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Regional Edition 2017/2018

b u i l d i n g

c e l e b r a t i n g

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Global

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Without You … Leadership Development Partner

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Just as much as there is a need for recognising the great women of our nation there is an equal call to recognise the Titans who are Building Nations. Our publication’s pages, are filled with incredible men who have achieved enormous amounts in their sectors. Titans is proud to be partnered with such giants in government and business and we are excited to see what the future holds. We hope that the platform of excellence, on which the Titan’s programme is based, will inspire more young men to use their talents and abilities to serve others and to build their communities by contributing to economic growth and the over-all wellbeing of all.

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Our growth is in large part due to the consistent support received from our partners. By partnering with us they have not only invested in our vision but also in those individuals that the Titans’ programme recognises and commends. We are grateful for your partnership and could not have come this far without you. Yours sincerely Annelize Wepener Chief Executive: CEO Global

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‘For good or bad, or for better or worse, the future of South Africa is becoming clearer. The signs are everywhere for everyone to see. It is better to deal with a clear future than an uncertain one, even if the future might look challenging. Now that South Africa’s future becomes clearer, we can all plan better. It indeed seems that things are going get very bad before getting better. The economy continues to be under pressure. All the estimates indicate that the economy is effectively in a recession, or is going to undergo a serious recession. Unemployment continues to increase, and it will most likely get very bad before it gets better. The economic inequality, let alone other historical inequalities and inequities, remains the highest in the whole wide world. Poverty has not declined as expected. In fact, it might very well be that poverty is also increasing – or would increase, at least income poverty, as the economy takes a further knock and unemployment further rises. To avoid society descending to complete further. We should probably find solace to the fact that we are dealing with something that is relatively clear and the future of the country is increasingly clearer.

Publisher CEO Global (Pty) Ltd Tel: 0861 CEO MAG Fax: (012) 667 6624 Tel: 012 667 6623 info@ceomag.co.za www.ceomag.co.za

Chief Executive Annelize Wepener annelizew@ceomag.co.za

who’s who in the zoo

is

2017/2018

Future Clearer The

GLOBAL Expand your business Horizon

Director: Strategic Development & Editor in Chief Valdi Pereira valdip@ceomag.co.za Director: Corporate & Financial Services Carl Wepener carlw@ceomag.co.za Manager: Office of the Chief Executive Anne Anderson annea@ceomag.co.za General Manager: Global Services George Wepener georgew@ceomag.co.za

General Manager: Global Media Services/ Head of Production Channette Raath channetter@ceomag.co.za Designer Heather Stobbe heathers@ceomag.co.za

Journalist Andrew Ngozo andrewn@ceomag.co.za

Continental Project Administrators Rumbi Chanda rumbic@ceomag.co.za CEO Class Administrator Mandisa Mnguni mandisam@ceomag.co.za

Manager: Corporate Support Raymond Mauelele raymondm@ceomag.co.za

* No article or part of an article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher. The information provided and opinions expressed in this publication are provided in good faith but do not necessarily represent the opinions of the publisher or editor. All reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication. However, neither the publisher nor the editor can be held legally liable in any way for damages of any kind whatsoever arising directly or indirectly from any facts or information provided or omitted in these pages, or from any statements made in or withheld by this publication.


Capturing the Light Browsing through a portfolio of professional photographer Brenda Biddulph’s work, makes me want to grab a camera and take a photo. Attempting to create a visual moment like the many she has created is not easy.

Brenda established her own photographic business four years after graduating from the National School of Photography in Pretoria. She had gained experience in advertising, corporate photography, weddings, school photography and publications. Today her business, Monsoon Photography, has a faithful following of diverse clients who entrust Brenda and her team with repeat business. Putting a person at ease is an accomplished skill. Even the most senior executive can be a reluctant subject when a camera is pointed in their direction. Monsoon Photography has become a popular name to call among organisations needing photos for annual reports and events. The Monsoon Photography team has the ability to charm a smile out of the most world-weary executive. “We ignite with a jovial professional approach,” says Brenda. Brenda’s special love is vibrant fusion photography and experimenting with her “fascination for light”. The recipe for success behind Monsoon Photography is simple. “Our enjoyment of the profession

and passion for people attract clients to call on our services again and again,” she says. Monsoon Photography works on site and in studio, depending on the client’s requirements. Their studio, situated in the eastern suburbs of Pretoria, is perfect for family portraits and for shooting music videos. The experienced studio and on-line photographers that comprise Monsoon Photography share two things in common: a fascination for light and an eye for detail. With clients as diverse as Deloitte, Sasol and The Land Bank, Monsoon Photography adds a creative and professional touch to whatever the occasion.

Contact 083 452 4530 www.monsoonphotography.co.za


CONTEN THE LEADING EDGE Leading Edge

13

CASE IN POINT Artform Sefa-Passionate About Economic Development

66 133

X &Y FACTOR Without You Annelize Wepener: On a Personal Note Meet the Judges A Word from our Chairperson Commander Tsietsi Mokhele: Africa’s Future Greatness Programme Director: Maintaining Strong Relationships

1 6 8 36 37 38

Winners and Finalists Quick Guide

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SUSTAIN ABILITY The Block chain Revealed Generating Opportunity through Visibility Venture Capital and Start-Ups Effective Ways to Motivate Employees New Ways to Keep Millennials at Their Jobs How to Make Prospecting and Selling Easy

61 75 90 94 99 158


NTS SKILLSTRANSFER On-Boarding for Novices Causes of Workplace Conflict Hiring & Retraining the best The Art of Customer Service

104 109 123 128

EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP Ego-Driven Deeds Leadership Means Letting Go Global Leadership Why Company Leaders Succeed … or Fail

78 82 114 118

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Dumb Things Organisation’s Do Hiring in the Age of Social Media Lessons from an Epic Corporate Failure Diversity and Corporate Governance

49 56 71 100

LIFESTYLE Meet the Tuareg People of the Sahara Toyota Fortuner BMW 750Li & 740e Series Millennials

136 142 150 156


X&Y FACTOR

06 2017 TITANS


X&Y FACTOR

Personal NOTE On a

To say that these are tumultuous times would be an understatement. Yet, I would venture so much as to say that these are ‘excitingly tumultuous’ times. South Africa and Africa in general, are posited to play a critical role in what has been referred to as the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Faced with such a state of affairs, what does the continent do? Get despondent or venture into the unknown jungle of the impending Fourth Industrial Revolution? At CEO Global we have decided to take the good with the bad and celebrate Africa’s pioneering sons who are billed to be critical role players in the economic transformation. We bring you the 2017 cohort of African leaders at your doorstep.

I

, and the team at CEO Global, have chosen to adopt this optimistic view deliberately. The reason for this is simple. The crop of African leaders that are being celebrated this year is a very special breed. These are leaders who, in the face of the toughest challenges, have thrived through the test of time. They went through the paper age and succeeded. One would have expected them to be relegated to the dustbins of history with the dawn of the technology era but that was not to be the case. They showed that not only can they embrace change but can do so extraordinarily well. Almost two decades into the 21st century the African pioneers we are celebrating in 2017 are still with us. Not only have they stayed the course but they have roped in the younger generation of leaders who, as is general knowledge, are tech savvy by design. So, in essence, for us at CEO Global, the 2017 leg of Titans: Building Nations is quite significant because it consists of an eclectic mix of leaders. Knowledge sharing between these distinct groups is phenomenal. As the Class of 2017 takes the centre stage, we would like to wish them well in all their future endeavours. May they be the exemplars that new and old wine can mix well to provide a refined product. As the Titans of 2017 begin the rest of their professional lives, may they use their collective leadership skill sets to pioneer a better Africa in the age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

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TITANS

07


Judges

Meet the

Adeola Osundiran Adeola Osundiran, is a business analyst whose expertise and exposure ranges from Container Ports evaluation, Tenders management, Maritime research, Logistics and Corporate social responsibility. She partners with transport and logistics firms to provide a comprehensive full supply chain solutions hence supporting growth. With over a decade in the transport and logistics industry, Adeola continuously works on adding value and impacting the transport sector. She is particularly interested in maritime research that ensures development and improvement of Seaports in Africa. Prior to this, Adeola has an M.Phil. (Cum Laude) in Maritime studies and an M.comm logistics Management (Cum Laude), from the Stellenbosch University, South Africa. In addition to her extensive Transport and Logistics experience, Adeola loves to mentor, teach and work with children and young adults. Adeola Osundiran is happily married with children.

Alexandra McDonald Alexandra McDonald was born and schooled in Pretoria, matriculating at Afrikaans Hoer Meisieskool in 1986. She further studied B. Com. Marketing at the University of Pretoria. In 1988 Alexandra I began her working career in banking, which served as the backdrop to her financial acumen. By 1996 she become the assistant to the Ambassador at an Embassy in Pretoria. Thereafter she applied and became an International Finance Manager at a Global Consulting firm. Today she is happily employed by Qualibooks Group Pty Ltd as Financial, Operations & Logistics Manager. She has developed a keen sense of social consciousness as the company’s core business is to help improve literacy among our children, by establishing libraries in school and communities countrywide. Alexandra is a cat person and parade her pedigreed cats at the annual Cat Shows held in Johannesburg. Other hobbies include travelling and reading and she is passionate about education.

Arend du Preez Arend Jacobus Du Preez is the Managing Director of Crossroads Distribution Proprietary Limited. Crossroads, a subsidiary of Community Investment Holdings (CIH), was inaugurated in the early 1930s. The small beginning was the impetus for initiating solutions and creating businesses to meet changing and challenging market and socio-political conditions of the day. Crossroads is a diversified domestic and regional services group with associated capabilities internationally, owning an impressive blue chip customer base in its sector. Arend practised as an attorney for 10 years before becoming the legal adviser of South African Airways and GM: finance and administration at KWE. His philosophy of life is: Do what you do to the best of your ability. He has been a managing director at many organisations in the past. These include at KWE, Bollore Africa Logistics and as the deputy managing director at SDV SA Pty Ltd.

08 2017 TITANS


Cristal Peterson Cristal Peterson business experience includes 15 years in higher education ranging from specialist to executive. She currently heads the Communication and Marketing Directorate of the UNISA Graduate School of Business Leadership (SBL) responsible for Public Relations, Communication and Alumni Relations. She is further responsible for the strategic direction as well as the execution of the strategy of the International Relations Office of the SBL and focuses on international and local partnership opportunities to establish a sustainable income for the business school. She is a member of the Extended Management Committee of the SBL and serves on the Advisory Committee of the business school. Her academic qualifications include a Masters’ degree in Linguistics and Bachelor of Arts (Language & Culture) awarded by the University of Stellenbosch as well as a National Diploma in Language Practice from the Cape Town University of Technology.

Elizabeth Malumo Elizabeth Malumo started her banking career 37 years ago in Zambia. She moved to South Africa with her family in 1993 and joined FNB in 1995 as a trainee manager. On completion of the programme in 1996, she was appointed as a customer service manager at the Southdale Branch – a position she held for two years. As part of a professional development programme, Elizabeth spent six months during 1998 in New York working for JP Morgan on Wall Street, this while she attended strategic management university classes on weekends at New School University in New York. In January, 2016 Elizabeth joined Barclays Africa, Business Banking as Provincial Head for Gauteng North. Elizabeth has sat on two Boards namely, Enablis South Africa and South African Women’s Entrepreneur Network (SAWEN). Elizabeth is passionate about assisting female entreprenuers and has assisted a number of women over the years.

Elsa Wessels Elsa Wessels was born and bred in South Africa and has a track record of standing in the field of Education and Training cum Business. Amongst other talents Elsa is a wintered Lecturer cum community developer and ‘stimulator’ of entrepreneurial activities. She worked in most of the rural areas with various projects in communities around South Africa. Elsa is a very good operations and organising talented person to have around, she is an adaptable person and copes in most any environment. She is a Leader, who leads by example because she is hardworking. One of her exceptional personality traits is the wonderful manner in which she thrives in an educational environment on all levels from pre-school to College and University. Having retired as Principal of an In-Service Training College for Teachers (Promat College), being an Educationist at heart, Elsa started her own business and worked from home.

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TITANS

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Jaresh Maharaj Jaresh Maharaj, Chairman and CEO of Indra SA, a Spanish technology and integration company, is well known in government, for his turnaround of the Department of Home Affairs in his position of Deputy Director General between 2007 to 2009, His name is also synonymous with the security upgrades at City of Joburg. Over the past 32 years, he has accumulated an impressive database of contacts throughout the SADC region in the public and private sectors within the fraternities of IT, Mining, Telecoms and Internet ISP. His early life as an IT expert guided him into major leadership positions of IT Operations Manager at DeBeers and Siemens and recently the General Manager at the Naspers group under the banner of Mweb. He is also a director on the Spanish Chamber of Commerce. He holds an Msc. Information Systems (USA) and a host of local and international IT qualifications.

Johan Roos Johan Roos has more than 13 years’ experience in the Wholesale and Retail sector. In 1978 Johan started working as a Clerk at Barclays, Vereeniging and later joined the / First National Bank in Pretoria. Johan has occupied various positions at First National Bank for close to 16 years, and served in different departments from just a Clerk to positions such as Branch Administrator, Departmental Head, Monitoring Team Leader, Approver, Portfolio Manager ; Commercial Business Banking. In August 11 in 2011 he became a pensioner, thereafter served on the First National Bank CBS Risk Management for a three years. Johan is a businessman in his own right having tried his hand at selling and trading eastern jewellery.

Makwe Darrel Ngwato Makwe Ngwato started his career in Marketing in 1997 after obtaining a Graduate Diploma in Marketing from the Institute of Marketing Management. His knowledge and expertise in the field of marketing was applied when he started his career with one of the Advtech colleges known as IMD College, which is now Rosebank College. He moved on to gain further experience with Monash University, Tsogo Sun, Absa Bank, Sail Sports and Entertainment and Mace Promotion. Makwe is currently the Group Executive; Marketing and Communication for the Jasco Group. What sets Makwe apart is his passion for marketing which has seen him work for companies across various industry sectors as he believes that the principles of Marketing can be applied in any industry. He is also passionate about enhancing the leaners’ skills in Mathematics.

10 2017 TITANS


Marna Van Der Walt Marna Van Der Walt has been the Chief Executive Officer, Excellerate Property Services Group (EPS) since October 2012. She began her career at Gensec as a senior internal auditor in 1996. This led to her eventual appointment as a CEO in November 2003. The company value quadrupled over the latter three years. Among many achievements, Marna was the first person that held the position of president for both the South African Council of Shopping Centres (SACSC) and the South African Property Owners Association (SAPOA). According to her, people development is critical because it is the only true legacy that one can ever leave. “It is not about me but all about the growth of the team,” she notes. With more than two decades in the property industry, she sits on various panels and boards.

Stephen Master Mahlobogoane Stephen Master Mahlobogoane is the Executive Chairman - Agrimegalo Consulting where he provides strategic direction. He takes care of the day to day management and administration of the organisation; liaises with clients about the projects; negotiates and signs contracts/deals on behalf of the company with both the clients and service providers; collaborates with other companies in pursuing common interests through consortiums or sub consultancy arrangements in pursuance of managing sustainable good relationships with clients and markets the products that the organisation offers. Prior to his role, Master was aa project manager. He is a member of various professional organisations which include the Secretariat of Economic, Social and Cultural Council (ECOSOCC – African Union civil society advisory body) SA Chapter and was the Deputy General Secretary of the South African National Civic Organisation (SANCO) from 2002 to 2008.

Nothemba Gqiba Nothemba Gqiba has been in the Development Finance sector for 10 years. She is a seasoned brand developer, communications and marketing practitioner. She is very passionate about entrepreneurship, development and growth of SMMEs and Cooperatives, moreover about the improvement of the lives of ordinary South Africans. Her career started off in the private sector where she spent the first years of her working life at McCarthy Motor Holdings and the Clicks Group. She is currently the Head of Department for Marketing and Communication at sefa (Small Enterprise Finance Agency). As the first HOD of marketing and communications at sefa, she has been responsible for building the sefa brand and ensuring its visibility nationally. In her current position she is tasked with giving strategic direction with regards to the implementation of the marketing and communication strategy to ensure sefa’s wider reach to more SMMEs and cooperatives throughout South Africa.

2017

TITANS

11


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City of Johannesburg - LEADINGEDGE

City of Johannesburg The Executive Mayor of the City of Johannesburg, Councillor Herman Mashaba


LEADINGEDGE - City of Johannesburg

Jozi

Making by Andrew Ngozo

Great Again

It is said the world over that one cannot divorce business from politics and vice versa. Increasingly, the world order is such that astute and successful businesspersons, concerned with the status quo of governments have swapped their airy offices for the often volatile political landscape. Abroad, the story of American President Donald Trump comes to mind. But closer to home, the story of Herman Mashaba, the Executive Mayor of the City of Johannesburg makes for more compelling reading. The business mogul left a thriving business empire to run Johannesburg, the economic powerhouse of the African continent.

M

ayor Mashaba is one of South Africa’s most loved entrepreneurs. He is no stranger to hard work, challenges and the ultimate sweet taste of success. He reveals that growing up during the apartheid days was no easy task for a young black man. As hungry as he was for education – as that was the sure fire way of escaping poverty and the township – the young Herman enrolled at university only to be met with one barrier after the other. He says that the original idea was to study law but, after being advised against it, he enrolled for and studied a B Admin degree majoring in political science and public administration. However in the second year of his studies the university closed down and Mashaba found himself at home with no education, work experience or future prospects. He managed to get a job but after working for a salary for several months Mashaba realised that he wasn’t going to get anywhere. As a young man who valued his independence, Mashaba bought a car in 1982 and started working as a door-to-door sales rep selling dinner services and hair products from the boot of the car. Within 19 months he knew that he had to move on, even though he was the top salesman in the company. Mashaba says he

14 2017 TITANS

wanted to take personal responsibility for his life. At that time hair salons were mushrooming all over the place in townships; he saw market potential for the product and since he had prior knowledge of the industry it was the next best step. He never looked back since then. According to Mayor Mashaba one has to have a strong work culture. That is not negotiable. You also need stability in your life. “One decision that I treasure in my life was to get married 30 years ago to stabilise my life because I knew I wouldn’t be able to get far without any personal security in my life. One must also be a risk-taker. Being a successful business person requires one to be able to take risks and do what others haven’t done before. You have to push your own boundaries!” he says on what his secret ingredient to success is. Mashaba says South Africa needs to invest in educating her children. “At the moment our education system is in crisis and we are failing our people. As an employer as much as I would like to hire children from the current learning system, I find they are not functional. The quality of skills among our people is shameful and we are not taking education very seriously. For government to give the impression that we are making strides is disingenuous. The least they can do is to admit its failing


The South African Local Government Association - LEADINGEDGE

and work towards finding a solution,” he notes. He believes that government also needs to focus less on getting equity for black people and prioritise skills development. Big corporates can be pulled into these initiatives. Equity requires money which people don’t have access to. But if businesses invest in good social programmes that help young people get the best education this will ensure that they will be productive members of society without disrupting business. Black economic empowerment should be run, not as a punitive measure, but as an incentive for people to do good deeds, he notes. Mashaba is a consummate entrepreneur, he has investments in the property, financial services, insurance brokerage, bullet proof materials, private security, fuel distribution, global cleaning, facilities management and construction sectors. Mayor Mashaba resigned his position as chairman of the Free Market Foundation to pursue a career in politics. He is the author of two books: ‘Black like You’ and ‘Capitalist Crusader’. He has been referred to by the former Deputy Chief Justice of South Africa Dikgang Moseneke as a true son of the soil. Mayor Mashaba says

he does not know why the justice viewed him as such. “To be honest I don’t know. I didn’t go into business to be a role model. I went into business to survive. But along the way one has to give back to the community. You have to

Black economic empowerment should be run, not as a punitive measure, but as an incentive for people to do good deeds. be good to your staff and the people around you as that is what sustains your business in the long run. My overall agenda is executed with a realisation that my survival and protection is dependent on the wellbeing of the people around me. Once you have people around you living a life as successful as yours that’s when life has meaning and becomes exciting!” he proclaims.

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LEADINGEDGE - City of Johannesburg

According to Mayor Mashaba one has to have a strong work culture. That is not negotiable. You also need stability in your life.

Changes in the City of Johannesburg Mayor Mashaba, reflects on his first few months in office and shares how he intends to change the landscape of the city of Johannesburg. An Open Tender System “For too long, these processes have operated behind closed doors and away from public scrutiny,” Mashaba says. “From now on they will take place in rooms open to the public, to the media and to all interested parties.” Occupation of Abandoned Buildings The mayor says there are around 115 000 people who illegally occupy abandoned buildings and that human rights lawyers who defend them are doing more harm than good. “Some human rights lawyers have used the courts to keep these people under these conditions to the benefit of the slumlords,” Mashaba says. “To remove these people, the courts have determined that they must be provided emergency housing for an unspecified period of time within 5km of the building they reside in illegally.” The provision of emergency housing meant that people who occupied abandoned buildings effectively jumped the housing list, Mashaba said. “What does this say to the people who have patiently waited on our housing lists since 1996? Occupy these buildings illegally and you can jump the queue?” A 10-point plan for a new and improved Johannesburg Mashaba’s 10-point plan is almost like the National Development Plan. The aim is to provide good leadership to the people of Johannesburg and to eradicate poverty. The 10 points are as follows: 1. The city has to adjust under the leadership coalition. 2. To be responsive and pro-poor. 3. To grow Joburg’s economy by 5%. 4. Professional civil service where city employees act with regard to service and economic goals. 5. Corruption is public enemy number one. 6. Compile a list of semi-completed housing units in the inner city that can be completed for housing.

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7. Compile an official housing list that can be accessed on the city website and by employees in the city’s offices. 8. Speed up delivery of title deeds to beneficiaries of housing projects. 9. Initiate a pilot project for clinics to open for extended hours. 10. Revitalise the Joburg inner city. Making a Pro-Poor Billing System Mashaba identified ways that the city’s billing system will need to change to be more pro-poor. He said the poorest in Johannesburg will receive free basic services. “Every month they will receive 50 kilowatt-hours of electricity, 6 kilolitres of water, free sewerage and refuse removal services,” Mashaba said. In order to achieve that, the city will ensure that people on the list are actually unable to afford those services. He also said the property valuations process will improve so that there are fewer under-valuations and that the city will have to improve its revenue collection because it needs more money.“With the city close to its debt ceiling, we need to improve our collections in order to bring in more revenue to fast track service delivery,” Mashaba says. The Restoration of Law and Order A large portion of the reflections was devoted to restoring law and order and while Johannesburg, like many cities around the world, faces issues of safety, he is confident the city can do better. If mayor Mashaba’s success and shrewdness as a business is anything to go by, then there should be no doubt in anyone’s mind that as, and when Mashaba has to vacate the mayor’s office, he would leave the city of Johannesburg a much better place than what it was when he assumed office. Some may denigrate him as being too radical but at the core of Mashaba is a patriotic South African who would do whatever it takes to make South Africa and Johannesburg great again. All that South Africans, and the city of Johannesburg citizens, can do is to stand behind and support the executive mayor. Additional Sources http://www.afropolitan.co.za ; www.joburg.org.za


Kenya Pharmaceuticals Distributors Association - LEADINGEDGE

Kenya Pharmaceuticals Distributors Association Dr Kamamia Wa Murichu, the Chairman of Kenya Pharmaceuticals Distributors Association (KPDA) and the Secretary General of the East African Health Platform (EAHP)

2017

TITANS


LEADINGEDGE - Kenya Pharmaceuticals Distributors Association

Strong by Andrew Ngozo

A healthy nation is a wealthy nation, says Dr Kamamia Wa Murichu, the 2016 CEO Global continental winner in the Titans Building Nations’ Chemical, Pharmaceutical and Petrochemical sector and the Chairman of Kenya Pharmaceuticals Distributors Association (KPDA) as well as the Secretary General of the East African Health Platform (EAHP). He discusses transformative leadership tenets and how he uses his own values to positively impact on the rest of the community. Dr Wa Murichu believes that Africa is a continent endowed with so many riches and he implores the various governments to exploit such sectors as the chemical, pharmaceutical and petrochemical sector in order to create wealth and empower their people.

to Serve

In your view, what do you believe is effective leadership and change in the health systems in the East African Region? Effective leadership in the East African Region requires that we recognise the challenges we face in the quest to deliver the highest attainable level of healthcare. Leadership involves providing direction and the impetus or momentum necessary for development or formulation and implementation of strategies to actualise the highest standards of service delivery. In that regard, I am a true believer in change; not just any change, but effective and positive change in leadership and change in the health care systems, not only in the EAC region, but in other parts of the world as well. I In the past, we had a health system that was filled with inefficiencies and costly and had never met the needs of the population. Health has been a luxury only met by the rich. But health should never be a luxury because access to health is one of the fundamental pillars of life. Today, a majority of governments in East Africa have started embracing universal health coverage and health insurance. This should be the way. No government in the EAC has met the Abuja declaration on health. Shortages of manpower, perennial shortages of drugs and other health amenities have been the norm in the EAC. Transformative leadership is required to reverse the losses and escalate health access to all by the year 2030. What are your views about the chemical, pharmaceutical and petrochemical sector in Africa in general? Africa, as a whole, aspires to achieve great strides in her social and economic development as a means of attaining

Africa, as a whole, aspires to achieve great strides in her social and economic development as a means of attaining and securing the improvement or advancement of her people.

18 2017 TITANS


Kenya Pharmaceuticals Distributors Association - LEADINGEDGE

and securing the improvement or advancement of her people. In general, industrial capacity, measured in terms of the level of innovation, especially concerning research and development as well as successful marketing of products and services, is still largely in its infancy. The chemical, pharmaceutical and petrochemical sector offers a very unique opportunity for Africa to not only satisfy the demand for her ever growing need for related products and services, but also offers a platform on which the continent can truly build her industrial capacity and capability. The chemical pharmaceutical sector is the most robust in the region and second only to the food sector. As the income sector per capita in the region continues rising, education standards and general standards of living continue to improve; newer demands are being made to the sector to meet the ever-growing demands of the various products from the petrochemical industry. Unfortunately, it’s only recently that Uganda and Kenya have discovered the oil deposits and are in the process of harnessing them. All products, and by-products from this sector, have been imported into the region. The products have, in a definite way, contributed positively to the economies of the region. But they have come along with their own pitfalls. Environmental pollution, as a result of the use of the plastic products, has a devastating effect. Rwanda and Kenya have put in place ways and means to address this problem. Poisoning from lead and other emissions from the combustion of petro-chemicals has had a devastating health effect. Yet we cannot live without this sector. What is important is that we integrate it fully into our systems; putting in place the necessary safeguards. In the meantime, we also need to digress to other re-useable forms of energy such as water/solar and wind power. What drives your passion for the sector you work in? The greatest reward for my endeavour is the specific improvement of individual human lives and the general betterment of the human condition. Providing accessible and affordable pharmaceutical services not only improves health but also relieves households of an immense out of pocket financial burden. This then positions these households for more productive social and economic selfimprovement activities. I define passion as a strong feeling of enthusiasm or excitement for something or about something. I am passionate about my quest for access to medicines. I grew up in an area where I saw, and was part of, people who could not afford to go to any of the government health facilities where a shortage or total lack of medicines was the order of the day. When we could be ‘seen’ by a ‘doctor’, a term by which many community health care workers used to refer to themselves by, they could prescribe medicines which were not available at all at the government health facilities. We

were then left with the option of going to buy them from private chemists. Having come from a poor agricultural community, affording money for medicines, let alone food, was an unheard of luxury. After my university education I graduated as a pharmacist and enrolled in the hospital and retail sectors. The same misery I had seen happening in my community was repeated. Yet this time it was that of seeing mothers and the aged go without medicines. I looked at the way medicines were being exorbitantly priced and I realised that it was pure daylight robbery. It was then that I researched and came to know about parallel importation and other tools of making medicines cheaper such as pool sourcing. It was a calling. Today, I believe that I have resolved the suffering and saved lives of a few people through what I do best. What values do you hold dear to you and how do you ensure that these transcend to those you lead? The honour of duty to God and country (piety and patriotism); altruism (being strong to serve or helping others at all times); being fully prepared in strength of character, integrity, moral uprightness, mental or intellectual acuity and strength in body i.e. physical fitness. I believe that all humans are born equal and that they are endowed by their creator with certain alienable rights, among which is life, liberty and pursuit for happiness. Without good health, you can never enjoy any of these. I believe in an equal society. I believe in fair sharing of resources. I believe in giving to the less fortunate. I believe in being ‘strong to serve’. Leadership should be transformative for the better. Whereas in many areas, we get leaders who are out to serve their own interest; I believe in the leadership style where I am the servant of the people. I will mingle with people of all classes, I will visit the slums and hospitals and I will share what I can be able to with the people. I will also get the right people to work with, those on whom I can instil the right attitudes. If people

Effective leadership in the East African Region requires that we recognise the challenges we face in the quest to deliver the highest attainable level of healthcare. have the right attitude towards others, then they are be able to lead others. It all starts with altitude. As a professional, I believe in the professional code of ethics and code of conduct. The most effective instruments for influencing the culture of those we lead are leadership by example and subscribing to a codified set of principles to which those we lead are required to swear allegiance to.

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LEADINGEDGE - Kenya Pharmaceuticals Distributors Association

Yet we cannot live without this sector. What is important is that we integrate it fully into our systems; putting in place the necessary safeguards. In the meantime, we also need to digress to other re-useable forms of energy such as water/solar and wind power.

What challenges have you faced in your career path and how have you used the same hurdles to spur you to greater achieve greater success? Resistance, opposition to ideas, innovations or even outright hostility from persons with vested interests, discouragement due to apparent failure and slow progression in realisation of objectives are but some of the hurdles that I have faced. That said, I am of the firm belief that challenges help one to sharpen their vision. The determination evoked by the same challenges helps to one to focus more intently on the realisation of objectives thereby actualising one’s mission in life. By far, the biggest challenge has been opposition from our competitors; the multinational pharma groups both in Kenya and in other parts of the world. We are in the same business, selling the same product, but at completely different prices. Our prices are far much lower and in such circumstances there is a very high preference of our products sourced through parallel importation. The multinational pharmaceutical companies who are well organised, heavily financed and well-connected often lead or start misleading disinformation campaigns by calling our products ‘suspicious’ or even ‘counterfeit’. They are also behind the attack or harassment on us by state agencies and this has even lead to threats to my life. However, I have never and won’t give up. With my meagre resources, I have managed to get like-minded people in government and in the media to support our cause. We have embarked on numerous media campaigns geared to educating the public. As a result, today, parallel importation of medicines in Kenya is no longer a myth. Our customers understand that the benefits go to the public and we have them on our side. The government, through our national medicines authority, has started putting in place various legal tools to make our operations easier and within the law. Do you have any tips for up-and-coming men in the industry? It is important for a person to improve themselves continuously and unceasingly dream big. Do not be afraid to try anything new; and if you should fail, try again and, never, ever, stop trying. The opportunities which exist in the pharmacy industry are enormous. They are so many

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that no single person or entity can be able to meet the ever increasing demands for health care and health technologies. To the younger men, they need to demystify health, so that they and their patients are reading from the same scripts. Health services are one of the most satisfying careers in life because, at the end of the day, you are lessening other people’s suffering and saving lives. You need to go into it with an open mind and be ready to be counted as a change maker and not as a manager of the status quo. Are there any thoughts/perspectives that you would like to share with stakeholders/readers? When we evaluate or assess ourselves, let us set the bar as high as possible. We are often too quick to congratulate ourselves on achievement based on diminished standards of measurement For example; our country, Kenya, prides itself in having recently joined the auspicious club of middle income countries due to the improvement of per capita GDP from about USD450 at independence in 1963 to USD1 200 in the past few years. But in the same scale, South Africa has attained a per capita GDP of over USD 10 000 while Singapore, which was at par with Kenya in 1963, now boasts a per capita GDP closing in on USD 60 000. All of these countries are very proud of the achievements they have each made in social and economic development because each uses a different sized yard stick. Africa is one of the poorest continents in the world. Today we are faced with an upsurge of new diseases such as the non-communicable diseases. Cancer is now the newest killer in Africa. We are far from adhering to infant mortality and other simple diseases which have been completely eradicated from other parts of the world. The government must rise up to the occasion and realise that they have to invest in the health of their people because health is wealth. Africa needs a healthy, energetic working population. Africa sits on numerous untapped sources of wealth. Therefore, let us make health investment a priority; let African governments invest in local production of pharmaceutical products instead of relying solely on imports. Let’s us increase trade and knowledge sharing among African nations because we have the capacity and the potential to make this happen. We need to awaken to that calling within all of Africa and her people.


Ministry of Health - LEADINGEDGE

Dr. Patrick Tusiime, Commissioner: Health Services, National Disease Control at the Ministry of Health in Uganda

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LEADINGEDGE - Ministry of Health

Health by Andrew Ngozo

at the Centre

To save lives is not for the weak or faint hearted. It is a lifelong calling that often involves many sacrifices between both professional and personal lives. For Dr Patrick Tusiime, Commissioner: Health Services, National Disease Control at the Ministry of Health in Uganda, nothing gives him greater pleasure than to serve his compatriots, especially those in the underserved areas of the country. “There is often unnecessary loss of life in the remote places largely due to the fact that there are no health facilities. If they are there, they are often ill equipped; both in terms of medical supplies and skilled professionals. However, as one who swore to the Hippocratic Oath, I will go to any lengths to save and protect a life,” says Dr Tusiime. He boasts of an envious career that has been filled with many highlights and also its fair share of setbacks and challenges. However, that has not deterred him from forging ahead with his life’s vocation, to give life and ensure healthy communities in Uganda.

H

e believes that health should be at the centre of any society. “Therefore I don’t believe that those who stay in remote places of any region should be deprived access to good health care. If there are no resources to build health facilities then it would be prudent for the powers that be to take good health to the people,” he says. According to him, his country, and the rest of the continent have all that it takes in order to sustain current healthy generations while creating healthier future ones. Dr Tusiime says that Africa, although termed a backward continent, is not what it used to be. “We have indigenous health systems across the continent. These, used properly and effectively, can complement Western medicine. I believe that in this manner, Africa will be a much better place to live in because she and her citizens will be healthy. It goes without mention that healthy citizens are progressive and productive individuals who will drive Africa’s economy forward. Africa is at a juncture when she is in critical need of healthy people who will propel her forward,” he points out. Dr Tusiime believes that success in the health professions industry is driven by passion. “Without passion, little else gets done. As a result, regardless of how minute a task is, or how many times I have conducted an exercise before, I engage my passion gear all the time. In this manner, one would realise that their job ceases to become a cumbersome ordeal that they have to do for a salary. Instead, it becomes

He served in all regions of Uganda and had an opportunity to be exposed to both good and difficult conditions and to interact and serve communities of all walks of life.

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Ministry of Health - LEADINGEDGE

something fun that you enjoy doing and have the bonus of getting paid for it. Further to this, I always advise young professionals to always stay true to their calling. The easiest way to do this is for one to stay true to their being,” he points out. A married father of two, Dr Tusiime says that he also instils the same values in his children. Serving Communities Dr Tusiime was born in Bucundura Village, Kashambya Sub-County, Kabale District. He completed primary education at Rubiriizi Primary School in Rukungiri District before proceeding to Kampala High School for secondary education. He then joined Makerere University Medical School where he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery in 1993. Dr Tusiime joined the Uganda People’s Defence Forces (UPDF) as a medical doctor, and served from 1994 to 2004. He rose to the rank of captain. He obtained a degree of Master of Public Health from Makerere University in 2000. During his years in the military, Capt. Dr Tusiime served in various capacities, including as Commanding Officer, Medical Doctor and Public Health Physician. He served in all regions of Uganda and had an opportunity to be exposed to both good and difficult conditions and to interact and serve communities of all walks of life. His passion to serve the less privileged and vulnerable communities was rekindled by that experience. In October 2004, Dr Tusiime was appointed the District Health Officer for Kabale District, a post he has held until 2011. Through his excellent leadership skills and goal oriented management, and with a team of over 1 000 health workers, he successfully managed to deliver health services to the people of Kabale, with the major focus being on underserved and hard to reach areas, as well as vulnerable populations. Whereas Kabale carries the greatest number of service delivery points in the country, it has stood out among excellent performers in all indicators. Under Dr. Tusiime’s leadership, the district managed to attract and recruit seven medical officers, anaesthetic officers, midwives and other critical health care providers for maternal and child health. Previously the district had failed to attract and retain medical officers. Currently, four out of six surgical theatres (operating rooms) at Health Centre IVs are functional and offering comprehensive emergency obstetric care to rural communities. All the theatres are now fully functional. Dr Tusiime has won two awards for his excellent performance and leadership in offering health services in Uganda. These include: The Presidential Distinguished Service

Award in 2010 and the Public Health Award in 2014. The latter was organised by the Private Sector and the Ministry of Health to recognise Ugandans that had significantly contributed to the social wellbeing of the country, especially for women and children. The Mahali Salama Uganda team that visited Mparo in 2015 was very impressed by Dr Tusiime’s commitment and support for his work, his passion and leadership style. Health for All is Possible Dr Tusiime is of the opinion that nothing but the best professionals will do for Africa’s health sector. He acknowledges that Africa, in general, has a critical shortage of skills in many disciplines. “The light at the end of the tunnel is that I see Africa rising. Africa is rising because, even with a rampant lack of infrastructure across the motherland, our relatively young population puts us at an advantage in an era where virtually all things are driven by technology. These are exciting times for us in the medical fields because technology is allowing health access to more people than ever before. To address the skills gap, however, Africa needs to ensure that it avoids the brain drain phenomenon. This is largely due to a lack of proper remuneration and adequate health facilities. While all these issues cannot be solved overnight, I believe that with the right mindset from policy makers, Africa can be a massive producer of skilled medical professionals to such an extent that exporting skills would be no issue at all,” he points out. Along the same lines, Dr. Tusiime envisions an Africa where ‘health for all’ is a norm. “Right now, Africa is regarded as the proverbial home of all disasters. “Hunger, disease, famine and war are all competing for breathing space in Africa. However, this need not be the case anymore. With all hands on deck, policy makers have the ability to end the strife. In that same breadth; Africa can be a healthy continent when access to health care is made universal. Should this be the case, now or in the near future, then healthy Africans will lead Africa in the march for the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” he concludes. Additional Source: http://mulerasfireplace.com

According to him, his country, and the rest of the continent have all that it takes in order to sustain current healthy generations while creating healthier future ones.

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Reach for a Dream - LEADINGEDGE

Reach for a Dream Mervyn Serebro, Chairman, Reach for a Dream

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LEADINGEDGE - Reach for a Dream

save lives Gratified to by Andrew Ngozo

When people go through pain and personal grief, they often think that it is over for them and are wont to spend the rest of their lives regretting what could have been. However, for Mervyn Serebro, Chairman of Reach for a Dream Foundation, his personal loss was a wakeup call for him to serve mankind in a more meaningful way. Having lost two of his own children, Mervyn set himself the goal of supporting those suffering the strain of life-threatening disease and traumatic loss. So started a journey that sought to create awareness about bone marrow transplants for cancer patients, as his son had succumbed to cancer due to a lack of a suitable bone marrow donor. He discusses the journey that he has travelled and says that it is a honour to save a life and serve humanity.

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Reach for a Dream - LEADINGEDGE

You have many decades experience in the not for profit space. What has driven your commitment? I have always have had a social conscience such that even in my corporate life I was lucky to grow very quickly in that space. People matter to me and I was always of the belief that I could make a difference to a family. It could have meant that I was the one who would mean that I could get a family’s child to a university or trade school. Personally I have also lost two children. I thought that when my first child died, I has paid my dues to God and that our lives as a family would be pain free. It was not to be, later I lost another child. Seeing him succumb to cancer, wasting away and suffering was for my wife and I , an enormously difficult experience. It was at that point that I started to learn about the power of hope and the understanding that in the midst of this very terrible experience, you can find meaning and purpose. It was then that we established that we really did not have a bone marrow database and patients were dying because bone marrow was not available. After that I made a conscious decision that I would create awareness for the need to have a registry at a time when everyone was focussed on HIV/AIDS. My turning point was at a talk in

Kimberly where I was addressing Rotary Club members. The organisers had told me I had only 10 minutes but I ended up taking 25 minutes. After sharing my story, the members were so moved that they pledged to raise funds and take the programme nationally. They also brought other stakehold-

When you are in a position of influence when you adding value, that is when you can add even more value towards the human race. ers on board such as the National Blood Transfusion Services who traditionally are rigid in their manner of operation. On boarding them eventually took a long time. Today we have a significant database that is linked to others worldwide that means that people who need bone marrow can get help earlier than it used to take. My journey evolved from personal pain but I should say that it was one that helped me to heal.

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LEADINGEDGE - Reach for a Dream

Between my need to work with the community and my business activities, I keep myself occupied. As far as I can, I try to work more with people who are in pain, especially those that have lost loved ones. After a lot of hard work we began to see the results and we started saving lives. Nothing is as gratifying as that and it is a privilege to say the least. I got into the thick of things at Reach for A Dream 18 years ago. It has been an exciting journey and we now engage with at least 30 000 children a year. Daily, we fulfil at least six dreams. Working with children is the most wonderful thing because it is not only for the benefit of the children who want to reach for a dream but all the people who help us to fulfil a dream always tell us that the experience made them a better person. Reach for a dream is a voluntary organisation and we are totally transparent and reliant on donor funding. Those on who we call on to help achieve a dream, will drop all that they are doing in order to come to our help. That is how far the organisation has grown and how influential it is in South Africa. Added to these are numerous ongoing programmes which seek to make children achieve their dreams or make their lives that much easier. Why am I doing this? It helps with my pain and I know the pain that a parent experiences when they lose a child. That is why I am driven to do the work that I do. However I am so passionate about this field that I am a part of several similar organisations in South Africa. I realised early on that drugs are critical to health and I am involved in other organisations that deal with the pharmaceuticals sector to develop cancer drugs. That is not to say that I am not business minded because I sit on the boards of very profitable businesses in South Africa. Between my need to work with the community and my business activities, I keep myself occupied. As far as I can, I try to work more with people who are in pain, especially those that have lost loved ones. Given your experience, what have been the keys to sustainability and the choices you make with regards to partners? First of all we are very privileged because we work with generous donors. Our head office is lease free and so is the equipment that we use. I suppose that this is a result of the very good work that we have been doing in the community. Some of our partners have been with us for a very long time. It is important to maintain a level of integrity and we work equally hard to communicate with doctors at children’s

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hospitals. Of course, living in such times, the cake is getting smaller every day. We would not be able to survive were it not for our brand, sub brands, partners and our passionate team. All our donors review our annual activities and based on that they see that we are worthy of their resources. There is a lot of demand on corporates and individuals to donate to various causes. How does one decide what to support? Different people and organisations have varying preferences with regards to the causes that they would like to back. Some are passionate about helping the blind because they have experienced that in some form. Others may be interested in aligning themselves to a cause that helps those with hearing impairments. Whatever cause they choose to back, I am in awe of anyone who is willing to give back and does it on a regular basis. We work constantly to create awareness in established business as well as the emerging ones. Our value offering is unique in that we allow the donors to choose the way in which they would help us. The onus then is on us to prove that their buck was well used. We are accountable to them every step of the way. Our partnerships are so strong that some of our partners come on board every year with special annual promotions. One such is an aviation company that allows competition entrants to win a refurbished plane. All the proceeds go towards helping a child somewhere reach for a dream. People often think that they will get involved in good causes at a later stage of their life. What is your view on this? I think people should desist from the mentality that they will give to charity later on in life because the time to give is now. When you are in a position of real power when you adding value, that is when you can add even more value towards the human race. I really admire captains of industry who give of themselves to make a dream come true for a child. They already have enough to fill up their days but they still give. A person who comes to mind in this regard is DJ Fresh, a man who is busy and sought after all over the country. Yet whenever we place a call to him, he responds in a positive way. I suppose that is what keeps them successful; because they are giving of themselves.


Institute ofWater and Environmental Sanitation - LEADINGEDGE

Institute of Water and Environmental Sanitation Professor Victor Helix Chipofya, Executive Director and Senior Consultant at the Institute of Water and Environmental Sanitation

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LEADINGEDGE - Institute ofWater and Environmental Sanitation

Leading by Example by Andrew Ngozo

Driven by his passion to ensure that communities in his home country have access to safe and clean drinking water, Professor Victor Helix Chipofya, Executive Director and Senior Consultant at the Institute of Water and Environmental Sanitation has made it his life’s work to ensure that this dream comes true for Malawians. Professor Chipofya, who was diagnosed with paraplegia in 2006, says that he has not allowed his disability to stand in the way of success. Instead, it has inspired him to strive to train as many young professionals in the water supply sector as possible. He discusses the journey thus far travelled, the challenges that he has faced in his personal and professional life and how he has used these to spur him on to greater success. Professor Chipofya also offers tips for young professionals in the sector.

Can you please elaborate on what drives your passion for the sector that you work in? I have been associated with the Water Supply sector for all the 43 years of my working career. I worked for a public water utility, the Blantyre Water Board in Malawi, during the first 19 years of my career. During this period, I was basically responsible for providing an integrated service of catchment management, abstraction of water from source, treatment, water quality surveillance, pumping and distribution within an allocated budget; and ensuring adequate supply that conformed to World Health Organisation guidelines for drinking water. What drove my passion then was to ensure that consumers had adequate and safe drinking water at all times, and that I work hard and rise through the ranks to the position of CEO. I had been trained up to Masters’ degree level while I was at Blantyre Water Board. In fact, I had two Masters’ Degrees over and above other professional qualifications. I particularly wanted to go on and study for my Doctorate degree, however, but the Board would not allow me to do that. Their argument was that a PhD was not necessary for my work at the Water Board. Thus when a related job opportunity in the academia, at the University of Malawi, cropped up in 1993, I applied for the same and was taken as Senior Lecturer in Water and Environmental Engineering, teaching up-coming water professionals.

But I have always told myself that disability is not inability. I have thus made sure that my situation will not in any way be a hurdle in my life. And, apparently, this has inspired many people.

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Kenya Pharmaceuticals Distributors Association - LEADINGEDGE

Immediately after joining the University, I set up a ‘purpose road-map’ for myself, which was to obtain a PhD in my field of specialisation at the earliest opportunity, and to rise to Full Professorship, being the top most academic position in the University. I attained both goals by 2004 and have been working hard and happily up to the present moment, seeing students complete their university courses, and continuing to mentor them in their careers. Throughout my academic career, I continued to work on consultancy and outreach programmes in Water Supply and Sanitation. This has seen me being appointed to National, Regional and International Boards in the field of Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene. How have you overcome your personal adversities to make a success of your life and career? I have always worked hard and remained focussed. Indeed, there have been ups and downs in my life and career. But as a practicing Christian (I am a Presbyterian, by the way) I have always prayed for God’s help and guidance. I have also received a lot of support and encouragement from my family. What values do you hold dear to you and how do you ensure that these transcend on to those whom you lead? Hard work and integrity are the values I hold dear to myself. I ensure that these transcend to those I work with by ‘leading by example’.

What challenges have you faced in your career path and how have you used the same hurdles to spur you to achieve greater success? Initially, it was when Blantyre Water Board would not allow me to pursue a Doctorate Degree. But determination to achieve what I desired most saw me resign from the Board in spite of my love for the job at that time. Then I fell very ill in 2006 whilst working with the University of Malawi. I suffered from what medical personnel termed paraplegia. This is an illness which results in the inability to walk without aides. I can only walk with crutches. Or to hasten movement, I use a wheelchair. But I have always told myself that disability is not inability. I have thus made sure that my situation will not in any way be a hurdle in my life. And, apparently, this has inspired many people. Do you have any tips for up-and-coming men in the industry? Work hard and be thorough and systematic in whatever job you do or are employed in. Always remain focused. Always set deadlines and ensure you meet them. Always comply with rules and regulations of your employer. Are there any other thoughts/perspectives that you would like to share with stakeholders/readers? Always aim high and beat the competition. Always aim for holistic quality and excellence in your products and services.

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PRETTY. DEADLY. When Chinese Lanterns, also known as Sky Lanterns, are released from beaches, they are often mistaken foremergency distress flares. NSRI volunteers then launch rescue boats and spend hours looking for people in difficulty.

Chinese Lanterns are also harmful to the environment and are a fire hazard.


PanAvest International and Partners - LEADINGEDGE

PanAvest International and Partners Professor Douglas Boateng, Chief Executive Officer of PanAvest International and Partners

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LEADINGEDGE - PanAvest International and Partners

Legacy to a Profession

A

by Andrew Ngozo

Industry and thought leader, trend setter, professor extraordinaire, lifetime achievement award winner….. The list of titles that can be used to refer to Professor Douglas Boateng, CEO of PanAvest International and Partners is, indeed, long and well deserved. Professor Boateng has earned the mettle and respect of his peers and the global supply chain management sector. He has left a last ting legacy. He shares some pearls of wisdom on his ingredients for success. He dwells on leadership values that have stood him in good stead for his entire live. Above all, he says that he believes in the Africa continent, particularly the small and medium sized enterprise sector. According to him, this is the sector that will propel the continent forward and whence our collective destiny lies. As the first ever appointed Professor Extraordinaire for supply and value chain management (SBL UNISA), what do you hope to be your legacy to your peers and the continent in general? I should mention that the work done in that regard was, by no means, an easy feat. It took a lot of hard work and determination to succeed. However, when all is said and done, I hope that I would have made a difference to company competitiveness, local and regional wide industrialisation and socio-economic development. I hope to look back on having managed to convince several C-suite executives and policy makers about the strategic importance of the procurement aspects of supply chain management to the economic wellbeing of Africa and helping to establish several small enterprises on the continent. The latter is so important and dear to me because, as far as I am concerned, the small players in business and industry will perform a very critical role in the continent’s industrialisation. Placing the professionalization of procurement firmly on the strategic agenda and developing and publishing the world’s first all-inclusive supply chain compendium for the entire global supply chain profession and a strategic sourcing book from a developing world perspective, I believe, will be part of my legacy to the profession in general. Further, I would like to be seen as an individual who assisted with improvements with service delivery quality and one who gave given procurement professionals hope. It would please me if I have managed to get C-suite executives and policy makers to see procurement as a function and not a mere process within finance. In my own small way,

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I would have helped to improve local, regional wide and global supply chain accountability and governance. Lastly, I have achieved some of what I had hoped to see as my legacy because I have been a multiple life time achiever awards winner for tangible contribution to supply chain management, industrial engineering and governance both locally, regionally and globally. Can you please elaborate on what drives your passion for the sector that you work in? Regardless of what profession one is in, passion should be the main driving force behind every thought, and single action that one does. Contribution, directly and indirectly, affects numerous lives. I am driven by the fact that supply chain’s impact is there for all to see and its benefits can be quantified. Supply chain is about progressive transformation and I am passionate about transformation in all its forms. Supply chain management helps to create value chain jobs and assists to create a better future the current and next generation. My passion, in this regard, is also driven by the fact that the sector aids in industrial and company competitiveness and improves service delivery quality. These are linked to long term socio-economic development as well as the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals. How have you overcome your personal adversities to make a success of your life and career? The desire to keep going, becoming a doer as opposed to a talker and keeping hope alive help me to overcome adversities in almost any situation. I also accept the truth


PanAvest International and Partners - LEADINGEDGE

even if others do not and endeavour to emancipate my mind and becoming open minded on matters of concern while I never accept failure or that it is over or that something will not work. As any other person I know, I am hungry for knowledge and so I look to learn and try new things as often as I can. Further to the above, I have respect for all people around me regardless of their stature. I respect culture and also harbour respect for institutions and governance structures. Lastly, I believe that helping others should be a norm, not only for me, but for the rest of humanity. By so doing, we will collectively overcome many challenges and the world would be a much better place than it is now. What values do you hold dear to you and how do you ensure that these transcend on to those whom you lead? Respect for all irrespective of background, race or culture, listening more and talking less, being factual and not emotional and talking to as opposed to talking about ‘the person’ are some of the values I live by. Regardless of the success that I have achieved in my life thus far, I am, surprisingly, always willing to learn new things. As an African and a global citizen, I have realised the immense benefit of thinking regional and not country specific. This comes in handy often as African regional integration starts to take shape. In the same vein, I think not only for the now, but I do things for future generations for they must not blame us for any hurdles that they may face in future as a result of our mishaps. I would like to think that I am selfless as opposed to selfish and I help others as much as I can. I am a firm believer in the value of laying a solid foundation for the future generations and I encourage all those who can to mentor and coach others. Although there is so much poverty and strife in our continent, both are human creations which, I believe, can be corrected. What challenges have you faced in your career path and how have you used the same hurdles to spur you to achieve greater success? Challenges have always been, and will always be, part of life. Different people deal with different challenges differently. Personally, I choose to be long term focused as opposed to being short term driven. Although we live in a very rapidly evolving technological age, it is prudent for one to adapt to as opposed to being an adopter of any or all new cultures that come up. I don’t let challenges limit my abilities and capabilities and, therefore, I am always constantly challenging myself. Accepting that the societal change I desire starts with me, refusing to accept incompetence and mediocrity and being driven by value add and not colour add are some of the ways in which I overcome any challenges that come my way. Of course, some stuff is wont to be misinterpreted and I learnt very early on that it always works in my favour to say things as they are. This avoids any future conflicts.

Do you have any tips for up-and-coming men in the industry? I will give this advice based on the life journey that I have travelled. Many people probably profess to live by them too. A young professional must always strive to be the best at what they do and pay attention to detail while at it. One needs to accept that short term thinking is the enemy of long term success and so they need to be realistic about what they can deliver. When one has made it through the hills and mountains of the corporate space, I would urge them to coach and mentor others and always be mindful of the fact that one’s limit is not [in] the sky but in their mind. Any future success in this industry will be for an individual that is optimistic about their prospects regardless of the circumstances. One has to respect and appreciate progress even if it is slow and also be a change agent and not a complain agent. Further to pearls of wisdom that I have dispensed in the preceding pages, one must always be clear on their goals and needs and be solution driven as opposed to focussing on the problem(s). Success is guaranteed for an individual who always looks out for what might go right and NOT what might go wrong. Be a team player; avoid self-pity and the entitlement culture; go after your passion and the long term wealth will follow; do not always blame others for your woes and be factual and not opinion driven are all principles that would serve one well in this sector. Further, see yourself as a value adder and a colour adder; see yourself as a global citizen and not a country specific citizen; accept responsibility for your actions; ensure that the market for your service is regional and global and not country specific; embrace new ideas and thinking from all races; first see the opportunities and not the problems and never stop learning. I can personally attest to the usefulness of all these values in my life and in the lives of many successful people that I know. As such, these words of advice come from a tried and tested source and one would do well to make use of them as often as possible, if not daily. Are there any other thoughts/perspectives that you would like to share with stakeholders/readers? I will share generic life lessons that have served me well as I journeyed through my life in all its aspects. One must accept the truth even if no one accepts it. They should strive to add value to others and not expect any returns as well as practise patience and never give up on any of their goals. A person/organisation knows their issues and it is only them that can solve the same. Being timid in this world has never worked for anyone, at least as far as I know in the corporate world. Therefore, one must be bold and decisive; challenge things early on. Know your worth and do not let someone determine your worth for you. Lastly, learn to walk away from something that you are not comfortable with and always remember that someone sacrificed to create a better future for you. Therefore, you are also duty bound to do the same for the next generation.

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Digital disruption is at the heart of many business discussions in our world today as we have all become aware of how fast our world is changing and how small it has become. We are at the start of what the World Economic Forum calls the “Fourth Industrial Revolution,” characterised by mass adoption of digital technologies and innovations.

Commitment to Sustainable

Change B ut how much time do we allow ourselves to spend on reflecting on these things that influence our lives, our careers and our businesses? How much time should we spend thinking and trying to future plan? Within the nominees for the 2017 Titans – Building Nations, there is a trend that many of the giants on the continent reflect, and have the impact they do because they are collaborating and connecting. The buzzwords today are different. We hear that business leaders must be agile, that volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity can be characteristics for organisational failure and that if we aren’t prepared to be disruptive we will fall behind in achieving client expectations. Our 2017 Titans are proving that they are fearless in this ever changing world; that they are prepared to be disruptive before they are disrupted. All this is good news for the African continent as it is vital that the continent is seen to be a significant business player on the global stage. In today’s turbulent business world there are countless hurdles to any individual’s success. Negotiating

ever changing laws to protect privacy, stopping cyber crime, circumventing the variety of sophisticated fraudulent scams and to keep up with disruptive new business methodologies have become the new norm for today’s leadership. The Titans awarded in 2017 are utilising their skills with tenacity and a calm commitment. Each is a role model in his environment, and each understands that the journey to sustainable success is paved through collaboration. My role in the awards process is to ensure that each judge, in all of the panels, is aware of what is expected from them. I am there to collate the marks of each panel member and facilitate any discussion that might ensue. As the only individual to sit on every panel, ensuring that the final results are reached through a fair and unbiased methodology is key to the overall credibility of the awards. I don’t have a vote and I cannot express an opinion – even when asked! This year it has been a privilege to see the quality and commitment to sustainable change that every nominee is addressing within their chosen sector. Yvonne Finch


X&Y FACTOR

A Rare Breed in

Africa’s Midst

Africa and all who live in it should be proud of her sons. Year after year, CEO Global is able to discover many more African leaders who have selflessly given of themselves while going about their daily business activities in order to make the world a better place. The 2017 cohort of Titans: Building Nations leaders are none like any other that I have seen in all my years working with CEO Global as the patron of their various excellence recognition programmes. Just when we think that Africa has shown all her cards, she surprises us with a rare breed of leaders in her midst.

F

or a better part of my career, both in the public and private sector political and socio-economic conditions in many parts of Africa have been challenging. It only takes a certain kind of courage, the rarest kind, for the leaders within the continent to forge ahead in difficult times and still come out at the top. It is this type of leaders that Africa is going to be in dire need of as we head into the very exciting era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. This is important for many reasons. Africa boasts of a relatively young population who really are the drivers of the technology era. This is going to be vital because we will need all the strength we can get to steer Africa out of the doldrums and into an industrialisation era. With the leaders that CEO Global and the rest of Africa are honouring in 2017, I have no doubt in my mind that the future is bright because our destiny rests in their capable hands. The leadership journey that these leaders will embark on henceforth will not be smooth but filled with many potholes. Due to the digitally driven economy in the world over, business disruption will be a norm. I urge the 2017 legion of leaders to take this in their stride because this is only an opportunity to do more things better. The respective winners have demonstrated their ability to adapt with the times. This will be a key component informing any future successes and anyone who wants to follow in the Titans’ footsteps would do well to take several leaves from their respective books of wisdom if they are to attain a semblance of their levels of success. The future is here and it is a privilege to be able to say that ‘I helped shape the future by way of identifying potential key role players in the charting of a new destiny.’ Having had the opportunity to interact with them on a more personal level, I can only offer a word of warning to Africa and the world: Brace yourselves and fasten your seatbelts for the imminent Fourth Industrial Revolution ride. It sure will be rough but, rest assured, these African leaders at your doorstep will take us to the other side safely.

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X&Y FACTOR

The Communication and Marketing Directorate of the UNISA Graduate School of Business Leadership (SBL), Cristal Peterson is the programme director of the 2017 Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government and Titans: Building Nations awards ceremony.

A Specialist Par

H

Excellence

er business experience includes 15 years in higher education ranging from specialist to executive. In her current role Cristal is responsible for Public Relations, Communication and Alumni Relations. She is further responsible for the strategic direction as well as the execution of the strategy of the International Relations Office of the SBL and focuses on international and local partnership opportunities to establish a sustainable income for the business school. She is a member of the Extended Management Committee of the SBL and serves on the Advisory Committee of the business school. Her academic qualifications include a Master’s degree in Linguistics and Bachelor of Arts (Language and Culture) awarded by the University of Stellenbosch as well as a National Diploma in Language Practice from the Cape Town University of Technology. She also completed a Diploma in Public Relations at the Public Relations Institute of South Africa. Before her current role, Cristal was corporate communications specialist for the SBL while she was

38 2017 TITANS

previously a language and and communication specialist at the office of the Auditor-General South Africa. She also worked as a communication specialist of AVBOB and was a marketing and language specialist at the Stellenbosch University. Integrity, commitment and a diligent work ethic are attributes which Cristal values highly. “I pride myself in my ability to develop and maintain strong relationships with our stakeholders ranging from CEOs, human resource executives to ministers and diplomats of foreign embassies. Over the past years, I have grown an extensive network of businesses in both the public and private sector, including executives from various international business schools in various other African countries, Europe and Asia. My professional competencies and skills include a comprehensive understanding of executive education, management development and protocols pertaining to the international environment,” she concludes.


Quick Guide

p40

Lifetime Achievers Partner - CEO Global Allan Ragi, Albert Isimbwa Lya `Waraga Rugumayo, Prof Victor Helix Chipofya, Philip Mututa, Dr Brand Pretorius, Raymond Ackerman, Roger McCleery, Roger Houghton, Sarel Daniel van Der Merwe, Ferdinand Nel de Vos, Hugh Masekela, Dr Imtiaz Sooliman, Johan Barnard, Leon Freimond, Roy Cokayne, Dr Felix Kwaku Anyah.

p52

Agencies & Regulatory Authorities Partner - CEO Global Country Winner: Oaitse Ramasedi Regional Winners: Richard Jabo, Hapenga Monty Kabeta, Joseph (Joe) Tackie

p58

Agriculture Partner - AGRI SA Regional Winners: Stephen Emmanuel, Joseph Nkandu

p64

Arts & Culture Partner - Artform Regional Winners: Chali Mulalami, Dr Mduduzi Xakaza

p68

Aviation Partner - SA AIRLINK Regional Winner: Sibusiso Welcome Nkabinde

p72

Building & Construction Partner - Transnet Regional Winners: Dhruv Ashutosh Jog, Eng Alex Turihohabwe, Webster Mfebe

p76

Business & Professional Services Partner - BCX Regional Winners: Dr Amit N Thakker

p80

Chemical, Petrochemical & Pharmaceutical Partner Shell SA

Regional Winners: Mike Capon, Nazeem Mohamed p84

Education & Training: Academic Partner - UNISA SBL Country Winner: David Ross Olanya Regional Winners: Dr Pierre Clarel Catherine, Dr Matobola Joel Mihale, Prof Letlhokwa George Mpedi, Peter Mwila Lukonde

p92

Education & Training: Private Partner - SMAB Regional Winner: Edward Siwela, Alain Munyaburanga

p96

Financial Services Partner - KPMG Regional Winners: Roshan Boodhoo, Tshepo Mahloele, Azim Tharani

Government-Employed Official Partner - CEO Global Country Winner: Virendra Kumarsingh Daby Regional Winner: Maubarakahmad Boodhun

p102

ICT Partner - CEO Global Country Winner: Hon Bernard Eric Typhis Degtyarenko Regional Winners: Anthony Wahome Githinj, Vidia C Mooneegan, Norman Moyo, Dr Joseph Walusimbi

p100

Logistics & Shipping Partner - PANAVEST Regional Winners: Ayob Mohammed Salim, Dr Sidharth Sharma

p112

Manufacturing & Engineering Partner - CEO Global Regional Winner: Darshan Chandaria

p116

Media Partner - CEO Global Country Winner: Michael Kudakwashe Chideme Regional Winners: Percy Sekgomenyane Raditladi

p120

Medical & Veterinary Partner - CEO Global Regional Winners: Dr Jonathan Amakye Anim, Dr Peter Kato Ssenyonga

p126

Small, Medium & Large Enterprises Partner - sefa Regional Winners: Amos Bagumire, Rubin Van Niekerk, Ketan Patel, Frank H. Moormann

p130

Sport Partner - CEO Global Regional Winner: Christiaan Arnold TheĂżse

p134

Tourism & Leisure Partner - The Premier Hotel OR Tambo Country Winner: Yenealem Getachew Habte Regional Winners: Dr Wasiu Adeyemo Babalola, Yenealem Getachew Habte, Moustafa H. Khataw

p138

Welfare & Civil Society Organisations Partner -

p146

BUSINESS LEADERSHIP SOUTH AFRICA

Country Winner: Dr Luc Kalisya Malemo Regional Winners: Rev Canon Captain Richard Wanzala Mayabi, Kenneth Okoineme, Dr Livingstone Sewanyana, Amade SucĂĄ Finalists

2017

TITANS

39

p154


SectorFOREWORD Lifetime Achievement In the grind of daily life, people often go about their life’s mission without thinking about the next person, especially the less fortunate. However, among the Titans being celebrated in 2017, there are those men who have reached the apex of business success but have stayed humble to the core. These are men whose once off recognition would not do any justice to the lifetime of work that they have given to humanity and their communities. And even then, such a tribute would not be enough or make up for their contribution to the greater good. The deeds of men in this category will continue to be felt by generations long after they are gone. No amount of words can ever be a tribute enough to these great heroes of our time. CEO Global would like to pay homage to all the lifetime achievers. Because of their efforts, the world is so much a better place today than what it was yesterday.


LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT From South Africa

Raymond Ackerman Raymond Ackerman is the founder and owner of the Pick’ n Pay chain. He has achieved phenomenal success as a businessman, and he’s known to almost every South African. For Raymond and his wife, business and philanthropy are intertwined. They’ve been very successful in business and they have also made it a point to be successful in philanthropy. Pick ‘n Pay has pioneered certain retailing concepts in South Africa, for instance the Hypermarket and generic or No Name brands, and were the first to launch these concepts successfully in this country. “Building a successful business is 90% guts and 10% capital”. This is the firm belief of Raymond, founder and executive chairman of what is today the most successful retail supermarket chain in South Africa, Pick ‘n Pay.

From Ghana

Dr Felix Kwaku Anyah Dr. Felix Anyah was born 29 November 1950, to a poor family of Christian faith healers who do not use orthodox medicine when sick. He was given the name Gamesu, meaning the one who ends worries and brings comfort. His surname Anyah symbolises truth, and unbreakable. His aim to become a lawyer was changed to a medical doctor when he escaped death with severe pneumonia and was abducted from his parents by a grandaunt, who had him recover with orthodox medicine. He grew up with excellent human relations, entrepreneurial spirit, philanthropy, marketing, writing and counselling skills and with boldness to use the legal system to advance his career. Dr Anyah has been a role model and counsellor for young doctors on ethics, business and success in medical practice – shaped by his several awards of excellence in business.

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LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT From South Africa

Johan Barnard Johan (Barries) Barnard started his boxing career in 1971 when he joined the local boxing club in Randfontein, South Africa and was actively involved in amateur boxing for 45 years. He participated in boxing from Grade 5 until he finished matric in 1979. Johan continued to participate in amateur boxing when he joined the army in 1980. Three years later he started coaching the soldiers in the art of boxing where he produced several national defence and national champions. While Johan was coaching it was inevitable not to become a boxing official. He qualified as a regional referee in 1986. Being an instructor in the military assisted him to step up to the management level of boxing.

From Malawi

Prof Victor Helix Chipofya Professor Victor Helix Chipofya is the current regional and international engagements coordinator in the water sector. He is also the National Coordinator of the Malawi Water Partnership (MWP), a local chapter of the Global Water Partnership; working closely with Global Water Partnership (Southern Africa) to meet the strategic objectives of the Global Water Partnership. He was executive director/senior research fellow at the Institute of Water and Environmental Sanitation (IWES) - a Malawian nongovernmental organisation. His principal duties included resource mobilisation, strategic planning and management, directing and monitoring and evaluation of IWES in its core functions of advocacy, capacity building, operational research, knowledge management and consultancy/community outreach in water, sanitation and hygiene promotion. The main target groups in IWES programmes are the poor in peri-urban and rural areas, including schools, in Malawi.


LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT From South Africa

Roy Cokayne Roy Cokayne is a responsible, committed and innovative journalist who has the ability to work independently and without guidance. He has the ability to write newsworthy, informative, well balanced, accurate and interesting articles on both non-controversial and controversial topics. Roy possesses exceptional interpersonal skills, an inquiring mind and is a selfmotivator. He has the ability to communicate clearly and effectively and has the ability to self-generate original articles on topical issues, resulting in unique and exclusive content. Roy has experience across a range of local, regional, national and international press. He can deal with difficult individuals and situations and has developed a vast contact base and network, including chief executives, senior management in companies and senior government officials.

From South Africa

Ferdinand Nel de Vos Ferdinand Nel de Vos does freelance media consultancy in publishing, editorial, marketing and sales. He has been involved in the South African media, marketing and PR industry specialising in the motoring sector and its associate businesses for the last 30 years. Ferdinand has over the years been instrumental in the development, establishment, creation and revival of various motoring media titles, working with media agencies, planning and creative work, and also in a PR role for a leading international motoring brand. He has over the years trained, mentored and upskilled many young and upcoming journalists, editors and corporate executives who now all excel in business in their own right. Besides journalism and sub-editing Ferdinand did various courses in business management within the media environment for corporates as well as entrepreneurial companies.

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LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT From South Africa

Leon Freimond Leon Freimond is retired from Tennis South Africa. He is a manager of performance tennis and coaches school tennis. His involvement with sport administration started in high school when he was tasked with running all the racket sport championships at school in the absence of a teacher available to do it. At university and thereafter it continued at club, district and provincial level in both tennis and hockey. In the early 1980’s tennis coaches administration was added. In 1993 he joined national tennis structures as a volunteer and so started his career at continental and international level. He is currently a member of the ITF Coaches Committee and represented Tennis South Africa at SASCOC on all the continental team competitions and the proposed Coaches Commission.

From South Africa

Roger Houghton Roger Houghton has been a South African motor man for more than 50 years. After matriculating at Pretoria Boys’ High School in 1960 he studied Mechanical Engineering at Pretoria University before switching to journalism in 1962. He joined the Pretoria News as a sports reporter, which later included the position of the newspaper’s first motoring Editor. At this time, he also became one of the founder members of the South African Guild of Motoring Journalists and served as the motor industry representative on its executive committee for 25 years. He was later made a Fellow of the Guild and has won several awards in the Guild’s annual Motor Writer of the Year competition. All aspects of the automotive industry have been his life ever since then.


LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT From South Africa

Hugh Masekela Hugh Masekela is a world-renowned flugelhornist, singer, and defiant political voice. He was born in the town of Witbank, South Africa, where his passion for music started. At age 14 he was given a trumpet by Louis Armstrong and is still blowing strong at 77. Masekela’s eclectic musical style is infused with jazz and mbaqanga, combining his gravelly voice with stirringly smooth horn sounds and an ever-present concern for his home country and continent. He spent 30 years of his life in exile and duly became a global citizen, having lived in the United States, United Kingdom, Guinea, Nigeria, Ghana, Congo, and Botswana before returning to South Africa after the freeing of Nelson Mandela in 1990. During his years in exile he released over 40 albums and was featured on countless more.

From South Africa

Roger McCleery Roger McCleery started writing at school in the 50’s in the Wynburg Boys High school magazine on motorcycle racing – mainly the Isle of Man TT. He wrote for the Cape Times whilst still at school, and wanted to be a car reporter on the Cape Argus but had to wait six months for the next intake so joined the bank, which everybody was doing in those days. Five years later Roger joined Caltex in the Transport Department. He wrote car and motorcycle road tests in the only other motoring magazine in the country other than Car Magazine, for Caltex. Roger then joined Midmacor as the first employee of Honda Motorcycles in South Africa after the MD and General Manager, to concentrate on the importation and distribution of Honda motorcycles in South Africa.

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LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT From Zambia

Philip Mututa Philip Mututa is presently serving as executive director of the Zambian College of Open Learning. A teacher by profession, he has worked in the Ministry of Education for 31 years; during which period he occupied different roles. These include being a class teacher, head of department, school head, senior education standards officer and district education standards officer. He spent much of his working life teaching in rural communities where he understood the staffing challenges that most of the schools were faced with. As a standards officer, he was always monitoring staff levels, teaching and learning processes in the remote parts of the province which he served. One of these was the least developed school in the country. He discovered that staffing challenges were largely due to the remoteness of the schools and a lack of local teachers willing to take up teaching posts in their own communities.

From South Africa

Dr Brand Pretorius Dr Brand Pretorius was born on 15 February 1948 in Steynsrus in the Free State. He matriculated at Kroonstad High School and obtained his M.Com degree in business economics at the University of the Free State in 1972. His business career had its origin at Toyota South Africa in March 1973. Following a number of management positions in research, planning, sales and marketing, he was appointed managing director of Toyota SA Marketing in 1988. Under his guidance Toyota became the market leader in terms of both sales and customer satisfaction. Brand currently serves as a non-executive director on the boards of Agrinet, Reunert, Italtile, Tata Africa Holdings and Tongaat Hulett. He is the non-executive chairman of Metair Investments Limited. Dr Pretorius is also a member of the advisory boards of the international consultancy firm Alexander Proudfoot, as well as the Motor Industry Ombudsman of South Africa.


LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT From Kenya

Allan Ragi Allan is the Executive Director at Kenya AIDS NGOs Consortium. He convened a regional high level policy dialogue meeting bringing together Members of Parliament from the Eastern African region in Tanzania in 2016 and facilitated the formation of the Africa TB Caucus which rides on elected leaders to champion for TB in the region. Allan is the director of International HIV AIDS Alliance as a linking organisation and provided regional leadership in mobilising resources from the Global Fund. He successfully set up and ran Ray Drop in Centre− a model drop in centre for service provision among young people and key populations. Allan facilitated acceleration of community land reforms that influenced the lives of 4.7million lives in 2007 and the African regional capacity building network for HIV AIDS prevention in treatment and care project.

From Uganda

Prof Albert Isimbwa Rugumayo Professor Albert Isimbwa Rugumayo is the dean of the Faculty of Engineering at Ndejje University. He is responsible for staff, students, curriculum development, research and collaboration. He studied civil engineering at the University of Zambia and later specialised in hydrology and water resources engineering at the University College, Galway, Republic of Ireland and at Washington International University. He worked with Gauff Consulting Engineers as a design and supervision engineer on water and road infrastructure projects for over 10 years before joining government. First, with the Ministry of Health he was responsible for health infrastructure and later with the Ministry of Natural Resources he worked as a technical advisor for a World Bank funded rural water supply project. He then served in the Ministry of Education and Sports as a coordinator for technical education programmes.

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LIFETIME

ACHIEVEMENT From South Africa

Dr Imtiaz Sooliman Dr Imtiaz Sooliman is the founder, director and chairman of Gift of the Givers (Waqful Waqifin Foundation). It is the largest disaster relief organisation of African origin on the African continent. They have delivered over R2 billion in aid to 42 countries around the world, including South Africa. Commencing as a disaster response agency the organisation now has 21 categories of projects which include bursaries, agricultural self-sustainability, water provision, counselling and life skills services, entrepreneurship and job creation, establishment of primary health care clinics and medical support to hospitals, winter warmth and supply of new clothing and shoes, sports development, feeding schemes and food parcel distribution, supply of household and personal hygiene packs, educational support and toy distribution, provision of housing, care of the physically and mentally challenged, orphans and the elderly as some of our diverse activities.

From South Africa

Sarel Daniel van der Merwe Sarel Daniel van der Merwe is a South African former rally driver, who was a multiple South African Rally Drivers Champion. He is sometimes referred to as Supervan. Sarel won the South African Rally Drivers Championship a record eleven times in 1975, from 1977 to 1985 and in 1988. He also drove one NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Watkins Glen for Hendrick Motorsports #17 Tide Chevrolet Lumina team in 1990. He also held the SA Saloon Car Championship (1994), SA modified Saloon Car Championship (1994 & 2001), and won the 1996 Castrol International Rally in Swaziland. He received his Springbok Colours in 1976 and his South African National Colours in 1997. In 2002, Sarel was awarded the Motorsport South African (MSA) Lifetime Achievement award.

48 2017 TITANS


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Dumb By Susan M. Heathfield

Things Organisations Do Even the best organisations periodically make mistakes in dealing with people. They mess up their opportunity to create effective, successful, positive employee relations. They treat people like children and then ask why people fail so frequently to live up to their expectations. Managers apply different rules to different employees and wonder why workplace negativity is so high. People work hard and infrequently receive positive feedback.

A

t the same time, many organisations invest untold energy in actions that ensure employees are unhappy. They ensure ineffective employee relations results. For example, one of the most important current trends in organisations is increasing employee involvement and input. Organisations must find ways to utilise all of the strengths of the people they employ. Or, people will leave to find work in an organisation that does. According to former Secretary of Labour Elaine Chao, the number of people in the labour force ages 25 to 34 is projected to decline by 2.7 million in the next seven years. To meet this challenge, work places need to recruit new populations and non-traditional employees. And, workplaces urgently need to retain valued employees. The book, High Five, by Ken Blanchard and Sheldon Bowles talks about building powerfully effective teams. The book emphasises that “the essence of a team,” according to Dr. Blanchard, is “the genuine understanding that none of us is as smart as all of us.” Teams allow people to achieve things far beyond each member’s individual ability. But teamwork also requires powerful motivation for people to put the good of the group ahead of their own selfinterest. Fortunately, the millennial generation grew up working in a team work environment. Valuing and appreciating teams, your youngest workers will lead the way. Pull these workplace trends together and it is no wonder that the Dilbert cartoon is perennially popular. Consider that Scott Adams, the strip’s creator, will never run out of material because, despite what organisations want or say they want for effective employee relations they often fail to:  retain valued employees,  develop empowered people working together to serve the best interests of the organisation, and  create an environment in which every employee contributes all of their talents and skills to the success of organisational goals. The next time you are confronted with any of the following proposed actions, ask yourself this question. Is the action likely to create the result, for powerfully motivating employee relations, that you want to create? Twenty Dumb Mistakes Employers Make Here are the 20 dumb mistakes organisations make to mess up their relationships with the people they employ.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

50 2017 TITANS


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

To meet this challenge, work places need to recruit new populations and non-traditional employees. And, workplaces urgently need to retain valued employees. 1 Add another level of hierarchy because people aren’t doing what you want them to do. (More watchers get results!) 2 Appraise the performance of individuals and provide bonuses for the performance of individuals and complain that you cannot get your staff working as a team. 3 Add inspectors and multiple audits because you don’t trust people’s work to meet standards. 4 Fail to create standards and give people clear expectations so they know what they are supposed to do, and wonder why they fail. 5 Create hierarchical, permission steps and other roadblocks that teach people quickly that their ideas are subject to veto and wonder why no one has any suggestions for improvement. (Make people beg for money!) 6 Ask people for their opinions, ideas, and continuous improvement suggestions, and fail to implement their suggestions or empower them to do so. Better? Don’t even provide feedback about whether the idea was considered or why it was rejected. 7 Make a decision and then ask people for their input as if their feedback mattered. 8 Find a few people breaking rules and company policies and chide everybody at company meetings rather than dealing directly with the rule breakers. Better? Make everyone wonder “who” the bad guy is. Best? Make up another policy to punish every employee. 9 Make up new rules for everyone to follow as a means to address the failings of a few. 10 Provide recognition in expected patterns so that what started as a great idea quickly becomes entitlement. (For example, buy Friday lunch when production goals are met. Wait until people start asking you for the money if they cannot attend the lunch. And, find employees meeting only the production goal that will merit the prize - and not one bit more.)

11 Treat people as if they are untrustworthy - watch them, track them, admonish them for every slight failing because a few people are untrustworthy. 12 Fail to address behaviour and actions of people that are inconsistent with stated and published organisational expectations and policies. (Better yet, let nonconformance go on until you are out of patience; then ambush the next offender, no matter how significant, with a disciplinary action.) 13 When managers complain that they cannot get to all of their reviews because they have too many reporting staff members, and performance development planning takes too much time, eliminate PDPs. Better? Require supervisors to do them less frequently than quarterly. Or, hire more supervisors to do reviews. (Fail to recognise that an hour per quarter per person invested in employee development is the manager’s most important job.) 14 Create policies for every contingency, thus allowing very little management latitude in addressing individual employee needs. 15 Conversely, have so few policies, that employees feel as if they reside in a free-for-all environment of favouritism and unfair treatment. 16 Make every task a priority. People will soon believe there are no priorities. More importantly, they will never feel as if they have accomplished a complete task or goal. 17 Schedule daily emergencies that prove to be false. This will ensure employees don’t know what to do, or are, minimally, jaded about responding when you have a true customer emergency. 18 Ask employees to change the way they are doing something without providing a picture of what you are attempting to accomplish with the change. Label them ‘resisters’ and send them to change management training when they don’t immediately hop on the train. 19 Expect that people learn by doing everything perfectly the first time rather than recognising that learning occurs most frequently in failure. 20 Letting a person fail when you had information, that they did not, which they might have used to make a different decision. You can avoid these employee relations nightmares. These ingredients add up to a recipe for disaster if you want to be the employer of choice in the next decade. Effective employee relations will always result in a win - for both the employees and for you. Article Source: Business Training Media.com

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SectorFOREWORD Agencies and Regulatory Authorities In many instances, organisations that fall under this category are independent regulatory entities established by statutes to oversee a specific industry and practices in the public interest. For example, financial services entities are is committed to promoting and maintaining a sound financial investment environment. Regulatory bodies operate outside the jurisdiction of the executive branch of government in order to give them complete power over regulating their respective field. Regulatory bodies are able to impose regulations that have the force of law. They are also responsible for conducting trials and imposing consequences on those who have failed to observe regulations. However, similarly to how these bodies operate without executive oversight, they also conduct judicial hearings using a judge who is not a part of the judicial system. These steps are taken in order to insulate regulatory bodies from outside influences and preserve their credibility in the eyes of the public. CEO Global wishes to celebrate all the men honoured in this sector. May their efforts serve to spur their peers to even greater heights of success.


REGIONALWINNERS From Uganda

Richard Arthur Jabo Richard Jabo is the executive director of Uganda Free Zones Authority (UFZA) was established by an Act of Parliament in 2014 with the mandate and responsibility for the establishment, development, management, marketing, maintenance, supervision and control of Free Zones. UFZA is now a fully operational body corporate under the supervision of Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development. Richard is a private sector development professional with broad experience in policy advocacy; policy formulation; financial analysis; investment promotion and facilitation; project planning and performance appraisal; etc. He has contributed to regulatory work aimed at improving the business environment in Uganda and to a wide range of sectoral work. Richard also developed an investment promotion manual used by His Excellency the President to attract foreign direct investment.

From Zambia

Hapenga Monty Kabeta Regional and country winner Hapenga Monty Kabeta is the secretary, registrar and CEO of the Zambia Institute of Chartered Accountants (ZICA). Hapenga is a mature Zambian citizen with over 34 years of experience in research, corporate leadership, corporate governance practitioner and trainer, undergraduate and postgraduate business lecturer, excellent public speaker, seminar/ workshop facilitator and process consultant. He communicates very well in English and speaks several Zambian languages. Hapenga is a social and economic researcher, educationist, conservationist and corporate governance practitioner and corporate training expert. He is a strategic planning expert of over 20 years providing advisory services to large and small entities. He has provided consultancy services to the agribusiness sector, regulatory sector and conservation and private sector organisations.

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REGIONALWINNER

From Ghana

Joseph (Joe) Tackie Joseph (Joe) Tackie is the chief executive officer of the Private Sector Development Secretariat (Office of the President) in Ghana. He is the founder and chief executive officer of Global Entrepreneurship Solutions and Meaty Foods Limited. Joe serves as the president of Ghana AmericaTowne at ATI Modular Technology Corp. He serves as the chief executive officer of the National Medium-Term Private Sector Development Strategy (PSDS II) having previously served as the coordinator of the Trade Sector Support Programme (TSSP) and the Industrial Sector Support Programme (ISSP) at the Ministry of Trade and Industry. He is the co-founder and executive director of Small Business Development Foundation. He is an accomplished entrepreneur and holds a B.Sc. (Hons) in Agriculture and executive MBA in entrepreneurial management. Joe is a member of Ghana Association of Consultants.

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CountryWINNER

From Botswana

Oaitse Ramasedi Oaitse Ramasedi is the Chief Executive at the Non-Bank Financial Institutions Regulatory Authority. NBFIRA is a licensing, regulatory and supervisory body for all non-bank financial institutions in Botswana. As the CEO, he is the overall head reporting to the board, providing strategic direction to the organisation. He is a former chief executive officer of the National Development Bank in Botswana. NBFIRA, a regulatory body for the non-bank financial sector, started operations on April 1, 2008. It is still at its formative stage. Its first CEO assumed duty in October 2008, and left NBFIRA on October 2, 2009.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Hiring in the Age of

Social Media By Patricia Lenkov, Founder & President, Agility Executive Search, LLC

Social media has changed everything! Human beings have been communicating since the beginning of time and with the advent of the Internet and more recently social media tools, the basics of human interaction have been altered forever. Does this sound a bit grandiose? That’s because it is. According to the 2013 Digital Marketing Report published by Experian Marketing Services, Americans spend 16 minutes (27%) of every hour online on social media. Compare this to the only five minutes they spend shopping and nine minutes on entertainment sites and you begin to grasp the importance of this predilection.

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s with any revolution, the fall-out is far-reaching. In the context of business, social media has definite ramifications and vast impact on the hiring process. In a bygone pre-Internet era, companies needing to hire typically used newspaper advertisements, a recruiter or, oftentimes, their personal network. Unless the candidate was very senior

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and well-known, obtaining unofficial information about their background and reputation was challenging to say the least. Then came the Internet which ushered in a new era of hiring. Companies could now avail themselves of online job boards and recruiting web sites such as early forerunner Monster.com. Additionally, search tools such as Google allowed those hiring to at least try to obtain information about those seeking to be hired. If the low-down on the job seeker was not yet readily available, at least information on his or her previous employer could be obtained. Fast forward to today where the Internet has evolved to the point that it is being used by 78.6% of the population in North America per Nielsen Online. And social media is ubiquitous. Companies needing to recruit


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

have never had more tools and information at their disposal. In fact, according to Staff.com, 92% of companies use social media for recruiting. But the question arises, in this brave new world of social media, how can a company best avail themselves and benefit from these incredible resources? Let’s start with a clarification of what social media is. The most popular social media sites are Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, all of which lend themselves nicely to hiring. Other prominent social media web sites are Pinterest, Tumblr and Instagram, which are far less useful in the hiring process (in their current form). Facebook, while originally directed to and used by the young and trendy is now the domain of all ages. Companies of all shapes and sizes now use Facebook as well. With reference to the hiring process, there are several ways that companies can avail themselves of Facebook. At a macro level, it is fairly simple for any company to create a Facebook page. A presence, or as I like to refer to it, ‘a parking spot’ in an environment with over 1.28 billion monthly active users is in no uncertain terms, a good thing! With a Facebook page a company can market and create awareness. The page can become a hub for the business providing direct contact with customers and potential customers. A company’s Facebook page will also allow potential employees to research and understand the company they are thinking of joining. The other, perhaps even more significant utility of Facebook in the hiring process involves what is being referred to as ‘social screening.’ Social screening is not limited to Facebook as it refers to a company’s use of social media to pre-screen job candidates. Until some states began enacting laws to prevent this, companies were oftentimes asking potential employees for their Facebook password in order to get a glimpse into who exactly their next VP of Sales is and how he or she spent their weekends. Notwithstanding legal and privacy implications which are too complex for this discussion, it is also possible to simply send a friend request to a potential employee. Twitter is another social media tool that can be invaluable in the hiring process. The most obvious application of Twitter in hiring is the ability to post job openings. Post is perhaps a generous term, as Twitter allows messages of only 140 characters at a time. However, it is simple to post key and engaging information and a link to your company web site and detailed job posting. The use of hashtags can further assist in engaging the right audience. For the uninitiated, a hashtag or number sign is a keyword or two and is Twitter’s way of assembling and filtering information. When you include a hashtag in a tweet, anyone who does a search for that hashtag will find your tweet. For example, a company can use a hash tag like #salesjob or #NYCjob in their tweet to help their job posting be found.

As with Facebook, employers can also appraise a candidate by looking at their Twitter feed. There are over 650 million Twitter users, with approximately 135 000 signing up every day. For a company in the hiring mode, this can be a treasure-trove. LinkedIn, having been designed specifically for professional purposes, is the dominant social media web site when it comes to hiring. In 2013, the Society for Human Resource Management found that of the 77% of employers using social networks to recruit, 94% of them were using LinkedIn. For a company looking to hire, LinkedIn offers a variety of options. There is the ability to pay a fee and post a job. While this may seem familiar to many other employment web sites, LinkedIn excels because through a variety of mechanisms it has the ability to gain the attention and interest of passive and employed candidates. It also operates to allow a hiring company to target their job to appropriate and qualified candidates thereby increasing the effectiveness and swiftness of the process. A company looking to fill a particular role can also use LinkedIn to search for candidates with a specific set of experiences and qualifications. The LinkedIn Advanced search function is extremely powerful. One can search for a precise job title at a particular company and even further calibrate to include a specific part of the world, as a simple example. With something that LinkedIn calls ‘InMails’ most candidates can be contacted directly. Another element of LinkedIn’s utility in the hiring process is the ability to quickly and easily reference a potential hire. A nominal fee provides a premium membership allowing the ability to search the network of a possible candidate. As with Facebook and Twitter, candidate information can also be obtained in a LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn profiles are self-populated and thus vary in the amount and detail of information available. However most people have at least the key components of their experience enumerated. Additional insight into a candidate can be obtained by looking at the LinkedIn Groups they are a member of and the comments and items they share on the site. Both of these items are easily accessed on a person’s profile page. As social media continues to evolve there will ultimately be advancements and certainly new tools for companies to use in the hiring process. In the meantime, social media as an element of strategy in the hiring process is wise and increasingly indispensable. As our demographics continue to change and millennials, or those who were born post the online revolution enter the work force, using social media in the hiring process will become less and less of an option. If all of this is a bit overwhelming, there is always, of course, the option of turning it all over to an Executive Recruiter!

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SectorFOREWORD Agriculture South Africa has a dual agricultural economy, with both welldeveloped commercial farming and more subsistence-based production in the deep rural areas. Covering 1.2-million square kilometres of land, South Africa is one-eighth the size of the United States of America and has seven climatic regions, from Mediterranean to subtropical to semi-desert. Agricultural activities range from intensive crop production and mixed farming in winter rainfall and high summer rainfall areas to cattle ranching in the bush veld and sheep farming in the arid regions. Maize is most widely grown, followed by wheat, sugar cane and sunflowers. Citrus and deciduous fruits are exported, as are locally produced wines and flowers. For ensuring the continued sustenance of Africa and its people through making food available, AGRI SA would like to praise all the men honoured in this sector.


REGIONAL

WINNERS

From Nigeria

Stephen Emmanuel Stephen Emmanuel is a graduate of philosophy and religion from Pontifical Urban University, Rome. He obtained a degree in education and public administration. Stephen is the founder and the chief executive officer of Vitae Seeds Nigeria Limited, an agro-allied company that is currently one of the market leaders in the production, distribution and marketing of quality agricultural seeds in Nigeria. The Vitae Seed Company Limited was established in 2011 with the sole arm of production, distribution, marketing and importation of agricultural inputs. It is currently one of the market leaders in the production, distribution and marketing of quality agricultural seeds in almost all the north-western states of Nigeria. The company is known for resounding success in business because of its value and its vision to be number one in agricultural inputs in boosting agriculture.

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REGIONALWINNER

From Uganda

Joseph Nkandu Joseph Nkandu has compassionately led the development of successful human-centred agricultural value chain initiatives that have created shared value among actors and society which have won him domestic, regional and international awards. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Agriculture, and a Master of Business Administration (MBA) in Global Business Sustainability specialising in social entrepreneurship and management. His MBA internship and business plan analysed critical success factors for forming and managing coffee value chains and coffee businesses along the entire coffee value chain. The country and regional winner in the agricultural sector is the executive director at NUCAFE. He effectively influenced government of Uganda to formulate the first ever National Coffee Policy which nurtures shared value and a regulatory framework to enhance competitiveness in the marketplace and sustainability.

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SUSTAIN ABILITY

The

By Avani Desai, Principal Privacy Leader and EVP of Schellman & Company, Inc.

Blockchain

Revealed For the past few years, there has been an increased interest in the world of ‘blockchain.’ It can be overwhelming at times, with so many articles and blog posts on the extended use cases of the blockchain. In this article, I will cut through the hype and go back to the basics--what is the blockchain? How will it impact certain industries? And, what, if any, security and privacy implications are there for blockchain adopters?

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o, Just What Is The ‘Blockchain’? The original concept of the blockchain was technology for the management of a digital currency, known as ‘Bitcoin.’ It was invented by Satoshi Nakamoto (pseudonym), who released the code as open source in 2009, after his publication on the topic “Bitcoin: A Peer-toPeer Electronic Cash System.” In its original guise for Bitcoin and the underlying technology, blockchain was used to manage the transactions, but that was almost anarchistic in its ideology. However, the idea of a digital currency took off in the following years, and Bitcoin wannabes, or atlcoins, such as Litecoin and Primecoin, appeared. People often refer to the blockchain as a database; however, it does not have the storage power, or the ability to do queries that we would traditionally associate as a functionality of a database, with data in any given transaction in a block being limited to 80 bytes. This has led to some misleading ideas of what the public

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SUSTAIN ABILITY

As blockchain is based on a peer-to-peer system, all the nodes (including, for example, an iPhone) have to store a copy of the blockchain. However, there is movement in this area. Amazon is looking at peer-to-peer storage issues, which may well be portable to blockchain use cases. More relevant is the use of ‘Blockchain as a Service’ by the likes of Ethereum, who offer to store a blockchain in the cloud-- this gets past some of the issues of local copy, but then you are then tied to that service (at least to some extent). blockchain is capable of. For example, some folks have said the blockchain could carry our individual identity attributes within it, but the storage power needed to accomplish this is not actually possible. You could instead digitally sign a set of attributes, or a level of trust based on identity attributes, then store the hash of the signature of these in a blockchain. In this vein, a better way to describe the blockchain is a type of ‘distributed ledger.’ This distributed ledger is made up of many individual blocks, each containing data - hence the word ‘blockchain.’ To create a distributed ledger, the data must be ‘mined.’ This involves someone with a very powerful computer picking up queued transactions and converting them into a securely stored digital item using a cryptographic function known as a ‘hash.’ This hash acts as a means of non-repudiation. If any details of that transaction change, the hash will also change and an audit log showing the change will then exist.

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The Blockchain in the Wild As with many new entrants to the world of technology, certain sectors are faster than others to embrace its application. I’ll look at two such markets here—finance and healthcare. Finance The financial space is the obvious choice for building extended use cases based on distributed ledger technology. There are several changes happening in the financial sector, in part as a response to the update of a number of regulations, such as AML and Know Your Customer (KYC), and also the EU’s PSD2 changes, which promote the use of ‘open banking.’ Many of these new initiatives are disrupting the centralised world that banking has operated in, to date. This leaves an opening for de-centralised technology, such as blockchain, to enter as a technology, above and beyond, digital currency.


SUSTAIN ABILITY

In its original guise for Bitcoin and the underlying technology, blockchain was used to manage the transactions, but that was almost anarchistic in its ideology.

In an IBM study into banking and blockchain usage, they found that, in 2017, 15% of banks will have commercial projects in production that are based on distributed ledger technology. The study also states that they found that all banks expect the technology to “eradicate frictions across the board.” Also in the financial sector, the Ripple Network has been advocating for cross-border payments. This distributed ledger is different from the public blockchain that is famous for bitcoin transactions, as it is private. This means that access is permissioned, adding an extra security barrier. Other financial schemes include the Hyperledger Project, which is an open source project that is being supported by the finance sector. The group is looking at a number of areas that distributed ledger technology can improve the finance industry, and so far, they have started to work in areas such as increased transparency (something that has been called for since the 2007 banking sector crash) and streamlining of payments. Moreover, the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation is employing distributed ledger technology to reduce costs of derivatives post-trade lifecycle events. Financial market specialist David Birch believes that blockchain technology will allow the financial sector to more closely represent real-world transactions. He believes that, ultimately, blockchain technology will lead to better ways to structure markets and reduce costs of compliance. Healthcare Healthcare is one of the most data intensive--and therefore data transaction intensive--industries in the world. As healthcare picks up the pace with the use of Internet of Things devices, this intensity will only increase. It is within this landscape that distributed ledgers can take hold. One of the keys to the blockchain is the immutable record of transactions that it contains. The blocks within the chain build up, over time, to provide an audit trail of data related events. In healthcare, this could be used for a myriad of use cases--for example, it could be used to store patient care details, such as a change in dosage over time. More and more, the application of the blockchain in healthcare is expanding. Just look at the Estonian eHealth Foundation, which will be using the technology to secure patient records by using the blockchain signature technology of start-up Guardtime. While the technology doesn’t store the files themselves, it instead uses the non-repudiation of digital signatures to ensure the security and integrity of medical records. Furthermore, a blockchain start-up,

Gem, has created a blockchain platform--the GemOS--that can be used by healthcare organisations across the industry to create a secure and audit-able, healthcare document exchange, recording every transaction across a patient’s history. Can Blockchain Solve Our Privacy and Security Woes? In his original treatise on Bitcoin, Nakamoto included a section on privacy. In this section, he set out the way transactions within a blockchain could be kept private through anonymity. He specified that public keys can remain anonymous by breaking the ‘flow’ of the transaction, and in addition, each transaction can have new key pairs to prevent traceability back to the original owner. In other words, you can’t know that this transaction is by X unless you know the public key of X. However, Nakamoto also pointed out that linking is unavoidable if you have multi-input transactions, and if the user key is ultimately revealed, the privacy of every transaction is removed—aka a single point of failure. Blockchain and distributed ledger technology are certainly built upon the tenets of security and privacy by design. As evidenced above, however, they are a not without flaws or problems (as is the case with any technology). In the UK, the government has been accused of using blockchain technology to spy on benefit claimants. More specifically, the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) are being accused of potentially using the technology to prevent claimants purchasing items, such as alcohol, by tracking benefit use. Other privacy issues are inherent in the design of the technology. The distributed ledger is meant to be immutable-this means that information is held, potentially forever, within the chain, and as such, the concept of the ‘right to be forgotten’ is not compatible with this immutable concept of the blockchain. Using the blockchain as a means of storing timestamps and signatures does decrease the privacy issues, but it doesn’t remove them altogether as the potential for tracking remains. Even with these issues, blockchain still has some excellent inbuilt security with the use of private/public cryptographic key pairs, which is why its potential is of such interest in huge fields like finance and healthcare. In this age of mass account compromise, hackers would have to hack the private key of every individual to gain access to their blockchain. That being said, we should look at the design and implementation of the technology with a policy of minimal disclosure, keeping information in the chain to an absolute minimum for any given process. We must bear in mind that once created, a blockchain is for life, and the design of the privacy and security of the data therein needs to be paramount.

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SectorFOREWORD Arts and Culture The creative industries have long been neglected in mainstream trade and industry policy in South Africa even though it is recognised as a significant contributor to the economies of developed economies such as Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia. In its broadest conceptualisation, the creative economy in OECD countries grew at an annual rate that was more than twice that of the services industries and more than four times that of manufacturing. Estimates are that the creative economy is growing annually at 5% per annum and is likely to triple in size globally by 2020 (Howkins, 2001). Similar trends are found even if using a more narrowly defined creative sector. In the UK, in the period 1997-2003, for instance, output of the creative industries, measured as value added, grew at six percent per annum, compared to three per cent growth for the rest of the economy while employment growth grew at a rate of 3% per annum compared with 1% for the whole of the economy (DCMS, 2005). The arts and culture sector is one that continues to thrive and shine in difficult times. ARTFORM attributes this to the efforts of the men, such as those being honoured today, who have been the mainstay of the creative industries.


REGIONAL

WINNERS From Zambia

Chali Mulalami Chali Bravo Mulalami is a son of Winston Chansa Mulalami a bank librarian and Molly Kabwata, a career secretary, parents who he lost by the age of 16. Venturing into business straight out of secondary school, Chali Bravo set up his first business at the age of 19 and went through various types of trading before opening up a real estate and property management company. A natural artist he was always looking for a creative outlet which he maintained through hobbies ranging from abstract painter to graphic designing. But he never quite settled ‘till he tried his hand at music, he later opened up Sling Beats Music to control the process of creating music in the studio and distributing it to fans.

From South Africa

Dr Mduduzi Xakaza Dr Mduduzi Xakaza is an artist specialising in landscapes, and specifically focuses on the KwaZulu Natal area. Mduduzi has exhibited great acclaim throughout South Africa. His works are found in many corporate and private collections and in the Museum Collections at the South African National Art Gallery, the Durban Art Museum, the Pretoria Art Museum, the Tatham Art Museum, and the University of Fort Hare Collection. He is also the director of the Durban Art Gallery. The Durban Art Gallery, now in its second century of existence, is home to collections that are as diverse as the eThekwini population. The Gallery has a comprehensive collection of artworks, and constantly rotates displays from its permanent collection, interspersing them with traveling exhibitions of contemporary and historic pictures and artefacts.

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By Samantha Barnes

CASE IN POINT

Bespoke

Framing Solutions by Andrew Ngozo

Monalisa Molefe, the managing director and owner of The Art Form Factory, is a young entrepreneur that is bullish about the prospects of South Africa’s economy and, more especially, that of her company, The Art Form Factory. She became the owner and managing director of the business in September 2016. She says that the journey, thus far travelled, has been an interesting one filled with its own challenges, highs and lows. Notwithstanding that, Monalisa stresses that the time is nigh to steer the Art Form Factory ship into new waters in order to capitalise on the changing business sphere and do business the unconventional way.

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he While the economic climate has not been the friendliest, Monalisa says she aims to stand out as the best framing company in town. “I would be the first one to admit that as a black woman in this industry, it is not always easy to open doors. One has to try twice as hard. Thus I have resolved to rebuild the company from the ground up by creating and maintaining new relationships and clients. That does not mean that we will neglect the existing ones. It simply means that we want to grow The Art Form Factory into a giant bespoke one stop shop for all framing requirements,” she reveals. Monalisa points out that she intends to revolutionise and shake up the sports memorabilia framing scene. “It has been a largely white dominated sphere and thus catered only for a few. But with the ideas that we have, we aim to introduce it to a wider audience of South Africans because, truth be told, we all have our favourite sports memorabilia that we would like to preserve,” she says. Monalisa adds that exploring that opportunity with a wider market may just result in the opening up of new markets and avenues for framing.

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Monalisa Molefe, the Managing Director and Owner of The Art Form Factory

In order to create capacity in the industry, Monalisa shares that work is underway to build capacity in her own sector by collaborating with young designers. “I hope this will encourage them to grow their own personal brands while we also explore the possibilities of increasing our service/product offering. Essentially, The Art Form Factory has to be the name that anyone thinks of when it comes to interior design,” says Monalisa. At the tender age of one, a human baby would still be just that. But the baby that is The Art Form Factory is a unique one; one that is destined for greatness. With Monalisa in the driving seat, it is clear that the future is very bright for both Monalisa and The Art Form Factory. Add to that the collective invaluable expertise and experience possessed by her staff and one is left with no iota of a doubt that The Art Form Factory is headed to the skies and beyond.


THIS ADVERT IS NOT ABOUT THE PLANTS. Well…it is. But mainly it’s about our dedicated fieldworkers who work tirelessly to protect southern Africa’s environmental surroundings and who need your support. Visit www.ewt.org.za to find out how you can help to protect another precious resource – our people.


SectorFOREWORD Aviation Following the liberalisation of the aviation industry in 1991, the survival rate of new entrant domestic airlines has been low. Two new entrants launched services in South Africa – a trend that is set to continue as new start-ups seek to capture a share of the air passenger growth that is predicted to grow over 5% annually up until 2032. Competition has led to a drop in fares early in 2015, but carriers have to grapple with shrinking margins and a challenging operating environment. There are around 17 million people flying in South Africa each year and the market is served by nine domestic carriers, which is far more airlines per person than one sees in the US, Europe or China. New entrants have helped add some additional domestic traffic, but passenger numbers are not growing that fast. This will result in carriers eating one another’s market share. As carriers eat one another’s market share, there are men at the centre of it all, who ensure that the aviation sector succeeds. SA AIRLINK celebrates your endeavours with the rest of the business community.


REGIONALWINNER

From South Africa

Sibusiso Welcome Nkabinde Finalist in the Aviation sector Sibusiso Welcome Nkabinde is the manager: air traffic services and head of aeronautical search and rescue at the Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC. He is responsible for effective and efficient search and rescue processes and operations and the improvement of the same through national and international cooperation. Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS) provides air traffic, navigation, training and associated services within South Africa and a large part of the southern Indian and Atlantic Ocean, comprising approximately 10% of the world’s airspace. ATNS operates from nine ACSA and 12 other aerodromes. As a globally competitive employer of choice, ATNS is committed to diversity and has achieved ranking within the top 10 companies in South Africa with regards to female representation at executive levels.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Epic Lessons from an By F. John Reh

Corporate Failure

We all get complacent sometimes. We have comfort zones. We do the things we enjoy, that feel good, and that comes easily. That’s why many people surround themselves with people who agree with them, think like them, and support them. The CEO of a large company does not have that luxury. In return for the outlandish compensation being heaped on them by the shareholders, the CEO must immerse himself or herself in the uncomfortable, the unfamiliar, and the different opinion. Only in that way can they keep the company strong and growing. Only then can they earn what they are being paid. Only then can they, and their shareholders, avoid a debacle like Enron. Enron Corporation was an American company that reached dramatic heights, only to face a dizzying collapse. The story ends with the bankruptcy of one of America’s largest corporations. Enron’s collapse affected the lives of thousands of employees and shook Wall Street to its core. To this day, many wonder how such a powerful business disintegrated almost overnight and how it managed to fool the regulators with fake, off-the-books corporations for so long.


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

won’t protect your job, as Enron’s employees have learned. Every manager has a boss. It is our responsibility to our bosses to be honest with them, to tell them what we really think, even if we disagree. Especially if we disagree. You, and every one of your peers, need to discuss issues openly, frankly, and with the best interests of your area clearly visible. You need to give the boss as much information and as many options as possible. Don’t be afraid to fight hard for what you believe to be right. Be professional about it, but be candid too. However, once the boss has made a decision, the discussion and arguing and dissent must stop. Once the decision has been made you have an obligation to support your boss in that decision. You expect it of your people; you should do no less.

Disagree Without Being Disagreeable

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here are many lessons that can be learned from the collapse of Enron. Any organisation has an obligation to all of its stakeholders, not just its shareholders, and those obligations were not met in this case. Executives at Enron made decisions that were wrong. Some of their decisions may have involved illegal activities. Many people also are beginning to question the professional conduct of auditors Arthur Andersen. Did their interest in preserving their income cloud their judgment? We will leave those discussions for others and focus instead on the key management failure - curbing dissent.

It Starts At the Top It is the leader’s job to provide the vision for the group. A good executive must have a dream and the ability to get the company to support that dream. But it is not enough to merely have the dream. The leader must also provide the framework by which the people in the organisation can help achieve the dream. This is called company culture. When your company culture allows people to challenge ideas, suggestions, and plans, you create an organisation of thinking, committed people capable of producing the kind of innovation and productivity required to succeed today. However, if your company culture does not allow dissent, if people who suggest alternatives are castigated for not being ‘team players’, you produce an environment of fear, stagnation, and antipathy. Not allowing appropriate dissent will kill your company.

Discuss and Debate - Up To a Point You’re a smart manager. You encourage your people to challenge you and suggest alternatives. But are you a good subordinate? Do you challenge your boss? Or do you sit back and protect your job by agreeing with everything the boss suggests? Such agreeing

You think your position is right. You want what is best for your people. You want things done in the way that works best for your department. So you argue your points strongly. That’s good, but don’t overdo it. You won’t win every battle. After all, your boss is looking after the best interest of his or her entire organisation, not just your part of it. Recognise the aspects of negotiation involved. Remember you will be working with these people again in the future. For those reasons it’s important that you “disagree without being disagreeable”. Dr. Suzette Elgin, an expert in psycholinguistics, wrote the definitive book, “How to Disagree without Being Disagreeable: Getting Your Point across with the Gentle Art of Verbal Self-Defence”. The next time you have to give someone a bad performance evaluation or a co-worker verbally attacks you in a meeting you will wish you had read this book of practical, real-life techniques. Challenging the status quo has to be a top priority in any organisation. Accepting the status quo leads to stagnation. Stagnation will kill any organisation. Being a yes-man is damaging to the individual, not just the company. The classic movie ‘The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit’ chronicles the stress Gregory Peck’s character endures by agreeing with everything his boss says just to keep a job he really doesn’t even want. If you find yourself in an organisation that does not encourage dissent, move on to one that does.

Manage this Issue Foster a culture in your company where differing opinions are encouraged. Avoid the temptation to surround yourself with individuals who are so similar to you that they can’t offer a different perspective. Don’t surround yourself with people who are so afraid that they won’t dissent. Reward creativity and original thought in your decision-making process. Hang on to those people who have mastered the art of disagreeing without being disagreeable. Maybe then you can avoid being blindsided by events such as Enron has encountered. John Reh is a senior business executive whose broad management experience encompasses managing projects up to USD125 million and business units including up to 200-plus people.

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SectorFOREWORD Building and Construction The construction industry is a significant contributor to employment and growth in South Africa. However the industry has been in a slump since the 2010 Soccer World Cup projects. The 2015 financial year got off to a poor start, with the construction industry being adversely impacted by the metal-workers strike in July 2014 and further instances of labour unrest internally and at clients and suppliers thereafter. This resulted in delays on significant projects in the country. The Government’s Infrastructure Plan aims to address the infrastructure needs of South Africa over the next few years. However this will require input from, and co-ordination with, the construction sector, to be successful. Such input as suggested above is likely to come from the Titans of the sector being honoured here. CEO GLOBAL would like to wish you well in all your future endeavours.


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WINNERS From Tanzania

Dhruv Ashutosh Jog Dhruv Ashutosh Jog is the owner and founder and director of Advent Construction, one of Tanzania’s largest civil and building construction companies. Advent is the first ISO certified construction company in Tanzania and is one of the few companies in the country that meets the demanding standards of the oil and gas industry. He says that part of being a good leader is not only to identify and recognise people’s ability but also to be able to enable others to improve themselves and attain their full potential. He pays attention to the people who work with him and whom he interacts with to try and pick up on their individual strengths and help them develop themselves. Therefore, it is important to identify key strengths that exist within people and to develop those talents and help them grow, in their personal and professional lives.

From South Africa

Webster Mfebe Webster Mfebe, who is the current chief executive officer of the South African Forum of Civil Engineering Contractors since January 2013, has accumulated a wealth of management expertise during his career spanning the mining industry, broadcasting, politics and running his own enterprise. He has addressed various international conferences, locally and abroad, on political and economic issues. Webster has a number of years’ experience in stakeholder relations, having developed and implemented a stakeholder relations strategy during his tenure at the SABC Content Enterprises and also developed SABC’s Soccer World Cup 2010 corporate strategy, the implementation of which earned SABC an FIFA Award. Prior to his appointment at the SABC, Webster was the Free State Government’s provincial minister responsible for Sport, Arts, Culture, Science and Technology, and occasionally acted as premier between 1997 and 2004.

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REGIONALWINNER

From Uganda

Engineer Alex Turihohabwe Alex Turihohabwe is the CEO at Tamp Blessed- 3MS JV ltd a company dealing in engineering consultancy; a leader who basically guides the daily running and operations of the company. He has an outstanding experience in the sector of over 25 years in the same profession and having been in the industry for long makes him conversant enough with what is involved. This has made him so conversant in starting and running companies; to date he is a director in other companies that include Blessed Investments Limited, and Safari Homes (U) Ltd. Alex is also currently the president of the Uganda Association of Consulting Engineers (UACE) an association that brings together 26 member consulting firms. He has encouraged staff to start an investment club where they are encourage to save a percentage of their salary.

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Visibility

Generating Opportunity through

Visibility. A large network. Relationships. They matter. You need them to formulate a strong leadership brand. Although it is the 21st century, I still hear grumblings about the existence of an “old boys’ club.” What is this virtual club but a set of people with similar skills, characteristics, and common friends, acquaintances, and allies? Because it’s “members” have affiliation through common connections, rapport is gained quickly and it is easier to establish trust, a key component to relationship building. These relationships provide opportunities and can contribute to lucrative introductions.

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t can feel exclusive when you are on the outside and not an active member of a recognised, powerful, and influential ‘club’ everyone has the capability to create their own strong and valuable network through establishing a large net of alliances and acquaintances. As you develop more relationships and a larger network, you benefit from gaining greater influence and potentially increased authority. It does not result from simply getting to know a lot of people inside your organisation. Visibility results from carefully considering with whom you form relationships, inside and outside your organisation.

By Lorraine Moore

Tips for Increasing Visibility  Deliver more than expected. Consistently delivering results gets notice  Suggest improvements  Ask to sit on committees  Offer to make a presentation at a lunch-and-learn session, a town hall meeting, or other corporate gatherings If another division provides or receives services from your area, or if you have staff who work together, reach out to your peers in that division. Explore what is working well and what challenges they are facing. Perhaps you can jointly identify solutions. Carefully consider how you volunteer. You want to position yourself as being innovative, strategic, knowledgeable, and business focused. Expanding Your Network Expanding your network works in conjunction with increased visibility to create opportunities. Carefully consider with whom you build relationships to expand your network and your reach within your organisation, industry or community. Some considerations when expanding your network:  To whom can you offer the greatest assistance?  Who is well regarded by others in the organisation or industry?  Return favours. Make introductions between colleagues and friends you know in other organisations. Do you have a mentor? Ask him or her whom you would benefit from meeting. If you don’t have a mentor, ask your boss, colleagues or your friends for suggestions.

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SectorFOREWORD Business and Professional Service Professional services are vital for development in Southern Africa. Accounting, legal and engineering services contribute directly and indirectly to economic growth, by lowering transactions costs, being key inputs and creating spill overs of knowledge to other sectors. While professional services are among the fastest growing services sectors in Africa, their weaknesses and underdevelopment are dwarfing their current contribution to growth in the region. African countries have initiated regional integration but negotiations on the liberalisation of services – professional services in particular have made little progress. BCX would like to pay its respects to all the hard working men in this sector.


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WINNERS

From Kenya

Dr Amit N Thakker Dr Amit N Thakker is one of East Africa’s eminent and respected business leaders in the healthcare industry. Founder of Avenue Healthcare, which is a leading primary healthcare provider in Kenya, Amit has been awarded a winner of the best Kenyan entrepreneur in 1999 by Rotary International. An accomplished champion in healthcare management, he is well recognised for providing innovative and bold business cross cutting solutions in the health services and financing sector within Eastern and Southern Africa. With over 20 years of experience in operations, change management and business networking coupled with successes in challenging economies and cultural contexts, Amit has successfully spearheaded the establishment of medical and primary health organisations in various developing countries including Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Rwanda, Nigeria, Tanzania and Kenya.

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EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

By Brandon Black and Shayne Hughes

Ego-Driven Deeds

Destroying Your Organisation Why Leadership Ego May Be Killing Your Company and What You Can Do About It

Captured on camera — a passenger being dragged off a plane goes viral instantly, and an international brand-tarnishing moment is made. As a leader such a scenario is a shining opportunity for a CEO, business owner or senior executive to seize control of the situation, and turn it around. Instead, far too many executives lose their cool, shift the responsibility and fault others — often relegating the situation to “regrettable actions of employees” or even blaming the victimised customer. In other words, the leader’s sense of selfimportance and corporate rightness reigns supreme.

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ase in point: The initial response by United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz regarding employees forcibly removing a passenger from a recent flight was originally positioned as regrettable but necessary. Then there’s the Uber CEO who was videotaped aggressively arguing with his own driver when he complained about corporate decisions to cut fares for Uber’s premium service. Instead of empathy or even tolerance, the driver’s comments were met with scorn. Finally, Wells Fargo’s results-at-all-costs mind-set led to millions of fake accounts being created. These are glaring examples of CEOs whose focus on financial and personal success damaged their company’s culture and bottom line — and then they blamed others when things went poorly. While highly public company crises are somewhat rare, each and every day C-suite

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executives and business owners worldwide are falling victim to their own egos — egos which are preventing them from making sound business decisions, unconsciously setting poor examples for their employees and creating a culture where poor customer service and underperformance are an acceptable way to work. Every organisation must decide whether they will allow their companies to be determined by an ego-driven culture or one that is ego free. Many of the employees at the organisations we’ve worked with are talented and hardworking, but have underperformed in their potential in proportion to the severity of these four dysfunctions. Below are four ego-driven personality traits that, at best, are undermining a company from realising its full potential


EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

and, at worst, can cause executives to irreparably damage their business’s reputation and performance. Dismissing Feedback The Symptom: Not listening to other points of view can lead to negative unforeseen and significant consequences in profitability, reputation and employee morale. The Source: Every leader knows that they should listen, but the ego wants to win, be right and avoid appearing incompetent or stupid. When these ego threats are triggered, it is almost impossible for leaders to constructively hear others and take to heart what will be best for the overall business. In the case of Munoz, his initial public response regarding the passenger pulled from the plane was to criticise the passenger and the lack of “proper tools, policies and procedures.” Deflection by a leader is invariably an ego-driven disaster in the making. “When leaders are defensive or abrasive, it triggers similarly dysfunctional behaviours in their colleagues. It doesn’t matter what poster you put up on the wall. Dominant organisational dysfunction will not decrease until leaders identify and overcome their personal egosystem reactions,” says Black. The Solution: A culture of trust and transparency starts at the top. This means that the CEO, executive or business owner must be highly — and visibly — receptive to input and feedback — especially when they disagree. For example, notice when you are sure that you are right and ask your team to tell you what you are not seeing or hearing. The Blame Game The Symptom: When things go wrong, our ego involuntarily points the finger at others. Our focus is on who’s incompetent, doesn’t get it, or never should have been put in that role. Painting a bleak picture of the company, co-workers, our customer base, etc., may make us feel better, but often makes us look worse. The Source: For the ego, being wrong or at fault (especially in public) can feel like death. Let’s face it: Everyone wants to be the hero and no one wants to be the fall guy. When blame is the name of the game, it is the rare leader who can own his or her responsibility first. The Solution: A leader must first call out the fact that the blame game is going on, making it too risky for anyone to take responsibility for anything. By humbly owning their (or the team/company) part of the problem, the leader sets the example for others to “look in the mirror.” Leaders who are secure enough to say “I screwed up” create a culture where employees hold themselves accountable. How much better off would Munoz have been to acknowledge that his policies directly or indirectly contributed to passengers being deplaned in such an un-customer-focused way? Or what about recognising from the start that this was not an action consistent with the values of the company? Owning a

problem requires doing the right thing above the egodriven goal of “looking good.” All leaders know this intellectually — but when the ego is threatened, the brain stem takes over and we react ineffectively. Us vs. Them The Symptom: Human resources is frustrated with operations, sales ignores HR, and everyone is mad at IT. In this common climate of mistrust, performance issues don’t get addressed, and departments fight over who’s in charge instead of coming together to achieve the organisation’s goals. The Source: While everyone may complain about turf wars, there is a hidden side benefit to the ego. Any lack of performance can be passed off as the failure of another person, group or department, and we get to be right that if they had just listened to us, everything would have turned out fine. The unchecked ego will choose being right over making progress. The Solution: One way to break this deadlock is to acknowledge the conflict and seek to understand how you are contributing to the problem. How are the other side’s frustrations with you true? What are the consequences on the organisation’s performance of your turf war? What common goals can you align on? That other group you think doesn’t get it actually feels just like you do. If you put your ego aside, they more than likely will too. Avoiding Conflict The Symptom: Performance and interpersonal issues don’t get addressed directly. Too often, leaders sugar coat, vent to others or just move folks from role to role. As a result, productivity suffers, employees feel unengaged and important matters are left to fester. The Source: Almost no one wants to appear mean or uncaring, and even senior leaders resist being disliked. So we tell ourselves that we don’t want to hurt the other person’s feelings by being too direct. At a visceral level, we avoid putting ourselves in the uncomfortable position of having a direct discussion about a delicate issue. The Solution: “There are three steps to overcoming this ego threat,” says Shayne Hughes, co-author. “Start by sharing with the other person the discomfort you feel at bringing up the issue. Then let them know what your intention is for the conversation,” says Hughes. “Finally, state your observations about their behaviour, not your conclusions.” One leader’s vulnerability can lead the way for someone else to face their fear of conflict, and encourage them to be more open to feedback—see dismissing feedback above. Brandon Black and Shayne Hughes are co-authors of the newly released book “Ego Free Leadership: Ending the Unconscious Habits that Hijack Your Business,” written from their personal experience about ego-driven decisions and discovered ways leaders can proactively avoid making those missteps. Reach them online at http:// learnaslead.com/ego-free-leadership.

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SectorFOREWORD Chemical, Pharmaceutical and Petrochemical

The chemicals, pharmaceutical and petrochemical industry has been shaped by the political and regulatory environment that created a philosophy of isolationism and protectionism during the apartheid years. This tended to foster an inward approach and a focus on import replacement in the local market. It also encouraged the building of small-scale plants with capacities geared to local demand, which tended to be uneconomic. Through isolation of the industry from international competition and high raw material prices as a result of import tariffs, locally processed goods have generally been less than competitive in export markets. Now that South Africa is once more fully part of the global community, South African chemical, pharmaceutical and petrochemical companies are focusing on the need to be internationally competitive and the industry is reshaping itself accordingly. Working as a collective unit and in their respective individual capacities, men in this sector have contributed immensely to putting South Africa back on the map in so far as the chemical, pharmaceutical and petrochemical sector is concerned. SHELL SA lauds your efforts.


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WINNER From South Africa

Mike Capon As managing director of Sensetek for the past eight years Mike Capon has identified strategic growth opportunities for the company, increased capacity and client base. Their focus remains true to their core competencies of fragrance, flavour and ancillary support products. They have increased their business with their principal Charabot who have given them full support to represent them in flavours for the group which will add strength to their product offering. Over the past two years Mike has developed a stronger relationship with another French principal Tournaire, a specialist packaging company associated with the fragrance & flavour industry. Mike manages a team of 12 people. The medium sized company is worth R35-50 million and increased turnover by 4.5x over past eight years achieved by the strategic acquisition of new clients and market expansion.

From Uganda

Nazeem Mohamed Nazeem Mohamed is the chief executive officer Kampala Pharmaceutical Industries (1996) Ltd. He has over 35 years’ experience in the global pharmaceutical industry working in Europe (United Kingdom, Denmark and Belgium), United States of America and Africa. Nazeem has a proven track-record in general management, manufacturing, strategic marketing, and product development. He is actively involved in public health initiatives, with the objective of creating synergies between the public and private sectors to increase access to essential medicines in Africa. KPI manufactures quality and affordable essential medicines for the East African Region. Their focus is on improving the quality of life of people in the region. He successfully turned around a loss making company into a healthy and profitable one with exports throughout the EA region.

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EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP

Leadership Means By Lorraine Moore

Letting

GO How do you measure your effectiveness as a leader? Do you consider employee turnover to be a blessing or a curse? Do you actively support your employees taking on new roles? Even if it is outside of your department or area of responsibility?

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n my work with leaders at all levels I have recently heard a fair bit of rationalisation regarding why direct reports (often in leadership roles themselves) are well suited to their current role. This is particularly true in large organisations that have been able to retain people in part due to: the economic downturn; the number of long term employees tied to pensions and deferred incentive plans and employees’ ease and comfort with the status quo. Many leaders in Fortune 500 companies are telling their employees that they will be ready for that next role “in another year or so”; or “when we complete this project; change initiative, or integration”; or “you need to develop a bit more in this area”. These responses indicate that as leaders we are largely in control of whether someone stays or goes. But at what cost to you and the organisation? Do they maintain the same level of engagement when you ask them to “stick around” for another year? Do they go the extra mile for you when you suggest that the required areas of development cannot be met through a new opportunity but mastered only in their current role? This is just as important to those of you occupying the C suite. Your behaviour sets the tone for all in the organisation. Do you reward the leaders who champion and promote moves throughout your organisation? Or do you turn a blind eye as long as your senior leaders deliver results? Engaged employees plan to stay for what they give; the disengaged stay for what they get. (Blessing White Employee Engagement Report 2011) I have heard the responses from some of you, “The Gen Y group expect rapid promotions. They seek change regularly. They haven’t paid their dues. It will all happen in time.” That may be. Or is it as likely that global demographics; the trend of retirements and part time work for baby boomers and the growth in small and medium sized businesses will provide choice and opportunities for motivated and talented workers in the years ahead? As leaders, how do we ensure enough stability that we meet our business challenges while supporting growth opportunities for our employees? Dedicate the time to hold conversations with your direct reports at least twice per year and/or when they are considering a move. Discuss their career aspirations and how their goals align to your organisation’s values, strategies and plans. Be honest. Practice transparency. If their timelines or expectations are unrealistic, explain your rationale. Offer them concrete opportunities to develop and/or ready themselves for future. Sometimes reassurance is all that is required when they are considering another opportunity. They may be comfortable with continued development in their current role if they understand you will support the right move later. Document development plans; keep your promises and hold people to account. If they do not follow through, explain the potential consequences and the possible impact to their personal brand. Sponsor and support talent. When you see a great opportunity for someone, be ready to champion them even if it means losing a star from your team. The organisation almost always benefits from people moves. Employees expand

their network, share a point of view from another part of the organisation and develop more intellectual property. Take a risk on someone. If offered, take the opportunity to mentor someone with potential. Perhaps they don’t have the deep technical knowledge or business acumen of their predecessor but if they are a strong performer with a proven track record, nine times out of 10 they will outperform for you because you gave them an opportunity and demonstrated belief in them. Gain a reputation in the organisation as being a leader who fosters talent for the entire company. Make your department or division a “destination” in the organisation and foster employee development. Everyone benefits – including you! Who’s Holding You Back? Many of us have been in situations in which we felt we were being held back from pursuing a change in job, company or locale…..by a boss, a friend, a spouse. What does this “hold back” look like? Is it an expression of disagreement when you talk about making a change? Is it an unwillingness to sponsor or support you for another role in the organisation or a statement that you are not yet ready for that promotion? I have coached many people through situations like this and here is my advice:  Listen carefully to the feedback you have been provided. Before you immediately discount it, consider – is there a nugget of valuable information in what was said? If you have moved companies every 1 to 2 years when you become dissatisfied, maybe staying longer with your current organisation might alleviate fears of prospective employers. If the feedback is from someone that you otherwise respect, consider what knowledge you can take from their message.  If there is some truth in what you have been told, what can you do to address the gaps? Do you need more development in your current role? Are there some behaviours that you need to modify to improve your reputation and/or personal brand?  Take action. If you have new insights, act on them. If you determined that there is no legitimate reason to change your approach or your goal, move forward. Create a plan and take a first step – today. From the moment you take the first definitive action towards a goal, your brain knows you are serious and the universe readies for your change. Ultimately, no one and nothing can hold you back from what you want to achieve. Only you do. It is often easier to attribute our lack of action – grounded in fear, lack of confidence or unwillingness to make sacrifices or change – that hold us back.  Define your goal – a promotion, a new location, return to school, a new organisation, a career change. Be very specific in defining what it is you are seeking. Reach out to your supporters. Create your plan. Take action. And look back over your shoulder and you will see – no one is holding you back!

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SectorFOREWORD Education and Training: Academic ‘Overworked, under resourced and underpaid’ are often the terms used by professionals in the academic education and training sector. Such a state of affairs should not be allowed to continue in a country and continent which needs to nurture its future generations and equip them with as much knowledge as possible in order that they can face the future and the challenges it will bring. A lot of the reasons why the education and training sector is not performing as well as expected is due to the fact that African governments, South Africa included, tend to invest too few funds/ resources in this all important sector. As a result, low morale is a common characteristic among both learners and educators. The ultimate outcome is that our respective communities often produce underequipped young adults who are not quite ready to tackle the real world. Thanks to the men in this sector, we may yet win this battle and start reaping the results of their hard work. UNISA SBL will forever be grateful for your efforts at steering our communities into the future.


REGIONAL

WINNER From Mauritius

Dr Pierre Clarel Catherine Dr Pierre Clarel Catherine is a lecturer, Telecommunication Engineering at the University of Technology, Mauritius. He is mainly involved in the engineering education sector, being a full time lecturer for over five years. His responsibilities are to deliver lectures and help students acquire the technical skills and leadership qualities they need to thrive in the job market after their degree. He purposely influences his profession by bringing a change in the philosophy of tertiary education. He embraces learning vs teaching and hands-on experience vs acquiring theoretical knowledge. Information is now readily available and is a commodity. He believes that universities should provide students with a holistic experience where they acquire lifelong qualities so they become the leaders of a better future.

From Tunisia

Prof Mohamed Thameur Chaibi Professor Mohamed Thameur Chaibi is the research director at the National Research Institute for Rural Engineering Water and Forestry. He has worked for almost three decades promoting science, technology, higher education and research programmes, as a scientist, expert and adviser who has been serving the African Union Commission for more than six years and the German agency for international development cooperation (GIZ), in Tunisia for more than 20 years in the field of water-energy-food security nexus and agriculture innovation and technologies. These cumulative capacities have added value to his personnel involvement in creating inter-institutional synergies, as well as facilitating reciprocal understanding and consensus in science, technology and research development.

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REGIONAL

WINNERS From Tanzania

Dr Matobola Joel Mihale Dr Matobola Joel Mihale is the associate dean at Open University of Tanzania. He has been have been a team leader in writing different research proposals for submission to different funders. He was a team leader in writing a proposal for equipment funding from Seeding Labs, USA. Through it they received a consignment of equipment whose value stand at USD106 000. The equipment is being installed and they will be used for teaching both undergraduate and postgraduate students, research and consultancy. He has been a team leader in writing different research proposals for submission to different funders. Since January 2017 he has written three grand research proposals. He was a team leader in writing a proposal for equipment funding from Seeding Labs, USA.

From South Africa

Prof Letlhokwa George Mpedi Prof Letlhokwa George Mpedi completed his B Juris degree and LLB degree at Vista University. In 2001 the LLM degree in Labour Law was conferred upon him by the then Rand Afrikaans University (now University of Johannesburg). He was twice the recipient of the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD) award. A National Research Foundation doctoral research award was also granted to him in 2002. His main duty as a director is to, give overall leadership and direction to CICLASS, also in terms of its mission and vision, within the context of the mission and vision of the University of Johannesburg, and to liaise and relate on behalf of and represent CICLASS at a high level both internationally, regionally and domestically.


REGIONALWINNER From Zambia

Peter Mwila Lukonde Peter Mwila Lukonde is a senior mining engineer and part-time lecturer in mining at the Copperbelt University and he also has a private consultancy. The motto of the Copperbelt University is Knowledge and Service. Enshrined in the motto are the following strands: Knowledge and service go together. Without knowledge service is hardly possible. Without the use of knowledge in service of mankind, knowledge is useless. The Copperbelt University, as a seat of learning, represents knowledge, and the tertiary-level education if offers to students is itself direct service to the students as individual persons, to society in so far as students are members of the human species, technically known as homo sapiens. With his 22 years of experience, Peter has the ability to manage multiple aspects simultaneously while exercising balanced judgment when confronted with conflicting objectives.

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COUNTRY WINNER

From Uganda

David Ross Olanya David Ross Olanya was born in Kitgum, Uganda. He received a Bachelor degree from Makerere University in 2005 and a Masters in public policy and administration from the School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, The American University in Cairo in 2007. He has been a lecturer in the Department of Public Administration and Management since 2008 and the head of Department from 2010 up to date. He was a World Social Science Fellow 2013, International Social Science Council: Risk Interpretation and Action: Decision-making under conditions of uncertainty, and a Mo Ibrahim Foundation Fellow 2011.

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Venture Capital and

Common Mistakes When Raising Start-up Venture Capital You have a great business venture idea and you are raising start-up capital but why is that nobody wants to invest in your business? There is always room for improvement. There are several mistakes on raising start-up capital that could be the reason why it is difficult for banks or for venture capital firms to invest on your business.

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obin Cross stated in her article that there are three groups of mistakes made when raising start-up capital: “poor preparation, structuring the agreement and managing the money.� This is truly the reasons why entrepreneurs would find their loan applications and investment applications rejected. By avoiding these blunders, then there would definitely be a higher possibility of having your business financed.

Poor Preparation There are entrepreneurs thinking that enthusiasm and passion would be enough to start and keep a business.


SUSTAIN ABILITY

Unfortunately, if you are looking for start-up capital, investors are not only looking for proper attitudes, they are also looking for a complete and solid business plan. When going to a meeting with bank or venture capital officers, you would like to be prepared with your business plan. This would show how important the venture is. Nothing is more disastrous when an applicant files an application that has an incomplete business plan. You do not need just funds; you would also need management skills. Another common mistake is forgetting about the managerial aspects of the business. A bank loan grantor and venture capital investor are looking for something when they meet you, how you will return their money and investment. Nobody could be successful without relying or having somebody to help. You would have to get the best people out there. Structuring the Agreement Surveys done by the U.S. Bank in 2004 showed that there are small businesses who fail because they start with a little amount of money. Most of the entrepreneurs who apply for starting capital are actually asking for the amount based on the best performance of their business. It is important to calculate the amount you will need in the worst scenario that could happen. Others would commit the mistake of actually not being too conscious about the legal agreements. If you are not confident with dealing with angel investors or venture capital firms, then it is for the best to get a lawyer that has experience about this kind of agreements. This would ensure that the terms would not be taking advantage of you and your business. Managing the Money Proper management is the key. It is natural to have difficulties on the first year, but overcoming it is important. There are entrepreneurs that would start a business just because of getting excited over it, but once they experience a difficulty, they would let it go completely. When having difficulties with business, some entrepreneurs tend to keep the problem to themselves. That is something you should not do! Look for people who can help you. Of course, there are mentors who are willing to help you out with your business issues. Asking for help or guidance is not a sign of weakness; rather it is about acknowledging your weaknesses and working to overcome them. You do not have to build a fortress around your business, community involvement can help you get additional business contacts and at the same time impart your blessings and knowledge to other people. Your business venture would benefit a lot from start-up capital offered by different institutions. But it is not just enough to get the capital, what happens with the money when it is already in your hands would decide what would happen to your business. Start-up capital for your venture is just a boost. Choosing the Right Venture Capital Firm for Your Start-up Business Not all venture capital firms offer start-up capital for your business. There are venture capital firms that are focused on a

specific kind of capital, so it is pertinent to research about the capital venture firms that would cater to your needs before you even think of approaching one. Venture capital firms have specific requirements when an entrepreneur applies for their start-up capital services. A great way of increasing the possibility of your business plan getting funded by VCs is knowing their requirements and evaluating if you would fit into what they are looking for. You could narrow down your VC choices to a specific group that would display high probability of accepting your business plan. Some venture capital firms would only fund those companies or businesses within the proximity of their headquarters. If your target venture capital firm has geographical limitations, then you could look for VCs that do not have any particularity on location or you could look for a credible VC within your area. Aside from the location or proximity requirements, look for venture capital firms that have experience in your field. For example, if they already have an existing and former portfolio company which is in the same field as your future business. You could look in the company’s records if the VC was able to help the business. This would give you confidence that the VC would be able to help you with your business. But how would you know if the venture capital firms in your area are credible? Ask around. You will be surprised that people in the community, like lawyers and accountants, would know something about the venture capital firms. They can give you information about the personality and experience of the venture capitalists. Aside from asking around, there are also published materials where you could check their portfolio companies. You could check the company websites or talk directly with the portfolio companies of the VCs. If a VC firm’s portfolio shows that they have considerably great success with businesses that have the same nature as yours, then there could be a probability that they will be investing in your business proposal. When conducting a face to face meeting with the portfolio company’s CEO or officer, make sure that you would be asking how the venture capital firms would conduct their relationship with them. Venture capital firms would often be a group of investors or affiliates of an insurance company or a bank. You can also ask about the partners of these VC firms. Do not be inhibited when asking about the reputation of a venture capital firm. Let’s put it this way, if you apply for them, they would surely ask about you and your background. It would be fair enough to learn if they are doing their business well before you go ahead with a business relationship with them. When looking for a venture capital firm make sure that you would be working with a firm that maintains a good communication and profitable relationship with their portfolio companies. The last thing that you could consider would be the assets of the venture capital firm. Even if you are just thinking about applying for start-up capital in the venture capital firm, do not deduct the possibility that you could get an expansion capital or a second stage funding from them. In a way, it would be beneficial for you since you will be getting somebody experienced following the development of your business.

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SectorFOREWORD Education and Training: Private The private education and training sector is as important as the public and academic facet of the industry. It is this sector that is responsible for equipping fresh out of school young adults with the skills that will prepare them for the rest of their lives. It is not an easy route to navigate as many young people hardly have any idea of what career path they want to follow for the rest of their lives. Coupled with the above, many school leavers have been left high and dry as public universities are swamped by large numbers of applicants. Thus, private tertiary education providers are burgeoning in the face of the government shortfall, stepping in to offer a range of fullyaccredited qualifications, especially to school leavers without university exemption. CEO Global would like to offer a word of thanks to all the practitioners in this space. They are lighting the way for the future of the African continent.


REGIONALWINNER From Zimbabwe

Edward Siwela Edward Siwela is the executive director at the Institute of Directors Zimbabwe. The Institute of Directors (IoD) was founded in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1903 and was granted a Royal Charter in 1906. Unlike many Chartered Institutes, it is not, at least at present, an examining body but first and foremost considers itself a training institute. As the executive director of the Institute, Edward is responsible for its overall day-to-day business activities and operations; developing its strategic and business plans; leading the training and development of directors across all sectors of the economy; leading and supervising staff and associate training facilitators who complement their training; leading the institute’s consultancy programmes in strategic planning and governance support services and leading the institute’s programmes in impacting public policy.

From Rwanda

Alain Munyaburanga Alain Munyaburanga became the in-country director of Rwanda Girls Initiative and at the same time, the headmaster of the Gashora Girls Academy of Science and Technology. He is in charge of RGI and GGAST in Rwanda, dealing with government relations, visitors and seminars on best practices of the school. He manages different partnerships RGI has with different institutions and organisations and leads a teaching and administrative staff of 25 people, with 272 students in a residential school setting. Alain participates in fundraising efforts done every year in the United States of America by the two founding members and the board of directors. He successfully led the school into becoming the leading high school in Rwanda as well as one of the few certified Microsoft Showcase Schools in the world.

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Effective Ways to by Andrew Ngozo

Nowadays, almost everyone is tech savvy and has a quasi-smart gadget of some sort. It is this gadget that opens up a universe of possibilities; mainly through the internet. But many people are so preoccupied about exploring that they forget that they leave a trail behind. This trail is often what bad people such as hackers, identity thieves and fraudsters prey upon to wreak havoc on a person’s life. So, even if you are not ecologically inclined, you may probably have heard the term “carbon footprint”-a phrase that refers to the amount of excess carbon an individual, family or organisation contributes to the earth’s atmosphere. But are you as aware of your “digital footprint?” Well, you should be.

Employees By Myron Curry

Nowadays, almost everyone is tech savvy and has a quasi-smart gadget of some sort. It is this gadget that opens up a universe of possibilities; mainly through the internet. But many people are so preoccupied about exploring that they forget that they leave a trail behind. This trail is often what bad people such as hackers, identity thieves and fraudsters prey upon to wreak havoc on a person’s life. So, even if you are not ecologically inclined, you may probably have heard the term ‘carbon footprint’-a phrase that refers to the amount of excess carbon an individual, family or organisation contributes to the earth’s atmosphere. But are you as aware of your “digital footprint?” Well, you should be.

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he answers to these questions and more are what should always be on every employer’s mind if they are to create effective, productive workforces. A lack of motivation is a true killer, as anyone certainly knows.

Show Me the Money or Not Popularised by the movie Jerry Maguire, starring Tom Cruise and Renee Zellweger, ‘Show me the money’, has become a commonly used term in society. And, often, this is the basis for what most people think is at the top of the list for employee motivation. But, is it? Naturally, higher pay is never frowned upon. There is not a person in the world that couldn’t use more money. Between bills, children, higher education, and personal desires, among many other reasons, money is a factor that can never be ignored. It is a need that we must all have filled. Many companies use money as incentive for motivation. Is this wrong? Not necessarily. Big pay raises and bonuses are always something that a person can use and these are things that will certainly never be turned down. Cash is a motivator that will always be popular.

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And, if possible, money is always a good choice to use for employee motivation because who doesn’t like money? But, money should not be the ONLY tool used from the toolbox of motivation. There are many other choices for motivational increase. In fact, many employees who claim money is the only thing that will drive their motivation higher do so because there is a lack of any other form of compensation. This frame of mind adheres to the comment so often heard, is well, they better pay me more money or give me a bonus because I’m sure not getting anything else out of working here. In other words, there sure isn’t anything else the employee is receiving that even remotely resembles compensation to increase motivation. Something Else Employee contribution is something that can increase employee motivation. If an employee is regularly able to contribute thoughts, ideas, and suggestions to problems at hand or regular work activities, that is a feeling of accomplishment which goes a long way. It makes an employee feel as though he or she is important and, hence, their motivation is elevated.


SUSTAIN ABILITY

Recognition is another form of motivation. If all an employee hears is the things he or she does wrong, the opposite effect of motivation will occur. Of course, an employee is going to do things wrong, at times. But, they will inevitably do things right, as well. Let them know when this happens, always. If an employee feels he or she has the respect of his or her peers and colleagues, this is another motivation booster. Stifle negative comments in the workplace. Do not allow employees to talk down to one another and/or drag each other through the mud. Likewise, make sure you don’t do the same when other employees are able to see it happen to a fellow co-worker. That’s bad for morale and only downplays motivation. Keeping an employee in the loop is something else that is important to motivation. When an employee feels he or she is not up-to-date with what is occurring in the company or their department, that is a message to the employee that says, You are not important. That’s not the kind of message that increases motivation. Keep information flowing to each employee; let them know what the company is doing and the direction it is taking. Stay flexible. Make an absolute effort to ensure your employee is not tied up in red tape. If an employee is

interests them and what doesn’t. Speaking with an employee frequently shows that you care about them in more ways than simply wanting them to keep up with productivity. This will increase an employee’s motivation as well. Keeping these methods of compensation in mind is what it takes to understand what it is that drives your employee to want to do a better job. They must WANT to do a better job or the work they do will never be as excellent as it could be. If you are ever in doubt as to what it is that drives your employee, simply ask, either in a group meeting or one-on-one. In fact, asking an employee what it is that motivates him or her is a good idea right from the start. Then, you can always be sure of what to provide. All in all, make sure that money isn’t the only thing you can offer an employee to increase his or her motivation. If it is, then as soon as the money is better somewhere else, your employee’s motivation will definitely increase working for the other company.

A lack of motivation is a true killer, as anyone certainly knows.

not able to solve problems with a degree of flexibility because there are too many company rules hampering common sense progress, an employee feels nothing but frustration. Motivation is not built on frustration. Constant check-in with higher-ups when working on a project undermines an employee’s confidence and willingness to think for themselves. It also deteriorates motivation. Make sure plenty of sufficient resources are available for an employee’s use. Motivation cannot thrive if an employee is constantly faced with having inadequate resources to do the job. Create a fun and stimulating work place. Let everyone address each other on a first name basis or have a casual dress day Encourage employees to create a work environment that is as comfortable as possible and not so office-like by bringing in personal pictures and things such as plants, for example. This will only promote creativity and, in the long run, increase motivation. Communicate with your employee. Find out what

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SectorFOREWORD Financial Services According to Investopedia, broadly speaking, companies that operate in the financial services industry are in the business of managing money. Globally, the financial services industry leads the world in terms of earnings and equity market capitalisation. In 2015, a number of large conglomerates dominated the landscape, offering a variety of financial services under one roof. However, a diverse range of smaller companies and individuals make up this dynamic group. The vast financial services sector also includes accountants and tax filing services, currency exchange and wire transfer services, credit card machine services and networks, debt resolution services and global payment providers such as Visa and MasterCard, as well as exchanges that facilitate stock, derivatives and commodity trades. For ensuring that we have a well-oiled and functioning financial services sector, KPMG would like to pay its tribute to the men in this sector.


REGIONAL

WINNER From Mauritius

Roshan Boodhoo Roshan Boodhoo is the managing partner and chief executive officer at Alliance Trust Co. (Mauritius) Limited. He manages the day to day business administration, improves the procedures and processes through a major internal reorganisation and contributes for membership to the financial association PrimeGlobal (ex IGAF Polaris).He also contributed to the setting up of Alliance Audit and Accounting; the outsourcing arm of the group. Roshan contributed to the setting up of Alliance Advisory Services, a tax and management consulting firm and contributed to the setting up of Prime Alliance International (Dubai), a financial services provider. He implemented new corporate strategies focusing on the longterm success of the business and promoted good corporate governance within both the Mauritius and Luxembourg offices. He represented Alliance offices in international seminars and conferences worldwide.

From South Africa

Tshepo Mahloele Tshepo Mahloele is the chief executive officer at Harith General Partners and one of the originators of the Pan African Infrastructure Development Fund (PAIDF). Tshepo previously headed the Corporate Finance and Isibaya Fund Division of the Public Investment Corporation and was the recipient of two recognition awards from the Association of Black Securities and Investment Professionals (ABSIP) for his work, including the CEO of the Decade award which he received whilst at Harith General Partners. Under his leadership, Harith General Partners has actively acted as a catalyst for Africa’s development in the form of the construction of various infrastructure assets which include: Main One undersea cable in Nigeria, Dark Fibre Africa cable company in South Africa, the Henrie Konare Bedie Bridge in Abidjan,Lake Turkana Wind Farm in Kenya, the Enfidha and Monastir Airports in Tunisia among others.

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REGIONALWINNER

From Uganda

Azim Tharani Azim Tharani joined Ruparelia Group of Companies heading the lottery operation as well as the Insurance Company and generally acting as a financial consultant to the group with interest in banking, insurance, forex, hospitality industry, education, floriculture and horticulture, real estate development and investment. He advised the group and dealt with tax and financial planning, acquisition and mergers, formation of new companies and recruitment of senior managerial staff. He has been an elected member of the executive committee of Uganda Insurers Association since April 2010 and served as an honorary treasurer, vice chairman and currently chairing the Oil and Gas technical committee. Azim was an executive committee member of Uganda Media Owners’ Association (UMOA) since its inception and served as its Chairman until November 2016.

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SUSTAIN ABILITY

New Ways to Keep Millennials at Their Millennials (“Generation Y” - aged 15-35) will hold 1516 jobs over their careers. This ‘turnover generation’ is costing businesses billions. The average cost of turnover is a whopping 21% of every employee’s annual salary with Microsoft’s turnover cost alone estimated at USD681 million.

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survey-based study released this week aims to keep Millennials happy and reduce turnover by uncovering important aspects of keeping them in the workplace. The study is the first in an upcoming series performed by the pricing survey company Atenga Inc. in collaboration with generational expert and Sundance award winning film director, Josh Tickell. According to Per Sjofors, CEO of Atenga, “These studies are unique because they compare and contrast the habits and attitudes of Baby Boomers (born 19461964) with those of Millennials.” The first study reveals that while Millennials share many of the same values in terms of significant life choices to their Baby Boomer counterparts, Milliennials are lacking support at work in the areas of Mentorship, Purpose, and Self Expression. Millennial respondents, 67% more than Baby Boomer respondents, reported that ‘having a great mentor’ at work is important. Study coauthor Josh Tickell says that “formal mentorship programs have sprung up in a number of fortune 500 companies as part of their onboarding process, so it’s no surprise that Millennials want mentoring as part of their job.” A workplace in which the generation with experience and knowledge fails to provide mentoring will be rocky place

Jobs

to work for young hires. This can cause turnover. The study found that companies must to work harder to make their work purpose-driven. Respondents from the Baby Boomer generation said they were 67% more interested in making more money than doing good. However, Millennial respondents weighed making more money on par with ‘doing good.’ Millennials entering the workforce are significantly more purpose-driven than members of their parents’ generation. If work has a greater social purpose, they are more likely to stay. In nine separate categories of items that could express individuality, Millennials showed they value selfexpression up to eight times more than Baby Boomers. Companies with strict anti-tattoo policies, strict dress codes and strict policies against ‘personalising’ one’s area of work are a no-no for keeping young people at their jobs. Today’s workplace (like Millennials themselves) is about customisation, individuality, and choice. A short three minute video captures the highlights of the study on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=qP037e3IZwU. Atenga is a pricing survey company helmed by Swedish statistician Per Sjofors that specialises in developing pricing strategies for Fortune 500 companies and small businesses alike.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Diversity and

Corporate Governance By Patricia Lenkov

Board-Talk is a weekly online live broadcast where I am privileged to converse with expert guests about the topic of diversity and corporate governance. It was conceived because despite the fact that we have long known that diversity in the boardroom is good for business, the rate of change is glacial at best. Our initial 10 week series which is hosted on MOSH.US consists of 10 guests that actually in some ways simulate what a diverse board could look like. They also simulate the richness and wisdom that comes from a variety of experiences and perspectives.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

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ur guests run the gamut from institutional investors, board directors to former CEO’s and others who offer insights and advice based on their own unique and heterogeneous backgrounds. We shall discuss some of the main highlights that were gleaned from our recent discussions. Brenda Gaines, board director at Tenet Healthcare, Southern Company Gas and the Smithsonian Institute says that improving diversity in the boardroom will take a collective effort. It should begin with the “tone at the top.”“This means that the lead director, chair of the nominating and governance committee as well as the CEO must believe in the value of diversity and be willing to take the steps necessary to improve this,” she states. There are also two groups that can have a major impact, Brenda elaborates. The first of these are member based organisations such as the American National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) and the Alliance for Board Diversity which is made up of Catalyst, The Executive Leadership Council

For Holly Gregory, partner and co-head, Global Corporate Governance & Executive Compensation Group, Sidley Austin, LLP, board composition is the foundation of an effective board. “Achieving the right mix of directors is a difficult task. However, the pace of change in the business world is accelerating so boards need to continually assess themselves in terms of their composition,” she states. Holly adds that boards need to look at whether their composition is appropriate vis-à-vis the needs of their business. The skill sets, experience, backgrounds and independence of the board directors must be aligned with the evolving requirements and strategy of the business. According to her, there is also a need to change the culture of the board and the mind-set of directors when they join. “Each director needs to be George Washington, he or she needs to be someone who is willing to say, I value turnover and I know change is good and therefore if the change needs to be me then that is fine with me.” Meanwhile, Michelle Edkins, Managing Director and Global Head of Investment Stewardship at BlackRock

It is no surprise to learn that many boards use their own networks when trying to find a new director. This may be easy and comfortable but the expected result is also predictable, homogeneity. Boards must look at their nomination process and find new ways to identify qualified candidates. and the Hispanic Association for Corporate Responsibility. These organisations are working to change the landscape through research, education and advocacy. The second group that can make a difference are institutional investors who are becoming increasingly vocal and progressive on the topic of diversity and corporate governance. Rakhi Kumar, managing director and head of ESG (Environmental, Social and Governance) Investments and Asset Stewardship at State Street Global Advisors (SSGA) believes that part of the trouble stems from how boards go about identifying new board directors. “It is no surprise to learn that many boards use their own networks when trying to find a new director. This may be easy and comfortable but the expected result is also predictable, homogeneity. Boards must look at their nomination process and find new ways to identify qualified candidates,” he notes. To even be able to look at the nomination process there must be a seat available or opening up soon. “This brings up another reason why boards are not more advanced in the diversity realm. There are simply not enough seats opening up to significantly change the composition of boards. Tenure and its close relative, board refreshment is important in any discussion of diversity in the boardroom,” he advises.

says that diversity in the boardroom is a matter of board quality and board effectiveness. She states that: “One of the reasons it is taking so long to improve diversity in the boardroom is that, in the U.S. at least, for so long this was couched as a social justice or fairness issue. The companies that pushed back on diversity did so in large part because they felt that this was not what they were in business to achieve.” One of the ways that BlackRock is working to catalyse the necessary change is writing to companies that have zero or one women on their boards. They are requesting a deliberate plan for how these companies are going to remedy this situation. They are also letting these companies know that complacency can result in a vote against members of the nominating and governance committee. This is in line with the considerable research and anecdotal evidence that suggests that deliberate action is necessary to close the diversity gap. The viewpoints overlap but each is nuanced and specific to the expert guest. Together they offer many options for improving diversity in the boardroom. It is incumbent on those in leadership and decision making positions to decide their own best path to change but doing nothing is not an option.

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SectorFOREWORD Government –Employed Official Regardless of the rung they occupy in the government corridors, employed government officials are important for service delivery to the country. The primary function of the government sector is to impose resource allocation decisions on the rest of the economy that might not be made otherwise. This is one of the four macroeconomic sectors. The other three are household sector, business sector, and foreign sector. The government sector includes all levels of government−federal, state, and local. These three levels intervene in the economy by collecting and spending tax revenue and by establishing and enforcing laws, rules, and other regulations. The government sector undertakes this intervention because society has deemed that the provision of some goods and services are better handled by the imposition of government than by voluntary market decisions. CEO Global would like to thank all the men honoured in this sector for ensuring that government coffers do not go to waste but are channelled to places and individuals where they are needed most.


REGIONALWINNER From Mauritius

Maubarakahmad Boodhun Maubarakahmad Boodhun is the permanent secretary of the Ministry of Civil Service and Administrative Reforms, Ministry of Gender Equality, Children Development and Family Welfare and the Ministry of Youth and Sports. He pioneered the creation of the National Trust Fund for Renal Dialysis Treatment and coordinated the creation of the Renal Dialysis Unit of the Victoria Hospital. He formed part of the team that organised the Indian Ocean Island Games of 2003 and the African Athletics Championship in 2006 and was the Chairman of Humanity First (Mauritius), an international NGO engaged in the relief of poverty, setting up on medical facilities in poor areas and providing assistance to the victims of natural disasters. He is a specialist in commercial law and served as part time lecturer for the legal framework module for ACCA students.

From Mauritius

Virendra Kumarsingh Daby Virendra Kumarsingh Daby is the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Regional Integration and International Trade. He seeks to ensure a prosperous and sustainable Republic of Mauritius fully integrated in a globalised and equitable world. The mission of the ministry is to uphold the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Republic of Mauritius; promote and safeguard the national interest of Republic of Mauritius at bilateral, regional and international levels. Virendra negotiates trade deals for Mauritius and ensures that international trade rules are shaped in a manner as to create better trading opportunities for Mauritian exporters on international, regional and individual markets.

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SKILLSTRANSFER

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o facilitate success for both the outside hire, as well as the company, some organisations implement ongoing orientation and mentoring programmes referred to as on-boarding. These programmes or activities could last for several months to several years. According to the American Psychological Association, on boarding, also known as organisational socialisation or assimilation “refers to the process that helps new employees learn the knowledge, skills, and behaviours they need to succeed in their new organisations.” The first 90 days or so of an executive’s tenure is viewed as a make or break period. Strategic on boarding programmes can help align a new hire with the organisation. As a team member rather than outsider this new executive has a much greater chance of success. The retention rates of these well-integrated individuals are also higher than those left to their own devices. Furthermore, according to the International Data Corporation (IDC) U.S. and U.K. employees cost businesses an estimated USD37 billion every year because they do not fully understand their jobs. Sink-or-Swim is Not the Preferred Approach In the old ‘Mad Men’ days, executives typically spent their first day on the job filling out paperwork, before being escorted through the office by a human resources manager for a series of brief introductions. After that, senior executives were largely left on their own to navigate

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the often-hazardous terrain of unwritten rules, shadow alliances, office politics and an undefined corporate culture. The old sink-or-swim strategy is no longer recommended. Today, a targeted on boarding support network is preferred by many organisations to provide speedy assimilation into the organisation’s culture, to help an executive develop successful networks and personal relations , and to develop a personal development plan that paves the way for success and credibility. Michael Watkins author of the seminal manual on onboarding, “The First 90 Days: Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at All Levels,” cautions organisations against what he calls, “Darwinian Leadership Development,” in which outside recruits are ‘thrown into the deep end’ and left to their own devices. After expending considerable time and resources to recruit the right candidate, organisations should not leave the ultimate success or failure of a new executive to chance. Increasing shareholder value is ultimately dependant on the productivity and development of valuable ‘soft skills,’ by individual executives and an effective on boarding programme is essential to fostering productivity and profitability. Study, Listen, Learn Whatever the scope and complexity of an organisation’s on-boarding plan, newly hired executives would be well advised to get a running start during the pre-boarding window after accepting an offer and before reporting to work. New executives should learn everything they can about their organisation’s culture,


SKILLSTRANSFER

vision and goals. During the early days and months, new hires should spend the bulk of their time listening to their team and supervisor, as well as diligently studying and learning the ins-and-outs of the corporate culture. Numerous studies show that organisations with a comprehensive on boarding plan in place enjoy a lower turnover rate within their executive ranks. Taking charge of your own success and developing personal goals within the framework of the on boarding plan can go a long way in ensuring a successful outcome. Early On-boarding Wins In his on-boarding tome, Watkins recommends that organisations help newly hired executives achieve an early win to instil confidence and develop professional

credibility during the critical early months. Organisations can assist executives by providing an accelerated learning programme and offering support during the crucial team building process. Establishing an individual performance plan with specific milestones, with plenty of coaching and mentoring throughout the process, can spur the allimportant early achievements and wins that are crucial to job satisfaction. Organisations that continue the extensive recruiting process throughout an executive’s early tenure with a strategic on-boarding programme will greatly benefit from an executive leader’s early success, confidence and buy-in of an organisation’s culture. On-boarding should be viewed as the final step in the lengthy recruitment process and the beginning of a comprehensive retention programme.

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SectorFOREWORD ICT Despite facing fierce competition and slowing revenues in 2016, South Africa’s telecoms operators are well placed to see growth in the near to medium-term. The mobile market is approaching saturation and a shift from traditional voice and SMS to data is expected to drive future growth, particularly in 4G long-term evolution (LTE) services, which are slated to expand significantly in the next few years. While the expansion of mobile broadband and fibre-optic networks are driving growth of ICT services in South Africa, additional infrastructure investment will be needed to keep pace with rapidly rising market demand. This will mean that forward thinking individuals and men will be needed in order to drive both the industry and country forward. CEO Global would like to extend its heartfelt thanks to all the innovators and leaders being honoured in this sphere today. Due to their efforts, Africa will never be left behind in the tech age.

From Mauritius

Hon Bernard Eric Typhis Degtyarenko Honourable Bernard Eric Typhis Degtyarenko is the chief executive officer of Business Intelligence Experts/Quickbooksmu /Quickbooks Ltd. Business Intelligence Experts is a privately owned company created in 2000. The company is involved in software design and creating innovative solutions for business locally in Mauritius and the region of Africa. The company won several awards in the past. They excel in designing software to provide solutions for the need in Mauritius. BIEX are experts in implementing software and systems. Implementation is not just simply installation; it involves a good understanding of the business processes in order to automate the process. The company provides Quickbooks software which help enterprise to manage their business easily and effortlessly.


REGIONAL

WINNER From Kenya

Anthony Wahome Githinji Anthony Wahome Githinji is the founder and chief executive of Linksoft Group. Wahome established Linksoft Communications Systems (LCS) in 1995 as a telecommunications company that offered products, services and network solutions. The Linksoft Group today has a pan-African footprint with seven companies under its umbrella. It operates in telecommunications, construction, engineering and education. Last year Wahome, together with other investors, purchased Hillcrest International Schools, a leading British curriculum school with over 600 students. Anthony chairs various boards of leading business organisations including advertising and media, education and charitable trusts. Under the Group’s CSR portfolio, Kingdom Business Network, Anthony conducts various youth mentorship programmes and a six month training for entrepreneurs with a focus on personal development. He is a country and regional winner in the ICT sector.

From Mauritius

Vidia C Mooneegan Vidia C. Mooneegan is a visionary, goal oriented and results driven entrepreneurial executive with 25 years of experience at executive level with proven ability to turnaround low performing organisations. He has a motivational management style with a record of building highly motivated teams and producing leaders and proven leadership, team building and cultural integration skills across teams in North America, Europe and Mauritius. He has the ability to focus organisations on customer defined quality metrics and institutionalise quality processes in all functions of the organisation. Vidia is considered as a pioneer of the Mauritius outsourcing industry. He led the first BPO company in Mauritius and established the first BPO company in Madagascar in 1995. He was the President of Outsourcing Association of Mauritius between 2008 and 2010.

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REGIONAL

WINNER From South Africa

Norman Moyo Regional and country winner Norman Moyo is the chief executive officer of Cumii International (Econet pan-African IOT business). He has 15 years in telecommunications, banking and FMCG sector across seven African markets and was previously, Towerco CEO for Helios Towers Tanzania and held senior positions at Celtel Zambia, Celtel Nigeria and Etisalat Tanzania, Norman was awarded the Global Telecoms Top 40 under 40 telecoms leadership award (GTB 40 under 40) and is a board member of HTT, WIOCC, Zantel and AVI Investors. He is the founder of AVI South Africa, property investment and management company. Norman has a strategic vision and a great understanding of the African market. In Nigeria, he successfully developed and implemented a breakthrough segmented strategy aimed at young people and the rural population.

From Uganda

Dr Joseph Walusimbi Dr Joseph Walusimbi is an avid entrepreneur embodied with a wide array of skills which when applied to commercial and social enterprises alike have proven to lead to significant and sustainable contributions, whether organisational growth or development of communities at the bottom of the pyramid. He has 20 years global experience in commercial, development and education sectors; and has held various departmental roles in FMCG and services industries, leadership of projects for NGOs and communitybased organisations, global advisory services for nascent and established entrepreneurial ventures, as well as thought-leadership based courses facilitation for local and regional management institutes. He is multi-skilled, particularly in the areas of social and development research, value chain analysis, agricultural commodity resource platforms, channel marketing, commercial management, stakeholder communications, programme management, organisational development and strategy development

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Causes of

Work place

Conflict By Myron Curry

Workplace conflict is a serious issue and is often an unavoidable one. Conflict in the workplace can become destructive when anger, jealousy, and other strong emotions turn the focus away from problem solving and toward personal attacks. Destructive conflict can ruin relationships among workers, interfere with productivity, destroy teamwork, and contribute to employee absenteeism and turnover. One of the most important tasks of the manager is to resolve workplace conflict in a constructive way before it escalates and affects others on the team. Before a manager can be effective at resolving workplace conflict, it is necessary to understand and identify the causes in order to find a successful resolution.


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here are two broad categories of causes of workplace conflict. Workplace conflict can be traced to a plethora of causes. In a study conducted by Boston University, such causes can range from differences in personalities and styles to personal issues relating to ideology, cultural practices, childcare issues and even substance abuse. According to this study, organisational factors like leadership, budget and core values are other contributing influences. In fact, workplace conflict can flare up for seemingly no real reason at all. However, studies show that all the causes of workplace conflict can be categorised broadly into two areas. These are as follows: Substantive Conflict Substantive conflict refers to the disagreement and conflict that exists between two co-workers about how they get their job done. The two co-workers may belong to the same team or they may perform two interdependent aspects of a single task. How person A does his or her work is going to influence the quality and punctuality of work of person B. Alternatively, they both have very different and very fixed ideas about how the particular job should be done and both are completely convinced that their own way is the best. The conflict may start as a disagreement about how to do a specific project, but it escalates to cover every subsequent activity so much so that A cannot tolerate or like anything that B does or vice versa. It is vital for the manager to intervene and mediate when the above type of conflict develops. The good news is, both the parties are passionate about their job and are intelligent enough to think of new approaches to it. With successful mediation, something very positive can be salvaged from this situation and the progress of the company can continue unabated. Personality Based Conflict This type of conflict is far more common and is much more difficult to solve by mediation. Personality based conflict arises not from any job related issues but from the difference in the personalities of the two co-workers. These traits may or may not affect productivity, but they simply get on the nerve of the co-worker. Have you got a colleague who insists on having loud music on all the time which you just hate? Or is there someone who makes inappropriate jokes and expects you to share in them? These are all ripe grounds for personality based conflicts.

Workplace romance or inappropriate sexual advances is one common source of conflict and can lead to the accusations of favouritism and nepotism.

The List of Causes When analysing the factors leading to workplace conflicts, many different views have been noted. They can all be classed under one of the above two categories. The most common causes of workplace conflict can be described as follows: Poor Communication This is probably the single most important cause of initiating workplace conflict. Such lack of communication may creep in at any tier. The lack of proper communication between the manager and the employees may create lack of understanding of exact responsibilities of each of the employees. This opens the scope of conflict. Similarly, unclear communication among the co-workers can also give rise to workplace conflict.

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Unclear Definition Of Responsibilities It’s the task of management to very clearly define the responsibilities of each individual worker. Often, the work environment is such that one person’s performance depends on other team members. This interdependence creates the possibility of blame shifting and refusal to take responsibilities for any problem. Conflict is inevitable in such cases. Competition for Limited Resources Whether it is two departmental heads fighting over the annual budget allocations or two colleagues trying to use the single copier in the office at the same time, limited resources are sure to spark and fuel workplace conflict. Such resources may range from personnel to money to equipment and such others. Workplace conflicts regarding limited resources may escalate into full-fledged departmental warfare if proper mediation is not done in time. Personality Clashes In order for a company to flourish and expand, two categories of workers are needed. You require the free thinker who breaks boundaries and sees outside the box, but you also need the meticulous and plodding workers who like to keep an eye on the bottom line. However, you can easily imagine how difficult it will be for the two people with the above characteristics to work together in an interdependent manner. Each regards the other as a stumbling block to the progress of the company. The clash of personality traits of the co-workers is a major cause of workplace conflict. In today’s global economy, a multicultural dimension has been added to this problem. Very seldom will you find a firm where all the people working belong to same race or religion. The cultural differences reinforce the personality clash. Poor Performance In an interdependent setting like your workplace, poor performance of one worker invariably affects the performance of others. The blame game begins and workplace conflict is initiated. This poor performance may actually be caused by a wide range of issues including lack of training or skills to do the job, health matters, problems at home, childcare or spouse related problems or substance abuse. But, it finds expression through workplace conflict. Other Causes of Conflict Apart from the above listed causes, workplace conflicts may be caused by several other different reasons. Workplace romance or inappropriate sexual advances is one common source of conflict and can lead to the accusations of favouritism and nepotism. Similarly, generational differences among the co-workers may cause tension. Where people of

different ages work together gaps in communication or style of working can develop easily. The workplace conflicts that occur due to the above causes can be categorised into four distinct types. Type I This type of conflict occurs over facts or data. It is a result of poor communication. For example, when using colloquial expressions, it can be interpreted in different ways. When one party says ‘first thing in the morning’, does he mean the same thing as the person to whom he is speaking? Similarly, confusion may arise when the two persons are getting conflicting data from two different sources. Type II This type of conflict occurs over process or methods. Each of the two parties thinks that their way is the best and negates the other person’s ideas. Type III The third type of conflict occurs over purpose and is one of the most difficult to resolve. Here, the two conflicting parties visualise the ends and objectives in two completely different ways. This often results because the basics have not been clarified in the beginning and the ground rules have not been laid. Type IV The most emotionally charged type of conflict is over values or rather, interpretation of the values. Each party is completely convinced of the truth of his stand and is not willing to consider any other viewpoint. The Styles of Workplace Conflict When workplace conflict develops due to any of the above causes, it is mostly expressed through negative styles. These are as follows:  The firecracker response means the person suddenly flares up in the middle of a meeting and loses his temper. He may later apologise for it, but everybody knows it will happen again.  The two conflicting parties cold shoulder each other, refusing to talk no matter how much it is necessary.  The two begin to badmouth each other to other colleagues behind their backs or even to the supervisor.  Each remembers any major or minor grievance they had against each other and drags it into every argument no matter how irrelevant that is.  The two parties get involved in every tiny decision and each is determined to have the last word. The above negative styles of conflict are the most common and they affect the efficiency and productivity of the company in the worst way. It is the task of the management to keep a sharp lookout for conflicts such as these and nip them in the bud.

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SectorFOREWORD Logistics and Shipping South Africa has a sophisticated logistics industry, making use of some of the latest global trends in the field. Its performance — specifically its costs — has a bearing on the global competitiveness of all the country’s industries. The country has an enormous demand-supply imbalance that is serviced by imports of almost exclusively manufactured and fastmoving consumer goods. The value of these imports is far greater than the value of the millions of tonnes of bulk commodity — mainly coal, iron ore and manganese — that the country exports to pay for its demand. These goods are moved vast distances into or out of the country, all at great transport cost to the consumer. Men in this sector have not only ensured that the sector grows but [that] it thrives and competes among, and with, the best in the world. PANAVEST would like to salute you.


REGIONAL

WINNER From Malawi

Ayob Mohammed Salim Ayob Mohammed Salim is the current chief executive officer of Capital Foods Group of Companies. He commenced his business career in 1986, whilst still studying and began his integration into the baking industry over 30 years ago. Ayob has extensive knowledge and experience, gained over the years in the bakery industry. He is proficient in procurement, imports, clearing and forwarding, and logistics management. He is involved in the senior management at board level of all subsidiaries—Capital Bakery, Movesa and Bakers Touch. Ayob is responsible for the development of Bakery Ingredients Supply in Malawi. He participated in the acquisition of a 130 000m² property in Lilongwe, resulting in this 150MT/day milling operation —production commencing in 2006, and has since doubled in capacity to 300MT/day, resulting in the necessity for the further acquisition of a 260 000m² property in close proximity.

From Mauritius

Dr Sidharth Sharma Dr Sidharth Sharma is currently the group MD of a listed company on the Mauritius Stock Exchange. Its interests includes public transport, private equity, real estate and information technology. Major companies in his portfolio include: RHT Bus Services Ltd. a transport company providing transportation to more than 40,000 people daily, RHT Investments Ltd. is an active investment player in the equity and structured financial products markets. The company is a substantial shareholder in some blue chip companies. RHT Properties Ltd. has an important land bank, which they intend to develop and unlock value for the Group. They are a fast growing group and are looking at expansion beyond Mauritius with interests in Zambia and Mozambique. Their primary focus remains public transport and leadership through innovation is their motto.

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EMPOWERED LEADERSHIP By Theo Veldsman, Professor and Head, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, University of Johannesburg

Global Leadership

is in

Crisis

It’s Time to Stop the Rot

People around the world are angry and frustrated with those who “lead” them. Increasingly, leaders and leadership generate scepticism and, in some cases, open revolt. People’s trust and faith in leadership and the institutions they represent is evaporating at an alarming rate. There’s a deepening, widening crisis in the legitimacy and credibility of leadership. This crisis can be attributed to five primary sources: unable; unintelligent; immature; immoral and/or destructive leaders. I estimate that at least 30% – and rising – of the world’s current leadership is virally infected by one or more of these sources. It is crucial that this crisis is tackled, and leadership is reimagined to fit the new world order. Without this process of reimagining, the world’s very future may be at stake. Bad leaders will destroy people, wreck economies and tear societies apart – irreparably.

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ore and more leaders are emerging without the abilities and qualities needed to lead effectively in a changing world. This is typified by variety, interdependency, complexity, change, ambiguity, seamlessness and sustainability. Today’s leaders often have obsolete abilities for this new world. They appear unable to reinvent themselves fast enough to adapt to the ongoing shifts. They lack the required levels of, for instance, resilience, responsiveness, agility, risk-taking, creativity and innovation. Simply put, many leaders have reached their “sell-by date”. There is a rapid increase in leadership burnout and leaders being rejected by their organisations. This is driven by the constant stress they’re under, which mercilessly exposes their hidden weaknesses. And because they are constantly under pressure, leaders are unable – or don’t make – time to build and maintain the essential qualities of hope, passion, confidence, efficacy, courage and perseverance in their followers. They don’t equip their followers with the psychosocial capital they need to deal with the world.


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Unintelligent Leadership Unintelligent leaders either overemphasise one or lack in some of the five interdependent intelligence modes: intra- and interpersonal; systemic; ideation; action and contextual. They fall short on the insight and wisdom needed to deal effectively with the new world. Leaders are dumbing down. They have poorly crystallised identities. They don’t understand themselves, others and their reciprocal impact. They tend to get trapped and overwhelmed by detail instead of seeing the big picture. They’re also are unable to be big dreamers who look constantly ahead: they’re stuck in the here-and-now. They do not have the insight to affect lasting, large-scale change and constructively engage with the new world. Immature Leadership Many leaders are stuck at earlier maturity stages and struggle to migrate to higher levels. Some seek constant approval from others because their self-worth has not been affirmed. They have no confidence in their own ability. Others strive to satisfy their egocentric interests and needs single-mindedly. Some proclaim ad nauseam to be the one and only, indispensable saviour of the world. Others push in an uncompromising manner for the realisation of narrow organisation specific goals to the detriment of the common good. Because such leaders are stuck at earlier maturity stages they are unable to graduate to maturity stage five, the highest level. Those who have reached this stage have embraced their role as a servant and steward who is in service to humanity, and drive commonly shared pursuits. Immoral Leadership Ethical leaders do the right thing for the right reasons in the right way in the right place and at the right time with the right people. But a growing number of leaders lack a moral conscience, compass and courage. They are arrogant, cowardly and secretive. They have little or no integrity, and pursue their own personal interests and needs. They shy away from any accountability for their own decisions, actions and the consequences of these. Immoral leaders’ followers are very rarely empowered and enabled to do their jobs well. These leaders feel threatened by their followers and tend to actively block their development. Destructive Leadership The previous four sources I’ve described pertain to a “lack of”. This fifth source relates to the “presence of” something: toxicity. Toxicity manifests in leaders’ ongoing,

deliberate actions to undermine their followers’ sense of dignity, self-worth and efficacy. These destructive actions may be physical, psychosocial, spiritual or all three. The Imperative of Reimagining Leadership What can be done to deal with these sources of the world’s leadership crisis? The first, knee-jerk response is to embark on a frantic search for a silver bullet. But such missions often cause more damage than the existing crisis. A supposedly new and “better” form of leadership is posited. This lulls people into a false sense of security. The hard reality? There is no magic wand. It’s imperative not to start with answers to given questions, but rather up front to identify the right questions about future-fit leadership and then seek answers. It’s time to reimagine leadership anew, both in terms of new questions and answers that will have lasting benefits. Here are six possible questions to help us find useful answers: Where? It’s important to choose an appropriate leadership vantage point from which to look at leadership. I contend this entails taking a complexity, long term perspective of leadership. This will allow organisations and societies to reimagine leaders as holistic, organic, integrated and dynamic whole persons. Where to? This involves crafting a leadership excellence model that is matched to the leadership challenges, demands and requirements of the new world. What? This encompasses systemically reinventing and reprogramming the five leadership facets of ability, intelligence, maturity, morality and authenticity at a much deeper level in order to match leaders closer to the new world. How? Continuous lifelong, blended leadership development across all leadership facets must occur and form part of leaders’ key performance areas. Leadership capacity, and its development, must be set as a national priority by countries’ governments, and by organisations. Who? Everyone must be enabled and empowered to be a leader. All leaders must be encouraged to take a leadership oath in which they’d publicly commit to leadership excellence and being held accountable accordingly. When? The identification, growth and development of leadership must start in early childhood at school level already, and continue throughout a person’s whole life. There is much to do if we’re to tackle the world’s deepening, widening leadership crisis. Without better leaders, the future of the world is truly at stake with the growing risk of a world implosion. We need to reimagine and nurture leadership for this new world.

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SectorFOREWORD Manufacturing and Engineering The manufacturing and engineering sector is the heartbeat of any thriving economy. A country without a thriving sector in this regard is as good as written off because it means that the economy would not grow and will, as a result, fail to create the much needed jobs. The South African manufacturing sector is at a crossroads and it is time for the country to reassess its strategy. For years, the industry has been in a state of decline, facing challenges around productivity, costs, labour issues, skills shortages, efficiency and new technology. In order to thrive, South African manufacturers need to take full advantage of the opportunities available to them on the rest of the continent, especially in countries with relatively undeveloped manufacturing sectors, but with high demand for manufactured products. Both at home and abroad, South African Titans have exploited opportunities available in this sector. CEO Global applauds you for taking the baton and running with it.


REGIONALWINNER

From Kenya

Darshan Chandaria Darshan Chandaria is the group CEO of Chandaria Group. The company started out as a small tissue converting operation and today is the largest tissue and hygiene products manufacturer in Kenya, East and Central Africa. It is also the only tissue and hygiene products manufacturer in Kenya that manufactures its products 100% in Kenya. Since joining Chandaria Group in March 2009 he has built it into one of the largest and most diversified privately owned groups in East and Central Africa with operations in tissue, paper, hygiene products manufacturing, real estate, automobile manufacturing, banking, mining, flexible packaging and solar energy generation across Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, India and Dubai.

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Why Company Leaders

Succeed‌ or By Antony Bell

Fail

Why do businesses with a mediocre product or service succeed, while others with offerings twice as good fail? The business landscape is littered with them. By the same token, why do some entrepreneurs with a mediocre idea thrive while others with a great idea fail?


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here’s one simple reason: at some point, the ones who succeed realise that a great product or service isn’t enough: they also need a strong organisation to deliver it. So they go about building a great organisation … and that, they realise, is a function of leadership. Great leaders make great companies. Those who fail to grasp that truth are much more likely to fail … however good their product or service. They assume that their great product will generate the kind of organisation that will make it thrive. It doesn’t ... not without the right kind of leadership. Leadership really does matter. There’s a thriving entrepreneurialism on the African continent, and more than ever, these dynamic, creative entrepreneurs need to embrace the importance of their role as leaders, not just as product or service initiators. But there’s a problem: leadership is complex! It’s confusing. There are tens of thousands of books out there on leadership. When I was looking for a publisher for Great Leadership (my second book), I went to Amazon to see how many books had the word “Leader” or “Leadership” in the title … the number was over 64 000! The choice is overwhelming: with that many books out there, how do company leaders figure out what they need to know to lead well? If you, as a company CEO, knew exactly what kind of leadership you needed to exercise for the different contexts you find yourself in—and more than that, if you knew what kind of leadership was needed at every level of your business—you would have the solution. You would exercise great leadership yourself, and so would the leaders working with you. And you would build a great organisation to deliver the product or service you offer. To be able to do that, you need a framework—a framework for leadership. Now that may not sound like much of a solution, but don’t be fooled: it is. With the right kind of framework, you would be able to figure exactly what you need as a leader when you need it—and more than that, you would also know what kind of leadership the leaders working for you would need to exercise. That framework exists. The Leadership Framework we offer does just that: it makes sense of the complexity around leadership, and helps leaders know what they need in order to exercise great leadership. Embracing such a framework is critical to a CEO’s success. So what is that Framework? Here are some key ideas:  Two fundamental elements define all leadership: character and competence. Everything about leadership is a function of one or the other. A successful leadership career is built on both, and just as an aircraft cannot fly without both its wings, neither can great leadership be

sustained without character and competence. CEOs derail because they neglect one or the other … or both.  Competence gets you to the table; character keeps you there. When a CEO stumbles, it’s either because he or she didn’t exercise the kind of competence in leadership you’d expect in a CEO, or because their character, or lack of it, compromised their competence.  Character is not the same as personality. Personality is about our internal wiring: you may be an introvert or an extravert, for example. Character is different: it’s about choices we make. The character qualities that define good choices is a long list, but three are particularly important: a healthy pursuit of self-awareness (great leaders develop a deep sense of who they are), a clear moral compass (they operate with high standards of integrity), and a willingness to act with courage (perhaps the most significant of all: what is the value of a clear moral compass if we don’t have the courage to act on it?).  Competence is not about technical or functional competence. You may be an engineer or an accountant; you may know a lot about your market and your product, but that’s not the same as competence in leadership.  Competence in leadership involves three dimensions: Organisational Leadership, Operational Leadership, and People Leadership. Think of a ship: it needs a captain and his team on the bridge (Organisational Leadership), it needs a ship that runs well (Operational Leadership), and it needs a crew that functions at its best (People Leadership). When a CEO as a good captain clarifies the direction and aligns the resources to pursue that direction (Organisational Leadership)—and does so in a way that builds trust (the character side of leadership)—that CEO is much more likely to succeed … and so is the company.  Great CEOs also focus on developing the leaders within the organisation. They realise that if they don’t, they simply won’t have the leaders to sustain the growth they’re driving for. That doesn’t mean they become training managers; it means they champion and support the leadership development process. If you want to build a great company, not just offer a great service or product, there’s one thing you must do: you must become a student of great leadership. Don’t be one of those company leaders who rely on intuition or experience—at some point either one will fail you. Instead, be one who learns great leadership, and does so with intentionality. Africa has plenty of talented, gifted entrepreneurs with great ideas and plenty of guts and initiative to sell them. What it needs—and what the rest of the world needs from Africa—is company leaders who know how to build a great company, not just a great product. Be one of them.

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SectorFOREWORD Media South Africa is a media-savvy nation, saturated with print, broadcast and online offerings. The traditional newspaper market is relatively static, but there has been phenomenal growth in the tabloid market. India and China have recorded a similar trend, with newspapers targeted at specific local audiences powering through the readership ranks. There has been significant growth in magazines published by the four major media houses, and by specialist independent publishers. Many of these are international titles, such as Heat, FHM, Elle, GQ, Cosmopolitan and Marie Claire, published under agreement with their international owners. And as in any fast-paced, first world nation, online media is accessed via cell phones, through RSS feeds and via national and international news websites and chat rooms. Local media houses have general and specialised news websites which, in terms of the speed and breadth of their coverage, are on a par with the best in the world. CEO Global would like to congratulate the men in the fourth estate, for ensuring that South Africa is kept on the straight and narrow through truthful and unbiased reporting.


REGIONAL

WINNER From Egypt

Mohamed Roshdy Aly Mohamed Roshdy Aly is the new media consultant at the Ministry of Social Solidarity – Egypt. As a new media consultant at the Ministry of Social Solidarity in Egypt, he has the responsibility to manage and create every tiny detail in publications, like the minister’s speech, journalism and television interviews, managing the journalism news, discover the weak points and develop the advantage points. In addition to training the media and PR team to work effectively regarding to Ministry’s activities and achievements. Their work helps Egyptian citizens in getting their problems solved in cooperation with all the ministry’s departments. He has experience as a media consultant, filmmaker and director, with a high level of communications and leadership skills.

From Botswana

Percy Sekgomenyane Raditladi Percy Sekgomenyane Raditladi is the group management consultant at the YMH Media Group. YMH Group, one of the fastest growing diversified media and advertising conglomerates in Botswana and Zambia with controlling stake in Yaronafm (Pty)Ltd, Radio Phoenix in Zambia, Horizon Ogilvy & Mather, Integrate Agency and Brandcentric, YMH Outdoor, Echo Newspaper and Boidus Magazine. The company has a turnover in excess of P65 million per annum. Reporting directly to the group chairman, his responsibilities are to: oversee all administration matters for the entities and advise management on areas of improvement, analyse business operations, trends, costs, revenues, financial commitments and obligations, to oversee projections of future revenues and expenses, to advise on all human resources issues, to oversee debt collection and cash flow management, to develop, implement, modify and document records.

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COUNTRYWINNER

From Zimbabwe

Michael Kudakwashe Chideme Michael Kudakwashe Chideme is the Corporate Communications Manager – City of Harare, President of the Zimbabwe Union of Journalists (ZUJ) and the President of the Southern Africa Journalists Association (SAJA).His responsibilities are to maintain the good standing of brand Harare through sustained communication with the city’s customers. I am also responsible for stakeholder engagement and marketing of the city’s tourism and investment potential. His division publishes several newsletters and magazines that talk about the city’s activities. Some of the magazines are specialised in that they have annual magazines for the health, water, housing and waste departments.

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by Andrew Ngozo

Hiring

&

Retraining the Best

By Myron Curry

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SKILLSTRANSFER

Hiring good employees is not only important to your business, it’s essential. Employees are the heart and soul of any business; they are the mechanism that makes a business run; they are the breath of life that enables a business to be something more than just an idea. A business can’t run unless someone (employees, in this case) is doing the work. Any intelligent business owner or manager should want good employees.

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ad employees not only affect an employer by driving down sales, costing the company unwanted expenses due to negligence or simple lack of motivation, etc., but they affect the customer as well. Once a customer has a bad experience with an employee, it could have the snowball effect where that customer will tell other potential customers about the negative experience. Although this seems like common sense to most people, it is uncanny how most employers will overlook this fact, whether it’s because of time constraints to effectively deal with the problem or lack of better judgment. Whatever the case, it is a fact that sales get driven down and production slowed for a reason. That reason could very well be because of the customer’s lack of satisfaction with whatever service he or she had received and that lack of satisfaction stems from bad employees. Find the Right People to Start With This is one of the most important things you, as an employer, can do. Getting the right people into your company to start with gets things moving in the right direction at the very beginning. According to Chairman and CEO, Hal F. Rosenbluth, and Consultant, Diane McFerrin Peters, of Rosenbluth International, the third-largest travel management company in the world, “Most of us choose our spouse with care and rear our children with nurturing and compassionate attention. Yet, we tend to select the people who will join our company on the basis of an interview or two, and once they have joined, they often find that they must fend for themselves. This contrast illustrates the disparity between the environments of family and work. But, given the amount of time we must spend at work, wouldn’t we all be happier if we took as much care at the office as at home to create a supportive environment? Wouldn’t we also be far more successful?” The answer is yes. The Customer Does Not Come First For the customer to be served with the best results humanly possible, a more modern approach to the theory of customer satisfaction must be realised which is that the customer should not come first; the employee should. Therein in itself is one of

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the most successful ways to attract a good employee. When a business puts its employees first, many things can happen. To begin with, the employee is happy. If the employee is happy, the service that the employee provides to the customer will be far more outstanding than if he or she were not happy. If the service is outstanding, the customer will be happy and that only spells successful results for the business. This does not mean that an employer must wait hand and foot on the employee. No, it simply means that careful consideration to what an employee thinks, wants, and suggests should be considered. Do not treat an employee as if he or she is a factory robot working on a clock. Treat them as people. Treat them with respect by talking to them as people and not ‘talking down to them’ as ‘employees’. Employee Leadership and Flexibility a Must An open, friendly atmosphere is a must in a workplace. Micro managing, as most already are aware of, is frowned upon. This is for a reason. When a work environment is open enough for all employees to contribute and offer ideas and suggestions, without ridicule or negative response, this sparks creativity in an employee and, again, empowers them to contribute more to the business. If everyone feels as though they are a part of the leadership process and not just a worker bee, they will have a satisfying feeling that can go a long way. Micro managing completely kills this system. An employer must be flexible. Does there really need to be a rigid schedule? Does lunchtime really need to take place at a specific time? Who actually needs a clock to tell them when they are hungry? This line of thinking is what is needed in every faucet of business, as simple as it seems. It makes an employee feel more like a human; it makes them feel as though the business respects them as a person and will put them first. Once that consideration is instilled in an employee’s mind, there isn’t anything that he or she wouldn’t do for a business. And, when a person looks forward to waking up in the morning to begin working in a place where they feel management gives them respect and thinks highly of them, they will put forth the effort to show appreciation. Hire Nice People Experience and degrees are great ways of measuring employees’ qualifications and potential…but ask yourself, are they nice people? A person can be the most qualified, educated, and experienced possible employee on the planet but if they have the personality of a wet paper bag or of a caged wolverine, it’s guaranteed they’re not going to do much for your business. Those that have to work with them will be disgruntled on a daily basIs and begin putting out a poor performance. The customers that receive service from them will be unhappy. Hire nice people. Nice people can do wonders for a business. Sound picky? It is. But, when it comes to your business, can you afford not to be picky?


SKILLSTRANSFER Some Key Points to Consider Thus Far  Consider your employees before your customers. Not only will the employee put out a far better performance due to feeling respected, but your company will also build a reputation as being ‘the company to work for’, which will attract other, good employees.  Be flexible. Constraints in the office constrain creativity and work performance. Go for casual clothing, if possible. Let your employee decide when it’s time to eat and take a break. Be flexible on your employee’s schedule, catering to his or her personal needs. The employee will show appreciation in return, by supplying a good output of production.  Hire nice people. Not one customer in the world, no matter what business you are in, enjoys service from someone with less-than-appreciative attitude. And, your other employees will not enjoy working with them either, bringing down morale and production drastically. This kind of person will not be willing to strive at contributing to your company; they will strive to contribute only to themselves.  Consider the unconventional when interviewing an employee. The more often you can set a scenario that a potential employee will not expect or could find to be an unusual method of interviewing, the better. It will give you a chance to see what that person is really capable of, as a person. Retaining Good Employees As important as attracting good employees is, it is just as important to retain them. As always, benefit packages help to retain employees. But, again, this is something that most people are already aware of. Sure, there will be those that will want to stay for the great benefits. But, is that all you, as an employer, can offer? No. After spending as much time as you should have in attracting good employees, it only makes sense that you would go to certain lengths to keep them. Chances are, if you really attracted a good employee, it wasn’t just because of the benefits. And, chances are that your good employee will not stay just because of the benefits. Benefits, although a positive force, are not the end all and can, at times, be a false sense of security to an employer. Not everyone develops his or her retention decision on a benefits package, at least not the smart employee. Let Them Change It Up Now and Again Let your people explore your company. Don’t lock them into one specific type of work, especially if they express desire to try other things. In today’s job market, job-hoping is a regular occurrence. If you provide your employees with the chance to job-hop ‘within’ your company, this is one way of keeping them there. Give them the opportunity to gain new experience, knowledge, and skills. This will only enhance your company anyway, by having an employee that can do and handle more. It also increases confidence in the employee and makes their work more satisfying.

Communication Communicating is very important, not only in day to day business, but in retention as well. People need to feel as though they have a grasp on what is going on within the company. They want to know where the company is going and how they will be part of that process. They need to feel they are involved in the company. Being part of any planning processes, being able to contribute ideas for the company, and essentially being heard is all part of communication. Know why your people wanted to join your company in the first place and hone in on that. Keep that priority of the employee in consideration, always acting on it and developing it, and the employee will want to continue that purpose with a strong sense. Talk to your people. Not only should you get to know them, you should get to know what they continue to want and think. And, don’t think for a minute that a person’s desires and thoughts on particular matters will be the same later down the road as they were when they first joined the organisation. Things change, including your employee’s thoughts and desires. Keep up with those changes. Get feedback from your employee’s. Find out what they think is right and wrong with the company. Provide a feedback forum. And, most importantly, act on the information you receive from this feedback. Let your employee job hop and provide an opportunity to let them do it within your company, instead of having to go outside the company. More than likely, if they can’t do it in the company, they will venture outside to a place that they can. Take advantage of

Do not treat an employee as if he or she is a factory robot working on a clock. Treat them as people. Treat them with respect by talking to them as people and not ‘talking down to them’ as ‘employees’ the multiple skills your people can learn within the company. This not only helps your company out, it gives the employee a feeling of more purpose and he or she will enjoy not having to go far to expand their skills. Get to know what your people want, when they first enter the organisation and periodically throughout their tenure. People’s motives and desires change. The good employer is the one that can keep up with those changes. Offer feedback methods and make sure you act on the results. Above all, remember what it was that got you that good employee in the first place. The concepts mentioned in this article that enable an employer to attain a good employee to begin with are basically the same principals of retaining them as well. It’s that simple. Anyone who works for a company that considers their needs, is just, and can remain flexible, as well as provides other good employees to work alongside, will want to continue working in that company. Hiring and retaining good employees goes hand in hand.

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SectorFOREWORD Medical and Veterinary In as much as one cannot extricate human lives from those of other living organisms such as animals, the same can be said about the medical and veterinary sectors. They are responsible for giving and nurturing life in all its forms. Professionals in this sector are often exceptionally skilled individuals who give their best at saving and nurturing lives. It is quite significant that these two professions have been juxtaposed against each other. One cannot be without the other. If that were the case we would, at best, have a ‘sick’ earth, or at worst, one that is nonexistent. In this vein, it is only proper to acknowledge to the custodians of our very being. They are the reason for being for the earth’s ecosystem. MONSOON PHOTOGRAPHY would like to urge the heroes in this sector forward. May they forge ahead with their work as they ensure our continued sustenance.


REGIONAL

WINNER From Ghana

Dr Jonathan Amakye-Anim Dr Jonathan Amakye-Anim worked with the Veterinary Services Department for eighteen years and left as a Principal Veterinary Officer. He has now established a private practice-La Veterinary Hospital which has been fully functional since October, 2000 providing comprehensive veterinary care and consultancy services to private and international development Institutions. He was involved in field and laboratories veterinary activities both in Ghana and in the United States. He holds a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) and Masters in Veterinary Science Degrees from Kishinev School of Veterinary Medicine, Moldova and another Masters in Veterinary Microbiology with specialisation in Avian Medicine (Virology and Pathology) from School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, USA and holds certificates in Tropical Veterinary Medicine (CTVM) -poultry management and disease control and risk analysis in disease control from Moldova.

From Uganda

Dr Peter Kato Ssenyonga Dr Peter Kato Ssenyonga is a dedicated, highly motivated and results-driven person. He is a highly skilled neurosurgeon with an interest in training and research and is experienced in working with and leading people. He possesses excellent interpersonal, communication and negotiation skills. Dr Ssenyonga has the ability to develop and maintain mutually beneficial internal and external relationships. He enjoys being part of, as well as managing, motivating and training, a successful and productive team. He is the medical director and chief of Neurosurgery at the CURE Children’s Hospital of Uganda, which is a paediatric neurosurgical hospital in the rural town of Uganda called Mbale. He is responsible for providing strategic leadership to the hospital’s medical team, both clinically and administratively. He is an actively practicing paediatric neurosurgeon performing over 600 lifesaving surgeries a year.

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The

Customer

of Service The fast-paced corporate environment and global marketplace of the 21st century has shortened the honeymoon period for newly hired executives. After conducting an exhaustive executive search, multiple interviews and extensive 360 degree referencing, the recruiting process is usually considered over. But even in the best of circumstances, this is, in fact, only the beginning of ensuring that the organisation receives the maximum benefit from a new hire.

I

n fact many have walked out of a restaurant based on the cleanliness of the restroom (washroom). Making sure your location is up to a general standard at minimum is important to your customer and to your business. When a customer sees the store is busy or under renovations, they are more understanding of the ‘disorderly’ chaos they see. Yet, if they enter to see a group of employees chit chatting when tables need to be cleared, the floors need to be washed, or a customer is waiting for their bill, it’s a really bad stage for business failure. There are reasons why those businesses who are booming are growing so well. They understand that customer service, cleanliness, and friendly staff make the experience one to return to. Those companies who have failed missed one of those criteria if not more and the customers eventually go elsewhere. In order to ensure the ultimate customer experience, address their satisfaction, from their entrance to their exit. Customer Service Training As a business provider you want to ensure all those working for you are supplying the same service. This is so that each time a customer enters your store or place of business they can expect the same service quality. Not all

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persons in your business will be the same, but, training on how to properly ensure a quality of service is incredibly essential. Training your employees to do more than just take the money and put the purchased items into a bag will have a huge impact on all involved. A well trained employee knows what they are selling/serving; they’re able to greet their customers with confidence, and are able to maximise their service potential. Training can be done as a seminar, manuals they’re required to review, or one-on-one training. Role playing is a great way of managing the way your employees will take care of your customers. Customer service doesn’t have to be complicated. Let your employees know the value of good service and show them how to; by your example. It’s a skill that develops with time and experience, but, it never hurts to have refresher courses to maintain and/or improve customer services. Well trained agents will maximise the customer satisfaction scenario keeping them coming back for more.


SKILLSTRANSFER Customer Service Tips for Success Ensuring the customer who keeps you in business is satisfied is crucial. Here are some simple tips on how to maximise your customer service: Keep in mind the quality of customer service can never surpass the quality of the people who provide it. Keeping those who work for you happy will improve the quality of service your customers experience. Do for your customer as you would want to have done to you. It’s an easy principle really, knowing that your employees take their cue from management. If you, the employer, don’t set the services expected by example, you are not going to find your employees doing as you would like. Don’t just tell them how, show them. Customers will notice it too. Remember you regulars. Remember to acknowledge those who make regular visits. They appreciate it when you have an understanding of who they are. Their regular attendance pays your wages. Treat them with the respect they deserve, you will keep them happy and returning again. Make a good impression. When your regulars come in, they will seek you out again and again. Your good service makes them want to return for your service. There’s a sense of trust and contentment knowing you’ve been a good representative of the company to them. Your smile and kind words will leave a lasting impression, an impression that will ensure they return. Go the extra mile. Customers appreciate feeling like VIP’s when they are being served. Giving them your attention and any ‘special’ treatment will go a long way on how they view the service they received. Ensure you always thank the customer for their business and a smile can go a long way.

Are your customers greeted when they walk in the door or at least within 30-40 seconds upon entering? Acknowledging your customer with a welcome and a hello, accompanied by a smile will have a huge impact on the rest of your service. If a customer feels ignored they will leave and give their business to another company. Give customers the benefit of the doubt. The customer is always right attitude goes a long way. Even when you believe they are mistaken, give them the courtesy of listening to their complaint. Then do what you can to resolve their concerns. If a customer is looking for something specific, it goes a long way if you can go out of your way to ensure you can provide their request. For instance a customer really wants an outfit you have in the store, but their size is sold out. Making efforts to bring in that item will really impress your customer. This will in turn bring about repeat sales. Training staff on the proper customer handling procedures so that all are on the same page will add an overall good impression of the customer service you have in your store. Talk to your customer. If you know a few things about them, you may be able to suggest items they could use in addition to the products they are considering. Don’t be pushy, just suggestive. Keep in mind that the big money isn’t as much in winning customers as it is in keeping your customers.

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SectorFOREWORD Small, Medium & Large Enterprises Around the world, in every economy, whether emerging or advanced, SMEs [small and medium sized enterprises] are widely accepted as a significant driver of gross domestic product (GDP) and the primary job creator. In South Africa Small, Medium & Large Enterprises account for around 40% of GDP and, according to a Finscope survey, 90% of jobs created between 1998 and 2005 were in small, medium and micro enterprises. Interestingly Brazil’s SMEs are estimated to produce 96% of jobs. Based off this the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants suggests that according to the National Development Plan, SMEs are expected to provide a staggering 90% of new jobs by 2030. Given South Africa’s divided past and our current population demographics, the importance of stimulating black owned SMEs must, therefore, take centre stage. sefa would like to thank all the men in the Small, Medium & Large Enterprises sector for driving South Africa’s economic engine in tough times.


REGIONAL

WINNER From Uganda

Amos Bagumire Amos Bagumire is the managing director of ABS Consulting Group, a company he started six years ago specialising in corporate governance, risk advisory, human resources, forensic audit and executive development. He has over 20 years’ experience in providing consultancy services in the areas of governance, audit, risk advisory and human resource management. Amos was a director at Ernst & Young in charge of business risk services and human resource advisory services in Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania and Ethiopia. He was project director for 20 million Euros- European Development Fund EDF Micro projects in Uganda and had worked for KPMG as well. Amos’s major contribution to the society is in grooming and training accountants and assisting in fighting corruption through transferring corporate governance skills to CEOs and boards of directors.

From South Africa

Rubin van Niekerk Rubin van Niekerk founded Africa’s first gay business network named, The Family Business in January 1992. By early 1994 they had arranged many cabaret shows at the Johannesburg Civic Theatre, where they networked and introduced new members to audiences of about 150 people. Their newsletter was not sufficient for their business association anymore and they published a business directory. This business directory evolved into the Gay Pages and was launched on 10 December 1994. Rubin completed a BA degree majoring in psychology and sociology at the University of Port Elizabeth in 1985. Working in human resources with a psychologist and psychometrists for about two years taught him to appreciate psychometric testing. Over a six year period he became exposed to all the aspects of human resources.

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REGIONALWINNER From Zimbabwe

Ketan Patel Ketan Patel is an experienced, entrepreneurial executive with a successful track record of establishing, growing and managing businesses in competitive, challenging operational environments. He is the founder of Social Enterprise that distributes products and services at the last mile to underserved communities using technology to measure impact on profits, people and the planet using Recycled Shipping Containers. He has impacted over 5 000 lives in the first 18 months of operations. Ketan secured equity and financing from a large Danish Foundation and he is also responsible for mapping growth strategies, formulating and implementing acquisition, joint venture and franchised business partnerships in diverse markets including Sub Saharan Africa, The United States, Canada, Egypt, India, Korea, United Kingdom, Jordan, Japan, Turkey, Syria, The Far East and China, Latin America and Australia.

From Namibia

Frank H. Moormann Frank H. Moormann is the chief executive officer and founder of Financial Consulting Services. He is a goal driven, well organised and innovative entrepreneur with excellent business acumen. He is also a strong leader and team player. These skills have served him well in several management positions and directorships held in a number of companies. A past chairman of various charitable and professional organisations. Frank is an outgoing person who enjoys motor cycling, good music, and socialising, travelling and outdoor activities. He is also a member of the several professional bodies. Frank shares his wealth of experience in different industries not only with clients but is actively engaged in presenting training courses ranging from taxation to corporate governance and soft-skills training.

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CASE IN POINT

Passionate about

Economic Development by Andrew Ngozo

The recent downgrade of South Africa to junk status by various rating agencies is a reflection of weakening investor confidence and this does not bode well for the already declining growth in fixed investment activity by the private sector in particular domestically. Hence the need, now more than ever before, is to support viable businesses run by SMMEs and Co-operatives given the potential they have to boost economic activity. To this end, Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) stands out as one of agencies that are crucial in this regard to provide the needed financial support to the small business sector. At the helm of this agency is Thakhani Makhuvha, the chief executive officer of sefa.

S

efa was established on 1st April 2012 as a wholly owned subsidiary of the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC), following the merger of Khula Enterprise Finance; the South African Micro Finance Apex Fund (samaf ); and the IDC’s small business activities. The overarching mandate of sefa is to promote the establishment, survival and growth of SMMEs and Co-operatives and, contribute towards poverty alleviation and job creation. One of the biggest stumbling blocks that entrepreneurs face when starting their businesses, is the lack of financial management experience, suggesting the importance of continuous learning by the players in this sector. The agency is open for business and will help those entrepreneurs who come with viable business plans demonstrating the ability to service the loans. sefa has a national footprint and is largely concerned with reaching people who would not ordinarily obtain access to finance. Most funders are based in big metros, and the services are also available in smaller, outlying provinces: the Northern Cape, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Free State and the Eastern Cape. The agency seeks to help people who cannot go into big metros for funding.

Thakhani Makhuvha, the Chief Executive Officer of Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa).

The agency is actively targeting those most in need of support, and one initiative the sefa CEO is extremely optimistic about is a scheme to fund people with disabilities. Makhuvha says the agency launched a funding scheme dedicated to entrepreneurs with disabilities and R30 million was allocated to kick start the scheme together with concessionary interest rates. Makhuvha has been in the development finance and banking sector for more than 20 years. He has previously worked, amongst others, at the following financial institutions in various capacities: Absa Corporate and Merchant Bank (now Absa Capital); African Merchant Bank (now AMB Capital); South African Reserve Bank; Ntsika Enterprise Promotion Agency, (now known as SEDA) and at Standard Bank Group. Over the years, Makhuvha has offered training and presentations to other Development Finance Institutions (locally and elsewhere in the African continent) on various topics such as ‘Enterprise Risk Management’, ‘Credit Risk Management’ and ‘Project Appraisal and Assessment’. In November 2011, Makhuvha presented a research paper on ‘Pricing for Development” at the Global Development Finance Conference held in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. He is passionate about economic development particularly in the SMMEs landscape and transformation.

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SectorFOREWORD Sport Sport and South Africa are intricately intertwined. In the country, sport is something of a religion, and no matter what our differences are, we all worship at the sporting altar. Sport in South Africa has and always will unite people from every walk of life. Who will forget that momentous occasion in 1995 when South Africa won the Rugby World Cup, and everyone danced with joy as the nation showed the world how strong we are when we unite our voices, hearts and minds? When it comes to sport, South Africans are extremely passionate. Soccer is the most popular sport in the country, with Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates firmly the fans’ favourites, and the national team, Bafana Bafana, being enthusiastically supported by its many supporters. Rugby and cricket, among others, are favourites with South Africans from all walks of life, and day-night games are very popular with the crowds. CEO Global honours all the sporting heroes for their achievements, especially for making the nation realise that South Africa is much stronger as a unit.


REGIONALWINNER

From South Africa

Christiaan Arnold TheĂżse Christiaan Arnold TheĂżse is the chief executive officer of the South African Korfball Federation. The South Africa national korfball team is managed by the South African Korfball Federation (SAKF), representing South Africa in korfball international competitions. In 2014 they won their third African Championship, held in Zambia. He was previously the finance manager of the Eldoglen Home Owners Association and was also an accountant with Coetzer Craddock responsible for accounting for various companies. Korfball is a ball sport, with similarities to netball and basketball. It is played by two teams of eight players with four females and four males in each team. The objective is to throw a ball through a bottomless basket that is mounted on a 3.5 m (11.5 feet) high pole.

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Tuareg People

Meet the

By Andrew Ngozo

of the Sahara

Have you ever wondered why one of the world’s most successful vehicle manufacturers, Volkswagen named one of its most famous SUV models after a semi-nomadic African tribe called the Tuareg? The Tuareg inhabit the Saharan regions of North Africa - Niger, Mali, Libya, Algeria and Burkina Faso. Tuareg is an Arabic term meaning abandoned by God and they call themselves Imohag which is loosely translated as free men. This is neither an indictment on the nomads nor an endorsement for the vehicle brand. However, that the later chose the former is an indication that the Tuareg tribe is a special one. Based on an evolving African continent, they have stayed true to their roots and survived through tough times. The auto manufacturer claims that their same name model is able to do this as well, and in more rugged conditions.

T

he story of the Tuareg people is as compelling as it is mysterious and surprising. They are traditional yet they defy many modern day societal norms where the women seemingly wield more power than men in the tribe. It is common knowledge that Islam faith followers have to adhere to a strict religious code but they do not. According to some sources, the Tuareg people attribute their fate to their female ancestors, founders of the tribe; part of the reason given for why women are more powerful than men. Thus, contrary to many Islamic faith followers, men cover their faces with a veil of blue cloth dyed with indigo. The veil that Tuareg men wear on their faces has several meanings. It is, first of all, a symbol of male identity. It is also thought to protect the wearer from evil spirits. In addition, it is considered an attractive adornment and can be worn in various styles. The face veil is worn differently in different social situations. It is worn highest (covering the nose and mouth) to express respect in the presence of chiefs, older


LIFESTYLE persons, and in-laws. Once they marry, Tuareg women wear a head scarf that covers their hair. In rural areas, Tuareg men wear long Islamic robes. Women wear wraparound skirts and embroidered blouses. In the towns, clothing is more varied. It includes West African tie-dyed cottons and also fashionable European styles for some wealthier people. Men begin wearing a veil at the age of 25. It is believed that the Tuareg are descendants of the North African Berbers, and that they originated in the Fezzan region of Libya. They later expanded into regions bordering the Sahara, bringing local farming peoples into their own society. With a current population estimation of 1 million, the Tuareg speak Tamacheq, which is in the Berber language group. A written script called Tifinagh is used in poetry and also appears in Saharan rock art. Many of the Tuareg also speak Songhay, Hausa, and French, and [can] read Arabic! Although most Tuareg now practice some degree of Islam the Maliki sect of Islam, resulting from the teachings of the great prophet El Maghili from the early 16th century - they are not considered Arabic. They have preserved many preIslamic traditions and do not strictly follow many Islamic rituals. Among the Tuareg the women have a great freedom and participate in family and tribal decisions. Descent and inheritance are both through the maternal line. For thousands of years, the Tuareg economy revolved around trans-Saharan trade. There are basically five trade routes that extend across the Sahara from the northern Mediterranean coast to the African cities on the southern edge of the desert. Tuareg merchants were responsible for bringing goods from these cities to the north. From there, they were distributed throughout the world. Because of the nature of transport and the limited space available in caravans, Tuareg usually traded in luxury items, which took up little space and on which a large profit could be made. Tuareg were also responsible for bringing enslaved people

north from West Africa to be sold to Europeans and Middle Easterners. Many Tuareg settled into the communities, with which they traded, serving as local merchants and representatives for their nomadic relations. On the social front, in rural communities, a nuclear family (parents and their children) live in each tent or compound (living area). Each compound is named for the married woman who owns the tent. She may make her husband leave the tent if she divorces him. Fathers are the disciplinarians of the family. But other men, especially maternal uncles, often play and joke with small children. Grandmothers also have a close, affectionate relationship with the children. Cousins have a relaxed relationship marked by teasing and joking. Relationships with in-laws are reserved, distant, and respectful. Traditionally, the Tuareg have married within their own social category, preferably to a close cousin. In the towns, both of these traditions are breaking down. In rural areas, they remain strong. However, many individuals marry close relatives only to please their mothers. Later they divorce and marry nonrelatives. Some wealthy Tuareg men practice polygamy. Two-thirds of a family’s property goes to the sons as an inheritance; one-third, to the daughters. A political office usually passes from father to son. Women who lack daughters of their own often adopt nieces to help with the housework. What has been discussed above is just a tip of the iceberg in so far as the Tuareg people of the Sahara are concerned. What is most striking is the fact that they are resilient at a time when most indigenous African tribes have all but embraced western culture. So was it a smart move on the part of Volkswagen to name one of their products after the Tuareg people of the Sahara. It appears that it was a master stroke. Sources: http://www.everyculture.com; www. bradshawfoundation.com; www.africaguide.com


SectorFOREWORD Tourism and Leisure The tourism industry continues to be one of the fastest-growing and most vibrant sectors of Africa’s economy. In spite of recent challenges, including the fall in oil prices, change in visa regulations in South Africa and contraction of the global economy, the sector has significant potential to create jobs, uplift inclusive economic growth across the continent, and reduce poverty. Africa is steadily developing into one of the world’s great regions for travel. With its exceptional, unfiltered fusion of breath taking, lifeinspiring offerings – history and heritage, culture and tradition, wildlife, natural beauty, and most importantly, the innate spirit of the continent’s people – Africa never fails to create an imprint on the minds and hearts of travellers from across the globe. To the champions of the tourism and leisure industry, THE PREMIER HOTEL OR TAMBO would like to offer its congratulations.


REGIONAL

WINNER From Nigeria

Dr Wasiu Adeyemo Babalola Dr Wasiu Adeyemo Babalola is the managing director for West Africa of the Swiss International Hotel & Resorts, Switzerland. He is also an adjunct/visiting lecturer to the School of Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management, Kwara State University, Malete, Kwara State, Nigeria. As a member of the International Management Council of Swiss International Hotel, he was able to develop the brand across Africa starting from Nigeria and today the hotel chain is operational in four countries, across six cities with seven hotels in Africa. In academics, he was involved in mentoring over 600 graduating students both at the Polytechnic and University levels across the country. He currently serves as External Moderator/ Assessor to Lagos State Polytechnic Hospitality Management Technology programmes among others. He was instrumental to the setting up of the Institute of Hospitality, UK in Nigeria.

From Tanzania

Moustafa H. Khataw Moustafa H. Khataw is the managing director and CEO of Skylink Group. Khataw was nominated as one of the five Top Franchise Owner of the Year (FOTY) at the UNIGLOBE Rendezvous in London in the UNIGLOBE system worldwide. UNIGLOBE Skylink Travel & Tours Ltd based in Dar Es Salaam – Tanzania with branches in Arusha, Mwanza and Zanzibar has been named to the 2015 UNIGLOBE Chairman’s Circle for being among the top-performing TMCs in the UNIGLOBE system worldwide. He recently went into a new business venture with First Car Rental Tanzania. The new business units form part of First Car Rental’s car hire partnership with Moustafa H. Khataw, the CEO of Uniglobe Skylink Travel, previously a network partner to Avis and now the brand new but still the market leader: First Car Rental Tanzania.

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COUNTRYWINNER

From Ethiopia

Yenealem Getachew Habte Yenealem Getachew Habte is general manager & shareholder of Horizon Ethiopia Tours & Travel. Horizon Ethiopia Tours & Travel is one of the experienced tour and travel companies in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. They offer their clients customised domestic and international tour packages that are designed according to the requirement and budget of the traveller. He studied geology and hold his first degree from the University of Addis Ababa and holds a diploma in tour operation from catering and tourism institute. Fifteen years ago he decided to open his own firm in tourism.

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Contact Details Tel: 011 018 5500 Fax: 011 018 5587 Website: www.nda.org.za


by Carl Wepener

THE

NEW TOYOTA FORTUNER:

A LUXURIOUS BRIDGE BETWEEN URBANITY AND

FREEDOM

It was really a pleasure waiting for the Toyota Fortuner. Although we knew it would not differ radically from the outgoing model, the new model did bring the Fortuner into the modern looking era with its good looking lines. It looks less robust and sleeker. However it is just as, if not, more capable on and off road. The whole package accentuates the luxury and practicality of the vehicle.


LIFESTYLE

T

he following quote from the press release sums it up well. “We all want and love freedom, or at least the idea of it. But what exactly is freedom? In short, it’s whatever we want it to be – enjoying life without inhibitions. It’s the ability to go anywhere you like, whenever you want. That’s the true luxury of freedom – and this is embodied in the new Toyota Fortuner”. The Fortuner has really undergone major changes and this is very obvious as it sports new-era diesel engines and power trains. Performance on and off road has improved and through the new 6-speed manual transmission I have found accelerating and changing gears does not influence power or induce power loss. The Fortuner is still as far as I am concerned one of the more versatile vehicles when it comes to both on, and off-road capabilities. This has much to do with the new-era frame and suspension, active traction control and a myriad of other functions like hill-start Assist Control and downhill Assist in the 4x4 models. Choosing between road and off-road settings is now much easier with the 4WD electric switch for 4x4 vehicles.

The Fortuner was designed with a bold yet elegant interior that features flowing surfaces and shapes with an emphasis on comfort and convenience. Premium soft-touch materials are used in key contact areas around the dashboard, windscreen pillars and door trims. These are complemented by metallic accents, woodgrain detail and carefully crafted ornaments precisely where necessary. Comfort on-road is a given but I was pleasantly surprised how comfortable the Fortuner was when going off-road. Its tendency to jump over ruts has all but disappeared although caution must always be kept when driving on a rutted surface. Some other features that give a premium feel is the smart entry and especially the power back door available on the 4.0 V6. All Fortuner models have audio systems with four to six speakers, an auxiliary/USB port, AM/FM radio and a CD player. Audio systems on the 2.8 GD and 4.0 V6 models boast a DAB+ digital radio and a 7” screen with DVD compatibility and a reversing camera display. The range-topping 4.0 V6 is equipped with satellite navigation. Other convenience features include standard Bluetooth connectivity, steering-wheel audio and telephone controls, as well as power door locks, windows and mirrors. Air conditioning is also standard and features separate air-flow controls for second-row passengers. Although I still don’t like the side folding third row of seats in the Fortuner it now has one-touch seat stowage capability for both the 2nd and 3rd rows. One thing that still remains is the ample storage space throughout the vehicle. All models feature three 12-volt accessory sockets – under the centre cluster, in the rear of the centre console for second-row passengers and in the rear luggage area. Safety and security has always been very important to Toyota and this is also true of the Fortuner where it now has a new-driver knee airbag, speed-sensing auto door locks, new anti-theft system, ISOFIX and trailer sway control. All models have LED stop lamps for a high-tech image, LED tail lamps, bi-halogen headlamps on the 2.4 Global Diesel (GD) and 2.7 VVT-i, and high-beam LED headlamps on the 2.8 GD and 4.0 V6. The new Fortuner is propelled by a range of newly developed engines, including the 2.4 and 2.8 GD series, the 2.7 VVT-i and 4.0 V6 power plants. The new GD series engines offer improved power output, efficiency and refinement. First introduced in the new Hilux, the new diesel engines have been developed from the ground up to offer an excellent on- and off-road driving experience. The GD series engines place strong emphasis on torque output and low-speed tractability. They make use of DOHC, 16-valve, four-cylinder inline architecture and utilise Variable Nozzle Turbocharger (VNT) technology, which deliver the compressed air through a new front-mounted intercooler.

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LIFESTYLE The 2.4 GD produces 110kW@3400 and delivers 400Nm of torque between 1600 and 2000rpm. The 2.8 GD offers owners a stout 130kW and effortless 420Nm from 1600 to 2400rpm in manual guise. Automatic transmission versions will receive a boost to 450Nm over the same rpm span. The fuel efficiency of both diesel engines has been improved over the units they replace: 13% on 2.4 GD and 9-15% on 2.8 GD. The high-output 2.4 litre GD engine delivers excellent fuel efficiency, weighing in at 7 litres per 100km in the manual and 7.9 litres in the auto. The 2.8 litre GD engine strikes a formidable balance between power and economy, returning impressive figures, ranging from 7.5 to 8.5 litres per 100km – depending on the model. The maximum towing capacity is rated at 2.5 tons for the 2.4 GD and 2.7 VVT-i models and at 3 tons for the 2.8 GD and 4.0 V6. Two petrol engines are on offer, including a revised version of the familiar 2.7 litre VVT-i (previously not available locally) and the livelier 4.0 V6. The former delivers 122kW and 245Nm with a 10% improvement in fuel

economy. Completing the line-up is the range-topping 4.0 litre V6, delivering a gutsy 175kW and 376Nm. The new Fortuner offers the latest Toyota six-speed transmission technology for ease of driving, comfort and fuel economy. Both transmissions, available on all grades, in both manual and automatic configurations have a wide spread of ratios to optimise both take-off performance and fuel economy at highway speeds. The 2.8 GD receives Toyota’s newly developed intelligent manual transmission (iMT) for smoother shifting on and off road. The iMT electronics match engine revolutions to transmission revolutions for smoother shifts – especially useful when carrying heavy loads. Toyota designed the new-generation manual transmission to improve fuel economy and shift feel, while also optimising reliability and durability. Fifth and sixth gears are over-drive ratios, with a direct-drive fourth gear. Shift feel has been optimised with a short gear-shift lever and careful attention given to the structure of the gears and bearings. The Fortuner has been developed to attain maximum safety standards. Standard electronic safety features include Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), Active Traction Control (ATC), Trailer Sway Control (TSC), Hill-start Assist Control (HAC) and Drive Mode Select. Downhill Assist Control (DAC) is available on only 4x4 models.


TSC uses brake control and engine output control to suppress lateral trailer movement caused by factors such as crosswinds or variable road surfaces. ATC is designed to prevent the wheels from spinning on low-friction surfaces such as mud and snow. It also provides high levels of control in off-road situations by distributing torque to the wheels that have traction. HAC helps prevent the vehicle rolling backwards when moving off on an incline. DAC provides braking in 4x4 high or low range to help maintain a constant speed when descending a steep hill, allowing the driver to concentrate on steering. An electrically controlled rear differential lock is standard on 4x4 models. Safety equipment in the new Fortuner includes emergency-locking retractor three-point seatbelts for all seats, with force-limiting seatbelt pretensioners for the front seatbelts. There are seatbelt reminders for front and second-row seats. There are three top-tether child-seat anchorages and an ISOFIX point for a child seat. Entry grade (2.4 GD-6 and 2.7 VVT-i)  Push start  Tilt and telescopic steering column  Cruise control  Speed sensing auto door lock  Front and knee airbags  Illuminated entry  Chilled glovebox  Front fog lamps  Rear spoiler  Roof rails  Side steps  17” alloys  Full alloy spare wheel

Auto air conditioner

High grade (4.0 V6)  All features of the standard grade  Power back door  Navigation system Retail pricing for the new Fortuner is as follows  2.4 GD-6 Raised Body Manual: R456 400  2.4 GD-6 Raised Body Automatic: R474 300  2.7 VVT-i Raised Body Automatic: R438 000  2.8 GD-6 Raised Body Manual: R538 500  2.8 GD-6 4x4 Manual: R599 100  2.8 GD-6 Raised Body Automatic: R557 200  2.8 GD-6 4x4 Automatic: R617 900  4.0 V6 4x4 Automatic: R633 900 All retail prices include a three-year/100 000km warranty and five-year/90 000km service plan. The Toyota Fortuner is still leader of the pack in its class although the Ford Everest and Chevrolet Trailblazer are nipping at its heels. What counts in the Fortuner’s favour is its brand, Toyota’s retained value and also its delivery on service promises. Add to that its capability and competitive price and you can see why it is so popular. Now, if Toyota can only do something so that the Fortuner can pass the Moose test.

Standard grade (2.8 GD-6)  Leather upholstery  Front, knee, curtain and side airbags  LED headlamps  Follow-me-home auto lights

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SectorFOREWORD Welfare and Civil Society Organisations Civil society in South Africa is affected by global trends but the sector has also faced a particular national context in the form of apartheid and has been profoundly shaped by this. In addition, welfare and civil society organisations have had to negotiate a new terrain after the transition to democracy in 1994. The 20th century CSOs first arose mainly in communities that were both politically disenfranchised and poor, and tended to be survivalist in most cases. The 1920s through to the 1990s were, therefore, seen as difficult years where community-based organisations were formed and took action, becoming openly oppositional to the state. Established with varying degrees of success and longevity, some did not last, while others survived until the dawn of democracy to the present day. BUSINESS LEADERSHIP SOUTH AFRICA commends the men in this sector for steering their communities through difficult times. May your selfless efforts propel you to greater achievements.


REGIONAL

WINNER From Kenya

Rev Canon Captain Richard Wanzala Mayabi The Rev. Canon Captain Richard Wanzala Mayabi is working for a just society through holistic transformational leadership by training and equipping men and women at the grass root to effectively live out scripture, seeking to change their neighbourhood. His organisation, Church Army Africa is a missionary agency of the Anglican church in Africa whose vision H. E. A. L Africa (Health, Education, Advocacy, and Leveraging wealth creation) is focused on training men and women towards becoming solution providers in every village on the continent of Africa. His main responsibility is to oversee the strategic implementation of CAA’s strategic plan creating environment for both staff, directors and the wider society to buy into the vision of CAA for transformation of African society.

From Nigeria

Kenneth Okoineme Kenneth Okoineme is a policy and governance advisor at ActionAid Nigeria. ActionAid is a global movement of people working together to further human rights and defeat poverty for all. ActionAid works with poor people in over 40 countries across the world. Their goal is to end poverty. They believe in doing things differently. They know that with the right opportunities, poor people will find their own solutions - and build new lives. ActionAid Nigeria commenced programmatic operations in January 2000 after a country appraisal which found poverty in the midst of plenty. They commenced work then through a country agreement signed with the National Planning Commission of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. Their works are currently spread across 26 states of the federation.

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REGIONAL

WINNERS From Uganda

Dr Livingstone Sewanyana Dr Livingstone Sewanyana who obtained a law doctorate from UCT, recently received the 2015 European Union (EU) Human Rights Defender Award in Kampala, Uganda. He is the executive director of the Foundation for Human Rights Initiative (FHRI); an independent, non-governmental, non-partisan and not-for-profit human rights organisation established in December 1991. It seeks to remove impediments to democratic development and meaningful enjoyment of the fundamental freedoms enshrined in the 1995 Uganda Constitution and other internationally recognised human rights instruments through enhancement of knowledge, respect and observance of human rights; and promotion of exchange of information and best practices through training, education, research, legislative advocacy and strategic partnerships in Uganda. FHRI addresses the entire range of human rights: civil and political as well as economic, social and cultural rights as defined in international human rights covenants.

From Mozambique

Amade Sucá Amade Sucá is the executive director of ActionAid International Mozambique. His areas of expertise include NGO leadership and management, international development, participatory rural development, democratic governance, conflict resolution and capacity development to civil society organisations. His international exposure includes work in Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Angola, Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, Ethiopia, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, The Gambia, Senegal, Tanzania, Liberia and Ghana. (Europe) – Belgium, United Kingdom, Greece, Italy, France, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Sweden, Spain and Portugal. (Americas) – United States of America, Brazil, Honduras and El Salvador. (Asia) – India, Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia and China. He is a results-driven person usually setting aims and targets and leading by example. Amade likes to be innovative and creative in developing effective solutions to problems and in making things happen while being determined and decisive when need be.

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COUNTRYWINNER

From DRC

Dr Luc Kalisya Malemo Dr Luc Kalisya Malemo is the chief surgeon and hospital director at HEAL Africa. Between finishing medical school in Goma in 2002 and his residency with Doctors on Call for Service in Family Medicine, Dr Luc spent some time working in a Rwanda refugee camp. In the period between 2005- 2007 Dr Luc graduated in Family Medicine from Limpopo University in Pretoria while working as a chief of medical staff and coordinator of the family medicine residency program at HEAL Africa. In the same year he joined Makerere University in Uganda to obtain a specialty in surgery.

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LIFESTYLE

BMW Pure Pleasure

750Li 740Le

& by Carl Wepener

The BMW 750Li and the BMW 740e is not much different from the rest of the range unless you look at the length of the 740Li or the size of the boot of the 740e. I found the driving pleasure, luxury and comfort to be much the same especially sitting in the back and being driven by a chauffeur. After having spent over 3000kms in the BMW 750Li, I still find some of the new autonomous driving innovations a bit tricky and it needs some more refinement before real relaxation can take place behind the wheel of a car that drives itself. The BMW 750Li is my favourite as it is luxury and refinement made perfect. Believe it or not but my average fuel consumption over 3000 kilometres was 8.5l per 100kms. My best was 8.1l per 100kms. The BMW 740e is nearly on par and is a short bit ahead when it comes to quietness in traffic due to the electric motors doing all the work.

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B

MW’s new flagships bristles with new innovations that are at the forefront of development and show cases the newest and most amasing innovations that puts driving pleasure at a new and much more enjoyable and luxurious level. The BMW 7 Series is further pioneering light weight construction with their unique ground breaking technology by extensive use of carbon-fibrereinforced plastic (CFRP) in the passenger cell. Greater dynamism, exceptional comfort, zero compromises is what BMW aims for in the BMW 7 Series and they have achieved their goal in both the 750Li and the 740e. The interior is luxurious, well equipped and with a grand ambiance that caters for the supreme wellbeing of its occupants. Add to that the individual range of products, a sport package and you can design and personalise to your heart’s desire. The interior is where the real charm of the BMW 750Li lies and it is an enjoyable adventure to let yourself go with all that is available like the electrically adjustable comfort seats with heat package and the Executive Lounge provide unbeatable long-distance comfort; active seat ventilation and massage function for driver and passengers with Vitality Programme included for rear seat passengers. Add to that a heated steering wheel, heated armrests in the doors, centre console and rear centre armrest, heated seats front and rear and you understand the word cocooned luxury. A panorama glass roof Sky Lounge with globally unique light display that can be switched between six colours

ensures prime lighting. Ambient light including Welcome Light Carpet for the area in front of the car doors as well as Ambient Air package (interior scent system) puts you at peace even after the longest of long stressful days. No more wires while charging your phone with the Telephony system inductive charging of mobile phones in the car and works quite well as tested. The iDrive operating system gains a touch display for intuitive operation of numerous functions; display and control unit of the optional Automatic air conditioning with 4-zone control system likewise with touch-sensitive capability.3D sensor allows intuitive and easy interaction with the infotainment system using predefined hand movements. Another smart innovation is the Touch Command multifunction control unit: removable 7-inch tablet computer integrated into the centre armrest or rear console to control comfort, infotainment and communications functions. What is really a very interesting is the lovely looking and functional Remote Control Parking using the BMW Display Key. The new BMW 7 Series is the world’s first seriesproduced car that enables owners to manoeuvre in or out of forward-parking spaces or garages without anyone at the wheel. As such, the Remote Control Parking option allows drivers to access tight parking spaces with ease. The driver initiates the car’s progress forwards into or in reverse out of a space using the likewise newly developed BMW Display Key. While the car is carrying out the semi-automated manoeuvre, the driver watches out for obstacles. The new Head-Up Display with 75 per cent larger projection surface on the windscreen is much more functional and I relied upon it most of my driving time. Driving Assist now is a complete comfort- and safetyenhancing package with additional functions Rear collision prevention, Lane Change Warning, Speed Limit Info and Rear crossing traffic warning functions. Driving Assist Plus includes comfort-optimising, Steering and lane control assistant, Lane keeping assistant with active side collision protection, Traffic jam assistant for semi-automated driving, and Front and rear crossing traffic warning. New-generation Surround View system with parallel Top View display function and 3D View in the Control Display, individually selectable perspectives and Panorama Side View to check the traffic situation to the sides of the car (front and rear) is also an innovative and needed detail that comes to good use.

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Models tested at a glance: BMW 750i V8 petrol engine with (BMW 750Li): BMW TwinPower Turbo Capacity: 4,395cc Output: 330 kW Max. torque: 650 Nm Acceleration [0–100 km/h]: 4.7 seconds. Top speed: 250 km/h. CO2 emissions*: 194–189 (197–192) g/km, exhaust standard: EU6. BMW 740e: Four-cylinder in-line petrol engine with BMW TwinPower Turbo Capacity: 1,997cc Output: 190 kW Max. torque: 400 Nm BMW eDrive technology with synchronous electric motor Output: 70 kW/95 hp Torque: 250 Nm, lithium-ion high-voltage battery. Total system output: 240 kW. 5.6 seconds (BMW 740Le: Acceleration [0–100 km/h]: 5.7 seconds, BMW 740Le xDrive: 5.5 seconds), Top speed: >240 km/h, Top speed, electric: 120 km/h (electronically limited); Electric range**: 40 km. Average fuel consumption**: 2.1 litres/100 kilometres 12.5 kWh/100 kilometres, 49/g km, exhaust standCO2 emissions**: ard: EU6. Plug-in hybrid BMW 740e features BMW eDrive technology. * Figures according to EU test cycle, may vary depending on the tyre format specified. ** Provisional figures as calculated in the EU test cycle for plug-in hybrid vehicles, may vary depending on the tyre format specified. All performance, fuel consumption and emissions figures are provisional.

Standout innovations in operating system and driver assistance technology include the extension of the iDrive system touch display and BMW gesture control, as well as Touch Command, the new BMW Head-Up Display, crossing traffic warning, the steering and lane control assistant, active side collision protection, Surround View with 3D View and the Remote Control Parking system. Full-LED headlights fitted as standard; anti-dazzle BMW Laserlight with BMW Selective Beam and range doubled from 300 to 600 metres now also available as an option for a BMW model for the first time following its world premiere in the BMW i8. The BMW 750Li had the Lazerlight system and I found it to be the greatest lights I have ever drove with. The laser headlights generate a particularly bright, pure white light as well as providing a high-beam range of 600 metres, double that of the LED headlights.

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The latest wave of innovations offer drivers greater freedom when selecting the perfect set-up for their car; they can opt for even sportier handling or further improved ride comfort, or use the high-efficiency ECO PRO mode. ADAPTIVE mode can now also be activated via the newly designed Driving Experience Control switch. In this setting, the car set-up adapts to driving style and route characteristics. Another new addition to the iDrive system’s functionality is BMW gesture control, which is being introduced for the first time. Hand movements detected by a 3D sensor control infotainment functions in an extremely intuitive and user-friendly fashion. The gestures can be used for a number of functions, including controlling the volume in audio applications and accepting or rejecting incoming telephone calls. Innovative driver assistance systems from BMW ConnectedDrive enhance comfort and safety.


LIFESTYLE

The Steering and lane control assistant, lane keeping assistant with active side collision protection, rear collision prevention and crossing traffic warning functions have been added to the Driving Assist Plus system. Meanwhile, the Traffic jam assistant – which involves semi-automated driving – can be used on any type of road. And the Active Cruise Control with Stop & Go function now only requires drivers to press a button to incorporate speed restrictions detected by the Speed Limit Info function. The new generation of the Surround View system now also includes a 3D View and Panorama Side View option in the Control Display.

Summary: I enjoyed both the BMW 750Li and the BMW 740e for different reasons. The 740e with its four-cylinder in-line petrol engine with BMW TwinPower Turbo is more powerful than I thought but if you are doing more than 40 kms per day you will not have much of a fuel consumption gain. Myself and my wife loves the BMW 750Li and although it used around 1.5 litres per 100km more in fuel it is offset against the extra space, luxury and brute power when needed.

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Semi-

Finalists

2017

Arts & Culture South Africa - Mr FrancoisTheron

Education & Training: Academic South Africa - Prof Godwell Nhamo

Sport South Africa - Mr Robert John Holden

Finalists Agencies & Regulatory Authorities Zambia - Mr Chilufya Peter Sampa

Uganda - Mr James Saaka

Agriculture Uganda - Mr Christopher (Loseph) Mulindwa

Arts & Culture South Africa - Mr Alan Samons

South Africa - Mr Titus Matiyane

Automotive & Components Ghana - Mr Bright K. Kubuafor

Aviaton South Africa - Captain Murad Allie Ismail

Building & Construction Tanzania - Mr Dipak Vassa

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Finalists Business & Professional Service South Africa - Mr Peter Van Niekerk

Uganda - Mr Robert Julius Muwema Kintu

South Africa - Mr Sibosiso Desmond Msomi

Education & Training: Academic Uganda - Dr. Michael Masanza

South Africa - Prof Ochieng Aoyi

South Africa - Prof Damtew Teferra

Financial Services South Africa - Mr Wilhelm Nauta

Logistics & Shipping

South Africa - Mr Khathutshelo Patrick Matshidze South Africa - Mr Shayne Krige

Rwanda - Mr David Kaswara

Manufacturing & Engineering Malawi - Mr Harold Stanley Pickford Jere

SME South Africa - Mr Francois Mellet

South Africa - Mr Pragalathan Michael Reddy

South Africa - Mr Sapho Maqhwazima

South Africa - Mr Corrie van der Wath

Sport South Africa - Mr Aleck Schosana

South Afriac - Mr Michael Patrick Randall

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Millennials

The Generation Forcing Brands To Reimagine

Their Customer Journey by George Bourdos

Gone are the days where brands can offer customers the same products or services they have been selling for years. No matter how successful these products and services are, it’s no longer good enough to have just a prime location as a fashion retailer or have that great signature dish as a restaurant brand.

T

he consumer is changing…no scratch that out…the consumer has already changed and will continue to evolve at an accelerated rate that brands have never before experienced with the generations of the past. Who is this consumer that has taken the market by storm? This techno savvy, attention seeking, know-it-all generation is known as the Millennials. Aged 23-34 (born 1983-1994), this generation grew up alongside (and you could even say they are siblings) some of today’s greatest innovations and technologies that their parents could only have dreamed of. They grew up with the first cellular telephones and these bulky devices become smaller as they grew up. As they matured into adults these phones grew smarter, they got cameras, they connected to the internet and evolved into the smart phones we know and depend on today.

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LIFESTYLE

This is the generations that saw the birth of the world-wide web and dial up internet. This is the generations that saw the birth of the world-wide web and dial up internet. They saw this world-changing tech become high speed fibre and Wi-Fi that we depend on almost as much as we do on the air we breathe. They say that Gen Z, the younger or next generation aged 17-22, are the “true digital natives” which means that Millennials have to be considered the “True Digital Adopters”. Adopters may even be an understatement because the research shows that Millennials are so dependent, not only on their mobile devices, but on the social and online access they give them. Without them they feel lost and helpless and in some cases even anxious or depressed. But what does this mean for brands and what makes these consumers so different from the ones who came before them? The biggest difference is that they are experience driven monsters, constantly searching and seeking new and unique experiences. The basic core product or service is still extremely important to them and still has to be a quality offering, but they expect brands to deliver these in new and exciting ways. They want what I like to call ‘share worthy experiences’. Remember, those are mobile devices that they consider extensions of themselves? They are demanding that brands offer experiences worth Texting, Tweeting, Instagramming or Blogging about. Although it sounds simple enough, this generation is not so easily fooled. Authenticity and relevance are key in winning them over and as much as they want the flash of exciting new experiences, they are also searching for brands that resonate with their personal style, their beliefs and brands that stand for something. 70% of Millennials would rather buy from a brand that supports a cause. But then again it is more than just acting like you care; brands need to prove that they care. It’s not only about giving back to their communities or the environment but also proving that they care about each individual customer. Millennials demand personalisation and customisation, whether it be their name on their Starbucks coffee mug or the custom madeto-order burger at the local burger joint. Just as they will love and praise you online for giving them unique and memorable experiences, they will also be just as quick to destroy you if you fail to deliver on your promises. Every day we see negative brand publicity go viral via social media, showing just how powerful the consumer of today can be if you dare cross them. On the other hand they also have the power to elevate your brand to new levels

if you can succeed in delivering what they want. Brands like Moleskin have had to rethink their product strategy… yes they still sell millions of notebooks each year but more and more people are turning to digital note making devices, thus leading them to launch their smart writing pen and notebook that allows customers to keep both hard and soft copies of their notes. Not only did they re-evaluate their product offering but also looked at another way they could make the customer experience better, as well as offer more than just great notebooks. They realised that their notebooks around the world are taken to thousands of meetings each day and one of the most popular meeting spots, apart from the office, are coffee shops. So in 2016 they launched the first ever Moleskin Café in Milan, Spain. Moleskin, like many leading overseas brands such as Nike, have gone back to the drawing board and reinvented their entire customer journey from start to finish. Like many other brands, they too have realised that the Millennial generation expects nothing less. Nike’s latest flagship store in downtown Manhattan is testament to this. From the second you walk through the door you can see the next level of customer journey mapping. From free Wi-Fi on entry, to staff that offer service second only to five star hotels, as well as product knowledge the likes of which I have never experienced! Not just the opportunity to try on Nike’s latest footwear but the chance to actually test-drive the shoes in store. Treadmills allow customers to do virtual runs through central park, in store Indoor-Soccer and Basketball courts with dedicated coaches to really test out the brand’s latest gear. But the journey doesn’t end there, they allow you to customise your merchandise with you own name and colours. Check out is made simple by each staff member having their own handheld point of sale device and if the store doesn’t have your size, simply order it online from their other stores and get it delivered to your door…even if that door happens to be a hotel door. So to truly be a brand that can win loyalty amongst the Millennial generations, brands need to engage in deep dialogue with their customers to understand their wants and needs. They need to reimagine their costumer experiences from the customer’s point of view. Offering seamless, on and offline experiences, that merge the best of both worlds into one truly unique experience. The brands that are willing to stray from the same old same old and really engage this new audience will ensure that they endure both the Millennial Generation as well as Gen Z to follow.

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How to Make Prospecting and Selling Easy!

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Most people starting a business forget about the most important part. They spend loads of time picking just the right product or service to sell. They’ll carefully weigh the best kinds of office equipment to buy. They’ll even fuss endlessly over their workplace decor.

ut none of that holds a candle to what is most assuredly the core of any new business: you can’t succeed until you master prospecting and selling! “But I’m really good at what I do. Won’t the word just get out and people will find me and want to buy?” you say. Don’t bet on it. We live in a busy, crowded world where thousands of businesses are shouting their marketing messages. If you don’t get in there and promote -- and promote WELL -- your customer base will resemble a trickle more than an avalanche. Here are several proven methods for finding lots of new prospects and turning them into customers. Then I’ll show you an exceptionally EASY way to do all this on a shoestring.  Get a web site, get it listed on search engines, and let your site grab prospects 24/7. By now you’ve surely seen scads of small businesses doing this. For those who do it right, the Net can pull in lots of new customers with very little effort. But remember, it’s not as easy as some make it look. Your site has to be good, your copy has to be right, and you must be visible in search engines to make the magic happen.  Sell over the telephone. I love email, and face-to-face meetings will always have their place, but good ol’ telephone conversations are a top-notch selling strategy. Prospects feel like they’ve made a personal connection with you when you give them information over the phone.  Finally, method number three is the one to use if you don’t want to or don’t know how to build your own professional web site, or can’t bear the idea of talking to hundreds of strangers on the phone. Frankly, this third method has become the only method I truly recommend to small businesses and individuals: OUTSOURCING. These days, you can OUTSOURCE all your online promotion and selling to companies that specialise in doing the work for you. In the past, that would have meant spending tens of thousands per month to hire an outside selling team. Today, with online and telephone automation reaching new heights, you can have all the advertising, phone calls, and closing done for you by the pros for about what it costs to get a decent home office computer set-up. Don’t hesitate, do it! Getting a really good marketing, prospecting, and selling machine working for you is essential to your success!


Dawid Mocke Four-time World Surf Ski Champion

Colour could save your life. Wear a life jacket and bright colours when out paddling.


GROWING THE NEXT GENERATION OF SCIENTISTS CHANGING THE LANDSCAPE OF MEDICAL RESEARCH

THE SOUTH AFRICAN MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Francie Van Zijl Drive, Parowvallei, Cape Town | Po Box 19070, Tygerberg, 7505, South Africa Tel: +27 21 938 0911 | Fax: +27 21 938 0200 | Email: info@mrc.ac.za | www.samrc.ac.za

Profile for CEO Global

Titans Regional Digital Magazine 2017  

Titans: Building Nations – this annual publication showcases the leading movers and disruptors on the continent. They are identified via a p...

Titans Regional Digital Magazine 2017  

Titans: Building Nations – this annual publication showcases the leading movers and disruptors on the continent. They are identified via a p...

Profile for ceoglobal
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