education 27 • Health Care 31 • Safety and Security 33 • Housing 35

ECONOMIC PROFILE

39

• Income and Wages • Cost of Living • Cost of Doing Business • Economic Sector Profiles • Overall Employment and Labour • Business Licenses • Development Costs • Taxation

40 41 41 43 55 57 57 59

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 63 • Business and Development Growth • Industrial Sector Growth • Commercial Sector Growth • Institutional Sector Growth • Residential Sector Growth • Other Sectors • Land Use • Development Opportunities

64 65 67 70 71 74 75 75

INFRASTRUCTURE 77 • Transportation • Shipping • Utilities • Media • Telecommunications

78 81 82 84 85

BUSINESS RESOURCES

87

• Business Support Programs • Immigration • Foreign Affairs & International Trade • Invest in Canada • Business Resources

88 89 90 90 91

KEY CONTACTS AND PROFILES 94 REQUEST FORM

95

QUICK FACTS

96

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DISCOVER CHILLIWACK • Highlights • Location • Climate • Geography • History

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5 7 9 10 11


DISCOVER CHILLIWACK

Chilliwack DISCOVER

BRITISH COLUMBIA • CANADA

“Being located in Chilliwack has granted us the opportunity to benefit from the city’s numerous competitive advantages such as a low cost of living, progressive business environment, superb lifestyle, convenient location, immediate access to a world-class transportation infrastructure, and economical property prices and lease rates.” TIM MCALPINE, PRESIDENT CURRENCY MARKETING

Chilliwack is one of the best places in the world to live, work, play and prosper. A superb quality of life, combined with a strong economy, a low cost of living, and proximity to a multitude of amenities, make Chilliwack a destination of interest for prospective residents and businesses alike.

EXPLORE OUR HIGHLIGHTS QUALITY OF LIFE

When people talk about “Beautiful British Columbia,” they might as well be talking about Chilliwack. Nestled in a wide, fertile river valley surrounded by endless mountains, miles of crystal clear lakes, and acres of untamed wilderness, Chilliwack is quite literally one of the most extraordinary areas of the planet. With access to the limitless recreational opportunities of BC’s great outdoors and all the amenities of any major urban centre, such as leisure facilities, educational institutions, healthcare, shopping, arts and culture and more, Chilliwack is fast becoming the destination of choice for many new businesses and residents. With a growing population of 92,308, the residents of Chilliwack love the relaxed country life-

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DISCOVER CHILLIWACK

“Our research, performed by Colliers International, confirmed that Chilliwack was the most competitive environment for our new facility. Key deciding factors were low land costs, transportation access, proximity to the US border and international airports and ocean ports, a supportive government and business community, and plenty of skilled employees.” BRAD MILLER, PRESIDENT, IMW INDUSTRIES LTD.

style, the supportive and proactive business community, and the collective joy of ongoing prosperity. VIBRANT ECONOMY

As part of BC’s Lower Mainland Economic Region (with a population of 2.5 million), Chilliwack enjoys many of the same benefits as Vancouver: proximity to major markets (the Pacific Rim), easy access to the United States, and access to a variety of business amenities. In addition, the City of Chilliwack enjoys significantly lower costs of living and doing business. Chilliwack’s many economic advantages, combined with a skilled and educated labour pool, continuously attract a multitude of employers. In fact, major corporations like Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers, Stream Global Services, Kal-Tire, IMW Industries, and Rogers Foods have discovered these competitive advantages and have chosen to establish operations in Chilliwack. With continued interest in the area, the City of Chilliwack enjoys a strong economy with a stable growth rate of 3%. Chilliwack’s strongest economic growth sectors include Agriculture, Aviation and Aerospace, Education, Film, Food Processing, Healthcare, Manufacturing, Professional Services, Real Estate, Retail/Wholesale Trade, Technology, and Tourism.

tive locations for business in the world. • Low cost of living: Vancouver’s costof-living is very competitive with major metropolitan centres in the United States. Chilliwack’s living expenses are lower than Vancouver — in some cases, about a third less! • Low industrial, commercial and residential land costs: Chilliwack’s housing costs can be as much as 50% less than Vancouver. Retail space can be as much as 75% less than downtown Vancouver. Also, Chilliwack’s industrial land prices are significantly lower (30-40%) than neighbouring municipalities, located closer to Vancouver.

(American, Asian and European). Located along the Trans Canada Highway and next to local, national and international railways, Chilliwack is only 20 minutes away from a USA border crossing and Abbotsford’s International Airport, 90 minutes from Vancouver’s International Airport and one hour from the nearest shipping sea port. There is an estimated trade population of about 270,000 people (within a 30-minute commute). There are about 900,000 people within 90 km, and about 2.5 million people within 130 km, including Vancouver. AMENITIES

• Low labour and production costs: BC’s costs are lower than the USA and other G-7 countries. For instance, costs for skilled technical and professional workers can be as much as 33% below comparable US centres. Also employersponsored benefits, payroll, tax and health insurance rates are all lower than the USA.

Chilliwack has two enclosed shopping centres and several open-air shopping plazas, providing over 366,000 m2 (about 4 million sq.ft.) of retail space. The latest retail development is Eagle Landing, a 65,000 m2 (about 700,000 sq.ft) commercial development featuring Walmart Supercentre, Galaxy Cinemas and Home Depot. Chilliwack also provides about 148,120 m2 (approx. 1.5M sq.ft.) of industrial space.

• Low energy costs: Canada’s cost of electricity and natural gas is lower than the USA and Europe.

The city has a modern full service hospital with 222 beds and 3 outpatient clinics, and is home to 101 physicians and 43 dentists.

• Incentives: The Federal and Provincial governments have created tax cuts and incentives that make our community attractive to businesses and investors.

The community has about 32 schools with about 14,000 students. Chilliwack has a number of notable post-secondary institutions like the University of the Fraser Valley at the renowned Canada Education Park.

LOW COSTS

PROXIMITY TO MARKETS

Chilliwack is one of the most cost-competi-

Chilliwack provides easy access to local, regional, national and international markets

CLIMATE The Lower Mainland of BC has one of the mildest climates in Canada. Winters are not

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LATITUDE: 49°10’19.770” NORTH LONGITUDE: 121°55’28.770” WEST ELEVATION: 11 METRES TIME ZONE: PACIFIC STANDARD TIME (PST)

LOCATION Chilliwack is located in the Lower Mainland area of the Pacific Coast of Canada in Southwest British Columbia (BC). This area includes Metro Vancouver (population: 2.5 million) and the Fraser Valley Regional District (population: 270,000). Chilliwack is about 100 km (60 miles) from downtown Vancouver. It is bordered by the City of Abbotsford in the west, the community of Agassiz next to the Fraser River in the north, the community of Popkum in the east, and the United States to the south.

H CHILLIWACK

SIZE

The City of Chilliwack measures 23.5 km (14.6 miles) from east to west and 12.5 km (7.8 miles) from north to south. It covers a total territory of 25,900 ha or 1,211 km (100 square miles).

DISTANCE AND TRAVEL TIME FROM CHILLIWACK DESTINATION

HOURS

KM

MILES

US Border (Sumas)

0.5

34

21

Abbotsford Airport

0.5

34

21

Seattle

2.3

214

133

Penticton

3.5

287

178

Kelowna (via

3.3

286

178

Vancouver

1.1

108

60

Surrey

0.75

78

48

Coquihalla)

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DOWNTOWN CHILLIWACK

CITY OF CHILLIWACK

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DISCOVER CHILLIWACK

too cold and summers are not too hot. With fresh air, comfortable temperatures, and vibrant greenery, Chilliwack is a popular choice among visitors, immigrants and other Canadians who are relocating or retiring.

AVERAGE TEMPERATURES

The average daily maximum temperature in January is 5.2 degrees Celsius (40 degrees Fahrenheit), but can drop to as low as -7 or -8 degrees Celsius (20 degrees Fahrenheit) in the middle of the night.

WINTER

SPRING AND FALL

Winters along the Pacific Coast are temperate. If snow falls, it generally only stays a few days as warmer rains typically wash the snow away. Most of the time, people only need a warm coat and an umbrella

Spring and fall can often be mild and pleasant. Good weather often starts in the month of April and extends into November.

PRECIPITATION The 30 year historic average is 1,680 mm (67.2 inches) of rain and 107.9 cm (43 inches) of snow. November and December

SUMMER

Chilliwack is relatively near the coast, which ANNUAL PRECIPITATION

ANNUAL TEMPERATURE

300

30

means that summer-time air is often more cool and fresh than interior regions of the country. However, compared to Vancouver, Chilliwack is more inland and can reach higher midday temperatures. The average daily maximum temperature in July is 24.4 degrees Celsius (76 degrees Fahrenheit), and can often reach the low 30s Celsius (up to 90 degrees Fahrenheit).

throughout the winter.

Daily Maximum (째C) Daily Minimum (째C)

Rainfall (mm) Snowfall (cm)

250

25 20

200

15

150

10

100

5 50

0 -5

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

0 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Source: Environment Canada 2010

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DISCOVER CHILLIWACK

are the wettest months, with rain around 250 mm (9.8 inches) per month. Snowfall usually occurs between November and February, with the greatest accumulation typically in January. By March, snowfall becomes a rare occurrence. Snowfall is light in Chilliwack in comparison to other parts of BC and Canada, and is evidenced by the fact that snow seldom remains on the ground for more than two consecutive weeks. By contrast, July and August are the driest months, with an average monthly rainfall of about 57 mm.

SUNLIGHT Chilliwack enjoys approximately 1,500 hours of sunlight per year. Sunlight is most abundant in the spring and summer months, with an average of eight hours per day in the summer.

Summer High: 24.4º C (76º F)

Mainland. Most of the Lower Mainland is fairly flat, with only a few hills to add character.

Winter High: 5.2º C (42º F)

The Coastal Mountain Range borders the northern portion of the Lower Mainland. The only mountains in the southern portion of the Lower Mainland start in Chilliwack. Chilliwack is literally a wide, arable oasis nestled among majestic mountains and miles of untamed wilderness.

Annual Sunshine: 1500 hours Annual Precipitation: 70 inches

FROST PERIOD In the Chilliwack area, the frost-free period is approximately 207 days (106 year average). The frost season typically starts in November and ends by March.

GEOGRAPHY Chilliwack is located in the Fraser Valley basin, in the eastern portion of the Lower

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Most of Chilliwack’s commercial and industrial base is spread out among the flat lands. Historically most residential development is in this area as well. However, as much of Chilliwack’s land is dedicated to agriculture, more recent residential development is occurring on the hillsides and in the downtown core.


DISCOVER CHILLIWACK

HISTORY ABORIGINAL HERITAGE

The area known as Chilliwack today was originally inhabited by the Sto:lo First Nations. In fact, approximately 30,000 Sto:lo were estimated to have inhabited this area because of its rich natural resources and beauty. GOLD RUSH

In 1857, things changed when gold was discovered. Within a year, more than 30,000 gold miners flocked to the Fraser River canyon to unearth this buried treasure. Chilliwack became a hub of activity. Fraser River steamboats stopped regularly to provide transportation for all manner of

goods and passengers. Miller’s Landing, Sumas Landing and Chilliwack Landing became the birthplace of a new community. FARMING

As the gold and fur trades died out, Chilliwack’s attraction changed. The arable flat river basin provided the ideal environment for farming. INCORPORATION AND GROWTH

In 1873, the Township of Chilliwack (at that time, spelled Chilliwhack) was incorporated and became British Columbia’s third oldest municipality. By 1881, the community had little room for expansion along the river, so the main com-

mercial area moved south to the junction of the New Westminster-Yale Wagon Road, Wellington Avenue and Young Road (the area we now call Five Corners). This part of town was originally referred to as Centreville until it gave way to the more popular name of Chilliwack. In 1908, “Centreville” became incorporated as a separate municipality as the City of Chilliwack. The surrounding rural farmland, however, remained within the Township of Chilliwack. By January 1, 1980, the former City and Township amalgamated to form the District of Chilliwack. It was renamed the City of Chilliwack in 1999. NOTE: The word Chilliwack is the name of a local First Nations tribe as well as a geographic description of the area. Chilliwhack is a “Halkomelem” word meaning “quieter water at the head” or travel by way of a backwater.

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COMMUNITY • Population • Households • Ethnicity • Religion

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14 15 16 17


COMMUNITY

Community MEET OUR

“One of the biggest advantages of working out of Chilliwack is the people. The Chilliwack area has a labour force second to none: people that care about their work, give it their all and work through issues.� PAUL BOILEAU, PLANT MANAGER SOPREMA

Chilliwack is a community that offers rural and urban balance. With 64% of our land base dedicated to agriculture, Chilliwack benefits from the availability of green space and local food products. Chilliwack provides a relaxed, easy-going lifestyle with all the amenities and ambition of a major urban center. Chilliwack also offers a variety of housing options, with 80% of households located in urban / suburban areas. The people here are open, friendly, and supportive. They love living here and they whole-heartedly encourage others to share in their superb quality of life.

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COMMUNITY

POPULATION

POPULATION BY AGE

British Columbia has traditionally been one of the fastest growing provinces in Canada. This is largely due to interprovincial migration as Easterners seek the milder climate of the Pacific Coast and its desirable standard of living. BC has also grown significantly as foreign immigrants seek BC’s lower cost of living and a new way of life.

The median age in Chilliwack is 40, which is comparable to the British Columbia median age of 40.8. Nearly 58% of people in Chilliwack are under the age of 45,which is similar to the rest of BC. However, because of the low cost of living and proximity to Vancouver, the City of Chilliwack has a slightly higher population of seniors aged 65 and over at 16.7%, compared to the rest of BC at 14.5%. Chilliwack also has a slightly higher percentage of children up to 19 years at a rate of 27.1% compared to 23.2% in BC.

POPULATION GROWTH The estimated population of Chilliwack is 82,626, with an average annual growth rate of about 2.73% (2011). With continued steady growth, the city’s projected population is expected to reach 101,210 in 2021.

WORKFORCE POPULATION

REGIONAL POPULATION Chilliwack

REGIONAL POPULATION

82,626

Chilliwack and Neighbours (within

274,388

40 km)

There are 274,388 people living within a 30-minute commute of Chilliwack and about 2.5 million within the Lower Mainland region.

Chilliwack and Fraser Valley (within

1,015,179

Lower Mainland (within 130 km)

2,504,861

British Columbia

4,113,487

90 km)

Including the American communities, there are over five million people living within 200 km of Chilliwack.

Source: Statistics Canada, 2008 * 40 km = Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Hope, Mission, Kent, Harrison * 90 km = Above communities, plus Delta, Langley, Township of Langley, Maple Ridge, Pitt Meadows, Surrey; * 130 km = Above communities, plus Vancouver, West Vancouver, White Rock, Richmond, Port Moody, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, North Vancouver, Burnaby

POPULATION GROWTH ESTIMATES

Chilliwack’s current labour force is estimated at about 40,605 people, representing a participation rate of 63.5% (based on the population of 15 and over). Chilliwack also has one of the region’s highest numbers of local employment, with about 72% of the population working within the community. The average commute is around 6 km.

POPULATION BY EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT University degree

120,000 100,000

Chilliwack

University certificate or diploma

BC

80,000

College certificate or diploma 60,000

Trades certificate or diploma

40,000

High school certificate or equivalent

20,000 0 1991

1996

2001

2006

2011 f

2016 f

2021 f

No certificate, diploma or degree 0%

POPULATION BY AGE

10%

20%

0 - 14

16%

Southern Asia: 2%

20%

Oceania & Other: 2%

United States: 9% Central America: 2%

Southeast Asia: 3%

55 - 64

Eastern Asia: 5%

11%

Carribean & Bermuda: 2% South America: 3%

Western Asia and the Middle East:

2%

15 - 24 13% 45 - 54 25 - 44 26%

Source: Population Estimates and Population by Age: City of Chilliwack, 2010

Chilliwack: Population Cohort - 2008 14

40%

IMMIGRANT POPULATION

65 and over

14%

30%

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Africa: 2%

Northern Europe: 25%

Southern Europe: 2%

Western Europe: 31%

Eastern Europe: 10%

Source: 2006 Census Data, Statistics Canada, updated 2010


COMMUNITY

POPULATION BY EDUCATION LEVEL

HOUSEHOLDS

Chilliwack produces more young workers with a high school graduation certificate, trade certificate/diploma and college certificate/diploma (at 62%) than the British Columbia average (at 55%).

There are currently 31,635 households in Chilliwack with an average household size of 3 persons.

This is in keeping with a common local opinion that Chilliwack produces highly skilled employees. With the presence of the University of the Fraser Valley, the percentage of young people with University degrees will also increase.

Chilliwack is a community that offers rural and urban balance. About 80% of its households are located in urban or suburban areas. Traditionally, Chilliwack proper (on the north side of the highway) has been the location of most of the urban housing units, but as land in the valley floor is protected and reserved for agricultural land, growth is spreading through Sardis-Vedder and up the hillsides (south of the highway).

FAMILY STRUCTURE

HOUSEHOLDS

Families in Private Households

25,168

2003

27,152

2004

27,886

Husband-Wife Families

21,453

2005

28,631

2006

29,395

Lone-Parent Families

3,715

2007

30,048

2008

30,881

Average Number of Persons per Family

3

2009

31,724

2010

32,584

2011

33,445

Average Number of Sons/Daughters at Home

1.1

2021

43,666

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2008

Source: Canadian Demographics, Financial Post, 2008

“After reviewing numerous other communities in the Fraser Valley and British Columbia, we decided move to Chilliwack. Chilliwack is a wonderful community as it combines a low cost of living and abundant recreational opportunities with brand new recreational centers and a commitment to business retention, expansion and attraction.� TED SHIPLEY, PRESIDENT TEKSMED SERVICES INC.

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COMMUNITY

ETHNICITY

immigrants who tend to locate in and around Surrey. In recent years, however, there is a growing trend for immigrants to locate outside of BC’s major cities.

LANGUAGES

Canada is a bilingual country with English and French as the official languages. However, the primary language of the province of British Columbia (like most of Western Canada) is English. Chilliwack is no different with 96.4% of the population speaking English at home.

The immigration growth rate to BC remains strong, with an increase of 15.9% over the last census period of 2001 to 2006. Chilliwack maintains a strong share of new immigrant population, at a growth rate of 7.2%. MIGRATION

ETHNIC ORIGINS

Looking at migration from other provinces, BC remains one of the key provinces that continually demonstrate a net gain of immigrants, competing mostly with Ontario and Alberta. All three provinces have strong economies, but BC’s mild climate, superb quality of life and progressive culture keeps it as one of the most desirable immigrant locations in the country.

The ethnic origins of Chilliwack, like much of British Columbia, are English, German, Scottish, Irish, Dutch, French, Ukrainian, and a variety of other European immigrants. Chilliwack also maintains a strong aboriginal population of 5,605 people, or 7% compared to BC’s 4.8%. IMMIGRANT POPULATION

The immigrant population in Chilliwack is estimated at 11,130 people or 14% of Chilliwack’s population. Most Chilliwack

LANGUAGES SPOKEN AT HOME IN CHILLIWACK %

POPULATION

English

96.4%

76,855

German

0.8%

675

Chinese (All)

0.4%

330

French

0.4%

295

Dutch

0.3%

270

Punjabi

0.3%

260

Spanish

0.3%

240

Hungarian

0.2%

150

Vietnamese

0.2%

130

Korean

0.2%

120

Japanese

0.1%

55

Arabic

0.1%

45

Croation

0.1%

40

Other

0.2%

150

TOTAL

NET MIGRATION TO CHILLIWACK NET MIGRATION RATE PER 1000 PEOPLE (2001-06) ≤ -30 - 29.9 to -1 -0.9 to 1 1.1 to 29.9 ≥ 30

80,125

*Note: many respondents listed speak more than one language. Source: 2006 Census Data, Statistics Canada, updated 2010

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immigrants originate from Europe, the United States, and Southeast Asia. The immigrant population in BC as a whole is much larger, at a rate of 27%. This can be attributed to a high percentage of Chinese, who tend to locate in and around Vancouver, and Punjabi

Within BC’s Lower Mainland, Chilliwack seems to have the strongest migration rate. (Reference the Net Migration Map below). An attractive lifestyle, gorgeous scenery, and low cost home prices — at about half of those in western areas of the Metro Vancouver — are causing the centre of population for the Lower Mainland to shift eastward away from Vancouver and toward Chilliwack.

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CHILLIWACK ENJOYS MORE NET MIGRATION THAN NEIGHBOURING COMMUNITIES http://geodepot.statcan.ca/GeoSearch2006/GeoSearch2006.jsp?minx=3848847.91815126&miny=1807286.15235294&maxx=4326242.87613445&ma xy=2097874.38764705&LastImage=http://geodepot.statcan.ca/Diss/Output/GeoSearch2006_geodepotfarm4232824481638.gif&resolution=H&lang=E&c md=thematic&displayThematic=YES&switchTab=3


COMMUNITY

WELCOMING MULTI-CULTURALISM A nation formed by immigrants, integrating with the native aboriginal communities of this land, Canada encourages and welcomes cultural diversity. Although most immigrants acclimatize themselves to Canada’s progressive and freedom-focused way of life, some distinct micro-community pockets inevitably form, preserving the language and cultural diversity of their immigrant nations. Furthermore, many communities throughout British Columbia form social organizations where immigrants can converse with other immigrants from their respective native countries. (For a list of religious and social organizations, go to page 25 under Organizations).

RELIGION The culture in Western Canada is largely based on Christianity, with 46.9% of the population practicing a Christian denomination. There is also a large percentage of people (35.1%) who do not claim a religion, but are still strongly influenced by Christianity. With BC and Canada’s strong immigration growth, the types of religion practiced are diversifying. RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS TOP 10 RELIGIONS IN BC

No religion

NUMBER

%

1,356,600

35.1

Roman Catholic

666,905

17.2

United Church

361,840

9.4

Anglican

298,375

7.7

Christian (other) 1

200,340

5.2

Sikh

135,310

3.5

Baptist

107,465

2.8

Lutheran

101,145

2.6

Buddhist

85,540

2.2

Protestant (other)

76,100

2.0

2

RELIGION AND MULTI-CULTURALISM

Canada supports and promotes cultural and religious diversities. As such, Statistics Canada reports that there is substantial growth in diverse religions. Public schools in Canada are secular, although there are some private schools that operate under a particular faith. In public schools and other public facilities, Christian holidays, such as Christmas and Easter, are still regularly observed. Supporting multiculturalism, public institutions and community organizations often also recognize celebrations such as Hannukah, Chinese New Year, Diwali, Baisakhi. Vaisakhi, Robbie Burns Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Ramadan and many others.

The provincial government and community organizations work together in British Columbia to promote multiculturalism and actively help immigrants settle into a new life here. Each year, the Government of British Columbia designates the third week of February as Multiculturalism Week. Communities across British Columbia celebrate and share the cultures and traditions of immigrants who have moved here from around the world. If you would like to learn more about settling into a new life in British Columbia, go to www.WelcomeBC.com. To learn more about integrating into life in Chilliwack, contact CEPCO at 604-792-7839 or toll free at 1-800-561-8803 or visit: www.chilliwackeconomicpartners.com.

1. Includes persons who report “Christian”, as well as those who report “Apostolic”, “Born-again Christian” and “Evangelical”. 2. Includes persons who report only “Protestant”. Source: StatsCan 2005 http://www12.statcan.ca/English/census01/ Products/Analytic/companion/rel/bc.cfm (2001 Census Data)

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QUALITY OF LIFE • Recreation and Facilities 20 • Community and Social Organizations 25 • Education 27 • Health Care 31 • Safety and Security 33 • Housing Stock 35

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QUALITY OF LIFE

EXPLORE OUR

Quality of Life “With various amenities, rural yet suburban atmosphere, new infrastructure and endless recreational opportunities, Chilliwack provides one of the best lifestyles available in British Columbia. With its golf courses, lakes, mountains and rivers and proximity to Vancouver, it is understandable why Chilliwack is growing.”

Chilliwack has a superb quality of life. People love living here and it shows. Plenty of business and employment opportunities, low cost of living, proximity to markets and amenities, a high standard of living, a relaxed lifestyle, and access to the great outdoors all contribute to Chilliwack’s quality of life. It is no wonder that Chilliwack, as part of beautiful British Columbia, is rated as one of the highest standards of living in the world. This part of the world offers the best mix of affordability, personal safety, clean environment, cultural amenities and recreational opportunity.

TIM MCALPINE, PRESIDENT CURRENCY MARKETING

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QUALITY OF LIFE

RECREATION Ideal for the outdoor enthusiast, Chilliwack is known as “The Great Outside!” With the nearby wilderness and freshwater lakes and rivers, many people choose to spend their summer days at the beach ... swimming, boating, and water skiing. There are plenty of walks and hikes to admire the surrounding natural beauty. Year-round adventurers who prefer a slightly more rugged outdoor experience pursue mountain biking, whitewater rafting, kayaking, skydiving, hiking or fishing. Of course, in winter, the nearby ski resorts are a great place to ski downhill or crosscountry, snowboard or toboggan. There are also plenty of activities for the whole family ... swimming at the local pools, ice skating (see Recreational Facilities on page 22), outdoor waterslides, go-carts, golf and mini-golf, horseback riding, and more. And for the sports enthusiast, Chilliwack has some of the best sports fields and facilities in British Columbia plus a wide array of sports clubs (see Organizations, page 25). For those who prefer a more cultured approach, Chilliwack offers dance, art galleries, symphony, theatre, museums, cinemas,

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music festivals, shopping, and a wide array of dining experiences. In 2010, the brand new $22M Chilliwack Cultural Centre was opened. A variety of events happen year-round. Just a few of the major, regular events attract upwards of 90,000 attendees annually. These events include, but are not limited to, the following: • Chilliwack Exhibition • Dixieland Jazz Festival • Flight Fest • Party in the Park • First Nations Pow Wow • Bluegrass Festival • Variety of trade shows (e.g. Home & Garden) For an up-to-date listing of events and activities, please visit the Tourism Chilliwack web site at www.tourismchilliwack.com.

MAJOR ATTRACTIONS CULTUS LAKE

There are a number of beaches, parks, trails, campgrounds and resorts in the Cultus Lake area. The lake is widely used for boating, waterskiing, swimming and camping. Only an hour from Vancouver, this area is a highly popular summer tourism destination for visitors from throughout the Lower Mainland.

GOLF

Chilliwack has nine full-sized golf courses plus a driving range — most provide 18 holes offering a total of 40,000 yards of golfing pleasure. And for fun for the entire family, there is Tap-Ins putting course or the theme attraction, Giggle Ridge Adventure Golf. FISHING

Fishing in Chilliwack is extremely popular. The Fraser River is one of the most productive rivers in North America for salmon, steelhead, and giant sturgeon. The Chilliwack and Vedder Rivers are popular spots for trout and coho, steelhead and chinook salmon. For more information, visit: www.fishchilliwack.com. WHITE WATER RAFTING AND KAYAKING

People come from all over the world to kayak or raft BC’s raging rivers, including the Fraser, Thompson and Chilliwack Rivers. If you seek a greater challenge, there are white water kayaking schools and several rafting companies that offer guided tours. MINTER GARDENS

Minter Gardens is a 32-acre show garden of floral artistry. Visitors enjoy a leisurely stroll along gently winding pathways through 11 theme gardens. Visitors will also enjoy the


BRIDAL FALLS

Bridal Falls Provincial Park provides visitors with a short hike to one of the Lower Mainland’s most beautiful waterfalls. The Bridal Falls area is also home to a family dining restaurant, a motel and RV Resorts, and several other attractions. WATERSLIDES

Chilliwack offers two top-quality water parks. The Trans Canada Waterslides and the Cultus Lake Waterslides. Both have yards and yards of twisting, curving, fun-filled slides; a hot tub; picnic area; and snack bar. CHILLIWACK LAKE

This provincial park is located a little further into the wilderness than the popular Cultus Lake. This lake is much larger, but also more tranquil. The provincial campground is located at the northern tip of the lake. Many excellent hikes are available in this area. SKIING

The two closest ski hills to Chilliwack are Hemlock (located in the District of Kent on the north side of the Fraser River) and Manning Park (located east of Hope). Both ski hills are about 1 to 1.5 hours drive from Chilliwack. Also relatively close is Mt. Baker in Washington State. It is also about 1.5 hours from Chilliwack. CYCLING AND HIKING TRAILS

There are several enjoyable trails (33 km) within the City of Chilliwack:

ENTERTAINMENT

• Heritage Wagon Trail (1 km long) • Hope River Trail (6.2 km long) – scenic • Luckakuck Trail – 1 km nature walk along the Luckakuck Creek • Mount Thom – pedestrian and equestrian trail offers a 100 meter climb to the Mount Thom Summit lookout • Rotary Vedder River Trail – 15.5 km long scenic trail. Great for running, biking, walking, horseback riding, or fishing in one of the best spots in the Valley • Trans Canada Trail, which makes its way through every province and territory. • Old Yale Yarrow Trail SHOPPING

Chilliwack offers a wide array of shopping options. In addition to numerous major retail operations and countless individual boutiques, there is Cottonwood Mall, Chilliwack Mall, Salish Plaza, Southgate Shopping Centre, Centre Point Plaza, and City Gate Square. In 2010, a 700,000 square foot commercial development called Eagle Landing opened with major tenants being Walmart Supercentre, Galaxy Cinemas Chilliwack and Home Depot. DINING

There are over 150 restaurants in the Chilliwack area, offering a variety of dining experiences ... including Greek, Japanese, Thai, Ukrainian, Chinese, French, Italian, German, Vietnamese, and more. There are a number of major restaurant chains including fast-food, family restaurants, casual dining, as well as fine dining establishments.

Chilliwack has two movie theatres: Cottonwood 4 Cinemas and the new Galaxy Cinemas at Eagle Landing. The brand new Chilliwack Cultural Centre showcases headlining theatre shows, dance shows, musicals, music concerts, and community events. The Chilliwack Community Arts Council, Chilliwack Player’s Guild and the University of the Fraser Valley Theatre Department put on a number of live theatre shows and musical events yearly. Chilliwack also has its own symphony orchestra. For evening fun for adults, Chilliwack is home to several nightclubs, pubs and sports bars. And for the kids, there are activity centres and theme parks.

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aviaries, beautiful waterfalls, ponds, and a children’s play area. Visitors can also enjoy the garden’s two restaurants and two glass enclosed conservatories, which are available for wedding receptions and conferences. The grounds are open from April to October, and frequently host a number of activities and events.

ACCOMMODATIONS The City of Chilliwack is home to 14 motels and hotels (offering a total of 595 rooms). There are also several bed-and-breakfasts and cabins in the area. Including the area around Chilliwack Lake and Cultus Lake, there are about 2,000 camping sites on provincial and private campgrounds. Some of the more notable hotels and motels include: • • • • • • • • • •

Best Western Rainbow Country Inn Chilliwack Travelodge Hotel Coast Chilliwack Hotel Comfort Inn Chilliwack Parkwood Lodge Rainbow Motor Inn Royal Hotel – Historic B&B The Falls Golf Club & Resort Traders Inn Vedder River Inn

For more information on Chilliwack and area accommodations, go to www.TourismChilliwack.com.

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“Chilliwack’s new infrastructure improvements such as a new hockey arena and a recreational facility with wave pool, numerous outdoor activities and proximity to Vancouver, as well as a lower cost of living, are all factors that assist us in attracting employees.” PAUL MURRIN, PRESIDENT WEDLER ENGINEERING

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

CHILLIWACK YMCA

CHILLIWACK LANDING LEISURE CENTRE

This facility includes ... an indoor family pool, a shallow children’s pool and a whirlpool; an outdoor running track; squash and racquetball courts; exercise room (including super circuit, cardio equipment and weight room); a play room, a multipurpose room and a meeting room.

The Chilliwack Landing Leisure Centre is a first-class aquatic facility that opened in the summer of 2002. It is built on the old Exhibition Grounds (a 38-acre site). This facility includes a large family wave pool, a competition pool and therapeutic pools; a fitness centre (including weight training equipment, cardiovascular equipment, and an aerobics studio); and a wellness centre (which offers physiotherapy services). The facility also has a coffee shop, pro shop, and meeting rooms. Outdoors, there is a water playground for children; sports court for basketball or street hockey; a sand volleyball court; and a skateboard park. CHEAM LEISURE CENTRE

The Cheam Leisure Centre, which recently underwent $9M in renovations, is a unique recreation complex that offers a variety of activities and programs for community residents. The complex has squash courts, a weight training room, fitness equipment, double gymnasium, 25-metre swimming pool, lazy river, hot tub, sauna, and meeting and multi-purpose rooms.

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ROTARY OUTDOOR POOL

This outdoor pool, open from May to September, offers public swimming, swimming lessons, aqua fit programs, seniors’ programs and much more. MULTIPLEX ARENA – PROSPERA CENTRE

The Prospera Centre, which opened in 2002, is home to the Chilliwack Bruins Western Hockey League Team. It includes a main arena with a capacity of 5,700 seats. A second arena for community use has 300 seats. The multiplex arena hosts major sporting events and concerts in Chilliwack, attracting visitors and creating jobs. TWIN RINKS ARENA

Twin Rinks Arena has two rinks with an ice

surface (85’ x 200’) open for 10 months of the year (from July to May); the floor is dry from mid-May to mid-July. The rinks are used for ice skating, hockey, ball hockey, lacrosse, rollerblading and more. The seating capacity in the bleachers by rink one is 528 and by rink two is 175. SPORTS FIELDS

Looking to play football, soccer, baseball or some other field sport? Chilliwack is one of the best places for field sports in the whole Lower Mainland region. Within the City of Chilliwack there are 11 public Sportsfield Complexes. School District playing fields are also open to the public. This brings the total number of ball fields to 78 and soccer pitches to 62. CITY PARKS

The City of Chilliwack has 87 parks which together make up over 335 hectares of green space. Parks vary in equipment and services. Most of the Community Parks and smaller parks have playgrounds, picnic tables, basketball courts, hockey nets or tennis courts.


CHILLIWACK EXHIBITION PARK

CHILLIWACK HERITAGE PARK

Chilliwack Exhibition Park is home to the Ag./Rec. Centre, Prospera Centre, Evergreen Hall, the Curling Rink and the Grandstand (with a 2,500 seating capacity), and Chilliwack Landing Leisure Centre.

Chilliwack Heritage Park is a 150,000 square foot recreation and trade show facility constructed on a 65-acre fairground. The facility is used as a trade show and events building, and has a racetrack (enclosing a rodeo arena) and two show rings for horses.

THE LANDING SPORTS CENTRE

This is a multiple-use building, and at different times of the year it hosts indoor tennis, ball hockey, craft fairs, dances, recreation sports, trade shows and meetings.

Chilliwack Heritage Park hosts equestrian competitions, agricultural events and trade shows, such as the Fraser Valley Chariot and Chuck Wagon Association and the Chilliwack Riding Club’s events (ie: chuckwagon and pony races, gymkhana events, barrel racing, cattle roping and penning). The fairground is also used for outdoor shows and concerts. The facility is used year-round. To learn more, visit www.chilliwackheritagepark.com.

The main floor area is suitable for horse shows, cattle auctions, banquets, dances, tennis (four courts) trade shows and sporting activities (capacity: 1872; bleachers: 500). The loft is suitable for banquets, dances and meetings (capacity: 250-300). CHILLIWACK CULTURAL CENTRE

The new $22M Chilliwack Cultural Centre

CITY PARKS Gwynne-Vaughn Park Island 22 Portage Park Promontory Park West Mt. Thom Salish Park Sardis Park Yarrow Central Yarrrow Community Walden Street Great Blue Heron NR

SPORTS FIELDS Atchelitz Chwk Track & Field Exhibition Park FG Leary Fairfield Island Meadowbrook Park Rosedale Park Sardis Sportsfield Townsend Park Watson Glen Park Yarrow Sportsfield

• • •

• • •

• •

• •

• • • • • •

• • • •

• • •

• • • • • • • • • •

Parking

Booking Info

Trail

Kiosk

Skateboard Area

Pond

• •

• • • • • • • • • • •

Fishing

Equestrian Area

Landscaped Area

Picnic Shelter

Ball Hockey Pad

Playground Area

Tennis Courts

Basketball Courts

Ball Fields

Soccer Fields

Change Rooms

Washrooms

• • •

• • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • •

• • • • •

COMMUNITY HALLS

Evergreen Hall is Chilliwack’s unofficial civic centre. It consists of a large auditorium and three meeting rooms. It has been used extensively for sporting events, wedding receptions, meetings, banquets, dances and conventions. It has three main rooms: the Cheam Room and Stage (capacity: up to 658); the Slesse Room (capacity: up to 99); and the Minto Room (capacity: 30). There are also about 15 other halls available for community-operated events. For more information, contact the City’s Parks and Recreation department at 604-793-2996.

CITY PARKS AND SPORTS FIELDS This is not a comprehensive list of the city’s park facilities. For specific detailed information on the city’s parks, contact the City of Chilliwack: Parks and Recreation Department.

is home to a number of theatre, music and arts-oriented events. This facility has a 596-seat main theatre and a 160-seat studio theatre. There are three lobbies with a combined capacity for 1,000 people; an art gallery; a crafting room; board rooms; and several studios suitable for various uses including music, fine arts, choral, and fabric arts. For more information, please visit www.chilliwackculturalcentre.ca.

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SPECIAL EVENT FACILITIES

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

SENIORS CENTRES

The Chilliwack Senior Recreation Centre is the main senior’s activity centre. It is host to a number of activities, including bingo, duplicate bridge, carpet bowling, whist, crib, tai chi, table tennis, line dancing, pool, shuffleboard and curling games and pot luck dinners. Light lunches are also available. For more information, call 604-792-4549. CONFERENCE AND MEETING FACILITIES

The major hotels, such as the Best Western Rainbow Country Inn and the Coast Chilliwack Hotel, offer a number of small conference and meeting room facilities. Likewise, the Falls Golf Resort has meeting rooms. There are also numerous smaller meeting areas available through the Public Library, Community Futures and other facilities. Larger events can be held at Chilliwack Heritage Park and Prospera Centre. The RCMP Pacific Region Training Facility (on the former Canadian Forces Base lands) has room available for large events or activities.

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MUSEUMS The Chilliwack Museum is located in the former City Hall, a national historic building. The Museum, operated by the Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society, also conducts programs to promote public awareness of local history, including talks and guided tours of historical land marks and buildings. For more information, visit their website: www.chilliwack.museum.bc.ca. Other museums near the Chilliwack area include the Agassiz-Harrison Museum, the Atchelitz Threshermen’s Museum, the Historic Yale and the Kilby Store & Farm (Harrison Mills), and Xá:Ytem Longhouse Interpretive Centre (Mission).

LIBRARIES FRASER VALLEY REGIONAL LIBRARIES

Chilliwack’s public libraries, located in dowtown Chilliwack and Yarrow, are part of the Fraser Valley Regional Library System. This system is the oldest of its kind in North America and dates back to 1930. Today, the library system serves more than half a million people in a 13,000 square kilometer area and has an extensive book collection — including over one million hardcover and paperback books, videos, newspapers and magazines, telephone and business directories, reference materials on CD-ROM, government reports, maps and pamphlets, vehicle repair manuals, large print books, language kits, books in other languages, audio books, legal guides, encyclopedias, sound print materials and medical and consumer information. For more information, visit www.fvrl.bc.ca. UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER VALLEY (UFV)

The library at the University of the Fraser Valley allows public borrowing. It offers the same types of information as the Fraser Valley Regional Library, but will have different source materials. Like the Fraser Valley Regional Library, the UFV library has access to materials from its other campuses in Abbotsford, Mission, Hope, and Agassiz.

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ARCHIVES

An important part of the Museum is the Archives, located at Evergreen Hall. Since 1958, Chilliwack Archives have been

collecting objects and records related to the history of the Chilliwack area. Communities represented in the collection include Chilliwack, Sardis, Rosedale, Yarrow, Greendale, Columbia Valley, Chilliwack River Valley, Popkum, Cheam, East Chilliwack, Ryder Lake, Promontory, Cultus Lake, Camp River and Fairfield Island. The Archives contain a significant collection of photographs (over 20,000) and maps, oral histories, numerous records from individuals, families, clubs, businesses, churches, schools and community organizations and municipal government records dating from the incorporation of the Township of Chilliwhack in 1873. The Archives also include original and microfilmed copies of The Chilliwack Progress dating from 1891 to the present. It also includes an object collection of Sto:lo First Nations material and numerous other objects dating from the 1860s to the present.


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COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Chilliwack Community Services is the City’s main social services organization. This organization is dedicated to helping members of our community through the provision of social programs or through advocacy and referral. Programs typically address the needs of individuals, families, youth, elderly, disabled, immigrants, and victims. The Chilliwack Family YMCA is also a main community social organization. This registered charity is a fellowship of members, volunteers and staff committed to the growth of people in “Spirit, Mind and Body.” Through its programs and services, the Chilliwack Family YMCA encourages the development of individual, family and community life. There is also the Chimo Family Resource Centre (Chimo FRC), which is a charitable, non-profit organization whose purpose is to be responsive to community needs, promot-

ing conditions that foster the social and emotional well being of families. Other social organizations include: • United Way of the Fraser Valley • Lions Clubs • Rotary Clubs • Boy Scouts of Canada/ Girl Guides Canada • Royal Canadian Legion • Air Cadets • Army Cadets • Kiwanis Clubs • Big Brothers/Sisters • The Youth Commission

ARTS CLUBS The main arts resource in Chilliwack is the Chilliwack Community Arts Council. The Arts Council is an umbrella organization whose purpose is to enrich the quality of life for the residents of Chilliwack through the effective use of resources and volunteers to encourage education and participation in the Arts. The Chilliwack Community Arts Council,

located at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre, produces a variety of programs and courses including the Christmas Craft Market and the Chilliwack Bluegrass Festival. The Chilliwack Arts Council supports the following types of arts clubs: • Crafts • Dance • Drama • Painting and Drawing • Weaving • Woodcarving

MUSIC The Chilliwack Academy of Music is a nonprofit society devoted to fostering interest and participation in music. It is located at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre and delivers a number of year-round programs and classes for all ages in a variety of disciplines. • Band • Classical • Choir and Chorus • Jazz • Opera and Symphony

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OUTDOOR ORGANIZATIONS Outdoor activities are a vital part of life in Chilliwack. Numerous organizations are available for those wishing to join a club. The types of outdoor organizations are as follows: • Boating • Canoeing • Cycling • Downhill and Cross-Country Skiing • Fish and Game • Hiking • Kayaking • Naturalists • Rock Climbing • Sailing • Whitewater River Rafting

SPORTS ORGANIZATIONS There are approximately 77 sports clubs in the city. They organize a variety of sports for people of all physical levels and diverse interests. Some types of sports organizations include: • Bowling • Court Games (ie: Tennis, Basketball, etc.) • Football • Golf (9 courses) • Gymnastics • Hockey • Lacrosse • Martial Arts • Rugby • Running, Cycling, etc. • Skating • Softball/Baseball • Soccer • Swimming • Other Sports (ie: rowing, curling, archery)

SENIOR’S ORGANIZATIONS There are over 18 senior’s organizations within the City of Chilliwack. The main organization is the Seniors Resource Society

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“Surrounded by mountains and nature, Chilliwack is truly a place of beauty. The community has small town charm with friendly people who say hello to each other while walking down the street. It’s also a very special feeling to go to a public event like a film festival, and recognize dozens of people; there is a sense of community here that I cherish very much. Chilliwack is still an affordable place to buy a home, start a business, and raise a family - things that enable people to have a sense of pride and belonging in a community.”

AMBER SHORT THE BOOK MAN

(604-858-9898), which is a non-profit organization formed to establish and run programs and services for the seniors in the Chilliwack area. Volunteers help seniors find the services or programs they need to maintain a healthy and independent lifestyle. These may include housing, transportation, and social or recreational programs.

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS There are more than 70 religious institutions in Chilliwack, representing numerous denominations, including: • Anglican Church of Canada • Apostolic • Baha’I • Baptist • Buddhism • Catholic • Charismatic • Christian

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Christian and Missionary Alliance Christian Reformed Church of Christ Church of God Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Church of the Nazarene Community Churches Evangelical Gospel Inter-Denominational Islamic Jehovah’s Witnesses Lutheran Mennonite Non-Denominational Orthodox Pentecostal Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada Presbyterian Reformed Church Seventh-Day Adventist United Church of Canada

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS There is an organization for almost any type of interest. Some of these areas include: • Agriculture • Amateur Radio • Aviation • Canine and other Animals • Cars • Computers • Garden and Flowers • Horse • Motorcycles • Museum and Historical Society • Photography • Politics • Singles • Toastmasters • Women’s Association • Youth


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EDUCATION CHILLIWACK SCHOOL DISTRICT #33 There are more than 14,000 school-age children attending public school in the City of Chilliwack. The Chilliwack School District (SD #33), which has approximately 1,800 teachers and staff, received over $80M to invest in earthquake upgrades. The rebuilding of Chilliwack Senior Secondary and Rosedale Traditional Community School is currently underway. There are 20 public elementary schools (K-6), five middle schools (7-9), one middle/ secondary school (7-12), and two secondary schools (10-12). In addition, there are three alternate schools and a distance learning school. Each child has access to full educational facilities with a standard liberal education, such as reading, writing, mathematics, social studies, science, literature, language, art and physical education. In addition, school curriculums at the secondary level also include technology (Java Programming; Microsoft Engineering; Microsoft Certified System Engineer; Cisco; Computer Animation; CAD; 3-D Animation; Graphic Arts); Office Management, Robotics, Drama, Music, Industrial Arts, Home Economics, an Apprenticeship Program, and Career Preparation.

PUBLIC ELEMENTARY & SECONDARY EDUCATION WITHIN CHILLIWACK PUBLIC

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

MIDDLE/SECONDARY SCHOOLS

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMS

ENROLLMENT

20

8

4

14,000+

(School District #33) Types of Programs:

In addition to basic curriculum, programming includes Computer (Java Programming, Microsoft Engineering; University Level Programming; Cisco Systems; Information Technology; Computer Animation; CAD; 3-D Animation; Graphic Arts); Office Management; Robotics; French Immersion; Fine Arts; Career Preparation, etc.

PRIVATE ELEMENTARY & SECONDARY EDUCATION WITHIN CHILLIWACK

PRIVATE Types of Programs:

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

MIDDLE/SECONDARY SCHOOLS

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMS

ENROLLMENT

9

5*

n/a

1,940

In addition to basic curriculum, education is tailored to particular school format: Christian, Catholic, or Specialty school.

* This number is not in addition to the number of elementary schools. There are four schools which provide programming from K-12 and one school which provides programming from K-9. Source: Chilliwack School District #33, 2010/2011 Source: Government of BC, Ministry of Education, 2010/2011

A Chilliwack Elementary School — Vedder Elementary — has been selected by the Ministry of Education to be a prototype for future British Columbia elementary schools.

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QUALITY OF LIFE

“The efforts of every staff member in the Chilliwack School District are focused on providing students with a quality learning environment. Daily, students are supported by caring, professional learning communities and an extensive network of partners, to become graduates who are well prepared for opportunities beyond graduation.” CORINNE MCCABE, SUPERINTENDENT CHILLIWACK SCHOOL DISTRICT #33

A late French Immersion Program, which begins in grade 6, is offered at two elementary schools (Sardis Elementary and Strathcona Elementary). French Immersion continues in grades 7-9 at Chilliwack Middle and Vedder Middle Schools, and for grades 10-12 at Sardis Secondary. For more information, visit the Chilliwack School District’s website: www.sd33.bc.ca or call 604-792-1321. GROWTH

With Chilliwack’s growing population, the need for more classroom space increases annually, with an average growth rate of between 3% and 4% over the past 10 years. In the last several years, recent infrastructure developments include: G.W. Graham Secondary School (new), Sardis Secondary School (rebuild), Mt. Slesse Middle School (new), Chilliwack Middle School (renovation), Vedder Middle School (renovation), Evans Elementary (rebuild), Promontory Heights Community School (new), and Vedder Elementary School. Also, a new combined school (Kindergarten - grade 9) is being constructed in the community of Rosedale. Of interesting note, Vedder Elementary School is similar in construction to Unsworth Elementary, which has been selected by the Ministry of Education to be a prototype for future British Columbia elementary schools.

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SCHOOL BUS SERVICE School bus service is provided for elementary students whose primary residence is at least 3.0 km (K - grade 6) and 4.0 km (grades 7 - 12) from their catchment area school. Special provisions are made for kindergarten and special education students. Effective September 2010, all riders, except forced cross-catchment students, must pay to ride a school bus to and from school for regularly scheduled classes. This service will be provided for registered riders to and from catchment area schools and special routes approved by the Superintendent. Families are charged $200 per child to a maximum of $600 per family for transportation. For

more information, contact the Chilliwack School District’s Transportation Department at 604-792-1255.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS Chilliwack is home to about 9 private schools. These schools generally provide the standard curriculum plus a special area of focus (such as a Christian education).

PRE-SCHOOLS AND DAYCARE There are 15 pre-schools and about 70 daycares in Chilliwack. For referrals and more specific information, contact Chilliwack Community Services at 604-792-4267 or visit www.comserv.bc.ca.

MAJOR FIELD OF STUDY (% OF POPULATION OVER 15 YEARS)

CHILLIWACK

BC

Education

3.7%

4.0%

Visual and performing arts, and communications technologies

1.4%

2.2%

Humanities

2.0%

3.0%

Social and behavioural sciences and law

3.1%

5.2%

Business, management and public administration

8.5%

10.8%

Physical and life sciences and technologies

0.7%

1.9%

Mathematics, computer and information sciences

1.1%

1.9%

Architecture, engineering, and related technologies

10.6%

11.4%

Agriculture, natural resources and conservation

1.7%

1.3%

Health, parks, recreation and fitness

7.8%

7.4%

Personal, protective and transportation services

3.6%

3.0%


UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER VALLEY (UFV) UFV is a fully accredited, public post secondary institution that enrolls over 15,500 students per year with campuses in Chilliwack, Abbotsford and Mission, and regional centres in Hope and Agassiz. UFV is recognized nationally for student success, an excellent learning environment, creative integration of programming, and working with local communities. The Globe and Mail Canadian University Report rates UFV at the top of its category in Canada for having the most satisfied students, highest quality of education, best library, smallest class sizes, and easiest course registration process. UFV offers more than 80 certificate and diploma programs available, as well as a master’s degree (Master of Arts in Criminal Justice), 15 bachelor’s degrees (Arts; Arts in Adult Education; Arts in Child and Youth Care; Arts in Criminal Justice; Business Administration (Agriculture Management, Aviation, Trades Management); Computer Information Systems; Fine Arts; General Studies; Kinesiology; Science; Science in Nursing; Social Work) and two associate degrees (Associate of Arts; Associate of

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UFV has embarked on a long-term construction program to relocate the existing campus to a new 85-acre campus in the Canada Education Park, and to increase capacity to 5,000 full-time students. The first facility to open was a two-acre, state-of-the-art Trades & Technology Centre. A second $40M facility is currently under construction.

HIGHER EDUCATION

CANADA EDUCATION PARK In March 2003, the City of Chilliwack, the Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), Canada Lands Company and additional partners signed a memorandum of understanding to officially launch the Canada Education Park project. Over the next 10 years, the Park will unfold on a 200 acre site at the former Canadian Forces Base Chilliwack. Science). UFV also offers a wide variety of programs, workshops, courses and special events through the Continuing Education division. GROWTH

UFV has campuses in Abbotsford, Chilliwack, and Mission, with regional centres in Hope and Agassiz and a growing presence in Chandigarh, India.

Upon completion, the Park will showcase several major institutional facilities. Currently, the RCMP Pacific Region Training Centre (PRTC), Justice Institute of BC (JIBC), University of the Fraser Valley, and Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) are located at the Canada Education Park. Future partners include the Canadian Police College, and Pacific Gateway partnerships (via UFV) with international universities from China and India.

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The Canada Education Park is growing and diversifying daily. The Park’s projected student population is expected to grow exponentially, with the number of full-time students increasing from 5,000 in 2007 to approximately 18,470 by 2020.

HIGHER EDUCATION NAME OF INSTITUTION

LOCATION

DISTANCE

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

TRADE PROGRAMS

ENROLLMENT

UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER VALLEY

Chilliwack*

0 miles

Yes

Yes

15,500**

Types of Programs:

OTHER POST-SECONDARY SCHOOLS There are also two colleges in the community: Sprott Shaw Community College and MTI Community College. These colleges have campuses in numerous other cities throughout the Lower Mainland area of British Columbia. Enrollments at these colleges vary between 50 and 140. Like most career colleges, these institutions provide technical and trades training, including Business, Healthcare, Hospitality and Computers. On-the-job practicum placements and job search assistance are also available. There are also a number of private businesses in Chilliwack and the surrounding area that offer specialized training programs, such as first aid, driving schools, beauty schools, and more.

* Other Locations: Abbotsford, Mission, Hope, Agassiz. ** Enrollment: This amount includes enrollment from all locations

MTI COMMUNITY COLLEGE Types of Programs: SPROTT SHAW COMMUNITY COLLEGE Types of Programs:

TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY Types of Programs:

KWANTLAN UNIVERSITY Types of Programs:

BC INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Types of Programs:

SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY Types of Programs:

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Types of Programs:

15 bachelor’s degrees, one applied master’s degree, and more than 80 certificate and diploma programs in applied and academic areas, including trades: MASTER’S: Arts in Criminal Justice. BACHELOR’S: Adult Education, Arts, Aviation, Business, Administration, Child and Youth Care, Computer Information Systems, Criminal Justice, General Studies, Nursing, Science, Social Work. TRADES: Aircraft Structures Technician, Auto Services Technician, Carpentry, Drafting Technician, (architectural/civil), Electrical Work and Electronics core (at the Career Technical Centre), Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport, Joinery, Parts/Warehousing, Professional Cook (Chilliwack), and Welding C, B, & A. ALSO: English as a second language, college and career preparations, and a continuing studies Chilliwack

0 miles

No

Yes

75-100

Business Management, Administration, Tourism and Hospitality, Child and Youth Care, Health Care, Internships Chilliwack*

0 miles

Yes

Yes

50-75

Business Administration/Management, Payroll/Accounting (Canadian Payroll Association Certification), Human Resources, Retail/Merchandising, etc. Langley

39 miles

Yes

No

4,000

Christian university: offers 41 undergraduate majors including Business, Education, History, Modern Languages, Theatre, Human Kinetics, Biotechnology and Nursing as well as 15 graduate degrees including Counseling Psychology, Theology and Administrative Leadership Langley

39 miles

Yes

Yes

2,230

135 Programs, including 14 Bachelor’s Degrees and Trades & Technology Certificate programs. Program areas include: Nursing, Information Technology, Applied Arts, Psychology, Fashion, HR, Accounting, Entrepreneurial Leadership, Graphic Design, Interior Design, Journalism, Criminology, Horticulture, Science, Mathematics, Applied Sciences, Business, and more. Trades Programs: automotive, electrical, drafting, etc. Burnaby

60 miles

No

Yes

47,969

Administration, Computer, Electronics, Customer Service, Graphic Arts, Lab/Medical Technician, Network Administrator, Plastic / Printing Trades, Radiology, etc. Burnaby*

60 miles

Yes

No

26,670

BA, Bsc, Computing Sc., Engineering, Archaeology, Economic Development, BACrim, BBA, Education, Communications, Psychology, Philosophy, Political Science, Liberal Studies, etc. Vancouver

72 miles

Yes

No

43,579

BA, Bsc, BACrim, BBA, B Planning, Dentistry, Forestry, Human Kinetics, Journalism, Law, Library, Medicine, Music, Nursing, Occ/Env Hygiene, Pharm, BSocWork, Family Studies, etc.

Sources: websites for various institutions: University of the Fraser Valley (www.ufv.ca), MTI Community College, 2009 (www.mticc.com); Vancouver Career College, 2009 (www.vancol.com); Trinity Western University, 2008 (www.twu.ca); BC Institute of Technology, 2008 (www.bcit.ca); Simon Fraser University, 2008 (www.sfu.ca); University of British Columbia, 2008 (www.ubc.ca). Updated 2010.

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QUALITY OF LIFE

“Chilliwack physicians provide comprehensive medical care. I have enjoyed opportunities to practice obstetrics, emergency and ambulatory medicine. The work environment is friendly, collegial and supportive.” DR. JOHN HAMILTON, MEDICAL DIRECTOR CHILLIWACK GENERAL HOSPITAL

HEALTH CARE In British Columbia, the Ministry of Health is responsible for providing a sustainable, affordable and publicly funded health care system. The health sector in Chilliwack is responsible for employing more than 10% of the local workforce while generating eight percent of all community income.

FRASER HEALTH Fraser Health provides a wide range of integrated health care services to more than 1.5 million people living in communities stretching from Burnaby to White Rock to Hope (or one-third of the BC population). Services range from acute care hospitals to community-based residential, home health, mental health and public health services. Fraser Health is one of Canada’s largest and fastest growing health authorities, with over 23,000 employees, 2,300 physicians and nearly 5,000 volunteers. For more information, visit www.fraserhealth.ca.

CHILLIWACK HEALTH SERVICES Chilliwack Health Services (CHS) is comprised of three main branches: prevention

and early intervention, public health protection and community care facilities licensing. CHS has approximately 60 professional and clerical workers on staff. For more information, contact 604-703-6975.

CHILLIWACK GENERAL HOSPITAL Chilliwack has a modern General Hospital (CGH) with about 1,400 employees and approximately 55 general practitioners and 25 specialists. The hospital has 140 beds in their complex care facility. In February 2007, the Regional Health District approved $30M for the comprehensive redevelopment of CGH. This was combined with a $5M contribution raised in the community of Chilliwack by the Chilliwack Campaign Committee and Chapter of the Fraser Valley Health Care Foundation. The redevelopment project included the entire outpatient care module, which encompasses the emergency department, ambulatory care, diagnostics and laboratory services. Below are photos of the new development. Inpatient services include intensive care, coronary care, maternity, medicine, palliative care, psychiatry, surgical, sub-acute and transitional care.

Outpatient services include ambulatory day care, critical care unit, diagnostic imaging, emergency 24/7, gynecology/urology, healthy heart, diabetes program, IV therapy, laboratory services, medical and surgical day care, nutrition counseling, cancer care, physiotherapy, pre-admission clinic, respiratory clinic and speech/language pathology. For more information, contact CGH at 604-795-4141.

PUBLIC HEALTH Health Prevention/Early Intervention focuses on the well being of our communities through promoting healthy choices and preventing disease. Services and programs include infant/ maternal health, child health (0-5 years and 5-19), immunization, adult flu clinics, sexual disease clinic, youth clinic, adult health information and education and communicable disease control. For more information, contact 604-702-4900.

CHILLIWACK HEALTH CARE Hospital Beds (Acute Care in CGH)

138

Outpatient Clinics

3

Physicians in area

235

Dentists in area

43

Source: Fraser Health, 2011

31


QUALITY OF LIFE

HOME HEALTH Professional support is provided for individuals in our community with acute, rehabilitation, chronic or palliative care needs. Home Health consists of the following: • Fraser Health Home Support provides in-home personal care to people who need assistance with daily living. • Assisted Living is available for those who are able to live independently, but require some regular on-site personal support. Funded sites include The Waverly and The Cascades. • Residential Care facilities that provide 24-hour complex health care services are available to those requiring long-term care and professional support. For more information on Home Health programs, contact 604-702-4800.

MENTAL HEALTH AND ADDICTIONS Support is provided for individuals who have a chronic and persistent mental illness or an addiction issue. For more information, contact 604-702-4860.

MEDICAL SPECIALIST SERVICES There are about 43 dentists and 68 physicians in Chilliwack. There are specialists in pediatrics; obstetrics; gynecology; orthopedics; plastic and cosmetic surgery; ear, nose and throat; neurology, urology, ophthalmology and oral surgery; periodontics; orthodontics; etc.

DOCTORS’ SATELLITE CLINICS The three satellite clinics were established to provide health care after hours and on weekends. An additional purpose is to provide relief for the Emergency Room of the Hospital.

LABORATORY SERVICES Full laboratory services and outpatient collection services are available at each acute care site. In addition, there is a Satellite Outpatient service station located in Sardis. This station is managed by Chilliwack

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General Hospital staff and offers a house call service to patients who are unable to come to the laboratory for their blood work.

PHARMACY SERVICES The City of Chilliwack has numerous pharmacies throughout the region. Also the hospital provides an outpatient dispensing service to patients receiving chemotherapy, investigation agents, and Home IV Therapy.

CHILLIWACK HOSPITAL AND HEALTH CARE FOUNDATION – (CHHF) The Chilliwack Hospital and Health Care Foundation is an innovative model dedicated to raising funds for the Chilliwack General Hospital and for the improvement of healthcare in the community. Funds raised help to ensure state-of-the-art equipment, facilities, and programs for over 90,000 residents of Chilliwack and the adjacent communities of Harrison Hot Springs and the City of Hope. For more information or to make a donation, please call 604-792-7839.

CITY OF CHILLIWACK AMBULANCE Chilliwack’s ambulance service is provided by BC Ambulance Services (BCAS) and is connected to the 911 Emergency System. BCAS works under the authority of the Emergency Health Services Commission of the provincial Ministry of Health Services. The BCAS provides emergency pre-hospital

treatment and transportation by ambulance to the public and visitors to BC. In BC, the service now employs about 1,100 full-time paramedic and dispatch personnel, 2,200 part-time staff, and 100 management and support personnel. Service in rural areas is largely provided by part-time staff paramedics trained to the Emergency Medical Assistant (EMA) I level. In urban areas, ambulance stations are staffed by a mix of full-time (EMA II) and part-time paramedics. In the major metropolitan areas Advanced Life Support (ALS) paramedic service is available. EMERGENCY TELEPHONE SERVICE: 911

All telephoned requests for ambulance service are directed to one of three regional dispatch centres, which provide call-taking and call assessment services, as well as communications links which facilitate contact with, and the dispatch of, ground ambulances. If an air ambulance is requested, the regional dispatch centre will put the caller into contact with the Provincial Air Ambulance Coordination Centre in Victoria. RESPONSE TIMES

Response times in metropolitan areas are measured against a standard of less than eight minutes for the most urgent calls. Response times in rural areas are predominately determined by the distance traveled to an accident scene. For more information, go to their website: http://www.gov.bc.ca/health.


QUALITY OF LIFE

Canada ranks among the most peaceful countries in the world, according to the global peace index. Ranked 8th safest place in the world, Canada is ahead of the United Kingdom (ranked 48) and the United States (ranked 96).

SAFETY AND SECURITY FIRE DEPARTMENT The Chilliwack Fire Department serves the community through six fire halls, located in downtown Chilliwack, Sardis, Rosedale, Greendale, Yarrow and Ryder Lake. The Chilliwack Fire Department is a composite fire department staffed with 31 career firefighters stationed in Fire Hall 1, and supported by 123 paid-on-call firefighters. The department is administered by the Fire Chief and three Assistant Fire Chiefs, and includes a Career Training Officer, a Fire Prevention Officer and a Public Educator/Inspector. In 2009, the fire department responded to over 2,307 calls for service and provided a wide range of services including: FIRE PROTECTION SERVICES

– responds to all fires within the City of Chilliwack, including structure fires, vehicle fires, brush fires and rail or air transportation emergencies. FIRE SUPPRESSION

– responds to public calls for carbon monoxide alarms, electric power lines down, gas line rupture, assist the RCMP and other agencies and responders. PUBLIC SERVICE CALLS

– plans, coordinates and responds to disasters or major emergencies which threaten our community. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

FIRE PREVENTION ACTIVITIES

– BC Fire Code enforcement through a system of cyclical and special fire inspections and life safety inspections of all public buildings. FIRE INSPECTION SERVICES

JUVENILE FIRE SETTER PROGRAM –counsels

and screens young people involved in fire setting activities. – partners with local business and service clubs to provide free smoke alarms to needy home owners. SMOKE ALARM PROGRAM

– in concert with the City Bylaw Department and RCMP inspects multi-family residences and public buildings to ensure life safety and coordinate building upgrades to meet minimum safety codes. HEALTH AND SAFETY INSPECTIONS

– fire safety lectures to schools, strata groups, employers, seniors groups, clubs and associations, and community groups as requested. Provides information and advice to citizens on fire safety issues as requested.

COMMUNITY SUPPORT

– as mandated by the BC Fire Commissioner’s Office determines the cause and origin of all fires and records and reports them.

• Provides educational bursaries for local students.

PUBLIC EDUCATION SERVICES

FIRE INVESTIGATION

• Supports the local food bank (Salvation Army). • Participates in fundraising for charities. • Participates in community events and parades.

– supports the BC Ambulance Service (BCAS) by responding to emergency medical calls including cardiac arrests and trauma. EMERGENCY MEDICAL AID

MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS –

provides rescue, fire extinguishment, scene safety and assistance to on-scene BCAS personnel at all major transportation accidents. RESCUE –

provides rescue to persons involved in farm, home and industrial accidents, rescues persons from elevators and hazardous material releases.

33


QUALITY OF LIFE

CHILLIWACK RCMP The community’s police services are provided by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), under contract with the City of Chilliwack. There are three separate RCMP facilities in Chilliwack: the Downtown Chilliwack Community Police Department (CPD), the Upper Fraser Valley Area Headquarters Administrative Office, and the RCMP Pacific Region Training Facility. ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE (RCMP)

The City’s CPD provides the community with general policing services. It includes 54 RCMP members, 1.5 Public Service employees, 28 Communications Centre dispatchers, and 37 Municipal employees. As well as providing police enforcement, our local RCMP unit participates in a number of local programs and initiatives to better serve our municipality: • Auxiliary Constable Program. • Victim Assistance Program. • Volunteer operation of the sub-station (CPAC). • Enhanced Crime Protection/Victim Services (CP/VS) programs and functions. • Other Crime Prevention Programs include BlockWatch, Child Ident, SpeedWatch, Citizens on Patrol, Crime Free Multihousing, GrowWatch, Business Winfax, D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education), Youth Services and other activities to support community crime reduction. UPPER FRASER VALLEY AREA HEADQUARTERS

Administration for all RCMP in the Chilliwack, Agassiz, Hope and Boston Bar

areas are managed through the Upper Fraser Valley Area Headquarters. This office includes 42 RCMP, 11 Public Servants, and two municipal employees. The Administration Office supplies all administration for the RCMP and for the following units: • Integrated Border Enforcement Team (formerly Customs and Excise): a federal unit who monitor activities of our border with the USA at points where there is no crossing.

CHILLIWACK CRIME PROFILE Population

95

Case Load

105

Population Served Per Member

819

VIOLENT CRIMES Number of Offences

850

Crime Rate

10.9

PROPERTY CRIMES Number of Offences Crime Rate

• Criminal Intelligence Section: a federal unit that monitors activities of known criminals and criminal groups.

OTHER CRIMES

• Forensic Identification Section: assists investigating officers by attending crime scenes to search for evidence (ie: fingerprints, footwear impressions, etc.)

TOTAL CRIMINAL CODE OFFENCES

• Major Crime Unit: assists with the investigation of serious crimes (ie: murder). • Police Dog Services: assists investigators in the apprehension of fleeing suspects. • Reconstructionist/Analyst: aids investigators with an in-depth investigation into the cause of a traffic collision, speed of the vehicles involved, etc. • Highway Patrol: patrols and enforces traffic laws on the Trans Canada Highway as well as attend to any complaints and traffic collisions. RCMP PACIFIC REGION TRAINING CENTRE

The RCMP also has a Pacific Region Training Centre (PRTC) located on a 60 acre campus in Chilliwack at the Canada Education Park. This training centre provides national and

77,796

POLICE STRENGTH

Number of Offences Crime Rate

CRIME RATE

5,133 66 3,945 51 9,928 128

DRUG CRIMES Number of Offences

281

Crime Rate

3.6

ASSAULT: Level 1 Number of Offences

489

Crime Rate

6.3

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT Number of Offences

699

Crime Rate

9.0

Source: Police Services Division, Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General, British Columbia, 2009.

international in-service training to RCMP members and other police services. The facility is also used by other government agencies for law enforcement related training. There are 80 course offered at this facility, with 6,000 RCMP officers and employees trained per year, and 2,500 officers receiving annual qualification.

CRIME RATES Crime rates in Chilliwack are comparable to many other Canadian communities. Crime rates in BC have declined 30% over the last several years, and they continue to decline respective to population growth.

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION


QUALITY OF LIFE

HOUSING

RENTAL HOUSING

About 76% of all properties in Chilliwack are owned (which is higher than the BC average at 70%). The remaining 24% of properties are rented.

There are about 8,000 rented dwellings, Historically, the Fraser Valley’s vacancy which includes about 3,000 licensed rental rate fluctuates between 0% and 4.5%. The apartments, plus another 500 unlicensed last reported vacancy rate is 4.5% for a rental units in Chilliwack. Approximately 2-bedroom apartment, which is average in 54% of the rental apartments are onethe Fraser Valley. With recent low mortgage bedroom units, and 39% two-bedroom units. interest rates, many potential renters are Average rental rates (based on a 2-bedroom entering the ownership market, causing apartment) is around $750 per month an increased rental market vacancy rate. Housing (CMHC Stock 2010). compared to $1160 in Vancouver.

Of the existing housing stock, 61% are single family detached, 20% apartments, 15% are semi-detached houses, townhouses, or duplexes and 4% are manufactured homes. There are more single-detached homes in Chilliwack at 61% as compared to the rest of BC at 49%. This is likely because many people move eastward into Chilliwack for more affordable housing and a better standard of living. However, there is a growing regional trend for the development of higher density housing options.

HOUSING STOCK Apartment: 20% Townhouse: 11% Manu. Home: 4% Duplex: 4%

Single Detached 61%

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2008

35


QUALITY OF LIFE

SUBSIDIZED HOUSING Subsidized housing is usually developed and managed by non-profit organizations. In Chilliwack, there are about 10 subsidized developments for seniors and/or for low income families. The demand for subsidized housing always surpasses the supply. To help bridge such a gap, a provincial program called S.A.F.E.R. (Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters) has been instrumental in placing the needy seniors in standard market rental apartments.

SPECIAL HOUSING Non-profit organizations are also involved in establishing group homes for those physically or mentally challenged. Usually they are located within existing residential neighbourhoods to provide a normal living environment for their residents. Contact the Chilliwack Society for Community Living at 604-792-7726 or visit www.cscl.org for more information.

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

RENTED/OWNED DWELLINGS

CHILLIWACK

BC

Total number of dwellings

31,635

1,643,150

Number of Rented Dwellings

7,335

493,995

Median Monthly Payments for rented Dwellings ($)

$699

$752

Number of owned Dwellings Average value of owned dwellings $ Median monthly payments for owner-occupied dwellings ($)

24,185

1,145,050

$300,911

$418,703

$926

$876

Source: Statistics Canada, 2006

There are also a number of private congregated housing projects for seniors, which are designed to meet the special needs of seniors for independent living, and offer common dining and living facilities. Some of them administer limited personal health programs. For more information, contact the Seniors Resource Society at 604-858-9898.

HOUSING PRICES Land costs are remarkably lower in Chilliwack than other areas of the Lower

Mainland; however, the cost of construction remains about the same. Nevertheless,the cost of housing can be hundreds of thousands of dollars less than western areas of the Lower Mainland. The next chapter on Economic Profile details some of Chilliwack’s housing costs.


QUALITY OF LIFE

CITY OF CHILLIWACK: RESIDENTIAL AREAS INDICATED IN BROWN L egend

C IT OF C H IL L IW

F IR S T N AT IO N S UNKNO W N C iv ic o pe n s p a ce F a rm ing - p o ultry F a rm ing -da iry/b ee f In d us tria l/co m m e rcial - hig h co ve rag e

L egend

In d us tria l/co m m e rcial - low co v era ge

F IR S T N AT IO N S

In d us tria l/co m m e rcial - m e diu m cov e rag e

C iv ic o pe n s p a ce

UNKNO W N

F a rm ing - p o ultry

In d us tria l/co m m e rcial o utd o or

F a rm ing -da iry/b ee f

In d us tria l/co m m e rci

In s titu tio n - h igh co v era ge

In d us tria l/co m m e rci

In d us tria l/co m m e rci

In s titu tio n al - hig h s ite cov e ra g e

In d us tria l/co m m e rci

In s titu tio n - h igh co v

In s titu tio n al - m e diu m cov e ra g e

In s titu tio n al - hig h s In s titu tio n al - m e diu

N a tu ra l o p en sp a ce

N a tu ra l o p en sp a ce P a rkin g

P a rkin g

R e sid e n tial - hig h/m

R e sid e n tial - low de

R e sid e n tial - hig h/m ed iu m de n sity

U rba n va can t

fa rm in g - cro p a n d f

R e sid e n tial - low de ns ity U rba n va can t fa rm in g - cro p a n d fruit

Ăœ 1000

0 M e te rs

I:\M A P S _G IS \C A D A S T R A L \A R C M A P

37


ECONOMIC PROFILE • Income and Wages • Cost of Living • Cost of Doing Business • Economic Sector Profiles • Employment and Labour • Business Licenses • Development Costs • Taxation

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

40 41 41 43 55 57 57 59


ECONOMIC PROFILE

Economic PROFILE

“Out of 28 sites in the Pacific Northwest, we chose Chilliwack. Key factors were proximity to rail and other transportation infrastructure, border crossing, raw materials, skilled and knowledgeable labour force, and a business positive Local Government and Community. The City of Chilliwack and CEPCO performed beyond our expectations, providing invaluable support, advice and service. Ultimately, it was the positive attitude of both the City and CEPCO that attracted us to Chilliwack.”

British Columbia is Canada’s third biggest province, after Ontario and Quebec. It is home to 13% of Canada’s population and produces about 12% of the country’s total GDP. The City of Chilliwack, as part of BC’s prosperous Lower Mainland Region, is a thriving and economically diversified community of growing importance to the region. With low business and housing costs — and a superb quality of life — the City of Chilliwack provides that ideal combination of attributes for businesses, investors and prospective residents.

LEW V. ROSSNER, VICE PRESIDENT ROGERS FOODS LTD.

39


ECONOMIC PROFILE

INCOME AND WAGES

WAGES

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

British Columbia’s minimum wage is $9.50 (CAD) per hour (increasing to $10.25 on May 1, 2012).

Chilliwack’s household income level has remained relatively stable over the past 10 years. The average rate of income increase over the past 10 years has been 2.2%, according to Service Canada.

EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE Government of Canada employment insurance premiums are based on gross payroll up to a gross per worker salary of $44,200 CAD per year. Employee contribution is 1.78% for every $100 of earnings, to an annual maximum of $786.76. These rates and amounts are reviewed each year. For more information on the most recent rates,

Chilliwack’s average household income is $64,276 per year. The BC average is slightly higher at $72,642. Comparatively, Chilliwack’s average family income is strong in relation to other cities of its size, due to its lower cost of living. AVERAGE PER PERSON INCOME PER PERSON EARNINGS

CHILLIWACK

BRITISH COLUMBIA

TOTAL

MALE

FEMALE

TOTAL

MALE

FEMALE

Average earnings (all persons with earnings)

$61,495

$38,528

$22,967

$69,438

$42,655

$26,783

Average earnings (worked full year, full-time)

$85,134

$50,268

$34,866

$98,845

$57,772

$41,073

Source: 2006 Census data from Statistics Canada, updated 2010.

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

phone 1-800-206-7218 or visit www.servicecanada.gc.ca. (Service Canada, 2011) Worker’s Compensation is paid via WorkSafeBC. The base rate is $1.54 per $100 of payroll, plus an industry rate. The maximum assessable wage is $71,700. (WorkSafeBC, 2011) For more information and current rates, visit www.worksafe.com.

BENEFIT PACKAGES Benefit packages given to employees are at the discretion of the employer. Benefit packages usually include medical coverage, and more commonly also include dental, disability insurance, and some sort of pension plan (such as RRSP contributions). Employees get at minimum two weeks of paid vacation and 10 statutory holidays, but some employers provide more paid vacation time. Costs for benefit packages are often paid for by the employer, but more recently employees make some financial contribution to their benefits plan.

CHILLIWACK

BRITISH COLUMBIA

All households

$49,342

$52,709

One-person households

$24,041

$27,773

AVERAGE SALARIES (SOUTH WEST BC)

Two-or-more-person households

$56,174

$63,969

CLASSIFICATION

CDN$

Management

$35.54

Business, Finance, Administration

$21.55

Sciences, Natural & Applied & Related

$30.95

Health Occupations

$28.69

Education, Social Science, Government

$27.43

Art, Culture, Recreation, Sport

$22.48

Service

$15.58

Sales

$19.64

Trades, Transport, Equipment Operators

$24.25

Primary Industry

$20.23

Manufacturing, Processing, Utilities

$20.06

Shipping/Receiving

$16.22

Machine Maintenance/Millright

$29.26

Administrative Clerk

$15.59

Source: 2006 Census data from Statistics Canada, updated 2010.

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Avg. Household Income ($)

Vancouver

83,487

British Columbia

80,929

Abbotsford

79,391

Chilliwack

75,769

Penticton

64,106

Victoria

60,022 0

15,000

30,000

45,000

Source: Financial Post 2012

60,000

75,000

90,000

SOURCE: 2010: http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/cst01/LABR69A-eng.htm

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION


HOUSING COSTS The average cost of a single-family detached home in Chilliwack is about 60% less than Vancouver and about 30% less than Abbotsford. (Reference charts on page 42). Comparing income to costs, Chilliwack residents enjoy significant savings in cost of living and a much richer standard of living.

COST OF DOING BUSINESS British Columbia’s cost advantage comes from abundant, inexpensive electricity and natural gas, well-developed infrastructure, proximity to markets, a cost effective work force, and low inflation. Some specific cost

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES $

better health insurance rates than the United States.

• Canada’s cost of electricity is cheaper than the USA and all European communities — with superior reliability in Chilliwack at 99.923%.

• BC also has a lower corporate tax burden than the western American States, averaging out to about 30%.

• Costs for skilled technical and professional workers can be as much as 40% below comparable US centres.

• Payroll taxes are lower in Canada than in any other G-7 country — about 16% versus nearly 25% in the United States.

• Costs for secondary manufacturers and technology firms are lower in British Columbia compared to US jurisdictions.

• Lower Health care Costs — about 22% lower than the United States.

• Labour and production costs in Canada are low in relation to the United States and other G-7 countries. For instance, BC has about 35% lower labour costs for semi-skilled workers than Washington State. • Canada also has lower employersponsored benefits, lower payroll tax and

ECONOMIC PROFILE

advantages include:

COST OF LIVING

• Lower statutory and employer benefits — Canadian employer-sponsored plans and time not worked are only 27.1% of salary and wages, compared to 41.7% in the United States. • Lower Premiums and Liability — Canada applies lower premiums and limits company liability.

COST OF LIVING INDEX

Shelter

13,680

Food

6,870

Kelowna, BC

111.9

Prince George, BC

112.7

Clothing

2,703

Transportation

10,241

Health and Personal

3,171

Recreation, etc.

5,656

Taxes and Securities

17,707

Los Angeles, CA

Other

10,908

San Francisco, CA

Total

70,937

Source: Financial Post, 2012

101.6

Chilliwack, BC

110.8

Tacoma, WA

121.7

Portland, OR

145.2 172.1 0

50

100

150

200

Source: ACCRA Cost of Living Index, (Canadian Cities: 3rd quarter 2005, US Cities: 1st quarter 2007)

COST OF LIVING INDEX COST OF LIVING INDEX

100% COMPOSITE INDEX

13% GROCERY ITEMS

28% HOUSING

10% UTILITIES

10% TRANSPORT.

4% HEALTH CARE

35% MISC. GOODS & SERVICES

Chilliwack, BC

101.6

115.2

93.7

94.8

103.8

61

109.2

Kelowna, BC

111.9

110

97.3

82.8

120

49.9

107.7

Prince George, BC

112.7

108.1

121.4

111.1

122.6

60.2

111.2

Tacoma, WA

110.8

125.1

112.5

102.3

113

123.3

104.5

Portland. OR

121.7

122.3

133.3

104.8

125

110.3

117.5

San Francisco, CA

172.1

148.7

273.2

88.6

131.8

126.2

140.4

Los Angeles, CA

145.2

112

253.1

78.7

113.6

103.9

103.9

Source: ACCRA Cost of Living Index, (Canadian Cities: 3rd quarter 2005, US Cities: 1st quarter 2007)

41


ECONOMIC PROFILE

AVERAGE HOUSING PRICE (MLS)

HOUSING PRICE COMPARISON

CHILLIWACK REA

Housing Price Comparison

Detached

$352,010

Attached

$235,500

Apartment

$139,200

Chilliwack

$900,000

ABBOTSFORD / FRASER VALLEY REB

Abbotsford

$800,000

Detached

$423,191

Attached

$300,806

Apartment

$175,824

Vancouver

$700,000 $600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $300,000

GREATER VANCOUVER REB

$200,000

Detached

$1,023,100

Attached

$471,700

Apartment

$371,500

$100,000 $0 Single Family Detached

Source: Chilliwack, Fraser Valley and Greater Vancouver Real Estate Boards, 2012

Attached

Apartment

Source: Chilliwack, Fraser Valley & Greater Vancouver Real Estate Boards, 2012

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA YEAR

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

AVG

2011

114.8

115.2

116.1

116.3

117.1

116.5

116.6

116.9

117.3

117.4

117.5

116.5

116.5

2010

112.2

113.2

112.6

113.2

113.6

113.4

114.9

114.5

114.5

114.8

114.9

114.6

113.9

2009

111.4

111.9

112

112.1

112.9

112.8

112.4

112.8

112.7

112.1

112.4

111.9

112.3

2008

109.9

110.3

110.8

111.8

112.8

113.6

114.2

114.0

114.1

112.8

112.3

111.4

112.3

2007

109.1

109.1

109.5

109.9

110.5

110.3

110.5

110.4

110.5

110

110.1

110.1

110

2006

106.6

106.7

107.2

107.8

108.7

108.7

108.8

109

108.4

108.3

108.7

108.8

108.1

2005

104.8

105

105.3

106

106.3

106.4

106.6

106.8

107.3

107.1

107.1

106.7

106.3

2004

102.5

102.9

103.2

103.9

104.7

104.9

104.7

104.7

104.8

104.8

105

104.8

104.2

2003

101

101.5

102.3

102.1

102.1

102

102.2

102.6

102.9

102.4

102.5

102.6

102.2

2002

97.9

98.3

98.9

99.8

100.2

100.3

100.6

100.7

100.8

100.7

100.9

100.8

100

2001

97.2

95.5

96.1

97.6

98.1

98.7

98.7

98.5

99

98.3

97.5

97.4

97.7

Source: BC Stats, 2012

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 120

BC Canada

115

110

105

100

95 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Source: BC Stats, 2012

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2010

2011


ECONOMIC PROFILE

“We made the decision to locate in Chilliwack because of the business, friendly environment, the lower cost of housing, the proximity to Metro Vancouver, and the ability to meet the growing needs of our business. Chilliwack demonstrates a positive business attitude and offers a labour force composed of experienced professionals, trades and workers. Local residents care about the community and work hard to promote a positive environment for families and businesses. The Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO) is doing an outstanding job in introducing our community to business and serving the needs of businesses that are already located in the community.” RANDY REGIER, PRESIDENT PREVIEW BUILDERS INTERNATIONAL INC.

ECONOMIC SECTORS Chilliwack has a diverse and growing economy. Today, Chilliwack has a variety of prominent sectors ranging from agriculture to manufacturing to retail and wholesale trade to professional services.

Chilliwack’s service and retail sectors account for approximately 50% of the GDP. The largest industries within these categories are: • Retail and Wholesale Trade at 12% • FIRE (Finance, Insurance, Real Estate) at 11% • Public Administration at 9% • Health at 6%

ECONOMIC SECTORS (GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT) Agriculture - 6%

3% - Industry 9% - Public Admin.

Mining - 1%

4% - Other Serv.

Utilities - 1% Construction - 8%

3% - Accommodation/Food

Manufacturing - 13%

3% - Arts/Enter./Recreat.

Wholesale - 5%

6% - Healthcare/Social Assist.

Retail Trade - 7%

6% - Education

Transportation/Warehousing - 6%

3% - Admin./Remediation 4% - Prof./Scientific/Tech.

Information/Culture - 1%

Finance/Real Estate - 11% SOURCE: GDP by NAICS industry. City of Chilliwack based on Stats Canada 2006 and BC Stats 2009

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ECONOMIC PROFILE

• Education at 6% The goods producing industries have been growing with the community, with manufacturing accounting for 13%, construction at 8% and agriculture and forestry at 6% of Chilliwack’s GDP. GROWING SECTORS

Sectors that are destined for economic growth in Chilliwack include: • Agriculture • Aviation and Aerospace • Education • Film • Food Processing • Healthcare • Manufacturing • Professional Services • Real Estate • Retail/Wholesale Trade • Technology • Tourism

AGRICULTURE SECTOR Agriculture is an essential part of Chilliwack’s community identity. It has been part of our history and it is a significant portion of our present, with approximately 64% (17,051 hectares) of our land dedicated to agriculture. Agriculture in Chilliwack accounts for 6% of NUMBER OF FARMS Dairy, Cattle & Calves

473

Poultry

255

Horses

146

Fruits & Nuts

138

Nursery Crops

121

Beef

97

Greenhouse

71

Sheep

49

Bees

18

Llamas & Alpacas

17

Pigs

17

Rabbits

15

Note: Some farms fall into more than one market segment. *Note: A small portion of the Greenhouse Floriculture segment have field-grown flowers. Source: Ministry of Agriculture and Lands, 2008

our GDP, which is strong in comparison to the provincial BC average of 3%. THE ECONOMIC STRENGTH OF CHILLIWACK AGRICULTURE

From its 828 farms, Chilliwack’s agricultural sector gains approximately $252M in annual gross farm receipts. Dairy farming accounts for almost half of all farm revenues in Chilliwack. In fact, Chilliwack is home to the largest farm in Canada. Also, the poultry, vegetable and berry production, floriculture and nursery industries play a growing and crucial role in the region’s economy. The City also gains substantial economic spin-offs through such agricultural supporting industries as feed, fertilizer, chemicals, machinery, and fuel. As well, agriculture attracts its fair share of investment activity with approximately $1.6B in land and buildings. THE FUTURE OF CHILLIWACK AGRICULTURE

The City of Chilliwack is committed to increasing and improving agriculture in our community. Efforts have been initiated to

attract new agricultural businesses and to help the City’s existing agricultural businesses grow, expand, and diversify. New technologies and changing demographics are creating opportunities and market niches for a whole new variety of goods and services. EMPLOYMENT

Agriculture is one of the City’s major employers and is essential to Chilliwack’s economy, providing annual cash wages over $34M. Like most other places, Chilliwack has experienced trends towards larger farms, decreased labour in commodity proMAJOR AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYERS COMPANY

EMPLOYEES

Rainbow Greenhouses

*160

Viterra Feed Products

95

Fraser Valley Duck & Goose

77

Cannor Nurseries

65

Inline Nurseries

50

*45 are part-time seasonal Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), 2010

“After examining a number of site location options in 1988, we chose Chilliwack for our new facility. With an agricultural base, Chilliwack is a natural fit for us. Today, our greenhouse wholesale company has grown and expanded to 1.2 million square feet, $26 million in sales and 150 employees. Our dealing with the City of Chilliwack have been very positive. They are and continue to be very supportive of the economic sustainability of our industry.” STAN VANDER WAAL PRESIDENT RAINBOW GREENHOUSES

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ECONOMIC PROFILE

ductions, and more high-tech applications of equipment and production techniques such as hydroponics.

FOOD PROCESSING SECTOR With the prominence of agriculture in Chilliwack, the area is ideal for food processing. For food processors, Chilliwack has become a desirable location due to its bountiful source of raw materials and proximity to major transportation and distribution points. Chilliwack has a very high percentage of agricultural operations, with about 64% of the City’s land mass dedicated to agriculture. These lands provide approximately $252M in local revenues annually (not including agricultural support industries such as feed, fertilizer, chemicals, machinery, and fuel). Additionally, Chilliwack accounts for 25% of the province’s farms (while only occupying 4% of the total agricultural land), and produces more than 62% of BC’s gross farm sales. As Chilliwack is situated in the eastern portion of the Lower Mainland region, food processing companies are able to take advantage of the proximity to the Vancouver and US marketplaces. The combined accessibility of agricultural resources and markets has led to the Lower Mainland region becoming home to the highest concentration of food processors in British Columbia. Chilliwack, in particular, provides approximately 11% of the province’s raw materials for food processing. It is these factors that have contributed to notable food processors selecting Chilliwack, such as Rogers Foods, Sandel Foods, Meadow Valley Meats, and Vantage Foods. DIVERSE RANGE OF FOOD PROCESSORS

Chilliwack is already home to a diverse range of food processors in such subsectors as beverages, dairy, meat, grains and flour, and organic foods. This diversity is reflected in the wide variety of processing facilities present in the community. In addition to larger food processing

firms such as Agropur Division Natrel, Johnston Packers and Fraser Valley Meats, smaller-scale operations have emerged including Honeyview Farms, Happy Days Goat Dairy and Anita’s Organic Grain and Flour Mill. The emergence of smaller food processing facilities over the past few years is attributed to factors such as vertical integration as production companies (farms) have incorporated small food processing facilities and retail outlets into their business. In addition this growth is due to the expanding MAJOR FOOD PROCESSORS COMPANY

EMPLOYEES

Vantage Foods

110

Johnston Packers

110

Fraser Valley Meats

70

Agropur Division Natrel

45

Sandel Foods

40

Coast Mountain Dairy

33

Rogers Foods

28

“Chilliwack has excellent road and rail transportation corridors that provides easy access to raw materials and our target markets. We also selected Chilliwack as the site of our new mill because of the community’s commitment to agriculture and agricultural infrastructure. We would also like to acknowledge the positive attitude and support of the City of Chilliwack and the Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation.” VIC BELL, PRESIDENT ROGERS FOODS LTD.

Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), 2010

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ECONOMIC PROFILE

popularity of organic produce and shop-local themes.

DOWNTOWN SECTOR PROFILE Chilliwack is continuously renewing its downtown core, drawing new interest in its business and community potential. Many of these improvements are the results of a partnership between the City of Chilliwack, the Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO) and the Downtown Chilliwack Business Improvement Association (BIA). IMPROVEMENTS

Recent downtown improvements include: • Coast Chilliwack Hotel purchased the property at First Avenue and Young Road for approximately $7M and invested

almost $5M to renovate the property. • Streetscaping on Yale Road and Wellington Avenue. • Chilliwack Five Corners office building complex: 18,000 sq.ft. facility that is the home of Family Justice, Community Corrections, Crown Counsel, City of Chilliwack Business Licensing Dept., Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), and Chilliwack Chamber of Commerce. • Chilliwack Law Courts: 40,000 sq.ft Provincial Court House. Additional major developments in the area include: • Chilliwack Landing Leisure Centre: a $13M, aquatic and recreational facility • Prospera Centre: a $20.3M, 3,500 seat multiplex arena. • Chilliwack Cultural Centre: a new $22M

facility featuring an art gallery, 500+ seat performance theatre, 250 seat studio, music, instruction rooms, arts and crafts studios and related amenities. • Complex Care facility: 100 beds, providing complex care for the elderly, $30M. HERITAGE BUILDING FACADE PROGRAM

To provide an incentive for local business owners to improve their store fronts, the Downtown Chilliwack Business Improvement Association offers a grant program that is available on a first-come, first-serve basis to downtown business. The cost-sharing stimulus plan will pay for half of the bill up to a maximum of $2,000. Improvements such as signage, lighting and new canopies must meet the City of Chilliwack’s design guidelines. REVITALIZATION INCENTIVE

“We were determined to remain in downtown Chilliwack because of the energy and character of the area. Further, our new location provides us with access, all within walking distance, to a variety of restaurants, banks, shopping locations and other amenities that are convenient and appreciated by our employees.” PAUL MURRIN, PRESIDENT, WELDER ENGINEERING

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ECONOMIC PROFILE

Downtown businesses are eligible for a tax exemption through the Downtown Revitalization Zone bylaw. This tax exemption applies to the construction of a new improvement (multi-family residential, commercial and institutional properties), or the alteration of an existing improvement where the alteration has a value in excess of $200,000. Assessments are frozen for five years in the core area, increasing by 50% in year six and full assessment in year seven. DOWNTOWN LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT PLAN

The overall intent of the Downtown Land Use and Development Plan is: • to give greater clarity and certainty for residents, the development community, and other key stakeholder groups regarding land uses, urban design, parks, and public open space at a neighbourhood by neighbourhood (or block) level, and • to encourage more cohesive and compatible development patterns in the downtown that foster city-wide sustainability and livability and that are responsive to growth patterns in the wider community and region. For more information on the Plan, visit www.chilliwack.com. DOWNTOWN CORE TASK FORCE

In 2010, Mayor Sharon Gaetz appointed the Downtown Core Task Force to examine factors that affect the viability of a vibrant downtown core area and to recommend a strategy and actions to Council that could accelerate the revitalization and redevelopment of this area in a manner consistent with the adopted Downtown Land Use Plan. REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL

Contact CEPCO at 604-792-7839 for a

comprehensive list of available properties.

BC is now the third largest film location in North America, behind only Los Angeles and New York. In 2010, film and television spending in BC totaled $1.01 billion.

BC’s film industry is also creating a significant economic impact in other industries including construction, tourism, and small business sectors such as accounting services, vehicle rentals, and gas stations. Also add the earnings of 50,000 BC film-industry employees who put their money back into the economy.

FILM STATISTICS AND PRODUCTIONS

ISTRATEGIC ADVANTAGES

BC is a viable, competitive and cost effective centre for production. There were over 246 film and television productions shot in BC in 2010, compared to 239 in 2009. These included major feature films; movies-of-theweek; pilots; documentaries; mini series; TV series; and animation projects.

Chilliwack is an ideal filming location for its multiple and diverse rural and urban landscapes: mountains, lakes, rivers, ski hills, farms, modern/historic sites, industrial/ office buildings, nightclubs, mansions, hovels, country roads, highways, and the Canada Education Park (former Canadian Forces Base). Chilliwack also has a full support network of hotels, restaurants, merchants, and large filming facilities.

FILM SECTOR

The majority of activity was in television series production, which totaled $512 million in 2010, an increase of $74 million over 2009. Domestic production spending in BC increased to $244 million in 2010 from $218 million in 2009. Productions in Chilliwack in 2010 include: commercials for A&W Restaurant, Tim Hortons and Walmart, as well as the fifth and final season of the highly popular Sci-Fi

FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION SPENDING (2010)$87M DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PRODUCTION SPENDING (CDN $)

TOTAL BUDGET OVERALL

TOTAL SPENT IN BC

Feature

$568M

$318M

TV Series/ Pilots

$747M

$535M

Movies of the Week/ Mini Series

$87M

$72M

Documentaries/ Short Films

18M

16M

Animation

87M

82M

Source: BC Film Commission, 2011

TV series, Eureka.

Financial benefits to filming in Chilliwack include low location and permit costs and tax credits. The Chilliwack Film Commission provides a one-stop shop for producers and location scouts by assisting with permit processing and various filming needs. PRODUCTION FACILITIES

BC has over 70 post-production facilities, 60 shooting stages, a water tank facility, and an extensive resource of equipment rentals. BC is also home to two of the largest film and television studio facilities in Canada, and one of the largest special effects stages in North America. EMPLOYMENT

British Columbia is the third-largest film and television service production centre in North America, contributing over one billion dollars

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ECONOMIC PROFILE

the Fraser TSA is 1.27 million cubic meters. Even though the Fraser TSA spans both the Metro Vancouver Regional District and the Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD), the majority of active harvest areas are in the latter. It is for this reason that the FVRD, and Chilliwack in particular, have a major share of harvesting-related employment. EMPLOYMENT

annually to BC’s economy and providing an estimated 20,000 direct and 15,000 indirect jobs.

FINANCE, INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE SECTOR Chilliwack is a convenient base for numerous Finance, Insurance and Real Estate (FIRE) companies serving Upper Fraser Valley communities. The rapid population growth over the last two decades has attracted virtually all major financial institutions into the community. Currently nearly all chartered banks and financial/ investment service institutions are represented. Also the vibrant real estate market for residential, commercial, industrial and institutional markets is effectively serviced through local agencies. EMPLOYMENT

The FIRE sectors in Chilliwack are estimated to have 1,150 local employees and another 4,035 employees in the Fraser Valley Regional District. MAJOR FINANCIAL EMPLOYERS COMPANY

EMPLOYEES

Envision Financial

101

Royal Bank

50

TD Canada Trust

44

Prospera Credit Union

35

CIBC

32

Scotiabank

31

Bank of Montreal

26

HSBC

21

Vancity Savings Credit Union

20

Coast Capital Savings

15

Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), 2010

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From an economic development perspective, the growing FIRE sectors provide Chilliwack the services that are essential for business development. Access to conventional capital sources and insurance requirements is readily available.

Chilliwack has the highest number of timber harvesting workers in the Fraser TSA. Recent timber supply analyses conducted by the Ministry of Forests indicate that as many as 30% of the region’s 1,300 primary forest workers reside in Chilliwack.

There are a number of realtor options that can provide site location and housing information to businesses wanting to relocate to Chilliwack.

In many communities around the province, logging and wood processing tend to be tightly linked, with integrated companies dominating activity. In Chilliwack, this is not the case. Logging activity in the region results in a net outflow of timber, mostly to processing facilities in Metro Vancouver.

FORESTRY SECTOR There are three components to Chilliwack’s forestry base: logging, silviculture, and manufacturing. Logging and silviculture is linked primarily to activity on the Crown forest land base, which is administered by the Ministry of Forests out of the Chilliwack Forest District office. Chilliwack is part of the Fraser Timber Supply Area (TSA), which includes Metro Vancouver, the Fraser Valley, the Fraser Canyon up to Boston Bar and the Hope area. The current Allowable Annual Cut (AAC) in

There are several secondary wood processors in Chilliwack that utilize lumber to MAJOR FORESTRY EMPLOYERS COMPANY

EMPLOYEES

Uneeda Wood Products

180

Visscher Lumber

126

Chilliwack Forest District

70

Yarrow Wood

*36

*4 are seasonal Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation, 2008


produce a variety of value-added products, everything from pallets and containers to furniture components and millwork.

HEALTH SECTOR The health sector in Chilliwack is as diverse as the government agencies, NGOs, volunteers and private sector businesses that keep the community well-served and healthy. There is a wide variety of community health services in Chilliwack, including Chilliwack Community Services (volunteers, directory of services, counseling and crisis line), Chilliwack Mental Health (counseling), Fraser-Cheam Home Support, and a number of facilities offering adult day programs, transportation services, meal service and rehabilitation services. A dedicated core of volunteers supports these services, ensuring that Chilliwack remains a healthy community for young and old alike. EMPLOYMENT

The health sector is responsible for employing more than 10% of the local labour force and generating 8% of all community income.

Employment and economic activity in the health care sector can be expected to increase as the population grows and ages, generating more demand for a full range of health-related services. In fact, per capita health care spending has risen dramatically over the past 20 years as the baby boom generation ages. Changes in the way health care dollars are spent will also have implications for the local economy. The share of expenditures for hospital and doctor services will continue to decline while spending on health care professionals other than doctors and alternative health services will increase. The long-term trends in health care have implications for economic development as the private sector will assume a more prominent role in the provision and delivery of services.

MANUFACTURING SECTOR Chilliwack’s manufacturing sector is relatively diversified, with firms engaged in forestry and agriculture product manufacturing as well as a variety of both resource and non-resource based production. The leading sub-sectors include wood, food processing, metal fabrication and machinery-equipment. Value-added wood processors are a growing presence in Chilliwack despite the fact that primary wood processing is shrinking

PROVINCIAL MANUFACTURING STATISTICS • Manufacturing has the biggest economic footprint in the province with over 12,000 BC firms supporting more than 400,000 jobs in the province. • Manufacturing is the largest goods producing sector and 11.2% of the provincial GDP.

ECONOMIC PROFILE

dentists and 235 physicians, including General Practitioners, Emergency Room, and locum physicians.

• Manufacturing represents $8.6B in wages at levels 15% higher than the overall average wage for all industries. • Every $1.00 of manufacturing output in BC generates $3.01 in total economic activity. • Manufacturers account for 42.1% of all private sector R&D, making them BC’s “”greenest”” firms. Source: Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters

elsewhere in the province. Convenient access to a regional timber and lumber supply base and a long history of involvement in the forest sector have allowed area remanufacturers to take advantage of their proximity to prime and growing Pacific Northwest markets. NEW MANUFACTURERS

Over the past five years, Chilliwack’s manufacturing sector has expanded with companies like Langley Concrete Group, Sonic Drill Corporation, Bar None Metal Works, and Tidy Steel setting up new plants in the community. ECONOMIC ACTIVITY

The manufacturing sector employs 8,000 workers and generates more than $1.8B in shipments and $618M in value-added manufacturing. The spending on materials

Chilliwack General Hospital is the City’s largest health sector employer with about 1,400 employees and approximately 55 general practitioners and 25 specialists. The community as a whole is home to 43 MAJOR HEALTH EMPLOYERS COMPANY

EMPLOYEES

Chilliwack General Hospital

1,400

Residential Care Facilities

210

Chilliwack Society for Community Living

110

(3 companies)

Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation, 2009

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ECONOMIC PROFILE

and wages is the main means of support for other economic sectors such as retail and services. This sector is destined for growth as the City actively promotes new business development and supports the growth of existing manufacturing businesses. Also as the population of Chilliwack increases, opportunities for new businesses and investment will expand. ATTRACTION

The attraction of Chilliwack for manufacturing enterprises is obvious: • an available, serviced and reasonablypriced industrial land base in close proximity to Cascadia markets. • an excellent multi-modal transportation system that provides access to regional and world-wide markets. • a state-of-the-art $21M UFV Trades and Technology Centre at Canada Education Park provides skilled employees. • Chilliwack School District (SD #33) provides work experience and apprenticeship programs. • a well-educated workforce. • an attractive lifestyle. These factors broaden Chilliwack’s appeal to manufacturers being squeezed out of more costly areas of Metro Vancouver. EMPLOYMENT

Almost 10% of the local labour force is employed in the manufacturing sector, which is marginally greater than the provincial average. This accounts for about 2,000 jobs. The biggest employers are involved in MAJOR MANUFACTURING EMPLOYERS COMPANY

EMPLOYEES

Tycrop Manufacturing

320

IMW Industries

280

Masonite International

178

Uneeda Wood Products

100

Langley Concrete

95

Westeck Windows

85

Viterra Feed Products

77

Visscher Lumber

70

Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), 2011

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

primary or value-added wood processing, construction materials, technology, and agricultural products.

PUBLIC SECTOR The public sector is a stabilizing force for the community, as employment and employment income in this sector tends to experience fewer ups and downs in the economy. Some sub-sectors like education and policing will continue to grow in step with anticipated population growth. EMPLOYMENT

The public sector (not including the health sector) is Chilliwack’s fifth largest employer. Public Administration accounts for about 7% of the labour force, while Educational Services accounts for 7.3% of the labour force. Public sector employment is spread among several educational institutions and government offices, some of which are major employers for the community. The Chilliwack School District, serving over 14,000 students in 32 schools, employs

more than 1,800 teachers, support staff and administrators. The University of the Fraser Valley has more than 150 management and staff serving approximately 15,500 students. The Council of the City of Chilliwack consists of a mayor and six councillors. The municipality has a staff of approximately 307 (including part-time workers), engaged in a variety of public services. The new RCMP Pacific Region Training Centre, plus the regular RCMP branch and MAJOR PUBLIC SECTOR EMPLOYERS COMPANY

EMPLOYEES

School District #33

1,800

City of Chilliwack

307

RCMP

210

University of the Fraser Valley

215

Sto:lo Nations – First Nation Govt.

150

Fraser Valley Regional District

100

Canada Post

70

(Chilliwack)

Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), 2011


to more than 6%, up from less than 4% in 1997. Although there are fewer people employed in high tech industries than in the tourism sector, the high tech sector makes a much bigger contribution to total GDP.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES SECTOR

Chilliwack’s profile for high technology is flourishing, not simply because of the addition of Stream Global Services, a global provider of CRM support solutions for leading technology companies and e-business, but because of the increased adaptation of high technology inputs into sectors such as avionics (transportation), GIS (government, forestry) and bio-technology (agriculture).

The service sector in Chilliwack is comprised of small businesses, with the majority of firms having less than four employees. Many are owner-operated. TREND

Provincially, there is an overall trend away from goods-producing activity into servicesector activity and this trend is expected to affect Chilliwack. The increase of employment in services will be driven by continued population growth, a more competitive downtown and new mixed-use commercial/ retail developments throughout the region. With this growth, there will be more and better service options for residents. Other demographic changes, particularly the rising population age, will also affect this sector. With more seniors and retirees attracted to Chilliwack by affordable real estate and housing prices, more seniorspecific service opportunities will emerge. Chilliwack’s proximity to Vancouver, combined with the area’s exceptional recreation assets and its reasonably priced real estate, will also appeal to increasingly mobile professionals and high technology, knowledge-based enterprises EMPLOYMENT

in professional, scientific and technical is nearly 5%, similarly other services adds another 5.5%. This has been a growth area in Chilliwack due to population growth and the increasing diversification of the local economy. Increased manufacturing and a stronger retail market have increased the need for service sector jobs. Also, many service sector jobs are dependent on Chilliwack’s growing primary industries, like agriculture.

TECHNOLOGY SECTOR Technology and advanced manufacturing are becoming a major source of economic growth in British Columbia. This growing sector is increasing its contribution to GDP and employment. In fact, GDP in the high tech sector is growing faster than the rest of the economy. Its share of GDP has risen

The proportion of the labour force employed MAJOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICE EMPLOYERS Baker Newby

71

MNP LLP

30

Langbroek, Louwerse & Thiessen

26

KPMG

22

Omega & Associates Engineering

21

“The city’s educational programs, cost of living and competitive labor, energy and housing costs make Chilliwack one of the most business-friendly destinations for contact center and business processing outsourcing operations.”

Waterstone Law Group

20

R. SCOTT MURRAY CHAIRMAN AND CEO STREAM GLOBAL SERVICES

Wedler Engineering

20

CHP Architects

13

EMPLOYER

EMPLOYEES

ECONOMIC PROFILE

the administrative offices add another 210 people to public sector employment.

There is a unique set of site selection advantages for high-tech businesses in Chilliwack. There is access to a critical mass of labour, transportation, firm networking, research, development and university resources. Combine this with Chilliwack’s significantly lower land, development and occupancy costs than neighbouring Metro Vancouver communities, and the quality of life factors such as recreational opportunities and affordable housing, and it obvious to see the draw that attracts many high-tech workers and employers to the community. EMPLOYMENT

Opportunities for employment in the high technology sector and advanced manufacturing have increased steadily over the past few years. Chilliwack has experienced an emergence of small businesses (1-5 employees) in the technology sector. In 2007, there were 81,100 people working in the province’s high tech sector. Most of them (82%) were employed in high tech service industries such as information services (33%), telecommunications (17%) or computer services and engineering MAJOR TECHNOLOGY EMPLOYERS COMPANY

EMPLOYEES

Stream Global Services

900

IMW Industries

280

Tycrop Manufacturing

243

TEKSmed Services

20

Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), 2011

Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), 2010

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ECONOMIC PROFILE

(15%). Eighteen percent of workers in this sector were employed in high tech manufacturing.

TOURISM SECTOR The tourism industry in the area ranges from major accommodations, hospitality firms and attractions to numerous commercial outdoor recreation operators. There are many businesses in the retail, service and transportation sectors which depend in part on tourism markets and revenues. VISITORS

Chilliwack caters to a mix of tourism markets, including skiers, outdoor recreationists, resort visitors, and travelers seeking a convenient stopping point

between Vancouver and the BC Interior. The geographic origin of Chilliwack tourism markets is shown in the table below. Over 70% of visitors to the Tourism Chilliwack Visitor Info Centre are residents, while another 16% are from BC, 2.5% are from Alberta and 3.5% are from other areas of Canada. Traditionally, few travelers to the region (about 18%) are here for multiple-day visits. The bulk of visitors (56%) are in the community for a single day, while another 26% are here for a single night. This is indicative of Chilliwack’s attraction as a day-trip destination. ATTRACTIONS AND ACTIVITIES

The reasons visitors are drawn to the region range from the physical all the way to the

cultural. The natural resources of the region are impressive and unique, offering a wide variety of outdoor activities. Also, a steadily increasing number of destination attractions, festivals and events round out a diverse array of tourism options. With the Trans Canada Highway as the main transportation artery through Chilliwack, the City gains constant exposure to a steady flow of travelers. Add these major attributes to Chilliwack’s proximity to nearby destinations like Harrison Hot Springs, Minter Gardens, Bridal Falls, Hemlock Valley Ski Resort, Manning Park and visitors begin to discover that the region is rich in tourism and recreation activities. Also Chilliwack’s own Cultus Lake Provincial Park — with its beaches, camping, boating, golf courses, and waterslides — is a major attraction for the area. Chilliwack Lake Provincial Park is also a popular summer destination. Agri-tourism is a growing segment of Chilliwack’s tourism activity. Agriculture tours, farm gate sales, roadside stands, corn mazes and visits to operating farms are LENGTH OF STAY (#) Same Day

3,482

1 overnight

1,588

2 overnight

486

3 overnight

281

4-6 (1 week)

229

7-13 (2 weeks)

89

14+

66

Nights in Community Source: Tourism Chilliwack Visitor Information Centre, 2010 * Numbers are specific to visitors using this facility.

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

6,221


A well-known example of agri-tourism is the Circle Farm Tour, which is a road map that directs people to a variety of specialty farmgate vendors, open air markets, eateries, heritage sites, fairs, and other special events. The tours are self-guided (there is a brochure and map for each participating community) and are all related to agriculture and the area’s farming heritage. For more information on the Circle Farm Tour, visit www.circlefarmtour.ca. A multitude of mountains, trails and rivers make Chilliwack a destination for outdoor activity, whether for the soft adventure seeker or the advanced thrill seeker. Mountain biking is popular on the Vedder Mountain trails or the Chilliwack River Valley, while more relaxed bicycle tours can be taken on the area’s dyke system. There are numerous hiking trails in the community, including the Rotary Trail along the Vedder River. Popular mountain hikes and backcountry camping opportunities, include Tea Pot Hill, Elk Mountain, Mount Cheam, and Lindeman, Greendrop, Pierce, Radium lakes and Slesse Meadows. Expert mountaineers are also drawn to the region by some of North America’s roughest, most spectacular and extreme terrain. There are few rivers

For more information, visit www.tourismchilliwack.com.

ECONOMIC PROFILE

Jazz Festival, the Chilliwack Bluegrass Festival, Flight Fest, and the annual Chilliwack Exhibition.

some popular agri-tourism activities.

ACCOMMODATIONS

in the province that can provide the variety of white water experiences as found on the Chilliwack River. As the sports fishing center of the Fraser Valley, Chilliwack’s rivers and lakes showcase steelhead, salmon, trout, and sturgeon fishing throughout the year. The Fraser River, one of the world’s great salmon-producing rivers, the ChilliwackVedder rivers and the Harrison River all have bountiful stocks. Chilliwack offers a mix of aboriginal and colonial culture and history. Attractions include the Chilliwack Museum and Shxwt’a:selhawtxw, a non-museum hands-on approach involving Stó:lõ artists and crafts people. Chilliwack is also a city of festivals, featuring the Cultus Lake Indian Festival, Dixieland

There are 14 hotels/motels in Chilliwack. Overall this area has a relatively high percentage of “rooms-only” hotel rooms compared to other markets of this size and character. There are about 200 full-service hotel rooms in two properties: the Coast Chilliwack Hotel and the Best Western Rainbow Country Inn. The community as a whole offers 617 rooms and 1,063 campsites. ACCOMMODATION TRENDS

Despite the challenges of the economy, the Fraser Valley maintained an annual growth in room revenues of 2.3%, providing nearly $50 million in room revenue in 2008. EMPLOYMENT

Tourism is a part of Chilliwack’s economic base, contributing employment and employment income to the community that rank it close behind agriculture and forestry. More than 9% of the labour force in Chilliwack is employed in the tourism industry, most of which is the hospitality and accommodation sector. Also many of these jobs are seasonal in nature. MAJOR TOURISM EMPLOYERS COMPANY

EMPLOYEES

Best Western Rainbow Country Inn

85

Coast Chilliwack Hotel

73

Cultus Lake Parkboard (summer)

50

Minter Gardens

50

Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation, 2009

FOCUSED MARKETING

CREDIT: TOURISM CHILLIWACK

Tourism Chilliwack continues to promote

53


ECONOMIC PROFILE

outside markets into the region.

Chilliwack and support local tourism operations. These focused efforts attract more visitors and increase tourism revenues.

ATTRACTION

The appeal of Chilliwack as a retail and wholesale distribution centre is easy to understand. A growing population, reasonable real estate prices, available inventories of developed land, convenient access to the Trans Canada Highway, close proximity to the US border, and an abundance of nearby multi-modal services (rail, port, highway, airport) provide numerous advantages for wholesalers and distributors serving the Lower Mainland and the rest of the province.

For more information, visit: www.tourismchilliwack.com.

TRADE (RETAIL AND WHOLESALE) The trade sector, involving both wholesale and retail activity, is Chilliwack’s largest sector (15.3%), employing more than 6,200 people. There are indications that Chilliwack’s trade sector is in an ascending performance phase and is bringing in new spending from outside areas as it develops into a regional trade and service centre. This growth is reflected in new commercial projects such as Eagle Landing, a 700,000 square foot commercial development that is home to major tenants including Walmart Supercentre, Galaxy Cinemas and Home Depot. CHILLIWACK RETAIL MARKET

Major retailers have experienced sales that exceed their projections. This strong sales growth has stimulated the expansion of commercial inventory and drawn new retailers and wholesalers into the region. With this have come more and better retail and service options for residents and fewer spending leakages. There are four retail categories which account for the bulk of spending in Chilliwack

EMPLOYMENT

Job growth in wholesale and retail trade has not kept pace with the rest of the BC economy, and as a result, its share of total employment has declined slightly in the past

RETAIL SALES 2008 ESTIMATES CHILLIWACK SALES RETAIL CATEGORY

BC SALES

$ MILLIONS

%

$ MILLIONS

%

214.5

20.0%

9496.7

16.6%

23

2.1%

991.8

1.7%

Beer/Wine, and Liquor

36.6

3.4%

2754.2

4.8%

Clothing

23.9

2.2%

2411.6

4.2%

Super Markets/Groceries All Other Food

Shoes/Accessories

8.8

0.8%

747.3

1.3%

MAJOR RETAIL/TRADE EMPLOYERS

Motor Vehicles/Recreation

265.7

24.8%

12990.4

22.7%

COMPANY

Gas Service Stations

150.3

14.0%

6095.1

10.6%

Overwaitea Food Group

450

Furniture Stores

13.6

1.3%

1310.8

2.3%

Real Canadian Superstore

340

Home Furnishings

9

0.8%

1038.6

1.8%

Canada Safeway

178

Sears

108

Home Hardware

73.2

6.8%

3732.3

6.5%

Wal-Mart

156

Home Electronics

27.1

2.5%

2128.9

3.7%

Zellers

90

Canadian Tire

110

Future Shop

53

Country Garden

*50

EMPLOYEES

*10 are seasonal Source: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation, 2010

54

As of the 2006 census, Chilliwack’s employment in the retail trade sector was 11.8%, which is slightly above the provincial benchmark. The whole trade sector is 3.5% in Chilliwack.

and which exceed the provincial benchmark. These are supermarkets and groceries, motor vehicle sales, gas stations and general merchandise. Collectively, these account for more than 70% of all spending. It is also believed that some of these retail sub-sectors are responsible for drawing

COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

Computer Software

0.7

Department and Other Retail

98.1

9.2%

6208.8

10.8%

Miscellaneous

32.1

3.0%

1660.2

2.9%

Pharmacy/ Personal Care

65.6

6.1%

3403.9

5.9%

Sporting Goods/ Hobby/ Music

28.6

2.7%

2041.9

3.6%

Source: Canadian Demographics, Financial Post, 2008

251.3


on agricultural production and related food processing activities in the Fraser Valley.

OVERALL EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT GROWTH Employment growth in the Lower Mainland has exceeded the provincial average. Employment in the region has increased about 35% since 1995. Strong population growth, together with relatively robust economic conditions during this period, have both contributed to job gains in this region.

The Lower Mainland is home to 61% of the province’s workforce. There were 1.4 million people working in the region in 2008. Full-time employment is more common in this region than in other parts of the province, with 81% employed full time. Just under 18% of the region’s workforce was self-employed in 2008, slightly less than the 19% share for the province as a whole.

CHILLIWACK LABOUR FORCE Chilliwack’s current labour force is estimated at about 40,605 people, representing a participation rate of 63.5% (based on the population of 15 and over). There are also a total of 274,388 people who live within a 30-minute commute of Chilliwack, providing an additional labour force of 160,000 people.

LABOUR FORCE BY INDUSTRY The percentage of workforce by industry is illustrated in the pie chart below. It is important to note that tourism and technolChilliwack's Labour Force (2006 Census)

ogy, which are not clearly defined in this chart, also represent a fair portion of the workforce. Looking at the Lower Mainland region as a whole, 8 out of 10 jobs are in the service sector, and just 20% of the workforce is employed in goods-producing industries. In the service sector, wholesale & retail trade (15%), health & social assistance (9%), and professional, scientific & technical services (9%) are key employers. Within the goods sector, construction (9%) and manufacturing (9%) account for the biggest shares of total employment, with a greater emphasis

ECONOMIC SECTORS (LABOUR FORCE)

7% - Public Admin. 6% - Other Serv.

1% - Industry

Agriculture - 6%

Construction - 10%

7% - Accommodation/Food

Manufacturing - 10%

2% - Arts/Enter./Recreat. 9% - Healthcare/Social

Wholesale - 4% Retail Trade - 12%

7% - Education

Transport./Warehousing - 4%

4% - Admin./Remediation 5% - Prof./Scientific/Tech.

Information/Culture - 1%

ECONOMIC PROFILE

two decades. However, their share of GDP has been rising over time, from about 9% in 1990 to nearly 12% in 2008.

Job growth in the region has largely been driven by steady gains in the service sector. The construction industry, which has benefitted from a building boom in the region, increased the size of its workforce 71% between 1995 and 2008. Agriculture (+56%) and utilities (+41%) are also among the industries in the region that have seen faster-than average growth. The number of jobs in manufacturing has also increased just 10%. This region is expected to experience continued population and employment growth. Its share of the province’s population is forecast to rise to about 60%, while a similar percentage of the province’s workforce is expected to be employed in the region.

COMMUTING PATTERNS According to the 2011 Census, only 13% of the population commute outside of the community for work, with 83% who commute less than 30 km, with the average commute of around 6 km. In fact, according to the Fraser Valley Regional District, Chilliwack enjoys more local employment than virtually all other areas of the Lower Mainland.

EDUCATION LEVEL OF WORKFORCE According to Statistics Canada, Chilliwack produces more young workers with a

Finance/Real Estate - 5%

SOURCE: 2006 Census data from Stats Canada. Updated 2010.

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ECONOMIC PROFILE

high school graduation certificate, trade certificate or diploma and college certificate or diploma than the British Columbia average. This is in keeping with a common local opinion that Chilliwack produces highly skilled employees. The presence of the University of the Fraser Valley will only increase the percentage of university graduates in Chilliwack.

UNEMPLOYMENT About 4.5% of the Chilliwack labour force is unemployed, which is slightly less than the provincial average (July 2011). The largest unemployed groups are aged 15 to 19, which is also comparable to the provincial average. (January 2011) PARTICIPATION RATE

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES BY INDUSTRY INDUSTRY

BRITISH COLUMBIA

CHILLIWACK

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting

66,665

2,565

Mining, Oil & Gas Extraction

18,370

170

Utilities

10,915

140

Construction

158,070

4,085

Manufacturing

180,415

3,950

Wholesale Trade

88,625

1,405

Retail trade

236,925

4,805

Transportation & Warehousing

110,375

1,705

Information & Cultural Ind.

55,950

360

Finance & Insurance

82,280

1,030

Real Estate/Rental/Leasing

49,310

850

Professional/Scientific/Tech. Services

157,050

1,925

Management of Companies & Enterprises

3,035

25

Admin. & Support, Waste Management & Remediation

91,460

1,835

Educational Services

147,370

2,960

POPULATION (15 years +)

63,920

Health Care & Social Assistance

206,995

3,620

LABOUR

40,605

Arts, Entertainment & Recreation

48,175

735

EMPLOYED

38,385

Accommodation & Food Services

168,685

2,815

PARTICIPATION

63.6%

Other Services (except public admin.)

105,225

2,220

Public Administration

106,865

2,820

Source: 2006 Census data from Stats Canada, updated 2010.

Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census *metropolitan, **sub-division

PERCENTAGE RECEIVING BENEFITS BASIC BC AGE

CHWK

BC

Under 19

3.5

2.7

19-24

4.3

25-54

2.7

55-64 19-64

EI CHWK

BC

2.1

3.2

2.6

1.9

3.0

3.1

0.8

0.7

1.8

2.0

2.6

1.7

2.8

2.8

Source: BC Stats, 2010, using administrative files from the BC Ministry of Employment & Income Assistance and HRSDC

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Canada has the lowest land and construction costs compared to the G-7 countries. In Chilliwack, depending on location, the average land costs are as follows: • Industrial: $500,000 per acre • Commercial: $800,000 per acre • Agricultural: $ 50,000 - $100,000 per acre

BUSINESS LICENSES Any person or group operating, trading or advertising a business for profit in Chilliwack requires a business license, including non-residents. Inspections and approvals (concerning land use, fire, health, gas, waste, etc.) may be required. ANNUAL LICENSE (JANUARY TO DECEMBER)

• Resident Business: $100 * plus the following: (1) $0.25 per m2 of commercial floor space occupied; (2) $0.50 per m2 of restaurant/assembly floor space occupied; (3) $0.10 per m2 of industrial floor space occupied. • Non-resident Business: $100 • Residential Rental Business: $100 * plus $2 per rental suite • Accessory Home Occupation/Cottage Industry: $10/$106 SEASONAL LICENCE

• Summer – (May 1 to October 31) – One-half Annual Fee. • Winter – (November 1 to April 30) – One-half Annual Fee.

another lot (with a special permit needed for moving on roadways) • install a wood burning appliance or a hearth stove EXAMPLE OF PERMIT FEES

ECONOMIC PROFILE

DEVELOPMENT COSTS

The fees for a building permit are typically a percentage of the construction costs. Following are two typical examples.

DEVELOPMENT COST CHARGE Developers of subdivisions pay a Development Cost Charge (DCC) prior to obtaining a Building Permit, where the construction value exceeds $50,000 for a commercial, institutional or industrial building. The fees collected are used to fund major capital improvements to the sewer, water, drainage, and road infrastructure and the acquisition of parkland and open spaces. Reference the chart below.

BUILDING PERMITS BC Building Regulations require you to obtain a Building Permit if you are planning to: • construct a new building (residential, commercial, industrial, etc). • construct an accessory building having a foot print area exceeding 10m2 • make structural changes or repairs to a dwelling • improve unfinished areas of a dwelling • demolish all or a portion of a structure or dwelling • move a building either within a lot or onto

EXAMPLE 1: If a resident were to construct a covered deck for an assumed construction value of $15,000, the building permit fee would be approximately $191. EXAMPLE 2: If a person wanted to construct a Single Family Dwelling on a residential lot, the average permit would run around $2,000. They would also be required to submit $1,000 in bonds, which would be returnable upon completion of the permit.

OTHER PERMITS OR FEES Depending on the needs of your building project, other permits or costs may be necessary: • Connection Fees – as applicable for water, sanitary and storm sewers. • Geotechnical Reports – construction on land that is subject to or is likely to be subject to flooding, mud flows, debris flows, debris torrents, erosion, land slip, rockfalls, subsidence or avalanche, may not be permitted unless a report is submitted by a Registered Professional geotechnical engineer certifying that the land may be safely used as intended.

DEVELOPMENT COST CHARGE (DCC) BYLAW 2000, NO. 2689 Water

Sewer

Roads

Drainage

Parkland

Totals 2010

$1,862.48

$2,202.43

$14,332.80

$1,762.05

$1,983.63

$22,707.10

– Townhouse (per unit)

$1,369.47

$1,619.43

$11,335.94

$909.45

$1,023.81

$17,000.62

– Apartment (per unit)

$1,095.58

$1,295.55

$10,814.75

$909.45

$1,023.81

$15,791.41

– Small Apartment (per unit)

$931.24

$1,101.21

$5,733.12

$909.45

$1,023.81

$9,818.68

– Congregate Living

$792.55

$937.20

$2,215.07

$909.45

$1,023.81

$5,625.86

$1,369.47

$1,619.43

$11,335.94

$909.45

$1,023.81

$17,000.62

Commercial (per m2)

$8.28

$4.89

$26.07

n/a

n/a

$34.86

Institutional (per m2)

$8.28

$4.89

$15.64

$11.37

$12.80

$50.36

Industrial (per m2)

$4.73

$2.79

$13.04

n/a

n/a

$21.85

Residential Subdivision (per parcel) Multi-Family Residential Development

Subdivision or Mobile Home Park Development (per pad space)

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2011

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ECONOMIC PROFILE

• Health Permit: For example, a food premise like a small café or delicatessen in the downtown with 50 seats or less, the permit cost would be $150. If the facility is larger than 50 seats, the cost would be $250. For more information, contact the Chilliwack Public Health Unit at 604-702-4900. • Floodproofing Requirements – floodproofing may be required for several types of development within the Floodplain Area, see Floodplain Management Bylaw. • Frontage Improvements Costs – where applicable will require entering into a Servicing Agreement to install certain works and services; or the payment of a non-refundable deposit for the estimated cost of such works and services. • Development Variance Permit – e.g. for proposed construction that requires Council’s approval to relax standards specified in the Zoning Bylaw. • Latecomer Fees – a charge imposed on benefiting lands by a resolution of Council which will be collected by the City as a condition of a latecomer connection to or using excess or extended services. • Homeowner Protection Office Documentation – With the exception of purpose-built rental units, the Homeowner Protection Act provides for the licensing of residential builders and makes third-party warranties mandatory on new multi-family residential construction throughout the province. • Tree and Green Space Management Plan and Security – Summary and security of retained tress and newly planted trees on developable land. For more information on permit and licensing fees, go to the City of Chilliwack’s Municipal Development page on www.chilliwack.com.

BUILDING PERMIT COSTS CONSTRUCTION VALUES: “Building Regulation Bylaw 2003, No. 2970: Schedule “C” 1. SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING, ROW HOUSING, SEMI-DETACHED AND DUPLEX:

(a) With full basement or part basement including first floor (b) First storey with no basement (c) Each additional storey (d) Attached garages (e) Attached carports (f) Buildings for ancillary use greater than 10m2

$ 910.00m2 $ 650.00/m2 $ 520.00/m2 $ 455.00/m2 $ 200.00/m2 $ 200.00/m2

2. AGRICULTURAL BUILDINGS

(a) (i) Farm Buildings: First Storey (ii) Farm Buildings: Second Storey (b) Pole Building (c) Manure Storage

$150.00/m2 $ 85.00/m2 $ 110.00/m2 $ Contract Price

3. BUILDINGS NOT COVERED IN THE ABOVE VALUES,

such as Assembly, Commercial, Industrial, Institutional, etc., shall be determined by a verified contract price. PERMIT FEES: “Building Regulation Bylaw 2003, No. 2970: Schedule “B” 1. BUILDINGS SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING, ROW HOUSING, SEMI-DETACHED AND DUPLEX:

(1) Single family dwelling, Row housing, Semi-detached and Duplex: (a) Construction up to $1,000.00 of value (b) Construction $1,000.00 to $100,000.00 of value; (i) First $1,000.00 (ii) Each additional $1,000.00 or part thereof but not more than $100,000.00 (iii) Each additional $1,000.00 in excess of $100,000.00 but not more than $250,000.00 (iv) Each additional $1,000.00 in excess of $250,000.00 (2) Multi-Family, Commercial, Industrial, Institutional, etc. (a) Construction up to $1000.00 of value (b) Construction in excess of $1000.00 of value (3) Temporary Buildings (a) Construction up to $1000.00 of value (b) Construction in excess of $1000.00 of value (4) Re-Inspections (5) Special Inspection (6) To site an ancillary building 10m2 or less or a swimming pool (7) Landscape drawing and review inspections (8) Permit Application Fee (9) Alternative Solution Report Fee (one per application) (10) Additional Report Review Fee (excess of one per application) (11) Amendment to reviewed Alternative Solution Report (per) (12) Plan review (subsequent from original drawings) (13) Premium plan review (hourly rate)

$40.00 $100.00 $6.50 $6.25 $5.75 $100.00 1.1% of construction value $100.00 0.6% of construction value $70.00 $80.00 $50.00 $200.00 $300.00 $100.00 $60.00 $50.00 $70.00 $100.00

2. CHIMNEYS & SOLID FUEL-BURNING APPLIANCES

(1) Chimney (2) One appliance (3) Each additional appliance (4) Chimney with one appliance (5) Each additional chimney (6) One fireplace (7) Each additional fireplace

$40.00 $40.00 $15.00 $50.00 $15.00 $45.00 $25.00

3. PLUMBING

(1) First 10 fixtures

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

$90.00


$9.00 $35.00

4. DEMOLITION

(1) To demolish a building or structure

$150.00

5. MOBILE OR MANUFACTURED HOME OR FACTORY-BUILT UNITS

(1) To move within the City (other than Mobile Home Parks)

$70.00

6. APPLICATION TO MOVE A BUILDING

(1) Within the City (2) Into the City (3) Out of the City

$70.00 $350.00 $70.00

7. APPLICATION TO MOVE ACCESSORY BUILDING

(1) Into the City (2) Within the City 10m2 or less (3) Within the City in excess of 10m2

$350.00 $60.00 $100.00

8. HIGHWAY ACCESS

(1) Permit to construct a highway access

$50.00

9. OTHER

(1) Letter of compliance (2) Owner name change for active permits (3) Title search from Land Titles Office (4) Occupancy Permit (5) Permit extension

$100.00 $25.00 $15.00 $40.00 $40.00

SECURITY DEPOSITS 10. BUILDING MOVING

(1) To erect a building on the new site and restore the old site for: (a) Buildings less than 10m2 (b) Buildings more than 10m2 but less than 50m2 (c) Buildings more than 50m2 (d) Mobile, manufactured, and factory-built units (relocated within the City) (2) To complete on-site parcel grading, parcel drainage and

$500.00 $1,000.00 $2,500.00 $1,000.00

11. DEMOLISH BUILDINGS

(1) Principal dwelling unit (2) Ancillary buildings of less than 50m2 (3) All other buildings over 50m2 12. PAVING

(1) To complete the paving of off-street parking (including drainage, curbing, marking and lighting)

$1,000.00 $500.00 $2,000.00 $8.00 for each m2 of parking area

PERSONAL INCOME TAX RATES

Federal tax rates range from 15% to 29% with surtax of 3% to 8% applied to basic federal tax, depending on the level of tax. Provincial tax rates on earned income in BC ranges from 5.06% to 14.70%. Other taxes may be due on unearned income (i.e.: Dividend). There is no local or municipal personal income tax. (2011) HARMONIZED SALES TAX (HST)

The new Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) is 12%, which is the lowest rate in Canada. The HST was introduced in 2010 to replace the 7% Provincial Sales Tax and the 5% Goods and Services Tax and enables business to benefit from input tax credits. CORPORATE TAXATION RATES

Corporate tax rates vary depending on the classification of a corporation as public or private. The basic federal tax rate is 11.0% for small businesses earning up to $500,000, and 16.5% for all businesses earning more than $500,000. (2009) The provincial corporate tax rate is 2.5% for small business earning up to $500,000, and 10% for all businesses earning more than $500,000. (2011) As such the total corporate tax rates are 13.5% for small business or 28.5% for larger businesses. PROPERTY TAX RATES

13. PARCEL GRADING, PARCEL DRAINAGE & LANDSCAPING

(1) Non-Residential: To complete on-site parcel grading, parcel drainage and landscaping areas (including placement of topsoil) (2) Residential: To complete on-site parcel grading, parcel drainage and landscaping areas (including drainage, curbing, marking and lighting)

TAXATION

ECONOMIC PROFILE

2) Each additional fixture (3) Reconnection

$10.00 for each m2 $500.00 per residential unit (to maximum of $10,000.00)

Property tax rates are usually calculated by the City of Chilliwack (www.chilliwack.com). The following charts outline tax rates and some community comparisons.

14. ANY SECURITY DEPOSITED UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THIS BYLAW MAY BE IN THE FORM OF:

(1) Cash (2) Certified Cheque (3) Irrevocable Letter of Credit drawn on a Canadian Chartered Bank or Credit Union for a term and in a form satisfactory to the City. Source: City of Chilliwack, 2011

59


ECONOMIC PROFILE

CORPORATE INCOME TAX/FRANCHISE TAX BUSINESS Income (-) $500,000

BUSINESS Income $500,000 (+)

MFG.

11%

15%

15%

2.5%

10%

10%

No

No

No

0%

0%

0%

28.5%

28.5%

• Business tax rates in the City of Chilliwack are up to two-thirds less than neighbouring communities.

FEDERAL Rate (range)

NOTE: Various capital asset classes permit accerlerated depreciation. PROVINCIAL (STATE) Rate (range) Federal Tax Deductible

• Federal and Provincial governments are working towards lowering tax rates to increase the region’s attractiveness for business investors.

LOCAL Rate (range)

NOTE: British Columbia has no local corporate income taxes. TOTAL CORPORATE INCOME TAX

13.5%

(FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL)

NOTE: $500,000 threshold is based on taxable income over or below that amount, reduced only when taxable capital exceeds $15,000,000 (Federal & Provincial). Source: KPMG 2012

MUNICIPAL SURVEY OF TAXES & DEVELOPMENT COST CHARGES (EXAMPLE: LIGHT INDUSTRIAL BUILDING; 10 ACRES; 50,000 SQ. FT) MUNICIPALITY

LAND

INDUSTRIAL TAX RATE

TOTAL TAXES

DCC RATES

TOTAL DCC

TOTAL MUNICIPAL CHARGES

Chilliwack

5,500,000

9.14150

76,570

20.56 /sq.m.

95,504

172,074

Maple Ridge

8,000,000

12.10450

128,441

11.98 /sq.m. + 3,794/ha.

$71,003

199,444

Delta

9,000,000

10.76640

131,235

32.65 /sq.m.

$151,664

282,899

Surrey

9,000,000

6.60730

76,717

58.13 /sq.m.

$270,023

346,740

Abbotsford

7,100,000

11.74920

114,096

61.16 /sq.m.

$284,097

398,194

Langley Township

8,000,000

9.7807

103,783

63.84 /sq.m.

296,547

400,330

Coquitlam

9,000,000

11.95810

138,845

60.43 /sq.m.

$280,707

419,552

This information is based on the following assumptions: 1. The scenario above includes an estimate for 10 acres with a 50,000 sq.ft. light industrial building. The improvement value is for a 50,000 sq.ft. plant (eg Unifeed – Chilliwack) valued on a Cost basis and does not include any assessable machinery, equipment, or possible outbuildings. 2. Land is based on each municipality’s typical rate for 10 acres of raw industrial land. 3. Both values are as determined under the guidelines for BC Assessment Authority. * Source, City of Chilliwack, 2011

MUNICIPAL PROPERTY TAX RATES (DOLLARS OF TAX PER $1000 TAXABLE VALUE) PROPERTY CLASS

CITY MILLAGE

REGIONAL DISTRICT

HOSPITAL MILLAGE

SCHOOL MILLAGE

OTHER MILLAGE

ASSESSMENT RATIO

EFFECTIVE RATE PER $100 OF ASSESSED PROPERTY

Residential

0.432977

0.011721

0.023951

0.244860

0.027399

100%

0.740908

Utilities

3.960304

0.108743

0.083830

1.410000

0.247610

100%

5.810487

Light Industry

0.914150

0.024395

0.081435

0.660000

0.063090

100%

1.743070

Business

0.962611

0.025996

0.058681

0.660000

0.065961

100%

1.773249

Managed Forest

1.655510

0.045039

0.071854

0.200000

0.110934

100%

2.083337

Recreation/Non-Profit

0.35580

0.009023

0.023951

0.340000

0.022526

100%

0.731080

Farm

1.437366

0.039541

0.023951

0.680000

0.077645

100%

2.258503

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2011

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MUNICIPALITY

PROPERTY TAXES ON A REP. HOUSE

RESIDENTIAL TAXES PER CAPITA

BUSINESS & OTHER TAXES PER CAPITA

TOTAL TAXATION PER CAPITA

Abbotsford

2,972

506

301

807

Burnaby

3,611

413

451

864

Campbell River

2,378

498

265

763

Chilliwack

2,437

471

206

677

Coquitlam

3,404

511

346

857

Kamloops

2,665

565

389

954

Kelowna

2,882

585

253

838

Langley City

2,793

424

374

798

Langley Township

2,788

529

339

868

Maple Ridge

2,945

572

167

739

Mission

2,789

551

176

727

Nanaimo

2,862

644

319

963

New Westminster

3,727

513

314

827

North Vancouver City

3,580

469

422

891

North Vancouver District

4,094

611

241

852

Pitt Meadows

2,735

504

299

803

Port Coquitlam

3,032

508

394

902

Prince George

2,524

552

468

1,020

Saanich

2,975

620

167

787

Surrey

2,703

329

152

481

ECONOMIC PROFILE

MUNICIPAL TAXES FOR BC COMMUNITIES

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2011

61


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT • Business and Development Growth • Industrial Sector Growth • Commercial Sector Growth • Institutional Sector Growth • Residential Sector Growth • Other Sectors • Land Use • Development Opportunities

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

64 65 67 70 71 74 75 75


“We work on projects in almost every municipality in Southern BC. In Chilliwack, we enjoy the City’s progressive and well balanced approach to development and building construction. The City works with developers and builders to resolve issues and eliminate roadblocks.” RANDY REGIER, PRESIDENT PREVIEW BUILDERS INTERNATIONAL INC.

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Growth and Development

Chilliwack continues to undergo significant business growth and urban development. In the last ten years, Chilliwack business licenses have nearly doubled to reach a total of 4,459 business licenses. Development in the industrial, commercial/retail, residential and public sectors continue to grow. Property assessment has nearly tripled over the last ten years to reach a current total of almost $11 billion in 2009. This development boom has been fueled by a number of factors such as low land prices, competitive tax and development costs, and population growth of the region.

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GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

GROWTH Chilliwack continues to grow steadily from year to year. Annual fluctuations aside, Chilliwack’s Assessment growth over the last 5 years averages 13.5% (2004-2009), with a peak of 21%. All sectors in Chilliwack have grown substantially. The Residential Sector accounts for 81% of Chilliwack’s growth. Its climb from $900 million in 1986 to $8.77 billion in assessed value in 2009 demonstrates the strength of Chilliwack’s economy. Business is a large sector of the economy, representing about 15% of the assessments. This sector has also grown, from $250 million in 1986 to $1.6 billion in 2009.

ASSESSMENTS BY REAL GROWTH INDEX

Chart 35 Assessment Real Growth Index

Index

1100 1000 Residential 900

Business/other

800

Industrial

700

Farm Utilities (Incl. S. 353 M.A.)

600

Managed forest

500

Unmanaged Forest 400

CHILLIWACK BUSINESS LICENSES YEAR

TOTAL LICENSES

NEW LICENSES

2001

2,777

411

2002

2,771

482

2003

2,764

485

2004

2,915

468

2005

3,649

734

2006

3,006

688

2007

3,640

634

2008

4,350

710

2009

4,459

643

2010

4,900

441

2011

5,392

492

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2012

Recreat./non-profit

300

Unclassified/S. 353 M.A.

200

All Classes

100 0 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Actual Year of Assessment

CHILLIWACK ASSESSMENTS (2008-2009) ASSESSMENT

DOLLARS ($)

PROPERTIES (#)

PERCENTAGE (%)

Residential

$8,768,466,781

29150

80.24%

Utilities (Incl. S. 353 M.A.)

$158,941,696

82

1.46%

Industrial

$135,148,200

120

1.24%

$1,625,244,911

1480

14.87%

-land – improvements -land – improvements

-land – improvements

Business/other -land – improvements

Managed forest Recreat./non-profit -land – improvements

Farm Unclassified/S. 353 M.A. -land -improvements

Total

-land – improvements

SOURCE: Assessments, City of Chilliwack 2010

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

$4,370,333,779 $4,398,133,002 $11,943,094 $146,998,602 $75,374,500 $59,773,700

$781,168,009 $844,076,902

39.99% 40.25% 0.11% 1.35%

0.69% 0.55% 7.15% 7.72%

$516,700

8

$160,045,540

209

1.46%

79,779,670

1825

0.73%

$0

10

$10,928,143,498

32884

100.00%

$93,960,940 $66,084,600

$0 $0

$5,413,076,692 $5,515,066,806

0.86% 0.60%

49.53% 50.47%


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

INDUSTRIAL SECTOR

INDUSTRIAL FLOOR SPACE

There are approximately 260 industrial businesses (such as manufacturing and wood processing) occupying approximately 150,000 square meters of building space.

Based on floor space, two industrial sectors stand out: wood (occupying 39,353 square meters), and storage and warehousing (occupying 19,517 square meters).

INDUSTRIAL LANDS

INDUSTRIAL SECTOR GROWTH

The industrial sector within Chilliwack has grown substantially over the past few years with the development of four new business parks: Chilliwack Business Estates, Cattermole Industrial Estates, Highway 1 Business Park and Progress Way Industrial Park. In total, these developments have created an additional 300+/- acres of industrial lands.

In the industrial sector, there were peaks in 2004 at nearly $20 million, 2006 at nearly $25 million, but most noticeably in 2009 at just under $35 million.

There are two main industrial areas in Chilliwack: Village West (including Chilliwack Business Estates, Highway 1 Business Park and Progress Way Industrial Park) that account for about 75% of the industrial land; and the rural areas (including Legacy Pacific Industrial Park) that account for about 25% of the industrial land. There is also a small percentage of industrial land in Chilliwack Proper and Sardis-Vedder.

• Canex Building Supplies (45788 Knight Road): This building supply store has expanded with a new building for its Masonry Division. The new store occupies 1,287m2 of floor area with a construction value of $1M. • Cattermole Industrial Estates (7530 Cannor Road): A heavy industrial park consisting of 200+ acres just west of Chilliwack Mountain. The site planning and servicing is complete. Langley Concrete Group, Amix Salvage, Western Concrete and Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers have established operations on the site. (2003-ongoing)

Adding this growth in improvements to the existing value of all industrial lands, Chilliwack enjoys a total assessed value of $135 million (2009). INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

Growth in the industrial sector can be attributed to several recent development projects: • Brannick Place Agri-Industrial Subdivision (8144/8188/8230 Brannick Place): An 8 lot industrial subdivision (8.4 acres/3.4 ha) intended for food processing ventures. Two lots have been developed as Vantage Foods and Sandel Foods. The 16 acre Kerr Avenue Food Processing Park is part of the development.

ALL BUILDING PERMITS ($)

• Highway 1 Business Park (8287 Lickman Road and 43650/43700/43850/43990 Progress Way): This industrial park is an 84-acre industrial site. IMW Industries, Kal Tire, Sonic Drill Corporation and Bar None Metal Works have operations in this Park. • IMW Industries (43650 Progress Way): IMW is a local metal fabrication/ equipment manufacturing firm with a 58,599 sq.ft. facility valued at $3.6M. (2007/2008)

INDUSTRIAL BUILDING PERMITS ($)

250,000,000 Residential Commercial

200,000,000

Institutional Industrial Agricultural

150,000,000

40,000,000 35,000,000 30,000,000 25,000,000 20,000,000 15,000,000

100,000,000

10,000,000 5,000,000

50,000,000

0 1999

0

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

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GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

• Kal Tire (43990 Progress Way): In 2006, Kal Tire relocated its distribution centre and retread plant for Western Canada to Chilliwack. The new centre, located in Highway 1 Business Park, is the second

largest industrial building in Chilliwack at 264,000 sq. ft. (24,522 m2) of floor space with a construction value of $6.65M. (2005/2006) • Langley Concrete Group (7580 Cannor Road): This $3.2M, 114,260 sq.ft. plant

INDUSTRIAL SPACE BY MAJOR GROUP AND NEIGHBOURHOOD BUSINESS TYPE

SIC CODE

#

Agricultural Industries

1

1

Service industries incidental to agriculture (excluding. SIC #021 – veterinarians, et. al.)

2

5

2,362

Logging

4

2

121

Forestry Services

5

1

167

Quarry and Sand Pit

8

1

100

Food

10

24

12,607

Beverage

11

8

2,391

Plastic products

16

4

7,631

Clothing

24

1

232

Wood

25

36

39,353

Furniture and Fixture

26

8

2,789

Printing, Publishing and Allied Industries

28

9

2,630

Fabricated Metal Products

30

17

8,997

Machinery

31

7

11,989

Transportation Equipment

32

2

3,138

Electrical and Electronic Products

33

1

93

Non-Metallic Mineral Products

35

3

267

Chemical and Chemical Products

37

-

Other Manufacturing

39

10

1,957

Building, Developing and General Contracting

40

14

1,271

Industrial and Heavy (Engineering) Construction

41

4

473

Trade Contracting

42

30

4,588

Transportation

45

32

6,114

Storage and Warehouse

47

6

19,517

Communication

48

2

1,138

Petroleum Products Wholesale

51

3

773

Food, Beverage, Drug and Tobacco Wholesale

52

2

1,524

Metals/Hardware/Plumbing/Heating/Building Mater. Wholesale

56

15

9,363

Machinery, Equipment and Supplies Wholesale

57

6

5,020

Other Products Wholesale

59

Total Note: This table excludes home-based/cottage industries and non resident permits Source: City of Chilliwack, 2004 (August 22, 2003)

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

FLOOR SPACE (M2)

6

1,515

260

148,120

manufactures concrete precast products. (2005) • Larry Industries (7968 Venture Place): This distributor/installer of siding, insulation and gutters has moved to a new plant at Village West. Construction value: $1M. Floor space: 910m2. (2008) • Legacy Pacific Industrial Park (44488/44550 South Sumas Road): This industrial park has undergone major renovations and growth in recent years, including a new $1.4M building in 2003, and a $12M/26,017m2 industrial complex in 2006/2007. • Magnum Glass and Door (7977 Venture Place): This window and door manufacturer’s new plant in Village West has a construction value of $1.8M and a floor area of 2,284m2. (2008) • Progress Way Industrial Park: A 67-acre industrial park comprised of fully serviced lots located near the Trans Canada Highway. The subdivision consists of 21 industrial parcels totaling 29.4 ha or 72.6 acres. (2006/2007)


• River Valley Estates (44930/44981 Commercial Court): This is a 27-strata industrial lot subdivision in Chilliwack Business Estates. (2006 – 2009) * Phase 1 – 10 units, 2,787m2, $1.5M * Phase 2 – 13 units, 3,649m2, $1.2M * Phase 3 – 4 units, 2,322m2, $2M • Rogers Foods Ltd. (44360 Simpson Road): In 2004, Rogers Foods Ltd. opened its $11M (construction value) state-of-the-art flour mill. The facility has the capacity to produce 250 tonnes of flour per day and has a total floor area of 3,960m2 (2004) • Sandel Foods (45739 Kerr Avenue): A food product manufacturer with a new plant in the Kerr Avenue Food Processing Park: 6,293m2 in floor area and $7.6M in construction value. (2009) • Sonic Drill Corporation (43833 Progress Way): This new building is located in Highway 1 Business Park. Construction value: $700,000. Floor space: 1,428m2. (2007) • Tidy Steel Fab (44313 Progress Way): A new plant in Progress Way Industrial Park. Two buildings with a total floor space of 4694 m2 and a construction value of $3.5M. The plant is 1.46 ha in area and located near the Lickman Interchange. (2009) • Vantage Foods (8200 Brannick Place): This meat packaging plant covers 66,167 sq. ft. on two floors. The building, placed in the east end of its 10.3-acre site, has a construction value of $8.5M. (2006/2007)

COMMERCIAL SECTOR There are approximately 1,200 commercial businesses in Chilliwack occupying about 300,000 square meters. The commercial sector continues to expand proportionately with the increase in population. Over the past few years there has been an influx of larger commercial/ retail stores, such as Home Depot and Walmart Supercentre, which are located at the 700,000 sq.ft. Eagle Landing commercial development. Chilliwack has also experienced an increase in smaller retail/ commercial establishments and strip malls. COMMERCIAL FLOOR SPACE

The total occupied commercial floor space in Chilliwack is estimated at nearly 305,000 square meters or about 3 million square feet. Vacant commercial floor space is not included, which could add another 5% to the retail/office space inventory. Of all occupied commercial floor space about 55% is located in Chilliwack Proper, 40% in SardisVedder, and the balance is scattered among Village West, the outlying communities and the general rural area. In terms of the major sectors, most of the floor space — about 39% — is allocated to offices. About 32% of the floor space is allocated to retail operations (including food and automotive). And approximately 29% of all commercial floor space is allocated to services (including food, beverage, amusement, and personal). In terms of the major groups, automotive dealerships stand out as the largest at 55,753 square meters, followed by general retail at 46,539 square meters and food/ beverage/drug retail at 36,465 square meters.

COMMERCIAL SECTOR GROWTH

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

• Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers (42275 Industrial Way): The world’s largest auctioneer has expanded to Chilliwack. The new facility encloses 5,138m2 of indoor space and a construction value of $12M. It occupies a high-profile 3.9 ha site in the Cattermole Industrial Estates. (2009)

In the Commercial sector, there was a peek in 2003 of about $30, million and another peak in 2008 over $40 million. Total assessment value of the commercial sector shows steady growth from $250 million in 1986 to $1.6 billion in 2009. COMMERCIAL / RETAIL DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

• Canadian Tire (7560 Vedder Road): In 1999, Canadian Tire moved to its current location on Vedder Road. The store, which covers 60,000 sq.ft., added another 17,000 sq.ft. with a construction value of $1.5M. (2006) • CIBC (5955 Vedder Road) This CIBC branch, with a construction value of $1.1M and floor space of 596 m2, completes the presence of all four chartered banks in Vedder. (2009) • Eagle Landing (Squiala Reserve at Evans Road Connector): Property Development Group and the Squiala First Nation are developing a 700,000 sq.ft. commercial site. To date, Cineplex Entertainment has opened Galaxy Cinema (31,000 sq.ft.), Walmart opened a 150,000 sq.ft. supercentre, and Home Depot is constructing a new facility. (2009 – ongoing) • Dairy Queen (9055 Young Road): This development provides 3,500 sq.ft. of floor space on its 0.608 acre site. The project’s construction value was $1.2M. (2007) • Garrison Village (45665 Tamihi Way): Garrison Village is a pedestrian friendly open mall. Cooper’s Foods ($4.5M construction value and 2,581 m2 floor area) and ten other buildings are to anchor this

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GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

new ‘neighbourhood centre’. Four of the remaining commercial buildings are still under construction (for a total construction value / floor area of $3.37M / 1,577 m2.) In addition, five mixed-use buildings (128 apartments above 3,446 m2 of street-level businesses) are complete at a total cost of $17.4M, providing contiguous street facades to frame the open mall. Five commercial buildings will be added to the “high street” cluster. The total construction value to date (Oct. 2009) for this phase is $25.24M. (ongoing)

veloped in two phases. The first phase is complete, resulting in 48 new units at a construction value of $1.2M. (ongoing) • Royal Bank (45460 Luckakuck Way): This new branch offers 425 m2 of office space with a construction value of $600,000.

• Mr. Mike’s Restaurant (45200 Luckakuck Way): Construction value: $1.6M. Total floor space: 446 m2.

• Safeway Centre (45850 Yale Road): The supermarket, with a construction value of $3.5M, has a total floor space of 51,839 sq.ft. The construction/renovation includes two other major buildings: Envision and Dakota’s Restaurant for a total floor space of 25,155 sq.ft and construction value of $3M. This new centre now stretches out on an expanded site of 7.8 acres with an overall floor area of 77,415 sq.ft. (2006)

• OK Tire Store & L.C. Tire and Auto (45676 Yale Road): This is the last infill parcel in this ‘highway commercial’ section of Yale Road. Construction value: $2M. Total floor space: 1,664 m2. (2009) • Promontory Hillside Plaza (5615 Teskey Way): This is a three-storey building with businesses on the ground level (4 CRUs for a total floor space of 1,090 m2) and 19 apartments on the upper floors. Its construction value is $5M plus commercial tenants’ improvements. (2008)

• Simpson Notaries Building (7408 Vedder Road): Construction value: $2M. Floor area: 1,069 m2. • Valley Toyota (98750 Young Road): This $2M facility has 22,000 sq.ft. of showroom/office space, and a total site area of 3.6 acres. (2006)

• Promontory Heights Plaza (45800 Promontory Road): This outdoor mall includes Shoppers Drug Mart (16,454 sq.ft.), ScotiaBank, two medical/dental offices, restaurants and several CRUs. The total floor area is 32,454 sq.ft. with a construction value of $3.25M. (2006)

• Vedder Village Mall (5725 Vedder Road): A 21,094 sq.ft. retail/commercial development located on Vedder Road. A new expansion has created 19 strata units for a total of 1,960 m2 of new retail space at

• River Inn Motel (5788 Vedder Road): The original motel (on one acre) is being redeCOMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS ($) 50,000,000 45,000,000 40,000,000 35,000,000 30,000,000 25,000,000 20,000,000 15,000,000 10,000,000 5,000,000 0 1999

68

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

a construction cost of $1.8M. (ongoing) • Village at Sardis Park Commercial Centre (6640 Vedder Road): This 5-acre site will have seven commercial buildings, four of which have been completed. Businesses on this site include Tim Hortons, BMO Bank of Montreal, Pharmasave and a medical office. (2009 – ongoing) • Young Road Holdings (8750 Young Road): This site has been transformed into a new open mall with four buildings totaling 1,725 m2 and with a construction value of $1.5M. (2008)

DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT Since its launching in 1999, the Downtown Business Improvement Association’s Downtown Revitalization Strategy has been producing impressive results. Its storefront facade and canopy improvement program has encouraged local business owners to transform the downtown core. Likewise, major public-private projects have led to the development of a new Court House, Five Corners Plaza, Chilliwack Landing Leisure Centre, Prospera Centre and the Chilliwack Cultural Centre. In 2007, the City of Chilliwack launched the Downtown Neighbourhoods Plan. This plan is a 30 year growth strategy for Chilliwack with short, medium, and long term actions that will provide a coordinated and unified way to affect major changes in the Downtown area. The City will take a leadership role in facilitating this change in liaison with Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), and the Business Improvement Association (BIA).


• Birch Street Condominium Apartment (9040 Birch Street): A 58-unit apartment project with a construction value of $4.7M. (2007) • Central Community Park (Young Road): The former Jean McNaughton/ Happy Wilkinson Parks have been transformed into an attractive, multipurpose community-oriented urban park. The new design includes an outdoor amphitheater, water feature, special lighting, pathways, interpretative signage and significant architectural details. (2007). • Chilliwack Cultural Centre (Corbould Street): This project, with a construction value of $22M and floor space of 5,987 m2, is a state-of-the-art facility on the west side of downtown Chilliwack. The Centre features an art gallery, 500+ seat performance theatre, 250 seat studio, music rooms, instruction rooms, arts and crafts studios and related amenities. (2009/2010) • Coast Chilliwack Hotel (1st Avenue): Coast Hotels & Resorts purchased the former Rhombus Hotel in December 2008 for $7.3M. In 2009, the hotel underwent significant renovations costing approximately $5M. The newly renovated hotel has 110 guest rooms, banquet rooms and meeting facilities, an indoor pool with hot tub and sauna, a fitness facility, and Preston’s, the hotel’s in-house restaurant. (2008). • Fairview Apartments (9330 Corbould Street): 55-unit apartment project intended for the rental market. Construction value: $2.3M. Total floor area: 3,488 m2.

• Former HSBC Building (Main Street): The building is currently being renovated for future federal government offices. (2010) • Southgate Shopping Centre (45905 Yale Road): This downtown open mall underwent a “wholesale” renovation of its exterior and interior, including the parking repaving of its lot and tenant reorganization. Its anchor store, Shoppers Drug Mart, has expanded into a large-format general merchandise “drug store”. The total construction value of various building permits is in excess of $1M. (2006)

• TRI-R Development (45893 Chesterfield Avenue): A 55-unit condominium apartment development with a construction value of $7M and total floor area of 6,059 m2. (2009) • Wedler Professional Centre (9300 Nowell Street): This former government building, renamed the “Wedler Professional Centre,” underwent major renovations. Wedler Engineering occupies the majority of the second floor. (2005)

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

COMMERCIAL SPACE BY MAJOR GROUP BUSINESS TYPE

SIC CODE

FLOOR SPACE (M2)

#

Service industries incidental to agriculture (#021 – veterinarians)

2

3,303

13

Food beverage and drug retail

60

36,465

60

Shoe, apparel, fabric and yarn retail

61

8,983

37

Household furniture, appliances and furnishings retail

62

14,895

30

Automotive vehicles, parts and accessories sale and service

63

55,753

167

General retail merchandising

64

46,539

68

Other retail stores

65

26,809

123

Non-store retail

69

764

7

Deposit accepting intermediary (banks, trusts & credit unions)

70

8,481

17

Consumer and business financing

71

242

2

Investment intermediary

72

1,692

10

Insurance

73

2,424

17

Other financial intermediaries

74

225

1

Real estate operators

75

4,756

156

Insurance and real estate agent

76

1,990

7

Business services

77

20,009

110

Educational services

85

2,621

9

Health and social services

86

14,004

142

Accommodation services

91

947

29

Food and beverage services

92

24,340

132

Amusement and recreational services

96

16,527

44

Personal and household services

97

7,978

102

Membership organizations

98

60

1

Other services

99

All

5,188

43

304,995

1,327

Note: Home-based businesses reported no floor space. All of the floor space values represent conventional businesses. Source: City of Chilliwack: 2003-2008 Commercial Floor Space

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GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

INSTITUTIONAL SECTOR In the Institutional sector, the highest peaks were $23 million in 2005 and nearly $40 million in 2009. This boom in institutional construction can be attributed to the Canada Education Park and the expansion of the Chilliwack General Hospital.

INSTITUTIONAL / PUBLIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS • Canada Education Park (45220 et. al. Keith Wilson Road): In March 2003, the City of Chilliwack, the Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO), Canada Lands Company and additional partners signed a memorandum of understanding to officially launch the Canada Education Park project. Over the next 10 years, the Park will unfold on a 200-acre site at the former Canadian Forces Base Chilliwack. The Park will showcase several major institutions including the RCMP Pacific Region Training Centre (PRTC), Justice Institute of BC (JIBC), University of the Fraser Valley (UFV), Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and the Canadian Police College. There will also be Pacific Gateway partnerships (via UFV) with international universities from China and India. Future activities will revolve around post-secondary and post graduate education, research and training; industrial research and enterprising; criminal justice programs sponsored by the RCMP, UFV and the Justice Institute of BC; First

Nations training programs, international studies, and health science programs. The Park’s projected student population is expected to grow exponentially with the number of full-time students increasing to 18,470 by 2020. • Central Elementary School (9435 Young Road): The school underwent a seismic upgrade at a cost of $4M. • Chilliwack General Hospital (45600 Menholm Road): The hospital invested $1.2M in the upgrade of its 5th floor for sub-acute care beds in 2006. In 2008/2009, a $35M Chilliwack General Hospital Redevelopment Project was launched. The project is funded by the Fraser Valley Regional Hospital District and the Fraser Valley Health Care Foundation. Upon completion in 2011, the hospital will have a new Emergency and Lab building, an improved entry and major renovations to the ambulatory care facilities. The hospital will be ready for future care capacity expansion as the population of the Fraser Valley grows and

INSTITUTIONAL BUILDING PERMITS ($) 70,000,000 60,000,000 50,000,000 40,000,000 30,000,000 20,000,000 10,000,000 0 1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2009

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2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

ages. (ongoing) • Cheam Leisure Centre (45501 Market Way): This $9M renovation of the former Cheam Centre showcases the following amenities: a 6-lane, 25 metre swimming pool, lazy river, hot tub, sauna, squash courts, weight training room, fitness equipment, double gymnasium and meeting and multi-purpose rooms. (2010) • Evans Road Connector and Interchange at Highway 1: The connector, including the Interchange, joins Evans Road in Sardis with Evans Parkway in Village West and continues North through the Squiala Reserve, and finally linking with Ashwell Road. It was designed to relieve the traffic pressure and gives direct road access and development opportunities to the Squiala Reserve. Together with the interchange at Highway 1 and Luckakuck Way, the project costs $38.2M. • G.W. Graham Middle School (45955 Thomas Road): Construction of this new secondary school (Gr. 7-12) began in May 2005, and in September 2006 it enrolled its first year students. The building cost $18.5M (construction only), and has


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

127,000 sq.ft. of space. • Prospera Centre (45323 Hodgins Avenue): This 102,000 sq.ft. facility consists of two arenas; the main arena has 5,700 seats. In 2005, it expanded its seating capacity to accommodate a new junior hockey franchise (Chilliwack Bruins). The project cost $21.5M (including the seating expansion) and was funded through a public-private partnership between the City and Chiefs Development Group. • Timothy Christian Expansion (50484 Castleman Road): This independent school added new classrooms (7,642 sq.ft.) at a cost of $1.1M in construction value. (2006) • University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) Trades and Technology Centre (Canada Education Park): In July 2006, UFV took possession of 85 acres of Canada Education Park and embarked on a relocation/expansion plan for its Chilliwack campus. The first project was to upgrade a former CFB shop into a modern Trades and Technology Centre at a construction cost of $13,258,757 and total floor space of 115,000 sq.ft. The new Trades and Technology Centre is a $29M investment by UFV once the land purchase and equipment and other installations are included. UFV is currently renovating and constructing its second major facility at Canada Education Park. The building consists of 5,000 m2 of renovation (of the former CFB Engineering Building) and 9,000 m2 of new construction.

RESIDENTIAL SECTOR In the early 1990’s, housing development started to move onto the hillsides, namely into Promontory, a hillside community with a planned capacity of 10,000 people. The Eastern Hillside has been planned for fully serviced urban development, with an ultimate capacity for 13,000 people. Chilliwack Mountain could also accommodate a certain amount of growth up to a capacity of 4,500 people. Other hillsideupland locations are being assessed in the

ongoing official community plan review. RESIDENTIAL GROWTH

Much of Chilliwack’s growth has occurred in the residential sector, which constitutes about 80% of the assessment total.

tion (2008) • Westpointe (43733 Chilliwack Mountain Road): An up-scale 34-unit duplex development. (2005) CHILLIWACK PROPER

Residential assessments have grown from $1.5 million in 1986 to nearly $11 billion in 2009.

• B & E Developments (9140 Hazel Street): 21 townhouse units. Construction value: $3.3M. Total floor area: 2,317 m2. (2008)

Residential building permits reached a peak in 2007 of $164.5 million. The 30 year average for housing starts is around 650 units per year.

• B.A.B. Enterprises (46675 Yale Road): A mixed commercial/residential development at a neighborhood commercial centre. It comprises almost 20,000 sq.ft. of commercial space on the ground floor, and 14 apartment units on the upper floors. Total construction value: $1.8M. Total floor area: 1,848 m2. (2006)

Projections for future growth remain strong and steady. Currently, the city projects a housing growth rate of 2.7%, which is marginally more than Chilliwack’s estimated population growth of about 2.5%.

RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS CHILLIWACK MOUNTAIN

• Copper Ridge (43733 Chilliwack Mountain Road): This development is comprised of 39 single family dwelling units. (2006) • Maple Hills Estates (8590 Sunrise Drive): a 142-unit townhome project (40 duplexes, 102 triplexes) on the south slopes of Chilliwack Mountain. Total construction value: $12.4M, total floor area; 28,675 m2. (2008) • Stogryn (43609/43645/43685 Chilliwack Mountain Road): 68-unit townhouse project under strata subdivision applica-

• Birchwood Cottages (CHS Birchwood) (45642 Patten Avenue): 12 congregate housing units in 6 duplex buildings. Construction value: $5.5M. Total floor area: 859 m2. (2008) • Central Parkside Development (8830 Nowell Street): A 41-unit townhouse project on the former Robertson Annex Elementary School site with a construction value of $3.3M and total floor area of 6,860 m2. (2007) • Custom Pride Homes (45541 Spadina Avenue): A 22-unit downtown apartment with a construction value of $2M and total floor area of 2,356 m2. (2007) • The Fairmont (9270 Edward Street): A 28-unit apartment development with a construction value of $2.8M and total floor

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GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

area of 3,666 m2. (2007)

5,654 m2. (2009)

• Flora Park Development (9108 Mary Street): A 34-unit rental apartment project in the downtown with a construction value of $4.47M. (2009)

• TR-R Development (45615 Brett Avenue): A 51-unit condominium apartment development with a construction value of 5.5M and total floor area of 6,340 m2. (2008)

• H&H Developments (45085 Wolfe Road): 68-unit, 17-phase townhouse project (18 buildings). Construction will span over next several years. Construction value: $5.9M. Total floor area: 11,748 m2. (under construction)

• TR-R Development (9060 Brett Avenue): A 22-unit condominium apartment with a construction value of 4M and total floor area of 2,738 m2. (2009) • TR-R Development (46021 2nd Avenue): A 40-unit condominium apartment development with a construction value of 5.5M and total floor area of 4,650 m2. (2008)

• King Edward Developments (8933 Edward Street): A 41-unit condominium apartment with a construction value of $3.5M and total floor area of 4,175 m2. (2006)

• The Vibe (45563 Yale Road): 4 condominium apartment buildings for a total of 220 units. With a construction value of $20.5M and total floor area of 11,581 m2, it represents a significant residential investment in Chilliwack proper. (2008)

• Newmark Condominiums (46289 Yale Road): The new 3.3 acre project will comprise 18 townhouses and three apartment blocks (228 units). Total construction value: $17.1M. Total floor area: 18,054 m2. (2009)

GARRISON CROSSING (45470 WATSON ROAD)

• OBC Developments (46059 Chilliwack Central Road): A 32-unit condominium apartment with a construction value of $2.7M and total floor area of 3,366 m2. (2008)

The redevelopment of the former Canadian Forces Base officially broke ground on November 24, 2003 and the first house was on the market in the summer of 2004. Garrison Crossing is a “masterplanned” residential neighborhood (153 acres), with significant institutional and commercial components. It incorporates many “neo-traditional” and “new urbanism” neighborhood features, such as rear lane access and pedestrian friendly roads, a pedestrian pathway system, due attention

• Riverford Developments (46083 Airport Road): 26 townhouse units with a construction value of $5.5M and total floor area of 6,340 m2. (2009) • The Summit (Ambros Developments) (46262 1st Avenue): A new 61-unit multifamily condominium with a construction value of $6M and total floor area of RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS ($) 180,000,000 160,000,000 140,000,000 120,000,000

The new neighborhood will accommodate 1,500 to 1,800 homes of various types, together with 80,000+ sq.ft. of commercial development. EASTERN HILLSIDES

• Elk Creek Park (50250 Prairie Central Road): A 45-lot subdivision located in the eastern hillsides of Chilliwack. (2007) • Elk Mountain Estates (Prairie Central Road): A 45-lot subdivision located in the eastern hillsides of Chilliwack. (Under development) • Emerald Ridge at the Falls Resort Community (8341 Nixon Road): A mixeduse residential development located 750 ft. above the Fraser Valley floor in the landscape of an 18-hole golf course. (Under development) • The Falls Country Club – Blackburn Developments (50957 Falls Court/8179 Nixon Road): A resort residential development that could ultimately yield 2,394 residential (and some hotel) units. The first project is Emerald Estates, a 3 phase, 90-strata lot single detached subdivision. The second project consists of seven phases of 64 strata duplexes. The developer also submitted a 106-lot subdivision application for 76 acres: * Phase 1 - 19 strata SFD lots * Phase 2 - 7 fee simple lots * Phase 3 - 54 strata SFD lots • Ford Creek (Unity Drive): A 62-lot subdivision located adjacent to Unity Christian School off Hack Brown Road. (Under development)

100,000,000 80,000,000 60,000,000 40,000,000 20,000,000 0 1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2009

72

to urban design, “green streetscape”, and urban wood lot, a Legacy Walk (former CFB history), and a mix of compact single homes, townhouses and condominiums. “Vertically mixed” commercial/institutional/residential developments will also be promoted at strategic locations.

COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010


• Highland Springs (7264/7270 Ramsay Place): A 66 SFD-lot subdivision. (Under application) • Marble Hill Road (7265 Marble Hill Road): A 29-lot subdivision on 14 acres. (2007) • Mark Steel Developments (8545 Nixon Road): A 149 SFD-lot subdivision on 55 acres. (Under application) • Palmer Subdivision (7942 Palmer Place): A 51-unit single detached residential subdivision. (2007) • Unity Village (50890 Hack-Brown Road/8502 Unity Drive): 100 SFD homes at the base of Mt. Cheam (2007) PROMONTORY

This hillside community started construction in 1992. Over the past 18 years, Promontory’s population has grown from 400 to 5,000. Its ultimate population could reach 7,000. Major residential projects in recent years include: • Cedar Grove Estates (5367 Teskey Road):

HOUSING STARTS BY TYPE 800 Single 700

Duplex Townhouse

600

Apartment 500

Suites/Other

400 300 200 100 0 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2010

a 6-phase single family dwelling subdivision with a total of 176 lots. (2006) • Cedar Spring (46808 Hudson Road): 24 townhouse units with a construction value of $2.5M and total floor area of 4,464 m2. (2008) • Cobble Stone Terrace (5649 Teskey Road): 42 townhouse units with a construction value of $3.5M and a total floor area of 6,649 m2. (2007) • Eagle View Ridge (5965 Jinkerson Road): 78 townhouse units with a construction value of $6.2M and total floor area of 12,371 m2. (2007) • Falcon Heights (5792 Jinkerson Road): 88 lot single residential subdivision. (2006)

• The Gables at Copper Creek (5648 Promontory Road). A 61 townhouse units with a construction value of $5M and a total floor area of 11,647 m2. (2008) • The Gables at River’s Bend (5556 Peach Road and 44720 Keith Wilson Road): 77 townhouse units with a construction value of $6.5M and total floor area of 6,493 m2. (2006) • Hipwell Subdivision (5633 Teskey Way): 11 bare-land strata and 2 fee-simple SFD lot subdivisions (2007) • Jinkerson Heights (5898/5900 Jinkerson Road): A 56-lot single detached residential subdivision with 28 townhouse units. Construction value: $2.3M. Total floor area: 55,116 m2. (2008) • Living Hope Developments (46835/46832 Hudson Road): 32 townhouse units with a construction value of 3.5M and a total floor area of 4,660 m2/ (2009)

HOUSING STARTS (10 YEAR AVERAGE) Suites/Other 4% Apartment 29%

Single 38%

Townhouse 26%

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

• Forest Gate (Resorts West BC) (51750 Allan Road et. al.): The original rezoning application was approved for a maximum development of 290 SFDs and 830 townhouse units. The subsequent rezoning applications are on hold. The total site area is 141 acres (within the City boundaries) plus additional land in the Fraser Valley Regional District. The original population estimate for this resort/hillside community is 3,600. (Ongoing)

Duplex 3%

• Premier Pacific (47570 Bailey Road/6012 Jinkerson Road/47271 MacSwan Drive): 102 SFD-lot subdivisions and 200+ townhouse units. • Promontory Centre (5615 Teskey Way): Mixed-use commercial (retail 5 CRUs)/ apartment units (11) with a construction value of $5M. (2008) • Promontory Village Heights (Sylvan Drive south of Thom Creek subdivision): A new

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2010

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GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

HOUSING STARTS BY TYPE YEAR

SINGLE

DUPLEX

TOWN-HOUSE

APARTMENT

SUITES/OTHER

MOBILE HOME

SINGLE SUBTOTAL

MULTIFAMILY SUBTOTAL

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

%

%

2001

161

47.35%

10

2.94%

26

7.65%

134

39.41%

9

2.65%

0

0.00%

47%

53%

2002

264

58.80%

22

4.90%

82

18.26%

71

15.81%

8

1.78%

2

0.45%

59%

41%

2003

267

43.84%

10

1.64%

241

39.57%

57

9.36%

31

5.09%

3

0.49%

44%

56%

2004

421

40.44%

30

2.88%

307

29.49%

269

25.84%

12

1.15%

2

0.19%

41%

59%

2005

430

35.57%

20

1.65%

350

28.95%

338

27.96%

66

5.46%

5

0.41%

36%

64%

2006

495

37.39%

58

4.38%

365

27.57%

335

25.30%

70

5.29%

1

0.07%

37%

63%

2007

354

25.38%

36

2.58%

250

17.92%

688

25.30%

66

4.73%

1

0.07%

25%

75%

2008

239

36.71%

30

4.61%

134

20.58%

215

33.03%

33

5.07%

0

0.00%

37%

63%

2009

166

39.24%

8

1.89%

181

42.79%

54

12.76%

10

2.36%

4

0.94%

39%

61%

2010

191

35.11%

20

3.67%

105

19.30%

173

31.80%

53

9.74%

2

0.36%

35%

65%

299

39.98%

24

3.11%

204

25.21%

233

27.06%

36

4.33%

2

0.30%

40.00%

60.00%

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2011

52-lot subdivision. (2008) • Sherwood Estates (Sherwood & Teskey Road): A single family dwelling subdivision consisting of 196 single detached homes. This includes the strata subdivision, Bridle Ridge Estates (34 strata single detached lots). The project was concluded with 46057 Weeden Drive, which consists of 58 SFD lots. (2006) • Timber Ridge (46840 Russell Road): 72-unit townhouse project in 7 phases. (Ongoing) • Walker Creek Developments (46791 Hudson Road): 51 townhouse units with a construction value of $5.75M and a total floor area of 10,040 m2. (2009) • West Bow Developments (46778 Hudson Road): 15-lot bare land strata subdivision; 42 townhouses with a construction value of $3.4M and a total floor area of 6,651 m2. (2008) • Wisteria Estates (5623 Teskey Road): 26 townhouse units with a construction value of $5.5M and a total floor area of 4,047 m2. (2008) SARDIS / VEDDER

• Cedar Park (6449 Blackwood Lane): This 86-unit townhouse project has a $7M construction value and a total floor area

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

of 12,660 m2. (2005) • Cotton Ridge (45645 Knight Road): 54-condominium apartments with a construction value of $4M and total floor area of 6,026 m2. (2006) • Double D Developments (45750 Shaw Avenue) A mixed-use, 4-storey development with commercial on ground floor and apartments above. Construction value: $1.7M. (2007) • Garrison Crossing (45470 Watson Road): Please see earlier reference on page 70. • Harvest Square (6577 Southdown Place): 44 townhouse units with a construction value of $4.1M and 10 single detached strata units with a construction value of $1.1M. (2008) • The Maples (6450 Blackwood Lane): 46 townhouse units with a construction value of $4.43M and total floor area of 10,671 m2. (2006) • Riverstone (5021/5100 Chittenden Road and 45390/45420/45502 Vedder Mountain Road): About 9 ha have been developed as a single detached subdivision. (Ongoing) • Village at Sardis Park (6760 Vedder Road): A 49-acre residential/ commercial mixed-use project with an approved capacity for 651 units of single detached

townhomes and apartments plus 150,000 sq.ft. of commercial space. (Ongoing) • Village Green (6498 Southdowne Place): 62 townhouse units with a construction value of $5.5M. (Ongoing) • Webster Landing (44523/44465/44495 McLaren Drive): * 233 dwelling units on 35.56 acres. * 112 fee simple SFD lots * The Grove: 47 strata single homes (5 acres) * The Haven: 74 townhouse units (6.2 acres) (Ongoing)

OTHER SECTORS AGRICULTURE In the Agricultural sector, growth rates climbed from about $50,000 in 1985 to about $6.9M in 2003.

FORESTS In 2005, Managed Forests peaked at an all time high of $439,600, with another peak in 2000 of $372,200.

RECREATION Recreational property has grown from $25.4M in 1987 to $126M in 2006.


CANADA EDUCATION PARK

DOWNTOWN CHILLIWACK

The majority of Chilliwack’s land is dedicated to agriculture at 64%. This land is part of the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR).

This 200-acre site is becoming a major centre for adult education, research and training facilities. The Canada Education Park is already home to: • University of the Fraser Valley • RCMP Pacific Region Training Centre • Justice Institute of BC: Paramedic Academy • Canada Border Services Agency • Department of National Defence, Area Support Unit • Correctional Service of Canada • Canadian Police College • Fisheries and Oceans Canada • Parks Canada

Through recent renovations, redevelopment, street-scaping improvements, and the tax savings offered by the “Downtown Revitalization Tax Exemption” bylaw, Downtown Chilliwack has become a popular location for new investment.

The remaining 36% of Chilliwack’s land is divided as follows: 20% Residential, 10% Commercial, and 6% Industrial. Within these areas, there remains another 4% of land that is available for further development or redevelopment.

DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES CEPCO continues to work with several public and private parties to make industrial, commercial and institutional lands available for development or investment. Some areas of potential growth include:

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

LAND USE

INDUSTRIAL OPPORTUNITIES With low industrial land costs, Chilliwack is ideal for manufacturing, food processing, technology, warehousing and more. Various sites are available. Contact CEPCO for additional information.

CITY OF CHILLIWACK LAND USE AREAS L egend

C IT Y OF C H IL L IW

F IR S T N AT IO N S UNKNO W N C iv ic o pe n s p a ce F a rm ing - p o ultry F a rm ing -da iry/b ee f In d us tria l/co m m e rcial - hig h co ve rag e

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F IR S T N AT IO N S

In d us tria l/co m m e rcial - m e diu m cov e rag e

C iv ic o pe n s p a ce

UNKNO W N

F a rm ing - p o ultry

In d us tria l/co m m e rcial o utd o or

F a rm ing -da iry/b ee f In d us tria l/co m m e rcia

In s titu tio n - h igh co v era ge

In d us tria l/co m m e rcia In d us tria l/co m m e rcia

In s titu tio n al - hig h s ite cov e ra g e

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N a tu ra l o p en sp a ce P a rkin g

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R e sid e n tial - hig h/m e

R e sid e n tial - low de n

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U rba n va can t

fa rm in g - cro p a n d fru

R e sid e n tial - low de ns ity U rba n va can t fa rm in g - cro p a n d fruit

Ü 1000

0 M e te rs

I:\M A P S _G IS \C A D A S T R A L \A R C M A P \L

75


INFRASTRUCTURE • Transportation • Shipping • Utilities • Media • Telecommunications

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78 81 82 84 85


INFRASTRUCTURE

WORLD-CLASS

Infrastructure

“Chilliwack provides our company with a central location, an easy drive to the Trans Canada Highway, a lower cost of living and competitive housing prices.” PAUL MURRIN, WEDLER ENGINEERING LTD.

Chilliwack provides easy access to local, national and international markets through a comprehensive transportation network of road, rail, air and sea. Chilliwack also enjoys all the services, utilities and amenities of some of the world’s most progressive communities, from economical electricity to top-class fibre-optic telecommunications. With low land costs, easy access to markets and all the necessary amenities, Chilliwack is one of the best places in the world to grow a business.

77


INFRASTRUCTURE

Chilliwack provides a thorough transportation network by road, rail, air and sea.

The Lion’s Club, with their Easter Seal Buses, offers door-to-door transportation for wheelchair passengers and others unable to use public transportation within and outside the city.

BY ROAD Many people in Canada consider a car an essential part of life — and it’s no different in Chilliwack. Most people commute around town and in between towns with their own vehicle via a combination of urban and rural roads and via the Trans Canada Highway (which connects to Vancouver, the USA and the Pacific Northwest). Chilliwack is divided into two main areas: Chilliwack Proper (north of the Trans Canada Highway) and Sardis-Vedder (south of the Trans Canada Highway). The two areas are DISTANCE AND TRAVEL TIME FROM CHILLIWACK

78

companies serve Chilliwack and the surrounding areas.

TRANSPORTATION

DESTINATION

HOURS

KM

MILES

US Border (Sumas)

0.5

34

21

Abbotsford Airport

0.5

34

21

Seattle

2.3

214

133

Penticton

3.5

287

178

Kelowna (via Coquihalla)

3.3

286

178

Vancouver

1.1

108

60

Surrey

0.75

78

48

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connected by several Highway Overpasses (which include freeway entrances). In the main urban area, the principal north-south axis route is Yale/Vedder Roads. This same road also connects with the Columbia Valley Highway (where Cultus Lake and other resorts are located) and Chilliwack Lake Road. PASSENGER BUS SERVICE

Scheduled inter-city bus services are provided by Greyhound Bus Lines, reinforcing Chilliwack’s position as one of the major stops in its BC/Canada network. For local transit, the municipality operates six conventional buses that run 12 routes from Monday through Sunday. Ridership averages 450,000 “paid passengers” per year and is expected to increase with population growth and improved services. TAXI AND SPECIAL TRANSPORTATION

One limousine service and four taxi

Chilliwack Community Services, a non-profit social service agency, offers “Handy DART” service. This local door-to-door transportation service, funded by BC Transit and the local government, is available every weekday for those who qualify. SHIPPING BY ROAD

Shipping is available in a variety of forms. The most common form of shipping for small regional packages is via courier. There are about 15 courier companies serving Chilliwack (including Greyhound Bus Lines, Purolator Courier, UPS, Federal Express, and Priority Courier (operated by Canada Post). For larger shipments, trucks serve most destinations. In British Columbia, trucks move over $5.5B (US) worth of goods and product to the United States each year. There are over 240,000 truck shipments heading south each year, equivalent to a truck every 2.2 minutes. Annually, another 300,000 shipments head north to British Columbia from the United States.


Because Chilliwack has no municipal tax on fuel, the city has been a favourite stop for trucks enroute to Metro Vancouver. Along the Trans Canada Highway, there are two fully equipped truck stops and two card locks, which have been benefiting from the growing truck traffic on the highway.

BY RAIL PASSENGER RAIL TRAVEL

British Columbia offers some of the best passenger rail routes in North America. Bookings for passenger travel can be made through Via Rail or the Rocky Mountaineer. The main terminals for these railways are located in Vancouver. There is also the West Coast Express commuter train that travels into Vancouver from various points, starting in Mission. SHIPPING BY RAIL

Chilliwack is a major interchange point between CN Railway and Southern Railway of BC. Much of the traffic in this area is comprised of loaded cars hauled from the East by CN Rail, which are subsequently redistributed by Southern Railway of BC to destinations in southern BC, or to Sumas for re-shipment by Burlington Northern to US destinations.

CN RAILWAY (CHILLIWACK)

CN Railway has a main line with double tracks crossing the City from east to west, totaling 11 km. It has an interchange point with Southern Railway of BC in Chilliwack Proper, supported by two sidings and a ramp track. SOUTHERN RAILWAY OF BC

Southern Railway of British Columbia (SRY), in operation since 1897, is a short line railway that physically connects with the Canadian National Railway tracks in Chilliwack and handles over 70,000 revenue carloads of freight annually. SRY also has interline connections with BNSF, Canadian Pacific, Union Pacific and BC Rail, enabling plenty of competition from the long haul carriers plus customized service provided by a “neutral” service-oriented, locally managed railway.

BY AIR For those wishing to charter an airplane, Chilliwack is home to a 130-acre airport right next to the heart of the City. Although

the airport is capable of handling heavy aircraft such as the RCAF Hercules, most airline traffic from this airport is small craft for personal, private or tourism uses. For air travel to major western Canadian cities, most people take flights out of Abbotsford International Airport (about a 25-minute drive from Chilliwack) or Vancouver International Airport (about 90 minutes from Chilliwack).

INFRASTRUCTURE

There are about 60 national and local trucking firms operating in Chilliwack. Their services range from moving, gravel hauling and general goods shipment. There are 19 common carriers and 14 local terminals serving Chilliwack.

CHILLIWACK AIRPORT (YCW)

Chilliwack Airport is relatively close to downtown Chilliwack, a variety of restaurants and full hotel amenities. It is also within easy access to the Trans Canada Highway. The airport services an estimated 60,000 in annual air traffic movements, and welcomes both pilot training and recreational flights from all around BC and south of the border. Some of the Airport’s amenities include: • Terminal Building: designed to accommodate aircraft with up to 19 passengers. This modern building houses the airport administration, a restaurant and Principal Air, a chartered flight company and training school. • 4,000 ft. Paved Runway: designed to take very heavy aircraft, including the RCAF Hercules. The airport classification is a B-2 rating, which will accommodate up to a Beechcraft 1900. • Parallel Taxiway: complete with lighting.

“A large part of our success is our advantage of being located at the Chilliwack Airport. With a 3900’ runway with full fuel service, the runway is long enough to accommodate our customers with regional airline aircraft. In addition, our close proximity to the US border has provided us with a great deal of business from the Northwest United States.” KEN SMITH, PRESIDENT UPPER VALLEY AVIATION

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INFRASTRUCTURE

• Aircraft Parking: can accommodate up to eight transient aircraft on concrete/hard surface, plus additional transient aircraft on a level grass surface across its 130 acres.

AIRCRAFT MOVEMENTS

ENPLANED PASSENGERS

DRIVE TIME TO CHILLIWACK

Vancouver International (YVR)

339,022

8.8M

1.5 Hours

Abbotsford International (YXX)

155,454

503,693

30 minutes

Source: Abbotsford International Airport and Vancouver International Airport, 2009

• 24 hour Flight Services: via Abbotsford Airport (which is within 30 km). Flight services provide weather, radar, etc. • Fuel System: for small aircraft and Jet B fuel for turbine and jet engine aircraft and helicopters. It also offers Jet Fuel and Avgas (100 LL). Available 24 hours a day. Chilliwack’s fuel prices are among the lowest in BC. • Air Services: via four helicopter companies. All the companies offer Executive Helicopter Service. In addition, there are two charter plane companies based at the airport. Note that the airport is home to approximately 75 private and commercial aircraft. A hangar development is currently underway which will accommodate another 13 aircraft.

ABBOTSFORD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Hub Status

International

Location

28 miles from Chilliwack

Hours of Operation – Flight Service:

24 hours

Hours of Operation – Tower:

16 hours

No. of Runways

2

Runway Lengths

9,600 feet and 5,328 feet

Helicopter Pad

Yes

Flight Schools

Yes (3)

Passenger / Charter Carriers

Westjet, Orca Airways

Total Daily Non-Stops to all cities served

52

Source: Abbotsford International Airport, 2009

VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

For more information, contact Chilliwack Airport at 604-792-3430 or visit www.chilliwackairport.com.

Hub Status

International

Location

63 miles from Chilliwack

Hours of Operation

24

ABBOTSFORD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (YXX)

Number of Runways

3

Runway Lengths

9,900 feet, 11,800 feet and 7,300 feet

Helicopter Pad

Helijet

Passenger

1

Charter

7

Air Cargo

See Charter

Passenger Carriers

55**

Charter Carriers

10

Cargo Carriers

5*

Total Daily Non-Stop to all cities served

Summer: 2,796 Winter: 2,203

Flights to Six Largest Cities Served

Weekly Non-Stop Departures

Los Angeles

92

London (Heathrow, Gatwick, Stanstead, Luton)

41

Mexico City, Mexico

13

New York, New York, USA

14

Seoul, South Korea

14

Tokyo, Japan

14

The Abbotsford International Airport offers air transportation to several major northwest destinations with connections to North America and Europe. The Abbotsford airport offers the following amenities: Two Operational Runways: runway 07/25 (9,600 ft) and runway 01/19 (5,328 ft). Runway 07/25 is instrument equipped and capable of handling the largest commercial aircraft. Aircraft Parking: plenty of available transient aircraft parking capacity including Apron REGULAR WEEKLY FLIGHTS FROM ABBOTSFORD AIRLINE

DESTINATION

FLIGHTS

SEATS

WestJet

Calgary, Toronto

63

119-136

Orca Airways

Victoria

14

9

Source: Abbotsford International Airport, 2009

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Source: Vancouver International Airport, 2009


INFRASTRUCTURE

1, which parallels almost the entire length of Runway 01/19, and Taxiway D (5,200 ft x 200 ft) can also be utilized for aircraft parking when necessary. Services: a broad range of aviation services and facilities including a regional Transport Canada service centre, NavCanada air traffic control tower (16 hours per day) and Flight Services Station (24 hours per day), aircraft refueling and ground handling, aircraft maintenance/overhaul and flight training. Maintenance: a well-established aircraft maintenance and overhaul company (Cascade Aerospace) specializing in Boeing 737, Boeing 757 and DeHavilland Dash 8 aircraft, has a $50M, 250,000 sq.ft. facility. For more information, contact the Abbotsford International Airport at 604-855-1001 or visit www.abbotsfordairport.ca. VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (YVR)

The Vancouver International Airport is second only to Los Angeles International Airport for international air passenger volume on the Pacific coast of North America, handling over eight million international passengers each year, out of a total volume of 15 million. The Airport operates more than 800 scheduled departures per week to 55 international USA destinations. Nearly all major airlines are represented with regional carriers providing approximately 200 daily flights from 32 destinations throughout the province. The Vancouver International Airport is approximately 110 km or 90 minutes from Chilliwack.

SHIPPING BY AIR Shipments overseas can also be handled via shipping or courier companies that operate out of Vancouver International Airport.

BY SEA Although Chilliwack lies along the mighty Fraser River — nearly 1,600 kilometers long (1,000 miles) — it is no longer our main system for transporting passengers and freight. The Fraser River now serves mostly as a waterway for tourism and recreation. Transportation to Vancouver Island and the surrounding islands is provided by BC Ferries. There are two main ferry terminals: one at Tsawwassen (Delta area) and the other at Horseshoe Bay (North Vancouver) – both terminals are about 1.5 hours from Chilliwack. The major ferries take passengers, vehicles, buses and heavy-duty trucks. For more information on schedules, rates and routes, contact www.bcferries.bc.ca.

There are also a number of cruise ships which depart Vancouver for northern and southern destinations along the Pacific Coast. For more information, contact Tourism BC or your local travel agent. SHIPPING BY SEA

Overseas shipments such as wood products and special manufactured products (which are not handled by air) are delivered to the Metro Vancouver Port (which is about 100 km from Chilliwack). The Metro Vancouver Port handles over 75 million metric tonnes of cargo and trades with more than 90 economies. This makes the Metro Vancouver Port one of the busiest ports in North America. SHIPPING RATES

Although some may recognize a slightly higher cost for transportation and shipping from Chilliwack to Vancouver, the savings in Chilliwack’s land costs and other related costs far outweigh any additional shipping or transportation expense.

UTILITIES

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INFRASTRUCTURE

POWER BC HYDRO

In BC, Hydroelectric power is our most reliable (99.923% to be exact) and biggest source of energy. The electricity generated from our water sources supplies a fifth of the energy used by BC households, businesses, and factories. Excess electric power generated in BC is exported to other provinces and to the rest of North America. Currently, BC Hydro (a Provincial Crown Corporation) serves 94% of all British Columbia’s residents, including Chilliwack. BC Hydro supplies electricity to the Upper Fraser Valley from two sources. One source is the Bridge River generating plant west of Lillooet which feeds the Rosedale substation along a 360 kV transmission circuit and continues east to Wahleach GS. At Rosedale, electricity is transformed for transmission east to the Fraser Canyon (69kV) and west to the Fraser Valley (230 kV). The other source, which carries most of the load for the South Fraser Valley, is the 230 kV substations at McLellen, Clayburn and Atchelitz. The area is also supplied by a number of 60 kV substations, such as Chilliwack, Sumas Way, Abbotsford, Balfour, Port Kells,

Cloverdale, White Rock and Surrey.

new network planning and improvements to the gas system in Chilliwack. New gas lines have already been extended to Promontory and Ryder Lake (a long-term growth reserve area). There are also plans to service Chilliwack Mountain and to expand the Eastern Hillsides network to deal with large scale urban development.

Currently BC Hydro has no plan to install any new generation facilities in South Fraser Valley. TERASEN

In BC, natural gas from the Peace River area is transmitted by pipeline to consumers in the Lower Mainland and on Vancouver Island. The rapid population growth has entailed

ELECTRICITY RATE COMPARISON 7.28

Chilliwack, BC

7.44

Portland, OR

9.84

Edmonton, AB

10.77

Toronto, ON

11.34

Halifax, NS

18.22

San Francisco, CA

20.14

New York, NY

0

5

10

15

20

Source: BC Hydro 2008: Average rate per kWh, based on consumption of 10,000 kWh per month and 40 kW demand.

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Chilliwack has been rated among the best for water quality in Canada. In 1999, the City implemented a comprehensive Groundwater Protection Plan (GPP) to preserve the high quality of the Sardis-Vedder Aquifer, which is the City’s potable water source. The GPP integrates water quality monitoring, wellhead protection, pollution prevention, and public education initiatives. Residents and businesses in Chilliwack must do their part to protect this valuable water resource. The City of Chilliwack is continuously updating and upgrading its water system. As of 2006, development projects include: • Water line and Reservoir for Marble Hill and Nixon Road Developments: the implementation of this project depends on the pace of development. • East Chilliwack Transmission Main: this

relies on septic tanks. But with population growth and the resulting new construction, the City of Chilliwack has an ongoing plan for sewer improvements. The rapid growth of the community has created much demand on its systems of water supply, sewer and sewage treatment. Substantial system upgrades and extensions have also been added to Chilliwack Proper and Sardis to aid densification. project will provide water to Mt. Shannon Reservoir which in turn will provide adequate water supply for future development in the Chilliwack Proper area.

SEWER The City of Chilliwack provides sewer services to most of the urban and sub-urban areas. Much of the rural sector currently

The City of Chilliwack continues to improve its sewage treatment facilities, and promotes recycling in its solid waste management strategy.

WASTE Recycling and waste reduction efforts are a high priority in our fast growing community. Each year, Chilliwack residents help to divert thousands of tonnes of waste from entering

ELECTRICITY AND GAS RATES

WATER PRODUCTION

ELECTRICITY RATES (BC HYDRO)

Rated Capacity:

71.28 million litres per day

Residential Electricity:

Average Daily Demand:

29.90 million litres per day

Peak Demand:

51.71 million litres per day

Cost:

Basic Fee of $18.15 for a basic 20mm service plus $1.072 CAD per 100 cu.ft.

Water Connection Fee:

$1,750.00 CAD minimum or the actual cost of installation, whichever the higher (depends on the size of connection)

Basic Charge/Minimum Charge

14.48 cents per day

Step One

6.67 cents per kWh

Step Two

9.62 cents per kWh

Business Electricity:

Small Power (under 35 kWh for 2 mo.)

Basic/Minimum Charge

18.53 cents per day All kWh: $0.0881 kWh

Rate Rider:

4.0% applied to all charges before taxes and levies

INFRASTRUCTURE

WATER

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2010

*different rates are available for different consumption uses.

SEWER TREATMENT

GAS RATES (FORTIS BC)

Rated Capacity:

45.00 (million litres per day)

Residential Rate:

18 (million litres per day) Basic Fee of $26.74 plus $1.98 CAD per 100 cu. ft. based on 90% of water used

Basic Charge per day

$0.389

Average Daily Demand:

Gas Rate per GJ

$4.005

Cost:

Midstream Charge per GJ

$1.365

Delivery Charge per GJ

$3.527

Small Commercial Rate 2: Basic Charge per day

$0.8161

BAILEY LANDFILL DISPOSAL FEES

Cost of Gas per GJ

$4.005 per

General Refuse (0-60 kg)

Midstream Charge per GJ

$1.352

General Refuse (61 kg or more) – per tonne

$73

Delivery Charge per GJ

$2.896

General Refuse (>5 tonne) – per tonne

$68

Gypsum for recycling (no contaminants) per tonne

$125

Permitted Special Waste Surcharge

$200

*different rates are available for different consumption uses. Source: BC Hydro & Fortis BC, 2012

$4.50

Source: City of Chilliwack, 2010

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INFRASTRUCTURE

our landfill. Waste is comprised of three main components: recyclable material, compostable material, and garbage. This waste is separated and directed to several sites:

Also a number of FM stations are broadcast over cable service to provide maximum auditory quality.

• Bailey Sanitary Landfill Site (garbage and recyclable materials)

NEWSPAPERS

• Parr Road Green Depot (compostable yard waste)

• local paper • published weekly (Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays)

CHILLIWACK PROGRESS

• Recycling Depots located at:

CHILLIWACK TIMES

* Bailey Landfill Recycling Depot * Emterra Environmental Depot (Yale Rd.) • Bottle Depots and other recycling / disposal facilities participating in provincial stewardship programs

for disposal and a number of products for recycling, such as scrap metal, drywall and propane tanks.

The City’s objective is to reduce waste through the “Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle” philosophy. Chilliwack’s program makes it easy for each resident to do their part. The City has achieved a significant amount of success over the past 10 years, and has diverted approximately 40% of waste away from the municipal landfill.

PARR ROAD GREEN DEPOT - COMPOSTING

COLLECTION SERVICES

Curbsidce collection, City website at www.chilliwack.com.

The City provides curbside garbage and recycling collection services to all singlefamily households under a contract with Emterra Environmental. Participating households receive a quarterly bill for recycling and garbage collection on their City utility bill. Multi-family complexes will have the option to apply for participation. This program does not apply to businesses. RECYCLING AND DISPOSAL SERVICES

Many recyclable and hazardous waste products have year-round free environmental disposal options, including paint, solvents, pesticides, gasoline, oil, oil filters, oil containers, tires, batteries, light bulbs, and electronic waste. For the nearest recycling / disposal facility or for additional information on other acceptable products, call the Recycling Council of BC hotline at 1-800-667-4321 or check the City website at www.chilliwack.com. BAILEY SANITARY LANDFILL

The Bailey Sanitary Landfill accepts garbage

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• local paper • published weekly (Tuesdays and Thursdays) REAL ESTATE WEEKLY

• free local real estate advertiser • published weekly (Saturdays)

The City promotes backyard composting; however if that is not a feasible option for residents, they can transport their organic materials directly to the Parr Road Green Depot or subscribe to curbside collection.

REAL ESTATE REVIEW

DETAILED INFORMATIN ON CITY WEBSITE

• The Vancouver Sun (BC-based newspaper) • The Province (BC-based newspaper) • Globe & Mail (national newspaper) • National Post (national newspaper) • West Coast Farmer (BC-based newspaper)

MEDIA CABLE TELEVISION Chilliwack provides all the cable television services of a major centre. The local cable provider (Shaw Cable) broadcasts from about 30 channels (basic cable) up to 200+ channels. The community also has one local broadcasting station (Channel 4), which hosts local community information.

• free local real estate advertiser • published weekly (Fridays) courtesy of the Chilliwack Progress OTHER NEWSPAPERS

RADIO • Rogers Media – Star FM 98.3 / Country 107.1 • Fabmar Communications – 89.5 The Hawk


ROGERS CANADA

British Columbia is one of North America’s leaders in telecommunications infrastructure and services, with all communities having access to T-1 lines, and medium and large communities having access to T-3 lines. Businesses have access to a full range of data and Internet services: available bandwidth ranges from 56 Kbps to 100 Mbps using technologies such as fibre optics, ISDN, ADSL, Frame Relay, and ATM. TELUS

The majority of telecommunications services and infrastructure is provided by TELUS Corporation (www.telus.com). TELUS is the second-largest communications company in Canada. TELUS services millions of Canadian households, more than 50,000 small businesses and thousands of midsized and large corporations across the country. TELUS offers local, long distance and wireless services; high-speed data networks; advanced data, Internet, and e-commerce solutions; multimedia, advertising, mapping, and information services. TELUS also offers television cable services.

Rogers Canada offers wireless services, home phone services, cable and digital television and high speed internet.

INFRASTRUCTURE

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

For more information, visit: www.rogers.com.

TELUS also offers regular business and residential line service, long distance, toll free, cellular, and a host of electronic messaging and related services. Although TELUS is the major telecommunications company in British Columbia, there are also a number of other companies that provide local, longdistance services and cellular services. SHAW CABLE

Shaw Cable offers the community television cable services, internet and digital telephone services. They are also a notable telecommunications supplier. For more information, visit: www.shaw.ca.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES TO CHILLIWACK Service Characteristics of the Office:

Switch technology GTDS

Digital Fiber Service Provided:

Ethernet Fibre

Mbps LAN Service Available:

Yes – customer sets up LAN/ WAN

Monitoring (managed services only):

Telus monitors router

ISDN Available:

Yes (1)

ADSL Available:

Yes (1)

ADSL Available form this Switch:

Yes

Central Office on Self-Healing Fiber Ring:

Yes

Dual Feed from Two Separate Switching Offices:

Yes (back up)

Frame Relay, DS3, T1, T3, etc. (with providers):

Yes

56 Kbps to 100 Mbps:

Yes

Fibre Optics

Yes (2)

ATM:

Yes

(1) Location and distance will determine availability. (2) Fibre is dependent on location and cost to bring it from the curb to the premise. Source: Telus, 2008

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BUSINESS RESOURCES • Business Support Programs • Immigration • Foreign Affairs & International Trade • Invest in Canada • Business Resource

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BUSINESS RESOURCES

Resources BUSINESS

“As part of the Chilliwack Business Link program, CEPCO helped us with numerous site options that would be conducive to our operation as well as information on a downtown Revitalization Zone Bylaw designed to encourage investment and development in downtown Chilliwack. We have now developed the Welder Professional Centre. We are proud to call Chilliwack home and looks forward to continued growth of this great community!� PAUL MURRIN, PRESIDENT WELDER ENGINEERING

Chilliwack, the Province of British Columbia, the Government of Canada, and various other organizations offer a number of business support programs. Programs vary, from the Provincial Nominee Program to information and guidance to help grow your business. The following pages outline some of these programs, services and business support contacts. Your primary point of contact for locating your business in Chilliwack is the Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO). CEPCO is the economic development arm of the City of Chilliwack. Incorporated as a private company, CEPCO can offer support and services that are uncommon among most municipal economic development organizations.

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BUSINESS RESOURCES

Invest in Chilliwack Whether you are considering business expansion or investment opportunities, local, provincial and federal organizations are available to assist you.

BUSINESS SUPPORT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

human resource consulting, CEPCO’s goal is to have your business up and running as soon as possible.

In Chilliwack, the principal source of business support or resource services is Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO). CEPCO offers or organizes several programs to both new and existing businesses to help strengthen their position in Chilliwack’s economy. Some of the areas where CEPCO can help you are outlined below.

BUSINESS RETENTION PROGRAM: CHILLIWACK BUSINESS LINK

SITE SELECTION AND INVESTMENT CEPCO can help businesses and investors by providing site location and investment options for your business. CEPCO can also provide community information (demographics and labour force data) and project development assistance (fast-track building permits and approvals, zoning, development cost charges, engineering and infrastructures). Research assistance is also available. CEPCO can also provide introductions to Chilliwack’s business organizations and various government agencies that can help your business prosper.

BUSINESS RELOCATION OR EXPANSION Whether you want to expand or relocate your business to Chilliwack, CEPCO will assist you with coordinating various aspects of your move to Chilliwack. From streamlining permits and approvals to coordinating

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Supporting Chilliwack’s existing businesses is one of CEPCO’s top priorities. Chilliwack Business Link is a comprehensive business retention and expansion program designed to respond to the needs of local businesses. Chilliwack Business Link includes a range of program categories each designed for business retention and expansion. • Business Visitation: provides opportunities to improve communication flow between a business, local government, and the Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation to ensure that potential challenges are addressed and opportunities for growth are maximized. • Business Solutions: enables direct support for individual businesses in human resource related issues. • Chilliwack Executive Welcome: creates an opportunity for a business or a new management team to get to know the community. It also gives community members the opportunity to express their appreciation of the new business or management team. • Business Seminars: Sessions are developed throughout the year based on the needs of different business sectors and the current issues that may impact business performance.

• Industry-to-Industry Events (I-to-I): These events provide a forum for executives that have participated in the Chilliwack Business Link program to network and develop new business opportunities.

EMPLOYEE RETENTION AND TRAINING If you want to improve productivity and increase employee retention, CEPCO will assist you in accessing Provincial and/or Federal funding for technical training, soft skills training, human resource consulting and other programs. Some of these programs include: • Targeted Wage Subsidy • Training Works • Youth Employment Programs • Job Creation Partnerships • First Nations Training Program

EMPLOYEE ATTRACTION AND RELOCATION CEPCO can connect businesses with local employment service providers. If you need help recruiting employees, CEPCO can assist and support your recruitment efforts. If your company is relocating to Chilliwack, CEPCO can assist with the transition process by providing information on a variety of topics ranging from schooling to housing options. CEPCO will develop a program that will provide advice to employees of the company wishing to relocate from other communities to Chilliwack. However, it should be noted that CEPCO cannot provide financial assistance in this regard.


IMMIGRATION PROGRAMS

BUSINESS IMMIGRATION

Because of the importance of healthcare and education to our community and economy, CEPCO actively assists our local health authority and hospital with the attraction of healthcare professionals.

There are several ways to immigrate to British Columbia. The main three options for immigrating include the BC Provincial Nominee Program (PNP), the Canadian Federal Business Immigration Options, and the Federal Alternative for Skilled Workers. Note that there are also options to work here temporarily. For detailed information, visit www.welcomebc.ca.

The Business Immigrants component of BC’s PNP considers applications from experienced business entrepreneurs who plan to invest in and actively manage an eligible business in BC. Business Immigrants fall into one of three categories: • business skills • regional business • strategic projects

BRITISH COLUMBIA PROVINCIAL NOMINEE PROGRAM

Each of these categories has different requirements for the minimum personal net worth of the applicant, the amount of investment, the geographic location within BC and the number of Canadian employees in the proposed business. The basic criteria for consideration under all three of the business categories relates to business eligibility: • The primary purpose of the business is to earn profits from active income from the supply of products/services; • The business’ sustained commercial viability must be probable; • The business must provide economic benefit to BC by contributing to one of the following: * increasing the exports of goods/ services; * increasing value-added manufacturing, processing, or primary resource activity; * increasing BC tourism; * increasing research and development and technology commercialization; * creating innovative approaches to traditional businesses; * servicing an under-served regional market; * transferring skills, technology, and know-how to BC

CEPCO also works with the Chilliwack School District, the University of the Fraser Valley, and other post secondary institutions on a variety of initiatives and programs.

IMMIGRATION IMMIGRATION SUPPORT CEPCO works with applicants and representatives of the Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) to fast track the immigration of business investors and skilled professionals.

ADMINISTERED BY MINISTRY OF JOBS, TOURISM AND INNOVATION IN COLLABORATION WITH CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION CANADA (CIC)

You may be eligible to apply for immigrant status under the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program if you have a job offer from a British Columbia employer, or if you have business experience and the ability to develop a business in British Columbia. If you are approved, your application for permanent residence (which includes your spouse and dependent children) will receive priority processing. There are two options under this program: • STRATEGIC OCCUPATIONS includes Skilled Workers and International Students. • BUSINESS IMMIGRATION includes Business Skills, Regional Business, and Strategic Projects. STRATEGIC OCCUPATIONS

The Strategic Occupations component of the Provincial Nominee Program helps BC employers recruit or retain qualified foreign workers to help meet current and future labour needs. Nominee applicants under the Strategic Occupations component must be a skilled worker and have a job offer of indeterminate length from a BC employer, or have completed a masters or doctorate degree at a BC post-secondary institution in either the natural, applied or health sciences. For applications where a job offer is required, the employer and the nominee applicant (potential employee) must submit a joint application to the BC PNP.

BUSINESS RESOURCES

HEALTHCARE AND EDUCATION

FEDERAL BUSINESS IMMIGRATION OPTIONS ADMINISTERED BY CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION CANADA

The Government of Canada offers two business immigration programs: • Federal Immigrant Investor Program • Federal Entrepreneur Program In addition to the option of applying to the BC PNP, entrepreneurs and investors intend-

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BUSINESS RESOURCES

ing to settle in British Columbia may also apply for permanent resident status through the federal business immigration programs. Requirements vary for each of these options and an applicant who qualifies under the BC PNP may not qualify under these federal streams. FEDERAL IMMIGRANT INVESTOR PROGRAM

The Immigrant Investor Program seeks to attract experienced business people to invest in Canada’s economy. Investors must have sufficient business experience and a minimum net worth that was obtained legally and are required to make a minimum investment. This program is currently undergoing changes to keep pace with the changing global economy and keep Canada’s program competitive. The proposed regulatory changes would require new investors to have a personal net worth of $1.6 million and make an investment of $800,000. FEDERAL ENTREPRENEUR PROGRAM

The Entrepreneur Program seeks to attract experienced business persons who will own and actively manage businesses in Canada that contribute to the economy and create jobs. Entrepreneurs must have sufficient business experience (at least two years), a minimum net worth (eg: $300,000) that was obtained legally, meet the definition of a qualifying business (eg: not businesses whose primary purpose is to derive investment income) and meet other assessment criteria (including medical, security and other requirements). They must also respect the conditions for entrepreneurs after they arrive in Canada. Applicants will be assessed based on selection criteria that include your experience, education, age, language abilities and adaptability.

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FEDERAL SKILLED WORKER IMMIGRATION OPTIONS ADMINISTERED BY CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION CANADA

In addition to the option of applying to the BC PNP, skilled workers intending to settle in British Columbia may also apply for permanent resident status in the federal Skilled Worker or Canadian Experience Classes. Requirements vary for each of these options and an applicant who qualifies under the BC PNP may not qualify under these federal streams. FEDERAL SKILLED WORKER

Applicants in the federal skilled worker class are assessed based on their education, work experience, knowledge of English and/ or French, and other criteria that have been shown to help them become economically established in Canada. CANADIAN EXPERIENCE CLASS

The Canadian Experience Class allows people who have recent Canadian work experience or have graduated and recently worked in Canada, as well as sufficient knowledge of English and/or French, to apply for permanent residence status from within Canada. MORE IMMIGRATION INFORMATION

More information on immigrating to Canada, plus information on settling into life in British Columbia, can be found on the website: www.welcome.bc.ca.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE (DFAIT) The Canadian Trade Commissioner Service has trade offices in every Canadian province and over 150 offices around the world. They can assist with export advice and guidance to help you achieve your international business goals. To learn more, visit www.tradecommissioner.gc.ca.

INVEST IN CANADA With its stable and dynamic economy, Canada is the ideal place to do business. To help firms flourish, Canada offers a competitive tax regime and generous research and development (R & D) incentives. • Over the past ten years, Canada has been first among the G7 countries in GDP and employment growth. • Canada will lead the G7 in real growth from 2009 to 2013, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). • Canada is the best place in the G7 to invest and do business during the next five years, as ranked by the EIU. Invest in Canada offers the following services: • Strategic market intelligence • Direct contact with key decision makers in Canada • Referrals to a variety of contacts with private-sector industry associations and with professionals such as bankers, lawyers, accounting firms and information specialists • Information and advice on how to set up a business in Canada, taxation, R & D incentives, regulations, and financial and non-financial government programs • Facilitation of site visits • Assistance in developing a business case for investment decisions For more detailed information, visit www.investincanada.gc.ca or email investincanada@international.gc.ca.


COMMUNITY FUTURES SOUTH FRASER

Following is a list of various organizations that can provide Business Resources, from statistical data to support services. For business resources not listed below, contact Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation.

www.southfraser.com

The mission of Community Futures South Fraser is to nurture community economic development and entrepreneurial culture by providing support and services for community well being. Community Futures South Fraser supports a prosperous, economically dynamic, environmentally sustainable, and socially empowered community.

LOCAL BUSINESS RESOURCES CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION www.chilliwackeconomicpartners.com

Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation (CEPCO) handles all the economic development and business support services for the City of Chilliwack. Most of the aforementioned business support services are administered by CEPCO. CEPCO is your first point of contact for business investment and relocation information and services. CITY OF CHILLIWACK www.chilliwack.com

A business license is your formal permission to operate a business within the City of Chilliwack. For information on the requirements for a license phone 604-793-2909 or visit the City of Chilliwack website. CHILLIWACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE www.chilliwackchamber.com

The Chilliwack Chamber is a business member-driven organization that works together to promote economic development, education, retail, tourism, environmental, cultural, and governmental concerns. BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION (BIA) – DOWNTOWN CHILLIWACK www.downtownchilliwack.com

The Downtown Chilliwack Business Improvement Association (BIA) is a nonprofit organization responsible for revitalizing and enhancing downtown Chilliwack, representing over 240 property owners and 360 businesses.

BUSINESS RESOURCES

provides maps and personal consultation to help visitors discover all that Chilliwack has to offer.

BUSINESS RESOURCE CONTACTS

CEPCO SUBSIDIARIES CHILLIWACK FILM COMMISSION

The BIA has four primary objectives: • physical improvements: such as streetscaping, facade incentive program, street cleaning and parking improvements. • regulatory controls: such as lighting, security, community awareness, bylaws, incentives • customer development: such as ambassador program, special events and festivals, resource centre. • economic and business development: such as programs to attract and retain businesses and property development TOURISM CHILLIWACK www.tourismchilliwack.com

The primary purpose of Tourism Chilliwack is to help strengthen and develop the tourism industry through a combination of marketing and promotional efforts, visitor services center, and through standard economic development initiatives. Tourism Chilliwack manages and operates the Visitor Information Centre located on Luckakuck Way beside Heritage Park, just off the Trans Canada Highway at Lickman Exit 116. The information centre is often the first point of contact with a visitor to our community and provides a wide array of literature on activities and accommodations in Chilliwack and the surrounding area. It also

www.chilliwackfilmcommission.com

The Chilliwack Film Commission was established in response to a growing demand for film locations in BC. The Chilliwack Film Commission’s mandate is to position Chilliwack strategically and to make it attractive and easy for producers and site locators to film in our community. The commission continues to develop services and infrastructure to meet the needs of Chilliwack’s film industry. CHILLIWACK AGRICULTURAL COMMISSION

www.chilliwackagriculturalcommission.com

The Chilliwack Agricultural Commission’s mandate is to encourage the establishment of Chilliwack as a centre of excellence in agriculture through public education, collaboration with businesses and stakeholders, agriculture-related business attraction, and sustainability development. CHILLIWACK AVIATION AND AEROSPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE

www.chilliwackairport.com

The Chilliwack Aviation and Aerospace Planning Committee is responsible for facilitating the development of the aviation and aerospace industry by identifying opportunities. CHILLIWACK HEALTHCARE

www.chilliwackhealthcare.com

Responsible for the attraction of physicians and other healthcare professionals.

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BUSINESS RESOURCES

PROVINCIAL AND CANADIAN BUSINESS RESOURCES INVEST BRITISH COLUMBIA www.investbc.com

Invest British Columbia is a single point of service for companies and site selection professionals exploring business location and expansion opportunities in British Columbia. Its services include: • Customized site location reports, providing in-depth analysis of local labour markets; business costs and taxation; sites, facilities and infrastructure capacity; training, research and supplier capabilities...and more. • Confidential financial projections for your project, comparing the rate-of-return on investment in British Columbia and competing locations. • Face-to-face and web-hosted introductory briefings. • Hosted familiarization tours, including visits to candidate sites, facilities and communities. • Facilitated meetings with local providers of tax, real estate, legal, utilities and other services, and with relevant government permitting agencies. WELCOME BC

www.welcomebc.ca

This website is managed by the Province of British Columbia. It is a key resource for immigrants to the area. GUIDE TO BC ECONOMY

www.guidetobceconomy.org/

This website is managed by the Province of British Columbia, and provides valuable information on the economy. INVEST IN CANADA

www.investincanada.gc.ca

This website provides a comprehensive resources of the advantages of investing in Canada, including links to incentives. It also provides information on investing in BC and in Chilliwack. See investincanada.gc.ca/eng/ explore-our-regions/western-canada/britishcolumbia.aspx. CANADA’S PACIFIC GATEWAY

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

www.canadaspacificgateway.com

This website is managed by the Province of British Columbia, and provides valuable information on living and working in BC. Also of interest is the Government of Canada’s website: www.pacificgateway.gc.ca. BC BUSINESS REGISTRY www.bcbusinessregistry.ca

OneStop Business Registry offers integrated business registration and business address change services. SMALL BUSINESS BC

www.smallbusinessbc.ca

Small business information, resources, and services. CANADA BUSINESS

www.canadabusiness.ca

Government of Canada site with information on services for entrepreneurs. SERVICE CANADA

www.servicecanada.gc.ca

Information on starting a business, financing programs, legal assistance, employment, education and training, etc. EMPLOYERS’ ADVISORS www.labour.gov.bc.ca/eao/

Employers’ Advisors provide independent advice, assistance, representation and training to employers, potential employers

and employer associations concerning workers’ compensation issues. HUMAN RESOURCES AND SKILLS DEVELOPMENT CANADA (HRDC) www.hrsdc.gc.ca

HRDC provides region specific services for individuals, business, and organizations. STATISTICS: This

site provides information on our economy, the worker-employer marketplace and the new world of work; labour market trends; significant occupations; statistics; economic development groups; web lists. Apply for funding from the Government of Canada to enhance the skills of your workers: www.hrsdc.gc.ca/ eng/workplaceskills/sector_councils/index. shtml SECTOR COUNCIL PROGRAM:

EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/sc/ei/index.shtml

Employment Insurance provides temporary financial assistance for unemployed Canadians while they look for work or upgrade their skills. WORKERS COMPENSATION www.worksafebc.com

Worker injury compensation in BC is managed by WorkSafeBC. This website provides information on insurance, claims and how to keep safe.


FINANCIAL RESOURCES CHARTERED BANKS AND CREDIT UNIONS

Chilliwack is home to nearly all of BC’s charted banks and credit unions. To name a few, Chilliwack is home to the BMO Bank of Montreal, Scotia Bank, TD Canada Trust, CIBC and RBC Royal Bank of Canada. Chilliwack also has a strong credit union presence with firms such as Prospera Credit Union, Envision Financial, Coast Capital Savings, and Vancity. Check the websites of your favourite bank or credit union to find out where your nearest branch is. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BANK OF CANADA www.bdc.ca

The Business Development Bank of Canada is a term lending and consulting corporation. They help companies, particularly knowledge-based industries, with such business services as strategic planning, succession planning, ISO 9000, marketing and more. Although BDC provides financial support, they are unlike regular financial institutions. BDC doesn’t make their lending decisions based on security, but based on cash flow and quality management. Therefore serve as an ideal complement to regular financial institutions. WESTERN ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION www.wd.gc.ca (604) 666-6256

A department of the Government of Canada, Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD) works to improve the long-term economic competitiveness of the west and the quality of life of its citizens by supporting a wide range of initiatives targeting inter-related project activities - innovation,

ENTREPRENEURS FOR ENTREPRENEURS

In Chilliwack, WD’s main point of service is the local Community Futures Development Corporation. Over the last 25 years, Community Futures in BC has played a significant role in entrepreneurial and community development. Comprised of 34 locally and strategically positioned organizations, the BC Community Futures Network has a significant impact on the socio-economic development and diversification of the rural communities it serves.

www.morebusiness.com

COMMUNITY FUTURES DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

www.allbusiness.com

www.southfraser.com

Includes information and templates for all aspects of running a business. Marketing articles included as well as downloadable legal forms and business plans.

BUSINESS RESOURCES

business development and community economic development.

BIZMOVE

www.bizmove.com

All aspects of business development are included. ALL BUSINESS

This site has nice link for calculating leases vs. purchase of office equipment.

Community Futures Development Corporation has a primary focus of job creation. Their services include local strategic economic planning, technical and advisory services to businesses, loans to small and medium-sized businesses, self-employment assistance programs, and services targeted to youth and entrepreneurs with disabilities.

BSMALL BUSINESS INFORMATION

FARM CREDIT CANADA

OPEN FORUM

http://sbinformation.about.com

This site is structured like a newspaper and has an interactive business plan. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION www.sba.gov

All aspects of starting/running a business are included here.

www.fcc-fac.ca

www.openforum.com

Farm Credit Canada is a Federal Crown Corporation and is the largest agricultural term lender in Canada. They only finance agricultural and related agricultural businesses. They are not a regular deposit type institution; they primarily provide mortgages and similar lending programs. They service all types of agricultural businesses — small, medium, large ... and even part-time farmers.

Contains straightforward information on all aspects of business planning, management, etc. This site also includes various interactive opportunities for the business layperson to use (eg: business plan, marketing, accounting, etc). HUMAN RESOURCE WEBSITE www.hronline.com

This site offers information on recruitment, training, evaluations, etc.

OTHER BUSINESS RESOURCES BUSINESS OWNER’S TOOLKIT – TOTAL KNOW-HOW FOR SMALL BUSINESS www.toolkit.cch.com

Includes information on starting, financing, and marketing a business; marketing strategies, market analysis, financial projections, etc. Also included are some basic contractual agreements that businesses may need.

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KEY CONTACTS

PROFILES

CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

Subdivision and Business Licensing) • Parks and Recreation

WWW.CHILLIWACKECONOMICPARTNERS.COM

COMMITTEES/COMMISSIONS:

In 1998, CEPCO took over the City of Chilliwack’s economic development function and was incorporated as a private company. The decision to separate Chilliwack’s economic development function from the municipal government opened the doors for CEPCO to provide services and support that is uncommon among economic development organizations. Still, the municipal government remains closely connected with CEPCO as it appoints all members on CEPCO’s 16 to 20-person board. Board members include one councilor, two BIA, two Chamber of Commerce, one tourism, one agriculture, one Stó:lõ, one representative from the University of the Fraser Valley, and four to eight community representatives

• • • •

PRESIDENT:

John Jansen ADDRESS: #201 – 46093 Yale Road Chilliwack, BC V2P 2L8 TELEPHONE: 1-800-561-8803 604-792-7839 EMAIL: info@chilliwackpartners.com WEBSITE: www.chilliwackeconomicpartners.com

CITY OF CHILLIWACK Sharon Gaetz Sue Attrill, Ken Huttema, Jason Lum, Stewart McLean, Ken Popove, Chuck Stam TELEPHONE 604-792-9311 WEBSITE: www.chilliwack.com MAYOR:

COUNCILLORS:

PROVINCE OF BC: CHILLIWACK’S BC ACCESS CENTRE LOCAL AGENT:

Kenneth Azimullah TELEPHONE: 604-795-8415 EMAIL: kenneth.azimullah@gov.bc.ca WEBSITE: www.governmentagents.gov.bc.ca

PROVINCE OF BC: MEMBER OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY MLA:

John Les Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier, Member of the BC Legislative Assembly Chilliwack-Sumas Constituency Office TELEPHONE: 604-702-5214 EMAIL: john.les@bcliberals.com WEBSITE: www.johnlesmla.bc.ca

CEPCO’s main purpose is to enhance the community’s economic prosperity and quality of life by attracting new business and development and by providing business retention, location and support services to new and existing businesses.

MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT: CITY OF CHILLIWACK WWW.CHILLIWACK.COM

Municipal elections are held once every three years to elect a City Council, which consists of a mayor and 6 councillors. Being a member municipality of the Fraser Valley Regional District, Chilliwack is also represented on the Regional District Board. The municipality has a staff of 260 people (including parttime workers), engaged in a variety of public services. The following is a list of the major committees/commissions and departments: DEPARTMENTS

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA: CHILLIWACK CONTACT MP:

Mark Strahl, Member of Parliament

TELEPHONE: 604-847-9711 EMAIL: mark.strahl@parl.gc.ca WEBSITE: www.markstrahl.ca

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION

• • • • • • • • •

Mayor’s Office Chief Administrative Office City Clerk Finance Corporate Services (incl. Purchasing, MIS, and Human Resources) Engineering/Operations Civic Services Centre Fire Municipal Development (Planning, Building,

Development Process Advisory Committee Leisure Services Advisory Committee Public Safety Committee Transportation Advisory Committee

SERVICES

• • • • • • • • • •

General local government services Taxation Planning, subdivisions and developments Building inspection Sewer, water, drainage and solid waste disposal Roads and other transport Police and fire protection Recreation, parks and cultural services Corporate Services and Public Relations Economic development planning/promotion. Note, however, most economic development initiatives are handled through Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT OF BC WWW.GOV.BC.CA

The provincial government ministries include education, agriculture, fisheries, family, energy, finance, forests, health, human resources, public safety, transportation, water, land and air protection, and more. The Provincial Government owns a number of Crown Corporations, including (but not limited to) BC Ferries, BC Hydro, BC Transit, ICBC, and Tourism BC, and are involved in numerous other provincial programs, activities and services.

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OF CANADA WWW.GC.CA

The Government of Canada has several departments, agencies and Crown Corporations, from Agriculture and AgriFoods Canada to Statistics Canada to Western Economic Diversification Canada. Services include Service Canada, Canada Business, Canada International, and many more.


PROPERTY RESEARCH REQUEST FORM COMPANY: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ CONTACT: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS: _________________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY: _________________________________________ PROV/STATE: ______________________ POSTAL CODE/ ZIP______________ PHONE: ___________________________________________ FAX/OTHER: ____________________________________________ EMAIL: __________________________________________________ WEBSITE: _________________________________________ COMPANY PROFILE:

TYPE OF BUSINESS: ______________________________________________________ YEARS IN BUSINESS:

BUSINESS STATUS:

RELOCATION

TYPE OF FACILITY:

OFFICE

HEAVY-DUTY INDUSTRIAL

TOURISM

RETAIL

ACCOMMODATION

TYPE OF PROPERTY: SPACE NEEDS: OFFICE:

EXPANSION

START-UP MARKET DESTINATIONS? _____________________

MANUFACTURING/ASSEMBLY

BUILDING

BUILDING WITH LAND FOR EXPANSION

MIN: ______________________________________

MAX:

MIN: ________________________________________________ MAX:

INDUSTRIAL/OTHER: PARKING:

WAREHOUSING/DISTRIBUTION

OTHER: _______________________________________________________________

LAND ONLY

LAND:

______

____________________________________

______________________________________

MIN: _______________________________________ MAX:

# OF SPACES: _____________________ # OF LOADING DOCKS:

___________________________________

_______________________

CEILING HEIGHT:

__________

NUMBER OF FLOORS: _____________________________________________________________________________________ TYPE OF ACQUISITION: TRANSPORTATION NEEDS:

LEASE

BUY

LEASE OR BUY

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

TRUCKING

RAIL

RAW MATERIALS NEEDED: __________________________________________________________________________________ UTILITY NEEDS:

ELECTRICAL:

______________ (AMPS) _________________ (VOLTS) ______________________(PHASE)

BACK-UP GENERATOR AVAILABILITY GAS

WATER (CITY/WELL)

SEWER (CITY/SEPTIC)

COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE (BROADBAND/FIBRE

OPTIC) LABOUR REQUIREMENTS: PLANNED NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES AT NEW SITE: __________________________________________________ DESIRED OCCUPANCY DATE: (MM/DD/YY) ____________________________________________________________________ OTHER INFORMATION: _____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ WWW.CHILLIWACKECONOMICPARTNERS.COM • 201 – 46093 YALE ROAD, CHILLIWACK, BC, CANADA V2P 2L8 • TEL: 604-792-7839 • FAX: 604-792-4511 • TOLL FREE: 1-800-561-8803 • INFO@CHILLIWACKPARTNERS.COM

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QUICK FACTS LAND AREA

HOUSEHOLDS

Land area (square km)

1,211.50

POPULATION

31,635

Single-detached houses

64.4%

Semi-detached houses

3.3%

2011 Estimate

92,308

Row houses

10.0%

2006 Census

80,892

Apartments, duplex

1.9%

2001 Census

74,003

Apartments (less than 5 storeys)

17.2%

Population Density (SQ.KM)

66.8%

Apartments (more than 5 storeys)

0.6%

Other dwellings

2.6%

AGE/GENDER

TOTAL

Total population

80,89

39,570

0 to 9 years

10,145

10 to 19 years

MALE

FEMALE

Number of owned dwellings

24,185

41,320

Number of rented dwellings

7,335

5,140

5,000

17,095

11,740

6,065

5,685

Number of dwellings constructed before 1986

20 to 24 years

4,680

2,395

2,285

14,540

25 to 39 years

13,920

6,710

7,205

Number of dwellings constructed between 1986 and 2006

40 to 54 years

17,740

8,650

9,095

Dwellings requiring major repair

6.5%

55 to 69 years

18,255

6,190

6,625

70 years and over

9,850

4,430

5,435

Median age

40.0

39.0

40.8

% (age 15+)

80.0

79.1

80.9

MARITAL STATUS

Total private dwellings

TOTAL

MALE

FEMALE

Single

18,205

9,930

8,275

Legally married

34,425

17,210

17,210

Separated

2,375

1,025

1,355

Divorced

5,350

2,235

3,115

Widowed

4,335

885

3,450

Common Law

5,340

2,665

2,675

LANGUAGES (MOTHER TONGUE) English only

68,365

French only

990

English and French

120

Other language(s) 10,650

Average # rooms per dwelling

6.9

Average value of owned dwelling $300,919 ($)

MEDIAN INCOME IN 2005

Participation %

63.5%

69.8%

57.7%

Employment %

60.1%

66.2%

54.3%

Unemployment %

5.3%

5.2%

5.8%

LABOUR FORCE BY INDUSTRY Total experienced labour force

40,020

Agriculture and other resource-based industries

2,880

Construction

4,080

Manufacturing

3,950

Wholesale trade

1,405

Retail trade

4,805

Finance and real estate

1,880

Health care and social services

3,615

Educational services

2,960

Business services

5,855

Other services 8,585

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Total population 15+ years

63,920

No certificate, diploma or degree

15,880

High school certificate

19,675 8,790

Couple households with children

$74,704

Couple households without children

$56,174

Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma

One-person households

$24,041

10,945

Other household types

$42,440

College, CEGEP or other nonuniversity certificate or diploma University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level

2,990

University certificate, diploma or degree

5,645

Median monthly payments for rented dwellings

$699

Median monthly payments for owner-occupied dwellings

$926

LABOUR FORCE

TOTAL

MALE

FEMALE

Population 15+

63,920

30,885

33,035

Total Labour force

40,605

21,560

19,045

Employed

38,385

20,445

17,950

Unemployed

2,215

1,120

1,100

Not in labour force

23,320

9,330

13,990

FLOOR SPACE

#

TOTAL M2

Retail space

492

190,208

Office space

484

59,747

Restaurant / Other

351

55,040

Industrial space

260

148,120

New Single Family (2008)

239

New Multi-Family (2008)

412

Source: 2010 Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, Chilliwack (CA) Floor Space: City of Chilliwack, 2010

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COPYRIGHT: MARCH 2011 • CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION


PRODUCED BY: CHILLIWACK ECONOMIC PARTNERS CORPORATION #201 – 46093 Yale Road, Chilliwack, BC V2P 2L8 TF: 1-800-561-8803 « T. 604-792-7839

FUNDED IN PART BY: Chilliwack’s Community Profile was made possible by funding support from Invest Canada – Community Initiatives, component of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada’s Global Commerce Support Program.

UPDATES AND ADDITIONS: Chilliwack Economic Partners Corporation welcomes submissions, additions, and updates to any of the enclosed information, including images. Please direct your submission to info@chilliwackpartners.com. Please include the source of your information, the date, and your contact information.

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/CmtyProfile_2012  

http://www.chilliwackeconomicpartners.com/storage/CmtyProfile_2012.pdf

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