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Entrepreneurial

View

Two business Titans share their views on local and continental entrepreneurship; the importance of innovative thinking, the role people development plays in building worldclass enterprises; the value of entrepreneurship and that to build a successful business it takes hard work and commitment.

e x p a n d

y o u r

b u s i n e s s

Global

h o r i z o n s

SADC SOUTH 2015/2016

ceo


Without You …

ANCHOR PARTNER

EXECUTIVE LIFESTYLE PARTNER

Just as much as there is a need for recognising the great women of our nation there is an equal call to recognise the Titans who are Building Nations. In 2014, for the first time, we launched the Titan’s recognition programme into the African Continent. Our publication’s pages were then, as they are now, filled with incredible men who have achieved enormous amounts in their sectors. Titans is proud to be partnered with such giants in government and business and we are excited to see what the future holds. We hope that the platform of excellence, on which the Titan’s programme is based, will inspire more young men to use their talents and abilities to serve others and to build their communities by contributing to economic growth and the over-all wellbeing of all. Our growth in 2015 is in large part due to the consistent support received from our partners. By partnering with us they have not only invested in our vision but also in those individuals that the Titans’ programme recognises and commends. We are grateful for your partnership and could not have come this far without you. Yours sincerely Annelize Wepener Chief Executive: CEO Global

PREMIER PARTNERS


but You

Story

Don’t Know my

Titans Building Nations showcases the achievements and abilities of the men who are the best of the best from all over Africa. In our second year we are seeing a wide range of skills across the various sectors and there is inspiration in each individual’s story. It is our privilege to bring to you tips and success stories on how to enhance skills, improving corporate governance and to work towards empowered leadership. We are fortunate to have been partnered with some of the biggest names in business and government and to present their personal stories in the hopes that their experience, accomplishments and lessons will carry over wisdom to others in their sectors. You may know the names of some of the men that are featured this year but do you know where they come from, where they are going and how they’ve built their success? We are proud to bring to our readers not only giants in the various industries but also their stories!

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

Publisher CEO Communications (Pty) Ltd Tel: 0861 CEO MAG Fax: (012) 667 6624 Tel: 012 667 6623 info@ceomag.co.za www.ceomag.co.za Chief Executive Annelize Wepener annelizew@ceomag.co.za

Director: Strategic Development & Editor in Chief Valdi Pereira valdip@ceomag.co.za

who’s who in the zoo

Know my Name

2015/2016

You May

Director: Corporate & Financial Services Carl Wepener carlw@ceomag.co.za General Manager: Global Services George Wepener georgew@ceomag.co.za

General Manager: Global Media Services Channette Raath channetter@ceomag.co.za Continental Manager: Client Services Bonita Brown bonitab@ceomag.co.za

Continental Manager: Finance & Corporate Support Rudolph Raath rudolphr@ceomag.co.za Continental Manager: Human Resources Abrie van Aarde abriea@ceomag.co.za

Manager: Business Development – SADC South Bruce Nimmerhoudt brucen@ceomag.co.za Manager: Office of the Chief Executive Nadine Aylward nadinea@ceomag.co.za Team Leader: Client Services Mari-Louise van den Berg ml@ceomag.co.za Event Coordinators Pule Mohodi pulem@ceomag.co.za

Sylvia Houinsou sylviah@ceomag.co.za Journalists Lydia Bundred lydiab@ceomag.co.za

Samantha Barnes samanthab@ceomag.co.za Manager: Production Linda Graae lindag@ceomag.co.za

DTP Operators/ Designers Demi Kurten demik@ceomag.co.za Doby Young dobyy@ceomag.co.za

Manager: Corporate Support Raymond Mauelele raymondm@ceomag.co.za

Client Development Administrators Winston Williams winstonw@ceomag.co.za Ray Pretorius rayp@ceomag.co.za

Client Liaison Officer Cobus Kramer cobusk@ceomag.co.za

Receptionist Wilheminah Nchwe wilheminahn@ceomag.co.za Office Assistant Minah Mahlangu

Security Guard George Mbana georgem@ceomag.co.za

* No article or part of an article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher. The information provided and opinions expressed in this publication are provided in good faith but do not necessarily represent the opinions of the publisher or editor. All reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication. However, neither the publisher nor the editor can be held legally liable in any way for damages of any kind whatsoever arising directly or indirectly from any facts or information provided or omitted in these pages, or from any statements made in or withheld by this publication.


“Clean water?”

“Infrastructure!”

“My future?”

“Infrastructure!”

Delivering sustainable Delivering sustainable infrastructure infrastructure that that improves our world. improves our world. GOOD WHILE “DOING“DOING GOOD WHILE BUSINESS” DOING DOING BUSINESS”

Contact www.bigenafrica.com, or the office most convenient to you: Pretoria (012) 842 8700; Johannesburg (011) 802 0560; Bloemfontein (051) 430 1423; Cape Town (021) 919 6976; Durban (031) 717 2571; East London (043) 748 6230; Gabarone gaborone@bigenafrica.com; Kuruman (053) 712 2882; Contact www.bigenafrica.com, or the office most convenient to you: Pretoria (012) 842 8700; Johannesburg (011) 802 0560; Bloemfontein (051) 430 1423; Cape Town (021) 919 6976; Mafikeng (018) 386 2111; Mthathato(047) 532 5234; 755 1421; Polokwane 297 4055; Richards BayCape (035) 753(021) 1235; Contact www.bigenafrica.com, or the office most convenient you: Pretoria (012)Nelspruit 842 8700;(013) Johannesburg (011) 802 0560;(015) Bloemfontein (051) 430 1423; Town 919 6976; Durban (031) 717 2571; East London (043) 748 6230; Gabarone gaborone@bigenafrica.com; Kuruman (053) 712 2882; Mafikeng (018) 386 2111; Mthatha (047) 532 5234; Rustenburg (014) 597 3655; Windhoek +26 461 237 346; Accra +233 26 052 8157; Zambia +260 211 372 900 (047) 532 5234; Durban (031) 717 2571; East London (043) 748 6230; Gabarone gaborone@bigenafrica.com; Kuruman (053) 712 2882; Mafikeng (018) 386 2111; Mthatha Nelspruit (013) 755 1421; Polokwane (015) 297 4055; Richards Bay (035) 753 1235; Rustenburg (014) 597 3655; Windhoek +26 461 237 346. Nelspruit (013) 755 1421; Polokwane (015) 297 4055; Richards Bay (035) 753 1235; Rustenburg (014) 597 3655; Windhoek +26 461 237 346.


CONTEN THE LEADING EDGE Leaders’ Perspective

30

CASE IN POINT Bigen Africa - Building a Legacy KPMG - Becoming African Champions merSETA - More than Education Air Mauritius - Airline Receives International Recognition Sefa - Entrepreneurial Friendly Approach Mabatho Events and Promotions - A Quintessential Brandy & Food Affair

70 102 120 142 151 154

X &Y FACTOR Annelize Wepener - Behind the Scenes Chairperson’s Reflections Titans: Yvonne Finch Heath: Corruption Watch About the Judges: Judging Panel A Brief History of Titans Building Nations Patron - Commander Tsietsi Mokhele (SAMSA) Watts Newsworthy with Derek Watts The Men of CEO

Winners and Finalists Quick Guide 37

04 2015 TITANS

6 10 12 14 22 24 26 166


NTS SUSTAIN ABILITY The Varied Perceptions of Africa From Africa to the World 3-D Printing Revolutionising Healthcare

72 66 84

EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP Sparking the Innovative Flame Education - Then and Now: The Pros and Cons Reframing Fear of Failure for a Positive View Does Africa Need Democracy

41 88 108 114

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Gender Equality - Not Just a Woman’s Fight The Other Side of the Fence Retirement: to be or not to be?

54 60 78

SKILLSTRANSFER Manufacturing on the Continent Africa Don’t Need No Broken English Advances in Artificial Limbs

47 96 131

GOING GREEN Have Some Hempathy Beekeeping is Coming to Town

126 156

OUT OF OFFICE The New BMW X5 M and the New BMW X6 M Journey of a Thousand Smiles

136 162


Behind the Scenes


X&Y FACTOR

with

Annelize Annelize Wepener grew up in Vereeniging, South Africa and attended the Vaal University of Technology. She began her career as a secretary in 1981 but it was when she joined Avroy Shlain Cosmetics that she began to make a name for herself. She went from success to success and became the youngest Regional Director in South Africa. With a passion for business and an eagerness to meet a demand in the market she launched CEO Communications.

In the Beginning Annelize began CEO Communications with a dream and goal in mind, “I really wanted to bring a positive media message into a space that was increasingly becoming cluttered with negative press. In this regard I think we have succeeded beyond our expectations.” Starting a new business in any market can be a challenge. Annelize shares about the early years and the hardest part about launching CEO into the South African market: “I think the intellectual and legislative business frameworks we have put in place in South Africa are in theory a good idea. They are clearly meant to support the growth of small business. However, I think over the years we have inadvertently over-regulated some areas and this can make it difficult for business to grow.” Everything In-between Much of what she achieved was nurtured from the mentors in her life. “A lot of what I have learned in the business world has come from Avroy Shlain. A hugely successful entrepreneur in his own right he has always helped me reflect on challenges and help me identify the best places

to start addressing challenges I may be facing. In the last few years I have also benefitted from the guidance of Commander Tsietsi Mokhele. He has a contemplative approach to business and has taught me to always keep an eye on the bigger picture.” Since the beginning the family-orientated leader has never stopped growing and developing her abilities. “I think my greatest challenge is constantly adapting to the pace of change in the business world. The environment is changing all the time and demands rapid responses from all of us all the time. Fortunately my role brings me into contact with a wide variety of leaders and I learn a lot from them through my interaction with them.” Still to Come CEO Communications has become CEO Global in a few short business years. From one publication to a flourishing organisation that offers four publications and various other services to the African market. There is no limit and the golden-touch entrepreneur Annelize says, “We are on a drive to expand our reach – watch this space, you will definitely see more of us!”

2015

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GOOD MORNING

AFRICA

Airing daily in 51 countries in Africa on DStv’s Africa Magic Channel 154 at 7am and 12pm

Good Morning Africa The Biggest and Brightest Breakfast Show on the African Continent!

Showing on GMA on Mondays


‘Good Morning Africa’ was initially broadcast in 2010 and the programme has been going from strength to strength over time. ‘Good Morning Africa’ airs on weekdays at 7:00am and 12:00 noon (CAT) on DStv’s Africa Magic Channel 154. CO N TAC T D E TAI L S : TEL: 011 3264 300 | EMAIL: gma@planetimage.co.za TWITTER: @GMA_AfricaMagic | FACEBOOK: Good Morning Africa (Africa Magic Channel)

GMA also airs on PRTV showing on Gotv Channel 73 at 10am and streaming live on www.planetradiotv.tv

Africa Magic Channel 154


X&Y FACTOR

Chairperson’s Reflections

Titans It gives me great pleasure to report that the nominations received for Titans Building Nations and Africa’s Most Influential Women were an exceptionally high standard this year. So, to those people selected as Finalists and Winners, you are in very good company! Also, with the standard set so high, all the more reason for you to celebrate your achievement and be acknowledged for your award. Give yourself a well -deserved, “I did it!”

W

ith the standard set so high this year, it made the task of selecting Finalists and Winners more onerous. This year the judges were compelled to engage in lengthy debates to reach consensus. This makes the awards all the more credible. On those occasions when the judges all agreed, the marks for the nominees were almost identical. As Chairperson of Titans Building Nations and Africa’s Most Influential Women my work is cut out for me. I need to ensure that each panel member on all the judging panels understand what is expected of them and that I respond to any questions that they may have. I collate the marks of each panel member and facilitate any discussion resulting from this. While the final results are not based on marks alone, the marking process enables the judges to identify the degree to which their marking corresponds with each other. Everyone involved with these Awards understands the need for the final results to be reached through a process in which all the nominees are measured according to the same standards, with no room for any partiality

towards a particular person. This ensures the ongoing credibility of these Awards, as going to the recipients who are deemed to add the most merit to their sector. I cannot influence the outcome of any decision as I don’t have a vote and I may not express an opinion – even when asked! I also collect the nominations for the Lifetime Achievers Awards, which are shared with the final judging panel. They select those worthy people who have dedicated their lives to the sector in which they operate or to their country as a whole. Every year we are challenged with nominations in some sectors, and these tend to recur in the same sectors. These include: agriculture, automotive, chemical, ICT, logistics, media, mining, pharmaceutical and petrochemical and tourism. However judges often observe that there are some serious contenders within these sectors. My congratulations to every Finalist and Winner; you are making a significant contribution in your circle of influence – both business and personal. Yvonne Finch

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Corruption

Watch


X&Y FACTOR Advocate Willem Heath is better known as the man who chaired the Heath Commission of Enquiry, into maladministration and corruption. A former judge in the High Court, Advocate Heath now heads up Heath Consulting; providing legal advisory and forensic services to clients in the private and public sector; in South Africa and abroad. Heath is Special Advisor to the honourable South African Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development.

… A Ticking Time Bomb? W

e asked advocate Willem Heath to share his views on how citizens can root out corruption. His insights are both insightful and practical. He emphasizes that business is just as much to blame as government. Heath says it is simple to create a culture of anti-corruption and proposes making an anti-corruption class a mandatory part of any school curriculum, like languages are. He stresses that corruption is a sin in any faith: educate people about the sins of corruption. Please share any positive signs that Government is serious about rooting out corruption. Unfortunately not enough is being done. The best way to combat corruption is providing positive feedback to the public about successful corruption investigations so that citizens have confidence that corruption is being addressed and perpetrators of corruption are not emboldened by the silence. Our anti-corruption legislation is powerful. It just needs to be properly implemented. What actions can concerned citizens take towards calling for harsher sentencing towards those found guilty of corruption? South Africans have a healthy culture protesting for our rights – this led to our very progressive Constitution. However, this is not always structured and effective. It should be though constructive petitioning through the media, organised groups, to debate and structure amendments to legislation. Our legislation regarding racketeering provides for very harsh fines and terms of imprisonment: 30 years

and or a R100-million fine. With racketeering based on counts of fraud and corruption and a pattern thereof, it should not be difficult to create harsher sentences for people convicted of corruption. Please share examples from governments elsewhere in taking corruption seriously. Many countries are effective in combating corruption, including Scandinavian countries, as well as New Zealand, Singapore, Canada and Australia. Probably the biggest success story is Botswana. It has a culture of anti-corruption with the support of government and the media, and the people. Botswana is rated as being the least corrupt country on the continent. Former president Kgalema Motlanthe said, “Corruption, especially among those of us charged with the important task of governance - of ensuring that the dividends of democracy reach all our people - must be eradicated root and branch.” Does Motlanthe’s call encourage you? Yes it does. He is a man of great stature and wisdom. He has the ear of the people and the respect of his colleagues. At the World Economic Forum on Africa, mining magnate Patrice Motsepe pointed out the importance of addressing growing perceptions of corruption in Africa. How can business be more outspoken in its fight against corruption? All businesses from listed companies to budding entrepreneurs should have an anti-corruption policy that they entrench in their staff, but more importantly communicate to shareholders, the media, and customers. Establish a dedicated business driven anticorruption forum. Businesses belonging to this should get procurement preferential treatment and tax rebates. They should transparently open their books of account, tender submissions and performance in supplying services and goods for tenders to such a forum, which is made available to government. Director of NGO, Section27, Mark Heywood says the private sector is a big part of the corruption problem. The private sector, in my opinion, is the biggest contributor to corruption in South Africa. A government official cannot be corrupted unless a private sector representative offers or agrees to offer a bribe. Businesses need to bar companies who have been involved in corruption and circulate the names of entities who have been involved in corruption. What aspects of South African society are you encouraged by? I am encouraged by every aspect of South African society. We are an amazingly resilient nation. We are able to constantly amaze and surprise ourselves. I am encouraged by the humour we have about all our problems and perceived problems and that we do not give up.

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Judges

Meet the

Aggrey Kankunda Aggrey Kankunda is a founding Partner of AA&L Associates. Under his leadership and guidance, the firm has grown over the past ten years to be one of the best indigenous independent providers of audit, business advisory and financial services in Uganda. Aggrey’s 22 years of experience encompass all phases of financial and tax services including preparation and review of financial statements, analysis of profit enhancement and management strategies, mergers and acquisitions and integrated planning for businesses regarding income tax strategies. He is also a member of the professional societies FCCA, ICPAU, FCMA and FGMA. Key assignments in which Aggrey has been involved include being Engagement Partner on the audits of UNFPA funded Government programmes / Projects for the financial years 2008 and 2009; Quality Assurance Partner and Co-Team leader on the audits of both the Uganda Railways Corporation for the financial years 2005 and 2006, as well as the Uganda National Chamber of Commerce and Industry funded by SIDA for the financial years 2007 and 2008.

Ann Kleynhans “For me the prestige of this award is very important, I don’t just engage with any nomination. Being aligned with the best is critically important,” says Ann Kleynhans, 2014/2015 MIW winner in the ICT sector. Ann, who started CEOS Technologies in 1998, says that as an entrepreneur, it can be lonely at the top. “The way they would do the whole judging panel – being part of it myself now – it’s strict, it’s confidential, they follow procedures, there is protocol and it has been audited. Receiving an award like that, it’s a prestigious award.” To become a Titan or MIW, she says that there is no place for clock watching. Instead Ann employs entrepreneurs who will hopefully become leaders and award winners in their own right. “It is critical that those people who align themselves with me in the same way that I align myself with them and we build a future together,” says the Enterprise Business Women winner of 2015, recognised by United Success.

Bridget Nkuna Bridget Nkuna is the Marketing Director of WestconGroup South Africa. She has over 18 years of managerial experience and has worked for companies such as Sun International, BP, Total and she is the founder of Owami Women. When considering an MIW and Titans winner she looks for someone who “has a proven track record, is professional, has influence and that is sustainable.” “The candidates that are selected demonstrate most of the above traits. However, much as it is important to select the candidates, it also matters how winners are showcased post awards. To my understanding, we are selecting people who other people could learn from and who inspire. Therefore greater media and publicity opportunities should be sought to showcase who they are and their winning achievement,” emphasises the communications expert. She offers these words of advice to finalists and winners: “The best way to enhance and to establish your brand is through consistency, credible delivery and having high standards of delivery and self-application.”

14 2015 TITANS


Dr Auxilia Ponga Since May 2014 Dr Auxilia Ponga has been the UN Women Representative to South Africa (Multi-Country Office) at UN Women. She believes that, “More could be done and the social responsibility should not be a one-off event, and better still, should be done in partnership with community so that the long term benefits can be measured and evaluated. ”With over 17 years’ experience in gender and development strategies she brings a wide set of skills to the panel. From her wealth of experience she offers others these words of advice: “I always have my to-do list not just in order of chronological priority but of importance. I also take time in the evening to go over my list and to see what was achieved and not achieved and why. That informs the plan for the next day including doing things differently based on lessons learnt. Life is a journey and one needs to stop every so often to take stock.”

Dr Snowy Khoza As an MIW Continental Lifetime Achiever Award Winner Dr Snowy Khoza shares how the award has impacted her life. “Amazingly, I have received many international, continental and national acknowledgements since being presented with the award. My diary has never been so full of requests to speak at conferences, present proposals for business opportunities, sit on boards, mentor leaders, and I have even received some job offers! Of course, I have also been profiled in a number of magazines.” As a 2015 judge she understands what a difference such recognition can bring to someone’s life. Her passion is to empower and enrich others and she believes the MIW initiative has only positively contributed towards her objectives. “All of this is encouraging, as it is always my intention to positively impact other women aspiring to make a difference in Africa, and such exposure helps me to do this more effectively,” explains the Bigen Africa CEO.

Dudu Thabede “The Most Influential Women and Titans initiative is important, because it recognises men and women who are doing an amazing job in terms of changing people around them with their skills and offering them opportunities they wouldn’t otherwise have,” says Dudu Thabede, an Independent Marketing and Advertising Professional. Dudu started her marketing career in 1997 by joining and gaining experience from British American Tobacco. She has comprehensive experience in marketing-research strategy and started her own company, Brand Smart, which operated for 10 years. Dudu spent three-and-a-half years in Rwanda working with the government, nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) and the private sector. She returned to South Africa to run a branding agency that positions brands with regard to market needs. As a communications and brand expert, she recognises that “participants in some sectors have really branded themselves well, and, on this point, participants must ensure that they market themselves and their brand to raise awareness”.

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Elaine Palmer Elaine Palmer is Manager Human Resources Professional Services for Exxaro group of mines. Her responsibilities include remuneration, leadership, change management, employee relations, HR development and more. Inspiring people to deliver their best is a given. “Your team needs to know what the HR strategy is and how their objectives align with it as well as the overall company strategy: where they fit in,” says Elaine. She has formal and informal conversations around their performance, individual development, career plans and their personal wellbeing. “I always try to steer my team towards working as one team – Corporate and Business. It does take a lot to overcome the Corporate versus Business set up (us and them),” she says. Being a woman in a male dominated industry is not insurmountable. “You have to work extra hard to prove yourself before getting accepted as an equal counterpart, mostly by the older generation. Important lesson: take control. Do not play the victim. Don’t give others power over you. Execute, execute, execute is key.”

Elizabeth Malumo A seasoned banker, Elizabeth Malumo has been in the banking industry for 35 years, 20 of which she has spent with First National Bank. She has a wealth of knowledge on helping small and large businesses grow and be profitable. She is currently FNB’s head of growth in Gauteng and oversees businesses with turnovers of up to R10 million. Elizabeth ran Gauteng Southwest, where her region was the best two years in a row. As a member of the South Africa Entrepreneur Board, she is passionate about developing and seeing women in business succeed. For Elizabeth, a potential winner is someone who “shows passion for what they do, someone who makes their business sustainable and is involved in uplifting the community around them”. She says there have been some phenomenal candidates this year and that selecting winners has been tough. Elizabeth emphasises to all candidates that “it is important to understand what drives your business and what sustains it, while also operating and benefiting the community”.

Gail Curtis Gail Curtis began her career in the 1980s in marketing and strategic account leadership and has since been instrumental in the development of companies such as Saatchi & Saatchi. The 2014 Southern African Development Community (SADC) regional and South African winner, found joining the Judge’s Panel a natural next step, and, as a former participant, it was an easy task to identify candidates with promise. Gail was named the most powerful woman in the South African advertising industry by Finance Week in 2006. Her achievements attest to her skills as a leader and she offers other female leaders this piece of advice: “Encourage women to help and mentor other women, to be team players and leaders that take their skills into their local communities.” As a judge, she has seen candidates with a high level of professionalism and considers a potential winner to be someone who “understands what it is to be a team player and who integrates their life into the betterment of others”.

Gerda Potgieter Her 25 year career in local government led to Gerda Potgieter’s eventual appointment as Director: Stakeholder Engagement and Capacity Building at the City of Tshwane Municipality. Gerda holds a Master’s Degree from the University of South Africa (UNISA) and she successfully completed an Executive Leadership Programme from the University of Pretoria (cum laude) for which she received the “Best Student” award. Besides holding other qualifications and awards, Gerda was recently awarded an Innovation Award for the Enhancement of Internal system in Government from the Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI). She was a worthy finalist in the CEO Global’s Most Influential Women in local government awards. Over the years she has participated in numerous mentorship programmes to uplift members of previously disadvantaged communities. She successfully project managed the Monyetla work readiness learnership programme, funded by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), and the Work Skills programme. Gerda was awarded Best Monyetla Work readiness programme for Government and Parastatals for her efforts.

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Gervase Ndyanabo Gervase Ndyanabo is currently the Company secretary and Chief Operating Officer for New Vision Printing and Publishing Company Ltd, Uganda’s leading media house. He was previously the company’s Chief Internal Auditor for ten years and before that he worked for Coopers and Lybrand, Chartered Accountants in Kampala. Gervase obtained a B. Com Accounting and MBA degree, and is also a Certified Internal Auditor and Certified Public Accountant. Gervase’s professional memberships include; the Institute of Certified Public Accountants of Uganda, the Institute of Certified Public Accountants of Kenya, Global Institute of Internal Auditors and the Institute of Corporate Governance of Uganda. Currently Gervase’s responsibilities include being a Council Member and Vice Chairman of Council with the Uganda Martyrs University; he is Chairman Finance Committee of Council Uganda Martyrs University; he is on the Board of Trustees Institute of Internal Auditors Uganda; Head of Laity, Archdiocese of Mbarara and Chairman for Uganda Timber Growers Association. In the past he has been a member, director and president of a number auditing committees in Uganda.

Lumko Mtimde Lumko Mtimde holds a BSc. degree in Physiology and Biochemistry and a Postgraduate Diploma in Telecommunications and Information Policy. “I think what helps, is passion, commitment and focus. But above all being able to know what is it you are doing, where do you want to go, and what are the requirements to assist you to go to where you want to go,” says the former CEO of the Media Development and Diversity Agency, as he discusses the MIW and Titans finalists and winners. Lumko has been impressed with this year’s contestants, saying, “The number of contestants is quite interesting, particularly in South Africa and Namibia, I think there has been growth in the number of entries. But also the quality of entries in some categories is very impressive, more so when I look at the women entries from the education and training category, I was amazed at the quality and the substance of women that we have in our country.”

Mary Nandazi Mary Nandazi’s field of expertise lies within formal banking and finance; she specialises in development finance, micro-finance, the development of community financial intermediation, village commercialisation, promoting village savings and loan associations run by communities, with emphasis on women participation for gender empowerment, development of financial community and grassroots organisations and rural livelihood improvements in income generating activities. This has led to her being Chairperson and Director at Zamnet Communications. Mary’s qualifications include: a Masters of Business Administration and a Bachelors of Arts in Economics and Business Administration. She has previously worked at ENK Consultancy to develop financial products for COMESA, she was also Secretary General for African Rural and Agricultural Credit Association, CEO of Micro Bankers Trust, Resident VP and Head of Trade services at Citibank Zambia Ltd-Lusaka and Corporate Manager at Barclays Bank (BBZ)-Lusaka Business Centre. Mary also participated in research for the World Bank’s Champion Team looking into Financial Performance Indicators for Micro-Finance Institutions in Zambia.

Prof. Mercy Mirembe Ntangaare Professor Mercy Mirembe Ntangaare’s personal objective is to give value, virtue and prestige. Mercy is currently Associate Professor at the Makerere University in Kampala and has been with the university since 1995. Her academic and professional qualifications include; Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Master of Arts (literature) and an Honours in Bachelor of Arts. She has also received qualifications from institutions in Germany, Netherlands and the United States. Her contributions to articles in journals, magazines and newsletters have been to the highest value. She has published a number of books, one being the first eBook to be written by a Ugandan available in Uganda. Professor Mercy has also had her hand in some film/video productions, stage performance, fairs and exhibitions. To add to this she has a number of manuscripts she is working on and has organised, directed and convened a number of conferences, fairs, awards and festivals, while also contributing to her community. She has been the VP of IDEA since 2008, chairperson of the UNCC since 2009 and founder of UTN.

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Monki Hlutwa “I think MIW and Titans is very important. I believe that it is important to recognise efforts,” says Monki Hlutwa, the Communications Manager at the Metal and Engineering Industries Bargaining Council (MEIBC). Monki, who worked in the Trade Union movement before joining the MEIBC, is looking for people who exceed their job descriptions. “For me, what stands out as a judge is what they do over and above their day-to-day business. I strongly believe that as an excellent individual, you also need to step up and ensure that over and above what you do, and what you are paid for, you also do things that touch the heart of others.” The thread of selflessness governs her other criteria as well. “It’s about ensuring that there is a lot of mentorship and coaching. I don’t personally believe in someone who is a one man show or is indispensable. I believe that people need to pass the baton…when they have decided to move on,” she says.

Neville Ndumo Neville Ndumo is an accountant by profession and served his articles of clerkship at a leading audit firm Deloitte, Haskins & Sells. He is also the former CEO of Immiig Holdings (Pty) Ltd. “Irrespective of the industry, one of the three key qualities to look for in a Titan or MIW winner is innovative leadership i.e. finding new ways of doing things. The second quality is internal locus of control, a Titan or MIW winner must be self-disciplined, self-driven and have a clear vision of where he/she wants to go. Thirdly, they must be able to work with other people, be a team player and a servant leader,” says the Group Executive – Portfolio Investments at Community Investments Holdings (CIH). To those hoping to be a potential MIW or Titan winner the Associate Member of the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants offers these words: “The person must understand how organisations work and then the person can develop strategies for personal growth without threatening other people and using fear”.

Noreda Bashabe Kiremire Noreda Bashabe Kiremire is a member at these professional societies: British Computer Society, African Women Scientist [Uganda Chapter]; Third World Organisation for the Women Scientist; Alumni Harvard International Institute Development [HIID], USA and Alumni Hull University – East Yorkshire (UK). Noreda is currently a PhD Student. Her area of Research is Knowledge Harvest and Management in the Public Sector and she also holds a Masters Degree in Business Administration (MBA), specialising in Information Management and Systems Analysis from the Hull University, U.K. In addition she holds Certificates in Monitoring and Evaluation of Projects, Resource Management in a Changing Environment and Leadership and Management Skills as well as a Certificate in Investment Appraisal and Management of Projects. Noreda has a Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Science, a Master of Science, Radiation Physics and a B.Sc. (Hons) in Physics from the Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

Nothemba Gqiba “The critical function is that we need to encourage small businesses. We take people from a small business idea to linking them up with people that can help them,” says Nothemba Gqiba Head of Communications, Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa). The mandate of sefa is to foster the establishment, survival and growth of SMME’s, and contribute towards poverty alleviation and job creation. “The reward is three to six months later seeing that they are happy that something has been started. They have an idea and they don’t know where to start. You are dealing with an emotion. They have a dream, which becomes a vision and then you have to actualise it. I can encourage them to make it happen,” says Nothemba. “I am honored to be an adjudicator. I picked up one critical thing: people rise to a position of power because of education. But each of us has a responsibility – besides our everyday work- to ask ‘What can I do for the person on the street?’ That is a nurturing aspect as a woman.”

18 2015 TITANS


Pumulani Ncube Pumulani Ncube, a qualified chartered accountant, was a founding member and Chief Investment Officer for Jala Capital, a black economic empowerment (BEE) investment holding company. He is currently the CEO of Beehive Capital, which specialises in enterprise and supply development as well as implementing programmes for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the public and private sectors in South Africa. Pumulani works with people in corporates and small business, so it is easy for him to relate to the candidates of MIW and Titans and as a judge he has “seen some wonderful candidates this year”. All candidates have unique skills, but, for Pumulani, the “differentiating factor is social responsibility and what candidates are doing in their individual capacities in society”. “The award has great importance for the winner and there is personal gratification when people in the industry recognise what you do” – it can only serve to benefit the person and their brand says Pumulani.

Rocky Sombe Rocky Sombe, chartered accountant, is an entrepreneur who obtained his degree in business administration from the University of Zambia. He is a fellow of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants in the UK and the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Zambia. He has worked in various senior positions in accounting and finance. He is currently a Subway Franchisee and he holds a master franchise license for Signarama in Zambia, the largest sign franchise in the world. Rocky is also the franchisee for Keg and Lion in Lusaka. He serves on boards of Professional Insurance Corporation PLC, Spagris Zambia and is Chairman of Kazang Pty in Botswana. He has also helped to set up the Competition and Consumer Protection Tribunal in Zambia where he serves as a member.

Sarah Babirye Lubega Sarah Babirye Lubega has been a consultant for Frederick Francis and Associates’ external consultancy services to the Private Sector Foundation (PSF) for the past 15 years. Her areas of expertise include Financial Institutions Law and Practice, Labour and Employment Law as well as Property Law and Conveyance. Sarah started her career as a Banking Officer/Legal and worked for the Central Bank of Uganda for ten years. She has been a member of numerous associations such as; FIDA-U, PPDA, ECOTRUST, Uganda Women Entrepreneurs Association and the Uganda Law Society; some of which she has been actively involved in for around 30 years. Sarah is a certified trainer in Industrial Management as well as Entrepreneurship Development and she holds a diploma in Legal Practice, a Bachelors of Law as well as Masters in Law degree. She obtained her academic qualifications at the Georgetown University Law School and the Makerere University.

Sarita Stonehouse As the Brand and Marketing Manager of Woodhill Residential Estate, Sarita Stonehouse is a strong advocate of the need for good communication skills. “I think it is everything in marketing to be a good communicator. If you are not a good communicator, and you keep everything to yourself, you will not be able to share your knowledge.” The experienced marketing and communications professional shares the secret to her success; “Knowledge and attitude makes you a good communicator. You can work as hard as you want to, but if you haven’t got the attitude and you haven’t got the knowledge, you won’t succeed.” With a keen eye for efficient functioning and the right attitude, she is ideally suited as a judge. Sarita believes that the glass ceiling which has held back women for too long has been broken and that MIW and Titans are great programmes for recognising individuals who make it to the top and can assist in helping to showcase their abilities.

2015

TITANS

19


Sotse Segoneco Sotse is inspired by people from the school of hard knocks. “With an MBA, working for a fortune 500, I expected the next guy to get off the bus and then I am the top dog. But now, having been in leadership for 30 years, what I see coming out of MIW is women having gone through life, and taking the knocks of life, have come back better and then empowering themselves, developing their communities and making an impact. Those are the key issues.” “Around the world we talk about leadership and entrepreneurship, but how do we make it sustainable and produce the outcomes that we desire? And that is where, for me personally, from the time I was very young has been a challenge,” she says. For this reason she sees a winner as someone whose practices are sustainable.

Tania Cleary Tania Cleary began her career in the motor industry in 1995 with BMW South Africa. She later joined Ford Motor Company in 2000 and then Jaguar Land Rover as the Sales and Marketing Manager. After 20 years in the motor industry she made the change to home renovations to fulfil a lifelong dream. Her years of managerial experience aided her through the judging process by allowing her to make informed decisions. “When working through the nominees descriptions of their leadership roles and achievements in their industries you are well positioned if you have been exposed to all the roles within an organisation and have a working knowledge of their industry.” For Tania the stand-out factor when choosing a winner is “The ability to communicate an idea clearly, succinctly and passionately. This is without a doubt important not only in the competition but also in business.” Her advice to this year’s winners and finalists; “You have been recognised as having potential, if you do nothing with it that is all it will ever be… potential.”

Tania Slabbert Tania Slabbert, WDB Trust CEO, works with rural women at grassroots level: empowering them and their community. “The challenges for women are enormous in the rural context in South Africa. Everything from social isolation, economic isolation; lack of access to basic services,” says Tanya. Established over 20 years ago the Trust’s flagship beneficiary microcredit programme replicates the Grameen Bank philosophy of banking on the poorest of the poor. Thousands of rural women enterprises and households have benefitted from access to credit and business skills. “Rural women typically are surviving in incredibly difficult circumstances and have very strong survivalist skills. WDB Trust acts as a facilitator; giving them access to certain resources that perhaps you and I would take for granted,” says Tania. An early client, Mrs Makakula, is a formidable role model. “She started selling offcuts of meat, but couldn’t freeze meat so was limited. With her first loan she bought a fridge with a freezer and is now a thriving entrepreneur.” Tania would like an award winner to be an agent of change in the community.

Terry Booysen “Learning about the amazing work done by others is a humbling experience,” says Terry Booysen, CEO at CGF Research Institute. His many years of business experience in judging events similar to that of Titans and MIW have assisted him in this year’s judging process. What stands out to him are candidates that go beyond their job descriptions and into their communities with the aim of making a difference. Terry is a frequent speaker at events, television shows and forums on Governance, Risk and Compliance and he has published numerous articles on the subject. The 2013 Worldwide Who’s Who awards winner offers a few words of advice: “Whilst it is imperative for organisations to remain sustainable through their profitability with prudent spending, it is equally imperative that organisations show their meaningful contribution to society…all finalists and winners must have the ability to articulate ethical business practices and how these relate to profitability, people and the environment at large and cause the necessary change as leaders in their respective organisations.”

20 2015 TITANS


Thierry Boulanger “An overriding characteristic of an African Business person is the ability to be entrepreneurial. Successful businesses are born from the fact that there is a definite need defined and a solution to accommodate that need,” says Thierry Boulanger, the Vice President of Philips Lighting Africa. “However, that intellectual property needs to be protected and this is where work needs to be done. The question is simple. What am I doing differently and what will prevent my global competitor from doing what I am doing?” Boulanger’s approach to choosing winners is as simple as it is relevant. “The seniority of the role is not relevant in an MIW or Titans winner. In fact with seniority, a bigger expectation comes with it. What is important is what this person has done over and above what is expected from this person. At the end of the day you should be able to answer the question; “What difference have I made in people’s lives?”

Thulani Mthiyane The Metal and Engineering Industries Bargaining Council (MEIBC) was created under the Labour Relations Act (LRA) and is a forum of organised business and labour. It regulates employment conditions and labour relations in the metal and engineering industry; representing approximately 10 624 companies and 306 747 employees. Thulani Mthiyane, General Secretary, MEIBC, joined the organisation in August of 2012. “There were attempts to collapse centralised collective bargaining. I have successfully, with my team, managed to sustain collective bargaining and conclude agreement that will contribute towards improving the lives of the workers in our industry. We are fortunate in our bargaining council. Yes, we do have strikes, but we are very fortunate because from both sides we have mature leadership, from the employers and trade unions,” says the former Momentum Industry Fund Strategist. “For me a winner should be a people’s person: interested in developing the people surrounding them and the people in the organisation,” notes Thulani.

Vasi Govinder The experienced Most Influential Women in Business and Government judge, Vasi Govinder, is the Director of TSLS Holdings, Legal Services and Telecommunications, which specialises in revenue enhancement and works with the government and local municipalities. Her experience in core business activities gives her a holistic perspective and makes her an ideal judge. “I’m passionate about promoting SMEs and women in business. There is a young crowd that is innovative and it is exiting to be a part of this initiative,” says Vasi. For her, a potential winner shows passion and is serious about what they want to do. Her advice to up-and-coming businesswomen is to “fall and fall again and get up … there is no such thing as failure. At the end of failure, there is success, because it is a learning curve for every business. If you are determined and do what you have to, you will get far”.

Victoria Sekitoleko Victoria Sekitoleko is currently Chairperson of the governing board of Uganda Agribusiness Alliance and Founder and Managing Director of the Uganda Culture Community Centre through which she promotes reading by establishing and supporting both urban and rural community libraries. She is also chairperson The New Vision Group National Best Farmer competition. Previously she worked as Director of the Food and Agricultural Organization (UN-FAO) representative to China, Mongolia and DPR Korea; FAO representative to Ethiopia for the African Union (AU) and the Economic Community for Africa (ECA); FAO Sub Regional representative to Eastern and Southern Africa in Zimbabwe; Was Member of Parliament (MP) and Minister of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries in Uganda; MP and Deputy Minister, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry in Uganda; Previously Senior Agriculture Banking Officer, Uganda Development Bank. Victoria is a Rotarian and Charter President of the Rotary Club of Kampala Impala and a member of the Business and Professional Women Kampala (BWP), plus an active member of the Uganda Women Entrepreneurs Association Limited (UWEAL).

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TITANS

21


A Brief

History of

ceo b u i l d i n g

celebrating excellence in organisations

n a t i o n s

Building Nations

2009

2010


For many years, Titans – Building Nations was a platform where South African organisations were showcasing their transformational excellence. In 2014, Annelize Wepener, Chief Executive of CEO Holdings, and the team at CEO Global looked at the African business landscape and determined that it was time to up the ante and honour the men on the African continent, a continent that has been dubbed the fastest-growing in the world and a place where any and all investors want a share of the spoils.

I

n retrospect, it can be said that this was a natural progression of events after CEO Global had, for more than a decade, honoured and celebrated women through the unique South African Most Influential Women in Business and Government Awards, which has since undergone a rebirth as it spread across the African continent under the name, Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government. By virtue of the nature of the awards, not anyone can be honoured as a Titan. While we may receive in excess of thousands of nominations from across the continent, there can only be the select few who stand above the rest. Even then, these men undergo a thorough vetting and judging process which consists of three independent judging panels. As we saw from

2011

2012

the first year of the awards, our continent is awash with great men and women who selflessly give of themselves for the betterment of our continent. Needless to say, the first year of the awards ceremony was an immense success and the future looks bright for the Titans – Building Nations Awards. The icing on the cake is that the country and regional winners are all invited to our Continental Awards Ceremony where Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government will also be present to celebrate the Continental Winners and Lifetime Achievers of both programmes. The event is a powerhouse of influential men and women who use the opportunity to network and grow their respective businesses beyond borders for a better Africa.

2013

2014


Commander Tsietsi Mokhele and

SAMSA Development Tsietsi Mokhele, also known as the Commander, is the CEO of the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA). SAMSA was established in 1998 in terms of the South African Maritime Safety Authority Act 5 of 1998 and is a South African government institution, accountable to the Minister of Transport.

T

he organisation delivers four main outputs including: safety and environment protection standards for responsible maritime transport operations, infrastructure for monitoring and enforcing compliance with safety and environment protection standards, the capability to respond to marine pollution incidents and other maritime emergencies and the capability to detect, locate and rescue people in maritime distress situations. The Authority’s mandate is vast, but chief among its many duties is development. The South African Dedicated Training Ship The aim of the SA Agulhas, SAMSA’s training vessel, is to train young people and develop an authentic South African maritime skills development programme that produces results that will accelerate the creation of seafaring work opportunities. Commander Mokhele says that South Africa’s maritime industry alone has the potential to provide 400 000 jobs, with 45 000 to 50 000 seafarers alone being employed. “We are still in the development period of this industry and not yet quite in the harvesting period. In order to grow and develop, South Africa’s maritime industry needs to make considerable

24 2015 TITANS

investments in human capacity development, that is, in the cultivation of skills and the development of capabilities,” he states. The gap in the leader group education calls for a maritime training institute. Many new entrants struggle to reach their full potential as they lack project management, financial management and other management skills; hence training and skillsdevelopment programmes aimed at cultivating these and other necessary leadership skills are required. Some tertiary institutions are currently in partnership with SAMSA in order to address this need. The provision of targeted technical training means South Africa needs to offer the required training at different levels of education so as to provide the necessary facilities, disciplines and degrees. Through integration of training and upskilling across the region, SAMSA will turn to its relationships with other African nations, and this “will allow us to develop targeted training capabilities across the region, spreading the cost and developing regional centres of excellence”. Lastly, among a host of these interventions will be the expediting of transformation in the sector. “There is a lack of transformation in the industry that needs to be addressed,” he concludes.


X&Y FACTOR

Watts Newsworthy By Samantha Barnes

With Derek

We swopped roles and asked TV celebrity Derek Watts questions for a change. He shares some interesting moments from his illustrious broadcasting career. Here is your chance to get to know the man behind popular actuality programme, Carte Blanche. As well as being a consummate professional Derek is an allround nice guy; approachable and genuine.

I

t is not every day that you interview a celebrity like Derek Watts. He is down to earth and approachable - even signing off his email; ‘bye for now.’ I refrained from sending him a friendly ‘Watts up’ greeting (although tempted) abstaining in the name of decorum. After all, Derek is a media man who has been awarded numerous accolades including, Best Male TV Presenter in South Africa for four consecutive years. Not too shabby! As anchor presenter on South African actuality programme Carte Blanche, for 27 years, Derek’s enduring popularity as a journalist and as a Master of Ceremonies reflects a combination of a good nose for news, a strong stomach, and excellent people skills. Could he be an undercover adrenalin junkie? The stories, personalities and events covered are often nerve-wracking, invariably controversial and always current.

We are blessed to have Derek Watts as Master of Ceremonies for Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government for the third year in a row. Quite a coup, if you will excuse the expression! Derek continues to grow ever popular; both on and off screen and for good reason.


X&Y FACTOR

Derek has met countless distinguished as well as notorious personalities over the years. We posed a lucky packet mix of questions to him in our quest to find out some of the experiences that stand out for him. Of all the dark and shady characters that you have interviewed who was surprisingly likeable and for what reason? It was disturbing, to say the least, interviewing General Butt Naked who was initiated as a tribal priest at the age of 11 and committed the most horrendous atrocities (including human sacrifices) during the first Liberian Civil War. And yet now as a reborn Christian, came across as repentant and charismatic. Have you ever been tempted (and succumbed) to a ridiculous challenge by a work mate or friend? If yes, please share. A few times…from driving into Mostar in a hired car during the Bosnian war and being arrested by the police, to shouting out to the Queen of England during an official ceremony. My biggest shock was that she replied and I was left speechless! You come across as composed. Have you ever ‘lost it’ with officialdom while covering a story? Once, in Kimberley with a housing official who gave contracts to his wife and friends and left hundreds of people homeless. He stormed out of the interview and locked the entire crew in the building. While deep sea diving with Trevor Hutton in Namibia you attempted diving 15 metres. What tips did Trevor share with you for diving deeper? Free diving is an unnerving experience. It starts getting dark, you can feel the water pressure on your face and body and there is that chilling thought that there is no scuba equipment that you can suddenly reach out for. So you panic thinking that you might not get to the surface. Trevor insisted that I should descend as far as I could and there would always be enough air in my lungs to make it to the top. I didn’t have the faith to do that! What is the most energetic sporting activity that you have accomplished in the past year? Trying to surf at St Francis Bay and standing on the board for one hundredth of a second. Just long enough to be featured as a “goofy footer” in Zig-zag magazine. What do you believe is needed to make Bafana Bafana a winning team that could compete with the best in the world? Taking the politics and greed out of the administration of the sport.

Please complete the sentence, ‘Africa is a continent of huge potential which could be realised if…’ Those with the power to make a difference had a genuine interest in uplifting the living standards of the entire population. Please share one of the most grueling Carte Blanche episodes you have done? While moving the starved animals out of the zoo in Luanda, Angola, a huge male tiger escaped and killed my producer Rick Lomba with one vicious bite at his throat. What was the upside of covering this story? It didn’t make up for the death of such a brave and dedicated conservationist, but the zoo animals found a new life in South Africa. Please share two of the most inspiring Carte Blanche episodes that you have done? There have been many in well over a thousand stories, but interviewing St John’s schoolboy Siyabulela Xuza, who went from being a praise singer for Nelson Mandela to becoming a top scientist in America was an amazing highlight. He initially worked with rocket fuels and NASA named a large asteroid after him! And I was also inspired by heading to Star City in Moscow to see Mark Shuttleworth training to be a cosmonaut and then flying in the military jets to Khazakstan to take part in all the crazy customs before standing close to that fiery Soyuz as he lifted into space. What was the best advice that you have been given as a broadcaster and by whom? Don’t think that the most important aspect of any event or story is that you have arrived to cover it! You are merely the messenger. You have a Paul Harris award from Rotary. What service had you rendered and what does this award mean to you personally? I was truly honoured by the award but see it as a tribute to Carte Blanche and to all those who we have in our team who have contributed over nearly 27 years to maintaining it as the flagship programme that informs, entertains, and strives to improve accountability in our nation. What saying do you live by? You are what you think, not what you think you are.

2015

TITANS

27


GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

ABOUT CEO Global is a media company, which entered its fifteenth year of existence in June 2015. We are the publisher of the monthly business title CEO Magazine as well as three special editions: Women in Motion, Africa's Most Influential Women in Business and Government and TITANS - Building Nations. CEO Global is committed to playing a significant role in reflecting the transformation of South African business. In this sense, our publications are totally inclusive, rather than representing or projecting vested interests.

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CEO Magazine is a business management magazine that focuses on organisational excellence across all sectors. Other titles in the CEO stable include special annual publications: Women in Motion, Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government and Titans - Building Nations.

CEO Communications has over the past decade, through its positive media platforms, been at the forefront of giving recognition to, and partnering with leading organisations in South Africa. They are initiating, implementing and growing sustainable change towards social, environmental and economic wellbeing in both public and private spheres of business. CEO Communications is proud to be associated with these pioneers. It is with great pleasure that we introduce you to more additional products and services through our newly established Custom Publishing (and Related Services) Division.

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Women in Motion 2014 Future Leaders and Enterprise Development

What to Ask your Mentor Instinct Driven Entrepreneur Rise of the Technical Female Knowing Your Value Who Needs a Runway

Transforming

The Art of Business

Business for

Success

Norman Hornby, Chief Executive Officer of Crawford & Company South Africa, and Mpho Mahanyele, Chedza CEO and Crawford and Company Group Executive Director, reflect on the transaction that has made Crawford & Company South Africa the first fully black-owned loss adjusting, and risk management and associated services, company in the country. Higher Education

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Three business Titans share with us their views on what it takes to succeed in the demanding world of business; the importance of developing people so they can be your key differentiator; building successful relationships and dealing with the inescapable reality that business success is the product of hard work.

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Providing high quality holistic care since 1970, Avril Elizabeth Home is a leader in the field of caring for the intellectually challenged. www.avril.org.za 011 822 22 33 aehome@mweb.co.za

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Entrepreneurial Entrepreneurship stems largely from the private sector and government’s responsibility is to create an environment that is conducive to entrepreneurial activity.


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t t The Serial S Entrepreneur S S e E

S

By Lydia Bundred

T S

“My self-confessed title is that of serial entrepreneur,” says Wouter Snyman, CEO and founder of the Attooh! Group of Companies. Attooh! delivers tailor-made financial planning solutions to individuals and corporate companies. Among Wouter’s many achievements are being named the Number One Health Advisor Group in 2011 and Number One National Advisor Group within Discovery for 2013/2014. Wouter has more than 22 years’ experience as an entrepreneur, he has a BCom Honours in Investment Management and he swam the Midmar Mile six times.

What is your goal as an entrepreneur? We live in a country that has many challenges and I think one of the solutions is entrepreneurs standing up and creating opportunities for others who wouldn’t have had the opportunity otherwise. For us it’s an opportunity to make a difference and to grow our brand in South Africa. We are a community business; we want to impact the lives of those in it, not only by means of jobs but also in a matter of making a difference at all levels. As a serial entrepreneur with 15 successful companies to your name, what is the biggest lesson you’ve learned? It comes with perseverance and a huge amount of discipline. More so, to be successful in any business it’s not about the business itself as much as it’s about the people. Where we’ve had successes it’s been where we’ve had good quality people. People with passion and a purpose at heart, and sometimes that purpose was without profit but in the end they impacted others positively. Who has been your biggest role model and how have they influenced you? It’s not a straightforward answer because there have been so many that I have learned from. I’m an avid reader so I’ve read many, many books of phenomenal leaders around the world. But a couple of leaders that have influenced me are Steve Jobs from Apple, with his ability to innovate, and then I had the privilege of working for the Discovery Group where I met up with and was mentored

32 2015 TITANS

by Adriaan Gore. Who is probably one of the most prolific entrepreneurs that Africa has produced. The lessons I learned from him is that you need to innovate. And I think that is something that we desperately need in South Africa. Entrepreneurs are about innovation and being optimistic and making a difference. If you look at his business, it’s not as much about profit as it is about impacting people and enhancing their lives. We set ourselves a very definite core purpose of what we want to achieve so that everyone in our business know what we want to achieve. What I’ve learned from both of these gentlemen is that you need to build your business on values because that is what people look for – value based business. As a leader how do you ensure that you, and those you oversee, continue to grow and develop? For me it’s about motivation and mentorship, and I take those roles seriously because that is ultimately how we as individuals develop. I have had many great mentors in my life and I try to play that role in the leaders in our business lives. My mantra is one of innovation. The vision in our business is very clear; we want to be a world leader and the very best in what we do. And for that we need to push boundaries and I’m that person that needs to guide the company in terms of a very clear vision and from a strategic point of view. As a leader I also need to layout the structures and processes that we need to build because that is ultimately what the individual in the business needs to fulfil that vision.


Wouter Snyman, CEO Attooh! Group of Companies

As a CEO, husband and father, how do you balance your personal and business life? It’s difficult and I think it’s a bit of a misnomer to think you can balance your life because I’ve found that being an entrepreneur is a 24/7 job. It’s a hard lesson that I’ve had to learn over many, many years. I think balance is achieved through setting boundaries and dedicating time to family. I have of late become better in this area, whereby when I get home my phone is switched off and I don’t spend time at work in my mind. And people at work know that after work hours they will most probably not reach me. It takes structure and one must realise that quality time with family and friends is needed. It releases some of the pressure because you can’t continuously be at work. What encouragement or advice would you offer other entrepreneurs, especially young entrepreneurs? Live your life with passion. We have a short stay on Earth and it is up to us to make a difference. We have a country that’s so beautiful and yet we have challenges. I believe each and everyone one of us must take our rightful place in solving these issues. I believe it starts at the core and if we are able to help people find jobs by providing employment and find their roles in society that we will prosper as a nation and it’s all of our responsibility. My challenge to all the winners would be make sure that you make a difference, make sure that you stand up be counted. We have a responsibility towards our country and our people. We can’t expect to just get, we must give. More about Wouter Not only is Wouter a successful and well respected businessman he is a published author. His books include; the number one Best Seller ‘The Ordinary Millionaire’ and ‘Would Driving a Porsche Change Your Life?’. He has read more than 3000 books and he is passionate about helping others realise their potential. When Wouter is not in the office or launching a successful business he can be found enjoying the great outdoors.


Fw

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WLeading L fromWithin L fW By Valdi Pereira

Leaders today face significant time constraints and demands upon their time. How do you think they can ensure that enough attention is given to developing the people they are responsible for? There is little doubt that we all find ourselves in a fast moving and complex world. Nurturing and growing your people is probably more important than ever before. In this respect large corporations possibly have it a little easier because they can use their human resource departments to ensure that people development is an integral part of the organisation. They also have the resources to improve and refine their development programmes as required. Small corporations and entrepreneurs are not in this fortunate position. They either need to get external assistance, or better still, the leaders should take it upon themselves to develop what is potentially their best asset. At the end of the day I think it also comes down to a business, irrespective of its size, ensuring that people development becomes part of the organisational culture. Are there any principles you believe all leaders should follow or live by? I think one of the first things is for leaders to realise there is no such thing as independent development. Through interdependency with others you can tap into a well of synergies, which can benefit you immensely as a leader. All of us have blind spots and interdependency can help one address this. Integrity or honesty as some people will call it is critical. Absolute integrity in all you do is very important and you should be able to underpin your behaviour with practical actions you have taken. It is important to always deliver on things you say you are going to do. If you get 95% of the way, I am confident people will accept that maybe you could not complete the very last bit of what you committed to, we are after all human. Respect for individuals is another vital element. Regardless of a person’s stature or social standing, one must have respect for the sanctity of human life and the inviolability of the human personality for all individuals. Probity and behaving in a manner that is beyond reproach is equally important. I am often accused of being idealistic when I raise this issue. My response is quite

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Dr Reuel Khoza has become synonymous with the spirit of Ubuntu. Notwithstanding the travails of leading at the top level of South African business for many years, he still believes that humanism is one of the most important aspects in leadership. He shares his thoughts with us on leadership, entrepreneurship and Africa’s economic opportunity. simply: ‘If one is not pursuing a set of ideals, one cannot live a principled life’. One must also avoid being deceptive, as it undermines ethical behaviour and any person who leads or follows intelligently must be alert to this. My parents also played an important role in providing me with guiding values and they always encouraged me to be industrious and commit myself to my work in a disciplined manner. As a result I have always tried to set an example by being dedicated to the cause and requirements of any organisation I have served.

What is the most important lesson you have learnt as a business and organisational leader? Only one lesson? [Laughs]. One of my former mentors, Conrad Strauss, former CEO and Chairman of Standard Bank and I, would occasionally debate my values of ubuntu (African humanism). One day he said to me, ‘Khoza, business is not a democracy’. We discussed the issue for some time and agreed it is not an autocracy either. We eventually arrived at what we believed is an acceptable interpretation – it is a meritocracy. In essence it is simple, people should be selected and rewarded on the basis of merit. However, if you accept meritocracy as a core principle, you need to be sure all the leaders and organisational stakeholders are in agreement with respect to how merit is defined. Thereafter, you need to jealousy guard this interpretation and not be swayed from the values that underpin it. I have seen situations where individuals are nominated to the board of an organisation, because they happen to wear the same school tie as someone. Where is the merit in that? In the same way I am resistant to government’s notion of deploying individuals. ‘Deployment’ is a corrosive term as far as I am concerned. An individual should be employed on merit and the ability they have to lead an organisation. Any other aspect should not be a factor in this process. A lot has been made in recent years of the need for South Africa to develop a strong entrepreneurial class. Do you think we are making progress in this regard? I think we are making limited headway and the reason for this is that entrepreneurship is a function of a number of discussions that we are not engaging in as a country.


We need to do a lot more in terms of developing an entrepreneurial mind set amongst our youth. If we are teaching life skills at schools, I am of the view that there can be no more important life skill than entrepreneurship. This is something we need to get right. Every year we put people that are 60 years old out to pasture because they are ostensibly ‘past it’. I think this is big mistake. These people should be paired with young people, who can benefit from their experience. There is no need for young people to burn their fingers and for the rest of us to write it off as ‘life experience’, we can save a lot of fingers, by taking a different approach. We also need to limit the amount of bureaucracy and red tape entrepreneurs have to deal with. There are just too many hoops to jump through at present and I think this is discouraging to potential entrepreneurs. I can share a personal example in this regard. It took me seven years to work through all the bureaucracy required to build a school in my home village. When I finally got what I believed was all the necessary permissions to start building, I discovered there were more government requirements I would need to meet. At some point you stop and look at what is unfolding and you say to yourself it is really nothing more, than unnecessary interference on the part of government, by putting stumbling blocks in your way. The concept of public private partnerships also needs to be revisited. It is a potentially powerful approach that is simply paid lip service at present. Entrepreneurship stems largely from the private sector and government’s responsibility is to create an environment that is conducive to entrepreneurial activity. While our government has established a Ministry of Small Business Development, I think we have missed an opportunity by not placing an experienced business leader at its helm. It is how the Japanese help their business people and is certainly something our government should do if they wish to signal serious intent in helping small business thrive. Africa seems to be on the brink of a period of great economic development. It also appears as if companies from across the globe are looking to entrench themselves on the continent to benefit from this development. Do you think, the continent’s ‘home grown’ companies are in danger of being muscled out of opportunities? I think the continent has a lot to be proud of in terms of business achievements. If one considers the Nigerian, Aliko Dangote and the diversified industrial group he has built, you get a sense of the type of thing that can be achieved. South Africans also have a lot to be proud of. MTN operates across the continent and the Middle-East. Shoprite has really set the standard across Africa in terms of their retail expansion. In fact, I think they could probably teach a retailer like Marks and Spencer a lesson or two. Even AngloGold Ashanti, which has had its fair share of challenges, can still hold its own in terms of its deep level mining expertise. Companies like South African Breweries, Sasol, Discovery and Old Mutual to name a few, have made real strides on the global stage and I expect they will continue to do so.

State-owned enterprises have also made their contributions. Despite the fact that Eskom is now a beleaguered entity, during the time I was Chairman we grew the company’s presence from seven African countries to thirty-three. We helped turn the Uganda Electricity Board turn around and competed against French utilities companies to build a power plant in Mali that supplied electricity to Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. There are many more stories of this nature that can be told about African companies growing the continent, while expanding globally. If we want to add to this, Africa needs to develop a continental business action programme to attract Foreign Direct Investment. Let’s take China as an example. It is an economic behemoth, for a single African state to think they can enter into contracts with a continent of this size and remain in control of the outcomes is a mistake. Lawyers don’t talk about leonine contracts for nothing. If an individual country makes an contractual mistake with a huge economic powerhouse, they can be pulverised. As a continent we must therefore guard against a fragmented approach. We must first think regionally, then continentally and be very careful of the civil and legal aspects we bind our countries to. Right now, everyone is eager to trade with Africa, we must use the opportunity wisely. Looking back on your career in business are you happy thus far? Is there anything you would do differently? If I had to do it all again, I would probably start off by studying a B. Com with subjects like accounting and law. I didn’t intend to go into business and when I started at Unilever I realised my fellow graduates who had studied in these fields had a head start on me. I like to think after a year on the job I was able to deal confidently with the concepts they worked with on a daily basis. I believe a degree helps you develop your brain and that you are responsible for taking the body of knowledge you have been exposed to and further developing yourself with it. Later on I completed a master’s degree in marketing management, which helped me in the corporate environment. Although, I must admit that as far back as March 1981, I had already made up my mind that I wanted to be an entrepreneur. Being fired from my position as a lecturer at Turfloop University, because I was an agitator, was an important turning point. God has a purpose with all our lives and he works in mysterious ways too. Later I was invited back to the university to present a graduation speech and later joined the university council; today I am Chancellor. I would have never thought that the day I left the university. I have had a good forty years in the business environment and I am satisfied with what I have achieved. Presently I am really enjoying working with young people. I am mentoring a number of them, who are working in the field of accountancy and engineering, which is a bit of a focal area for me, helping them think and behave strategically. At the end of the day I am delighted by the fact that these young people see me as a role model and that they would like to learn from me.

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Quick Guide Arts & Culture Partner - Hilton Hotel Finalists: Germain Henri Yombo; Gervais Hugues Ondaye; Pablo Kenneth Kimuli Regional Winners: Stephen Rwangyezi; Elvis Blue

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Automotive & Components Partner - MEIBC Finalist: J. Robert Houdet Country Winner: Benjamin Hauwanga Regional Winner: Ntuthuko Shezi

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Building & Construction Partner - Bigen Africa Finalists: Rory Gallocher; Stephen Goodburn Regional Winners: Willem Jakobus Lategan

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Business & Professional Services Partner - Parinama Finalists: Albert Geldenhuys; Victor Sekese; Yuvraj Thacoor; Patrick Wanambisi Country Winners: Lerata Pekane; Alex NK Fakudze Regional Winners: Wouter Snyman; Paul Kampakol

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Chemical, Petrochemical & Pharmaceutical Partner - CEO Global

Country Winner: Corné Schalwyk Regional Winners: Emmanuel Katongole; Shepherd Shonhiwa

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Education & Training: Academic Partner - CEO Global Regional Winners: Valère Glèlè Kakaï; Prof. Albertus Johannes Strydom

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Education & Training: Private Partner - Sizwe IT Group Finalist: Clemence Chiduwa Country Winner: Dr Gerhard van Rensburg Regional Winners: Prof. Roger Armand Makany; Rowan van Dyk

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Financial Services Partner - KPMG Finalists: John Njagi Karionji; Viwe Gqwetha; Robert Walton; Patrick Vusumuzi Gamedze; Cas Coovadia; Benson Kariuki Kitabu

Manufacturing & Engineering Partner - merSETA Finalists: Silas Mzingeli Zimu Country Winners: Wilhelm van Niekerk Regional Winners: Dr Stephen John Meijers; Alain Brice Niama

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Media Partner - CEO Global Finalists: Geoffrey Angote; Boitumelo Koloi; Dr Pierre de Villiers; Alec Lushaba Country Winners: Mbongeni Mbingo Regional Winners: Robert Kabushenga; Victor Kgomoeswana

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Medical & Veterinary Partner - CEO Global Finalists: Prof. Arthur Rantloane; Dr Victor Fredlund Regional Winners: Prof. Bavesh Davandra Kana

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Mining Partner - CEO Global Finalists: Dr Freddy van der Berg Regional Winners: Percival Ntuthuko Khoza

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Public Enterprises Partner - Air Mauritius Finalists: Nakampe Modike Regional Winner: Xolile George

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SME Partner - CEO Global Finalists: Emmanuel Omaruaye; Pieter J van den Berg Country Winners: Dr Lucas Moloi Regional Winners: Shem Bajura Bageine; Kelvin Macharia Kuria; Christian Ngan; Sonwabile Ndamase

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Tourism & Leisure Partner - VisaRequest Finalists: Manish Bundhun; Marie Jean Cyril Jullienne Regional Winners: Adriaan Johannes Liebetrau

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Welfare & Civil Society Organisations Partner - CEO Global Country Winners: Bryan Ramkilawan Regional Winners: Kelvin Esiasa; Francis Asong; Oumarou Fousséni; Khulekani Magongo

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Wholesale & Retail Partner - Kenya Airways Regional Winners: Dr Richard Maponya

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Logistics & Shipping Partner - Egypt Air Regional Winners: Robert Leo Maslamoney

Agriculture Partner - CEO Global Country Winner: Rev. August Basson Regional Winners: Oupa Mathebula; Timah Moses Tetuh

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ICT Partner - CEOS TECHNOLOGIES Finalists: RK Raman; James Chona; Damian Michael; Kovelin Naidoo; Elvis Ndong Regional Winners: Steve Nell; Paul Odero

Agencies & Regulatory Authorities Partner - NDA Finalists: Serobi Maja; Sipho Dlamini; Thakhani Reuben Makhuvha Country Winner: Jochen Traut Regional Winner: Kaizer Mabhilidi Nyatsumba

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Country Winners: Mpho Vumbukani; Walter Don; Alfred Madondo Regional Winner: Dr Suresh Parbhoo Kana

Lifetime Achievers Partner - CEO Global Stephen Rwangyezi; Dr Suresh Parbhoo Kana; Sonwabile Ndamase; Dr Richard Maponya; Moses Kgosana

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Sector Foreword

LifetimeAchievement

Life Time Achiever Foresight and perseverance are two of the qualities foremost associated with those deemed to have succeeded in reaching the top. In few other theatres of man’s existence on this continent have these characteristics been more needed to ensure the successful transition to a dominant force on the world stage.

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hrough their commitment to the cause, their unwavering devotion to the legacy that is man and the spirit they have shown in the face of adversity, the following men have revealed themselves to be true Titans and are commended for their actions. These men stand as living beacons of hope in these tumultuous times, their leadership and skills an ode to civility and humanity, their contributions and sacrifices unquantifiable, the quintessential architects of the continent’s future.

CEO Global salute these Titans for

the roles they have played in ensuring a better world for countless generations to come. Long may they be remembered for their efforts and forfeitures.

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

From South Africa

Dr. Suresh Parbhoo Kana

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inancial Services regional and South African country winner Dr Suresh Parbhoo Kana, Chief Executive Officer – Territory Senior Partner for PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) Africa joined Coopers & Lybrand, later to become PwC, as an articled clerk in 1976 and was admitted to the partnership in 1986. He has continued to build his career with the firm, successfully fulfilling roles in the Accounting Technical field, as Human Capital leader and Assurance leader, as well as leading and defining PwC’s Transformation and Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives. Dr Kana believes that skills development is critical for the development of the economies and improving the lives of people across the African continent. It is the golden key to the alleviation of poverty across Africa. A Chartered Accountant, Dr Kana holds, among others, a Master of Commerce Degree, Honorary Doctorates from the University of Johannesburg and the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. He teaches accounting at the former.


LifetimeAchievement

From South Africa

From South Africa

Moses Kgosana

Dr. Richard Maponya

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e achieved the distinction of being the first African to be appointed as chief executive of a ‘big four’ accounting firm in South Africa. Moses Kgosana adds exceptional value to his profession and is a worthy recipient of the Lifetime Achiever Award in the Business and Professional Services category. Moses is CEO of KMPG in South Africa, which is part of a global group of offices, providing audit, tax and advisory services. His professional highlights include being chairman of KPMG’s Africa High Growth Markets and Global Lead Independent Director of KPMG International. Moses is a champion for transformation and one of the commissioners of Black Economic Empowerment. He has served on the Financial Services Board licensing committee and as an assessor of the Income Tax High Court. Moses speaks of the need to “focus more externally (on the market) and to look to the future with renewed optimism and courage.” He urges that “the sky is the limit.”

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ntrepreneurs are born with the desire to create opportunities. “I am constantly developing new businesses,” says Dr. Richard Maponya. His business interests include building retail malls, establishing bottle stores and retail property letting. Career highlights include building a world class mall in Soweto; changing the lives of over 5 million South Africans and becoming a catalyst for shopping malls in South African townships. Dr Maponya has developed two world class dealerships for Toyota and Volkswagen, the first of their kind in South African townships. His latest venture is poultry farming; supplying eggs to over 25 hospitals in the Pretoria area and to Pick ‘n Pay. Dr Maponya is community minded. He has built and registered the Richard Maponya Institute for Skill and Entrepreneurship. The esteemed entrepreneur has received countless awards. Among the most noteworthy are the Order of the Grand Counsellor of the Baobab in Silver (2007): for his contribution to entrepreneurship despite oppressive apartheid conditions, and inspiring disadvantaged South Africans to strive for business success. Dr Maponya is a recipient of the prestigious Ernst & Young Award: World Enterprise Award 2008. He is the founder of both NAFCOC and the Johannesburg African Chamber of Commerce..

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LifetimeAchievement

From South Africa

From Uganda

Sonwabile Ndamase

Stephen Rwangyezi

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onwabile Ndamase is the creator of the iconic Nelson Mandela shirt. For over 20 years, he has been dubbed the ‘Godfather of African style’ and helped shape the design direction of the African continent. Sonwabile is the executive president of the South African Fashion Designers Agency (SAFDA) and the Regional and Country winner in the SME Sector. He is also the creator of one of South Africa’s biggest design brands, Vukani! Range Creations. His annual Vukani! Fashion Awards are a highlight on the South African design calendar, and one of the biggest African fashion events. Consistent brand-building and delivery have seen Sonwabile and SAFDA discover and mentor some of South Africa’s greatest, including Gert-Johan Coetzee, for 20 years. As the leading design mentor in South Africa, fashion and design institutions from across the continent request the Godfather of African style to conduct workshops, deliver lectures, help structure curricula and adjudicate at some of the most high-profile fashion events.

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or his ongoing dedication and investment in his community and its people Titans is proud to present Stephen Rwangyezi with the Lifetime Achiever award. As the Founder and Executive Director of the Ndere Foundation, Stephen has been a pillar and role model to those around him for 39 years. He is a firm believer, and practitioner, of the development and equipping of others. The Music, Dance and Drama Diploma holder regularly teaches at local schools and colleges and he financially sponsors underprivileged children, providing them with training and mentoring. Due to Stephen’s upliftment and involvement, the community has experienced a renewed zeal for its local culture. He provides employment and guidance for 148 full-time employees and approximately 62,520 others who are a part of his Development Theatre Groups. This year Stephen aims to further his dream by launching The Institute of Indigenous Civilizations and Creative Industries.


EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

Sparking

the Innovative Flame:

5

Points for Building Your Team’s

Creativity

Technology is ever changing and, with it, the structures and processes that govern how we do business. Adapting is essential for not just surviving but thriving in the new information society. Often, the best ideas and ‘next big thing’ are right under your roof but in need of some nurturing and direction. by Lydia Bundred

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EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

When employees understand the vison, goals and priorities of the organisation, they will know how to align their function towards reaching the said objectives.

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he forerunners in the business world are those that embrace and make provision for change and growth. In today’s competitive and fast-paced environment, it isn’t enough to have a good idea – one needs to know how to separate the good from the bad, the relevant from the irrelevant, and the need from the want. Every aspect of the business – small and large – needs to be audited in order to evaluate current processes and their relevance and place in the life of the business, and to pinpoint gaps and weaknesses. By knowing where you are lacking, you will know what to build towards and which ideas to encourage and which to keep on the back burner. To make the leap onto the innovation train, you will first need to create the right environment. 1. Start from the top Your leaders and managers are a great starting point for boosting and building a creative environment. Your personnel are likely to imitate the values that are modelled for them. To quote the late Steve Jobs: “Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” Motivating people to think for themselves requires that they think like leaders. They must be pliable in their ways and thinking so that they are open to change and take ownership of their work. The innovative spirit and philosophy must become one that everyone embraces. Department heads and managers should be the forerunners in respect of innovation by presenting ideas and motivating staff to do the same. Leaders should be approachable and accessible to all levels of the organisation. Google practises an open-access policy where all top leaders and executives can be reached directly by email. By breaking down the barriers between the ranks, information can be requested straight from the source, which will eliminate any misinterpretations. 2. Embrace the diversity Often, our offices are a melting pot of diversity that is forced to conform to the office norm. By having rigid guidelines and small margins for mistakes, employees can feel confined and limited in their thinking and processes.

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By easing your management style and embracing the individuality of each member, you will allow free thinking and optimise functionality. Encourage staff to think outside of the daily routine and to find quicker, easier ways of completing tasks so that they utilise their time proficiently. Create an ethos among your team which celebrates their differences and allows them to follow their own rhythm. People from different walks of life can view the same thing and yet all may have seen 100 different things – the secret is harnessing these views.   3. Free information flow When employees understand the vison, goals and priorities of the organisation, they will know how to align their function towards reaching the said objectives. Make sure that all systems for creating, gathering, retrieving, dispersing and storing information are up to date and accessible to all the relevant personnel. No one should have to experience any frustration when trying to access a standard or essential work document –this will just waste time and energy. Irrelevant or outdated information should be archived so that prime space can be free of clutter. Include a monthly newsletter in which all departments’ current affairs are listed as well as any changes. The minds of project managers, administrative personnel, designers and engineers are filled with a wealth of knowledge that often goes untapped. Knowledge management is essential for the maturity of any organisation and inspires innovation in different areas. Build on existing ideas, technologies and systems to maximise their output. 4. Brainstorming sessions Members should feel that they have an opportunity to speak their minds and to bring their ideas to the table during brainstorming sessions. By scheduling a weekly or monthly session with your group, employees can come together in their departments to present ideas. This is one of the innovative methods practised by Google, which holds weekly meetings with all employees where questions can be asked of the Google leadership team. Encourage questions and research in the different departments so as to boost creativity.


EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

Motivating people to think for themselves requires that they think like leaders.

Keep these sessions to a predetermined time limit in order to stop people from going off at a tangent and cutting into working hours. In any walk of life, there will be extroverts who enjoy presenting their ideas, and then there will be those introverts who will find a group intimidating. To allow ideas to flow from everyone, have a designated day where staff can send their ideas via email or an internal platform. Brilliant ideas can grow from within an organisation, but they can also be introduced from outside. External consultants can bring valuable input and ideas, as a fresh set of eyes can see things that have been overlooked internally. 5. Find the balance Staff members should know that not every idea will be implemented. Don’t create false hope that all ideas will be utilised, because, in reality, this is not possible. There are limits to what are essential, secondary and non-essential elements for functioning. For example, a new, faster internal system is essential to operations, whereas an idea such as Free Coke Friday, which boosts worker satisfaction, is secondary because it supports good morale but does not directly affect internal functions of the business. Drive ideas towards your overall aims and praise and reward those who do. When innovative ideas

have been presented, customise them and make use of high-speed implementation. Idea producers will be encouraged by the use of their suggestions and will be motivated to perform better. To make sure you aren’t a one-hit wonder, systems need to be in place that continually drive attention and practices towards your main focus and goals. View the products and services as your consumers do and try to optimise their usage and make them user-friendly. Track current and new ideas, their success and their shortfalls, so adjustments can be made. Above all, keep everyone informed of developments and changes. Functioning innovatively is an ongoing process that requires effort and teamwork. Top five consistently innovative companies, according to Forbes: 1. Salesforce.com 2. Alexion Pharmaceuticals 3. ARM Holdings 4. Unilever Indonesia 5. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

Source: http://www.forbes.com/innovative-companies/list/ #page: 1_sort:1_direction:asc_search:_filter:All%20regions_ filter:All%20industries

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Agencies and Regulatory Authorities ‘Efficiently’ and ‘ethically’ are two words that aptly describe how agencies and regulatory authorities seek to achieve their goals. Balancing the needs of people and businesses while maintaining and promoting profitability can be a challenging feat. However, we have an extremely competent workforce in this sector. Men remain the larger percentage of the workforce in these bodies.

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any individuals and organisations rely on these agencies and regulatory authorities to play an advisory role in diverse spheres. Their specialised fields of operation are important in streamlining and standardising processes and in providing set government procedures for ensuring efficiency and good governance on our continent. With broad mandates and high demands, this sector may prove challenging to some, but those fulfilling their roles within it are dedicated individuals who have the continent’s best interests in mind at all times. The Titans in this sector are those who embrace the challenges they face and ensure that high standards are maintained in all professional fields.

National Development Agency commends these men for their ongoing successes.

From South Africa

Kaizer Mabhilidi Nyatsumba

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ince 2013 Kaizer Mabhilidi Nyatsumba has been the Chief Executive Officer of the Steel and Engineering Industries Federation of South Africa (SEIFSA). SEIFSA is the national employer Federation representing the metals and engineering industries. In his time as CEO he has launched annual SEIFSA Awards for Excellence and an annual Southern African Metals and Engineering Indaba. Kaizer was the first black Political Editor of The Star and the first African to be a newspaper Editor in South Africa for The Independent on Saturday and Daily News. While working for Anglo American he was instrumental in motivating the company to sponsor South Africa’s Bid for the 2010 FIFA World Company. His resume includes an Advanced Management Programme Diploma, a Post-Graduate Certificate in Economics, an MBA from the University of Hull, UK and in 1996 he attended a Leadership Development Program hosted by Harvard University, USA. The 2002 Emma Awards for Journalism Finalist (UK) is the Non-Executive Director for Metal Industries Benefits Funds Administration. He is also the Agencies and Regulatory Authorities sector Country Winner.


COUNTRYWINNER From Namibia

Jochen Traut Jochen Traut has a B.Com degree, a National Diploma in Technology and has completed a Senior Management Programme. As the CEO of the Communications Regulatory Authority of Namibia (CRAN) he is a firm believer in hiring people with the right attitude and then instilling the needed skills. He developed the first spectrum band plan and the digital terrestrial television (DTT) regulatory framework and frequency channelling plan for Namibia. Jochen also developed the first type approval, national numbering plan and quality of service regulations for Namibia.

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FINALISTS From South Africa

Sipho Dlamini Sipho Dlamini is the CEO and Director of the Foundation Board of SAMRO, the largest Collective Management organisation in Africa. In his capacity he manages 250 staff members. The Stellenbosch University final year MBA student received a South African Music Award for Best Producer in 2012. In 2010 he was the Co-Event Producer for the Opening and Closing Ceremony of the FIFA World Cup. He is a Director on the Moshito Board and the SAMIC Board as well as the Treasure.General.

From South Africa

Serobi Maja The BA degree holder, Serobi Milton Maja, is the CEO of the Limpopo Gambling Board. He has been in his sector for 14 years and in his capacity manages 60 people. Serobi was the first African elected to serve as Chairman of the International Association of Gaming Regulators from 2009 – 2011. He is the Chairman of the Council of University of Venda and the Gaming Regulators Africa Forum. In adition Serobi is the Director of the South African Responsible Gambling Foundation.

From South Africa

Thakhani Reuben Makhuvha As the CEO of the Small Business Enterprise Finance Agency, Thakhani Reuben Makhuvha manages 207 staff members. Since 2012 his involvement and efforts have increased funding commitments to SMMEs each year by more than 200%. He holds a B Com in Accounting, Honours Bachelor of Accounting Science, a Masters in Financial Management and completed a Leadership Development Programme in 2006. Thakhani is a board member at SEDA and a member of the SAICA’s Risk Governance Forum.

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by Samantha Barnes

on the

Africa is a continent of contrasts: between rich and poor, educated and illiterate, employed and unemployed, lush farmland and drought-ravaged wasteland, luxurious houses and shanty towns, and manufacturing powerhouses and roadside hawkers. Political instability, violent clashes, factionalism, extremism and kidnappings are included in the mix.

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or a manufacturer seeking to expand its footprint into Africa, many challenges go hand in hand with doing business on the continent. These challenges are as much part of the business landscape as the beloved pap (cooked porridge made from maize meal ) that is a side dish to meat in African communities. Common challenges often overlooked are distribution and logistics, infrastructure, and selecting trusted and respected business partners. Yet, there are African success stories. The flip side is that, despite Africa’s rich natural resources, too many goods are manufactured outside the continent. There is, however, good news. Africans are realising that Africa is the proverbial land of plenty. With world markets under strain and overseas economies battling with their own challenges, expanding into Africa makes good business sense.

Zandile Ratshitanga, World Bank senior communications manager for Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa and Swaziland, paints a brighter picture of developments in Africa. She reports that foreign direct investment (FDI) in sub-Saharan Africa rose to USD45 billion in 2013, up 8% from 2012. This was driven by East and Southern Africa. In Southern Africa, 62% of inward FDI went to South Africa in 2013. European countries are by far the biggest investors in Africa, while United States FDI in the continent has fallen. Predictably, China is consolidating its position, Zandile confirms. Meanwhile South–South FDI in Africa is on the rise, especially from the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) countries. These investments are primarily in services and manufacturing.

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Manufacturers to Look up To of allocating the right resources to drive further export Nampak, Tiger Brands, Mabeo Furniture and Aliboat opportunities,” explains Rajan. are notable examples of Southern African firms investing Volkswagen South Africa, although a leading autoin significant projects in Africa In a press release issued motive manufacturer, also faces similar challenges as a in March this year, Nampak reported that it had signed a manufacturer in Africa. Matt Gennrich, general managmemorandum of understanding (MoU) with a property er of group communications for the Volkswagen Group developer for a majority stake in a proposed greenfield glass furnace in Ethiopia, some 120 Having cost-effective and reliable means of kilometres north of the capital Addis Ababa. Andre de Ruyter, Nampak CEO, says: “This delivering to customers across Africa is always a project has the potential to meet significant glass demand in the fast-growing Ethiopian challenge and integral to achieving success beer market. To date, the land for the works has been secured on a long-term lease and a source of sand of South Africa, cites economies of scale (South Africa is has been identified. We are excited about this project and responsible for less than 1% of the world’s automobile are working hard to firm up the business case.” production), exchange rate volatility, the relatively high Defy is another name worth watching. The company cel- cost of labour, as well as labour instability and South ebrates 110 years in existence this year as Southern Africa’s Africa’s distance from key markets as making logistics largest manufacturer and distributor of major domestic and Volkswagen’s cost structure a challenge. However, appliances. It markets its products under the Defy and the Volkswagen Group is very active in China, where it Ocean brand names . In 2012, Defy declared an annual turn- is a market leader. over in excess of R3.5 billion and exports to various markets, Toyota has set itself apart from its peers on a couple including Africa and the Indian Ocean islands. of levels The high local content used in the Hilux and Several factors underpin the continued success of Corolla models makes these models Defy, among them continuous investment in producing compliant with the requirements products that address the needs of consumers and that of the European Free Trade enhance the quality of their lives. Head of marketing at Agreement with South Africa and Defy, Rajan Gungiah, says: “We have invested over R500 thus eligible for importation into million over the last 24 months in our plants to produce Europe free of duty. Toyota is the world-class differentiated products.” Another differentia- first South African vehicle mantor is having the local capability needed to provide rapid ufacturer to achieve this. Both innovation and to consistently produce superior quality. models are produced in rightMaintaining a competitive edge is ongoing. “We have and left-hand drive variants. managed to sustain our leadership through a difficult Toyota South Africa president trading environment and stronger competition from and CEO Dr Johan van Zyl was quoted as imported brands (Europe, Korea and China),” says Rajan. saying in 2008: “This required a total transfor“Our leadership position in SA is approximately 36% mation in the way we do business and in the (and growing) in market share and is double [that of] our way we build vehicles. Fundamental to this nearest competitor.” process was a multibillion rand investment in Defy has a firm foothold in Africa, selling into Namibia, new facilities and technologies that overshadSwaziland, Lesotho, Botswana, Zambia, Mozambique, owed anything that the local industry had seen Angola, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic before. Toyota South Africa is now firmly estabof Congo (DRC), Malawı, and other central African coun- lished as the largest vehicle manufacturer on tries, including the Indian Ocean islands. the African continent and as the largest vehicle exporter in South Africa.” Reaching the Market Having cost-effective and reliable means of deliver- Support from ‘Big Brother’ ing to customers across Africa is always a challenge and Rajan Gungiah confirms that the integral to achieving success. Besides dedicated Defy main challenge for Defy is ensuring branches in Namibia, Botswana and Swaziland, the com- that there is a more regulated induspany uses appointed distributors in Zambia, Mozam- try. Better controls and duties are bique, Angola, Zimbabwe, the DRC and Malawi. It is not required to protect the local manuresting on its laurels either. “We are also in the process facturing industry. To this end, Defy

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has a close relationship with the Department of Trade and Industry and has recently become a member of the South African Electrotechnical Export Council (SAEEC) in order to develop new partnerships and increase exports into Africa. Matt Gennrich of Volkswagen South Africa confirms that the sale of new passenger cars in Africa is difficult, as many African markets allow grey imports from Volkswagen Asia. South Africa does not produce cars in South Africa that are in demand in the rest of sub-Saharan Africa, for this market tends to be dominated by pick-ups. Lessons Learnt from a Deal That Went Belly Up In business as in life, not everything is plain sailing. A case in point was the Tiger Brands acquisition of Dangote Flour Mills (DFM) in Nigeria in 2012. Of the R1.5 billion for a majority stake in DFM, Tiger Brands had to write off an amount of R849 million that was paid for the business, in addition to R105 million against the value of DFM’s assets.

Peter Matlare, Tiger Brands CEO, was quoted as saying earlier in 2015 that Tiger Brands had not been put off buying businesses of scale and that its rest-of-Africa strategy had been unaffected by its bad experience in Nigeria. The lesson to be learnt from this for future deals, he said, is that Tiger Brands will, earlier on, send larger management teams to its new business. It will also ‘take the keys’ of its takeover targets from day one in order to establish certainty. He conceded that Tiger Brands had not correctly assessed the competition or Nigeria’s way of doing business. Tiger Brands is investigating ways to improve route-to-market capabilities. In South Africa (aside from its bakery business), it outsources 90% of its logistics, and, in Nigeria, may well outsource this function to one of its partners there. Tiger Brands’ ongoing search for African growth is based on identifying new opportunities as well as less promising prospects in South Africa. This may include a regional approach where Kenya or Ethiopia could service east Africa, Cameroon could supply central Africa, and Nigeria could supply West Africa. At the end of the day, achieving business success anywhere is about doing intensive research upfront and creating mutually beneficial and enduring partnerships. Sources: Business Day Live, 8 December 2014; SouthAfrica. info, 23 April 2015; www.thedti.gov.za

Rajan Gungiah, head of marketing at Defy

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Agriculture The agricultural sector is a thriving economic sector across Africa. With the world’s most arable land on our continent, agriculture is our ‘bread and butter’ and a significant contributor to gross domestic product (GDP). The success of agriculture is largely dependent on the vagaries of nature, and, as a result, the sector and those working in it are faced with many challenges.

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en play an integral role in this sector’s development and occupy positions at all levels. Sustainability of agriculture is largely dependent on the methods used to process agroproducts from start to finish. Education about this sector and its operations is a major goal, as this empowers many individuals and communities to sustain themselves. Food security and job creation are major benefits created by this sector. Locally and internationally, African produce is appreciated by all.

CEO Global lauds this sector and

the Titans working in it as a pillar of our very being. Moreover, we are fortunate to have the resources for agriculture to thrive as it does.

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

From South Africa

Oupa Mathebula

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ased in easily the hottest part of South Africa, Oupa Mathebula, Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer of FABCO and Legacy Limpopo Investments, is the Regional and Country winner in the Agriculture sector. FABCO, of which he is the Founding Chairperson, is a hybrid primary agricultural cooperative which has over 300 members who are farmers. Together with the Young Agribusiness Entrepreneurial Development Project Oupa placed more than 100 unemployed youth in real farm operations and they emerged as managers and entrepreneurs during the period 2002 – 2005 Project. He has served at NRM Consulting as Executive Chairperson from 2007 until 2011. Oupa believes in empowering all members of his team because they do not only make his job easier but “empowered people are able to help build the economy of the country. They become independent people who understand the need to fight the scourge of poverty and they also help to empower others”.


REGIONALWINNER

From Cameroon

Timah Moses Tetuh

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he Country and Regional winner, Timah Moses Tetuh is the General Manager of Anong Development Agricultural Association, which aims to reduce poverty, improve health and living standards in Cameroon. He has implemented a farming system in his village and through the ADA Association the community’s unemployment has been reduced. Timah motivated and equipped members of his village to begin private farms to increase their incomes and improve their quality of life. He has done practical training in plantation and cocoa farming and has a Bachelor degree in English. Timah has been in the sector for ten years and in his role as Manager he oversees 25 people, who he continually encourages and assists in growing their skills. The agriculture expert has completed a course in Project Management and believes in team work and equal opportunity for all. Timah plans to expand his influence to other villages.

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COUNTRYWINNER From Lesotho

Rev. August Basson Reverend August Basson, Director of Growing Nations says he is a visionary that has achieved many firsts thus far. One of the reasons for the success, he elaborates, is that he has always been able to attract the best calibre of people into his team. “Without them, I will not be able to accomplish much. Instilling vision and passion to the people around us have been one of our keys to success,� August notes. He is also the Country winner in the Agriculture sector.

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Gender Equality – Not Just a Woman’s Fight

by Lydia Bundred

Even in the 21st century, women’s equality within the workplace, especially in the higher ranks of an organisation, is still lacking. Recent studies in the European Union (EU) have shown a link between economic growth and women’s participation in the work populace. The overall performance and productivity of an organisation is also impacted by gender equality. Certain professions are seen as female-specific or male-suited within the culture of the business and, to break these moulds and bridge unequal opportunities for promotion and wages, organisations must look within. Saudi Arabia is testimony to how leaps can be made by implementing changes within a system.

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ccording to the United Nations (UN) Entity for Gender Equality, the issue is not to make men and women, girls and boys the same but to remove the dependence of rights, responsibilities and opportunities from gender. Gender equality is often synonymous with women, but the stakes are high for both genders. The Economy When more women join the workforce, it lessens the labour force gap between men and women and this benefits the economy. UN Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson recently remarked that “women’s participation in the labour force remains too low. We know that economic growth is closely tied to the level of women’s engagement in the labour force, and the economic autonomy of women

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underpins their political and social rights.” On average, women earn 60 to 75% of the average male’s salary. When comparing hours worked, both paid and unpaid, women in developing countries work up to twice as hard as men. In a study conducted in 2013, 49.1% of the world’s working women were in jobs where they were vulnerable, with no labour law protection, and who felt they were undervalued as compared with 46.1% of men who work under labour law protection. A little more than half of the world’s population are women, and yet 100 countries have laws restricting women from participating in economic activities. By enabling an entire population to actively grow and be a part of the labour force, the economy would see exponential growth. A study done by USAID on development revealed that female-owned firms showed higher sales return overs those owned by males. Female-run organisa-


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

tions also tend to employ more same-sex employees than do male-owned organisations. The same study showed that women tend to make higher payments on their loans and save more than men. The Boston Consulting Group predicts that, by 2028, women will be the major globalconsumption spenders. Organisational Benefits Studies conducted on companies with women in senior positions scored higher on overall effectiveness than those with all-male senior executives. Research in the EU showed a direct link between organisations that have men and women on their boards and productivity, in contrast to those that were all-male. A nonprofit organisation, Catalyst, saw a 66% better performance in its organisations with heterogeneous board directors than homogenous ones. Organisations have the added benefit of attracting more employees, male and female, by promoting gender equality and fair representation for both. Businesses will maintain higher staff retention and save on staff recruiting and training costs. Advocating for both sexes appeals to audiences, builds strong rapport

as male-dominated, while other professions such as midwifery, secretary, receptionist and hairdresser are viewed as female occupations, according to a poll taken by YouGov. These gender moulds have seen some significant cracks and changes in the last 10 years. However, some sectors are still largely dominated by one sex. Encouragement from employers and the opposite sex to join predominantly male or female industries will affect the statistics positively. Training programmes and outreaches from department heads can act as a catalyst for awareness and for the recruiting of both genders. Internal organisation policies must cater for and advocate equality while showing no tolerance for gender bias. Incorporate fair expectations and equal opportunities for growth as a business value. Interact with staff to highlight areas where policies should be put in place to accommodate the needs of both sexes. Build your organisation by listening to those you manage, because they are your brand ambassadors. “Now reaching that balance is going to mean that we – and I mean we men – have to play a stronger role in bringing about the necessary transformational change. We must ensure representation of women on boards

Equal opportunities, responsibilities and rights in all areas of life aren’t just a woman’s fight but belong to us collectively, globally and organisationally. with customers, and allows internal views to customise approaches for reaching all audience types. For these benefits to be realised, organisations must create an environment that fosters impartiality. Internal Policies and Priorities Information technology, firefighting, sports coaching and police officer are some of the jobs that are seen

and panels, both in the public and the private sector. We must put an end to tolerance of sexist behaviour or discriminatory practices against women.” These were the words of the UN deputy secretary-general at an address on gender equality given in January 2015. Equal opportunities, responsibilities and rights in all areas of life aren’t just a woman’s fight but belong to us collectively, globally and organisationally.

Making Rights Work: A View from Saudi Arabia “Women will claim their rights if they know there is a support system that will protect them from the reaction of their own communities. This support system should certainly include some of those who hold the keys to the power structures,” were the powerful words spoken from within Saudi Arabia by Thoraya Ahmed Obaid. Thoraya is a Saudi Arabian woman who has achieved many firsts for the women of her country. She was the first female to receive a government scholarship to study in America, was the first Saudi national to be head of a UN agency, and, in 2004, Forbes named her one of the 50 most powerful Arab women. Her focus

has largely been on promoting human rights and gender equality in all areas of life. This Wayne State University graduate and 29 other women were selected as the first women to join the previously all-male Shura Council of King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud. She believes that the system “must not be broken down from without” but that it must be changed from within by both men and women. Her progress is proof that, even in a rigid system that limits women, progress can be made from within the system to bring about equal opportunities for both men and women.

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Arts and Culture For many years, arts and culture did not appear to be a profitable sector of our economies. Africans, however, have begun to embrace our diversity in order to showcase it through various artistic media and for profit. Men and women have also embraced this sector and have grasped the opportunities presented in order to use their creativity as a contributor to their livelihoods.

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aising awareness of social issues has been a major theme of some of Africa’s best and most inspiring works of art. African arts and culture remain diverse and intriguing, grabbing the world’s attention. This sector has therefore been a major contributor to the increase in travel and tourism to numerous African countries. Creativity has become a beacon of opportunity, one that many Africans are grasping with both hands and are utilising as a form of expression. In doing so, they are able to profit from their natural talents at the same time.

Artistic men are bringing our social issues to the forefront and are educating many through their works. Hilton Hotel congratulates and thanks those taking our art and culture to the global stage.

From South Africa

Elvis Blue

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lvis Blue, Owner and Operator of Elvis Blue Music, is one of South Africa’s top selling musical performers. Both a singer and songwriter with a musical career spanning 15 years, he has seven albums and multiple awards under his belt. As an artist Elvis strives to make music that connects with the stories we all carry in our hearts, and he also tries to influence South Africa’s cultural context both in word and deed. He is in the top 20 most followed celebrities on social media and uses this platform to promote his causes, which include 46664, CANSA (Cancer Association of South Africa) and music development in disadvantaged communities. The Regional and Country winner in the Arts and Culture Sector’s newest single Shine, made him the highest ranking South African artist on iTunes in the first week of its launch and remained a top 10 single on every major South African radio station for weeks thereafter.


REGIONALWINNER

From Uganda

Stephen Rwangyezi

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tephen Rwangyezi is the Country and Regional winner in the Arts and Culture sector with an impressive 39 years on his resume. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the performing arts company the Ndere Foundation. There are 148 full-time employees under Stephen’s management and approximately 62,520 people which are a part of his Development Theatre Groups. The Music, Dance and Drama Diploma holder reaches out to the local community by sponsoring the formal education of hundreds of talented but socially disadvantaged children up to professional levels in different fields. He also teaches at primary, secondary and college level. The Uganda Development Theatre Association and Entertainment Education system were both created and managed by Stephen. “A well-developed person is the most important development resource and a well-informed, proud and confident society is the safeguard for democracy, peace and stability,” shares Stephen.

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FINALISTS From Uganda

Pablo Kenneth Kimuli The Arts and Culture finalist, Pablo Kenneth Kimuli is the CEO of Pablo Live Limited. The Mass Media, Journalism and Creative Writing Bachelor’s Degree holder is a theatre practitioner specialising in stand-up comedy, forum theatre, radio drama and play script writing. Pablo won the Stand Up Uganda Mnet Reality TV show in 2009 , the Young Achievers Award in 2013 and he was voted Best Television Personality by the Buzz Teeniez awards in 2008 and 2009.

From DRC

Gervais Ondaye The Festival Lights of Brazza aims to identify, preserve and document local traditional music in Congo. Gervais Ondaye is the Founder and General Director of this inspirational and iconic music entity. He is a finalist in the Arts and Culture sector, which he has been a part of for 20 years. Brazzavile is the first African city to be named a UNESCO creative city due to Gervais’ efforts and initiatives and he has a Certificate in Cultural Tourism.

From Congo Brazzaville

Henri Yombo Henri Yombo is a finalist in the Arts and Culture sector and he is the Managing Director of the Group Yombo Pella. Henri is a cultural promoter, musical event manager and a consultant with 40 years’ experience under his belt. His creativity and innovative thinking have birthed ‘The Night of the Congo’ and the award ‘The Sanzas of Mfoa’ which promote and celebrate local culture and artists’ work. To give back to the community he offers training, workshops and conferences in the arts.

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The

Other Side

Fence by Lydia Bundred

of the

How can two halves of one town with the same ethnic background, climate and region differ like night and day? One half is flourishing and its inhabitants are safer, wealthier and living longer than its neighbour. The separating factor: a fence line. What are the elements in the ‘fence’ that cause such a wide divide between nations of prosperity and poverty, and can they be overcome?

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any theories have been put forward in an attempt to explain why some countries are richer than others. Among those are speculations on population density as a favourable contributor to economic growth and religious affiliations in the establishment of nations. Though some of these can be seen in economically prosperous nations, there are several counter-examples as well. In her thesis, Jeanet Sinding Bentzen, of the Department of Economics at the University of Copenhagen, states that “climate, culture, geography and institutions have a bearing on a countries’ economic state”. This perspective on economic growth holds that certain countries will flourish, depending on their climate and geography. Jeanet also puts emphasis on the culture and institutions that govern the nation. However, in the town of Nogales, the geographical location, climate and cultural background are precisely the same. Only the point of institution remains and it is here where Why Nations Fail makes its case. Nogales is a town that spans two countries: Mexico and the United States of America (USA). Though the two have much in common, their current political and economic statuses differ greatly. Residents in Nogales, Arizona, have an average income of USD30 000, while a few feet across the fence residents in Nogales, Mexico, earn one-third of this amount. One half experiences free elections and health care (even in the poorer regions) and has the advantage of public services such as electricity and proper sewage systems, whereas southern Nogales does not. Daron Acemoglu, MIT economist, and James Robinson, Harvard political scientist, conducted 15 years of research into the dynamics at work in Nogales on either side of the fence in an effort to understand and literally write the book on why nations fail. Their theory on history and institutional influence provides a thought-provoking view on why some nations experience an overflow of prosperity and others do not. Historical Influence The goals and purposes of those who came to the USA and Mexico were spurred by different motives. The Spaniards came to find and take resources home with them, while the colonists came to settle and begin a life on American soil. It is often the resource-rich countries that are plundered and left in poverty, which is known as the ‘resource trap’. To add to the crippling of Mexico’s resources and development, after it achieved independence it still had fifty plus/minus years of instability in its leadership, with presidents rotating on a regular basis. This led to “insecure property rights” and “little ability to raise taxes and provide public services,” write Daron and James. American citizens experienced more stable,

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accountable leadership which sought to create equality among the people. These historical events heavily impacted the economies on both sides of the Nogales fence and played a role in shaping modern-day institutions. As their theory goes – every institution today is a product of history. The Power of Institutions The bottom line: it’s all in the institutions. The major focus is on political institutions and their bearing on economics. According to Daron and James, institutions can be either ‘extractive’ or ‘inclusive’. The former refers to institutions, as the minority, exploiting the majority, and the latter refers to institutions that allow participation by the masses in governing and decision making for the benefit of society as a whole. “Inclusive economic institutions that enforce property rights, create a level playing field, and encourage investments in new technologies and skills are more conducive to economic growth than extractive economic institutions that are structured to extract resources from the many by the few,” they write. “Nations fail today because their extractive economic institutions do not create the incentives needed for people to save, invest and innovate,” write the American authors. Such institutions create a vicious cycle in which only the elite

the 1970s, the “diamond revenues were managed for the good of the nation,” and not the elite only, write the young academics. This protected the country from the ‘resource trap’ which has befallen so many African countries. The diamond revenues were invested in public services and, in doing so, civil wars were avoided and a stable economic foundation was laid. The Theory The economist and political scientist state that, in order for a country to prosper, its political institutions must be in line with an ‘inclusive’ strategy. “Central to our theory is the link between inclusive economic and political institutions and prosperity,” they write. Institutions must connect with, represent and include their people. According to the MIT and Harvard graduates, instead of pouring billions into struggling countries, which will only reinforce the elite, structural changes in political institutions and their operations must be made to create economic growth. Countries that manage the needs of society as a whole will have citizen participation and unity. Inclusive economic institutions that enforce property rights, create a level playing field, and encourage investments in technologies and skills are more conducive to economic growth than institutions that ‘extract resources

“Nations fail today because their extractive economic institutions do not create the incentives needed for people to save, invest and innovate,” write the American authors. benefit and prosper, while the majority are left in poverty with little to no means of bettering their circumstances. Break the Mould: Botswana’s Success Chapter 14, ‘Breaking the Mold’, highlights Botswana as an example of an inclusive institutional society. At independence, “Botswana was one of the poorest countries in the world: it had a total of twelve kilometres of paved roads, twenty-two citizens who had graduated from university and one hundred from secondary school,” yet “over the next forty-five years Botswana would become one of the fastest growing countries in the world,” reads page 410. Botswana was an ideal candidate for forming an ‘extractive’ political institution, yet it transformed its economy and became ‘inclusive’. Why? The authors attribute its success to “inclusive economic and political institutions” as a result of “a history of institutions enshrining limited chieftaincy and some degree of accountability of chiefs to the people”. When diamonds were discovered in Botswana in

from the many by the few’. A brief summary of Daron and James’ theory amounts to this: inclusive institutions support society and are therefore in turn supported, which creates power and prosperity, whereas extractive institutions produce the opposite results. The difference between those on either side of the fence line is then whether the one or the other is built ‘inclusively’ or by ‘extraction’. How Can This Understanding Bring about Change? Change cannot be imposed on nations externally, but it can be encouraged and their citizens can be educated on the issue. By creating awareness, citizens can be empowered to question leaders and rally support around inclusive institutions.

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Automotive and Components Demand for automotive parts is high throughout the continent. Owing to a lack of manufacturing resources and facilities, a large percentage of such parts has to be imported. This African industry is still very much of an assembler rather than a manufacturer of these components. A great deal of development in the manufacturing and engineering sector is required for this sector to move forward.

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mports of automotive components keep this sector afloat. However, at the same time, this does not allow for significant contributions to gross domestic product (GDP). Sustainability and continuity largely depend on the development of manufacturing processes in respect of automotive products and components rather than on remaining stagnant and engaged in purely assembly-type operations. The majority of Africans staffing this sector are men, and, despite the challenges mentioned, they are meeting the high demands across the continent. Men occupy positions at all levels, and have also greatly diversified services and product offerings.

MEIBC

recognises the following men with gratitude for meeting the high expectations of Africans and for growing the sector substantially. We believe you will continue to develop this sector so that it becomes a sustainable contributor to GDP.

2015

From South Africa

Ntuthuko Shezi

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n December 2006, Ntuthuko Shezi, Chief Executive Officer of Scratch Mobile resigned from his job in Management Consulting and decided to start his own business. The Regional and Country winner in the Automotive and Components sector says the primary motivation in going with the type of business he started was his view that economic transformation in South Africa needs to be centred around young, skilled people writing invoices on a daily basis to different types of customers and not relying on solely on government business. A few years later, Ntuthuko employs 28 people at Scratch Mobile where they conduct auto body repairs on vehicles for individuals, fleets, government and companies. The company is growing and aims to have a national presence and more than 12 mobile units by 2015. He says that the day he will achieve success is when the company he created does not need his presence on a daily basis.


COUNTRYWINNER From Namibia

Benjamin Hauwanga Namibia’s Benjamin Hauwanga, Managing Director of BH Spares and Accessories is the country’s winner in the Automotive and Components Sector. He holds a Master’s Degree in Entrepreneurship (honoris causa), International University of Management, Windhoek, Namibia. He believes people development is vital because people are the engines for socio-economic and political development in society. Their spiritual as well as their material wellbeing is the window of growth and sustainable development. Ben is an active and influential member of the Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

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FINALIST From South Africa

J. Robert Houdet Finalist in the Automotive and Components sector J. Robert Houdet is the Executive Director at the National Association of Automotive Component and Allied Manufacturers (NAACAM) as well as the Chairman of the Automotive Industry Export Council. He received Exporter of the Year and Businessman of the Year while working for a family owned company in Reunion Island. Whilst in the employment of PSA Peugeot Citroen, Robert was chosen to represent the company in the following foreign countries: South Africa, Nigeria, Turkey and India.

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From Kenya

Benson Kariuki Kitabu


SUSTAIN ABILITY

From Africa to the World by Andrew Ngozo

From time immemorial – in fact, since the days of colonialism – Africa has been known as an agricultural and mineral hub. In the century or so that has gone by, the continent continues to be regarded as a resource-rich place where any company that seeks to thrive will do well to set up base.

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owever, today, many countries across the African continent are economic powerhouses in their own right. From banking, consumer goods, oil and gas to technology and telecommunications, Africa – once termed the ‘Dark Continent’ of the world – has a lot to offer the world economy. Before we explore some of the industries that have given Africa a real voice in the world, it is prudent to note that the continent is blessed with a hard-working populace, one that is innovative and has not allowed the continent’s history to stand in the way of progress. From an African perspective, one cannot help but see a bright future when examining insights by respected global bodies concerning the continent’s industries. According to McKinsey & Company, a multinational management consulting firm with 105 global offices that conducts qualitative and quantitative analysis in order to evaluate management decisions, agriculture is Africa’s largest economic sector, representing 15% of the continent’s total gross domestic product (GDP) or more

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than USD100 billion annually. It is highly concentrated, with Egypt and Nigeria alone accounting for one-third of total agricultural output and the top 10 countries generating 75%. Say McKinsey’s Kartik Jayaram, Jens Riese and Sunil Sanghvi: “Agriculture generates only 10% of global agricultural output. There is [still] huge potential for growth in a sector that expands moderately, at a rate of 2%-5%.” They point out, however, that the agricultural sector is faced with challenges that inhibit the faster growth of its output. These include underinvestment and enabling conditions. “African agriculture needs business

From banking, consumer goods, oil and gas to technology and telecommunications, Africa – once termed the ‘Dark Continent’ of the world – has a lot to offer the world economy.


SUSTAIN ABILITY

models that can significantly increase the level of investment from the private and public sectors, as well as donors. Transportation and other kinds of infrastructure, stable business and economic conditions, and trained business and scientific talent are some of the basics required in this regard. While many African countries are making great strides in laying the groundwork some are lagging behind,” they note. A Substantial Player For Hilary De Grandis and Gary Pinshaw, Africa’s banking sector has grown rapidly in recent years. According to them, sub-Saharan Africa has become a substantial player in emerging-market banking and can easily compare with other emerging markets, such as Russia. The financial sector is outgrowing GDP in most of the continent’s main markets. For example, between 2000 and 2008, whereas Kenya’s GDP grew by 4.4% annually, its financial sector grew by 8.5%. Nigerian banking reform promoted a swift consolidation from 89 to 25 banks between 2004 and 2006. “This unlocked the sector’s potential and bigger banks with better capabilities could drive down their costs, allowing them to penetrate a larger portion of the unbanked population and to ride on the back of rapid economic growth,” says Hilary, and elaborates that new entrants are also gaining share in countries where governments are allowing private banks to enter. Algeria, for example, has been opening up to private players since 1990. From 1990 to 2006, 12 new private-sector banks entered this market. South Africa’s Capitec Bank leverages a technology-driven, low-cost banking model attractive to formerly unbanked customers. Its business model has four pillars: affordability, accessibility, simplicity, and personal service. The African Consumer on the Rise Africa is a continent on the rise – much in the same way that its citizens have swiftly moved from being ‘beggars’ to becoming masters of their own destiny. According to McKinsey & Company, many consumers have moved from the destitute level of income of less than USD1 000 a year to the basic-needs (USD1 000 to USD5 000) or middle-income (up to USD25 000) levels. Many local and multinational consumer companies are already thriving in Africa and are delivering fine returns to their shareholders. To succeed, however, consumer companies must address some major challenges, some of which are familiar to businesses operating in other emerging markets. These include a heterogeneous market structure, low affordability levels, underdeveloped distribution and route to market, as well as talent shortages, for, despite the abundant work opportunities, talent remains scarce across Africa. Truly competing and winning in the long-term, however, will require local know-how and

talent. At first, companies will need to bridge the gap by using a mix of local and international employees. Local capability-building programmes, attractive career paths, and apprenticeship opportunities will then be critical to achieving long-term success.

It is prudent to note that the continent is blessed with a hard-working populace, one that is innovative and has not allowed the continent’s history to stand in the way of progress. From Voice to Data Telecommunications has been an important driver of Africa’s economic growth in the last decade. The market is increasingly competitive, and world-class local enterprises are emerging in the field of voice and data services. Revenues have increased and profits are made by service providers. On the other hand, investment in telecoms infrastructure has been pegged at about USD15 billion a year and it continues to grow. According to Zakir Gaibi, a principal in McKinsey’s Dubai office, and Andrew Maske, a consultant in the Johannesburg office, annual growth will, however, slow down to the low double digits but remain quite enviable by Western standards as traditional urban markets become saturated. Penetration in major cities such as Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire), Lusaka (Zambia) and Libreville (Gabon) is 70% or more. They note that still up for grabs are two key pockets of growth: data and rural voice. Many will attest to the growth of the former, as there has been a significant uptake and use of mobile data services across Africa. Even the most remote rural places have cellphone coverage and an average person has a quasi-smartphone to browse the Internet! The African mobile-phone market has surpassed the 500-million-subscription mark. According to Andrew and Zakir, about 50% of the growth in voice will come from rural areas, but data services are a large growth pocket that has untold potential to contribute to many markets’ GDP. Social welfare improves as well: many small-boat fishermen in Senegal, for example, now use mobile-data services to select the best ports for unloading their catch each morning, increasing sales by 30%. Applications such as mobile health care will also provide significant benefits, helping governments to stretch thin resources further. “McKinsey’s experience in developing markets indicates that 80% of health care issues can be resolved by mobile phone, at a cost per capita that is 90% lower than that of traditional health care models,” they conclude. Source: www.mckinsey.com

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Building and Construction Sustainable and timeless building and construction are a current focus of the sector. Evolving methods and components are making current construction more environmentally friendly and lasting. As greater collaboration occurs among engineering, architecture, building and various utilities, we see that this industry is moving toward better planning and longevity.

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ell-planned construction has a direct impact on infrastructure development. As we move toward integrated building solutions, planning for future infrastructural demand becomes easier and is top of mind for most occupants of this sector. Inadequate infrastructure remains a common challenge in the development of most economic sectors. Building and construction are, however, moving toward addressing this challenge through more selfsufficient structures which can contribute directly to the productivity of our economies and the wellbeing of our communities.

Leading infrastructure development company, Bigen Africa celebrates the evolutionary thinking of the men in this sector. We anticipate great things from you, thanks to the forward thinking that has consistently been displayed by you.

From South Africa

Willem Jakobus Lategan

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egional and Country winner in the Building and Construction sector Willem Jakobus Lategan has been the Group Managing Director at Calgro M3 Holdings Limited since June 2015. He served as the Financial Director of Calgro M3 since August 2008 and as a Secretary from 2011 to 2013. He is responsible for the company’s previous audits and assisting the current financial director in compiling financial and listing statements, advising management and the board on technical opinions by the auditors. Wikus, as he is affectionately known, gained considerable experience in advising on group structures to ensure operational, tax and compliance optimisation, control, review and implementation thereof, internal management reviews and reports, VAT and PAYE audits. He was also involved in the technical treatment of public companies’ financial statements and setting up of corporate governance and SENS reports. Internal audits, due diligence reviews, foreign audits, tax law and high level consolidations are his forte.


FINALISTS From South Africa

Rory Gallocher Finalist in the Building and Construction sector, Rory Gallocher is the current Chief Executive Officer of the Johannesburg Social Housing Company (JOSCHO). Since his appointment, Rory has been responsible for JOSHCO, the size of the organisation’s active leasing accounts has grown from an initial 717 to 8 280 and revenue collection has peaked at 94% compared with only 18% at the outset. He has lectured at the Wits School for Public and Development Management on subjects such as development and housing legislation.

From South Africa

Stephen Goodburn Nothing gratifies one as much as rising through the ranks of your own organisation and becoming the chief executive officer. Stephen John Michael Goodburn, CEO of WACO International can attest to this reality. He is a finalist in the Building and Construction sector. Stephen is a hands-on leader who sits on all operational executive teams and ensures that internal training commences from the grassroots level right up to executive management level. This has reaped huge successes for WACO International.

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CASE IN POINT

Dr Snowy Khoza, CEO of Bigen Africa

Building a

Legacy

by Lydia Bundred

Many dream of leaving their mark on this world, but few attain that dream. Bigen Africa’s Dr Snowy Khoza has invested her life in creating a better tomorrow through various initiatives and projects. Her perseverance and living for more than herself have been essential in building a legacy for the next generation. Through her involvement as CEO, Bigen Africa has taken massive strides in reaching out to, and developing, the African continent.

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ore often than not, people learn by demonstration, and that is why great leaders often have, or have had, great role models. Growing up, Snowy’s most important role model was her grandmother, who taught her three valuable life lessons. “Her wisdom was unparalleled by any book I have ever read. She taught me mainly three things. Firstly, that ‘the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom’ – meaning there is a greater ‘I am’ up there. As an individual, I cannot be my own. Secondly, that life is a problem-solving process. In our lifetime, we cannot avoid challenges and problems, but we should not become weary. Thirdly, that every action we take has consequences, which means that we should be wise when making decisions. We have to understand that our actions and choices impact others – hopefully for the good – and that is one of the reasons why I find fulfilment in my role at Bigen Africa.”

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CASE IN POINT

Empowering Others Snowy is particularly passionate about increasing female representation in business. She explains: “Bigen Africa values its employees as human collateral and, especially because its core business relies on hardto-find expertise, emphasises their development and the retaining of scarce skills. Transformation is also prioritised and this includes encouraging women to step into and grow in this field.” As a leader, one needs to maximise the capabilities of those around you and under your management. An effective team is only as good as the skills of its members. “At Bigen Africa, individuals are developed through formalised empowerment, training, delegation, mentorship, coaching and succession planning. Our policies ensure that identified people are given opportunities to job-shadow, rotate, choose a career path, attend external conferences and workshops, become thought leaders internally, attend communities of practice, share knowledge through publishing articles, and/or be deployed to projects and countries of choice,” explains Snowy. In 2012 Bigen Africa’s mentorship programme, which is key in transferring valuable knowledge in this field, was awarded Mentoring Company of the Year, and, in 2013, one of its engineers, Kobus Viljoen, won the CESA Mentor of the Year Award. The Passion Snowy’s children have witnessed her struggles and can attest to her strong nature and perseverance. “My children, who include all my God-given children out there, know that, to be a successful person in life, you have to fear God Almighty first and foremost. You also have to work hard, make wise life choices – such as having a clean lifestyle – and help other people along the way as well,” she says. “They, too, will face challenges in life and they need to possess resilience and determination to continue living a fruitful life.” She is passionate about “the development of those who face the same struggles and obstacles, such as debilitating poverty. An important message that I have for all youngsters in South Africa and on the continent, is that education is the key to improving lives and to a better future. I am especially passionate

about furthering the education of young girls and have created a school fund, which aids children and child prisoners in obtaining an education.” The Legacy “Since my appointment in 2010 as the first woman to head the company, Bigen Africa has evolved into a thought-leading multinational infrastructure development consultancy with core capabilities in engineering, management consulting and project finance. Its vision is to develop sustainable infrastructure that will improve the quality of life of all. These projects also provide opportunities for putting the company’s creed of ‘doing good while doing business’ into practice, which involves channelling some of the employment and procurement opportunities to the local communities.” This is the legacy, explains the Agape Christian Women’s Network International President. Indicative of Bigen Africa’s service excellence, the company clinched a number of prestigious awards during the past two years, such as:  PMR Bronze Arrow for Civil Consulting Engineers in SA.  PMR Bronze Arrow for Structural Consulting Engineers in SA.  PMR Combined Award for Civil and Structural Engineers in SA.  SA Top 2 Best Managed Engineering Consultancies.  SA Top 500 Best Managed Engineering Consultancies.  Impumelelo Award for Top Empowerment Company.  PMR Gold Award for Top 9 Structural Engineers in SA.  PMR Bronze Award for Top 9 Civil Consulting Engineers in SA.  PMR Bronze Award for Top 4 Structural and Engineering Consultancy.  Govan Mbeki Housing Award for the Klarinet and Second Creek Housing Projects.

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There is no one-size-fits-all view of Africa, yet the media has traditionally lumped together the whole of a huge and varied continent. As a result, the view of Africa has been quite onedimensional and, in most cases, improperly portrayed in local and global media. From colonial times, Africa was portrayed as the ‘dark continent’. This culminated in Africa’s identity being defined by a default colour and, according to some analysts and experts, made Africans spectators in their own game waiting for the West to come and remedy one situation or the other. However, things are changing and developing, as there is nowadays a more multidimensional view of a rich and varied part of the world.

The Varied

by Andrew Ngozo

PERCEPTIONS

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udanese-born Zeinab Badawi grew up in the United Kingdom. Now a presenter on an international news channel, Zeinab says there are many factors that drive the multidimensional view. “For a start, Africans in the diaspora are much more prominent these days. In particular, Africans in the global media, with links to the continent, are keen to drive more realistic coverage. Non-governmental organisations have always played a major role in shaping perceptions of Africa and, recently, have become much more locally engaged. They are listening to, and being influenced by, their local staff. African governments are becoming more transparent,

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of Africa

more democratic and, increasingly, they are making themselves available to the global media. They want to show that, in essence, there is more to Africa than coups, wars and famines. Lastly, with the proliferation of technology, the Internet is driving global conversations, and people are reading, and seeing, first-hand what is happening on the continent,” she says. Africa Is Open for Business Investors are flocking to Africa to do business. This is likely to augur well for the continent as it slowly emerges as a region that can be self-sufficient by virtue of locals


SUSTAIN ABILITY

For instance, businesspeople like Mo Ibrahim have been very instrumental in changing views by saying: “Come to Africa, we’re open for business. We’re not talking about charity here. You can make real money in Africa.”

exploiting the vast natural resources, and as a continent that is calling the world to it for business. For instance, businesspeople like Mo Ibrahim have been very instrumental in changing views by saying: “Come to Africa, we’re open for business. We’re not talking about charity here. You can make real money in Africa.” With regard to the media, there are pan-African media outlets that are getting off the ground and, eventually, they will be huge global media providers. Africa is a very fertile market for the English-speaking media, for it is a very vibrant and colourful continent that provides great coverage for the global news media. However, says Zeinab, one must be aware that, while there are high rates of growth, there are still a huge number of the world’s poor and disenfranchised on the continent. “Nonetheless, there is a new-found confidence among Africans on the continent. They know that it’s the place to be, the youngest continent in the world, and it is thriving. Personally, I feel that the West may be tired, and not everyone wants to flee there. In short, the tables are starting to turn slightly. Africa is like every other place; some bits are good, some bits are bad. But the bad is receding more and more, and the good parts are on the rise.” Africa in the Near Future For Kingsley Amoako, president of the African Centre for Economic Transformation (ACET), in an article titled ‘Africa 20 Years from Now’ in The Quarterly: The Africa Edition, the current scenario is just the tipping point for the continent, because future projections, across spectrums, look quite positive. “But it all depends on whether the reforms of recent years can be sustained and if governance continues to improve. Over the last 10-15 years, there have been some very important macro-economic reforms. We have also seen significant progress on governance issues, with more accountable governments and the rise of civil society,” he believes. According to him, whether one looks at the media or otherwise, the key issue

that will plague Africa is to deal with the vulnerabilities that have traditionally beleaguered African economies. “African nations need strong transformation agendas. This means moving away from low-productivity agriculture to higher-productivity manufacturing and services. They need to develop competitive exports, make better use of technology, and secure greater regional and economic integration. If one looks at the Asian economies that have done so well – such as South Korea, Thailand, Malaysia – they all had a strong vision of where they wanted to get to. Then they worked towards those visions. If they did it, so can we!” Although the future looks somewhat bright, there are significant challenges that still loom on the horizon. Says Kingsley: “Inequality is potentially a major threat. In most cases, growth has not been inclusive enough. Rapidly growing populations, and the related issue of youth unemployment, present a huge challenge for African governments. More than ten million people are being added to the labour force in Africa every year, but already people cannot find jobs. Tying growth to job creation is critical. African policymakers have to ensure that education and training match up with the needs of the economy, so that students coming out of college have the skills that will allow them to find jobs.” On the economic front, matters are improving, as there is more intra-African trade, but the growth is not fast enough and there are still too many obstacles, concludes Kingsley. “African nations cannot be competitive on any front unless the critical issue of integration is addressed. Uniting the continent will require concerted political and economic efforts. The good news, however, is that the African Union is now striving to boost the integration process, but there is a need to move from mere rhetoric to clear action. Africa has all these institutions for integration, but there has been too much fragmentation and the capacity of these institutions has been weak. And then, of course, it is every African’s wish to see an aid-free Africa that holds its own in the world!”

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Business and Professional Services The people staffing the business and professional services sector have invested many resources in order to be in this tertiary sector of our economy. Africa is unique in that most qualified professionals are equipped not with only one skill but with multiple skills. As a result, Africans are in high demand as workers across the globe.

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frica has lost many professionals to the ‘brain drain’, as many think that pastures are greener elsewhere. Those professionals who have remained on African soil are major contributors to our economies. They offer specialised services to businesses and individuals, playing an integral advisory role in legal and other specialised fields. The business and professional services sector is occupied by men at all levels. However, men are mostly to be found in the toptier positions. Accessibility of these services to all is an immediate aim of the sector.

To the following men who have so much invested in this field, Parinama applauds your endeavours. Your sacrifices have had long-term benefits for many and have not gone unnoticed.

From Congo Brazzaville

Paul Kampakol Obana

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aul Kampakol Obana is Secretary General of the Youth Entrepreneurs forum of Congo, which acts as a platform for up-coming leaders to present ideas around economic growth and sustainable practices. He has been in the sector for 25 years and is the Country and Regional winner in the Business and Professional Services sector. Paul has been Advisor to the Minister of Small and Medium Enterprises and from 2000 to 2013, he was Secretary General of the Professional Association. He has a Diploma of Superior Studies in the study and development of Project Evaluation, a Degree in Commercial Action and he is a Patent Technician. Paul is a strong advocate for entrepreneurs and has been building the entrepreneurial spirit in Congo for years. “Collective learning helps to anchor a new practice for everyone. I encourage teamwork that knowledge is shared to become property of the structure rather than individual,” says Paul.


REGIONALWINNER

From South Africa

Wouter Snyman

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y self-confessed title is that of serial entrepreneur,” says Wouter Snyman, CEO and founder of the atooh! Group of Companies. “Our country needs entrepreneurs more than anything else. I have founded and started more than 15 companies, in the past 15 years, most of which are now run by individuals who were once employed by me.” Wouter recently appointed professional life and business coaches for staff development. He produces a monthly newsletter, with ebooks and workbooks, focusing on the company’s core purpose, ‘Helping ordinary people become millionaires and millionaires become finanically independent.’ The atooh! Group of Companies delivers tailor-made financial planning solutions to individuals and corporate companies, ranging from healthcare, risk, wealth and employee wellness. Wouter’s professional achievements include, among others; being appointed No 1 Health Advisor Group in 2011, and appointed No 1 National Advisor Group within Discovery for 2013/2014. Wouter is involved with various social responsibility initiatives, among them feeding schemes, fundraising initiatives, and pro bono talks to schools and businesses.

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COUNTRYWINNERS From Swaziland

Alex NK Fakudze Being awarded private, public and NGO contracts is a sure sign that Faze in Advertising is on the right path. Founder and managing director Alex NK Fakudze says, “A happy, empowered, developed work force translates to an enterprise meeting its strategic objectives.” The company is the most recognisable all-round marketing solutions entity in Swaziland. A career highlight is an assignment to document and graphically package the 40 year old diplomatic ties between the Kingdom of Swaziland and the Republic of China (Taiwan), and the branding of Swaziland’s new International Airport.

From Lesotho

Lerata Pekane New Dawn Chartered Accountants was started three years ago with two employees, one office and zero capital. It has grown to 20 staff, and to three locations. “We recruit well, train well, and send them off as ambassadors to the industries,” says Lerata Pekane, one of the audit firm’s two partners. New Dawn Chartered Accountants actively develops the profession in Lesotho. Among the firm’s accolades is becoming Corporate INTL Global Awards Winner 2014 (boutique accountancy firm in Lesotho). Lerata is a patron of “I am the Change Agent” campaign.

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FINALISTS From South Africa

Albert Geldenhuys Professional engineer Albert Geldenhuys is managing director of Aurecon South Africa, and manages about 2900 people. He started his career with a cum laude for a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering. A fellow of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE), Albert is an advisory committee member for the Department of Civil Engineering of CPUT and UCT. He is a passionate advocate of bursary schemes and is a board and council member of Consulting Engineers South Africa (CESA). Albert lectures to final year engineering students at the University of Stellenbosch. He is an external moderator for Project Management and/or Professional Practice subjects.

From South Africa

Victor Sekese Victor Sekese is chief executive and one of the founders of SizweNtsabulaGobodo (SNG), the fifth largest accounting firm in South Africa and an African audit and advisory services firm. Victor is vice-chairperson of the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants. He established international links for SNG, making it a global player. “Being a services firm, people are central to the success of the firm,” says Victor. In 2012, he founded the SNG Corporate Academy, to develop talent. SNG has been recognised both locally and internationally and has grown its revenue by 50% since 2011, in a tough trading environment.

From Mauritius

Yuvraj Thacoor Yuvraj Thacoor has been an accountant since 1976 and is currently a Managing Partner at Grant Thornton Mozambique. He was with Deloitte Haskins and Sells for two years as well as Coopers & Lybrand Deloitte and PricewaterhouseCoopers. He is a Member of The British Institute of Management and an Associate of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators. In his role with the firm he oversees the day-to-day operations and ensures that all work meets the firm’s high standards.

From Kenya

Patrick Wanambisi Patrick Wanambisi has been in the Business and Professional Services sector for more than ten years and he is the CEO of Excellent Operations Consultants Ltd. EOC provides assistance to organisations in streamlining processes to become more efficient and implementing best practices, among others. Patrick has a Bachelor of Technology, an MBA and is currently perusing his PhD in Entrepreneurship. In his capacity he ensures that staff continually grow and develop through training programmes and workshops.


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Retirement: “To be or not to be…?” by Lydia Bundred

The biggest factor when considering retirement as a possibility is financial security. For those who draw state and other pensions, the burden is increasingly on young workers to sustain pension funds. With people living longer and the retiree-to-worker ratio slowly becoming greater as the number of retirees increases, many countries are upping the retirement age and lifting compulsory retirement-age limits to compensate. By planning ahead, there are ways to ensure that retirement can become a reality and that your golden years are comfortable.

In Today’s Day and Your Age The Basic Conditions of Employment Act of South Africa does not prescribe a mandatory retirement age, and, for the most part, it has been left up to companies to reach an agreement with their employees. The average actual retirement age for South Africans is 60, at which age citizens qualify for a state pension. In the USA, citizens can start receiving a portion of their retirement funds from 62 and are eligible for full retirement funds from the ages of 65 to

Timing, Timing, Timing “It is crucial to start saving for retirement as early as possible,” says Universal Financial Management Advisory Services’ Stefanie Bekker. For someone in their 20s who starts saving 15% of their monthly earnings over a period of 40 years, they will have saved enough for retirement by the time they are in their 60s. “Statistics show that 51% of South Africa’s pensioners can’t make ends meet and that a third of them do not have enough to cover medical ex-

According to Discovery Health, 90% of South Africans are spending more than they earn and 33% of retirees are still in debt. 67. In Australia, to qualify for a state pension, citizens must be at least 65 years of age. However, in 2017, the retirement age will increase to 65.5 years, and, in 2023, to 67 years. In the UK, the retirement age of 65 is no longer the standard, as people can now retire when they choose or in accordance with justifiable age restrictions set by employers. Citizens can qualify for a state pension anywhere from 61 to 68 years of age, depending on gender and year of birth.

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penses, which is the second-biggest expense for pensioners,” explains Stefanie. According to FNB, studies show that only 9% of South Africans are adequately prepared for retirement and have made preparations for their future health-care needs. According to the US National Institute on Retirement Security, 45% of working households have no retirement savings in place and those aged 55 to 60 have saved only


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

USD100 000, which is far from adequate to sustain 20 to 30 years of expenses. Most Americans start planning for their retirement in their 50s, whereas they should be preparing for this in their 20s. In comparison, 40% of UK households have sought professional advice on creating personal retirement funds and 60% felt that they were adequately prepared for the future, according to an HSBC survey conducted in 2013. Good Retirement-savings Practices Many people do not save or invest adequately for their retirement because of a lack of knowledge. Be informed; contact a financial adviser to assist you in choosing a plan that suits your needs. According to Discovery Health, 90% of South Africans are spending more than they earn and 33% of retirees are still in debt. Budgets are a great way to ensure that you do not exceed your means, while still saving and allowing for spending. “A rough rule of thumb is that you need 15 times your current annual salary to retire on (if you retire at 65), but it is of the utmost importance that you obtain advice from a qualified financial adviser who can take your personal circumstances into consideration. After 10 years of working, you need to have saved 2 times your

annual salary, after 20 years 4 times and after 40 years this figure should be 12 times your annual salary,” explains Stefanie. When/if you change jobs, do not cash in your retirement funds, because this will set you back. “Once you have started saving for retirement, it is essential not to withdraw your accumulated retirement savings before retirement. The act of withdrawing and spending retirement savings before normal retirement age is the single-biggest culprit for so many South Africans retiring in poverty,” emphasises Stefanie. Depending on your county’s policy regarding retirement, relying on a government or state pension may not be the answer. For those wanting to set their own retirement deadlines, personal funds and investments seem a sure way to fulfil your plans. Countries with the lowest retirement age: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Turkey: 45 Greece: 57 Bolivia: 58 Italy: 59, but rising to 65 by 2030 India: 60

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Chemical, Pharmaceutical and Petrochemical Many sectors of our economy rely on the chemical and petrochemical sectors. With ongoing questions of sustainability being the order of the day, these sectors are subject to continuous scrutiny. Men remain the pioneers in these sectors and are prominent in the top positions. Although women play an important role in this sector, gender equality remains to be achieved, but reforms in this regard are becoming a priority.

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he pharmaceutical sector is also an important sector for the wellbeing of our most important resource, our people. The recent Ebola crisis has shown how much we rely on this sector for the treatment of illnesses. Men and women occupy various positions in the sector, which displays more gender parity than other sectors. The pharmaceutical field continues to progress rapidly, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where testing and development are common.

CEO Global recognises the influence that the following men have had on the sectors mentioned. Well done on your achievements – we encourage you to continue taking our continent forward.

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

From Uganda

Emmanuel Katongole

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mmanuel Katongole is the Executive Chairman of Cipla Quality Chemical Industries Ltd. He oversees 500 staff and has been in the sector for 18 years. This year he has been awarded the Country and Regional award within the Chemical, Pharmaceutical and Petrochemical sector. Emmanuel has a Master of Arts Degree in Economic Policy and Planning and a Bachelor of Statistics degree from the Makerere University. He was a finalist for the East Africa Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year award in 2011 and the Africa Business Leadership Award hosted by the Africa Development Bank in 2012. As the leading pharmaceutical manufacturers in East Africa, Emmanuel ensures that his team is well equipped through continuous training. For his exemplary role in the sector in 2013 he was the East African Winner and representative at the Ernst and Young world Entrepreneur of the year awards in Monte Carlo-Monaco.


REGIONALWINNER

From South Africa

Shepherd Shonhiwa

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hepherd Shonhiwa is a man of many achievements; he has authored and published two books, launched Sportsday, the first sports daily newspaper in SA and he was President of Employers Confederation of Zimbabwe. He also established the first 37 Mc Donald’s restaurants in South Africa from 1995 – 1997, which included training and recruiting staff, managers and franchisees. Today he is the Managing Director of Egoli Gas (Pty) Ltd, a distributor of natural gas based in Johannesburg. Shepherd supports the South Africa Gas Association through training initiatives and by speaking at their events. He believes in uplifting those around him and so he coaches young executives and built a church for his local community. The MBA holder’s goal is to “establish and grow my own business enterprise across the subregion, while contributing my skills to the development of the economies and societies of Africa.”

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COUNTRYWINNER From Namibia

Corné van Schalkwyk Corné van Schalkwyk is the Director of Bachmus Property One Pty (Ltd), the company under which all his acquired properties are registered, and Bachmus Oil and Fuel Supplies Pty (Ltd). The latter won Chevron South Africa Top Distributor, four years running and is one of the largest fuel suppliers in Namibia. Both have significantly increased in value under Corné’s direction. He is also a member of Namibia Fuel Distributors CC, a business that has increased their truck ownership from one to six trucks in just three years.

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COUNTRYWINNER


SUSTAIN ABILITY

Printing Is Revolutionising Health Care by Andrew Ngozo

3-D printing is ushering in a new era in personalised medicine. From prosthetics to teeth to heart valves, it’s bringing made-to-order, customised solutions into operating rooms and doctors’ offices. Experts say dozens of hospitals across the world are now experimenting with 3-D printers, while researchers work on more futuristic applications of the technology: printing human tissue and organs.

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n an African or South African context, the Vaal University of Technology (VUT) boasts the only 3-D printer in the Southern Hemisphere. Worth R12 million, the machine allows the creation of a mould from a 3-D drawing. It can be used to manufacture soft-body tissue for individuals who have been injured in accidents. This is a huge leap forward in health care, for it brings about savings when compared with plastic surgery, which is often expensive. So, imagine an ink jet printer that, rather than spraying out ink in the shape of letters, sprays out a plastic or metal gel or powder in the shape of a tooth, finger or a hip joint. A typical printer receives a document to print, while 3-D printers take their commands from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or a computed tomography (CT) scan of a body part. Also known as ‘additive manufacturing’, 3-D printing produces an object, layer by layer, from the ground up. Although 3-D printers have been around since the 1980s, medical uses have skyrocketed in the past

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few years, experts say. These printers can produce more complex shapes than traditional manufacturing. This allows the products to be highly personalised: a tooth that looks just like the one you lost or an exact replica of a hip joint. The process can save time and practically bring production of medical devices to the patient’s bedside. Teeth, Limbs, and Hearing Aids 3-D printing is already widely used for body parts – usually made of plastic or metal – that come in contact with the body but don’t enter the bloodstream. These include teeth, hearing-aid shells and prosthetic limbs. “In the past, a dental crown had to be fabricated in a lab, which takes a few days, if not a few weeks, and two to three trips to the dentist by the patient,” says Chuck Zhang, a professor of industrial and systems engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Now a dentist can take a 3-D scan of a tooth and print the crown on the spot! He elaborates that this technique gives amputees an alternative to ugly


SUSTAIN ABILITY

and ill-fitting prosthetics. Zhang and his colleagues at Georgia Tech, he reveals, are working with American military veteran amputees to correct the notoriously poor fit of their prosthetics. His team is using 3-D-printed materials to create a prosthetic socket that adapts to the body’s changing fluid levels. It will tighten or loosen as needed so the limb doesn’t fall off or become painfully uncomfortable. Implantable Devices 3-D-printed plastics and metals have also made their way inside the body. Doctors at the University of Michigan’s Mott Children’s Hospital have saved the lives of two babies since 2012 by implanting 3-D-printed plastic splints into their windpipes. The babies had a rare birth defect called tracheobronchomalacia. Without treatment, their weak airways would have collapsed, thus suffocating them. The only treatment is to insert a tracheostomy tube and put the baby on a ventilator for up to several years until, hopefully, the airways become strong enough to stay open on their own. According to Zhang, the 17-month-old baby’s airways were not showing any signs of getting stronger while on the ventilator. Doctors in Utah, where the family lives, said they had done all they could. “Everything had to be perfect in the world. The baby couldn’t cry, or he’d turn blue. He couldn’t poop, or he’d turn blue. They just had to hold him and keep him perfectly happy, so it wasn’t realistic to keep him on the ventilator.” This went on until the baby’s parents read an article about a similar baby helped at the university in 2012 with a 3-D-printed tracheal splint, and they sought the help of Dr Glenn Green of the University of Michigan’s Mott Children’s Hospital.

It can be used to manufacture softbody tissue for individuals who have been injured in accidents. This is a huge leap forward in health care, for it brings about savings when compared with plastic surgery, which is often expensive.

Baby Steps in the Right Direction “It was decided that this was Garrett’s only chance and, based on CT scans of the baby’s airways, Green and a biomedical engineering professor designed and printed custom-fit splints to hold his airways open. His body will eventually absorb the device, and the airways will stay open on their own. Mott Children’s Hospital says it was the first facility in the world to perform this procedure,” says Zhang. It was the first example of using a 3-D-printed device in a life-or-death situation. Costs for a tracheostomy and extended time on a ventilator exceed USD1 million per patient and the splint totalled USD200 000 to USD300 000. The costs were reduced by at least two-thirds, says Zhang. Since then, surgeons have implanted other 3-D-printed devices into patients. He says: “Cranial plugs fill holes made in the skull for brain surgery. Cranial plates can replace large sections of the skull lost to head trauma or cancer. Many hospitals in the USA offer 3-D-printed hip and knee replacements to eligible patients. The custom joints minimise surgery and recovery time, as surgeons do not have to chisel away at bone to put them in.” Adam Clark, the founder of Tangible Solutions (www.tangiblesolutions3d.com), a consultancy and provider of Additive Manufacturing & Engineering Design Services, adds: “We are seeing Additive Manufacturing being used more and more for customisation of replacement hips, knees, and spines. The ability to scan body parts, or take data from X-rays, has allowed doctors to recreate body parts for replacement. We have also seen a case where doctors used 3D printing of a baby boy’s heart. He had a congenital heart defect, and was saved when his surgeons made use of a 3D-printed heart. Not, however, an organ 3D printed from tissue, but a model of the heart that allowed a team of surgeons to review and practice before the main event.” Closer to home, in 2014, media reports stated that two South Africans had the second and third 3-D jaws ever printed. They were suffering from facial disfigurations after battling cancer. The procedures were done by Dr Cules van den Heever, who is well known in the field and has extensive experience in implanting prosthetic jaws. Although not as extensive as the breakthroughs made in the USA, these procedures are indeed baby steps in the right direction. Additional source: www.3dprint.com

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Education and Training: Academic Academic education and training have for the most part been linked to formal educational and training institutions. Although such institutions are doing commendable work, they remain inaccessible to many, which poses a major challenge for those working in this sector. Men are in the minority in the sector, but their contributions are no less valuable.

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lthough men are not prominent in the sector, those who do occupy it are making a major difference to formal education and training. With the standardisation and greater accessibility of education being priorities, academics are showing that they are taking steps in the right direction. Resources such as textbooks and other reading material are still very much part of African schools, whereas many other continents have moved toward digital materials. This is an example of an area in which Africa will need to catch up.

Although there are challenges in the sector, we have the following men to thank for the steps being taken in order to ensure that education is accessible for all. CEO Global praises these Titans not only for their persistence, but also for their noteworthy contributions.

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

From Benin

Valère Kakaï

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n 1992 Valère Kakaï founded a university in Benin, which is today recognised as an International Polytechnic University, and named after President Obiang Nguema Mbasogo. A regional finalist in the Education and Training: Academic category, Valère is committed to education and to creating opportunities for employment. Valère’s ideal was that everyone could access higher education. He created the Order of African Schools and Universities under French law (ORAGEU) in Paris. President Obiang Nguema Mbasogo was among the main donors. “The objective was to offer over 100 000 grants called Training for All - to enable African students wishing to enroll,” says Valère. He initiated a project ‘Employment for All’ providing scholarships to students who were unable to gain access to higher education. Valère is also active in community upliftment projects. He created a NGO, Youth Action Conscience to help young people, widows, orphans and prisoners and as honorary president of NGO Sedufa, he supports the advancement of women.


REGIONALWINNER

From South Africa

Prof. Albertus Johannes Strydom

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t Central University of Technology (CUT) we believe that people are one of the four strategic pillars for success. The other three are planning, products and pennies (finances),” says Professor Strydom, dean of the Faculty of Management. He participates in partnerships with government, business and industry to improve the socio-economic conditions of people. The university has set itself a target date of 2020 to produce quality social and technological innovations in socioeconomic developments, primarily in the Central region of South Africa. With a PhD in Economics, Professor Strydom was appointed by the Free State MEC for Economic Affairs and Tourism to restructure tourism in the province. Professor Strydom develops partnerships locally and overseas; aimed at developing skills related to tourism, accounting, and applied sciences. Professor Strydom has played a key role in establishing several projects which generate third stream income for the faculty. One such project; the Strongbow Europe capacity building project in Ethiopia is valued at almost 4 million euro’s.

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EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

Education – Then and Now: The Pros and Cons by Andrew Ngozo

From teaching mathematics in Ghana to built educational technology in Uganda and observed technology use in townships in South Africa, Kentaro Toyama, WK Kellogg Associate Professor at the University of Michigan, former lecturer at Ghana’s Ashesi University, and author of Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology, believes that, if anyone has ever looked over the shoulder of a child with a smartphone, they will see someone who is not using educational apps but playing video games.

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he reality, he explains, is that digital tools in education require a lot of effort to use well. “This is effort from students, parents, educators and administrators. Indeed, more often than not, these gadgets are a distraction and not an aid to learning. As such I am of the opinion that the older generation had it much better. They could learn without ‘blingy’ graphics and cognitive candy to detract from a nutritious education,” says Professor Toyama. Granted, every parent in the developing world, and anywhere on the planet, wants a good education for their offspring. However, it is common knowledge that good education is neither easy nor cheap to get. With information and communications technologies abounding, one may then argue that a good education is surely but a click away. Professor Toyama differs: “There are no technology shortcuts to good education. For underperforming primary and secondary schools or those with limited resources, efforts to improve education should focus, almost exclusively, on better teachers and stronger administrations. Information technology, if used at all, should be targeted for certain, specific uses or limited to well-funded schools whose fundamentals are not in question,” he argues.

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EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

To back these assertions, there are four different lines of evidence that it is incredibly difficult to have a positive educational impact with computers – including the fact that the history of electronic technologies in schools is fraught with failures, that computers are no exception, and that rigorous studies have shown this. Technology, at best, only amplifies the pedagogical capacity of educational systems; it can make good schools better, but it makes bad schools worse. Moreover, technology has a huge opportunity cost in the form of more effective, nontechnology interventions and many good school systems excel without much technology. “The inescapable conclusion, then, is that significant investments in computers, mobile phones, and other electronic gadgets in education are neither necessary nor warranted for most school systems,” Professor Toyama contends. In particular, the attempt to use technology to fix underperforming classrooms (or to replace non-existent ones) is futile. And, for all but wealthy and well-run schools, one-to-one computer programmes cannot be recommended as a good method. A number of reasons can be cited to explain why technology is not a substitute for good teaching. According to Professor Toyama, quality primary and secondary education is a multiyear commitment “whose single bottleneck is the sustained motivation of the student to climb an intellectual Everest”. Though children are naturally curious, they nevertheless require ongoing guidance and encouragement to persevere in the ascent. Caring supervision from human teachers, parents and mentors is the only known way of generating motivation for the hours of a school day, not to mention 8 to 12 school years. While computers may appear to engage students, which is exactly their appeal, the engagement swings between uselessly fleeting at best and addictively distractive at worst. Therefore, he says, no technology, today or in the foreseeable future, can provide the tailored attention, encouragement, inspiration, or even the occasional scolding, for students that dedicated adults can, and attempts to use technology as a stand-in for capable instruction are thus bound to fail.

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EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

When Technology in Education Is Justified In order to avoid any misunderstanding, it should be clarified that some uses of computers in education can be justified, although with the ever-applicable caution that, while technology can augment good schools, it hurts poor schools, notes Professor Toyama. Firstly, in those cases where directed student motivation is assured, technology may lessen the burden of teaching. Some cases of tertiary or adult education may fall into this category. Secondly, targeted use of computers in schools, for example as an aid to teach computer literacy, computer programming or video editing, etc., are important as long as those uses are incorporated only as a small part of a well-rounded curriculum. Thirdly, technology can help with the administration of schools – recordkeeping, monitoring, evaluation, etc. – as long as the school system is able to fully support the technology. In richer environments, where the cost of educated labour is relatively

high, careful use of well-designed software may have value in fundamental education, particularly for remedial or drilling purposes. Lastly, concludes Professor Toyama, again in rich environments, where the basics of education are assured, where teachers are facile with technology, and where budgets are unconstrained, widespread use of technology, even in a one-to-one format, might benefit students. However, certain uses of computers enhance computer literacy and writing skills, but these outcomes are limited to well-run, well-funded schools; such outcomes are notably absent in underperforming schools, even in more progressive nations of the world. “I must emphasise that the last two cases are specific to very wealthy, well-run school systems and that none of the positive instances pertain to underperforming schools or to broad dissemination of technology to students.”

Some Myths about Technology in Education Below are some frequently heard sound bites extolling technology in schools. The reality is that they are mere rhetoric. • Twenty-first century skills require 21st-century technologies. The modern world uses email, PowerPoint, and filing systems. Computers teach you those skills. • Technology X allows interactive, adaptive, constructivist, student-centred learning. The reality is all of that may be true, but, without directed motivation of the student, no sustained learning actually happens, with or without technology. • It’s still easier for teachers to arouse interest with technology X than with textbooks. Maybe a little bit at first. But, the novelty factor of most technologies quickly wears off, and those which don’t tend to turn viewers into zombies rather than engaged learners. • Teachers are expensive. It’s exactly because teachers are absent or poorly trained that lowcost technology is a good alternative. The reality is that low-cost technologies are not so low-cost when total cost of ownership is taken into account and put in the economic context of low-income schools. Furthermore, technology cannot fix broken educational systems. If teachers are absent or poorly trained, the only proper solution is to invest in better teachers, better training, and better administration – even if it’s expensive.

Kentaro Toyama, WK Kellogg Associate Professor at the University of Michigan and author of Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology


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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Education and Training: Private Private education and training aim to support the academic sector by bridging the gaps and by being available to students of all ages. This spirit of inclusion has developed and empowered many to undertake various ventures that have created opportunities within their communities. Men are more prominent in this field than in the academic sector, but women still predominate.

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he private sector has the advantage of not being bound to formal institutions and can accordingly be more flexible in terms of where and how information is shared. Moreover, skills and knowledge transfer is the priority of the sector, with such transfer not being limited to a particular level of education or sector of our economy. This diversity and flexibility have played an important part in uplifting our communities to a level of self-sustainability. This sector not only recognises that people can continuously learn and grow, but it also serves those who aspire to greater heights.

Sizwe IT Group lauds the

following men for the development of our communities. Future generations have much to aspire to, thanks to you.

From Congo Brazzaville

Prof. Roger Makany

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rof Roger Armand Makany believes that in order for an organisation to function at full capacity it must include its staff in its operations. By motivating and keeping employees involved and aware of the university’s goals and vision, he has created a motivated team. Upper School Management and Business Administration was founded in 1993, the institution provides top quality training to management professionals and has over 100 administrative and teaching staff members, which Roger oversees and directs. The university is ranked among the 1,000 best schools and universities in the world. Professor Roger is the Owner and CEO of the Upper School Management and Business Administration and he is a Regional and Country winner in the Private Education and Training sector. Roger has received many awards in his career including; a Higher Distinction from The State Government, Ambassador for Peace award and a Diploma of Honour from the Minister of Justice, to list but a few of his many achievements.


REGIONALWINNER

From Namibia

Rowan van Dyk

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espite a busy schedule, Rowan van Dyk, managing member of DNL Training, is currently completing a doctorate in business management. DNL Training was established 15 years ago and recently expanded to Namibia. The company develops NQF aligned learning materials for SMME’s and other providers within all SETA’s, but mostly for WRSETA. Rowan is involved with WRSETA by helping companies draft, and submit their training needs and assisting smaller providers in becoming accredited. He is a past founding member of ASDFSA, and a verifier and auditor for FoodBev Seta. A qualified assessor and moderator, Rowan consults to leading companies. He is an internal moderator for the Foschini Group, Shoprite, Checkers and Woolworths, and developed an IDP for Sea Harvest. Aside from his professional commitments, Rowan conducts New Venture Creation training for unemployed people to assist them in starting their own businesses. He also mentors smaller providers from under-priviledged communities.

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COUNTRYWINNER From South Africa

Dr. Gerhard van Rensburg Dr. Gerhard van Rensburg, owner of New Era Leadership teaches and leadership. “People development is my passion and focus,� says Dr. van Rensburg. He serves organisations and executives through leadership seminars, assessments, the 32 leadership principles online programme, individual coaching, group sessions, workshops and inspirational talks. Dr. van Rensburg has been recognised by Motivational Press and PDA Africa as a thought leader. His work is endorsed by people such as Archbishop Desmond Tutu (who wrote the foreword to his book The Leadership Challenge in Africa), and Prof. Bennie Andersen of The Da Vinci Institute.

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FINALIST From Namibia

Clemence Chiduwa A master’s degree in Economics is a sound foundation for the work that Clemence Chiduwa does as CEO and programmes director of the Institute for Capacity Development (ICD). His expertise has been widely recognised. The ICD works in partnership with the United Nations to provide training in Supply Chain Management . The ICD provides short courses; focusing on development and does development oriented consultancy projects. Clemence was chosen by the African Union to be on panel of experts on land issues in Africa.

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SKILLSTRANSFER

‘Africa Don’t Need Although Africa has improved access to primary education significantly in the last few decades, too many children on the continent are still facing educational environments that are unacceptable.

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generation ago, access to primary school in Africa and the chance to learn how to read, write and work with numbers were something of a luxury. In 1998, only 58% of children in Africa enrolled for primary school. Thankfully, the tide of despair and illiteracy has shifted in the last few decades. Significant strides – but not yet success – have been made in achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of ensuring universal primary education. In 2008, 76% of African children were able to enrol in primary schools, with the number continuing to climb. In South Africa, around 99% of children enrol for primary school and 95% of them make it past Grade 6. However, challenges persist. In some African countries – despite progress – enrolment levels are unacceptably low and dropout rates are too high. Even in countries that are able to get their children to school, and keep them there, learning isn’t a forgone conclusion, according to research

South Africa seems to be doing well when it comes to getting children to enrol in school, and it is having some success in keeping them in primary school, but the challenge seems to be in getting learning to take place. conducted at Stellenbosch University by Dr Nicholas Spaull and Dr Stephen Taylor. Of the 95% of South African children who complete Grade 6, only 73% were found to be literate, while only 60% were found to be numerate. South Africa seems to be doing well when it comes to getting children to enrol in school, and it is having some


SKILLSTRANSFER

No Broken Education’ by Leigh Schaller

success in keeping them in primary school, but the challenge seems to be in getting learning to take place once the children are in schools. The study found that South Africa is not alone in its struggle to ensure quality education. In Zambia, 56% of children who complete Grade 6 are literate, while only a third pass numeracy tests. Tanzania experiences a different problem. Fifteen percent of its children never start primary school and a further 11% drop out before reaching Grade 6. However, those who remain tend to learn something, with 97% of them being literate and 87% numerate. Swaziland achieves near universal access, with 98% of its children going to school. Sadly, 11% of children drop out before finishing Grade 6, and 1% of those who finish Grade 6 are functionally illiterate and 8% are functionally innumerate. The progress made towards achieving the MDG is a good start, according to Graeme Bloch, an education specialist, but we still have a long way to go. Graeme believes, though, that we should keep in mind the low base that South Africa is working from. “Verwoerd didn’t want black children to learn maths. And look now.” To its credit, the South African government has ploughed money into improving this low base by spending more than 6% of its gross domestic product (GDP) on education, according to the World Bank. However, the cash has not been able to buy quality education. “I think what this research shows is that we need to be thinking more about how resources are spent and what they are achieving rather than just how much we are spending,” says Dr Spaull, co-author of the Stellenbosch paper and a postdoctoral fellow in the economics department at Stellenbosch University. “There are a number of reasons why increased resources may not translate into improved outcomes. In many instances, this is owing to a lack of accountability; in other words, that there are few, if any, consequences for non-performance,” says Nicholas. “Non-performance may mean textbooks that are not delivered, teachers that are not in school or even teachers that are in school, but that are not teaching,” says Nicholas, who notes a 2009 study conducted in 58 schools

in the North West province which found that teachers did not get to teach 60% of the lessons they had been scheduled to teach. Graeme believes, though, that we are undervaluing our teachers. And perhaps there is a risk of seeing underperforming educators as villains instead of essential members in an imperfect but vital system. This belief underwrites the philosophy of Partners for Possibility, an organisation that tries to improve the approach and attitude of school principals, teachers, parents and learners by partnering with them. The organisation has worked with 279 schools in South Africa, with the aim being to assist principals by equipping them with skills. “Educators are victims of a system that requires a great deal of administrative and paper work, but they work in environments where there are a lot of socioeconomic factors that impact the schools and the ability of the learners to actually learn. Many of them are also simply not equipped to deal with all the new technological requirements and demands that the environment is making on them,” says Merlinda Abrahams, stakeholder engagement consultant at Partners for Possibility. In order to improve learning in South Africa and Africa, Graeme believes that more focus should be placed on early childhood development, a view that science supports with studies showing a link between early childhood development and an increase in school completion rates. Less than 20% of African children have access to an early childhood development programme, the lowest percentage in the world. Currently, the South Africa government aims to ensure that all children have greater access to early childhood development. It’s sometimes easy to look at the despair-inducing education statistics on Africa and believe that there is no hope. Yet, the progress made and the people inside government, schools, NGOs and academia that refuse to be numbed into despair and who carry on identifying areas that need improvement mean that there is a very good chance that a generation or two from now someone will be writing about how Africa overcame its education problem.

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Financial Services Africa’s growing economy has given rise to growing financial responsibility among all Africans. The African Development Bank (AfDB) has expressed concern that less than one in four adults in Africa has access to financial services. Although ‘access to financial services’ is a very broad term, the AfDB is strongly committed to the promotion of financial inclusion.

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inancial inclusion relates to personal and organisational finance. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are an important focus of financial inclusion, as they promote job creation and self-sustainability. Banks and governments are laying down new policies to encourage saving among Africans and also to enable Africans to gain access to capital more easily. Education about financial wellness is our most valuable asset at this point, as we can all learn how to become financially well and independent and so be responsible contributors to our growing economies and communities.

Men in the financial sector are promoting equal distribution of wealth and financial inclusion through their ethical practices. KPMG applauds your exceptional work and we look forward to a financially inclusive continent.

From South Africa

Dr. Suresh Parbhoo Kana

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inancial Services regional and South African country winner Dr Suresh Parbhoo Kana, Chief Executive Officer – Territory Senior Partner for PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) Africa joined Coopers & Lybrand, later to become PwC, as an articled clerk in 1976 and was admitted to the partnership in 1986. He has continued to build his career with the firm, successfully fulfilling roles in the Accounting Technical field, as Human Capital leader and Assurance leader, as well as leading and defining PwC’s Transformation and Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives. Dr Kana believes that skills development is critical for the development of the economies and improving the lives of people across the African continent. It is the golden key to the alleviation of poverty across Africa. A Chartered Accountant, Dr Kana holds, among others, a Master of Commerce Degree, Honorary Doctorates from the University of Johannesburg and the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. He teaches accounting at the former.


COUNTRYWINNERS From Namibia

Walter Don Walter was a Human Resources Practitioner for 17 years before he joined the Bank Windhoek as an Executive Management Member responsible for Human Resources, SME and Micro Finance and Business Development. The Namibian country winner in the Financial Services sector, Walter Don is the Chief Executive Officer of Nam-mic Financial Services Holdings, a Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) partner company of Bank Windhoek. He is a trustee of Nawa Life Trust and a Task Force member of Bank Windhoek.

From Swaziland

Alfred Madondo Alfred Madondo, General Manager and Acting Chief Executive Officer of Lidwala Insurance Company, is the Swaziland winner in the Financial Services sector. He says developing people is important as it ensures continuity, creates a satisfied employee who will be more productive and efficient, and it helps manage the loss of young top talent. “People care if you take a genuine interest in their future. It helps builds loyalty, and loyalty increases productivity. Good talented people naturally want to advance, and appreciate meaningful support in the process,� he observes.

From Lesotho

Mpho Vumbukani Currently the Chief Executive of Standard Lesotho Bank, the leading bank in the mountain kingdom, country winner in the Financial Services sector Mpho Vumbukani also serves as Chairman of the Bankers Association of Lesotho, as well as the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Bankers Association. Mpho is the Founding CEO of Lesotho PostBank, which he managed for five years until 2010 and transformed it into a fully-fledged bank that provides electronic transacting and micro lending services to clients. He has served as the Africa Region President of the World Savings Bank Institute.

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FINALISTS From South Africa

Cas Coovadi “I encourage a culture of professionalism and delivery, through individual effort and team work. I mentor people, where appropriate, and encourage young people to be responsible in their attitude to work and society,” says Cas Coovadia, the Managing Director of the Banking Association South Africa. The Bachelor of Commerce degree holder participates in continental and global forums including; the International Banking Federation and the SADC Banking Association. The Financial Services finalist is the First Deputy Chairman of the International Union for Housing Finance.

From South Africa

Viwe Gqwetha Viwe is described as a dedicated goal oriented executive providing strategic vision and project leadership of high profile multimillion rand multi-disciplinary development programmes. He is highly adaptable; effectively translates strategy into implementation and successfully manages change management initiatives. Skilled at managing concurrent projects and applies a systematic innovative approach in resolving complex problems. A decisive and analytical leader that is committed to continuing professional development and thrives on responsibility and challenge, he is a finalist in the Financial Services. He is Viwe Gqwetha, Managing Director of NURCHA.

From Uganda

John Njagi Karionji The Chartered Insurer and Certified Executive Coach, John Njagi Karionji, is the CEO of the ICEA General Insurance Company in Uganda. He believes that “A good leader is only as good as the people he leads and effective performance depends on well-developed team members.” He has been a Director for the Uganda Insurance Institute and Uganda Insurers Association as well as a resource person for the Insurance Institute. In six years John has increased the profitability of the company from 3.8 billion to 30 billion.

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FINALISTS From Kenya

Benson Kariuki Kitabu He is the Financial Director of Kenya Women Microfinance Bank Ltd and a finalist in the Financial Services Sector. The Master of Business Administration holder has been in the sector for 22 years, in addition he is a Certified Public Accountant. Among his proudest achievements is that he has, “Managed to oversee the financials of a multibillion company with over 2 000 staff and over 500,000 customers, ensuring it’s financially stable and profitable,” he explains.

From Swaziland

Patrick Vusumuzi Gamedze He was a Swaziland Member of Parliament from 2008 – 2013, the Leader of Delegation to the European Parliament in Belgium and attended several business seminars in Taiwan, India, Malaysia, Germany, England, Togo, Ivory Coast, Kenya and Ethiopia. Meet Patrick Vusumuzi Gamedze, Managing Director of Finsure Insurance Brokers, a finalist in the Financial Services sector. He holds a Finance and Accounting diploma, Diploma in Business Management, Diploma in Marketing Management and a Certificate of Proficiency in Insurance.

From South Africa

Robert Walton A holder of qualifications from revered international institutions such as the Harvard Business School, the Stanford Business School and Fuqua Business School Duke, South African finalist Robert Walton is the Chief Executive Officer of Efficient Invest, which includes Boutique Investment Partners and Boutique Collective Investments. He says his enterprise has a well-defined and nonhierarchical structure that acknowledges that clients and their investment objectives is the core of Efficient Invest’s existence. The core team has been working together for 8-20 years and they treat all staff equally.

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By Samantha Barnes

Bryan Leith, Chief Operating Officer, KPMG’s Global Africa Practice

CASE IN POINT

Becoming

African Champions by Samantha Barnes

Africa is on the rise. Yes, the continent has its share of coups, kidnappings and corruption, but it is also a continent that speaks of survival, strategy and opportunity. Speaking to decision-makers on a regular basis, they frequently comment on the talent within their organisations. Headlines can be discouraging. But some leaders have retained their optimism about South Africa and the continent’s prospects; countered by a healthy dose of realism.

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ryan Leith, chief operating officer of KPMG’s Global Africa Practice, reminds us that the choice to be positive is ours. “Perhaps the most motivating force is the knowledge that in South Africa we don’t have any other alternative. Africa is the last frontier and, we can sit on the sidelines and watch the world capitalise on what Africa has to offer, or we can get involved and be a part of the journey for Africa to capitalise on its own assets – and towards its own development.” One of the best assets Africa has is its people. “The quality of people is equal to anywhere in the world when we put our minds to the task at hand, and by creating more access to education and skills, will make the African workforce one to contend with globally,” explains Bryan. Facing challenges head on Contrary to what investment guides are saying, South Africa cannot rely on its supposed status as the gateway to Africa. “The country is no longer recognised as the only or even the main gateway into Africa – and the country has increased competition from other countries, such as Zambia, Nigeria, Ghana and Kenya, which have now also been earmarked as key investment gateways,” explains Bryan. “South Africa is facing fierce competition for foreign direct investment (FDI) as investors are seeing larger returns on their investments from other African markets.” There are other challenges: Bryan cites instability in power supply, labour instability, perception of increased

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corruption, and compliance with Black Economic Empowerment. It is blatantly obvious that we need to raise our game to attract investment. Opportunities in Africa Anyone living on the continent appreciates the wide open spaces and arable land at our disposal. Bryan confirms that with Africa holding 60% of the world’s uncultivated arable land, this presents “an incredible opportunity to meet the demand for food security, within the continent and, potentially the world.” “Mining and oil and gas industries will continue to grow – despite the current slump being experienced in commodity prices, as in the long-term there will be continued demand for Africa’s natural resources,” says Bryan. KPMG Africa also expects rapid growth in consumer driven industries, especially in fast moving consumer goods, health care and financial services, driven by an emerging middle class. Bryan emphasises the need for private education, with parents investing in their children’s future. Investing in High Growth Sectors “Three key areas that we’ve invested in, as we believe they will continue to see significant growth in coming years, include Payments, Infrastructure and Deal Advisory and Market Entry,” says Bryan. KPMG has invested in getting the right person on board to champion these areas and having the right technology systems to connect all KPMG offices across Africa – and globally – to render excellent service regardless of where clients are based or where in Africa they are seeking to invest. This is an excellent prospect for growth.


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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

ICT The information and communications technology (ICT) sector in Africa is largely at a disadvantage internationally due to challenges relating to accessibility and hardware development. Nevertheless, the sector has made massive strides in order to make ICT systems more publicly accessible, with some degree of success. The sector is continuing to develop and is a prominent force in ensuring our economic growth.

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en are the dominant force in this field, taking it to new heights almost on a daily basis owing to the rapid pace of development of ICT across the globe. This sector is striving for increased access through hardware distribution to public institutions such as schools and libraries. ICT also has a positive impact environmentally, as it leaves paperless trails and increases communication across borders – with fewer resources required. Government is relying heavily on ICT for the streamlining of its processes in respect of online support services.

CEOS TECHNOLOGIES praises the following men for the strides they have made in developing the ICT sector so that it may become a global contender and for contributing to efficiency across the continent.

From South Africa

Steve Nell

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itans is proud to present Steve Nell with the Country and Region Awards for his excellent achievements and contributions made in the 20 years that he has been in the ICT Sector. When Steve bought over Marine Data Solutions from Transnet it was operating at a loss and today, under his guidance as the Managing Director, it is a globally recognised leader in the provision of maritime technology. Steve is the President of The International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities, which was the first in Africa. The Electrical Engineer National Diploma holder explains that “The number of people or leaders I develop is one of my measures of success. When people experience progress they become more motivated and that ensures that a company grows� Marine Data Solutions was awarded the Best Performing Company for 2013 and 2014 in the ICT sector.


REGIONALWINNER

From Kenya

Paul Odero

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he Bachelor of Science Diploma in Computer Science and Bachelor of Science Degree in Information Technology holder, Paul Odero, has found that “skill is a living thing and can only evolve and sharpen if exposed to as much divergent opinions and tests, as is productively possible. Empowering others ensures these skills are applied, tested, verified or adapted to changing tech-conditions and organisational cultures.� He is currently the IT Manager for African Population and Health Research Centre, Inc in Kenya. His vast knowledge of the ICT sector and hard work has attributed to him being named the Country and Regional winner in the sector. Amongst his career achievements are: moving APHRC to Google Apps, the implementing and management of a Linux Server Environment, Automated Offsite Backup, Helpdesk system, and a Linux based Firewall and routing. To keep up-to-date with the ever evolving world of IT, Paul regularly attends forums and summits.

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FINALISTS From Zambia

James Halukaala Chona “I believe in a very well defined succession plan and aim to build a team that can have continuity in my absence,” says James Halukaala Chona the Aeronautical Engineering Diploma holder. James works for Samsung Electronics as the Business Leader for Zambia, Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique. His involvement with the company opened the door for Samsung to establish themselves as a hub for operations in Zambia. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineering from the Copperbelt University and he is a finalist in the ICT sector.

From South Africa

Damian Michael With 16 years in the ICT sector, CEO of Innovo Networks and mentor to the Allan Gray Orbis Foundation, Damian Michael’s goal as a leader is to develop more leaders, not followers. He also provides leadership development to Young Guns and partakes in CSI projects to help build and develop entrepreneurs in the ICT sector. Since he has been with Innovo Networks the company’s revenue as well as profitability has increased. The launch of Neotel in SA can also be attributed to Damian.

From South Africa

Kovelin Naidoo In 2013 Kovelin Naidoo, a certified Information Systems Security Professional, joined Internet Solutions Global as the Chief Information Officer. The PROSCI Change Management Practitioner believes that developing people is “absolutely key and vital for success.” He is a passionate and purpose driven leader who aims to inspire and empower his team to be the best. He regularly participates in ICT thought leadership and Cyber security topics, articles and conferences. Kovelin mentors a young group of African entrepreneurs and he works with the DTI.

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FINALISTS From Cameroon

Elvis Ndong IT professionals are not just into technology. Elvis Ndong is a young professional who is using his skills as an IT Technician and web designer to educate communities, both young and old; on IT based skills such as computer software, hardware, internet services, web design, and secretarial services. Elvis is manager of Ndelch Computer Training and Internet Center, which educates the local community in information communications technology (ICT). He has trained more than 500 Cameroonians in computer hardware and software. Elvis Ndong is a worthy Finalist in the ICT category.

From Zambia

R.K. Raman R.K. Raman relocated to Zambia from India in 1990 where he was a major asset to a few IT companies before beginning his own in 2000. Today he is the Managing Director of Reliance Technology Limited, which is rated the number one Office Automation company by PMR South Africa, a title they have held for several years running. This recognition brought new clientele to Reliance Technology Limited and has made them a leader in the industry. The sector finalist has a Bachelor of Engineering with Distinction.

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EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

Reframing

Fear of Failure for a Positive View by Lydia Bundred

No one can go through life unscathed by failure and fear. Often, people face the two together as a fear of failure. Meriam Webster defines ‘fail’ as “to fall short” or “to be or become absent or inadequate”. With such a definition, it isn’t surprising that failure can generate fear in people, especially if reinforced over time.

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here is a fine line between ‘desire to succeed’ and ‘fear of failure’, though these two concepts are closely related. Pressure serves a function in activating a desire to succeed. However, at some point, too much pressure may tip the scale, causing the desire to succeed to turn into a fear [of ‘not succeeding’] or, in other words, ‘to fail’,” says Ile Schutte, a psychologist at Elmien Aspeling & Associates. A stern sense of fear of failure can be instilled in the childhood years by parents and teachers who try to motivate students with fear. During development, this affects the brain and how individuals compute success and self-worth. “It [fear of failure] occurs when a person subjectively experiences pressure that is above the threshold of what he/she can cope with – which leads to anxiety, brought on by a rigid focus on achieving a specific outcome. The greatest contributing factor to fear of failure may therefore actually be an intense need to succeed, which creates a build-up of pressure,” states Ile. Some people overcome failure easier than others, she says, and this might be due to “strong avoidance tendencies, low self-esteem, and negative and ineffective forms of cognitive processing”. Fear and the Brain Lauren Leon, a psychologist at Elmien Aspeling & Associates, attributes fear of failure to how we think. “This is because, ultimately, how we think about ourselves, our challenges and our abilities will influence how we would respond in any given situation.” The signalling for fear is rooted in the amygdala of the brain, which is meant to alert its owner of any threats, danger


EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

“It [fear of failure] occurs when a person subjectively experiences pressure that is above the threshold of what he/she can cope with – which leads to anxiety, brought on by a rigid focus on achieving a specific outcome. The greatest contributing factor to fear of failure may therefore actually be an intense need to succeed, which creates a build-up of pressure,” states Ile. or pleasure. When the brain receives a message, it interprets it and signals an action accordingly. This function is vital to the survival of humanity, but can also be detrimental to certain life activities of an individual if improperly conditioned. People experience different fear responses, which can range from sweaty palms, shaky voice to fainting when triggered. When a situation or obstacle appears that an individual perceives as a fearful one, the brain and body may react in a conditioned manner. If someone attaches a negative connotation to test-taking or to public speaking due to fear of failure when presented with a test or public platform, the brain will signal the body to act in accordance with fear. Educational Institutions and Behaviour A survey conducted by the Bilkent University in Turkey among 1 000 high-school and university students revealed that those who were fear-driven were more likely to outperform those who were not, but they were also more likely to pass and succeed at any cost, even by cheating. Those who were fear-driven also indicated that they were not motivated by a need to satisfy their desires and interests, but rather to avoid being labelled a failure. “I think certain terminology/ methods/policies used by educational institutions could contribute to fear of failure. However, it is the individual’s personal intra-psychological makeup along with a combination of external influences that would ultimately culminate in a fear of failure,” explains Ile. A study published in the American Journal of Political Science regarding the behaviour of people, especially introverts and extroverts, showed that it was those who were more fearful that were introverts and not that introverts hesitate to act out of fear. This relationship is very important, because it shows how fear can shape an individual’s personality if conditioned that way. The Impact If an individual has been shaped by years of feardriven success, it may negatively affect their view of achievement and successful career growth. Adults who have been shaped by their fears are less likely to take risks or be innovative in their workplaces. They will work well within the operating procedures, but may lack ambition and accomplishment for self-satisfaction. “If students enter the labour force already with a sense

that they are not good enough, then, as daily challenges are faced, these professionals will be quick to succumb to it,” says psychologist Lauren. Reframing Fear of Failure Don Shula, a former NFL coach, used what he called the ‘24-hour rule’. After every defeat or win, he allowed 24 hours for grieving or celebrating. In those hours, he encouraged his team to intensely feel their emotions and, after that period, to focus all of their attention and thoughts on the next task, regardless of a win or a loss – a tactic which brought him 100 NFL wins in 10 seasons. By not dwelling on what could have been and focusing energy towards new tasks, you can harness more mental and physical participation. Mark Leary, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University, recommends keeping record of daily events, both positive and negative. Once a week, “review the events you deem as a failure or a negative experience and look for positive outcomes,” he says. Learn to laugh at yourself and to think more optimistically about these occurrences in order to generate positive mental connections with those situations. People hoping to overcome fear of failure must come to terms with challenges they may face and recondition their minds to react healthily in such instances. JK Rowling once said: “It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all – in which case, you fail by default.” Reconditioning Techniques 1. Acknowledge failure as an obstacle that may be encountered. 2. Do not think of failing as synonymous with you as a person and your worth. 3. Focus on the current process and not the outcome or goal. 4. Regardless of the outcome, only think on it for 24 hours, then reframe failure with a positive connotation (as a building block to success or a lesson learned) and celebrate success.

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Logistics and Shipping The logistics and shipping sector has experienced fast-paced development that has matched the pace of African economic growth. Although it has grown immensely, this sector currently faces major challenges due to the troubled inland freight network. Importing internationally is less costly than inland African trade, and this is a major obstacle with regard to the success of our trade networks.

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nfrastructural development is thus a priority in order to promote trade growth and organic economic growth in Africa. The cost of intercontinental transport is much greater than that of cross-continental transport, forcing most African organisations to trade cross-continentally because of the sheer costs of the former. Much of Africa’s produce is in high demand. However, crosscontinental imports and exports are more common than intercontinental trade. Men make up a large portion of the workforce in logistics and shipping and face a challenging period in order to overcome the obstacles concerned.

Many in Africa rely on the expansion of trade networks in Africa for continued economic development. Egypt Air therefore congratulates the following men for their ongoing contributions to this field.

From Namibia

Robert Leo Maslamoney

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obert Leo Maslamoney received a full scholarship to study towards his Master of Business Administration degree in Denmark at Copenhagen Business School. He completed his degree at the top ten of his class and graduated with honours. For his stand-out work in the Logistics and Shipping sector he has been awarded the Country and Region award. Robert is currently the Managing Director of Maersk Namibia, industry leaders in shipping. In 2011/12 the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs (DANIDA) awarded him with the Emerging Leaders of Africa award. In addition to his Bachelor of Social Science and Post Graduate Diploma in Management, he is currently completing his gateway exams with the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants. “Training and providing staff with adequate exposure and support is key to ensuring we have the correct level of skills in place. I believe in coaching my staff and developing them to become the best at what they do,� explains Robert


Celebrating 70 Years of Collective Bargaining

The Metal and Engineering Industries Bargaining Council (MEIBC) is a statutory body created under the Labour Relations Act to provide for the co-regulation of stable and productive employment relations in the metal and engineering industries in South Africa. Contact Details: The Metal and Engineering Bargaining Industries Bargaining Council (National Office) Physical Address 1st Floor Union Corporation Building 77 Marshall Street Johannesburg 2001

Postal Address PO Box 9381 Johannesburg 2000 Tel: 011 639 8000 Fax: 086 636 8690

www.meibc.co.za


EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

Does Africa Need Democracy? by Leigh Schaller

Singapore has transformed itself from a lowincome backwater to a vibrant First World nation in one generation without the help of a democratic system. Does Singapore’s success make democracy redundant?

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ever before has a nondemocratic leader garnered so much praise from leaders of so many liberal democracies than when Lee Kuan Yeh, the ruler of Singapore for 31 years, died earlier this year. Barack Obama referred to him as “a true giant of history”. Australia’s parliament paid tribute to him, and praise and condolences poured in from across the developed world. So monumental was the success that Lee Kuan Yew and Singapore achieved in a generation that it would have been impossible for Western leaders not to heap praise on his legacy. Before gaining independence from Malaysia in 1965, Singapore was largely underdeveloped and rural. Its strong economic growth since independence came about largely thanks to the Singapore government encouraging foreign direct investment, brought about by what the World Bank describes as “the world’s most business friendly business environment”. As a result, the island’s economy has grown by an average of 7.7% since independence. This success was achieved despite the absence of a flourishing democracy. The Economist Intelligence Unit in its 2013 Democracy Index Report lists Singapore as a hybrid regime. This is one rank bellow a flawed democracy, but one step above an authoritarian regime. Although it credits Singapore for having a functioning government and a fair degree of civil liberties, Singapore’s political culture and electoral process rank poorly. Nor is Singapore alone in its growth-without-democracy model. China has experienced growth of around 10% a year since 1978. Closer to home, Rwanda has experienced gross domestic product (GDP) growth of around 8% since 2001, while Ethiopia has seen its economy grow by more than 10% between 2003 and 2013. Some may argue that the free-market policies implemented by Singapore such as low corporate tax and the absence of a minimum wage would not have been as easy to achieve if Lee Kuan Yeh feared being voted out in a general election. “Viewed instrumentally, many have long thought that democracy was inferior; that elected leaders would always go for things like consumer goods or social welfare at the expense of long-term investment in infrastructure and education of society,” says Professor Robert Mates,


EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

director of the Democracy in Africa Research Unit. “The ‘modernization’ school of development, and its adherents in Western governments, often believed this, and when push came to shove sided with dictators who would modernize their society.” However, those who believe that development and economic growth may benefit more from the absence of democracy do not have a scientific footing to stand on, according to Prof Mates. “Emerging cross-national research – rather than cherry-picking selected cases – has shown that, in general, there is no authoritarian advantage for development. For every Brazil and South Africa of the 1960s, you get the same case a decade or so later with low growth and double-digit inflation,” says Prof Mates. This sceptical view regarding the long-term viability of authoritarian regimes, specifically in Africa, is shared by Dr Emmanuel Giymah-Boadi, the executive director of the Ghanaian Centre for Democratic Development, who doubts the long-term viability of such regimes. “What we need to see before we get too excited about Rwanda, for example, is how far it will go in working out a succession plan in which the new leadership will continue to govern the country with the same level of seriousness and commitment that we have seen from President Kagame,” says Dr Giymah-Boadi. Instead, Dr Giymah-Boadi believes there has been a case of ‘wrong attribution’ or correlation but no proven causation when it comes to how we view successful nondemocracies. He believes that it is wrong to look at Singapore or China and draw the inference that the reason they flourish is because they are nondemocracies. Dr Steven Friedman, head of the Centre for the Study of Democracy in South Africa, agrees that it is difficult to draw such a simplistic conclusion. He believes that, because we cannot conduct an experiment whereby we look at whether Singapore and China would have achieved greater growth in the last few decades had they been fully fledged democracies, we have no idea as to whether it was their authoritarian nature or some other factor that has caused their success. Instead of looking at Rwanda and Singapore as examples of how long-term success can be achieved in Third

Emerging cross-national research – rather than cherry-picking selected cases – has shown that, in general, there is no authoritarian advantage for development. World countries, proponents of democracy believe that we should look towards Botswana as a model for sustained growth. This Southern African country transformed itself from one of the poorest in the world to an upper middle-income country since gaining independence in 1966, while promoting many democratic principles. Prodemocracy experts argue that Africa’s failures boil down to too little real democracy rather than a failure of democracy. They emphasise that we should look beyond the possible economic impact of a specific type of governance and at the degree of freedom it offers. According to Human Rights Watch (HRW), Singapore restricts freedom of expression, peaceful assembly and association to various degrees. Its criminal justice system also allows for “virtually unlimited detention of suspects without charge [or] judicial review”. In Rwanda, HRW reports that the ruling Rwandan Patriotic Front “dominates all aspects of political and public life”. HRW also reports that people are “tortured and pressed to confess [to] alleged crimes or to incriminate others”. This leads one to ask if one can speak of an improvement in economic growth in the absence of democracy. “Has anybody seen anywhere in Africa where people were going on riots demanding less free speech, less accountability from their governments. It never happens. What we get is people demanding more,” says Dr Giymah-Boadi. Since its reincarnation in the American and French revolutions, people gravitate towards democracies because, “viewed intrinsically, no other political system can match democracy in terms of recognising one’s moral agency, rather than treating one like a moral infant who needs to be guided by a great leader,” says Prof Mattes. Despite the success shown by Singapore and China, and despite the promise displayed by Ethiopia and Rwanda, Africa should be careful of throwing away hardfought individual freedoms without concrete evidence that democracy is to blame for government failure. To risk the freedom of individuals seems brash in the extreme.


Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Manufacturing and Engineering Men are still the most prominent workers in the manufacturing and engineering sector at all levels. However, the automation of processes is opening this field up as an equal-opportunity work provider, and men are stepping up to promote it as such. Although the sector is doing relatively well, assembly still overshadows Africa’s manufacturing and engineering abilities.

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frica is not generally considered to be a point of manufacture, but is employed regularly as an assembly station. Another hinderance to the growth of this sector is that many skilled Africans are employed internationally, rather than locally. The ‘brain drain’ affects numerous economic sectors, with the manufacturing and engineering sector being one of them. With a shortage of skills in this field, continuity is questionable. This is another reason why the sector is striving for a reputation as an equal-opportunity provider that will appeal to younger generations.

The merSETA applauds the following men for their ongoing dedication to uplifting this sector. Your efforts do not go unnoticed and have huge potential for our developing economies.

From Congo Brazzaville

Alain Niama

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he world needs useful inventions. Fortunately there are scientists of Alain Niama’s calibre bringing progress. Alain is a scientist and inventor who works at the Innovation Circle in Congo. His pet project, and one that he has been working on for several years, is producing renewable fuel out of coffee wastes and vegetable matter. His other inventions include multipurpose carbon paper, and an anti-fraud for certificate detector. Alain is one of 30 outstanding young persons in the world to receive a TOYP nomination in 2008 based on his inventions and technology achievement. He received a Roberval Prize in Paris, France for his innovations on anti-fraud detection. In 2014 he invented a mini-drone and counterfeit detector pen for currencies anywhere in the world. Most of his innovations have been submitted for patents. Alain Niama is a worthy Regional Winner in the Manufacturing and Engineering sector.


REGIONALWINNER

From South Africa

Dr. Stephen John Meijers

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ppointed associate professor at 29 years was an indicator that Dr. Stephen John Meijers was destined for greatness. Today as group chief executive officer of ELB Group Limited, Dr. Meijers is clear on his greatest career achievement, “Re-growing the engineering company in ELB from one person to 1400 in eight years with a PBT growth exceeding 30% per year over that period.� ELB Engineering Services is regarded as one of the most entrepreneurial engineering companies in South Africa. Dr. Meijers has several patents, won the coveted Technology Top 100 award, won three Institute of Mechanical Engineering design awards, built the longest overland conveyor in the world, and successfully invented and installed many unique processing solutions. A recognised expert in the field of material handling, Dr. Meijers is on the advisory board of the Department of Engineering at the University of Pretoria. He serves on the Board of Directors of the African Academy for the Built Environment; with over 800 students.

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COUNTRYWINNER From Swaziland

Wilhelm van Niekerk The NMI Group produces and distributes food and animal feed. General Manager, Wilhelm van Niekerk, prides himself on being results orientated and hands-on. “I live for challenges and strive towards continuous improvement,� says Wilhelm. He believes the key to successful development of people is achieved when they start taking ownership of their role in the organisation. His approach is working. Over the last few years NMI Group has doubled in volumes; during a very difficult time in the livestock sector.

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FINALIST From South Africa

Silas Mzingeli Zimu Silas Mzingeli Zimu has been in the renewable energy sector for 23 years and is energy advisor to President Jacob Zuma. His credentials are noteworthy. Silas is formerly CEO of Suzlon Wind Energy, which constructed the first and biggest wind farm in Africa - a 140 MW wind energy farm. Showing the initiative of an entrepreneur, in the past Silas has recruited expats to support and accelerate the development of black engineers in the renewable energy sector.

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Dr Raymond Patel, CEO of merSETA

CASE IN POINT

More than

Education By Lydia Bundred

The Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (merSETA) was established in the year 2000. Their focus is on metal and engineering, auto manufacturing, motor retail and component manufacturing, tyre manufacturing, and plastics industries. In total merSETA is comprised of approximately 44 000 companies, with a workforce of about 600 000. At the helm of it all is Dr Raymond Patel, who has been the CEO since 2006.

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r Raymond has to his record 10 unqualified audit reports, top 10 rating in CRF’s Best Employer survey for 2009/10 and more than 24 000 learnerships and apprenticeships in 2010/11. Raymond expounds regarding the need for further education and the importance of skills development in our nation. The Goal “Unlike basic and general education, the point of further education is employability. We are well aware that what business and industry need are people who can ‘hit the ground running’, people who can be productive in the workplace immediately. The key to this,

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at least in our industry, is good quality, vocationally oriented education in which school-leavers are exposed to occupations in the manufacturing and engineering sectors and where they then receive further post-school training before they enter the labour market. Yes, we have always aligned our strategy with the requirements of the National Skills Development Strategy, but we regard these as our baseline deliverables. There is always room for improvement, hence our strategy to strengthen merSETA’s sector mechanisms through skills planning and implementation in partnership with our members,” explains the CEO. The Vision “MerSETA’s vision is aligned with the national vision; it exists within the broader national skills development system which aims to achieve the growth and development objectives as outlined in government’s Medium Term Strategic Framework. In fact, this national vision has provided the merSETA with the opportunity to articulate an approach towards skills development as a critical enabler to job creation. Skills are central to the achievement of decent work, poverty reduction, and employment growth in South Africa,” maintains Patel. The Next Step “Though the skills mismatch has its origins in the apartheid era, our education system has not helped the situation, nor have our labour regulations helped induce firms to switch from capitalintensive technology. The missing piece of the skills development puzzle is to be found in the synergy between the SETAs, employers and education and training institutions. At around 26.40%, South Africa has an unacceptably high unemployment level, while the number of unemployed graduates has of late swollen from 60 000 to more than 200 000, according to Statistics South Africa. The June 16 slogan may have been ‘Economic emancipation in our lifetime’, but the slogan we now need to embrace is ‘Skills development in our lifetime’,” insists Patel.


21 YEARS OF DEMOCRACY WE BUILD THE PEOPLE THAT BUILD THE NATION The merSETA is one of 21 SETAs established through the implementation of the Skills Development Act of 1998. The merSETA is also part of the manufacturing and engineering cluster. In the merSETA domain, there are five economic sub-sectors, Metal and Engineering, Auto Manufacturing, Motor Retail and Component Manufacturing, New Tyre Manufacturing and the Plastics Manufacturing.

VISION

Leaders in closing the skills gap

VALUES WE CARE:

It’s about caring for people we render services to

merSETASocial

@merSETASocial

The merSETA facilitates implementation of provisions of the Skills Development Act through our levy-paying companies: these companies sign learnership agreements and apprenticeship contracts and offer workplace experience to learners or internship opportunities to graduates. The merSETA incentivises and supports the companies that recruit learners in the aforementioned chambers.

MISSION

To increase access to high quality and relevant skills development and training opportunities to support economic growth in order to reduce inequalities and unemployment and to promote employability and participation in the economy.

WE BELONG:

It’s about working together with colleagues

merSETA Social

WE SERVE:

It’s about going beyond the call of duty

www.merseta.org.za


Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Media There is great demand for transparent and ethical media services. Truth and equity are attracting many people to media platforms which embody these values. Although an increasingly competitive sector, the media sector sees men and women staffing positions at all levels.

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he media is a challenging sphere globally, and there is a high demand for African perspectives on local news and developments, as most global media houses employ international reporters and experts for coverage. African media organisations have a unique opportunity to provide the latest on African happenings from a local viewpoint. With the increasing use of mobile devices and online services, the demand for media in all its forms is greater than ever. Multiplatform media are the current trend, a trend that looks to continue for the foreseeable future.

CEO Global lauds the Titans in

this field for their ethical approach in a competitive market. May you continue to carry the media sector with integrity, for the world is watching you.

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

From Uganda

Robert Kabushenga

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obert Kabushenga is chief executive officer of the Vision Group, a media group in Uganda. He championed and managed big investments in multimedia expansion from one revenue stream of print products to broadcast and online. He has taken the business into new markets and wrested number one business positions from existing players. Robert also led innovations to address the needs of a changing market. He led the setting up of the Uganda Media Owners Association and has been relied upon to take the lead in resolving complex industry issues with regulators in the industry. An advocate of the High Court of Uganda and a member of the Uganda Law Society, he is also a fellow of the African Leadership Initiative-EA, part of the Aspen Leadership Network. He is currently pursuing an MBA with Heriot Watt University. A Regional Winner in the Media category, we acknowledge Robert Kabushenga’s contribution in the field of communication.


REGIONALWINNER

From South Africa

Victor Kgomoeswana

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s a much deserved Country and Regional winner in the Media sector, Victor Kgomoeswana has been involved in various platforms across the sector since 2000. He has been the anchor of Africa Business News on CNBC Africa since August 2014 and the anchor of Power Hour on Power FM 98.7, for the Gauteng Province since November of the same year. He is also a columnist on African matters for Sunday Independent and a speaker and consultant on African business for multinationals since 2007. The author of ‘Africa is Open for Business’ has a Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Limpopo. His credentials include a Diploma in Business Management and he is a Certified Associate of the Institute of Bankers (IOB South Africa). He believes that “People are the only factor in economics and other spheres of life that can convert resources/ commodities into products, services or solutions.”

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COUNTRYWINNER From Swaziland

Mbongeni Mbingo Since his appointment as the Managing Editor of the Swazi Observer, Mbongeni Mbingo has been responsible for improving the content and overall performance of the publication. Mbongeni has a BA Honours in Journalism and Media Studies from Wits University and he participated in the Edward R. Murrow Leadership Programme. In 2012/13 he won the Best Newspaper Editor Award and was named Editor of the Year twice. He is Chairman of the Swaziland Editors Forum, a position he now holds for the second consecutive term.

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FINALISTS From Kenya

Geoffrey Angote Photojournalist at Nation Media Group, Geoffrey Angote says: “Daily Nation newspaper has received positive feedback from within and outside Kenya. Our plans are to see that we are the best in the country and the region.” Geoffrey confirms that the photography desk has been instrumental in producing a quality newspaper. He covers all aspects of news and human interest stories in Kenya. Geoffrey provides end user support to his colleagues in Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania.He is a worthy finalist in the media category.

From South Africa

Dr. Pierre de Villiers Since 1999 Dr. Pierre de Villiers has been the Managing Director of African Online Scientific Information Systems, a first of its kind in South Africa. AOSIS specialises in online publishing and open access of academic research journals and books that cater for healthcare professionals. Dr Pierre was the first professor of family medicine at Stellenbosch University and he has an MB, ChB and Bachelor of Science with Honours degree. His impressive resume includes a Doctorate in community health and he was awarded a fellowship by the College of Family Physicians South Africa.

From Lesotho

Boitumelo Koloi Boitumelo Koloi is the Managing Editor of the Informative Newspaper of Lesotho. Boitumelo ensures that his newspaper delivers quality, in-demand content to readers by being involved in the daily operation and production of the publication. He holds a Diploma in Mass Communication from the National University of Lesotho and received a Best Radio Programme Producer award in 2011. Boitumelo has been a member of the National Editor’s Forum, an executive member of the MISA-Lesotho board and he won the PMR Gold award for Best News Producer in 2008.

From Swaziland

Alec Lushaba Alec Lushaba has a Diploma in Journalism and Mass Communication from the University of Swaziland and a Diploma in Online Research Communication from JMK Stockholm University, Sweden. In 2010 he won the Regional (SADC) Gender and Media Award for Best Business Unusual Story and in 2011 he won the Column of the Year award at the Journalism Media Awards. Alec is the Editor of the Observer on Saturday, of the Swazi Observer Group of Newspapers and a member of the Swaziland Editors Forum.


GOING GREEN

have some by Leigh Schaller

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ony Budden is something of a hemp hipster. Long before it was cool to advocate the legalisation of the plant, he preached to every ear that would listen about the uses and benefits of a plant that is illegal to grow in South Africa. If, at the mention of hemp, your mind jumps to the word ‘dagga’ before conjuring up a foggy image of drug-affected youths, then you are by no means alone. Yet this image is far removed from the nature of hemp. Although the hemp and marijuana plants are derived from the same family (Cannabis) and share similarities in the same way as say a white and black rhino, there are also clear and important differences. Hemp contains only tiny amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active ingredient that induces the ‘high’ feeling in marijuana users, whereas marijuana contains anywhere between 5 and 15% of THC. There are also differences in appearance with hemp, which reaches 2.4 meters in height, as opposed to marijuana, which is typically smaller and bushier. One aspect that both plant types have in common is that, in South Africa, and in many other countries, it is illegal to grow either the marijuana or hemp plants. Proponents of the ban believe that, despite their aesthetic differences, the two plants resemble each other too closely, making it easy to grow marijuana in the guise of hemp. This state of illegality is a relatively new phenomenon for a plant that has been grown for almost as long as humans have abandoned hunter–gatherer lifestyles. Dutch colonialists arrived on ships equipped with hemp ropes. The Declaration of Independence in the United States of America was originally written on a scroll made from hemp. It was seen as such a vital plant that, in the 17th century, it was illegal for farmers in certain states not to grow hemp.

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Proponents of the crop often refer to its many uses as a primary reason why its illegalisation needs to end.

PRO

A growing movement to relax the almost worldwide ban on industrial hemp could result in the opening of a lucrative industry for agriculturedependent Africa.


GOING GREEN

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Proponents of the crop often refer to its many uses as a primary reason why its illegalisation needs to end. Once it is processed, hemp yields oil that is in demand by groups such as soap manufacturers and food producers. Its leaves and stem fibres can be used for a range of products, including insulation for buildings, bricks for construction, rope and clothing, as well as in the automotive industry where it is used as a material for car panels. Because hemp is high in protein, it is used as a food substitute. Hemp requires few pesticides or herbicides, making green types and farmers happy. It is also a good rotation crop. Remarkably, it takes the plant only about six months to grow from a seedling to 2.4 meters in height. Budden, together with other activists, has built a house in Cape Town using many materials containing hemp, in part to prove hemp’s viability. The South African government is slowly beginning to change its stance regarding hemp. Since 1996, hemp has been grown in small amounts across the country for research purposes. According to Budden, a hemp trial is being conducted in Malawi, where cannabis has been widely – but illegally – grown since precolonial days. Other countries, though, have been quicker to adopt hemp. China, which has been growing hemp for 6 000 years, is currently planning to grow more than a million hectares of hemp, with the previous president of China, Hu Jintao, visiting and approving facilities associated with hemp. Attitudes of both the general public and Get in the industry already many (but not all) government bodies have been softening with regard to the use of industrial by doing something, hemp, according to Budden. “The amount of peowhether it is t-shirts, or ple that I have to tell the whole story [of hemp] to, food or any product so that is becoming less. Attitudes are changing, but it has been a long educational process.” you are ready to go and you South African companies, including Budden’s have a history. Hemporium, have been importing foreign-grown and manufactured hemp products into South Africa. But should the South African government and other African governments bow to the wave of decriminalisation that is rolling across the world and nullify the ban on hemp soon, opportunities should open for an entirely new industry. Yet, although money could be made, believes Budden, you need to get your foot in the door now. “Get in the industry already by doing something, whether it is t-shirts, or food or something that you are ready to go and you have a history when something opens up.” Although it may be too late to become a hemp hipster and though decriminalising the production of hemp may never occur in South Africa, it could nevertheless be worthwhile getting into the hemp industry in some form so that your shop is set up if and when the floodgates open.

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Medical and Veterinary The good health of our populace and of our animals has always been the chief focus of the medical field. With a growing economy, this is becoming a more prominent priority and accessible health care takes centre stage as the major goal for the medical and veterinary sector.

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en are prominent in these fields and exemplify ethical and responsible practices. Our growing economy creates major demands on this sector and looks to such practitioners for the good health of our valuable resources, our people and our animals. Much of our economy relies on the labour of people and animals. Workplace policies on health care are therefore more important than ever. The medical field understands that what you sow, you will reap. Fortunately, these fields are governed by high ethical standards and procedures.

We laud the following men for their ongoing dedication to the good health of our people and animals. CEO GLOBAL values your determination in rendering good service to our communities.

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

From South Africa

Prof. Bavesh Davandra Kana

P

rofessor Bavesh Davandra Kana directs a national Centre of Excellence for tuberculosis research at the University of the Witwatersrand. “Tuberculosis remains the number one killer of South Africans,� says Professor Kana. He participates in tuberculosis awareness programmes through engagement with civil society advocacy groups and the community. The Centre has developed novel products that have enabled nationwide rollout of next-generation tuberculosis diagnostics in South Africa. His translational research programme, involving collaboration with researchers in Africa, USA, UK and Europe, aims to identify new tuberculosis drugs and vaccines. He has been the recipient of 25 awards, including the NHLS Innovation Award for Rollout of GeneXpert. This product was endorsed by the World Health Organization and rolled out in 22 countries. Tuberculosis patients in these countries can now receive a quality assured diagnostic result in 2-3 hours (versus 4-6 weeks). He is also focused on training postgraduate students and postdoctoral fellows. They will serve as the next cadre of world-class scientists for the developing world.


FINALISTS From South Africa

Dr. Victor Fredlund A GP always has a full schedule, but Dr. Victor Fredlund is far more than a generalist with medical, obstetric and surgical and anaesthetic skills. He is medical manager at Mseleni Hospital and has been acting CEO for the past five years. Dr Fredlund was named SAMA Community Doctor of the Year 2013. He participates in provincial task teams, contributing towards improved health in the community, running antiretroviral and circumcision roll-outs. Dr Fredlund’s commitment is undeniable. He received the Pierre Jaques Award for South African Rural Doctor of the Year in 2003.

From South Africa

Prof. Arthur Rantloane Being bright is one thing, being a trail blazer is another. Professor Arthur Rantloane was lead anaesthetist in the world’s first successful Siamese twin separation, which were joined at the head. Up until 2014 Professor Rantloane was the only person of colour to have been President of the College of Anaesthetists in South Africa. As chief specialist of Steve Biko Academic hospital and academic head of department at the School of Medicine, University of Pretoria, his expertise is sought at a clinical and policy level. Professor Rantloane is a recipient of the Mandela Medallion in Gold for distinguished service to the former President.

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SKILLSTRANSFER

Advances

in

Artificial Limbs Give Patients a New Lease by Samantha Barnes

Life

on

“Put your best foot forward!” we say. There is nothing wrong with wishing someone well, but what if someone has lost the use of their limb or limbs and, in a worst-case scenario, amputation has to be done? What most of us take for granted – our mobility –suddenly becomes a whole new ball game.

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very day, countless people worldwide are fitted with an artificial limb. Losing a limb is anyone’s worst nightmare. Those of us who are able-bodied barely give a thought to the wonderful freedom we have been granted to walk, dance, run, climb, swim, get around, and move it all about. We even jump for joy! Jaco Deist is faced, on a daily basis, with assisting people in adapting to this new reality by helping them to regain their mobility after losing a limb. Jaco graduated with a Diploma in Medicine in Orthotics and Prosthetics, followed by a BTech degree. Prosthetics is the name given to the branch of surgery that deals with prosthesis,

the word used for replacing a missing body part with an artificial part. Jaco has been in private practice for 20 years and finds it an amazing profession. “It sounds corny, but you can really make a difference in somebody’s life!” he says. “Many people are down in the dumps after the news of an amputation, or after a traumatic amputation, and to get them at that point and to work with them from beginning to end and to fulfil your promise to them, and to see how they are getting integrated back in society, is amazing.” Justifiably, his clients are very appreciative of what has been done for them, especially when many of them

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Marcell Blignaut received a prosthesis for his left leg after being in a serious motorbike accident earlier this year.

thought they could never walk again. “To see some- they are able to manufacture lighter and thinner, but body happy again, and you were part of it, is great!” stronger products.” Jaco reflects. “Working with kids is even better, as they It is in the area of lower-extremity prosthetics like just continue to live life as if nothing is wrong, and one prosthetic knee joints that massive technology adhas the opportunity to build long and lasting relation- vancement has taken place, specifically in respect of ships with them!” With advances in science come advances in In the past 15 years, there have been great improvements in artificial limbs. The leading artificial limbs in terms of the materials used and their durability. companies and countries in terms of this are Ossur “Weight has come down considerably,” Jaco says. in Iceland and Otto Bock in Germany. These countries started research and devel- pneumatic and hydraulic cylinders and microprocesopment in prosthetics many years ago. Jaco confirms that sor knee units. “The knees are faster, more responsive Iceland and Germany spend massive amounts in testing and safer and they are trying to get closer to the human new componentry, and have good financial support and knee joint,” Jaco explains. enormous factories where all the tests and manufacturing Prosthetic feet are not made from rubber or wood take place. “They are light years ahead of South Africa,” anymore. They consist of carbon fibre layers for what is he says. termed ‘energy return’ feet. “The more you put in, the For as long as people have been around, there has been more you will get out,” Jaco says. “Shock absorbers and a need for prosthetics. Prosthetics is not a new branch rotators are also included to make sport and long-disof medicine and has been in existence for thousands of tance walking easier.” years. The oldest known example of a prosthetic device Advances in technology have also resulted in improveis a wooden toe that was found attached to an Egyptian ments to artificial limbs in the upper extremities. Arms mummy’s foot. now have myoelectric componentry. This picks up electrical impulses from the residual limb to open and close the Weight Loss in an Unconventional Sense hand or to lift the elbow. Jaco confirms that, prior to this In the past 15 years, there have been great improve- new technology, all this was done with cables. ments in artificial limbs in terms of the materials used Patients who are frail are also reaping the benefits of adand their durability. “Weight has come down consid- vances in artificial limbs. “Products are lighter and safer to erably,” Jaco says. “With materials like carbon fibre, protect them and to prevent them from falling,” Jaco reveals.

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They are also able to purchase less expensive products, as their needs are less demanding in terms of what they need to be able to do with their prosthesis. What is good to hear is that children are benefitting from the fact that much prosthetic componentry is specifically designed with children in mind. Such examples include silicone liners, prosthetic knees, and different models of feet. Change is the Name of the Game Human beings truly are unique, and no less so when selecting an appropriate artificial limb. One size does not fit all. The prosthetist has umpteen factors to consider when doing a consultation. These include the patient’s financial means, their weight, amputation level, reason for amputation, length of residual limb, and needs, as well as their sports and hobbies. Other considerations include their age, general health, whether cosmetics is a concern, and their strength. Even the appearance of the residual limb is taken into account in terms of being bony, flabby, conical, long or short. Instead of all these elements being a drawback to inspiring advances, they are a motivating factor. “I think that is exactly the challenge and that is what inspires us, keeps it interesting and always a challenge. We consistently have to change and redesign to meet all the new and different challenges,” Jaco explains. The Real Heroes and Heroines Those who have to go through the ordeal of an amputation and prosthetic limbs could not do it without the commitment of their medical team, family and friends.

They also need heaps of courage and determination. Orison Swett Marden succinctly describes what it takes to face your fears. “Obstacles are like wild animals. They are cowards but they will bluff you if they can. If they see you are afraid of them, they are liable to spring upon you; but if you look them squarely in the eye, they will slink out of sight.” Jaco has had many cases over the years where patients have looked fear squarely in the eye and, as a result, their rehabilitation has been a success. In the words of Jaco: “Amputations and prosthetic limbs are usually associated with images of heartbreak, pain and broken dreams. But, every once in a while, we see proof that miracles do happen.” Marcell Blignaut’s story is one such example This young man was in a near fatal motorcycle accident. His left leg was badly injured and, unfortunately, there was no possible way that doctors could save it. He had multiple injuries and, after his amputation, all care was devoted to keeping him alive. Marcell was under sedation for a couple of weeks before being woken up and being told he had lost his leg. He was positive from the outset and extremely grateful to be alive. Jaco could see that Marcell’s positive attitude would enable him to make a success of his long rehabilitation process. Before the accident, Marcell did rock climbing, kick boxing, quad biking and scuba diving. Despite the accident, Marcell is diving and riding quad bikes again. He has even received his black belt in kick boxing. Marcell has been rehabilitated to his full potential and is an inspiration to us all. People like Marcell are our unsung heroes.

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Mining The African mining sector is set to be a source of global relief in the coming years. Africa is well known for its rich mineral resources. While the rest of the world comes under strain due to a lack of sustainable mining methods coupled with high demand, Africa shines as a beacon of hope.

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en leading this sector will come under the microscope as they face difficult decisions with the global demands that are being made on the African mining market. Global energy demands, environmental issues, and a constantly changing precious metals market have brought sustainability of the mining sector to the forefront once more. Sustainability is an ever-present cautionary factor and also an extremely important part of the decision-making process that lies ahead. Despite such pressures, the mining sector will make us proud and we look forward to showing the world what we’ve got.

CEO Global congratulates these

men. Being recognised in a challenging sector makes your achievements laudable. We wish you well in the coming years and know you will do us proud.

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

From South Africa

Percival Ntuthuko Khoza

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he mining sector Country and Regional winner, Percival Ntuthuko Khoza, is the CEO of Alexkor. He has been in the sector for 20 years and currently manages 1 000 people. Percival has a BSc Mining Engineering degree from the University of the Witwatersrand and completed an Executive Development Programme with the South African School of Business Leadership in 2011. He regularly participates in private and public forums that discuss mining issues, policy and compliance and he belongs to the Wits University Mining Engineers Association. His business acumen and years of experience have transformed the profitability and sustainability of Alexkor. In his personal capacity he coaches young people and potential female entrepreneurs on business development and sustainability. Percival believes individual development is important because “The future of any organisation or society is dependent on competent people who learn, master and advance from those who lived before them.�


FINALIST From South Africa

Dr Freddy van der Berg Dr Freddy van der Berg is the Group Chief Executive Officer of Mukundi Mining Resources, a company which aims to create efficient and effective executive teams in the mining sector. He has an MBA from the Commonwealth Open University and a PhD from Trinity University. In 2014 Dr van der Berg was a Semi Finalist for the Boss of the Year. He has been a Director for several institutions including; MMR Lesotho, MMR Diamonds, Vibe Group, Jireh Holdings and F.C. Hospitality Group, to name a few.

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OUT OFOFFICE

The New BMW

X5 M and New BMW X6 M

by Carl Wepener

Powerful , Playful , Delightful The new BMW X5 M and new BMW X6 M are setting the pace once again in the high-performance Sports Activity Vehicle (SAV) and Sports Activity CoupĂŠ (SAC) segment. When the previous generation of the two vehicles arrived in 2009, it was the first time that the high-performance character distilled by BMW M GmbH had been transplanted into an all-wheel-drive BMW X model. The result was class-leading dynamics. The new BMW X5 M and new BMW X6 M pull no punches and continue their success story in respect of dynamic excellence and outstanding efficiency as thoroughbred SAC vehicles.

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he new BMW X5 M and new BMW X6 M are exclusive, robust, agile and very user-friendly for everyday driving and especially for highperformance driving. The two vehicles’ impressive performance sprint figures, from 0 to 100 km/h in 4.2 seconds, are testimony to their capability as M sports vehicles. Both models have the super-smooth and fast-changing standard eight-speed M Steptronic transmission. Top speed is limited to 250 km/h. Our fuel consumption figures were not calculated on the basis of the ECE test cycle, which comes out at around 11.1 l/100 km. Ours was 16.1 l/100 km with sport-like driving throughout.

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BMW is well known for its innovative engine technology and thus it is no surprise that the new M TwinPower Turbo engine for the BMW X5 M and BMW X6 M is the most powerful unit ever developed by BMW for an all-wheel-drive vehicle. Boasting innovative M TwinPower Turbo technology with a pair of TwinScroll turbochargers, cross-bank exhaust manifolds, VALVETRONIC and High Precision Direct Petrol Injection, the 4.4-litre V8 produces a maximum output of 423 kW between 6 000 and 6 500 rpm. Peak torque has been boosted by 70 Nm, which equates to a rise of 10%. Its 750 Nm can be enjoyed across a broad rev range between 2 200 and 5 000 rpm.


Technical Specifications at a Glance

BMW X6 M Ground clearance

195

Tank capacity

app. ltr

85

Engine Config/No of cyls/valves

V/8/4

Engine technology

BMW M TwinPower Turbo technology with variable inlet geometry, TwinScroll biturbo charging, High Precision Petrol Direct Injection, VALVETRONIC

Capacity, effective

cm³

4395

Stroke/bore

mm

88.3/89.0

Compression ratio

:1

10.0

Fuel grade

RON 95–98

Max output

kW/hp

423/575

at

rpm

6000–6500

Torque

Nm

750

at

rpm

2200–5000

Driving Dynamics and Safety Driving stability systems

Standard: DSC incl. ABS and M Dynamic Mode, Cornering Brake Control (CBC), Dynamic Brake Control (DBC), Electronic Differential Lock ADB-X, Dry Braking function, Fading Compensation, Start-Off Assistant; DSC cross-linked with xDrive all-wheel drive, Dynamic Performance Control, Hill Descent Control (HDC), Adaptive Drive

Safety equipment

Standard: airbags for driver and front passenger, side airbags for driver and front passenger, head airbags for front and rear seats, crash-activated head restraints at the front, three-point inertia-reel seatbelts on all seats with belt stopper, belt latch tensioner and belt force limiter at the front, crash sensors, rollover sensors, tyre defect indicator

Transmission Type of gearbox

8-speed Steptronic

Performance Power-to-weight ratio (DIN)

kg/kW

5.4

Output per litre

kW/ltr

96.2

Acceleration 0–100 km/h

s

4.2

s

22.6

s

–/–

0–1000 m

in 4th/5th gear

80–120 km/h

Top speed

km/h

250 (280)2)

BMW EfficientDynamics BMW EfficientDynamics, standard features

Brake Energy Regeneration, Electric Power Steering (EPS), Auto Start Stop function, ECO PRO mode, intelligent lightweight construction, on-demand operation of ancillary units, detachable a/c compressor

Fuel Consumption EU3) With standard tyres: Urban

l/100km

14.7

Extra-urban

l/100km

9.0

Combined

l/100km

11.1

g/km

258

CO2

Emission rating

EU6

Specifications applicable to ACEA markets, data relevant to homologation applicable in part only to Germany (weight). Figures in brackets refer to automatic transmission 1) 2) 3)

Oil change In conjunction with optional M Driver’s Package Fuel consumption and CO2 emissions depend on the selected tyre format

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OUT OFOFFICE

The new BMW X5 M and new BMW X6 M, with their exteriors painted fully in body colour, cut a sleek yet menacing figure on the road. Additional exterior design modifications elevate the M models even further from the standard BMW X5 and BMW X6. Large air intakes at the front end, side gills with a model badge and Air Breathers, signature M exterior mirrors in twin-stalk style, a typical M four-tailpipe exhaust system and a rear spoiler (for the BMW X6 M) give them a standalone look M fans will immediately recognise. Setting the seal on this exclusive range of features are M-specific 20-inch light-alloy wheels with mixed tyres or forged 21-inch M light-alloy wheels (optional). The high-quality interior is most impressive with its combination of sporty features, exclusive materials and flawless workmanship. The M instrument cluster, M leather steering wheel with aluminium gearshift paddles and M gearshift lever are complemented by electrically operated M sports seats for the driver and front passenger as well as a M driver’s footrest. New BMW X5 M and BMW X6 M customers also have the choice of various options exclusive to the M models, such as 21-inch M light-alloy wheels, Merino full-leather trim and M multifunction seats. And there’s also a choice of two new and exclusive M paint finishes. The real pleasure of both these brutes lies of course in their performance and drivability while being in the fold of pure luxury or Spartan functionality. We have already mentioned the 0 to 100 kph time and the almighty power sent to the road through its four driven wheels, but what has not been mentioned is the exhilaration

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of being behind the wheel of both these SACs that makes you feel you are piloting a superfast fighter jet and not a land-based vehicle. Road stability both on tar and gravel is excellent, while you can easily throw the Ms around twisting corners with no fear of understeer or oversteer. Rough roads are easily negotiated and potholes, unless over the whole road, are easily missed by rapid and precise turns on the steering wheel. Luxury is the word and there is want for nothing in these luxury SAC vehicles. Pricing for the Two Models

BMW X5 M X5 M 6-speed M Sports Automatic Transmission Steptronic

R1 643 000

BMW X6 M X6 M 0 6-speed M Sports Automatic Transmission Steptronic

R1 676 500

There is a list as long as my arm of optional equipment in order to personalise or individualise your M vehicle. My prediction is that both these vehicles will be supreme contenders in this field for a long time to come – and, yes, the space occupied by the BMW X6 is surely going to get other brands like Mercedes-Benz, Jaguar and some others going, but it is going to be a tough act to follow.


Technical Specifications at a Glance

BMW X5 M Ground clearance

195

Tank capacity

app ltr

85

Engine Engine technology

BMW M TwinPower Turbo technology with variable inlet geometry, TwinScroll biturbo charging, High Precision Petrol Direct Injection, VALVETRONIC

Capacity, effective

cm³

4395

Stroke/bore

mm

88.3/89.0

Max output

kW/hp

423/575

at

rpm

6000–6500

Torque

Nm

750

at

rpm

2200–5000

Driving stability systems

Standard: DSC incl. ABS and M Dynamic Mode, Cornering Brake Control (CBC), Dynamic Brake Control (DBC), Electronic Differential Lock ADB-X, Dry Braking function, Fading Compensation, Start-Off Assistant; DSC cross-linked with xDrive all-wheel drive, Dynamic Performance Control, Hill Descent Control (HDC), Adaptive Drive

Safety equipment

Standard: airbags for driver and front passenger, side airbags for driver and front passenger, head airbags for front and rear seats, crash-activated head restraints at the front, three-point inertia-reel seatbelts on all seats with belt stopper, belt latch tensioner and belt force limiter at the front, crash sensors, rollover sensors, tyre defect indicator

Transmission Type of gearbox

8-speed Steptronic

Performance Power-to-weight ratio (DIN)

kg/kW

5.4

Output per litre

kW/ltr

96.2

Acceleration 0–100 km/h

s

4.2

s

22.6

s

–/–

0–1000 m

in 4th/5th gear km/h

80–120

Top speed

km/h

250 (280)2)

BMW EfficientDynamics BMW EfficientDynamics, standard features

Brake Energy Regeneration, Electric Power Steering (EPS), Auto Start Stop function, ECO PRO mode, intelligent lightweight construction, on-demand operation of ancillary units, detachable a/c compressor

Fuel Consumption EU3) With standard tyres: Urban

l/100km

Extra-urban

l/100km

9.0

Combined

l/100km

11.1

CO2

g/km

Emission rating

14.7

258 EU6

Specifications applicable to ACEA markets, data relevant to homologation applicable in part only to Germany (weight). Figures in brackets refer to automatic transmission 1) 2) 3)

Oil change In conjunction with optional M Driver’s Package Fuel consumption and CO2 emissions depend on the selected tyre format

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Public Enterprises The public sector faces constant scrutiny, as public demands and extensive mandates can be vastly conflicting. Fortunately, we have dedicated men staffing this sector at all levels. Leadership of public enterprises requires immense skill and knowledge of one’s surroundings in order to remain a national contributor.

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tate-owned enterprises have invested many resources in development that is conducive to the entrepreneurial spirit. This has been a priority in order to promote the development and sustainability of communities. Moreover, public enterprises are making considerable contributions to our continent’s gross domestic product. Further benefits arising from this sector include job creation, accessibility to many resources, and economic development. Although this sector has come a long way with regard to gender equality, men are still the most prominent, occupying positions at all levels.

Air Mauritius commends these

men for their endurance in a challenging economic sector. You manage to contribute so much that is noteworthy.

From South Africa

Xolile George

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olile George is the CEO of South African Local Government Association (SALGA), an organisation that provides advice and support to South Africa’s municipalities. His 23 years and international experience within the Public Enterprises sector has greatly contributed to his status as Country and Regional winner within the sector. Xolile is a member of the Presidents Co-ordinating Council and is a member of the forum of South African Director Generals. In addition to his impressive and extensive qualifications he was City Of Jo’burg’s Best Performing Regional Director in 2003/04 and a finalist in the Boss of the Year’s Awards for 2013. Since joining SALGA he has put in place a five year strategy which has achieved; debt recovery, financial recovery and improved revenue streams from municipalities. In addition SALGA enjoyed successive clean audits for 2012/13 and 2013/14.


FINALIST From South Africa

Nakampe Modike The Secretary General of Rand Water Young Professional Forum, Nakampe Modike is a water treatment specialist for the Rand Water Board. He is a member of South African Institute of Internal Auditors, Water Institute of South Africa and a Registered Professional Natural Scientist: Water Resources. Nakampe has a Water Care National Diploma and B-Tech from the Tshwane University of Technology as well as a B-Tech degree in Operations Management from the University of Johannesburg. In 2013 he was voted one of the top 200 young South Africans by Mail & Guardian.

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CASE IN POINT

Airline Receives

International Recognition by Samantha Barnes

Carla da Silva does not shy away from a challenge. When she joined Air Mauritius as the regional manager for Southern Africa and Latin America in 2010 she recognised that there were opportunities to improve the way that the airline generated business. Carla also recognised that she would need to inspire her team if she was to bring about the change that she knew was achievable in her own mind. Carla da Silva, Regional Manager for Southern Africa and Latin America, Air Mauritius


CASE IN POINT

B

ut with all well thought out plans Carla knew that she had to start somewhere and make goals clear and achievable. The only way to get bums on seats was to get people on board (if you will excuse the pun). In all business success stories the first step starts with examining the balance sheet and the assets that you have at your disposal. In 2010 Air Mauritius was a R114 million business. Today, a mere five years later, Carla heads up a R400 million operation: achieving these results in an industry as competitive as aviation takes some doing. Not only has Air Mauritius attained and exceeded its sales targets; it has grown and expanded revenue in Africa and Latin America, attracting favourable attention from what can only be an expanding passenger base. Da Silva’s has set clear targets for the airline to achieve this year. Diversifying the ways in which Air Mauritius appeals to its market is reaping rewards for the airline in terms of growing passenger numbers. ”Through e-commerce we are able to offer flights and accommodation in one booking online that is far more cost effective for the traveller,” explains Carla. Mauritius is not Just for Honeymooners Typically we think of Mauritius as a destination for honeymooners, romantic getaways and laid back family holidays. All this would be true. Mauritius also appeals to business traveller, for several good reasons. “Many South African companies are establishing offices in Mauritius,” explains Carla. “Mauritius is recognised for its tax benefits as well as for the ease of doing business there.” What is the first thing you want to do before embarking on the next leg of your flight home or to another destination? The three ‘r’s’ in this case (give or take a few exceptions) are rest, relaxation and reading. The newly upgraded (and oh so posh) Amedee Maingard Lounge in Mauritius is by invitation only. You may think ‘that rules me out as my company only purchases economy class tickets.’ But here is the thing…. If one has purchased an economy class ticket and wish to upgrade to business class on departure, you

may at only R1850 enjoying a business class seat, service and business class lounges. Plainly put, this means that you actually get some well-deserved shut eye, instead of your knees playing ‘meet and greet’ with the passenger in the seat in front of you. And I am talking about enjoying a proper sleep, not the catnapping kind when you wake up in a confused fog. Imagine waking up refreshed! If you think all this sounds pretty good, it gets better. While waiting to embark your flight as a member of Travel Smart Program you have access to a business lounge. “We have introduced French champagne and shower facilities for passengers who are going beyond Mauritius, and a play area for children,” says Carla. Travel Smart was an idea proposed by Carla. “When I started with the airline in 2010, the low season was problematic. We were not filling seats during this period. The Travel Smart programme introduced cost effective value propositions. A family travelling with two children under 12 years will get free air fare for their two children,” says Carla. The entire family and their travel experience has been well thought out by Air Mauritius. “A mom and her baby are eligible to an extra luggage allowance. Dad is also eligible for an extra luggage allowance, understanding that he may want to take his golf bag on holiday. A bride receives a 20% discount on her airfare.” The Travel Smart programme has generated substantial business for Air Mauritius, which confirms that passengers appreciate the perks and convenience that they are getting with travelling with the airline. “The Travel Smart programme has created a smooth growth of business across the years instead of having dips during the low season,” explains Carla. Such has been the success of Travel Smart that a new programme, Extravaganza, is being introduced.

“A family travelling with two children under 12 years will get free air fare for their two children,” says Carla.

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CASE IN POINT

Linking with Key Destinations “Air Mauritius is acting as a hub to schedules serving the developing and emerging markets,” confirms Carla. South Africa is geographically well located to serve this growing market. “We are only 7 hours from Australia and only 6 hours to all four parts of India,” says Carla. “Air Mauritius is also linking up with schedules to China, Singapore, Europe and Africa. We serve Africa from Durban, Cape Town and Johannesburg. Latin American travellers love the bush and the beach and once you have created the relationship they will return.” Award for Excellence Earlier this year Air Mauritius achieved a Four Star Sky Trax Rating. This recognises Air Mauritius as a global entity in terms of service and product. A lot of enhancements and improvements have been made across the operation. “This award reassures the customer that our number one priority is safety,” explains Carla.

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In addition to safety, the six new aircraft will offer good looks and comfort. Carla speaks of the airline’s new Air Bus 350 900 with the same measure of pride as a mother showing off her baby. The Airbus uses advanced materials. Environmental impact is also a key consideration. It is heartening to learn that there is a 25% cost savings reduction in fuel burn as well a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. Air Mauritius is taking their commitment towards greening the planet one step further. “We plant one tree for every takeoff,” explains Carla. Let’s Meet in Mauritius Mauritius is a popular destination for the MICE market. For those unfamiliar with the term this refers to ‘meetings, incentives, conferencing and exhibitions.’ It usually refers to large groups of people being brought together for a conference or event. It includes incentive tourism, where an employee is rewarded by an organisation for targets met or exceeded, or a job well done. Incentive tourism is usually conducted for


CASE IN POINT

Air Mauritius offers a unique opportunity for passengers to upgrade their booking. entertainment rather than for professional or educational purposes. Air Mauritius has two dedicated consultants to the MICE market, with clients including big names in the IT and financial sectors and corporates like SA Breweries and Coca-Cola. “Groups can vary between 20 and 500 people,” says Carla. ”The upgrades to our fleet include the Airbus 340 which can accommodate 300 passengers. “The Mauritian conference market has the facilities to meet requirements at all levels of the market, which is reassuring. Mauritius also appeals to the MICE market because it is conveniently situated from South Africa, being only 4 hours from Johannesburg, 3 hours from Durban, and 5 hours from Cape Town. Plus you don’t need visas and there is no malaria,” explains Carla. Creating a New Customer Experience Air Mauritius is gaining ground over the competition for another reason; its flexibility towards its passengers and the airline’s fresh approach to adding to the overall customer experience. “As a small airline we offer more flexibility and provide for breakaways from a group booking. So if a couple wanted to extend their stay after a conference in Mauritius, we could arrange this. We even have a special dedicated terminal for this. We also brand headrests,” says Carla. Air Mauritius offers a unique opportunity for passengers to upgrade their booking. “They bid online to upgrade their ticket. Sometimes they can be very lucky with the deal they get,” notes Carla. We Saw It On Facebook Social media is a marketing tool highly favoured by the airline. “I am definitely an avid Facebook fan,” says Carla. “It is a powerful tool for marketing and has turned the world into a global village. It has a split second impact in reaching people, and

is especially useful when we are having specials. We are contacted within hours by so many fans! The drawback is that people are not communicating anymore. If you travel on a train in Europe, people are all on their phones with their headsets. It is frightening, but we also have to be a part of this technology.” Carla loves the way in which people who have travelled with Air Mauritius are sharing their travel

Earlier this year Air Mauritius achieved a Four Star Sky Trax Rating. stories of their travel experiences. “This has reach!” says Carla. “I am inspired by this as are people viewing this on Facebook. Human beings are more inspired by pictures. So looking at photos connects with them by reaching their emotions.” The Numbers Tell a Story The new airport terminal at Mauritius caters for 4,5 million passengers annually. Air Mauritius as a government owned airline is playing an important part in stimulating the island’s economy. Carla and her Southern Africa team are playing a big part in attracting these passenger numbers. “It is rewarding to know that we are impacting on the Mauritian economy,” says Carla. Her more than 18 years in the aviation industry have brought Carla recognition as a respected leader within the sector. Carla is the Chairperson of BARSA, Board of Airline Representatives of South Africa and a Board Director of Aviation Coordination Services and a keynote speaker at many conferences; sharing her expertise. She is also a brand ambassador for Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government. But it is her will to make her mark on the world that is making the most difference.

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

SME Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are an integral sector of our economy. Government, financial services and public enterprises are investing much in order to make entrepreneurship more accessible through capital investments. This is a sector with an elevated position in our communities, as it empowers many to fulfil community needs and to sustain themselves.

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oreover, SMEs are employers of many local citizens, thus giving back in many ways. Although they are small enterprises, SMEs make their contributions to gross domestic product (GDP) and keep our economies afloat in various ways. Starting up a business is not without risk and SME contributors do what they can to ease this pressure. Entrepreneurs who recognise opportunities and take the plunge to turn something into a business are brave. They are, however, able to reap the rewards by taking risks and investing in a structured business venture.

The following men have identified opportunities and earned their successes. CEO Global recognises the risks you take and congratulates you on your efforts.

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

From Uganda

Shem Bageine

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eal estate investment agency, Bageine and Company Uganda Limited, better known as BCL, has provided property related services for over 25 years. Services include running an estate agency, providing property letting and management. “Our clientele covers local and international corporate companies, government institutions, banks, professional firms, private companies and individuals,” says Shem Bageine, chairman of BCL. The company also provides facilties management, site acquisition, property marketing and promotion, and property development. “The firm has vast experience in the valuation of commercial, industrial, agricultural, and residential properties as well as in plant and machinery, motor vehicles and motorcycles, office furniture and equipment for banks, as well as for parastatals and nongovernmental organisations,” shares Shem. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Surveyors of Uganda and a registered valuation surveyor in both Uganda and in Kenya. He has accreditation as a Senior Certifed Valuer from the International Realty Institute. We are honoured to have Shem Bageine as a Regional Winner in the SME category.


REGIONALWINNERS

From Kenya

From South Africa

Kelvin Kuria

Sonwabile Ndamase

“W

S

e launch a new product or system in the market every 6 months,” says Kelvin Kuria, Chief Executive Officer of Sunrise Tracking. The car tracking company was established five years ago. “We offer car tracking, fleet management system, fuel management system, car alarm, CCTV surveillance and biometrics services,” he says. Innovation is an important aspect of his company’s success. A wireless CCTV system which he invented in 2014 attracted favourable publicity. Kelvin was recognised by Forbes as among the top 30 Most Promising Young Entrepreneurs in Africa 2015. He has received a fellowship from President Barack Obama and received recognition in the 2015 Business Daily Watch Top 40 under 40 for Young entrepreneurs recognised and awarded for their accomplishments in business. A Regional Winner in the SME Category, Kelvin Kuria is an entrepreneur par excellence. He has been featured on CNN and Voice of America; reinforcing that he is a name worth watching.

onwabile Ndamase is the creator of the iconic Nelson Mandela shirt. For over 20 years, he has been dubbed the ‘Godfather of African style’ and helped shape the design direction of the African continent. Sonwabile is the executive president of the South African Fashion Designers Agency (SAFDA) and the Regional and Country winner in the SME Sector. He is also the creator of one of South Africa’s biggest design brands, Vukani! Range Creations. His annual Vukani! Fashion Awards are a highlight on the South African design calendar, and one of the biggest African fashion events. Consistent brand-building and delivery have seen Sonwabile and SAFDA discover and mentor some of South Africa’s greatest, including Gert-Johan Coetzee, for 20 years. As the leading design mentor in South Africa, fashion and design institutions from across the continent request the Godfather of African style to conduct workshops, deliver lectures, help structure curricula and adjudicate at some of the most high-profile fashion events.

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REGIONALWINNER

From Cameroon

Christian Ngan

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ntrepreneur, Christian Ngan started Malyn Cazalis, a natural ingredients cosmetics company in 2012 – with just $3000 in personal savings. Today Madlyn Cazalis has over 50 retail outlets in Central Africa (Cameroon and Gabon). The company is expected to generate more than $80.000 cumulated earnings within 3 years. The company is expanding: South African ALN Ventures invested $20.000 for a 5% equity stake. “We bring a new approach in the cosmetic industry in Central Africa. We produce products suitable for black and mixed skins avoiding maximum use of hazardous chemicals to the skin. Our products are between (90% to 99%) of plant origin,” says Christian. “We are very close to our customers, communicate in forums as well as in conferences and have a loyalty card,” says Christian. Home delivery has set the company apart from its competitors. Christian was recently listed twice in Forbes 30 Most Promising Young Entrepreneurs in Africa. He shares his experience as an entrepreneur with countries across Africa as well as in France. Christian Ngan is a worthy Regional Winner in the SME category.

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COUNTRYWINNER From South Africa

Dr. Lucas Moloi He scooped the same accolade in 2014 and he has done it again in 2015! Dr Lucas Matholela Moloi, Chief Executive Officer of Junto Group, is South Africa’s SME Country Sector winner. He is the current Vice Chairperson of Vuka Entrepreneurship Board, Vice President of World Quality Congress and Chairperson of South African Quality Institute among others. Dr Moloi holds a Doctorate in Arts and several diplomas. He facilitates internships with sector education training authorities (SETAs) and mentors those around him.

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FINALISTS From South Africa

Emmanuel Omaruaye South Africa’s Emmanuel Omaruaye, Chief Executive Officer of Delta Cab is a finalist in the SME Sector. Delta Cab corporate shuttle offers services for corporate companies such as banks consulting companies, hotels and private individuals. Emmanuel personally developed the Delta Cab brand into a successful professional world class shuttle service provider that is currently creating permanent employment in South Africa. He was a finalist in the Excellent Service of the Year Category at the Annual Business Excellence Awards 2011 and launched Delta Cab in Nigeria and other African countries.

From South Africa

Pieter J van den Berg He says he creates Fun! A finalist in the SME Sector, Pieter J van den Berg, Chief Executive Officer of Great SoapBox Fun has a fleet of 160 Soapbox Carts with which they offer a service to schools as a fund raiser, fun days or for corporate teambuilding. “I assist private, government and model C schools and NGO’s in all South Africa’s provinces by helping them arrange fun-filled soapbox cart events”. Based in Centurion, Gauteng they offer services nationwide.

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CASE IN POINT Thakhani Makhuvha, Chief Executive Officer, Small Enterprise Finance Agency

Entrepreneurial

Friendly Approach by Valdi Pereira

A quick conversation with any budding entrepreneur will reveal one of the most daunting challenges they face is securing funding. Often they find themselves dealing with organisations that are not attuned to the needs of entrepreneurs or for that matter, even understanding of their business aspirations.

“O

ne of the most important things I have learned in my role as CEO of the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa), is that you need humility and sensitivity when dealing with entrepreneurs,” reveals Thakhani Makhuvha. “We deal with so much more than business plans. Each one of the funding proposals we are asked to consider, carries within it, the hopes and aspirations of people who are dreaming of a brighter future.” sefa was established in April 2012 when the South African Micro-Finance Apex Fund, Khula Enterprise Finance and business activities of the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) merged.

As the newly appointed CEO, Thakhani spent the first part of his tenure bedding down the merged entity and dealing with the challenges that are inherent to any corporate activity. “The merger process taught me that there is no such thing as ‘too much communication’. Team members have the right to know what the future holds for them and how actions the organisation is taking will affect them,” he notes. The lessons he learnt in terms of the power of ongoing engagement have been put to good use in his dealings with finance applicants. He does not shirk contact with them and is always willing to engage directly if they want to talk to him. “At sefa we place a high premium on corporate governance and ethical behaviour. However, I am always willing to deal directly with applicants and listen to their challenges and hopefully learn how we can offer a better service. It’s important to adapt to the environmental challenges entrepreneurs are experiencing and I can only do this if I am open to engaging with them.” With a keen focus on remaining flexible and attuned to market needs it is no surprise to learn then that in 2013 sefa teamed up with the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) and the IDC to support one of the New Growth Path goals to create 5 million new jobs by 2020. In terms of the agreement the entities work together to fund young entrepreneurs. The IDC contributed R1bn to the fund and sefa committed R1,7bn. The NYDA plays an important supporting role in screening and recommending young entrepreneurs to the finance offered by the entities. “During the past two years, we have distributed about R450mil to young people,” shares Thakhani. “We focused intensely on making young entrepreneurs aware of the funding opportunity that has been created.” While working with youthful entrepreneurs is a tremendous source of inspiration for him. He notes that challenges do exist. “We see a lot of good ideas, but often young entrepreneurs are vexed by challenges of scalability. They are not always sure how to take the next step with their product or service and how to work towards a long-term vision for their business.” He believes that with guidance and support from experienced institutions and mentors, these challenges can be overcome: “Young entrepreneurs are committed to achieving success. If we give them our support, I am confident we will see the positive results.”

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Tourism and Leisure The tourism and leisure sector has grown immensely along with our developing economy. African countries are global destinations of choice for many. The diversity of this sector offers abundant business opportunities. Besides an influx of foreign investment, Africans have numerous opportunities to capitalise on this blossoming market.

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owever, locals need to be educated on the benefits of a growing tourism sector. Not only is this sector one in which we can make personal gains, but it is also a sector that can significantly contribute to GDP (gross domestic product) growth and draw attention to the treasures of our continent. Infrastructure is one challenge facing this sector, but investors recognise this and are collaborating with government to cater for local and international travellers. Our rich heritage and vast diversity are points of interest for foreigners, making it easy for Africans to grow their legacy beyond our borders.

These Titans have invested much in the development and continuity of their sector as well as in its economic growth and development. VisaRequest admires your determination and consistency.

.co.za

From South Africa

Adriaan Johannes Liebetrau

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eginning his career in the Tourism and Leisure industry at the age of 10, Adriaan Johannes Liebetrau has been in the sector for 21 years. He has trained and worked with Protea Hospitality, Peermont Hotels, Casinos and Resorts, Emperors Palace and Travel with Flair. In his time with TWF he took the division from one office and R50 million turnover annually to seven offices and over R500 million turnover annually. Adriaan opened seven hotels, one convention centre and one casino while working at Peermont as the Operational Project Manager. At 23 he was the youngest General Manager at Peermont Hotels Casinos and Resorts. He is currently the CEO of The Southern African Association for the Conference Industry (SAACI), a position he has landed at the impressive age of 30. He serves on the advisory boards and regularly lecturers at several universities around South Africa. Adriaan is also the Country winner in the Tourism and Leisure sector.


FINALISTS From Mauritius

Manish Bundhun The MBA holder, Manish Bundhun is the Chief Human Resources Executive of the Rogers Group, which was established in 1899. With over 4 000 employees the Rogers Group is a conglomerate which is active in aviation, finance, hospitality and more. The Certified Agility Coach and Trainer received his B.Sc. Degree in Management in 2003 from the University of Mauritius. Manish develops those around him through mentoring, coaching, formal training and through lecturing at local universities and colleges. He is a finalist in his sector.

From Mauritius

Marie Jean Cyril Jullienne Marie Jean Cyril Jullienne is the Chief Human Resources Officer for Veranda Leisure and Hospitality Ltd in Mauritius. Marie is a certified practitioner of Neuro Linguistic Programming and has a Diploma in Business Administration from the University of Nice Cote d’A zur in France. In addition the Tourism and Leisure finalist holds a Degree in Business Administration with specialisation in Human Resources Management. Marie was involved with the successful opening of the Heritage Awali Golf and Spa Resort for the VLH Group.

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It was a cold evening in Tshwane: the perfect setting for a brandy-tasting with Thamsanqa Makhehla and a fine meal prepared by restaurateur and chef Dino Retsos. The weather had the kind of chill factor where one holds onto one’s trench coat like a safety blanket. I had an awful cough that was doing the rounds in Tshwane. My voice had undertones of a chain smoker turned brandy drinker, giving me an air of respectability in terms of knowing something about the goldencoloured liquid.

a

Quintessential Brandy Food Affair

by Samantha Barnes

&

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abatho Events Management came up with the concept of the event. This Level-3 BEE company focuses on events and promotions activations. It is also succeeding in establishing long-term relationships with brand owners, companies and associates. “We try to do things differently,” says CEO Mapula Digangoane. “Brandy has a different connotation. We invited select guests and the response has been overwhelming. We chose Richelieu, as it is not celebrated enough. Our association with establishing Richelieu as a brand presence goes back three years.” That Mabatho Events Management secured Richelieu as a premium brandy carries some weight. “We provide consistency in service delivery,” says Mapula. “I love intimate gatherings such as this evening where we give guests the attention that they feel they deserve.”

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Food Maestro Flourishes in the Kitchen Business strategist turned restaurateur and chef Dino Retsos represents that special breed of professional who makes a success of whatever he puts his mind to. Dino is the founder of Quintessence of Food and the owner of Bugatti Taste Café in Brooklyn Shopping Mall in Pretoria. He is cooking up a five-course meal for a select group of invited guests and will be pushing the creative envelope. His original plan was not to follow in his dad’s footsteps by working in the restaurant trade. Nevertheless, being a dutiful son in a Greek household, Dino helped out in the kitchen as a teenager in the family restaurant in Pretoria. “Dad was very old school and very hard on us. It was good – it forces you to find your own way,” says Dino. With a BCom under his belt, Dino initially worked in prestigious companies as a business analyst and


CASE IN POINT

lending specialist. The renowned Greek work ethic in cooking. “Look at the brandy-tasting notes. Find kicked in, accelerating Dino’s rapid ascent up the all the complementary pairings for each note. Look corporate ladder. “I never studied IT. I went for the at cross-synthesis. Be wary of the alcohol content in interview, used the lingo and got the job. I didn’t know brandy. It can override flavours.” He is not a brandy snob, if there is such a thing. Dino what a server was! “Through a combination of creativity and the desire is not too fussed about whether a brandy-inspired menu to get ahead I was promoted six times in six years,” should be with meat, fish or fowl. “Just look at the tasting explains Dino. “We are here for something. We must profile of each brandy,” says Dino airily. “I am serving seafood, lamb and pork tonight. There is no particular enforce it: try and improve things all the time.” Dino’s business-analyst background has stood him protein that should accompany brandy.” in good stead for a career as a chef. “With each problem you are presented with, you need to think out of the The Face of the Brand box and be solution-driven. By understanding business Thamsanqa Makhehla talks to and trains consumers processes – which were developed in a week – this regarding Richelieu. Describing what sounds like the forced you to be creative. nose of a bloodhound, Thami was trained to pick up “The food industry also requires creative thinking. the difference in smell between Richelieu and other In the last 10 years the food brands, and trained how to channels have influenced drink it (jokes aside). His this. People are looking for “Brandy has a different connotation. ability to discern smell to the those experiences with food. required took five years We invited select guests and the level There is more specialisation and included items like apand the need to be more crea- response has been overwhelming,” ples, figs and pears. A skill tive.” for sure! says CEO Mapula Digangoane. Dino is making a delib“After smelling something, erately gradual transition you need to restart your nose. towards this level of creativity. He doesn’t want to risk It is simple: you smell the back of your hand,” says Thashocking people, so his signature menu has one or two mi. No overnight sensation, brandy has a heritage and is special items. “I enjoy working in the kitchen the most. Proudly South African. “Richelieu has brandies that win The simple chopping of onions and the focus on what international awards. Richelieu won a double gold in 2015 you are doing. Not having to worry about wages,” says in an international spirits and wine competition.” Judges Dino. taste blind, removing the risk of possible bias in judging. He is quick to spot changing trends, starting his None of the guests actually know what brandy is. bespoke catering company Quintessence of Food a It would be embarrassing if Thami was not so nice. year ago. “Life pushes you to certain situations,” he “Brandy is actually wine; Chenin Blanc that is matured says. “Load-shedding forced me to look forward and for a minimum of three years. He asks the guests to be clear about what I stand for.” smell the brandy. Everyone points their nose downDino is game for a challenge, creatively speaking. wards in the goblet. We are swiftly corrected by the “I am friends with some upper class mates. Initially, connoisseur. “Rather hold your nose above the glass. they requested a three-course menu and it turned out Let it come to you,” says Thami. to be nine courses! Working under that pressure is a “What is coming up?” Thami asks, referring to the mixture of adrenalin and fear and not about what they undertones. “Drink me! Drink me!” replies a cheeky are going to say. Pushing yourself beyond your comfort guest, to laughter all around. “There is no wrong way zone just means that you don’t know if you are capable. in tasting,” says Thami, undeterred. He will make branIt is important for the customer and for you.” dy drinkers of us yet. “Every person has an imprint in Dino pushed his stress barometer sky-high when their memory.” he accepted a contract to handle catering for 400 guests Later on in the evening, I taste a delicious dessert on behalf of Groot FM when the radio station hosted which includes caramelised apple, pistachio, fresh the Ghooma Awards. “We worked off site on a balcony apple and apple sorbet. Dino overhears me saying that for this state banquet, making canapés to serve in the the taste reminds me of Christmas time. His face lights late evening.” up in delight, pleased that he has accomplished this. Food and brandy pairing is referred to as a marriage Just a Dash of Brandy between the two, evoking memories from taste and Chef Dino speaks in what sounds like a conductor’s smell. He has accomplished his mission. rendition of a melody when asked about using brandy Sheer genius!

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GOING GREEN

Beekeeping

Is Coming to Town

by Samantha Barnes

If ever there were a person who sang bees’ praises, it would be Dominique Marchand. He even quotes a line from a song, ‘Praising Bees’: “When we learn to understand bees we see that they are our teachers.” Cape Town-based Dominique has many strings to his bow, including providing training for the Urban Beekeeping Project, being a miller of beeswax foundation sheets, and producing honey wines (mead) and honey confectionery.

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ccording to Dominique, Africa is blessed with a natural phenomenon named Apis mellifera. A simple combination of good weather, flowers and the honeybee enables many people to harvest honey for home consumption or as a valuable commodity for local trade or export. As passionate about the Urban Beekeeping Project as he is about bees, Dominique says that the project has the potential to improve the lives, nutrition and income of many people in greater Cape Town. “A growing number of urban residents keep indigenous Cape honeybees, and this project will work with beekeepers to improve skills and strengthen the local honey brand,” Dominque explains. Starting with up to 10 sustainable pilot projects, the Beekeeping Development Programme will train up to 100 beneficiaries in beekeeping as well as in marketing the honey and valued-added products. Beekeeping Is Spreading Its Wings It doesn’t matter which side of ‘the railway line’ you live on, you can work with bees. “Whether you live near the Newlands forest, in the CBD [central business district],

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or in Mannenberg, you can work with the Apis mellifera capensis [Cape honeybee] to provide nutritious and valuable honey,” says Dominique. Today, Dominique can hardly contain his excitement. A family living in Milnerton, an established and upmarket suburb, and a short drive from the exclusive Cape Town Waterfront, has just harvested 20 kilograms of honey. This is not an uncommon quantity for a single hive. What excites Dominic is that the family approached him about a swarm of bees that had made its home in their garden last October. Rather than flushing out the bees, the family decided to work with them. In the space of just six months, they produced a good harvest. In the past, beekeeping has been a hobby of the privileged few. The aim of the Urban Beekeeping Project is to extend the benefits of beekeeping to historically disadvantaged people throughout greater Cape Town. This is done through skills transfer and AgriSETA training in beekeeping, as well as investment in equipment and business skills. Training consists of a one-year interactive course (therein lies the skill) followed by at least three years’ of mentorship. Dominique plans to extend the focus of the Urban Beekeeping Project. His heart is set on producing


GOING GREEN

Cape Town’s own local honey. “The project will combine food security with entrepreneurship and ecotourism for local and international visitors discovering the worldunique Apis mellifera capensis,” says Dominique. Feed the Bees! The trendy hobby of keeping bees could be bad for them. Go figure! British scientists at the University of Sussex have claimed that urban beekeepers who set up hives in cities could be harming honey bees, with city bees running the risk of starvation. The reason for this, according to the scientists, is that bees living in city hives cannot find enough flowers to feed on locally and can end up sick or starving to death. They recommend that city dwellers wanting to help honeybees plant their favourite flowers to feed on.

The aim of the Urban Beekeeping Project is to extend the benefits of beekeeping to historically disadvantaged people throughout greater Cape Town. Beekeeping has become a popular pastime among people in greater London. Professor Francis Ratnieks and Dr Karin Alton from the Laboratory of Apiculture and Social Insects (LASI) at the University of Sussex note that most of the promotion of beekeeping is aimed at urban areas, especially London . Data from BeeBase, a register of apiaries maintained by the United Kingdom’s National Bee Unit, showed that, in five years from 2008 to 2013, the number of beekeepers in Greater London tripled from 464 to 1 237, and to over 3 500 hives. There are about 10 hives in every square kilometre of London compared with one hive per hectare across England as a whole. Among the reasons cited by scientists for the decline in honeybees and wild bees in the United Kingdom is loss of flowers and habitat. Professor Ratnieks says: “In the UK, 75 per cent of the total land is now agricultural, so the lack of flowers is a major problem for our bees.” Winnie the Pooh Would Be Pleased There are many reasons to promote the production of honey. In the Western Cape in South Africa, which is a fruitgrowing region generating significant export earnings from deciduous fruit, honeybees are vital as pollinators. Yet, this opportunity has not been fully utilised in terms of producing honey. “Production does not satisfy current domestic demand, and honey is therefore routinely imported, up to 2,000 tons per annum,” says Dominique. There is also great scope for increasing demand by promoting the benefits of hive products.

Money in Honey As the Royal Beekeeper to Charles II said: “A bee is an exquisite chemist.” It is quite remarkable that, with some training, South African beekeepers can work in harmony with these industrious creatures to generate a fair income for themselves. By the fifth year of production and with 40 hives, aspiring beekeepers should generate a return of R74 000 per annum. Yet, South Africa “currently imports more than 3 500 tons of honey per annum, plus a couple of hundred tons of beeswax for cosmetic purposes,” Dominique says. All South Africa’s honey could be produced locally. The reason for importing is due to a shortage of trained bee farmers. By comparison, East Africa produces and exports up to 100 000 tons of honey per annum. “Kenya for example is only a third of the size of South Africa and has large semi-arid parts similar to us, but their beekeeping industry plans to triple its honey and beeswax production in the next few years,” Dominque confirms. The present value of the Turkish bee industry is over R2 billion a year, plus pollination. Not a figure to be scoffed at! We Are in Bees-iness Dominique has done his sums, using figures from farming-industry bodies: In South Africa, there are 40 000 commercial farmers plus 250 000 emerging and traditional farmers, and 500 000 farm workers who could be potential bee farmers. If only 1% (7 900) were to be involved in beekeeping, each one looking after 10 hives, it would result in 79 000 active hives each producing 20 kg of honey per year, which amounts to 1 580 tons of honey per year, not to mention the other products and services related to beekeeping. There are many value-added products and services to build with, for example: beeswax, pollen, propolis, and pollination services. This is not a bad deal considering the low investment and the long-term benefits, as well as providing thousands of people, especially those in rural areas, with a foothold in the economy. Sources: Cape Times, ‘Honey bees to the rescue’, 3 June 2014; Daily Mail, 14 August 2013


Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Welfare and Civil Society Organisations Although a difficult sector to keep afloat, welfare and civil society organisations (CSOs) provide services that are integral to our communities. These organisations address major social issues and mostly rely on the goodwill of others for resources. Sadly, many Africans are in need of these services for their wellbeing.

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en in CSOs and welfare organisations make up a smaller percentage of the workforce than do women, but their contributions are no less valuable. The welfare of our citizenry and animals are important to those working in this sector and they address numerous issues such as abuse, malnutrition, poverty, health care and overall wellbeing. Although resilient, Africans endure many hardships that can have life-changing effects on communities. Thankfully, welfare organisations and CSOs are endeavouring to bring about change on numerous levels. However, without the support of the public, many of these organisations would be left with little to no funding and resources.

CEO Global applauds the work of

the following Good Samaritans for their devotion to those in need. You are a beacon of hope to many. We thank you.

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

From Ghana

Francis Asong

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rancis Asong helped to develop Voice Ghana from its beginning as VOLPHIG in 2002 - with no office and resources - to a well-established and credible organisation in Ghana. Voice Ghana is a disability rights, advocacy and capacity building organisation. We want “to improve the lives of people with disabilities at grassroots level to take charge of their lives and to achieve their true potential,” says Francis. As director he ensures that Voice Ghana focuses on people with disabilities who have no or limited access to education. The reason for this maybe because of their gender, or that they live in remote areas or they are extremely poor. “We champion their rights and needs,” says Francis. “Our core mandate is to empower people with disabilities to take charge of their lives.” Other focus areas include education for people with disabilities in Ghana, championing economic empowerment, including political participation, and supporting their mobility rehabilitation needs.


REGIONALWINNERS

From Zambia

From Cameroon

Kelvin Esiasa

Oumarou Fousséni

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resident and founder of the Zambia Society for Public Administration (ZSPA), Kelvin Esiasa receives a Regional Award in addition to a Lifetime Achiever Award in the Welfare and Civil Society Organisations sector. Kelvin also provides strategic leadership at the Zambia Institute for Customer Management. He successfully launched this organisation to promote customer service excellence in the customer service industry, including call centre management. A weekly writer on best leadership practices in the Zambia Daily Mail, Kelvin’s expertise and views are sought in the media. He has a weekly slot on Joy FM Business Focus and Career Talk; looking at improving customer service in corporate entities and how to effectively choose a career, respectively. Kelvin’s innovative ideas are sought after, resulting in his membership of the intellectual institute of Zambia, an organisation which was established to be a think tank for Zambia’s development. In 2015, Kelvin established the Chief Mumena Institute of Education Aid, and also this year, was elected as a council member to the American Society for Public Administration .

“I

have trained the population and created infrastructure such as wells for water and roads. In some areas I have invested a lot in the promotion of preventative health, and have increased the productivity of populations from disadvantaged backgrounds,” says Oumarou Fousséni, from Cameroon. We are honoured to announce our Regional Winner in The Welfare and Civil Society sector, Oumarou Fousséni, from Cameroon. Oumarou is chief executive officer of PASSE: Programme Actions Social Sante et Environnement. “The organisation sets out to improve the health of the population in and around Cameroon, and we make sure that youth, including adolescents, are involved in our programmes,” says Oumarou. The organisation is also fighting for rights pertaining to health and the environment. With Oumarou at the helm, PASSE has established 123 wells in Cameroon and nine drinking water systems in rural Cameroon. He has also supported income generating micro projects and jobs to support more than 750 women and young people, and has trained 1000 educators on health issues.

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REGIONALWINNER

From Swaziland

Khulekani Magongo

R

egional and Country winner in the Welfare and Civil Society Organisations Sector, Khulekani Magongo, Executive Director of Young Heroes, managed a variety of development projects in the Lubombo region. He has a background in education and participated in community development projects while at university, where he was working as a volunteer, which inculcated his interest in project management. He studied programme activities and designed budget templates in excel spreadsheets to maximise use of time. For him teaching developed his love for children and motivated him to develop projects to address gaps in the care and development of children. He possesses the flexibility, communication skills and enthusiasm, businesses and nonprofit organisations require. Extensive skills development has boosted management skills and Khulekani’s capability to organise information and resources. He holds several qualifications from the University of Swaziland and the Columbia State University in New York, United States of America. He participated in the Southern African Knowledge Exchange where he was a speaker.

160 2015 TITANS


COUNTRYWINNER From South Africa

Bryan Ramkilawan He spent four years as a designer, 17 years as an academic lecturer, has been the Chairperson of an Academic Sub Committee and the Director of the South African Fashion Council. Bryan Ramkilawan, Chief Executive Officer of the Cape Town Fashion Council is the South African Country winner in the Welfare and Civil Society Organisations sector. He is an Associate of the following councils: Namibia Fashion Council, Botswana Fashion Council, and Mauritius Design Council and has fostered partnerships with the Zimbabwe Fashion Week and Mozambique Fashion Week.

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OUT OFOFFICE

Journey of a I Thousand Smiles by Leigh Schaller

Here are five destinations which prove that life is too short for the road most often travelled.

f time is money, then those days of paid annual leave in a year are surely priceless. We asked Wendy Smit, who has explored 32 countries and is the owner of For the Love of Cape Town Tours, a walking-tour operation, for her recommendations on some of the lesser-known destinations that are well worth spending your leave days on.

Explore New Zealand Like Frodo There is more to New Zealand than an almost invincible rugby team and the fact that New Zealand has seven sheep for every person. It is also blessed with a landscape that will make you tired of ‘oohing and aahing’. Wendy recommends renting a car and driving from Christchurch around the island. You should allow enough time to visit the picturesque Abel Tasman National Park as well as the Franz Joseph and Fox Glaciers – two of the most accessible in the world. Consider making Queenstown your base while you explore the area. Much of the landscape around Queenstown can only be explored by boat. “Be sure to check the weather forecast, as sunny and clear days are quite scarce,” advises Wendy. Let Croatia Amaze You “Imagine Italy and Greece combined, and there you have it – Croatia,” says Wendy. Less

Croatia

Argentina


OUT OFOFFICE

heralded than neighbouring Greece and Italy, Croatia is nonetheless worth a visit: “crystal-clear Mediterranean waters, food to tantalise all taste buds, and hospitable locals that will warm your heart,” she says, advising that you hop from island to island or tour the mainland by car. “Be sure to leave enough time to discover Dubrovnik, an ancient city enclosed with high walls. It is not really located off the beaten track but [is]known as the Pearl of the Adriatic and a top tourist destination for a reason. Go wander and get lost in the maze-like city streets and be on the lookout for secret passages in the outer wall that lead to low-key bars away from all the crowds.”

you’re there, take a step further out of your comfort zone and volunteer at the local library. “Volunteers are required to give two to three hours of their time in the afternoon and all you have to do is speak English. You will be expected to sit and talk to novice monks so they can practise their English. This will not only enrich their lives but also give you a very authentic experience, as you get to interact with locals on a deeper level,” notes Wendy. The cultural experience doesn’t have to end there. You can also give to those in need by attending a Tak Pak ceremony where “monks walk the streets of Luang Prabang with their baskets to collect alms,” explains Wendy. “Participants give food or gifts. This is an ancient and respected ceremony.”

Watch a Glacier Grow in Argentina With global warming turning the polar regions into soup, Perito Moreno – located in the southern part of Patagonia in Argentina – offers you the rare opportunity to view a glacier that is actually growing. “The glacier is magnificent – you can use boardwalks and boats to take you up to the face of the glacier, where you are almost guaranteed to witness large chunks of ice cracking off and exploding into the turquoise glacial lake,” Wendy explains. “The glacier’s face is approximately five kilometres wide, with an average height of 60 meters.”

Break New Ground in Bolivia Consider yourself an adventurous traveller? Give Bolivia a go. Bolivia has a rugged edge, which makes exploring Salar de Uyuni, the world’s largest salt flat, even more rewarding. “On route you will get to see wildlife such as Alpacas and Llamas, deserted ancient towns, dormant volcanos, active geysers, mineral lakes of all colours, including red, and also huge flocks of flamingos,” Wendy says. The Isla del Sol (Island of the Sun) is also worth visiting. “It is here that the sun is believed to have been born.”

Talk to a Monk in Laos Looking to explore Southeast Asia? Why not avoid being just another tourist in Thailand and instead discover the city of Luang Prabang in lesser-known Laos. While

To travel is to live, according to writer Hans Christian Anderson. So why not ensure that you travel somewhere new and live authentically when next you decide to run away from the concrete jungle.

New Zealand

Laos

Bolivia

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Sector Foreword

REGIONALWINNER

Wholesale and Retail The wholesale and retail sector is affected massively by other economic sectors, in particular the logistics and shipping sector. Current inland infrastructure is a major hindrance to the consistent success of our wholesale and retail industries. The cost of logistical services makes imports and exports from other continents a more viable option for many African organisations.

I

nland trade has taken a major knock. However, the sector is not down and out. Wholesalers and retailers have continued to meet the specific regional demands of our populations. Since these demands vary greatly, the sector is not doing consistently well throughout the continent. Men are prominent players in this industry and are looking to upgrade and enhance infrastructure development for the sake of the sector’s continuity and to guarantee more consistent success.

We look to the following game-changers in this sector for future development. Kenya Airways salutes you for your accomplishments up to now.

From South Africa

Dr. Richard Maponya

E

ntrepreneurs are born with the desire to create opportunities. “I am constantly developing new businesses,” says Dr. Richard Maponya. His business interests include building retail malls, establishing bottle stores and retail property letting. Career highlights include building a world class mall in Soweto; changing the lives of over 5 million South Africans and becoming a catalyst for shopping malls in South African townships. Dr. Maponya has developed two world class dealerships for Toyota and Volkswagen, the first of their kind in South African townships. His latest venture is poultry farming; supplying eggs to over 25 hospitals in the Pretoria area and to Pick ‘n Pay. Dr. Maponya is community minded. He has built and registered the Richard Maponya Institute for Skill and Entrepreneurship. The esteemed entrepreneur has received countless awards. Among the most noteworthy are the Order of the Grand Counsellor of the Baobab in Silver (2007): for his contribution to entrepreneurship despite oppressive apartheid conditions, and inspiring disadvantaged South Africans to strive for business success. Dr Maponya is a recipient of the prestigious Ernst & Young Award: World Enterprise Award 2008. He is the founder of both NAFCOC and the Johannesburg African Chamber of Commerce.


Men CEO

The

of

The men of CEO Global were asked, “If you could make a 30 second speech to the entire world, what would you say?” Their answers are as different and unique as they are! We hope that you enjoy their insights.

Valdi Pereira

Director Strategic Development & Editor in Chief

Abrie van Aarde

Director Human Resources “It’s a puzzling thing. The truth knocks on the door and you say, ‘Go away, I’m looking for the truth.’ And so it goes away. Puzzling.” – Robert M. Pirsig. Without a doubt the most difficult task we all face is to be honest with ourselves. Our contemporary society appears to relish bombarding us on a daily basis with news that is fundamentally negative and uninspiring. One of the best ways to counter this is by ensuring we are honest with ourselves – understand what our talents are and how we are going to put them to good use. If we can achieve this, then we will all be placing ourselves in a position to make a positive contribution.

What is the true meaning of life? And how do you know when you have found the most precious and valued treasure of all? That one thing that every person on earth is searching for. Is it to be successful? Is it to find that perfect balance between work and life? To have that happy family and a satisfying career? Or to find the perfect space where Life, Spiritual, Work and Physical meet in the ultimate harmony with each other… Do you think that the moment you find the true meaning to life, that it will be satisfying and that the feeling would be enough to last you forever or will it put you in pursuit of the next big thing? Maybe we’ve already experienced the meaning to life. Maybe it is the simplest thing, maybe we should learn to challenge ourselves and be content with the content of our lives? Just maybe…


Bruce Nimmerhoudt

Manager New Business Development

‘We can’t become what we need to be by remaining what we are’. The world today is in much need of accountable leaders. Leaders across all walks of life must live out their mission statement and not just preach about it. These are the people from whom we model our dreams, aspirations and goals around and young men and women pin their dreams on being successful, recognised and respected social and business trailblazers. We are deserving of the leaders who we elect into power. Social degeneration and decay does not leave us with a future to be excited about and thus it is our leaders who must exemplify leadership as a ‘value which has value only if its values are valued’.

Carl Wepener

Director Corporate & Financial Services

Everything changes, yet nothing is new. We run around in circles starting over every year but do not look at the wonderful opportunities around us and within us to really change our world or circumstances for the better. Is the unconditional love of a dog greeting you, not a daily example of how we should interact with all of God’s creatures, man included? Nature’s example of its cycles of hibernating and then bloom in all its glory shows us how we should act. Nearer to home we can look at the examples set by Mother Teresa, Nelson Mandela and Jesus himself. If we focus on the obvious goodness and love that surrounds us and live our life accordingly and share the abundance of that given by the Lord to us, then we will live in harmony with each other as God intended. Learn to love and bless thy nearest in abundance.


Cobus Kramer Client Liaison Officer

God is still there in dark days. Sometimes there are things in human life when the carpet is pulled out from under your feet. We think it always happens to other people - but it can also come your way. We are being tested and life is about choices and we sometimes make wrong choices. We so easily say wrong things about others and judge others easily, but actually make ourselves vulnerable to negative influences. If you have a second chance, be grateful and use it. And while it might not happen to you yet; and while you stand on your feet, you must prepare in such a way that you can handle it when it comes your way. Equip yourself, empower yourself against the attacks of life. I am what I am by the grace of God, sometimes a person just needs a slap on the shoulder so that you can open your eyes.

Doby Young Designer/Junior DTP Operator

Hello people of world! There is just one topic I would like to discuss with you. That topic is space colonisation. Discovering and exploring not just the secret of earth, but discovering the secrets of our galaxy and beyond. Would it not make sense to invest in this noble pursuit? Imagine all the possibilities that are just waiting for us to take advantage of, new materials to build with, new wonders of the galaxy to observe, new land to settle on, though this adventure is not for the faint of heart. There is much we have to learn, new environments to adapt to and many obstacles to overcome. This great adventure must include the whole world for divided we are small, united we are strong!


Ray Pretorius Client Development Administrator

George Wepener General Manager

We all, every one of us knows what the problems in the world are and how to fix them, why not just fix them and leave all the politics behind.

Receive, reflect, improve, achieve… In a world thriving on a fast paced system it seems everyone is seeking the new up and coming quick-fix on how to motivate their employees and more importantly themselves. Is it not true that the soldier can only be as good as the general? It is said that the guidance given by motivational speakers lasts about three days. From the few that I have heard the message is powerful though very generic. “Let go… let go… just let go” so many have said. Ultimately an impossible feat compared to your Monday ritual. How many of us absolutely fear the prospect of the up and coming Monday like a soldier injured in the battlefield trying to crawl away to safety. Let me reassure you, you are safe and you will survive. The answer everyone is looking for… perception. I could explain to you why this is important. I could explain to you in which manner you can change your thinking to a healthy perception that could well lead to success. Fortunately I do not believe in spoon feeding. The key to perception is the same as finding your passion, simply put, a choice you have to make. Should you choose to take the time to ponder my words, I would leave you with four simple words: receive, reflect, improve, achieve…


Raymond Mauelele IT Support

Africa belongs to everyone. My brothers and sisters, my mothers and fathers, Africa belongs to everyone. So why can’t we try to accommodate one another, love one another, respect old and young ones and treat each other with respect and love. Because Africa belongs to all. Let us all live peacefully and look after each other.

Rudolph Raath Financial Manager

My fellow humans… We are different in so many ways. Half of you are men, whilst the other half are women. There are more than 4,200 official religions in the world, and 197 sovereign countries. There are 6,500 languages being spoken right now, and in the US alone, there are 151,671 different last names. This does not even scratch the surface as to the magnitude of our differences. Cultural Differences, Personal Preferences – it’s safe to say that there is not one other human being who lives or has lived on this earth who is close to being the same as you. What is the point of telling you this? That despite the overwhelming nature of these differences, every person on earth has one thing in common – We all practise love at some level… and if love is indeed the strongest emotion we possess, and we’re all emotionally driven, does that not make us all the same?


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Men of CEO The Women Behind the

ceo

ceo

The Men of Global would like to Thank the Women of Global for a Successful Year. Your contributions have been fundamental in recognising the Most Influential Women in South Africa.


We celebrate

LIFE

Providing high quality holistic care since 1970, Avril Elizabeth Home is a leader in the field of caring for the intellectually challenged. www.avril.org.za 011 822 22 33 aehome@mweb.co.za

QVC/2013/AEH/01


“Sizwe is ideally positioned to provide innovative solutions to the public and private sector, particularly at a time when technology is a key enabler of the delivery of services in the South African socio-economic space, especially in the health and education sectors.� ~ Reverend Dr Vukile Mehana, Chairman

Delivering Excellence Together sizwegroup.co.za

Profile for CEO Global

Titans Magazine SADC South 2015  

In this issue two business Titans share their views on local and continental entrepreneurship, the role people development plays in building...

Titans Magazine SADC South 2015  

In this issue two business Titans share their views on local and continental entrepreneurship, the role people development plays in building...

Profile for ceoglobal
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