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ANNUAL REPORT 2016 2017


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Contents A Message From the Chair and CEO ............................................................................4 About Us................................................................................................................................5 Our Strategic Priorities......................................................................................................5 Our Approach.......................................................................................................................6 Our People............................................................................................................................7 Youth Advisory Groups.................................................................................................. 10 Strategic Objectives ........................................................................................................ 13 Working with Young People: Support...................................................................... 14 Case Study: The Pathways Programs ........................................................................ 21 Youth Referral and Independent Person Program (YRIPP)................................ 24 Working with Young People: Leadership & Development................................. 26 Amplifying Young People's Voices............................................................................. 27 Regional Presence........................................................................................................... 30 Case Study: 'Le Mana' (Empower) Pasifika Program............................................. 32 Equipping Services.......................................................................................................... 34 Case Study: Equipping schools to support vulnerable young people........... 36 Working with Decision Makers.................................................................................... 38 Working with Researchers............................................................................................ 39 Multicultural Youth Advocacy Network (Australia).............................................. 40 Governance Statement.................................................................................................. 42 Directors' Report.............................................................................................................. 44 Financial Summary.......................................................................................................... 46 Independent Auditor’s Report.................................................................................... 49 Funders, Partners and Supporters............................................................................. 50

Front Cover (L to R): Sherry-Rose is a CMY Shout Out speaker. Tom is a member of the Carlton Youth Advisory Group and Najmeh Haidari Volunteers with CMY's Settle Smart program.

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

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A message from the Chair and CEO CHAIR MESSAGE

Finally, a big thank you to my fellow Directors for your time and expertise. As Directors you provide invaluable advice and guidance on a voluntary basis to the Governance of CMY. Your efforts and contributions are greatly appreciated.

On behalf of all the Directors, I would like to welcome Shelin David to the Board. Shelin brings a wealth of experience in financial accounting and her business acumen makes her a strong asset to CMY.

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Thank you to our Youth Advisory Groups for your wisdom and passion.

Over the past 12 months the Board has been undertaking a 2030 visioning journey to inform our next five year strategic plan – to be launched in 2018. Thank you to the thought leaders, critical friends, current and former Board members, staff and young people who have been part of this process.

I also want to acknowledge CEO Carmel Guerra for her inspiring leadership. And to the talented and committed staff and volunteers at CMY – thank you.

This year the Board has strengthened our connection with the CMY Youth Advisory Groups, hearing twice yearly from young people about the issues and priorities that concern them. This is invigorating and keeps the voices of young people at the centre of Board decisions.

Yet again this year again I was struck by the strength and resilience of the young people we work with. Having led CMY for close to 30 years, it is always the voices of young people that inspire and motivate me to lead this wonderful organisation.

In February 2017, CMY acquired Sports Without Borders. This exciting merger was based on our mutual commitment to engaging young people and building social cohesion through sport. For more than 10 years, CMY has assisted sports clubs across Victoria to become more open and welcoming of young people from diverse backgrounds. In addition, CMY supports thousands of young people to take up sport and recreation opportunities in their local communities. CMY continues to receive strong support from both the State and Federal Government. We are delighted that with their investment CMY is able to achieve positive outcomes for young people across Victoria in the areas of education, early intervention in homelessness, support for Unaccompanied Humanitarian Minors, and protecting the rights of young people in police custody. We are also improving the capacity of others to engage young people and creating opportunities for youth leadership. Philanthropic investment has enabled CMY to continue our commitment to innovation and to addressing gaps in service delivery. With philanthropic support, CMY has been able to pilot a range of initiatives including business enterprise development, supporting transitions from education to work, providing engagement in sport to assist social cohesion, and our public speaking bureau. In addition, our partnership with the Australian Communities Foundation leverages further grants for out-of-school-hours learning support programs across Victoria. Thank you to all of our philanthropic partners.

CEO MESSAGE

Over the past 12 months CMY has been delighted to pilot a range of initiatives and approaches that address key gaps in supports available to young people. These initiatives have had many positive outcomes including: • Increased attendance and engagement in school through mentoring support • New business enterprises in Wyndham through training and support • Earlier identification and support for young people at risk of homelessness through school based youth workers • Young people gaining entry level employment, apprenticeships and traineeships through work readiness support and mentoring. 2017 saw the launch of the 'Le Mana' (Empower) Pasifika project. This project has been a journey with the Pasifika community. Twenty-five per cent of Pasifika young people do not finish secondary school. While the community makes up two per cent of the Victorian population, 14 per cent of young people in the youth justice system are Pasifika. With the support of the Office of Multicultural Affairs and Citizenship, the Office for Youth, and the Cities of Wyndham and Casey, CMY is partnering with the Pasifika community to engage young people in school and in their community. At the heart of our advocacy this year has been addressing youth crime, both the perceptions and the reality. CMY has strong links with the South Sudanese community leaders and has seen first-hand the tireless work they do on behalf of their young people. They are deeply disappointed in the constant negative portrayal of South Sudanese young people in the media, and from a few vocal and outspoken politicians.

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About Us It is impossible to separate youth offending from creating accessible employment opportunities for young people. CMY has worked cooperatively with Victoria Police, Youth Justice, other not-for-profit organisations, and the State Government to provide insights, community connections and potential solutions. Positive steps are being made and CMY is now working in Wyndham directly with young people currently in detention, to prevent re-offending. CMY continues our commitment to working with universities to ensure quality research is undertaken to better understand the needs and capacity of young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds. We are delighted to be a key partner in two Australian Research Council Linkage projects that will inform and extend our understanding. Firstly, with the University of Melbourne we are developing the first ever national data and status reporting framework on young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds. We have also partnered with Victoria University, Monash University, Swinburne University of Technology and Curtin University to look at diversity management in junior sport. Thank you to our Board, staff, volunteers, partners, and young people who make this all possible.

The Centre for Multicultural Youth is a Victorian not-for-profit organisation that supports young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds to build better lives in Australia.

Our Strategic Priorities My Community: Young people are connected, belong and contribute to their families and communities.

My Voice:

Is a recognised leader and preferred partner in working with young people and shares its knowledge for the benefit of all Australians.

Young people are understood, accurately represented and influential in Australian society. BULENT (HASS) DELLAL AO Chair

CARMEL GUERRA OAM Chief Executive Officer

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

My Journey: Young people are empowered to access opportunities and actively shape their own futures.

My CMY:

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Our Approach Young people are at the centre of what we do. What we learn from them helps us to develop stronger communities, support other service providers and lead positive change at local, state and national levels.

OUR PURPOSE WORKING WITH DECISION MAKERS Providing evidence-based advice and advocacy at local, state and national levels

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CMY works with young people and other organisations in Victoria to ensure that young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds have every opportunity to succeed in Australia.

WORKING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE Delivering direct support and leadership opportunities

OUR CHALLENGE Young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds can face significant barriers to adapting and thriving in Australia. Alongside the challenges of growing up, they are figuring out how things are done and adjusting to unfamiliar cultural, academic and social expectations. Their sense of wellbeing and belonging can be considerably diminished by factors such as racism and discrimination.

Young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds WORKING WITH RESEARCHERS

WORKING WITH SERVICES

Partnering with researchers to document young people’s issues

Forging sector and community partnerships that enhance delivery

OUR VALUES Diversity is a cornerstone of Australia’s success, respect for everyone’s human rights is essential for a fair and equal society, and everyone should be able to feel like they belong and can participate fully.

WHAT WE DO Through a combination of specialist support services, training and consultancy, knowledge sharing and advocacy, we are working to remove the barriers that young people face as they make Australia their home.

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Our People STAFF CMY walks the talk by supporting younger members of the workforce. We offer study leave and access to salary packaging for all staff on contracts of three months or longer.

We value the diversity of our employees and celebrate it at every opportunity. Their skills and varied experiences are key to our success. CMY’s family and culturally friendly work arrangements include support for women who wish to continue to breast-feed when they return to work; flexible work arrangements surrounding events of cultural or religious significance; and generous compassionate leave for staff with family commitments overseas. CMY is also one of the first not-for-profit organisations in Australia to offer Family Violence Leave as part of our Enterprise Bargaining Agreement.

Thanks to the Mary Danckert Internship – now in its fourth year, we’ve also helped give young people new skills and training that they carry with them throughout their career journey. Our Business Services traineeship is in its fourth cycle too, supporting young people to learn the ropes in an office management context. BOARD

MYAN (auspice)

Youth Advisory Group

CEO

7 Finance

Business Services

Sector & Community Partnerships

Knowledge & Advocacy

Youth Support

Payroll

Administration & IT

Education

Direct Youth Work

Research & Evaluation

Accounts

Human Resources

Employment

Regional Presence (Ballarat & Gippsland)

Policy

Communications

YRIPP

Humanitarian Support

Sector Capacity Building

Funding

Sports

Crime Prevention

Community Connections

Mentoring

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

Youth Leadership


VOLUNTEERS CMY’s reach and impact would not be nearly as widespread if not for the fabulous people who donate their time to making our programs great. Our volunteers are at the heart of what we do and we cannot thank them enough for their selfless dedication. With more than 600 volunteers engaged in a variety of programs, our volunteers have given over 18,000 hours to programs and services in 2016/17, helping more than 4,500 young people involved in those activities.

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For example, the Youth Referral and Independent Persons Program’s (see YRIPP page 24) 425 volunteers support young people at what can be their most vulnerable time. Young people who are arrested and taken into police custody must have an adult present before being questioned. When their parent, guardian or someone else close to them isn’t available, YRIPP volunteers are there to help. This year they supported 3,610 young people through this difficult time.

Fifteen volunteer mentors were successfully recruited into the Pathways to Opportunity program to provide invaluable one-on-one support to mentees with career options, job applications and to maintain employment.

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VOLUNTEERS

Local business leaders and experts (17) volunteered to mentor the participants of the Enterprising Tarneit program through the development phase of their business plans. While 45 volunteer mentors of the MY Mentoring program successfully improved the educational outcomes of young people from African and Pasifika backgrounds who were at risk of dropping out of school. All CMY programs have rigorous selection and training processes in place and child safe practices are implemented in all recruitment processes. Ongoing training is also required for many programs.

Our Ucan2 program utilises the skills of 136 volunteers to run social inclusion programs for newly-arrived young people. They host a program of information and recreation based activities that help young people learn about life in Australia. Ucan2 continue to attract a high number of young volunteers with 57% of applicants aged below 25 and only 17% aged over 36. Women made up 85% of the program’s volunteer cohort while over 30 language groups were represented.

18,000 VOLUNTEER HOURS

4,500

Many young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds volunteer with CMY across various programs such as Shout Out and Settle Smart, as well as, as sports leaders and mentors.

YOUNG PEOPLE SUPPORTED

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Volunteers and staff of CMY A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


Youth Advisory Groups (YAG) We ensure young people’s voices are heard in all of our service planning, development and delivery activities. Our Youth Advisory Groups (based in Carlton, Ballarat and Gippsland) are engaged to share their opinions and thoughts on everything we do and make certain that our work is appropriate for the young people we work with. CMY’s Board, management team and staff highly value the insights of young people and through the respective YAGs, ensure our actions are informed by the real experts in youth affairs - young people.

GIPPSLAND

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• Hosted the Minister for Youth, Jenny Mikakos during her visit to the Latrobe Valley • Contributed to a number of community consultations and conversations, including: -- The Youth Forum hosted by the Victorian Youth Affairs Council in Morwell -- Consultation on a local initiative to tackle youth employment known as the My Choices ‘Just One Thing’ strategy -- Consultation for the Gippsland Multicultural Strategic Plan hosted by the Victorian Multicultural Commission -- Conversations with the Gippsland multicultural community and Victoria Police -- Presentation to the Latrobe City Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee -- The first ever Parents Engagement Night for friends and family of the YAG • Two members successfully selected as members of the Victorian Multicultural Commission’s Regional Advisory Committee • Assisted with the planning and delivery of a number of activities and initiatives, including: -- Girl Space fortnightly activities for girls only -- MY Story Living Library Project -- AFL Auskick program -- Various school holiday programs attended by other young people.

BALLARAT • Hosted the Minister for Youth, Jenny Mikakos and Treasurer, Tim Pallas and shared experiences of regional settlement • Raised over $2,500 for the Ballarat Refugee and Asylum Seeker Support Fund by hosting a Comedy Gala event to mark Harmony Week. Held in partnership with

Balla Rat Cat Comedy, Ballarat Regional Multicultural Council and City of Ballarat, the event attracted over 120 guests and featured emerging performers and wellknown comedians • H osted a screening of the film Cast From The Storm for Refugee Week 2017 at the Museum for Australian Democracy • Participated in the AMF Community Resilience project to learn more about youth radicalisation and antisocial behaviour • Participated in and represented CMY at the following events: -- UN Youth Representative Listening Tour consultation -- Ballarat Welcome Walk Event -- Destination Ballarat Launch -- Unity Shield Soccer Tournament -- ECCV Conference -- YACVic Youth Forum -- Victorian Youth Summit -- Phoenix College Refugee Week forum

CARLTON • Ran a youth-led art show as part of National Youth Week 2017. Planned, designed and hosted the event – Journey To Self, which was attended by Miss AustraliaInternational Finalist Alice Su and over 25 young people • Presented the group’s priority issues and recommendations at the CMY Board Meeting in December 2016 and May 2017 • Represented multicultural youth at: -- Premier’s Gala Dinner as part of Cultural Diversity Week -- FUSE Multicultural Youth Summit -- Victorian Young Achievers Awards Gala • Presented at consultations by: -- The Human Rights Commission on the Framework for Protecting Australia’s Young People - Third Action Plan -- CMY program Pathways to Opportunities -- CMY survey on a draft policy paper -- Facilitated and moderated the Victorian government’s first ever Youth Summit • Attended 30-year Infrastructure Strategy forum hosted by Infrastructure Victoria.

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Some of the YAG members for 2017

Our Youth Advisory Group members represent a wide range of communities including:

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GIPPSLAND: 11 countries of origin, 10-15 languages, 7 male, 7 female South Sudan, Thailand, South Korea, Australia, Cook Island, The Philippines, China, Sudan

BALLARAT: 7 countries of origin, 10 languages, 5 male, 8 female Togo, South Sudan, Afghanistan, China, Ethiopia, Iran, Australia

CARLTON: 15 countries of origin, 19 languages, 7 male, 8 female and 1 gender non-conforming person Vietnam, Sri Lanka, India, Macedonia, Afghanistan, Iran, China, Pakistan, Ghana, Fiji

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


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CMY volunteers Fereshta and Rehila C MY.N E T. AU


Strategic Objectives In line with CMY's Strategic Plan 2013-17, CMY activities fall into one of four categories: MY Community, MY Voice, MY Journey and MY CMY (Organisational Capacity). Throughout the report, each program's strategic objectives can be identified by the markers outlined in this legend.

MY Community: Young people are connected, belong and contribute to their families and communities.

MY COMMUNITY Objectives

MY Voice:

MY Journey:

Young people are empowered to access opportunities and actively shape their own futures.

MY JOURNEY Objectives

MY VOICE Objectives

Increase the connectedness of young people to their communities.

Improve education outcomes for young people.

Increase the capacity of communities and families to deal with intergenerational conflict.

Improve employment outcomes for young people.

Improve practice and support for disengaged and disadvantaged young people. Increase community awareness of young people’s public safety issues. Engage young people in community action to tackle racism.

Young people are understood, accurately represented and influential in Australian society.

Increase young people’s access to useful connections and diverse social networks. Increase the capability of mainstream agencies and settlement services to respond to the needs of young people.

MY CMY:

is a recognised leader and preferred partner in working with young people and shares its knowledge for the benefit of all Australians.

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MY CMY Objectives

Increase the opportunities for young people to develop leadership skills and contribute to civic activities.

Enhance our governance, management and workforce capacity and improve our business services.

Increase positive media representation of young people and coverage of their issues.

Strengthen CMY’s brand.

Increase the safe engagement and contribution of young people in digital communities. Increase the prominence and awareness of the social and economic issues facing young people.

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

Strengthen CMY’s role as knowledge leader and expert in working with young people. Strengthen CMY’s financial position to ensure the best outcomes for young people.


Working with Young People: Support We undertake our support work in a number of settings including schools, sport and recreation centres, TAFEs and community hubs. We use a combination of outreach, one-to-one specialist case management and group work to support and empower young people to overcome issues, connect to community and settle well in Australia. We offer tools, networks and pathways that support them to overcome a range of barriers.

Mentoring MY MENTORING

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MY Mentoring is a pilot program designed to engage disadvantaged refugee and migrant young people particularly from the African and Pasif ika communities. Through tailored mentoring models, the program works to improve educational outcomes and aspirations for young people in a school setting. MY Mentoring also seeks to increase knowledge of best practice in developing and delivering mentoring to young people.

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

• E ngaged 124 young people in mentoring • Delivered at five schools: - Victoria University Secondary College - Copperfield College - St Albans Secondary College - Mount Alexander College - St Albans Community Centre • Screened, recruited and trained 45 mentors

• Participants across five sites reported: - increased engagement and participation - strengthened connections with peers, family and community - improved personal, social, communication and leadership skills - increased engagement with schoolwork - increased attendance at school - improvement in goal setting and planning - increased cultural connectedness

Delivered in partnership with Charis Mentoring and supported by the Victorian Government

"BEFORE THE PROGRAM I STOPPED [GOING TO SCHOOL] BECAUSE I WASN’T FEELING GOOD ABOUT MYSELF. THEN THIS PROGRAM HAPPENED AND I STARTED WORKING OUT WHAT WAS HELPING ME AND I BECAME MORE CONFIDENT … IF IT WASN’T FOR THIS PROGRAM I WOULDN’T BE WHO I AM TODAY." YOUNG PERSON (MY MENTORING) C MY.N E T. AU


Community Connections 'LE MANA' (EMPOWER) PASIFIKA PROJECT Established in early 2017, the 'Le Mana' (Empower) Pasifika Project seeks to build the capacity of communities and young people to strengthen their connections to the service system and to coordinate responses to issues facing Pasifika young people. Delivered in partnership with the Cities of Casey and Wyndham and the United Pasif ika Council of Victoria, 'Le Mana' is supported by the Victorian Government and the Office For Youth

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

• Employed three Pasif ika youth workers to deliver project activities, co-located with youth services in Casey and Wyndham • Established a map and network of various youth services and organisations currently working and servicing Pasif ika young people in the two regions • Met with youth services, schools, Victoria Police, Pasif ika community leaders, church ministers and families to discuss the issues around disengagement of young people • Planned, designed and conducted youth services forums in the West • Developed and delivered a Pasif ika Cultural Competency Training package across the youth services sector

• In-school engagement to improve educational outcomes for Pasif ika students • Linkages and support of mainstream services to improve access to youth services and programs to address identified social needs • The youth services sector has increased understanding of Pasifika cultural competency

"THE SUPPORT WE REALLY NEED TO PROVIDE IS INFORMATION AROUND THEIR CULTURE AND TOOLS FOR THESE YOUNG PEOPLE TO NAVIGATE AND NEGOTIATE THE CHALLENGES THEY FACE OUTSIDE THEIR CULTURAL IDENTITY."

TEMESE LEULIA ('LE MANA' PASIFIKA PROGRAM)

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

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Case Management RECONNECT

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

Reconnect is a specialist program that works with newly-arrived (in Australia for less than five years) refugee and migrant young people and their families, who are at risk of homelessness. The program is delivered across some of the most diverse and fastest growing areas of metropolitan Melbourne.

• Completed 154 episodes of specialist case management • Facilitated one young women’s group • Facilitated one women’s soccer program • Four schools hosted Multicultural Youth Workers

• Young people reported: -- 95% said CMY listened to them and understood their issues -- 94% said they were happy with the support they received -- 90% said they were better able to deal with the issues that they sought help with • Delivery in schools resulted in earlier identification of young women at risk of forced marriage • Increased access for girls to play sport

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

• Nine young people participated in the program • Hosted more than 20 house meetings • Referred young people to more than 15 support services • Made connections to more than 10 sport and recreation opportunities • Four young people turned 18 and exited the program

• Young people who exited the program demonstrated their capacity to live independently through: - 100% in employment - 75% in tertiary study - 50% in private rental - 50% in supported accommodation

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

• 18 young people received intensive case management, of which five were on orphan visas • 10 referrals received from external agencies

• Young people reported 80% of the prescribed goals were met in key areas of support, including: -- Access to education -- Job readiness -- Access to mental health support

Supported by the Australian Government Department of Social Services

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UNACCOMPANIED HUMANITARIAN MINORS PROGRAMME The Unaccompanied Humanitarian Minors (UHM) programme provides housing and support for unaccompanied minors who have arrived, for the most part, through Australia’s onshore refugee program and have been assessed as capable of living independently. Supported by the Australian Government Department of Immigration and Border Protection

COMPLEX CASE SUPPORT (CCS) Complex Case Support (CCS) provides intensive case management to refugees and humanitarian entrants with complex and high needs that cannot be met by other settlement services. Supported by the Australian Government Department of Social Services

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Employment ENTERPRISING TARNEIT

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

The Enterprising Tarneit pilot project was designed to create new employment opportunities in Wyndham. It assists community members to develop, plan, and implement business ideas and built small business knowledge, skills and capacity. The program also focused on providing mentors, networks and resources to help Tarneit locals turn their big ideas into small businesses. This pilot phase concluded in December 2016.

• Engaged 16 participants representing eight different cultural backgrounds (Samoa, South America, Zimbabwe, Malta, India, Russia, Vietnam, and Philippines) • 12 business plans were completed for a range of business ideas • 17 mentors and 35 business experts/speakers were successfully curated and recruited to assist participants • Hosted graduation event attended by 100 people

• 100% of the program participants reported developing business acumen and gaining clarity about their business idea • 70% of participants reported working at least 15 hours a week on their business idea and 10% reported drawing an income from their business • 90% of participants agreed on the strengthening of their professional business and peer networks as a result of being part of the program

Enterprising Tarneit is a partnership with CMY, the Scanlon Foundation and Wyndham City Council

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ENTERPRISING WYNDHAM VALE Commencing in January 2017, CMY built on the success of the Enterprising Tarneit pilot project to develop the Enterprising Wyndham Vale (EWV) Business Start-Up Intensive. As phase II of the Enterprising program, EWV is building small business knowledge in Wyndham Vale and continues to improve skills and capacity; provide mentors, networks and resources; and help locals turn their big ideas into small businesses.

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

• Held three community workshops with 78 local residents attending • 22 applications received and 17 participants selected for business start-up program • Commenced recruitment of business mentors • Delivered two community workshops on future of work and small business secrets

• Enterprising Wyndham Vale will conclude in the early part of 2017/18 financial year at which time a full evaluation will be undertaken

Enterprising Wyndham Vale is a partnership with CMY, the Scanlon Foundation and Wyndham City Council

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


Transitions to Work UCAN2

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

Ucan2 provides an integrated approach to the education and broader settlement needs of young people from refugee backgrounds with a focus on transitions to work. It facilitates social inclusion by fostering cooperation between providers of education, social support, training and employment services. Ucan2 Sport supports young people to engage with local sporting opportunities. Ucan2 is delivered in partnership with Foundation House and AMES Australia and is supported by the Australian Government Department of Social Services as part of its national Youth Transitions Support Pilot Program

• 300 young people participated • Delivered Ucan2 at 27 sites, in education settings and at Job Active sites across metropolitan Melbourne • Screened, recruited, trained, inducted, managed and supported 136 volunteers • Ucan2 Sport: - 396 young people engaged in sports ‘taster’ sessions, local competitions and events - 68 young people engaged in a formal sports club or association - 9 young people linked to a potential employment outcome in sports - 29 young people engaged in leadership programs

• 93% participants reported feeling more confident about getting a job • 94% participants reported better understanding of things to do to get a job • 87% participants reported better understanding about what they should expect from an employer • 66% participants reported better understanding about where they can get support to participate in education • 75% participants reported feeling more confident to undertake vocational training • 93% participants reported positive relationships with new people they just met • 92% participants felt more positive about the future • 92% participants felt more welcome in the community

YOUTH TRANSITIONS

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

Youth Transitions is a pilot program delivered in partnership with local services in Hume. The program addresses barriers to participation in education, training and employment that are specific to newlyarrived young migrants and refugees under 25.

• Engaged 131 young people through group programs – 73% arrived in Australia in the past two years • Delivered 56 sports sessions including swimming, basketball, football, badminton, volleyball • Provided one-on-one support in employment, education or training readiness assessment and preparation to 46 participants • 19 referrals made to partner organisations • Delivered leadership and project management training to 10 young people through partner schools and educational institutions • Delivered a training workshop to 60 Year Nine students at Lalor North Secondary College • Eight participants referred to local sports clubs

• 100% of participants surveyed reported that, through the sports programs, they have built positive social connections, confidence and/or new skills • 100% of participants surveyed reported that, through the readiness support, they feel better prepared and equipped to pursue their goals in employment, education and training • 100% of participants reported greater awareness of opportunities and support networks

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Supported by the Australian Government Department of Social Services as part of Youth Transitions Support Pilot Program, led by the Brotherhood of St Laurence

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


" I LIKE HOW WE MAKE NEW FRIENDS AND LEARN NEW THINGS, WORK ON OUR RESUMES, LOOK FOR JOBS AND MOST OF ALL HAVE FUN. IN A WAY I LIKED EVERYTHING ABOUT UCAN2 ." UCAN2 PARTICIPANT 2017

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

• 57 young people engaged in the program • 5 job readiness sessions delivered • Screened, trained and recruited 15 mentors into the program • Successfully matched 30 young people with an employment mentor • 18 young people secured paid work • 16 young people engaged in further study and work experience

• 31% placed in paid employment • 28% engaged in further study and work experience • 83% participants reported increased motivation to get a job • 92% participants reported feeling like they are more likely to get a job • 83% participants reported greater confidence to get a job

PATHWAYS TO WORK

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

Launched in late 2016, Pathways to Work supports culturally and linguistically diverse young people in the south east of Melbourne into traineeships or direct employment.

• 32 young people engaged in the program • 16 young people assessed as job ready and referred to AFL SportsReady for employment case management • Six young people placed in employment opportunities

• 37% placed in employment • 100% of the employers surveyed reported feeling confident about their decision to employ young people from CALD backgrounds • 35% of young people engaged went on to enrol in further education pathways to achieve future employment goals • Feedback from post-workshop surveys indicates a very high level of learning of job-readiness concepts for young people.

PATHWAYS TO OPPORTUNITY Pathways to Opportunity supports young people from African and Pasif ika backgrounds in the northern and western suburbs of Melbourne into meaningful employment and education pathways.

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Delivered in partnership with AFL SportsReady and supported by the Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation, William Buckland Foundation and The RE Ross Trust

Delivered in partnership with AFL SportsReady and supported by the Victorian Government and the Jobs Victoria Employment Network

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Mayela and Meryema from the Pathways to Opportunity program C MY.N E T. AU


CASE STUDY: The Pathways Programs “I struggled to find suitable opportunities. It was also hard to balance looking for a job, studying and trying to meet new people and make friends,” says 21-year-old Meryema, about her first few years in Australia. She came to Australia in 2015 and has a background in health services assistance. “Mayela helped me with writing my cover letter and resume, applying for a job and interviewing. I’ve picked up a lot of skills along the way. Now, I’m working as an Office Admin and I enjoy it,” she says. Mayela is Meryema’s mentor through the Pathways to Opportunity program. Mayela grew up in Mexico and came to Australia as a student to pursue a Master’s degree. She went on to work in student mobility at university.

Fifteen mentors have been successfully recruited into the program having completed required training and screening. Over the last year, participating young people attended a series of work readiness workshops covering: career aspirations, job search skills, applying for a job – resume writing, job ad analysis, cover letter writing, interview skills and work rights. The young people reported improved skills and more confidence as a result of attending the workshops. Following the workshop series, these young people were matched with volunteer mentors.

“Mentoring was an attractive volunteering opportunity for me as I have a background in working with students,” she says.

Of the 50 clients of the Pathways program, the majority are from African or Pasifika backgrounds, and live in the Northern suburbs. This number includes 20 young women and 30 young men.

Mayela and Meryema’s successful mentor-mentee relationship is one of the many success stories that the Pathways program has seen in its pilot year.

CMY continues to work with existing and new employer networks to source direct employment opportunities for the young people we work with.

In 2014, CMY and the Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation produced a report titled Facilitating the Transition to Employment for Refugee Young People which identified the key elements for service delivery to assist young people into employment. These included: individualised support; support in the workplace; work experience or placements; mentoring; and cultural awareness training to service providers.

“I would recommend the program to other young people,” says Meryema.

The Pathways program draws on these findings, and learned from approaches that have proven to work with a different cohort experiencing employment vulnerabilities – Indigenous young people. CMY partnered with AFL Sportsready (AFLSR) to seek partnerships with employers. The project has had 57 clients so far – referred largely by schools and community representatives. During the August-November 2016 period, most referrals came through schools, largely Year 12 school leavers. In 2017, more referrals came through community connections.

“It helped me a lot and I’m sure it will help other young people who’ve newly arrived from their home countries.”

“WHEN YOU ARE NEW HERE, YOU DON’T KNOW HOW TO COMMUNICATE WITH PEOPLE, GET WORK OR GO TO SCHOOL. WITH PATHWAYS, YOU GET THE CHANCE TO MAKE FRIENDS AND MEET OTHERS LIKE YOU.” MERYEMA

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

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Inclusive Sports

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SPORTS CONNECTS

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

Sports Connects works to improve the social connections of multicultural communities in Brimbank through sports. It provides vulnerable communities with links to more established local communities, sport clubs and activities. Sports Connects is supported by the Australian Government Department of Social Services

• Engaged 2730 young people in Brimbank, linking them with a range of sports • Partnered with six sports, including tennis, soccer, volleyball, rugby, netball and basketball • Delivered one youth leadership program in partnership with Melbourne City Football Club and Brimbank Community Soccer Hub • Developed one women’s soccer initiative

• Created flexible and affordable opportunities for social sport participation • Linked newly arrived young people in Brimbank with sports they were interested in • Increased the capacity of sports clubs in Brimbank to engage with multicultural communities • Young people demonstrated greater leadership skills

GAME PLAN

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

CMY has over 10 years of expertise working with the sports sector to increase its capability to engage young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds. This program uses CMY’s Game Plan resources to work with state sporting organisations, sports clubs and other sport or recreation organisations to increase levels of engagement with young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds.

• Worked with six state sporting associations: Table Tennis Victoria, Badminton Victoria, Lawn Bowls Victoria, Touch Football Victoria, Ultimate Frisbee Victoria, Gymnastics Victoria to develop and implement strategies • Provided advice or training on how to increase diversity to eight organisations: Helping Hoops, Tennis Victoria, Golf Victoria, AFL Victoria, Hockey Victoria, Basketball Victoria, Parks Victoria, Life Saving Victoria • Worked with clusters of organisations and sports clubs in the Cities of Greater Dandenong and Casey and in northern Melbourne in the Cities of Darebin and Whittlesea, across a diverse range of sports

CMY’s sport capacity building work is supported by the Victorian Government, Sport and Recreation Victoria

Sports clubs reported: - increased participation from CALD young people across a range of activities - increased understanding and confidence in engaging with young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds and their families

SPORTS WITHOUT BORDERS • In February 2017, CMY and Sports Without Borders made the decision to merge. CMY and Sports Without Borders share a belief that sport can be an effective approach to building a sense of belonging and strengthening social cohesion. CMY and Sports Without Borders share a number of key philanthropic and government investors and we look forward to announcing joint initiatives in the future.

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23 NATIONAL SPORTS FORUM In October 2016, CMY and six other leading sports and social justice organisations presented the first national Diversity & Inclusion in Sport Forum, tackling inclusion and equity challenges common in Australian sports. Forum topics included cultural diversity, gender equity, homophobia in sport, disability and inclusion of LGBTIQ participants, plus many more. With over 150 attendees the forum was well received and by popular demand is to be run again in the 2017/18 financial year. The Sports Connects team at CMY A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


Youth Referral and Independent Person Program (YRIPP) The Youth Referral and Independent Person Program (YRIPP) delivers a high quality system of adult volunteers or ‘Independent Persons’ who attend police interviews with young people in police custody when a parent or guardian is not available. YRIPP also seeks to divert young people from future offending through early intervention at the point of police contact. YRIPP is operational in 159 police stations state-wide. YRIPP is delivered in partnership with YACVic, Community Legal Centres and Victoria Police, and supported by the Victorian Government.

9K+

OUTPUTS

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• 3,610 young people (aged 10-18 years) supported at 159 police stations throughout Victoria • In 89% of cases, a volunteer attended the police station within 60 minutes of receiving a call from the call centre (24/7) • 135 young people provided with legal advice at the police station • 968 young people (27% of all young people supported) were referred to support services or provided with information for self-referral • 425 volunteers involved in the program • 79 new volunteers completed training and became active • 100% volunteers received 20+ hours of training before becoming active on the roster • 39 existing volunteers (longer than six months in role) attended booster training • 9,025 hours of volunteer time (average of 2.5 hours per call) was utilised

OUTCOMES

HOURS OF VOLUNTEER TIME

3,600+ YOUNG PEOPLE SUPPORTED

• 100% of volunteers reported being satisfied with the YRIPP training • 100% of volunteer rated the training as very supportive to their role NOTE – THE NATURE OF THE YRIPP PROGRAM DOES NOT CAPTURE FEEDBACK FROM THE YOUNG PEOPLE

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"IF IT HELPS THE YOUNG PEOPLE, THEN I'M ALL FOR IT. IT'S SO REWARDING WHEN THEY THANK YOU SINCERELY & SHAKE YOUR HAND."

YRIPP VOLUNTEER 25

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


Working with Young People: Leadership & Development We are committed to ensuring young people have every opportunity to have their voices heard, build their skills and create positive change in the community around them. We believe anyone can be a leader if supported and given the opportunity, and that there are many different ways of leading. Our programs use a variety of techniques and approaches to engage and support young people in their leadership aspirations, whether they be formal, informal, collective or individual.

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SHOUT OUT

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

The Shout Out public speakers agency was developed to alleviate the marginalisation of migrant and refugee young people by giving them a voice in the community. Young people are trained and supported to share their experiences and views with a wide audience.

• 97 presentations made to over 8,000 people • 30% increase in number of presentations (from 2015/16) • Places of presentation included: - secondary schools - local government agencies - youth services - primary schools - migrant and refugee services - not-for-profits - sporting organisations • Hosted a showcase event attended by 51 guests representing 42 organisations

• 88% of organisations agreed or strongly agreed that the Shout Out speaker added value to their event • 77% of organisations agreed or strongly agreed that the speaker’s presentation was of a high standard • 85% of organisations agreed or strongly agreed that it was easy to make a request and communication was timely from CMY staff • 82% of organisations agreed or strongly agreed to recommend Shout Out to others

Shout Out is supported by Gandel Philanthropy

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Amplifying young people's voices CMY works to increase the accurate and positive portrayal of young people in the public sphere and increase the prominence and awareness of issues facing young people as well as their aspirations. We do this through a combination of strategic communication channels including social media, electronic direct marketing materials and traditional media liaison.

Channel implemented

INSTAGRAM

June 2016 NEW

MEDIA

TWITTER

55

1K+

FACEBOOK

1.5K

Media hits

Tweets 2016-17

Posts

5M+

1.8K

823

Reach overall *

Total followers

Post reach - 94% increase

3,045

22%

3K

eNews subscribers 16% increase

increase in followers

* Based on circulation data for print & radio outlets 2016 A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

Page likes - 28% increase

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SETTLE SMART

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

Settle Smart gives newly-arrived migrant and refugee young people the necessary knowledge to increase their understanding of various aspects of life in Australia. CMY runs sessions on topics young people have identified as important to them. Young people are trained and supported as peer educators to deliver these sessions.

• 4 43 young people engaged through purpose designed information sessions • Delivered 30 information sessions • Screened, trained and recruited nine new Peer Educators, bringing the total up to 14 • Developed two new information sessions on Cyber Safety and Employment Skills

• 83% of participants reported greater confidence to volunteer after the Volunteering information session • 82% of participants reported feeling more confident to report racist and discriminatory behaviour after the Racism and Discrimination session • 97% of participants felt more confident about education pathways in Victoria after the Education Pathways session

SHORT BURST TRAINING

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

Short Burst workshops aim to provide young people with an introductory knowledge of leadership, and to support them at different stages of developing their own initiatives.

• 1 6 training workshops delivered across metropolitan Melbourne • 101 young people engaged • Topics covered included Team Building and Leadership, Project Management, Advocacy and Introduction to Media

• 100% of participants reported satisfaction with the training • 70% of participants who took the Project Management module reported feeling more confident to practice project management after the session • 83% of participants who took the Team Building module felt more confident to practice team building after the session • 100% of participants who took the Leadership module felt more confident to practice leadership after the session

Supported by the Australian Government Department of Social Services

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Supported by the Victorian Government Office for Youth and the Australian Government Department of Social Services

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I SPEAK FOOTBALL

OUTPUTS

OUTCOMES

I Speak Football is a youth-led project that uses football to tackle social inclusion issues by creating a shared sense of unity and community amongst young people from different cultural backgrounds. CMY’s involvement in the program concluded at the end of 2016.

• 13 weekly football sessions delivered to 233 students in secondary schools across Hume, Moreland, Darebin and Banyule • 18 Young Leaders completed leadership training, coaching and/or refereeing accreditation • Planned and delivered weekly school sessions • Young Leaders planned and delivered ‘I Speak Football Cup’ with 15 teams and 120 players aged 14-25 years

• 80% of students and Young Leaders reported increased understanding of other cultures • 96% of students and Young Leaders reported increased interaction with diverse cultural communities • 100% of students reported seeing refugee and migrant background young people in leadership roles • 61% of Young Leaders reported that they gained qualifications that will help them find work in the future • 100% Young Leaders surveyed reported increased skills and confidence

Delivered in partnership with Melbourne City Football Club and supported by the City Football Foundation

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" I SPEAK FOOTBALL CONNECTS YOUNG PEOPLE IRRESPECTIVE OF THEIR CULTURAL BACKGROUND AND GIVES THEM A SENSE OF BELONGING IN THE COMMUNITY " JAMES (I SPEAK FOOTBALL COACH)

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


Regional Presence For over five years, CMY has built its presence in Gippsland and Ballarat to better support the multicultural young people of regional Victoria. Supported by the Victorian government, CMY plays a crucial role in representing and advocating for the interests and needs of multicultural young people, as well as providing in-school support and secondary consultations. The Regional Presence Project is supported by the Victorian Government

GIPPSLAND

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EDUCATION

ENGAGEMENT

SPORT AND RECREATION

CMY Gippsland delivered the in-school MY Life program to two schools and developed, facilitated and delivered the MY Story Living Library Project, in partnership with the United Muslim Sisters of Latrobe Valley, to four schools.

Twenty parents engaged with CMY events throughout the year. Ten young women were engaged through the Girls' Space program. Participants reported considerable learnings and enjoyment of the program. CMY continues to support the Gippsland Youth Advisory Group and developed a book of their achievements highlighting the importance of the YAG in Regional Presence Project and the region.

Continued to provide sport and recreation opportunities for multicultural young people in the region including development and delivery of four school holiday recreation programs. Activities included a day trip to Melbourne and meet up with young people from Ballarat, a day trip to Walhalla, a day of creative workshops and a multicultural Auskick program in partnership with AFL Gippsland. All activities were sibling and family inclusive.

CAPACITY BUILDING

EMPLOYMENT

Fifty participants undertook cultural competency training. Feedback from participants indicated an increase in knowledge and skills.

Continued to provide information on employment and employment pathways for multicultural young people including support of two school-based work placement programs and development and distribution of Info Packs for employers. Packs provide employers with a cultural self-audit tool, information about CMY services and a guide to working with young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds. CMY also attended the Latrobe Valley Newly Arrived Employment, Education and Training network to advocate for the needs of multicultural young people.

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BALLARAT EDUCATION

ENGAGEMENT

SPORTS & RECREATION

MY Life content was adapted and delivered to 76 young people in 43 in-school support sessions. Feedback from students and staff was positive indicating strong support to continue the sessions in 2017-18.

CMY was invited to present on diversity and multiculturalism to a group of 48 students in Year 5/6 at the Little Bendigo Primary School. CMY partnered with BallaratCat Comedy, BRMC and City of Ballarat, to host a successful comedy gala night that attracted over 120 guests. CMY also partnered with Ballarat Regional Multicultural Council to host the Welcome Film Festival for Refugee Week, which was attended by over 80 people.

CMY engaged 30 young women in a new GirlSpace program featuring regular fortnightly activities and events such as self defence sessions, yoga and other health and wellbeing being activities. Sixty-six young people participated in school holiday events and camp. CMY collaborated with the Western Bulldogs, Victorian Aboriginal Community Service League and Victoria Police to host three social football events that bought young people from newly arrived and Koori backgrounds together.

CAPACITY BUILDING

EMPLOYMENT

CMY convened the Youth Action Network on behalf of the Ballarat Regional Settlement and Advocacy Committee to provide a platform for local services to collaborate and address issues impacting newly arrived young people. Five meetings were held with a total of 42 participants attending.

Supported 14 young people with employment and study advice including, job applications, TAFE and university enrolments and scholarships. Support was also provided to a young person to access a full fee waiver scholarship at Federation University to study a Bachelor of Engineering. Ten young people successfully completed work experience placements at Sovereign Hill.

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

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CASE STUDY: The 'Le Mana' (Empower) Pasifika Project Nearly one in four Pasifika young people attending secondary school will not go on to complete their schooling. The Pasifika community makes up 2% of the total population of Victoria but 14% of the population in juvenile detention, cementing this as a section of the community in need of focus, support and care.

CMY CEO Carmel Guerra advocated on behalf of the community to Ministers and the Office for Youth to create support for appropriate services for this group of young people. Research into existing services and support has provided new insights into the gaps in knowledge and cultural understanding on the part of the service providers.

CMY’s new (established in January 2017) 'Le Mana' (Empower) Pasifika Project is focused on engaging ‘at risk’ Pasifika young people and their families across Melbourne. The project provides cultural intelligence to youth service providers and concentrates on improving outcomes in education and employment, as well as, developing training pathways for services dealing with youth offending.

“When you say Pasifika, you are talking about eight or nine different Maori and Pacific Island community groups such as Tonga, Samoa, Fiji, Maori, Niue, Cook Islands, Tuvalu, Tahiti and Kiribati,” said Temese. “There are 17 different Pasifika nations in total within the Polynesian triangle alone excluding Micronesia and Melanesia, and that number could be as high as 37-40 in the south Pacific.”

‘Mana’ means power, authority, status, position, or leadership. Le Mana means to empower – Pasifika communities and young people.

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“There are shared cultural values, practices, protocols and nuances across the Pasifika community but there are also distinct differences. This makes for a complex issue when considering individual identity across the collective Pasifika group and is why we are here to help guide organisations working with Pasifika young people.”

Temese Leilua, 'Le Mana' Pasifika Project Coordinator says 'Le Mana' is about "engagement and creating strong supports around young people so that they can engage and not deviate from their path to independence and wellbeing.”

“We provide the cultural support and aids to help give service providers an understanding of what steps to take to engage these young people.”

Through out 2017, CMY's project workers have established a strong presence within the sector and will work towards improving the relationship between agencies and Pasifika young people. They will also look to bridge the divide between government agencies and the Pasifika community.

The foundational work done to get Le Mana up and running has also created essential data in an area that does not historically have a large amount of credible research.

“The bi-cultural project staff play a supporting role in student and family engagement across various community settings,” said Temese.

The next year will bring an exciting implementation phase for the program. where learnings can be further investigated and acted upon.

Temese is joined on the project by two CMY youth workers who partner with schools in engaging Pasifika students. They provide advice to teachers and wellbeing staff, work with parents to create appropriate support at home, and encourage alternate outlets for young people’s energies, such as cultural performing arts groups. Together, these support structures ensure Pasifika young people are engaged, given a voice in their own futures and decision making, and empowered to succeed.

‘MANA’ MEANS POWER, AUTHORITY, STATUS, POSITION, OR LEADERSHIP. LE MANA MEANS TO EMPOWER THE PASIFIKA COMMUNITIES AND THE YOUNG PEOPLE. C MY.N E T. AU


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The 'Le Mana' (Empower) Pasifika Project Team (L-R): Paora Te Paki, Teme Leuilia and Sefita

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


Equipping Services Building capacity of youth and settlement TRAINING AND WORKSHOPS

STATEWIDE FORUMS:

CMY’s capacity building activities include consultations on policy and/or program design, delivery of cultural competency training, and convening statewide forums and networks on practice issues.

CMY runs up to two statewide forums each year to continue to share its knowledge with the sector and other stakeholders

Supported by Department of Social Services and Department of Health and Human Services

OUTPUTS

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• 27 training sessions delivered consisting of three modules: -- Culturally competent youth work (half day) -- Youth migration pathways (half day) -- The National Youth Settlement Framework

OUTCOMES • • • • •

348 staff trained 100% of participants satisfied or very satisfied with training delivered 37.5% participants reported being ‘not confident’ pre-training 10.85% of participants reported being ‘very confident’ pre-training 62.9% reported being ‘very confident’ post training

LISTEN UP FORUM ON MENTAL HEALTH OUTPUT • Hosted in partnership with the Victorian Transcultural Mental Health Unit at St Vincent’s Hospital. 78 participants from the mental health and youth sectors were exposed to a range of programs that used sports, art and music to engage with CALD young people and the impact these programs have on young people’s mental health

FORUM OUTCOME • 93% of participants felt it was relevant to them • 95% of participants agreed the event met their expectations

FORUM ON THE NATIONAL YOUTH SETTLEMENT FRAMEWORK OUTPUT

VICTORIAN SETTLEMENT YOUTH NETWORK

• 42 participants listened to young people’s stories of how the framework domains and indicators link directly to the lives of young people. Discussions linked the framework to practice issues for services

Convened three Victorian statewide network meetings with participation from representatives in the settlement and youth sectors.

FORUM OUTCOME • 96% of participants agreed the forum met their expectations • 89% of participants agreed the forum was relevant or very relevant to their work

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Building capacity of schools and learning support programs MY Education provides resources and support crucial to the success of primary and secondary students’ learning. MY Education is supported by the Victorian Government, Department of Education and Training

REFUGEE EDUCATION SUPPORT PROGRAM (RESP)

LEARNING BEYOND THE BELL

RESP works with place-based clusters of schools to provide holistic and targeted support. The program builds connections between student achievement and wellbeing, while strengthening engagement between family, school and community. In 2016-17 the cluster locations were Shepparton, Whittlesea, Tarneit, Wyndham and Casey.

Learning Beyond the Bell supports over 300 organisations delivering out-ofschool-hours learning support programs (OSHLSP) across Victoria. Out-of-school-hours learning support programs are run by schools and community organisations across Victoria. More than 850 volunteers act as tutors supporting more than 6,170 young people across Victoria.

RESP is a partnership with Foundation House and the Department of Education and Training, delivered in collaboration with Catholic Education Commission of Victoria and the Association of Independent Schools Victoria

OUTPUTS

OUTPUTS • 12 professional development workshops attended by school staff • Provided intensive support to 35 schools • Established new cluster with schools in Shepparton

OUTCOMES • • •

Students reported increased confidence to ask for help in class, increasing language skills and social skills Schools reported improved capacity to plan and respond to the needs of students of refugee background Families reported being more engaged in students’ learning and more able to connect with the school community

Formal evaluations to measure these outcomes are conducted every two years with the cycle of reporting due next financial year.

• • • • • • •

Trained 853 tutors, coordinators and school staff Developed and delivered new training modules on ‘Recruitment and Retention of Volunteers’, ‘Engaging Families in your OSHLSP’, ‘Evaluating your OSHLSP’ and ‘Creating a Safe and Supportive OSHLSP’ Reviewed and redeveloped existing tutor training modules to align with Victorian Child Safety Standards Provided advice to over 141 organisations Provided intensive support to 20 community organisations, and 15 schools Supported the establishment of six new learning support programs in growth corridors and rural Victoria Annual MY Education Awards held

OUTCOMES • Feedback from training: -- 98% of coordinators reported feeling well-supported with quality, targeted professional development and networking opportunities -- 100% of coordinators stated confidence in role had increased as a result of training

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

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CASE STUDY: Equipping schools to support vulnerable young people Since 2009, CMY has been funded to provide Reconnect – a homelessness prevention and reforming program – across a range of Victorian metropolitan and rural areas. Early last year, CMY developed avenues to be more proactive, focus on early intervention and build better relationships with schools. By placing a Multicultural Youth Worker in a school environment, CMY provided secondary consultations and referrals to appropriate services within or outside of CMY. After discussions with partner schools across the south east and north west suburbs of Melbourne, it was agreed that basing Multicultural Youth Workers (MYW) in schools would lead to:

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• improved identification of young people in need of support/case management • early assessment • early intervention and targeted responses • improved outcomes for the young people and their families • better capacity within schools and across the service system • increased understanding of the support service network • the establishment of sustainable referral pathways By employing the principles of a ‘collective impact’ framework (collaborationforimpact.com/collective-impact/) and using existing resources and partnerships, CMY supported the development of a cluster model. This model furthered our reach without CMY having to place Multicultural Youth Workers in all schools.

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The cluster approach improved collaboration across schools and settlement and mainstream services, providing opportunities for ongoing capacity building and sector development. Some of the other positive outcomes of this model have been: • • • • • •

Streamlined referrals Improved service responsiveness Fiscal and service efficiencies in service delivery responses Improved identification of eligibility for service referral Improved referral pathways Helped maintain family relationships through intensive case management and support • Helped keep young people in education Building on these positive outcomes, CMY and the Reconnect team have big plans for the future. We hope to expand to other schools while building on the work we continue to do at Hallam Secondary College, Gleneagles Secondary College, Western English Language schools and Mount Alexander College. As communities of newly arrived people continue to move to other areas of local government, CMY is working to move with them. The Reconnect team is also looking to develop more group work programs and provide schools with training around complex issues such as forced marriage.


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Reconnect Schools Support Officer Girma Seid

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


Working With Decision Makers Our work with young people and the services that support them gives us insights into current and emerging issues. We use our unique position to bridge the gap between young people, their communities and decision-makers in government and non-government arenas.

POLICY PAPERS DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP & YOUNG PEOPLE FROM REFUGEE AND MIGRANT BACKGROUNDS Looks at how young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds use digital technologies to participate both formally and informally as active citizens. This paper reveals that young Victorians from refugee and migrant backgrounds are using digital technologies to help shape the communities they are connected to – from the local to the global. Findings suggest that the digital divide (or gap in access to digital technologies) has shrunk for young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds in recent years as technologies have become more widely available and cheaper. Young people’s online engagement has grown with increased access, as have their technical skills and the areas of life in which they now use technology. Much of this growth, however, has been self-directed, with gaps in formal education and parental digital knowledge identified as key areas for intervention.

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FORGING FUTURES: HOW YOUNG PEOPLE SETTLING IN VICTORIA ARE FARING Explores the experiences of young people settling in Victoria. Findings suggest that overall young people are settling well – they feel like they are contributing to society and can achieve the goals they have for the future, they are also confident to manage acculturation, are engaged in education, self-report that they are healthy and feel confident to navigate services and supports. However, barriers to full participation persist. During the first five years, manifest challenges such as a lack of financial resources, poor English language skills and limited cultural capital, hamper settlement. Over time, as young people become more established, more intangible – and intractable – factors such as intergenerational conflict, racism and discrimination and limited social and cultural capital within their networks, are identified as negatively impacting on successful settlement for young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds in Victoria.

CMY SUBMITTED WRITTEN RESPONSES TO THE FOLLOWING INQUIRIES AND CONSULTATIONS: State Government: •

Standing Committee on Legal and Social Issues Inquiry into Youth Justice Centres in Victoria, March 2017

Federal Government: •

Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights Inquiry into Freedom of Speech, December 2016

Joint Standing Committee on Migration Inquiry into Migrant Settlement Outcomes, January 2017

Select Committee on Strengthening Multiculturalism, May 2017

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Working With Researchers Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage projects CMY were involved in this financial year:

PARTICIPATION VERSUS PERFORMANCE: MANAGING DIVERSITY IN JUNIOR SPORT There is a tension between encouraging diversity and the pursuit of excellence in sport. This project investigates how junior sports clubs and their participants manage this tension and its impact on diversity in terms of culture, gender and, in particular, (dis)ability. Diversity management in junior sport affects how young people understand and react to diversity throughout their lives. Now in its final year, a report will be drafted and findings shared with the sector. Research findings will increase policy makers’ and practitioners’ knowledge and capacity to develop inclusive environments that welcome people of all backgrounds and abilities. Partners: Victoria University (Lead), Swinburne University of Technology, Monash University, and Curtin University. The industry partners are the AFL, VicHealth and CMY.

THE STATUS OF CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE YOUNG PEOPLE Young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds represent 25% of all Australians aged 12-24 years, however, there is little systematic data on how they are faring. This three-year ARC fund Linkage Project aims to critically define the status of young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds, develop the first national status reporting framework that will generate new social, economic and cultural indicators, and build a first-ever online knowledge hub to store and curate data on this cohort of young people. Partners: The University of Melbourne, CMY, Access Community Services Ltd, Multicultural Youth Affairs Network of NSW, Department of Education and Training, Migrant Resource Centre (Southern Tasmania Inc), Youth Coalition of the ACT, Multicultural Youth South Australia Inc, Youth Affairs

ACTION RESEARCH •

Participated in research into forced marriage by Helena Zeweri, facilitated by Monash University and the Gender, Leadership and Social Sustainability Institute

Assisted International Social Service to conduct research into particular needs of client group arriving on 117 visas

Member of the Victorian Forced Marriage Executive and Network

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

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Multicultural Youth Advocacy Network (Australia) CMY has nurtured the development of Multicultural Youth Advocacy Network (MYAN Australia) since its establishment in 2007. Ten years on, the MYAN is now a vibrant national body, with MYAN-affiliated networks or organisations existing in every state and territory. MYAN facilitates national connections between young people, academics, policy makers and practitioners, providing an important policy perspective, capacity building tools and resources and youth leadership opportunities. After the launch of the National Youth Settlement Framework in May 2016, MYAN has supported the application of the Framework in practice through national training and a webinar hosted by the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) CFCA. The Framework is the first of its kind in Australia and internationally, supporting and measuring good practice in settlement for young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds.

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This year, our policy work has focussed on engaging with a number of government inquiries, seeing these as important opportunities to highlight the issues facing young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds. MYAN, including YAN representatives, provided evidence at a number of federal government inquiries, including the Inquiry into Migrant Settlement Outcomes and the Inquiry into Strengthening Multiculturalism. Along with its state and territory partners, MYAN is also excited to be part of the ARC Linkage Project ‘Defining the Status of CALD Young People’. This project aims to critically define the status of CALD youth; develop the first national status-reporting framework for this group that will generate new social, economic and cultural indicators; and build a knowledge hub to store and curate CALD youth data. MYAN continued supporting the Special Interest Group (SIG) in partnership with the Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) and Macquarie University. The SIG is a national network for supporting better education outcomes for asylum-seeking students and those from refugee backgrounds across Australia. MYAN has continued its national support role with the Youth Transitions Support Pilot (YTS). Funded through DSS Settlement Services, the YTS supports young humanitarian entrants and vulnerable migrants under 25 years to participate in education, training and employment pathways and social and recreational activities – supporting a range of transitions in the settlement journey. MYAN

oversees the independent evaluation of the pilot and facilitates a national Community of Practice with providers. This forum has a focus on sharing and capturing good practice. The year 2016-2017 has also seen MYAN continue to share good practice in youth settlement in the international arena. MYAN participated in the Annual Tripartite Consultations on Resettlement (ATCR) Working Group on Resettlement in Auckland, New Zealand – sharing the National Youth Settlement Framework as an evidence-based tool for measuring good practice in youth settlement with those in government, UNHCR and NGOs. MYAN also supported the participation of young people in the Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network (APRRN) consultations in Bangkok in September 2016 (in partnership with RCOA) and in the UNHCR NGO Consultations in Geneva in June. MYAN led the work on youth advocacy for the Australian delegation at the Geneva meetings and Apajok Biar (Youth Ambassador, NSW) was selected to present at a session on the Global Refugee Youth Consultations. MYAN will work with those in Australia and globally to support the inclusion of youth rights and needs in the Global Compacts, particularly the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework. Our work on the Global Refugee Youth Consultations (GRYC) continued, with the launch of the Australian report 'Speaking Out', at the UNHCR NGO Consultations in Canberra in November and presentation at the GRYC Follow-Up session at the UNHCR NGO Consultations in Geneva in June. We are planning the development of training modules on youth leadership and advocacy and youth participation in 2016-2017 to support the implementation of 'Speaking Out' recommendations. Our work with young people included our bi-annual national multicultural youth event – FUSE 2016. Building on the success of FUSE 2014, FUSE 2016 brought together more than 45 young people from across Australia to develop leadership and advocacy skills, engage with MPs and other decision-makers, and share experiences with peers. A new round of Youth Ambassador’s were appointed in June and will play an important role in the MYAN National Conference in November 2017.

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“MYAN AUSTRALIA PROVIDES A CRITICAL CONNECTION POINT FOR MYAN WA TO A STRONG NATIONAL ADVOCACY PLATFORM FOR MULTICULTURAL YOUTH ISSUES, AND HELPS CONNECT SERVICES IN WA TO OTHER GREAT WORK HAPPENING ACROSS THE COUNTRY.” ROSS WORTHAM, CEO YOUTH AFFAIRS COUNCIL WA, MYAN WA (AUSPICE)

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Photo courtesy of MYAN NSW A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


Governance Report CENTRE FOR MULTICULTURAL YOUTH ABN: 82 127 444 713

ETHICAL STANDARDS AND CODE OF CONDUCT

CMY is incorporated under Commonwealth Company Law. It is a public company limited by guarantee with a Constitution setting out legal requirements and the rules under which it must be governed. CMY is also a Tax Concession Charity (TCC) or Public Benevolent Institution (PBI) endorsed as a Deductible Gift Recipient (DGR) under the Income Tax Assessment Act. CMY’s accounts are audited externally each year and a copy of the audited accounts is provided to stakeholders within an Annual Report.

COMPLAINTS HANDLING CMY’s Prevention and Settlement of Grievances Policy outlines the steps towards internal grievance resolution and provides the process for external resolution of grievances should it be required. Clients receive CMY’s Client Services Charter which clearly outlines what they can expect from CMY staff and how to share feedback and complaints..

CMY currently manages a budget of $8.68m from diverse funding sources, including federal, state and local government and philanthropic foundations. With a team of over 100 staff and 600+ volunteers, we deliver programs across metropolitan Melbourne and Victoria through our offices in Ballarat, Carlton, Dandenong, Gippsland, Hoppers Crossing, Shepparton, Sunshine and Narre Warren.

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Board members, senior executives and staff are expected to comply with relevant laws and the codes of conduct of relevant professional bodies. All staff are made aware of the YACVIC Code of Conduct, as well as the CMY Child Safety Code of Conduct, agreed to by staff as part of a strategic coordination group working project. These codes guide CMY’s approach to dealing with colleagues, clients and other stakeholders.

CMY’s Board consists of five directors who are responsible for setting the strategic direction of CMY, reviewing the organisation’s strategic process and performance, appointing an auditor, monitoring the organisation’s financial position, monitoring its framework for managing risks, appointing the CEO and ensuring compliance with all relevant State and Commonwealth laws. A mix of board members and senior staff are also members of finance, human resources and communications sub-committees. These committees report to the board on a regular basis. The board has formally delegated responsibility for day-to-day operations to the Chief Executive Officer and executive management team.

RISK MANAGEMENT CMY’s attitude to risk is guided by robust and consistently applied risk criteria, which are reviewed alongside an organisational risk register at least annually. CMY’s risk register is sub-divided into the following sections: people, property and systems, finance, legal, information and partnerships, and knowledge and partnerships. All major programs and projects are subject to a risk assessment based on the approach advocated in AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009.

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INDEPENDENT ADVICE CMY receives pro bono legal support and has access to material and intellectual resources from numerous suppliers, partners, supporters and critical friends.


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Young people at the Summer Holiday Activities Day (Gippsland) A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017


Directors’ Report SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN THE STATE OF AFFAIRS

Your Directors present their report on the company for the financial year ended 30 June 2017.

No significant changes in the company's state of affairs occurred during the financial year.

DIRECTORS

EVENTS SUBSEQUENT TO THE END OF THE REPORTING PERIOD

The names of the directors in office at any time during or since the end of the year are:

No matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the financial year which significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the company, the results of those operations, or the state of affairs of the company in future financial years.

Bulent (Hass) Dellal Sally James (retired 23 May 2017) Donato (Don) Smarrelli Demetrio Zema Jennifer Sharpe Shelin David (appointed 12 December 2016)

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Directors have been in office since the start of the financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated.

REVIEW OF OPERATIONS The surplus of the company for the financial year amounted to $666,036 (2016: $322,394). A review of the operations of the company during the financial year and the results of those operations are as follows: CMY continues to deliver strategic success ahead of its budgeted objective with strong operating results for financial year 2017. CMY's overall revenue increased by 36% to $8,688,783 compared to previous year of $6,383,147. The surplus of $666,036 was up 106% compared to $322,394 in 2016. These achievements reflect growing revenue base of the organisation, financial discipline and a consolidated effort of careful resource management. This result strengthens CMY's financial position and will support CMY to invest in its future capabilities and achieve its strategic plan.

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Directors’ Report INFORMATION ON DIRECTORS Dr Bulent (Hass) Dellal AO (Chairperson)

Demetrio Zema (Deputy Chairperson)

COMPANY SECRETARY

Executive Director, Company Secretary, Australian Multicultural Foundation Ltd Director/ Chair, Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) Director/ Trustee, Scanlon Foundation Trust Director/ Chair, Islamic Museum of Australia Director, Board Member Project Rozana

Director & Founder of Law Squared (ZDD Pty Ltd); Director & Founder of INNTW Ltd Director (Board Member), VicDeaf

The following person held the position of company secretary during the 2016/17 financial year:

Sally James (Resigned 23/5/2017) Principal Advisor Youth Transitions, Brotherhood of St Laurence

Donato (Don) Smarrelli OAM

Jennifer Sharpe

Carmel Guerra OAM

Founder/Director at Think HQ

Shelin David Business Consultant at Martin and Martin Consulting International Volunteer with Habitat for Humanity

Director/Principal, Lawcorp Lawyers Pty Ltd President of the Board, Assissi Centre Incorporated

Dr Bulent Dellal AO

Donato (Don) Smarrelli

Jennifer Sharpe

Demetrio Zema

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

Founder and Chief Executive Officer of the Centre for Multicultural Youth (CMY) since the inception in 1988. Appointed Company Secretary at incorporation of CMY in 2007. Appointed company secretary at incorporation of CMY in 2007.

Shelin David

Carmel Guerra OAM

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Directors’ Report cont.

Financial Summary

MEETINGS OF DIRECTORS

Discussion and Analysis of the Financial Statements

Directors Name

46

The following financial statements have been derived from the full 2017 financial report of the Centre for Multicultural Youth. A copy of the full financial report and auditor’s report is available on our website, cmy.net.au.

# Eligible to Attend

# Attended

Bulent (Hass) Dellal Chairperson

5

5

Shelin David Appointed 05/12/2016

3

3

STATEMENT OF PROFIT OR LOSS AND OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Sally James Resigned 23/5/2017

5

4

CMY had solid operating results with a surplus of $666,036 (2016: $322,394) and total income increased by 36.1% to $8,688,784 (2016: $6,383,147).

Jennifer Sharpe

5

4

Overall expenses were contained and in line with CMY’s increased budget for 2017.

Demetrio Zema Appointed as Deputy Chairperson 12/12/2016

5

4

Donato Smarrelli

5

4

5

4

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION Total assets increased by $1,983,038 to $5,954,956, representing an increase of 49.9%. This increase was mainly attributable to the following: -- Cash and cash equivalents increased by 76.3% to $1,066,329 (2016: $604,729); -- Financial assets and investments increased by 49.1% to $4,667,500 (2016: $3,130,000).

Company Secretary Carmel Guerra

No director has received, or become entitled to receive, during or since the beginning of the financial year, a benefit because of a contract made by the company, or a related body corporate with a director, a firm of which the director is a member or an entity in which a director has a substantial financial interest. The statement excludes a benefit included in the aggregate amount of emoluments received or due and receivable by directors and shown in the company's financial statements. This directors' report is signed in accordance with a resolution of the board of directors:

Total liabilities increased by 60% from $2,193,031 to $3,510,033. This increase was mainly attributable to the following: -- Income in advance increased by $894,823 to $1,876,403 (2016: $981,580); -- Employee provisions increased by $70,690 to $717,284 (2016: $646,594).

Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income

BULENT DELLAL Director Dated in Carlton on this the 24th day of October 2017

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For the Year Ended 30 June 2017

ASSETS $ 2017

$ 2016

Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents

$ 2017

$ 2016

1,066,329

604,729

Revenue

6,507,864

5,433,351

Other income

2,180,920

949,796

Employee benefits expense

(5,452,858)

Depreciation and amortisation expense

(11,369)

Repairs and maintenance

(4,271)

Utilities expense

(13,995)

(10,354)

Non-Current Assets

Rental expense

(145,459)

(134,880)

Plant and equipment

39,180

32,972

Training and welfare expense

(28,637)

(70,518)

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS

39,180

32,972

Audit, legal and consultancy expense

(181,517)

(50,382)

TOTAL ASSETS

5,954,956

3,971,918

Other expenses

(2,184,641)

Profit for the year

666,036

Other comprehensive income for the year TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR

(4,404,005) (14,895) (7,561)

666,036

(1,368,158) 322,394 322,394

Statement of Financial Position As at 30 June 2017

Trade and other receivables Financial assets Other current assets TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

137,381

37,988

4,667,500

3,130,000

44,566

166,229

5,915,776

3,938,946

LIABILITIES Current Liabilities Trade and other payables

$ 2017

$ 2016

903,352

551,690

Borrowings

12,994

13,167

Provisions

553,159

497,067

Other TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

1,876,403

981,580

3,345,908

2,043,504

Non-Current Liabilities Provisions

164,125

149,527

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

164,125

149,527

TOTAL LIABILITIES

3,510,033

2,193,031

NET ASSETS

2,444,923

1,778,887

EQUITY Retained earnings

2,444,923

1,778,887

TOTAL EQUITY

2,444,923

1,778,887

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

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Directors’ Declaration In accordance with a resolution of the directors of Centre for Multicultural Youth, the Directors of the company declare that: 1. The financial statements and notes, are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001: and a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards, which, as stated in accounting policy Note 1 to the financial statements, constitutes compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards; and b) give a true and fair view of the financial position as at 30 June 2017 and of the performance for the year ended on that date of the company. 2. In the Directors' opinion there are reasonable grounds to believe that the company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

48 BULENT DELLAL Director Dated in Carlton on this the 24th day of October 2017

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Independent Auditor’s Report To the Members of the Centre for Multicultural Youth

REPORT ON THE FINANCIAL REPORT We have audited the accompanying Financial Report of the Centre for Multicultural Youth, which comprises the Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2017, statement of profit and loss and comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cashflows for the year then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, and the directors' declaration.

evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimatesmade by the directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report.

DIRECTORS RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE CONCISE FINANCIAL REPORT

INDEPENDENCE

The directors of the company are responsible for the preparation of the Financial Report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Act 2001 and for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the Financial Report that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

In conducting our audit, we have complied with the independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001. We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the directors of the Centre for Multicultural Youth, would be in the same terms if given to the directors as at the time of this auditor’s report.

OPINION In our opinion, the Financial Report of the Centre for Multicultural Youth is in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001, including:

AUDITOR’S RESPONSIBILITY Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Financial Report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the Financial Report that is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the Financial Report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the Financial Report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation of the Financial Report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes

(a) giving a true and fair view of the company's financial position as at 30 June 2017 and of its performance for the year ended on that date; and (b) complying with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Regulations 2001.

HAINES MUIR HILL KRISTIAN LUNARDELLO Chartered Accountants Partner 888 Doncaster Road DONCASTER EAST VIC 3109 Dated in Carlton on this the 24th day of October 2017

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

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Funders, Partners and Supporters FUNDERS CMY has long-standing partnerships with many state and federal government departments. In recent years, we have forged relationships with key philanthropic foundations. We would like to thank all of our funding partners for their continued commitment to improving the lives of young people.

Victorian Government • Department of Education and Training • Department of Health and Human Services • Department of Justice and Regulation • Office for Youth • Victorian Multicultural Commission

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Multicultural and Community Sectors AMES Australia AMF Research Trust Australian Multicultural Foundation Australian Red Cross Ballarat Regional Multicultural Council Banksia Gardens Community Services Brotherhood of St Laurence CatholicCare Catholic Education Commission of Vic. Charis Mentoring CO.AS.IT DASWest Diversitat Drummond Street Services Ethnic Communities Council of Victoria Foundation House Gippsland Multicultural Services Jesuit Social Services Kildonan UnitingCare

Australian Government • Department of Immigration and Border Protection • Department of Social Services

MacKillop Family Services Quantum Support Services Refugee Council of Australia Royal Children’s Hospital Immigrant Health Service Settlement Council of Australia Southern Migrant and Refugee Centre Spectrum Migrant Resource Centre The Salvation Army The Smith Family Travancore Trustees of the Christian Brothers (Edmund Rice) Victorian Alcohol and Drug Assoc. Victorian Immigrant and Refugee Women’s Coalition Whittlesea Community Connections

Philanthropic Foundations • The Antipodean Family Foundation • 6A Foundation • Australian Communities Foundation • Newsboys Foundation • Bennelong Foundation • City Football Foundation • Gandel Philanthropy

Youth The Commission for Children and Young People Orygen Youth Services Youth Affairs Council of Victoria Youth Junction INC Youth Support and Advocacy Service Education and Employment AFL SportsReady Ainslie Parklands Primary School Albion Primary School Alkira College Baden Powell P – 9 College Baw Baw and Latrobe LLEN Berwick Fields Primary School Braybrook College Career Education Association of Vic. Catholic Education Office Melbourne Clayton North Primary School

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• Reichstein Foundation • Grace & Amelia Fund • Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation • Portland House Foundation • The RE Ross Trust • Scanlon Foundation • The William Buckland Foundation

Collingwood College Collingwood English Language School Copperfield College Craigieburn South Primary School Cranbourne Carlise Primary School Cranbourne East Secondary College Cranbourne Secondary College Dallas Brooks Community Primary School Dandenong High School Dandenong Primary School Dandenong South Primary School Dandenong West Primary School Deakin University Doveton College Edmund Rice Community and Refugee Services Epping Primary School Epping Secondary College Embrace Education Federation University


Findon Primary School Gleneagles Secondary College Hallam Senior College Highlands LLEN Hume Central Secondary College Independent Schools Victoria Kolbe College Kurnai College Lalor Primary School Lalor East Primary School Lalor North Primary School Lalor Gardens Primary School La Trobe University Lavalla Catholic College Lynbrook Primary School Lyndhurst Secondary College MacKillop Catholic College Manor Lakes P-12 College Marian College Meadows Primary School Melba College MiCare Monash University Mossgiel Park Primary School Mount Alexander College Mount Clear College Narre Warren South P-12 College Noble Park English Language School Noble Park Primary School Northern Bay College Phoenix P-12 Community College Preston North East Primary School Roxburgh Rise Primary School Roxburgh Homestead Primary School Ruskin Park Primary School South East Local Learning and Employment Network Shepparton English Language Centre St. Francis Assisi Primary School

St. Francis Xavier College St. Monica’s College Sunshine Harvester Primary School Tarneit P-9 College The Grange P-12 Thomas Carr College The Huddle Tomorrow Foundation Trafalgar High School Truganina South Primary School University of Adelaide University of Melbourne University of Sydney Victoria University Warringa Park School Werribee Secondary Western English Language School 100 Story Building Justice and Policing Australian Federal Police Children’s Court of Victoria Eastern Community Legal Centre Magistrates Court of Victoria Office of the Public Advocate Victoria Legal Aid Victoria Police Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service Youthlaw

Sport

Government

AFL Victoria Badminton Victoria Basketball Victoria Bowls Victoria Carlton Football Club Cricket Victoria GippSport GWS Giants Football Club Gymnastics Victoria Football Federation of Victoria Life Saving Victoria Netball Australia Netball Victoria Softball Victoria Tennis Victoria Vicsport Victorian Health Promotion Foundation Victorian Rugby League Victorian Rugby Union Volleyball Victoria Werribee Basketball Association

City of Ballarat City of Brimbank City of Casey City of Greater Dandenong City of Hume City of Latrobe City of Maribyrnong City of Moonee Valley City of Melton City of Whittlesea City of Wyndham City of Monash

National Partners (MYAN) Access Community Services Limited Migrant Resource Centre of Southern Tasmania Multicultural Youth Affairs Network NSW Multicultural Youth Northern Territory Multicultural Youth South Australia Youth Action Youth Affairs Council of WA Youth Coalition of ACT

A N N UA L R E P O R T 2016 - 2017

Business Chobani Ltd Justine Coleman Performance Culture Consulting Lawcorp Lawyers Maurice Blackburn Lawyers

PARTNERS AND SUPPORTERS Our success is built on the ability to forge excellent partnerships. Our supporters and partners are as diverse as the young people we work with and we would not achieve what we do without their commitment and openness.

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Get Involved

PARTICIPATE – if you are a young person needing support or looking for an opportunity to make a difference, contact us about our current programs. VOLUNTEER – we have programs that recruit volunteers across Victoria. Check out our website for details. ENGAGE – we provide training, consultancy, events and resources that support individuals and organisations to develop their skills and knowledge in working with young people. PARTNER – we partner with a wide range of agencies, community groups and organisations to deliver impactful programs across Victoria. INVEST – we are seeking investors to help grow our impact. Contact us to see how your investment could help.

@

DISCOVER – to find out more about all of these opportunities visit cmy.net.au CONNECT – subscribe to one of our newsletters or connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Vimeo, Instagram or LinkedIn. facebook.com/likeCMY twitter.com/talktoCMY centre.for.multicultural.youth au.linkedin.com/company/centre-for-multicultural-youth

VISIT – 304 Drummond St Carlton VIC 3053 (03) 9340 3700 info@cmy.net.au

Centre for Multicultural Youth Annual Report 2016-17  

The Centre for Multicultural Youth is a Victorian not-for-profit organisation that supports young people from migrant and refugee background...

Centre for Multicultural Youth Annual Report 2016-17  

The Centre for Multicultural Youth is a Victorian not-for-profit organisation that supports young people from migrant and refugee background...

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