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THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE www.CentreCountyGazette.com

On with the show ... State College Area High School stages the musical ‘The Drowsy Chaperon.’/Page 22

March 29-April 4, 2012

Volume 4, Issue 13

FREE COPY

O’Brien reaches out at charity dance By CHRIS MORELLI editor@centrecountygazette.com

FARA LIPPINCOTT/For The Gazette

GETTING TO KNOW YOU: Patrick Moore shakes hands with Penn State football first-year coach Bill O’Brien on Friday night.

BELLEFONTE — When Sarah Brownson made a phone call to invite a few Penn State football players to the Centre County Down Syndrome Society’s dance party, she didn’t know what answer to expect. Turned out she got a whole lot more than she could have imagined. “We contacted Penn State just to see if we could get some football players,” Brownson said. “(Coach) Bill O’Brien contacted us and asked if he could come along. We were just so thrilled to have him. We know he’s really busy, so to have him come out and support our group is really special. We’re really excited.” O’Brien brought several Nittany Lions with him to Bellefonte High School on Friday. They included linebacker Mike Mauti, running back Silas Redd, center Matt Stankiewitch, defensive end Pete Massaro and lineman Angelo Mangiro. Defensive line coach Larry Johnson was also there.

While he signed footballs, shirts and caps, O’Brien talked about what the cause means to him. “It’s very special. It’s a cause that’s near and dear to my heart. I have a son who is handicapped,” O’Brien said. “Anytime that I can come out and meet the kids and meet their parents, it’s a very special time for me.” O’Brien’s older son, Jack, has lissencephaly, a rare brain malformation. “He’s my oldest. He’s 9. Anytime I can do something like this, I just love to do it,” O’Brien said. While O’Brien was clearly the most popular man in the room, the players were a close second. They chatted with the children, signed autographs, tossed footballs and danced. “Anytime we can come out and give back to our community, especially for a cause like this, it really makes you take a moment and realize how blessed you are,” said Mauti, a senior. “What these people are doing here is just awesome.”

Charity, Page 6

AccuWeather’s Reeves remembered for passion Late Monday afternoon, Evan Myers was still in shock. It had been less than 24 hours since he found out that his co-worker and friend, Ken Reeves, died after falling off the roof of his home around 5 p.m. Sunday. According to State College police, Reeves was taking Christmas lights down when he fell from the roof at 1119 Jonathan St. in Lemont. “First and foremost, Ken was a very good friend of mine,” said Myers, senior vice president and chief operating officer at AccuWeather Inc. “I’ ve known Ken for 29 years. He was an energetic and enthusiastic person. He had a passion for life and was

very young at heart.” Reeves was a senior meteorologist, vice president and general manager at State College-based AccuWeather. Reeves was pronounced dead at Mount Nittany Medical Center around 6 p.m. Sunday. He was 50. “Ken was younger than me, and he never let me forget that,” Myers said with a laugh. “He was just a great person, very involved in the community.” While Reeves was close with just about everyone at AccuWeather, one of his best friends was co-worker Bernie Rayno, AccuWeather’s executive producer of video broadcasting and expert senior meteorologist. The loss of Reeves was still sinking in on Tuesday. “People like Ken Reeves don’ t come around very

Police logs ......................... 3 Opinion ............................ 7

Education ......................... 8 Lifestyles ................... 10-15

By CHRIS MORELLI editor@centrecountygazette.com

CHRIS MORELLI/The Gazette

SETTING SALE: Elise Watson and Lori Martin, both of State College, sift through items in preparation for the annual Big Brothers Big Sisters Spring Fling rummage sale March 24.

KEN REEVES 1961-2012 often in life. As a friend, there was no one better than Ken,” Rayno said. “He had this amazing ability to make you want to be the best person you could possibly be. It’s often said that leaders aren’ t made, they’ re born. That was truly the case with Ken.”

Reeves, Page 6 Centre Spread ........... 16-17 Health ............................. 18

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Spring Fling benefits agency By CHRIS MORELLI editor@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — If you were looking for a bargain, the Big Brothers Big Sisters 15th annual Spring Fling rummage sale was the place to be. On March 24, bargain Sports ........................ 19-21 Arts & Entertainment 22-24

hunters from all over Centre County descended on Penn State’s Ag Arena, looking for treasures in boxes, on tables and stacked on bleachers. According to Centre County Youth Service Bureau CEO Andrea Boyles, the event was a success What’s Happening ......... 25 Group Meetings ............. 26

once again. “It was a good day. We had lots of volunteers, lots of positive energy,” Boyles said. “We had people lined up at the beginning of the day. It’s definitely something special for the

Spring Fling, Page 6 Business .................... 28-29 Classifieds ....................... 30


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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

Front and Centre POINT, COUNTERPOINT: Does the ‘stand your ground’ defense law need to be reconsidered? Page 7

COMING UP SHORT: The Lady Lions fell to the UConn Huskies in the NCAA tournament’s regional finals on Sunday. Page 21

WALK OF LIFE: Organizers prepare for suicide awareness, prevention event in April. Page 15

CREAM OF THE CROP: Area high school scholar athletes were honored during an awards banquet at the Penn Stater Conference Center on Sunday. Page 21

EVERY BREATH YOU TAKE: Learn how proper breathing can help you to overcome anxiety. Page 18

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TYING IT ALL TOGETHER: Fisherman Mark Belden shows fellow anglers how to rig flies during a Clearwater Convervancy event at Fisherman’s Paradise on Spring Creek. Page 10

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MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

Retrial ordered in ’06 death

POLICE LOG

DUI checkpoint set for Friday The Centre County Alcohol Task Force will run an impairment check point on Friday, the task force announced this week. It did not disclose the expected area of the checkpoint. However, “officers will be on the lookout for persons impaired by either alcohol or drugs and will arrest anyone driving impaired,� according to a news release. Over St. Patrick’s Day weekend, the task force arrested six drivers under suspicion of DUI.

STATE COLLEGE

PSU student reports assault A Penn State student told police that she was sexually assaulted in a residence hall by someone she knew. According to campus police, the assault took place between 11:30 p.m. Friday and 9:30 a.m. Saturday. No further information was available from police.

Police investigate counterfeit bills State College police are investigating several incidents that involve counterfeit money being used in downtown shops on Friday and Saturday. According to police, the money involved are believed to be phony $1 and $5 bills. Police have identified several suspects in connection with the bills. They ask that any businesses that may have received counterfeit bills to contact police. Anyone with information about the crime is asked to call police at 814234-7150.

Woman charged with DUI A Bellefonte woman was charged with drunken driving after crashing her car in Boggs Township on March 23, according to state police. Police reported that Margaret Mascolo, 55, was traveling south on state Route 144 when she crossed the center line and swerved to avoid an on-

coming vehicle. Her vehicle, a 2001 Nissan, then struck an embankment and came to rest in the middle of the road, police said. Mascolo refused to be treated for her injuries, police said. She was charged with driving under the influence, according to reports. The vehicle was towed from the scene. No one else was injured in the crash.

STATE COLLEGE (AP) — Jury selection begins next month for the retrial of a central Pennsylvania man accused of having bludgeoned a Penn State student to death six years ago Andrew Rogers, 34, of State College, is scheduled to go on trial in Centre County in May in the February 2006 death of 23year-old Youngcheol Park. Rogers was convicted of third-degree murder in April 2007 and sentenced to 20

to 40 years in prison. He contended that he acted in self-defense when he was attacked by Park and a man he knew only as “Sweet.� Prosecutors said at the first trial that police had been unable to locate anyone matching the description of “Sweet.� But a new trial was ordered after a judge ruled that evidence connected to the potential mystery person was never provided to defense attorneys.

CORRECTION POLICY The Centre County Gazette corrects errors as soon as they are brought to our attention. Please contact us at editor@centrecountygazette.com to report a correction.

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Two State College men have been charged with sexually assaulting a 13year-old girl at a party in Ferguson Township last year, according to police. According to police documents, Jacob Nossek, 18, told police in July that he had sex with a girl. Nossek confessed to the crime shortly before he was scheduled to take a polygraph test, police said. Police had requested the polygraph because he first denied having sex with the girl. Nossek waived his right to a preliminary hearing on March 21. His bail was set at $2,500. In a related incident, Fahron Rosemond, 22, of State College, was charged with raping the girl at the same party. Rosemond was taken into custody after police asked for the public's help to find him in February. Rosemond was being sought in connection with an aggravated assault and simple assault following a domestic dispute that occurred on Jan. 31. He remains jailed on $75,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for April 4.

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Two men charged in sexual assault

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PAGE 4

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

Corruption convictions cost ex-politicians their pensions

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HARRISBURG — In a series of recent real-life courtroom dramas, a judge spelled out the consequences of corruption for nine Republicans convicted as a result of a sweeping state investigation. Some of the ex-legislators and exaides were ordered to spend time behind bars, others were placed on probation and there were fines all around, totaling tens of thousands of dollars. But for public officials and employees convicted of using their positions to commit theft or certain other crimes, the forfeiture of future pension benefits may have been as great a concern as the sentences Dauphin County Judge Richard Lewis meted out. Records released by the State Employees’ Retirement System in response to a Right-to-Know request filed by The Associated Press revealed the size of the broken nest eggs: Four of the GOP convicts lost their pensions. ■ Former House Speaker John Perzel of Philadelphia, sentenced to 2 ½- to four years in state prison, was forced to give up a $7,138 monthly pension check that would have added up to $1 million in 11 years. Perzel, 62, retired in December 2010, while charges against him were pending. He withdrew nearly $204,000 that represented his own pension contributions plus interest over three decades. He also collected $64,000 in monthly checks before SERS cut him off when he pleaded guilty in August 2011. ■ Ex-Rep. Brett Feese, 57, who headed the House Republican Cam-

paign Committee, gets to keep nearly $107,000 in contributions and interest, as well as more than $142,000 that he collected in pension checks between his November 2009 retirement and his sentencing in February. But the former Lycoming County lawmaker, ordered to spend at least four years in prison, no longer receives the $5,423 monthly pension checks that produced $65,000 a year in income. ■ Brian Preski, 46, Perzel’s longtime chief of staff, forfeited his $1,092 monthly check when he was sentenced last week to two to four years in prison. But the Philadelphia lawyer collected checks worth about $60,000 between his 2007 retirement and his October guilty plea. He also received a lump-sum payment of $85,752 for his contributions plus interest. ■ Jill Seaman, 59, a former Feese aide who stood trial with her ex-boss, collected pension checks totaling $26,000 between her November 2009 retirement and her January sentencing. The Dauphin resident, who was ordered to spend at least nine months in a county jail work-release program, withdrew contributions and interest worth $12,380 but lost her $1,032 monthly checks. Several former lawmakers and former aides connected to the House Democratic caucus previously forfeited their pensions as a result of the attorney general’s five-year-old investigation into the illegal use of public resources for political purposes. All five other Republicans convicted in the case were fined and placed on probation. Two of them — Perzel’s brotherin-law and a fellow New Jersey resident who ran Perzel’s former

VIEWING HARRISBURG Philadelphia campaign headquarters — are not members of the retirement system so pensions were not an issue. The others — former House GOP aides Al Bowman, Paul Towhey Jr. and Eric Ruth — were able to keep their more modest pensions because the plea bargains their lawyers struck with prosecutors excluded the charge of theft. Instead, the men pleaded guilty to conspiracy, conflict of interest or both — offenses that do not affect pensions. Bowman’s lawyer, Donna McClelland, said the state public pensionforfeiture law is among the many potential “collateral consequences” of a criminal conviction that are in addition to the penalties available to judges. She compared it to the threat of a professional license revocation for a physician, a driver’s license suspension for driving drunk or the risk of deportation for a foreign visitor. “Those are all things you need to take into account when you’re advising a client,” the Greensburg attorney said. “Some of them do carry significant civil penalties.” Peter Jackson is the Capitol correspondent for The Associated Press in Harrisburg. He can be reached at pjackson@ap.org.

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MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

Identity of Victim 2 looms as key question in abuse scandal By MARK SCOLFORO Associated Press

HARRISBURG — The case is highly emotional, with accusations delving deep back in time and numerous alleged victims. But for all its breadth, one chapter in the Penn State abuse saga outpaces the others: the alleged sexual assault in a team shower by former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky of a boy known only as Victim 2. It’s the allegation that Penn State acknowledges ended Joe Paterno’s distinguished football coaching career and spawned criminal charges against two school officials. But the only person who says he saw it happen is another assistant. Prosecutors don’t know who the boy is, while Sandusky says he believes he does know, and that the now-grown man, referred to in court papers only as Victim 2, could exonerate him. Even the timing of the allegation is in question, as is the age of the boy a decade ago. All the conflicting information presents tough challenges for prosecutors — not just at the sex abuse trial beginning in mid-May, at which the defense does not plan to call the man, but also in the court of public opinion. “I’m not trying to make light of the situation, but how can you say it’s murder if there’s no body?� said 1982 Penn State alumna Wendy Silverwood, a saleswoman from West Chester, Pa., who said she believes Paterno was not given a fair shake. “If you don’t know who the victim is, and you can’t identify and speak with them, how can you bring charges?� As recently as Thursday, Sandusky’s lawyer argued in court filings that there wasn’t enough evidence to support the charges relating to Victim 2. Sandusky, 68, faces 52 criminal counts involving 10 boys dating to the late 1990s and denies all the allegations. The lawyer, Joe Amendola, told The Associated Press that a young man contacted him after Sandusky’s November arrest to say he believed he might be the person referred to as Victim 2. After meeting with him, along with his mother and adult brother, Amendola was left with doubts. “I wasn’t sure he was,� Amendola said. “I’m still not sure. I haven’t been able to verify it. Jerry’s very sure.� Amendola said that the young man told him Sandusky had not abused him, but that he later obtained a lawyer and cut off contact. Amendola does not plan to subpoena the young man and declined to identify him or his lawyer. “I don’t want to put someone on the stand who might say something completely different,� Amendola said. “And quite honestly, now that

he’s got a lawyer, he might say something different.� Records supplied by prosecutors indicate some purported victims have changed their stories, the lawyer said. “Several of the kids, who are socalled victims now, initially said nothing happened,� Amendola said. “And now they’re victims.� Mike McQueary, who in 2002 was a graduate assistant for the football team, testified at the December preliminary hearing that he saw Sandusky and the boy, both naked, after hearing skin-on-skin slapping sounds. He called it “extremely sexual� and “some kind of intercourse.� McQueary said he reported what he saw in the locker room shower to Paterno and Penn State administrators Tim Curley and Gary Schultz. Exactly what he saw and what he told them are both certain to be hotly contested at Sandusky’s trial, as well as at the pending trials of Curley and Schultz on charges they failed to properly report suspected abuse. Penn State trustees have said Paterno’s lack of follow-up after McQueary’s report was behind their decision to summarily fire him in November, before the end of the football season. The dismissal of Paterno, who died in January of lung cancer, has rankled alumni and other supporters. Even the year of the shower incident is in dispute. Sandusky’s lawyer said that his client is convinced it was in 2001, not 2002 as the prosecution has said, and that Sandusky offered to help Curley find the boy when the administrator asked him about McQueary’s complaint. Amendola said Curley never mentioned McQueary’s name, and Sandusky does not recall seeing McQueary. Sandusky told Curley at the time that he knew the young man in question but they had been only horsing around, sliding around inside the wet shower, the lawyer said. Sandusky said back then that “if Tim Curley wanted to verify that, Jerry offered to give him the name and number of the young kid,� Amendola said. “Curley seemed satisfied with that,� he said, and did not get the boy’s name from Sandusky. “The reason he remembers is that Jerry contacted him after that shower situation and said someone from Penn State may contact him,� Amendola said. “He said nothing sexual occurred at that time between him and Jerry. In fact, the mother said Jerry was a godsend to the family.� Caroline Roberto, a lawyer for Curley, said only that Curley acted appropriately judging by what he knew at the time. Curley and Schultz have both denied the allegations and are asking a judge to dismiss the charges. Prosecutors said this month in a court filing that they still did not

know the boy’s identity, raising questions about whether the man’s lawyer contacted the attorney general’s office. Victim 2 is not the only mystery in the case. There is a second alleged victim who has not been identified by investigators and is being called Victim 8. A grand jury report alleged he was seen by Penn State janitor Jim Calhoun in fall 2000 in athletic department showers with Sandusky, pinned against the wall as Sandusky performed oral sex on him. Calhoun told another janitor and a supervisor what he saw, the grand jury said, but as of November suffered from dementia and was described as incompetent to testify. Amendola considers the charges related to Victim 2 and Victim 8 the weakest part of the government’s case. “I think that creates a problem for the commonwealth,� he said. “And the commonsensical reaction would be, if the stuff really occurred, why didn’t they come forward and say, ‘I’m the guy’?� State prosecutors, who need to be able to prove the ages of victims, declined to discuss the issue of the two identities. “This case has been the result of an extensive investigation and an extensive grand jury investigation,� said Nils Frederiksen, a spokesman for the attorney general’s office. “We have a high degree of confidence in the case, but we’re not going to discuss the strategy of how our prosecutors plan to present the case in court. It’s just not appropriate.� To establish the age of anonymous children in child pornography cases, prosecutors sometimes have pediatric specialists apply standard measures of development, a technique that might be used in the Sandusky case. “It’s a little bit unusual to prove a child rape case this way, but it’s also unusual to have an eyewitness to child rape,� said Christopher Mallios, a former Philadelphia deputy district attorney who helps train police and prosecutors in sexual violence cases. Jurors may wonder why the young men have not stepped forward, despite the detailed reports of abuse and the extensive publicity surrounding Sandusky’s arrest. But that would not be surprising, Mallios said, given what he saw during investigations in Philadelphia of abuse allegations against Roman Catholic clergy members. “A lot of the victims did not tell anyone about what had happened to them until well into their 50s,� he said. “They just couldn’t talk about it. Even when the investigators were able to piece together their identities by talking to other victims, some just wouldn’t talk about it.�

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Vaccination deadline nears By KATHY MATHESON Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Pennsylvania students who don’t comply with an upcoming immunization deadline will likely find themselves unable to attend school, state and local officials warned this week. New state vaccine guidelines took effect this school year, putting Pennsylvania in line with recommendations from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They mandate several extra shots, including ones against mumps, chicken pox and meningitis. Students who were not up-to-date on their inoculations when school started last fall were given an eight-month grace period. That expires on May 1 for many districts, though the deadline can vary depending on when classes started. Officials in some school districts say they have repeatedly notified students and parents about the deadline, yet many have not complied. Students must be vaccinated to attend school, with few exceptions. “Our nurses have been concerned about this since the beginning of the school year,� said Eileen Kelliher, a spokeswoman for the Bristol Township schools near Philadelphia. Nearly 1,000 of Bristol Township’s 6,200 students are not in compliance, despite numerous reminders, Kelliher said Wednesday. The new regulations re-

quire children in all grades to receive a second dose of mumps vaccine and a second dose of chicken pox vaccine. Students in seventh grade also must have one dose of meningitis vaccine, and one dose of the tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis inoculation. The shots must be appropriately spread out. Statewide, about 15 percent of kindergarteners and 24 percent of seventhgraders were not up to date as of October, according to figures from the state Health Department. “We are hopeful that these rates have gone down in recent months,� agency spokeswoman Holli Senior said. In the Pennsbury district, which has about 11,000 students, about 400 high schoolers and several hundred middle school students were not in compliance as of mid-March. However, spokeswoman Ann Langtry said Wednesday that the numbers are steadily declining due to publicity, local immunization clinics and personal outreach. Students can be excused from the vaccine requirement for religious or health reasons. However, they cannot attend school during an illness outbreak. That happened this past winter in Chester County, where at least two schools declared outbreaks of whooping cough, also known as pertussis. Health officials consider two or more cases at one location to be an outbreak.

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PAGE 6

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

Charity, from page 1 The dance featured a DJ, prizes and games. The event was a part of “we’re more alike than different” day and was done in conjunction with World Down Syndrome Day. Redd chatted as he helped dance organizers bring in baskets filled with toys that were donated as prizes. “I’ve done Make-A-Wish for a couple of years now. This is definitely a cause that I’d like to get involved with more during my time at Penn State. It just shows you what kind of people that are here. To hold an event like this for these special kids … I’m just happy to be a part of it,” Redd said. As the children danced, Brownson thanked each player and coach who came out on a Friday night. And while the dance certainly generated some funds, that was not the goal at the end of the day. “The goal is not to raise money. It’s not so much a fund raiser, but it’s to raise awareness for people with disabilities, promote acceptance and show everyone that people with disabilities are more alike than different,” Brownson said. At one point, the players took part in a line dance with the kids. That brought broad smiles to the faces of the children. For one parent, the event was a special night. Fara Lippincott walked around and took photographs to capture the memories. “I’m a parent of a 9-year-old with Down Syndrome,” Lippincott said. “It’s a lot of fun to bring so many people from so many different communities together. The Centre County Down Syndrome society just started up a couple of years ago. There aren’t many events that bring so many kids together. There’s something for everyone and it’s all about them.” Her son, Jackson, chose to play games instead of dancing with the players. “He helped me decorate, he’s got a lot of friends here,” she said. “It’s just a great night.” Jackson, however, was in the minority. Most of the kids chose to hang with O’Brien and his players. Make no mistake about it, O’Brien was the most popular man in the room. Although he hasn’t coached a game at Penn State, the kids faces lit up as he chatted with them and signed autographs. “This makes my night,” O’Brien said. “It’s a challenging life that they lead. Anytime that I can take part in a special night, it means a lot to me.”

Reeves, from page 1 Reeves was born in Philadelphia in 1961 and graduated from Abington High School in 1979. He graduated from Penn State with a degree in meteorology in 1983 and worked at AccuWeather for 29 years. “What he did for AccuWeather was unprecedented. He was a tremendous asset. His contributions are immeasurable. He contributed from the moment he walked in the door 29 years ago until he walked out of here on Friday,” Rayno said. As word of Reeves’ death spread on Sunday and into Monday, condolences from across the weather community began to roll in via email, phone calls and on the company’s website. “Ken had a lot of friends,” Myers said. “Even our competitors like The Weather Channel have expressed their condolences. That’s the kind of guy Ken was.”

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

At AccuWeather on Monday, there was still business to conduct. But, according to Myers, it was done with a heavy heart. “The mood here is very somber. People here are just saddened and shocked,” he said. “As a media company based in State College, we’ re used to tragedies that are weather-related. This is different. Ken used to say ‘ suck it up and get it done.’ He’d want us to keep moving forward.” When Reeves was building his home, he lived with Rayno for a short period of time. According to Rayno, the two became closer than ever. “The one thing I’ll remember about Ken is that he always had to be productive. He was constantly doing things, being active. He wasn’ t one to sit around. If there was a way to sleep and be productive, Ken probably would have

Spring Fling, from page 1 community.” For a an early-bird fee of $5, one could enter the Ag Arena before the doors officially opened to the public at 8 a.m. By 7 a.m., there were over 100 early-bird shoppers lined up outside the building. Some were looking for furniture. Others were sorting through piles of clothing, looking for the right size. There were those in the crowd who were looking for collectibles in the plethora of items scattered throughout the arena. All of the items that were for sale were donated by residents in Centre County. “It’s a little bit different than (Penn State’s) Trash to Treasure. While all of their items are left behind by students, our items come strictly from community donations,” Boyles said. According to Alexandra Oropesa, event planner for the Youth Service Bureau, the community really responded in the days leading up to the sale. “We had a lot of people donate items. We got a lot of clothing and a lot of furniture this year,” Oropesa said. “The response was really good as far as donations were concerned.” Heading into the event, BBBS didn’t have a pre-determined goal in mind, Oropesa said. “We didn’t really have a goal in mind,” she said. “We just wanted to raise as much money as possible.” The event raised nearly $7,000 for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Centre County.

figured that out,” Rayno said. Rayno said that Reeves had planned to travel to California this week. “He probably looked at Sunday as an opportunity to take those lights down. He was just trying to be productive again, getting something done before he left and he’d never have asked for help,” Rayno said. “His loss is just immeasurable, both in the community and in the field of meteorology. It’s hard to put into words how much he will be missed.” Reeves is survived by his wife, Raychel, his parents and a brother and sister. Funeral arrangements are as follows: Visitation is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday at Koch Funeral Home, 2401 S. Atherton St., State College. A memorial service is scheduled for 1 p.m. Friday at State College Presbyterian Church, 132 W. Beaver Ave.

“That’s a little down from previous years,” Boyles said, “but still a good number.” Big Brothers Big Sisters operates on the premise that inherent in young people is the ability to thrive and succeed. BBBS helps young people between the ages of 5 and 17 to reach their full potential through professionally-supported, one-to-one mentoring relationships with carefully screened adult volunteer mentors. In 2011, BBBS of Centre County served 371 youth. Penn State played a big role in the event. Once again, the university provided space at the Ag Arena. The arena is ideal because it is indoors and there is plenty of parking in the shadow of Beaver Stadium. “I’m just not sure where we’d go. We’ve had it here for so long,” Oropesa said. “We’re just so grateful to them.” YSB will look to raise $400,000 privately this year. The rummage sale is just one of many fund-raising events that will take place throughout the year. Around the same time as Spring Fling, there was a Bowl For Kids Sake taking place in Lewistown to aid Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mifflin and Juniata counties. “That was a great event. We did really well there. We had 52 teams bowling,” Boyles said. One of YSB’s biggest events of the year is the “On the Fly” fishing event, which is set for May 14. “That’ s our biggest generator of revenue,” Boyles said. “We’re really looking forward to it.”

W E N E H T O LISTEN T

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OPINION

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE 403 South Allen Street, State College, PA 16801 Phone: 814-238-5051 Fax: 814-238-3415 www.CentreCountyGazette.com PUBLISHER Rob Schmidt

COMMUNITY EDITOR Sandie Biddle

MANAGING EDITOR Chris Morelli

SALES MANAGER Don Bedell ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Vicki Gillette Debbie Markel Kathy George BUSINESS MANAGER Aimee Aiello AD COORDINATOR Bikem Oskin GRAPHIC DESIGN Beth Wood

CONTACT US: To submit News: editor@centrecountygazette.com Advertising: sales@centrecountygazette.com The Gazette is a weekly newspaper serving Centre County and is published by Indiana Printing and Publishing Company. Reproduction of any portion of any issue is not permitted without written permission. The publisher reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement for any reason.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Borough should rethink move to buy property With regards to Mr. Stewart’s desire to bring a small hotel to Bellefonte, I think the idea is a noble one despite the fact that Bellefonte already has a hotel that failed (the Garman across from the courthouse in the heart of the town’s historical district). His desire, wish, hope, that this idea will work is akin to me planting a handful of beans in my garden and expecting to find the next day a beanstalk leading into the sky. I would be more comfortable knowing if Mr. Stewart did any research. Has he sent surveys to hotel chains to ascertain if any would be interested in building a hotel on a flood plain? Have any responded that they would despite the fact that guests facing the rear of the hotel would have to look upon an old, grungy factory now being used for storage? Then there is the fact that the only barber on Allegheny Street is moving, I would rather see the borough try to revitalize our downtown rather than condemn two active, taxpaying businesses. After all, it’s supposed to be an attraction, a historical district. The loss of the Weis Store certainly hurt us taxwise. How long can we afford to keep losing businesses? That tax loss has to be made up somewhere. I think before Stewart and the borough condemn the businesses that are already there, they should seek a definite tenant and obtain a commitment that a hotel will be built there before we taxpayers have to face the burden of a lawsuit by these fine people against the borough. We don’t live in Fantasyland, although I believe the borough thinks we do. Taxes are high already. We can’t afford more. John Skerchock Bellefonte

Editorial policy We invite comment, rebuttal or the expression of your own thoughts about matters you deem of public importance. We invite stories and photos about our community and its people. All submissions must be of the writer’s own creation and include contact information, which may be held upon request. The Gazette reserves the right to edit any submission. Att: Editor, The Gazette, 403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801; email to: editor@centrecountygazette.com; fax to: (814) 238-3415.

Unless labeled as a Gazette editorial, all views on the Opinion page are those of the authors.

PAGE 7

Health care bill unaffordable By U.S. REP. GLENN THOMPSON R-Howard Township

With rising prices at the gas pump and escalating health care costs, American families have been seeking economic relief, while the average paycheck fails to keep pace with the cost of living. With the two year anniversary of one of President Obama’s signature legislative initiatives — the Affordable Care Act of 2010 — we are especially reminded of this unfortunate reality. In 2010, thenSpeaker Nancy Pelosi suggested, “We have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it.” Two years after passage of the Affordable Care Act, families and U.S. REP. GLENN small businesses have found out THOMPSON the hard way, with increased taxes, looming regulations and a slew of broken promises, from fictitious cost controls to limitations on consumer choice. Just last week, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office served a devastating blow to President Obama’s most frequent used tagline, “If you like your present coverage, you can keep it.” CBO issued a report suggesting there will be a net loss of employer-based insurance coverage of between 3 and 5 million people each year from 2019 and 2022. This has the potential for 20 million Americans to lose their insurance coverage over a four-year span. On the first anniversary the Affordable Care Act, I joined the U.S.

House Energy and Commerce Committee for a congressional field hearing in Harrisburg in order to review the law’s impact throughout the commonwealth. During the hearing, Pennsylvania’s acting insurance commissioner, Michael Consedine, testified that new mandates on insurance coverage had resulted in premium increases of up to 9 percent. These figures mirror the national trend, as outlined in a recent study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit research group that tracks employer-sponsored health insurance on a yearly basis. The Kaiser report shows that the “average annual premium for family coverage through an employer reached $15,073 in 2011, an increase of 9 percent over the previous year.” This is a far cry from Barack Obama’s 2008 proposition that his law would cut family premiums by $2,500 before the conclusion of his first term in office. President Obama had also promised that he “… will not sign a plan that adds one dime to our deficits — either now or in the future.” However, an honest accounting of the health care law finds that it will increase the deficit by hundreds of billions in the first 10 years alone. Douglas Holtz-Eakin, former Congressional Budget Office director, has testified that the law will increase the deficit by at least $500 billion in its first 10 years and more than $1.5 trillion over the decade thereafter. Correspondingly, further estimates suggest that the law will cost nearly half a trillion dollars more than supporters of the law originally claimed. At a time of severe budgetary constraints, there is only one place to turn in order to keep up with this spending: the wallets of Ameri-

cans, in the form of tax increases. Having spent almost 30 years in a non-profit health care field, I am acutely aware of the challenges many face when it comes to obtaining reasonably priced health care. And while many of us agree there are portions of the law that are beneficial, such as the ability for adult dependent children up to age 26 to stay on their parent’s insurance, the elimination of excluding those with pre-existing conditions from plans, and the expansion of low-cost clinics into underserved areas, the path the so-called Affordable Care Act provides is unsustainable. We must repeal the law and toss out the negatives while maintaining and expanding upon the elements that are commonly agreed upon. Over the past two years, as the regulations have been rolled out and the American people continue to learn what is really in the law, the broken promises have continued to pile up, weighing on the backs of small businesses and families. This week, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments on the constitutionality of the mandate that all Americans must purchase health insurance. While the court’s decision is yet to be made, the verdict has already been cast by the countless American families and small businesses that simply cannot afford the Affordable Care Act. Congressman Glenn Thompson represents Pennsylvania’s 5th congressional district, which includes all of Centre, Cameron, Clarion, Clinton, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, Juniata, McKean, Mifflin and Potter counties, and portions of Clearfield, Crawford, Lycoming, Tioga, Warren, and Venango counties.

Is ‘stand your ground’ a bad law? Is it time to reconsider self-defense laws in America? The killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Florida has generated new scrutiny on selfdefense laws across the country. Martin was shot to death by a neighborhood volunteer, George Zimmerman, who said he was acting in self-defense — and Florida’s “stand your ground” defense laws give such claims the benefit of the doubt. But Martin was unarmed, and federal authorities are now scrutinizing the case. How far should the right to self-defense go? Joel Mathis and Ben Boychuk, ScrippsHoward’s RedBlueAmerica columnists, debate the issue.

JOEL MATHIS

JOEL MATHIS There is a difference between legitimate selfJoel Mathis, joelmmathis@ defense and stugmail.com, is a pid macho poswriter in turing. The Philadelphia. “stand your ground” doctrine belongs mostly in the latter category. I won’t try to litigate the Trayvon Martin case here: Federal authorities are investigating, and it seems likely we have a lot more to learn about those tragic events. But it’s not too early to say that Florida’s “stand your ground” doctrine probably claims more lives, violently, than it preserves. Florida’s law says that anybody who is attacked in a public place “has no duty to retreat and has the right to stand his or her ground and meet force with force.” (As many as 20 other states have similar laws.) What this means, essentially, is

that if you see a man enter a Florida park with a drawn gun and menacing other patrons, there’s no need to leave the park and flee to safety: You’re free to whip out your own revolver and confront the problem yourself. It’s a rule that has created far too many Clint Eastwood wannabes. A 2010 review of the law by the Tampa Bay Times on the law’s fifth anniversary found that reports of “justifiable homicide” tripled after the law took effect. In 2009, the paper reported, “twice a week, on average, someone’s killing was considered warranted.” This is not to say that there is no such thing as justifiable homicide. Sometimes, there really is no choice. Sometimes, however, the best and safest way to avoid injury or death is to flee an attacker and let police handle the problem. “Stand your ground” hurts public order by suggesting that public safety can be a secondary concern to holding turf — that individuals can choose to inflict violence and death just because they don’t feel like walking away from a confrontation. It’s a law that makes for a great Old West movie. But it’s lousy policy.

BEN BOYCHUK One tragedy, or 100, in Florida does not negate an individual’s right to stand his ground in self-defense. Self-defense is a natural right, older than civilization. “Civilized people are taught by logic, barbarians by necessity, communities by tradition; and the lesson is inculcated even in wild beasts by nature itself,” said the great Roman orator Marcus Tullius Cicero more than 2,000 years ago. “They learn that they have to defend their own bodies and persons and lives from violence of any and every kind by all the means within their power.” If the news accounts are even half true, George Zimmerman likely

should face charges for pursuing and shooting Trayvon Martin, who was apparently minding his own business. We’ll know soon enough. Legislators in 21 states didn’t abolish the canons of reason or precedent when they enacted their “stand your ground” statutes. Florida’s law, which lead the way, is worth quoting at length: “A person who is not engaged in an unlawful activity and who is attacked in any other place where he or she has a right to be has no duty to retreat and has the right to stand his or her ground and meet force with force, including deadly force if he or she reasonably believes it is necessary to do so to prevent death or great bodily harm. ...” Now, it’s certainly true that Ben Boychuk, some judges bboychuk@cityhave taken leave journal.org, is of their senses associate editor of when applying City Journal. the law. Only the most obtuse reading would lead a judge to conclude, as one did in Miami-Dade just a few days ago, that a man who chased down an alleged burglar and stabbed him to death — in the back — had “stood his ground.” But even the author of the Florida’s statute says Zimmerman forfeited his defense when he ignored a 911 operator’s instructions not to chase Martin. The real lesson in this case: Leave policing to the police. Maybe Florida’s law should be revisited and clarified. But abolished? Where’s the justice in that?

BEN BOYCHUK


EDUCATION

PAGE 8

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

Cub Scout Pack 88 turns out for annual Pinewood Derby By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

MILLHEIM — For those with nifty little handmade racers — no more than five ounces — this was a big-time competition. Cub Scout Pack 88 in Millheim held its annual Pinewood Derby on March 25. Racers and families filled the Millheim Fire Hall and leader Dave Dorman inspected nearly 30 cars. Dorman checked the cars for conformance to official Pinewood Derby rules. The rules specify the cars’

maximum dimensions and weight. No car could exceed five ounces. Once the cars passed inspection, race coordinator John Hawkins registered each car and its owner, entering the data in a laptop computer. The computer contained software which chose the cars for each of the four-scout heats and kept track of wins and losses. The four-lane race track was borrowed from Centre Hall Cub Pack 20. Judges were positioned at the finish line, and so was a video camera, so spectators could look at a video screen for a better

view of the finishes. Winners were determined by a point scoring system, where a first-place finish gets one point, second gets two, etc. The lowest score wins the event. The cars for each heat are chosen by the software so that each boy gets to race once in each round on each of the track’s four lanes. There were many heats with quite a few close races, generating a lot of excitement and cheering among the boys and large group of spectators. When it was all said and done, first

place went to Nicholas Miller. Second place was captured by Wyatt Auman. Third place was a tie between Carter Neese and Cody Shreckengast. For their efforts, the winners received trophies. In addition, awards were given out for best paint job, looks most like a race car, most colorful, most unusual shape and others. Besides the Cubs' racing, there was a category for adults. A total of 13 adults got to re-visit a piece of their childhood.

SAM STITZER/The Gazette

THE WINNERS, from left, were Nicholas Miller (first place), Wyatt Auman (second place), Cody Shreckengast and Carter Neese (third place, tie).

SAM STITZER/The Gazette

FIRST-ROUND starter Kasey Sellner prepares to launch a heat of racers.

Variety show benefits food bank From Gazette Staff Reports BELLEFONTE — Students at Bellefonte Elementary School performed in their annual Lip Sync and Variety Benefit show on March 24. It was their 18th annual show and students were eager to showcase their talents and make a difference in the lives of many needy families. In the week leading up to the concert, students participated in a variety of “food spirit” activities such has crazy hair day, mix and match day and dress like a rock star day. For each theme day, students collected canned goods to help fill shelves in local food banks. A canned good was your ticket to gain admission to the concert. The show featured 19 student acts. They performed classic rock tunes and 1980s favorites to current chart busters and seemingly everything in between. The students put many hours into rehearsing their acts as well as preparing their own costumes, props and scenery for the show. The Lip Sync and Variety Benefit has become a much anticipated tradition at the Bellefonte elementary school, living out its slogan of “caring kids fighting hunger one song at a time.” In the end, the event collected 835 non-perishable food items for the Bellefonte food bank and raised $37 in cash donations.

Scholarships awarded in honor of Penns Valley physician By SAM STITZER For The Centre County Gazette

Submitted photo

HALLE MITCHELL, Elizabeth Nugent and Carmen Seybold perform “Like Woah.” All three are in the fifth grade at Bellefonte Elementary.

SPRING MILLS — Erin Deihl and MaryAnne Ventura were recipients of the first Dr. William Young Scholarship Awards. Sponsored by the Penns Valley Area Health and Welfare Association, the scholarships are $1,000 each. The primary goal is to encourage students in advanced medical studies who reside in the Penns Valley area or who graduated from Penns Valley Area High School. The late Dr. William Young was well-known and respected at the Penns Valley Area Medical Center. Deihl is a student at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine at Virginia Tech. She completed her degree in 2011 and is

now in her residency at Lehigh Valley Health Network in Internal Medicine. Ventura is a pharmacy student at Ohio Northern University. She is planning to graduate in 2013. Request applications for this scholarship from pvahwa@gmail.com or through the Penns Valley Area High School guidance office. Applications are also available at Penns Valley Pharmacy, 4576 Penns Valley Road, Spring Mills; McLanahan Drug Store, 2827 Earlystown Road, Centre Hall; and at the Penns Valley Area Medical Center, 4570 Penns Valley Road, Spring Mills. The entry deadline is June 1 each year. Call Jack Smith 814-3495820 or Joanne Horner 814-364-9940.

Bald Eagle Area students place at single lift open The following Bald Eagle Area students placed in the ADAU Scrappy Joe's Gym Single Lift Open held Feb. 11 at Hooversville: ■ Bastian Conaway (age 14-15, 148-pound weight class) - first place in bench press, squat and deadlift ■ Orianna Conaway (age 12-13, 132-pound weight class – girls) – first

place in bench press and squat ■ Garren Kunes (age 18-19, 198pound weight class) – first place in bench press ■ Eric Lose (age 16-17, 181-pound weight class) – first place in bench press and deadlift ■ Caleb Orner (age 12-13, 132pound weight class) – first place in

bench press, squat and deadlift ■ Devan Welker (age 16-17, 165-pound weight class) – second place in bench press Compiled by Rose Hoover for The Gazette

JANE TAYLOR/Special to the Gazette

ERIN DEIHL examines a baby at a Lehigh Valley clinic.


MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

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MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

Experts teach fly-fishing at fundraiser By ERIC TAYLOR SCHMIDT For The Gazette

On March 17, the Clearwater Conservancy held a fly fishing event at Fisherman's Paradise on Spring Creek. Katie Ombalski, a Clearwater biologist, said the event was to raise money for the Clearwater Conservancy. Guest speakers and instructors included: Joe Humphreys, Mark Belden, Greg Hoover and Vance McCullough. McCullough gave a presentation on how to fish a stream. McCullough advised to approach the stream with stealth and consider all of the obstacles before you approach it. Consider the obstructions that could interfere with your casting. How are the currents going to affect your line and where the fish will be? How much weight will you need to get your fly where you want it? Be careful not to have your shadow go where it could spook the fish. Don't allow your silhouette to be visible to the fish. Keep a low profile. Some wear camo clothing, when they fish. Remember you can't catch a fish that’s spooked. You need a game plan. At each spot where you are going to fish, think about where you are going to hook the fish, play the fish, land the fish, and release it. It seems to be a lot to think about before fishing each spot; but as time goes on and the more you do it, it will take less time to evaluate each spot. The group went outside and Humphreys awed everybody with his masterful casting techniques. Before Humphreys started teaching, he said he could have a person who never fly

fished before casting in 20 minutes. He had the students start casting on one knee with right-handed casters on the right knee and left-handed casters on their left knee. He was teaching what he calls the short technique, because you don't have to move your arms very far and you use the shock of the cast. He explained this was the beginning of any cast you want to make. He said you should be versatile in your casting and practice all types of casts at different angles. “The secret to casting is fundamentals refined to perfection,” Humphreys said. Humphreys was asked if he had only one fly to fish with, what would it be? He said: “In Centre County, it would be the sulfur nymph, because it looks like many other nymphs.” For the rest of the country, he would select the stone fly nymph. In the back of the classroom, Hoover had dishpans of water with live nymphs, larvae, worms and a crayfish, collected from local streams the day before. Hoover had them arranged in three groups, as indicators of water quality. Mayflies were in the group of the best water quality. He said there is about 200 species of mayflies. The next group was caddisflies and stoneflies. They are an indicator of deteriorating water quality but still good. The last group had fresh-water shrimp, sow bugs, crane flies, worms and crayfish. They are indicators of organic matter in the water that can cause problems. After lunch, Belden showed how he rigged three flies using a dropper system on his leader. He also said the wind resistance of a fly determines the size of the

Fashion show benefits Nittany Valley Symphony By EBUN ADEWUMI For The Gazette

STATE COLLEGE — More than 125 guests enjoyed an afternoon of inspiring fashions, classical music and good food on March 24 at Centre Hills Country Club. “Spring Into Fashion,” a benefit for the Nittany Valley Symphony, was hosted by the club. The luncheon was a fundraising event put on by the NVS Guild with all profits going to the symphony. For a half hour before the event, the attendees could purchase raffle tickets, browse the Worth Collection clothing featured in the fashion show and mingle with other guests. The raffle ticket prizes were all donations from area stores and merchants. While the guests ate, the fashion show was presented. It was emceed by Jeff Brown of 93.7 The Bus and Pat Williams, a representative for the Worth Collection. Models wound their way around the tables to give the guests a close look. As the

women modeled, Williams shared fashion tips. The Nittany String Quartet set the tone with subdued classical selections. Worth is a New York City luxury brand sold by a national network of sales associates online and in private homes. Worth has been featured in the annual NVS fashion show for the last five years. “This was the biggest crowd we’ve ever seen,” said Nancy Jacobson, the NVS Guild president. “We have 16 models and approximately 130 guests.” She noted that the event raises money for the symphony through ticket sales, merchant donations and raffle ticket sales — about $5,000 to $6,000 a year. The Nittany Valley Symphony began more than 40 years ago as the State College Chamber Orchestra. More than two-thirds of the participants are amateur players who enjoy the pleasure of playing with fine professionals. The Nittany Valley Symphony Guild’s purpose is to promote the symphony, develop leadership and outreach and raise funds and friends for the NVS.

ERIC TAYLOR SCHMIDT/For The Gazette

JOE HUMPHREYS analyzes casting techniques during the Clearwater Conservancy event on March 17. leader. The more wind-resistant flies need a heavier leader. Belden then demonstrated how to fish the flies in the water. After the demonstration, everybody spread out along the stream to put what

they learned into action. Even though fishing conditions were tough, a few were caught. For more information about the Clearwater Conservancy, visit www.Clearwater.org

Bald Eagle State Park offers weekend events The following activities are scheduled at Bald Eagle State Park this weekend. The park is located at 149 Main Rd. in Howard. Call the park office for more information at 814-625-2775.

THURSDAY, MARCH 29

■ Home School Day Park staff members are partnering with Penn State students to create a day of learning from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The classes will provide learning opportunities for students. In the case of rain, the class will be postponed until April 4.

FRIDAY, MARCH 30

■ Woodcock Trot Explore the Woodcock Trot’s unique habits during a brief classroom presentation, followed by a

walk to try to watch the bird perform a courtship dance. The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Environmental Learning Center.

along F.J. Sayers Lake and look for fossils in the dried lake bed. Meet at 2 p.m. at Pavilion No. 6.

TUESDAYS IN APRIL SATURDAY, MARCH 31

■ Nature Inn Green Building Tour and Discussion Tour the Nature Inn and receive detailed explanation of leadership in energy and environmental design and the major green building systems. Learn about geothermal heating and cooling, solar hot water heat generation, rainwater harvesting, native habitat restoration and the use of rain gardens. Meet at 11 a.m. at the Nature Inn lobby. ■ Treasure Hunting Hike Hike with a naturalist

■ Bald Eagle Bird Walks Wake up to experience an unpredictable morning of bird watching. Become acquainted with the winged migrants that pass through Bald Eagle State Park. These walks are for novices and experts alike. Each week we will explore local hotspots to see what birds are passing through or have returned for the summer. Those intererested should meet at the park office. The walks will run from 8:30 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. on April 3, 10, 17 and 24.

Pheasants Forever to hold annual membership banquet From Gazette Staff Reports

EBUN ADEWUMI/For The Gazette

NITTANY VALLEY Quartet played at the event.

Pheasants Forever, Central Pennsylvania Chapter, will hold its fourth annual membership banquet with cocktails at 5 p.m. and a prime rib dinner 6 p.m. Saturday, March 31 at the Old Fort American Legion, 2928 Penns Valley Pike, Centre Hall. Tickets are $50 for individuals, $80 for couples, $25 for children 18 and under,

$120 for families, and $250 for sponsors. Each ticket includes a membership to Pheasants Forever. Prizes and auction items include guns, clothing, wildlife prints, outdoor gear and collectibles. To order tickets, visit www.centralpapheasants.org or call Jesse Putnam at 814598-9789 or Justin Markey at 814-8830029.


MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

Retired Police Chief McClellan continues to protect and serve From Gazette Staff Reports BELLEFONTE — It must be in his blood, even after his retirement from the Bellefonte Police Department. Retired Bellefonte Police Chief Lester McClellan and his wife, Marie, recently participated in and passed a Citizens' Assisted Patrol Course held for residents of Ridge Manor Park in Haines City, Fla. These residents subsequently volunteered to patrol the streets of the village in which they live. The course is provided by the sheriff's department of Polk County. Other area residents who participated in the training include Jerry and Delores Corman from Zion, James and Nancy Williams from Boalsburg and David and Sandra Feree from Centre Hall, all seasonal residents of Ridge Manor Park.

Submitted photo

RETIRED BELLEFONTE Police Chief Lester McClellan, second from left, and his wife Marie recently participated in a Citizens' Assisted Patrol Course in Haines City, Fla. With the couple are Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd and Haines City Police Chief Richard Sloan.

Habitat accepting applications for housing repair program From Gazette Staff Reports BELLEFONTE — Habitat for Humanity of Greater Centre County is now accepting applications from qualified, low-income homeowners for the housing repair program, A Brush with Kindness. A Brush with Kindness is aimed at providing landscaping and minor exterior repair services to low-income homeowners in need. Habitat for Humanity’s A Brush with Kindness program has a goal to serve low-income homeowners who struggle to maintain the exterior of their homes. The work is done by volunteers,

using donated materials whenever possible. The homeowner must meet the following criteria: demonstrated need, willingness to partner and the ability to re-pay a no-interest loan. Payments made by the partner family are placed in a revolving fund to help A Brush with Kindness serve others in need. Helping people repair and maintain their homes fits seamlessly with Habitat’s core mission of making decent, affordable housing available to low-income families. For an application, visit www.habitatgcc.org or stop by the office at 1155 Zion Rd. in Bellefonte. The office is open Monday through

PAWS ADOPT-A-PET

Ripple, a young male cat with handsome marble tabby markings and mitten feet, seeks a family who won’t be fooled by his extremely shy personality at PAWS, but will instead imagine the outgoing, active kitten he is in his foster home. Ripple actually earned the nickname “Ripster” at his foster home for how he rips around the house during playtime. His foster family found that toys, treats and the presence of other cats are keys to winning Ripple's trust. If you would like to read more about Ripple, who promises to be a great addition to any family once he comes out his shell, please visit http://www.centrecountypaws.org/cats/ or stop by PAWS, 1401 Trout Rd., State College.

Submit Photos of Events To ... editor@ centrecountygazette .com

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Friday from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. For more information about how you can get involved with Habitat for Humanity visit www.habitat.org. Habitat for Humanity of Greater Centre County is a non-profit ecumenical Christian housing ministry whose main purpose is to provide simple, decent, affordable housing for qualified low-income people in need. Habitat relies on volunteers and donated materials to accomplish the work at an affordable price to homeowners. Habitat is a hand-up, not a hand-out. Since the founding in 1983, HFHGCC has built more than 50 houses in Centre and Clinton counties.

Writers’ network hosts workshop — A Carolina Slade Mystery.” She will speak on four topics: ■ The Story of Carolina Slade — A Mystery Becomes a Reality ■ Revisions — Polishing for Publication; ■ Funding Streams for Your Freelance Career ■ Platform and Other Tools for the Serious Writer, including a discussion of “The Shy Writer.” A question and answer session and book signing will follow the talks. Seating is limited. Registration is $20 through April 21 and $25 at the door if spaces remain. Contact Karen Dabney, NVWN workshop coordinator, at greywing228@verizon.net.

STATE COLLEGE — The Nittany Valley Writers Network will present a writers workshop, featuring speaker C. Hope Clark. The workshop will begin at 10 a.m. through 4 p.m. Saturday, April 28 at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Clark is the editor of the “Funds for Writers” newsletter and website, and is one of the Writer’s Digest 101 Best websites for Writers from 2001-2011. She is a full-time freelance writer and the author of “The Shy Writer: An Introvert's Guide to Writing Success.” In February 2012, Clark released the first book of her agricultural mystery series, “Lowcountry Bribe

PAGE 11

Author explores fate of children of differing legal status By WENDY KLEMICK For the Centre County Gazette

STATE COLLEGE — What could keep smart, ambitious teenage girls with excellent grades, superb test scores and a laser-focus on college from attending college at all? From getting a driver’s license? Flying on an airplane? The answer: legal status. State College Mayor Elizabeth Goreham will introduce journalist and First Lady of Colorado Helen Thorpe at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 5 at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Thorpe will discuss “Just Like Us,” her award-winning account of four high school students whose lives are impacted — and even defined — by the issue of immigration status.

A seasoned reporter whose work has appeared in publications from The New Yorker to Texas Monthly, Thorpe offers a unique perspective on one of the most complicated issues of our time. Her husband, John Hickenlooper, originally from Philadelphia and now Governor of Colorado, was Mayor of Denver at the time she was reporting this story, and his administration became engulfed in an immigration-related scandal, which becomes part of the rich, complex narrative. Thorpe herself is the child of immigrants, arriv-

Submitted photo

Helen Thorpe ing in the United States at age 1 and carrying a green card until she became a naturalized citizen at 21. The author brings skill and sensitivity to the account of four close friends who have lived in the United States since they were very young. All are successful and ambitious, and want to live the American dream — but only two have documents. As the girls attempt to enter college, they discover that only the legal pair has a clear path forward. As the nation hotly debates whether undocumented residents have any right to live in the country where they have grown up, the girls’ friendships start to divide along lines of immigration status. “Just Like Us,” a coming-of-age story, is also about identity. It is about what it means to inherit an identity from parents. Through the story of the girls, their families and the critics who object to their presence, Thorpe offers a powerful view of the most vulnerable members of American society as they grapple with the dilemma: Who gets to live in America? Writing in The New Yorker, Malcolm Gladwell reviewed Thorpe’s work: “‘Just Like Us’ beautifully and powerfully reminds us of the individuals whose lives lie at the center of the chaos that is our approach to immigration. Helen Thorpe has taken policy and turned it into literature.”

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SUNG MASS WITH WASHING OF THE FEET, PROCESSION TO THE ALTAR OF REPOSE AND STRIPPING OF THE ALTAR, 7:30PM


PAGE 12

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

100+ Women Who Care makes big difference Have you ever wished you could do more to make a difference to a local charity? There are certainly a lot of ways to help and many are not with money, but I have never seen a charity turn down funding to help with their mission and goals. There is a new concept coming to the Centre region that may be of interest to readers of the Gazette. This concept, being led by Tere Rill of the Women’s Journal, is called 100+ Women Who Care. While it is not Rill’s original idea, she found it fascinating and thought the women of Centre County might, too. 100+ Women Who Care was first started in Jackson, Mich. by Karen Dunigan in 2008. Her group of 100 women at their first meeting Tammy Miller is a one-hour professional speak- raised $10,000 by each er, speech coach, au- providing $100 to buy thor and auctioneer 300 new baby cribs for in the State College an organization in area. For informa- their city. Their memtion on ordering her bership has now latest books, or engrown to nearly 300 gaging her as a speaker for your members. Since that other cities next event, check time, out www.tammy throughout the counspeaks.com. try have formed groups. Ohio currently has groups in Dayton, Medina and Columbus, and newly-formed groups in the Cleveland metro area and Cincinnati. Rill hopes to eventually organize a group in each of the 14 central Pennsylvania counties served by the Women’s Journal. The concept is relatively simple. Each woman commits to providing $100 each quarter. The group would meet on a quarterly basis for a one-hour meeting. At that time, all attendees can submit the name of

TAMMY MILLER

a local organization they would like to be considered for that quarter’s donation. The organization must serve Centre County and have a 501 (c)(3) status. From the list of submitted organizations, three places are randomly selected and a person from the group gives a 3-5 minute presentation about why to choose the organization. A person employed by the organization cannot make the pitch for themselves – it must be someone else. After the presentations, the entire group votes and the chosen charity receives donations for that quarter. The individual checks for $100 are made payable to the charity and delivered. When the group reaches 100 participants, that would be a donation of $10,000 for the charity in one hour. If the $100 donation is financially difficult, a member may choose to partner with another woman with the understanding that there is only one vote. Rill said, “We come from all walks of life with different financial backgrounds. As individuals, it is difficult to have a large impact, but as a group we have the ability to support people in our community in ways we never thought possible.” ❏❏❏ The Centre County chapter will hold its inaugural meeting at The Penn Stater on April 16 at 5:30 p.m. Members are invited to stay afterward to network and dine if they choose. Rill added, “There are many groups in need of financial support in Centre County and we want to help. The possibilities are endless.” There are no fees involved; just a oneyear commitment. Following the initial meeting, the group will hold events once a quarter with the date, place and time to be determined by the group. For more information, check out: http://www.100womenwhocarepa.com. This is an interesting concept that shows we can make a big difference in Centre County from many hearts. I look forward to seeing you there.

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

Mountainback event will aid Tides efforts From Gazette Staff Reports STATE COLLEGE — Organizers of the Tussey Mountainback 50-Mile Relay and Ultramarathon recently announced that Tides, a local non-profit community service organization, will be the beneficiary of this year's event. Tides’ mission is to provide safe and nurturing peer support programming for children, adolescents and their families who have experienced the death of a loved one, according to the organization’s website. “We were surprised and thrilled to learn that the 2012 Mountainback will support Tides,” said Leslie Finton, Tides’ executive director. “The demand for our services to local families in the community has been increasing rapidly, so this will make a real difference.” In addition to peer support groups, Tides provides referral services, telephone support, educational resources for grieving children and families and resources for schools and other professionals in the community who work with children. Scheduled to take place Oct. 21 in Rothrock State Forest, the Mountainback footrace welcomes both recreational and

competitive runners to participate on relay teams, as well as offering a solo ultramarathon option. Past relay teams have been sourced by clubs, businesses, university departments, student groups and families. Participants have represented more than 33 states, four other countries and more than 250 communities in Pennsylvania. For the eighth time, the event has been selected by USA Track & Field to host the USA 50-Mile Road Championships, which draws worldclass ultramarathon runners to compete for a $6,000 cash purse. Last year’s event saw a new course record set in the ultramarathon. Event details and registration information are available at www.tusseymountainback.com or by calling 814-238-5918. The Central Pennsylvania Convention and Visitors Bureau is a major sponsor of the Mountainback event. Sponsors also include CaliKlineBenton of RE/MAX Centre Realty, Subway restaurants, Appalachian Outdoors, The Bicycle Shop, McClarren Financial Advisors, Nittany Bank, Nittany Valley Running Club, Rapid Transit Sports, Restek, The Sign Stop, Tussey Mountain Family Fun Center and Wegmans.

Local Knights elevated

Cycling event on tap From Gazette Staff Reports STATE COLLEGE — The Penn State Cycling Club Nittany Cycling Classic downtown criterium will be held on April 1 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The cycling route will be closed to vehicle traffic during the race. According to State College Borough Po-

lice, the race route is as follows: Cyclists start on East Fairmount Avenue at Berry Alley, will travel east on Fairmount Avenue, north on Fraternity Row, west on Foster Avenue, south on Locust Lane, west on Nittany Avenue, south on Pugh Street and east on Fairmount Avenue to the finish line.

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BELLEFONTE Knights of Columbus 1314 recently had four members elevated to Knights of the Third Degree. From left are: Tim O'Donnell, Robert Ruggiero, Patrick Cronin and Peter O'Donnell, who all completed third degrees at Father O’Hanlon Council 4678 on March 18 in State College.

Notables: thoughts on spring My daffies are out at least two weeks early, so I predict the maple leaves will pop out April 15. Last year it was May 1. Anyone care to wager a few tomato plants on it? ❏❏❏ We already knew that our Karen Dabney is quite the reporter when it comes to arts, entertainment and history. Today we discover her newest expertise with the debut of her new column. Look for Health & Wellness on page 18. ❏❏❏ Put on your walking Sandie Biddle is the shoes and get out your community editor of The Centre Coun- checkbooks. Look out for “Walk Weekend.” ty Gazette. That’s what I named this weekend when I saw that March 31 and April 1 are the dates for four fantastic charity walks in State College. Walk With Me for Easter Seals takes place downtown on Saturday. The other three are back-to-back-to-back at Medlar

SANDIE BIDDLE

Field at Lubrano Park: Habitat House Walk, April Fools 5K for the PSU Alumni Association scholarship fund and the “mom of all walks,” the Relay for Life of Penn State, from 11 a.m. Saturday through 11 a.m. Sunday. This year, luminaria opportunities include special glowing memorials to JoePa, who was died after a brief battle with lung cancer in January. ❏❏❏ Gee, I’m bushed from all that cleaning and rearranging we did at the Gazette. It’s always painful to go through all your stuff and decide what stays and what goes. Fortunately, our mission remains the same, to serve our readers, to publish the best community newspaper possible. I hope you like our sleek new design. ❏❏❏ Send us your comments, suggestions, and, for heaven’s sake, your news. News of good neighbors. Your events and meetings. Ideas for feature stories. Your news is our news. ❏❏❏ Word of the week: twitterpated. As in: I was twitterpated when I saw the new Gazette.

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MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 13

Myers Memorial Run a big draw By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

SPRING MILLS — More than 150 runners competed in the Fifth annual Rodney Myers Memorial Run Around Egg Hill on March 25. The race is held in memory of Rodney Myers, a Penns Valley High School wrestler. Myers was an avid runner, often training in the Spring Mills and Egg Hill areas. Myers died in 2005, and the previously established Run Around Egg Hill was renamed the Rodney Myers Memorial Run Around Egg Hill. The monetary proceeds from the race support the Penns Valley High School track and field and cross country teams. According to Myers' daughter, Jodi Butler, a grant was given for scholarships for Penns Valley cross country athletes for the first time. “We’re pretty excited to award these this year,” she said. Butler is one of the race organizers. Another race organizer, Scott Butler, said that approximately 175 runners came out to run, setting an event record for participation. The race began on Sinking Creek Road, just west of Spring Mills. Jimmy Brown, a member of Hampton’s Battery F Civil War reenactment group, fired the starting gun — a cannon from the

Civil War era. The race course took the runners on a 10-mile loop through Spring Mills, exiting the village’s southeast corner, proceeding to Upper Georges Valley Road. They followed that road to Egg Hill Road, a gravel surface, which took them past the historic Egg Hill Church and back to Sinking Creek Road. The last leg was the road along Sinking Creek to the finish line near the Old Gregg School. The runners were a diverse group of male and female athletes, ranging in age from pre-teens to senior citizens, competing in age groups of 19 and under, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, and 60-plus. There were also medley relay classes for team participation. The youngest runner was 8-year-old Alyssa Lynch, from Burnham. Lynch ran the last two miles of the race as a member of a relay team. “I passed eight people. One of them said, 'She’s pretty tough’ as I went by,” she said. Lynch said that she ran three races before the Egg Hill Run. Awards were given for first, second and third place in each category. All results were tallied by the Nittany Valley Running Club. The first overall male was Patrick Singletary, who finished the race in 57:40. The first overall female was Elizabeth Herdon, who finished in 1:03.26.

Results in each class are as follows: Women Under 20 1. Elizabeth Pringle 2. Juliet Moen

30-39 1. Andy Cunningham 2. Alan Effrig 3. Michael Renz 40-49 1. Jim Wenger 2. Miles Smith 3. Paul Winkelblech

20-29 1. Kendra Foor 2. Lynda Nguyen 3. Bianca Baier

50-59 1. Dave Mitchell 2. Michael Goldfine 3. Garth Benton

30-39 1. Meira Minard 2. Tara Murray 3. Brianna Bair

60 & over 1. Barry Kernfeld

40-49 1. Carole Dudukovich 2. Andrea Quarry 3. Christine Rodgers

Teams Open Men 1. Arby & The Chief 2. Going Greene 3. The Tradition

50-59 1. Sue Bacon 2. Nancy Simcox 3. Martha Freeman

Mixed team 1. Enthusiasm 2. LionHeartCrossfit 3. Garamuchi

Men Under 20 1. Nathan Kruis 2. Thomas Nichols 3. Alec Winkelblech

Family Team 1. Team Dooris 2. Squirrelmeetsmoose 3. McBaker

20-29 1. Yu Zhang 2. Josh Cone 3. Jeff Welsh

SAM STITZER/For The Gazette SAM STITZER/For The Gazette TIM WEIGHT/For The Gazette

MORE THAN 150 runners line up at the start of the race along Sinking Creek Road.

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PAGE 14

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

Pets Come First hosts Dog Jog to raise funds From Gazette Staff Reports CENTRE HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Grab your sneakers, your furry friend and come out and enjoy a day with the dogs. The fourth annual Dog Jog is April 28 at Grange Fairgrounds, Gate 2 in Centre Hall and the public is invited to attend and help make a difference in the community, one animal at a time. Registration for the event begins at 8:30 a.m., the 5K race starts at 10 a.m., the 1.5K walk/fun run is at 11 a.m. and the pet fair/silent auction is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Pets Come First is the proud organizer of this community event ,where family, friends and colleagues come together to raise money for local animals. Racers without dogs are also welcome.

The Pet Fair features rescues, animal resources, silent auction, refreshments, awards and prizes for runners and walkers. The Dog Jog is PCFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest community fundraiser, and the organization is hoping that this year, with the new adoption center, even more animal lovers who enjoy running and walking for a great cause will come out to enjoy the event. Last year, 163 dogs and 249 runners and walkers came together and made a difference. Awards and prizes will be given to the top three male and female dogs and their owners. Categories are small, medium, large, rescue and veteran dogs, and all will receive a tasty treat. For information and registration, visit www.petscomefirst.com.

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

Penns Valley musicians keep audience engaged with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;concert in roundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

SPRING MILLS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard of theatre in the round. How about â&#x20AC;&#x153;band concert in the round?â&#x20AC;? The Penns Valley music department presented its Instrumental Chamber Night Concert on March 21 in the high school auditorium. The concert was in a format never before seen at Penns Valley. Band director Darris DeRemer welcomed everyone to â&#x20AC;&#x153;a concert in the round, without pause or applause.â&#x20AC;? The concert featured 22 selections played by a host of soloists, duos and several ensembles, stationed at various locations around the auditorium. Some took the conventional stage location, while others stood on the floor, flanking the stage area. Other musicians stood in the rear corners of the auditorium, while others were along the east side wall. Spotlights illuminated each performer or ensemble as they played, then shut off between acts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; suddenly reappeared to shine on another act in a new location. This format had the audience members turning their heads and swiveling in their seats all night. The musicians ranged in age from middle school to high school seniors, with Virginia Stattel being the lone seventh-grade performer. She did a fine job playing a clarinet solo of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ave Maria.â&#x20AC;? There were many

ensemble groups â&#x20AC;&#x201D; brass, woodwinds, percussion, or all of the above with names like Pot of Gold 2.0, Thirty Percent, The Freshmen Trio, Flying Wombats, The Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cabinet, M&M, and Baby Mutant Tigers. The music performed covered a wide range of genres and styles. Included were classical pieces like the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Minuet in G,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ave Maria,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nessun Dormaâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the Hall of the Mountain King.â&#x20AC;? Older pop standards included â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhere Over the Rainbow,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the Mood,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Entertainerâ&#x20AC;? and The Beatlesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yesterday.â&#x20AC;? The concert concluded with two lighthearted numbers: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Flintstones Theme,â&#x20AC;? by an eight-member brass-andwoodwind ensemble, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Movie Night Madnessâ&#x20AC;? by the Baby Mutant Tigers, a percussion ensemble of xylophone, vibraphone and bells. Baby Mutant Tigers' percussionist Mitchell Shuey said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t nervous when we played.â&#x20AC;? The concertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unusual format was suggested by DeRemer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did a similar concert when I was in college at Mansfield University. That was my favorite concert â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it featured every group in the university, and I thought we could do a similar thing at Penns Valley,â&#x20AC;? DeRemer said. He said that he was pleased with the musiciansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were a little nervous,â&#x20AC;? he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but I think they all did very well.â&#x20AC;?

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MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 15

Community walk for prevention of suicide scheduled for April 15 By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — The 2012 Out of the Darkness Community Walk is April 15 at Sidney Friedman Park (formerly Central Parklet) on Fraser Street in State College. Check-in is 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. for groups or individuals. The walk begins at 1 p.m. Visit the web site www.outofthedarkness.org for information to register or make donations. Net proceeds from the Out of the Darkness Community Walk will benefit the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. AFSP is the leading national non-profit organization exclusively dedicated to understanding and preventing suicide through research, education and advocacy and to reaching out to people with mental disorders and those impacted by suicide. Cindy Ross, of Spring Mills, is one of many in Centre County dealing with the aftermath of suicide. Cindy’s husband, Rick, committed suicide in April of 2008, leaving her and their three children behind. Cindy has decided to “come out of the darkness,” and tell her story to help suicide survivors cope with their tragedy, or perhaps to dissuade someone from taking his/her own life. Here, in Cindy’s own words, is her story:

OUT OF THE DARKNESS Yesterday, things were normal ... little did I know that something was going to happen to change my life, as well as my children’s, in one brief moment. We had been learning to work together closer over the last eight or 10 years. We were a family, and we worked to support whoever in the family needed help. My husband had a horrible struggle with depression. Unknown to most people is, depression doesn't hurt just one person, it hurts everyone close to him. Helping a loved one with depression is very difficult. There are many challenges in the lives of families as they try to work through things themselves.

I don't know what you think when you hear the word depression, but to me it has become a disease that people don't understand or even recognize the signs and symptoms. For the person who has the depression, they struggle to try to fight their way out of all that sadness. Some choose to get help or they make a decision that they can't go on anymore. Sometimes they feel useless and a burden to their family. Depression can be that other “silent killer.” Many questions remain unanswered, for example, what causes them to change from normal, happy people to falling into deep sadness and committing suicide? The most troubling suicide is when there is no note, no warning and we wonder why. Some of the hardest things I have learned over the last four years are that it is very hard, and I mean almost impossible, to stop blaming yourself for your husband’s suicide.There’s that nagging question, ‘why?’ Why did you make the decision to end your life? They didn't die from a heart attack, cancer, stroke or other medical problem, but rather, died from the depths of that silent killer, depression. What isn't understood is that depression is a disease, just like cancer, stroke or a heart attack. It is wrong to think otherwise. People can and do kill themselves by hanging, self-inflicted gunshot, drowning, overdose, crashing their cars and many more ways. Our families and funeral directors continue to hide suicide and increase the stigma and the social guilt that surrounds suicide. Think about reading an obituary that reads, “John Doe died at home.” It is just a way to hide from everyone like it is shameful and making the family feel guilty. For the surviving friends and family it becomes very hard to get through a day without sadness, guilt, and pain. Friends attend the viewing and funeral with all their well-intended remarks like, ‘If you need me just call’ or ‘You had many good years together.’

In the days that follow the suicide, for survivors family: The first week is shocking ... the family being deluged by calls, questions and condolences. There are meetings with the funeral director, the viewing and finally the burial. It is all done in a mental fog, not knowing half the time what is going on. And then, there is the silence. In the silence the phone calls stop, the usual friends who visit disappear and the way of life that was normal no longer exists. In a sort of cruelty, friends don't come to the family to talk because of the stigma and they have no idea what to say. What they don't understand is that they don't need to say anything — just be there. You say the same things to a family who has lost someone from cancer or heart attack. If you really want to help, listen and try not to offer too many opinions. I have learned that I will have to get through all of this in my own way. It is my struggle to move on or grieve. I have been shaken to the core and I shake from anxiety, the butterflies that came to live in my stomach. I can't eat. I can't sleep. I can't stop crying. I can't stop the anger. I can't be around other people because I have to hide how I feel. Part of that is the stigma that surrounds suicide. I go to the cemetery often and a sob over the stone. I scream and swear at that one person I loved with all my heart. That one person I trusted with everything in life. I leave without an answer and exhausted. I retreat to home where it is safe to be myself. God forbid, I sometimes want to join him because he was my life. Since that horrible day in April, 2008, I have reached out to pastors, therapists and doctors. What was once a normal life has changed into a battle against my own depression. My decision is to stick around and fight as long as I can. Life is beginning to take on a whole new meaning and I am not sure what that might be. My children and I are suicide survivors.

This week’s opportunities from Centre Region Parks and Recreation FRIDAY, MARCH 30 ■ Line Dancing – No experience necessary or partners needed. Dance at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. Admission is free. Call 814-231-3076. ■ Healthy Steps in Motion – This low-impact exercise will help improve balance, flexibility, strength and reduce the risk of falling, can be done in a chair or standing. Participants use hand-held weights and exercise bands, provided. Classes are 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. Admission is free. Register at www.crpr.org or call 814-231-3076. ■ Centre Region Badminton Club – Meets from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Easterly Parkway Elementary All Purpose Room, 234 Easterly Parkway, State College. Call 814-234-1039. SATURDAY, MARCH 31 ■ “Billy and the Story Machine,” puppet shows – Puppeteer Adam Swartz will perform an interactive, family-friendly, one-hour puppet show at 2 p.m. at Millbrook Marsh Nature Center, Spring Creek Education Building, 548 Puddingtown Road, College Township. Admission is $5 and free for children 4 and younger. Register at www.crpr.org or call 814-231-3076. MONDAY, APRIL 2 ■ Line Dancing – No experience necessary or partners needed. Dance at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. Admission is free. Call 814-231-3076. ■ Youth co-ed field hockey in cooperation with the Penn State Lady Lions field hockey – Class are for youth in grades 3 to 6 and will meet from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Lady Lion hockey field. If raining, class will meet at Holuba Hall. Registration fee is $36 for residents and $54 non-resident. Register at www.crpr.org or call 814-231-3071. ■ Lifeguarding Class, American Red Cross Certification – The course provides the skills and information necessary to become a professional lifeguard. Candidates must be 15 years old by April 21 and pass swimming skills pre-test. Candidates who do not pass the pre-test are eligible for a refund. Contact Aquatics Supervisor Todd Roth at 814-231-3071 or troth@crcog.net. Classes meet from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Monday, April 2 through Thursday, April 9 at the State College Area High School North Natatorium and Library, 653 Westerly Parkway, State College. Registration fee is $190 resident and $285 nonresident. Register at www.crpr.org or call 814-231-3071. TUESDAY, APRIL 3 ■ Line Dancing – No experience or partners needed. Dance at 7 p.m. at Mt Nittany Residences, 301 Rolling Ridge Drive, State College. Admission is free. ■ Knee High Naturalist Program, Sensational Spring – The programs are for children ages 3 to 6. Children can learn about and explore the Millbrook Marsh. Programs are one hour and include indoor and outdoor activities. Parents are encouraged to stay. Meet at 10:30 a.m. or at 12:30 p.m. at the Millbrook Marsh Nature Center barn, 548 Puddingtown Road, College Township. Registration fee is$6.50 residents and $9.75 nonresidents. Advance registration is required by visiting www.crpr.org or calling 814-231-3071.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4 ■ Line Dancing – No experience necessary or partners needed. Dance at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. Admission is free. Call 814-231-3076. ■ Youth co-ed field hockey in cooperation with the Penn State Lady Lions field hockey – Class are for youth in grades 3 to 6 and will meet from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Lady Lion hockey field. If raining class will meet at Holuba Hall, University Drive, University Park. Registration fee is $36 for residents and $54 non-resident. Register at www.crpr.org or call 814-2313071. ■ Teen Flashlight Easter Egg Hunt – Bring a flashlight to the event geared for children in grades six to eight. Meet at 8 p.m. Millbrook Marsh Nature Center barn, 548 Puddingtown Road, College Township. Dress for the weather. Advanced registration is required for the free event. Register at www.crpr.org or call 814-231-3071. ■ Knee High Naturalist Program, Nature Close Up – The programs are for children ages 3 to 6. Children can learn about and explore the Millbrook Marsh. Programs are one hour and

include indoor and outdoor activities. Parents are encouraged to stay. Meet at 10:30 a.m. or at 12:30 p.m. at the Millbrook Marsh Nature Center barn, 548 Puddingtown Road, College Township. Registration fee is$6.50 residents and $9.75 non-residents. Advance registration required by visiting www.crpr.org or calling 814-231-3071. ■ Beginning Tai Chi Class – The program may reduce pain and stiffness due to arthritis. Classes will be held at 4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, April 4 through June 20 at Centre Region Senior Center Meeting Room, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. The fee is $95 resident and $143 non-resident. Register at www.crpr.org call 814-231-3076. FRIDAY, APRIL 6 ■ Line Dancing – No experience necessary or partners needed. Dance at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. Admission is free. Call 814-231-3076. ■ Centre Region Badminton Club – Meets from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Easterly Parkway Elementary All Purpose Room, 234 Easterly Parkway, State College. Call 814-234-1039.

Oct. 19-27, 2012

Chamber of Business & Industr y of Centre Count y Join the CBICC for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explore exciting destinations in this beautiful and mysterious land! To learn more, please join us at a free, no obligation information session to be held on April 3, 2012 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Hoag’s Celebration Hall. To register for this session, call the CBICC at (814) 234-1829 or visit our website at http://www.cbicc.org/china.aspx This trip to open to the general public


PAGE 16

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

CENTRE

Having a ball CURTIS CLOUSER (in red) and Chris Wolf (in black) takes part in a group dance.

PHOTOS BY FARA LIPPINCOTT/For The Gazette

STEVEN PLAFCAN gets his cast signed by Penn State football first-year coach Bill O'Brien on Friday night.


SPREAD

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 17

PENN STATE coach Bill O'Brien, assistant coach Larry Johnson and several Nittany Lion players pose for a photo with the dancers at the annual Centre County Down Syndrome Society's dance party, which was held at Bellefonte Area High School on Friday night.

JACKSON LIPPICOTT dances during the annual Centre County Down Syndrome Society's dance party on Friday night.

LILI ARCHIBALD dances to the music during the annual Centre County Down Syndrome Society's dance party on Friday night.


PAGE 18

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

HEALTH & WELLNESS Proper breathing can beat stress Breathing is essential for human life. What may not be so obvious is that the way we breathe affects our health and mood. Many breathing techniques have been developed to improve human well-being, such as the centuriesold breathing techniques of yoga. I will share two easy-tolearn methods that can help you relax, become more centered and ease anxiety. Healthy, contented babies instinctively breathe using deep belly breaths. This type of breathing helps to activate the Karen Dabney completed her training parasympathetic nervin massage therapy ous system, the part of at the Baltimore our nervous system School of Massage, that promotes relaxYork Campus and ation, digestion and has an ongoing in- the body's ability to reterest in wellness pair itself. and holistic health. If our ancestors remained in this relaxed

KAREN DABNEY

state all the time, they would have become lunch for local predators. To face emergencies and evade danger, our ancestors needed to shift into “fightor-flight” mode, governed by the sympathetic nervous system. In this state, breathing and heart rates accelerate and blood rushes to the skeletal muscles to prepare us for action. Breathing becomes more shallow. The sympathetic nervous system is designed to assist us with temporary emergencies. Most of us no longer face sabertooth tigers and other predators on a daily basis, but our nervous systems still react as if we do. When the boss is angry or the stock market crashes, many people experience the same physiological response they would experience during a life-threatening emergency. If the boss is always angry, many people remain in fight-or-flight mode and their bodies and minds don't get a chance to rest, repair and recharge. Over time, this can result in health problems on all levels — mental, emotional and physical. Changing your breathing can help you regain a more relaxed, less stressed state. Start by lying down and placing one

hand on your upper chest and one hand on your stomach. Observe which area rises and falls when you breathe. If you notice that your chest expands the most, you are currently breathing in the more shallow and rapid way, characteristic of fight or flight mode. You may not be stressed at the moment; this form of breathing can become habitual. If your stomach moves the most, and the motion in your chest is limited to the sideways expansion of your rib cage, you are experiencing belly breathing, also known as diaphragmatic breathing. This style of breathing is the goal of this exercise. Lie down and imagine that there are three balloons in your body — one in your chest, one in your stomach and one in your lower abdomen. Breathe in, imagining that you are filling the three balloons — first in the chest, then the belly, then the lower abdomen. When done correctly, there will be little or no rise of your chest. You will feel your lower body expand as the air enters and contract as you breathe out. When you get more comfortable with this, you may notice that you feel more relaxed and peaceful. If you practice while

lying, sitting and standing, over time it will become your primary way of breathing. You can use diaphragmatic breathing to calm and clear your mind before and during stressful moments, such as a job interview or dealing with a difficult person. Another helpful technique is mindful breathing. Sit quietly in a comfortable position and place your full attention on your breath. You may wish to focus on a place in your body where you feel your breath, such as your nostrils, throat, or belly. Sometimes I prefer to put my attention on one of the oxygen molecules flowing into my lungs and out again. Don't try to change your breath. Let it be exactly as it is and simply observe it. If your mind wanders or you start judging how well you are doing, let go of that thought and gently bring your focus back to the breath again. This concentrated focus can help you become more centered and peaceful. It can help ease painful emotions such as sadness and anxiety and take the edge off them, making them easier to bear. Diaphragmatic breathing can have a positive impact on your health by helping you shift from the stress of fight-or-flight mode into a more restful state.

Working out together requires good balance By TERRY TOMALIN Tampa Bay Times

Exercise is great for your heart, but a regular fitness routine can wreak havoc on a relationship, especially if your significant other’s idea of movement is reaching for the remote control. We’ve all heard about “golf widows” bemoaning the hours their partners spend in pursuit of the little white ball. And for every person who is thrilled when his or her spouse goes from fat to fit, there’s another who resents the fact that Chunky Monkey has been banned from the freezer. But triathlon, with its extreme time demands and its power to transform athletes both physically and emotionally, may be one of the toughest challenges any couple can face. Triathlon has been called the “divorce sport” because the commitment it takes to complete one of these runbike-swim events can leave the noncompetitive partner feeling neglected, and perhaps even abandoned. We talked to three couples who have found their own ways to cope with the challenges of rigorous regimens — while making good relationships even better.

JULIO AND JOLIE Julio and Jolie Velez met more than 40 years ago when they were both working at a department store in New York City. She was a 17-year-old with a part-time job. He was a 21-year-old starting his career. It was love at first sight. Twenty years and three kids later, Jolie decided it was time to get in shape, hoping to control the asthma that she had suffered from since she was a child. “I am a physical therapist,” she said. “I wanted to be healthy.” In 1998, she started running, just a mile at first, but gradually she increased her distance to the point that she could finish a 5K. “There was a tremendous sense of accomplishment,” she said. “I felt great.” Julio, however, was overworked and out of shape. “I was proud of her, don’t get me wrong,” he said. “But there was a little tinge of resentment.” But inspired by his wife, Julio eventually quit smoking,

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modified his diet and started exercising. He ran and walked, ran and walked, until eventually he could cover a mile without stopping. Forty pounds of fat melted away. The Velezes ran a couple of races together and then they decided to try a triathlon. “The only trouble was that neither one of us could swim,” Jolie said. “I was deathly afraid of the water. You grow up in the city, you don’t have a lot of access to pools.” So at ages 52 and 56, Jolie and Julio MELISSA LYTTLE/Tampa Bay Times took swimming lessons. “It took us JULIO AND YOLANDA Velez, married 40 years, have always run together. They took up swimming a few about a year to get years ago to compete in triathalons. comfortable in the man, I get out of the house when it’s still dark out,” he said. water,” Julio said. “But we stuck to it and did it together.” “I try not to let it take too much time from the family.” In 2005, Jolie entered her first triathlon, on Long Island. Even at the height of the season, Chuck sets aside at Two years later, now living in Seminole, Fla., Julio finished least one weekend a month for a family activity, and he and the St. Anthony’s Triathlon. Since then, they have raced toWendy never miss their date nights. gether several times. “If Mom is happy, everybody is happy,” he said. “The “We have always had a tight relationship,” said Jolie, key is balance.” now 59. “But this whole experience has brought us closer together.” “It has been fun,” said Julio, 62. “We’ve been really CHIP AND JOAN lucky.” Joan Kuykendall, 49, has been married to her husband, Chip, for 16 years. The Belleair, Fla., couple are veterinarians by training, but Joan put her career on hold to stay at CHUCK AND WENDY home with their three children. Chuck Wasson has a stressful job, working in insurance. Back in the summer of 2006, their daughter Ana, then If he didn’t have an outlet, he’d go crazy. age 7, saw a triathlon and wanted to do one. “So I trained “I started doing triathlons back in 2000,” said the 47with her,” Joan said. “I wasn’t fast. I just wanted to finish.” year-old Largo, Fla., resident. “I really got into it. It is alBut Joan kept at it, eventually getting good enough to most like having a part-time job.” enter an Ironman-distance event. But Chuck has seen the sport ruin marriages. “It can re“It’s a lot of work, getting up at 4:15 to train and then ally pull people apart,” he said. “For it to work, you really getting back in time for Chip to get off to work,” she said. need a supportive spouse.” “But it’s been worth it.” Chuck and his wife, Wendy, have been married for 21 Her 42-year-old husband is hardly a couch potato. years and have two daughters. “Chip has always been a competitive soccer player,” she “I know that this is his passion,” she said. “He also likes said. “He played in college and then adult leagues, and to cook, which could be a bad thing without all the exernow he is a coach and a soccer dad.” cise.” But recently he decided he had enough time on the Wendy and daughters Rebecca, 15, and Sarah, 17, are sidelines and went out and ran a half-marathon, “just like Chuck’s biggest supporters. that,” Joan said. “We go to all the races,” said Wendy, who prefers to do “I love the fact that she competes,” he said of Joan. “It her own workouts at the gym. gives her a chance to express her personality and it gives “We carry the towel and the sweats. We are there at the me a chance to show my support. finish line.” “But in the end, that is what relationships are all about. Chuck, too, has made adjustments to make his workYou got to be able to give and take.” outs work with family life. “When I’m training for an Iron-


SPORTS

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

Ward was truly one of a kind Steeler Sundays just won't be the same without Hines Ward. A little over a week ago, the former Pittsburgh Steeler wide receiver formally announced his retirement from the NFL. He was released several weeks ago by the Steelers, a casualty of the salary cap. I've been a journalist for over 20 years. There's very little that gets to me emotionally, especially when it comes to sports. However, watching Ward's teary farewell touched me. The guy has been a staple of my Steel- HINES WARD er Sundays for 14 seasons. I still remember when the Steelers drafted him in the third round out of the University of Georgia. When that selection was announced, my first thought was: Hines who? But several games into his career, it was clear that this guy was special. He was a throwback. He could catch, run and even throw — he was a quarterback at Georgia, after all. But it was clear from the start that Ward could throw a killer block. Through the years, Ward became known for his blocking skills. He shattered the jaw of Cincinnati's Keith Rivers. During a Monday night game in Pittsburgh, he knocked out Baltimore's Ed Reed. The NFL changed the rules because of Ward. Throughout his career, Ward racked up 1,000 receptions and 12,083 yards. He caught 85 touchdowns and laid out countless defenders. The guy always had a smile on his face, except when the Steelers lost, of course. He took the losses harder than anyone. I will never forget him standing in the locker room at Heinz Field, bawling his eyes out after the 41-27 defeat at the hands of the New England PatriChris Morelli is the ots in the 2004 AFC Championship editor of the Centre Game. He wasn't feeling sorry for himCounty Gazette. He self. No, he was upset because the can be reached at Steelers had failed in their mission to editor@centre countygazette.com get beloved No. 36 — Jerome Bettis — to Super Bowl XXXIX. “He deserves to be a champion,” Ward said, tears streaming down his face. That image graced the front page of the Pittsburgh PostGazette and certainly motivated Ward and Co. in 2005. Sitting at 7-5 and on the verge of missing the playoffs, Ward was a key cog as the Steelers rolled off four consecutive victories to sneak into the playoffs as the No. 6 seed. In the postseason, they rallied from a 10-0 deficit on the road at Cincinnati to win a wildcard game. The next week in Indianapolis, the Steelers were double-digit underdogs to Peyton Manning and the top-seeded Colts. In that game, then-second year starter Ben Roethlisberger came out throwing the ball, catching the Colts off guard. The Steelers took an early 14-0 lead before hanging on for a 21-18 AFC Divisional playoff win that propelled the Steelers into the AFC title game at Denver. In that game, the Steelers jumped out to a 24-3 lead and Ward played a pivotal role in a 34-17 victory that sent the team to Super Bowl XL in Bettis' hometown of Detroit. Super Bowl XL was Ward's shining moment. He caught five balls for 123 yards that Sunday evening and pulled in a 43-yard TD from fellow wide receiver Antwaan Randle-El on a gadget play in the fourth quarter. That catch salted the win away and gave the Steelers their fifth Super Bowl title. For his efforts, Ward was named the game's MVP. The shot of him bounding into the end zone with a mile-wide smile was immortalized on the cover of Sports Illustrated. There would be two more Super Bowls for Ward — XLIII and XLV. Although he didn't play a huge role in either game, his presence on the field was invaluable. He sparked a comeback in Super Bowl XLV that nearly gave the Steelers another Lombardi. Since he announced his retirement, there has been much debate over whether or not Ward is a hall of famer. There should be no debate — he is. He played 14 seasons in the black and gold and is the Steelers' all-time leading receiver. He is eighth on the alltime list. Not bad for a third-round pick who played quarterback at Georgia. I am certainly in the minority, but I felt that Ward still had a little gas left in the tank. He was a casualty of the salary cap. It seemed inevitable that he would wind up elsewhere this season. In the end, it's good that he didn't. Ward is, without a doubt, the consummate Steeler. Sundays won't be the same without him.

CHRIS MORELLI

PAGE 19

After back-to-back national titles, Lions look ahead to next season By ERIC KNOPSNYDER Special to The Gazette

In his three seasons as coach, Cael Sanderson has already doubled the number of NCAA titles that the Penn State wrestling program had won in the 101 years prior to his arrival from Iowa State. With eight starters returning from this year's team – including five AllAmericans, two undefeated national champs and college wrestling's most dominant wrestler – it looks like the only thing that might derail the potential dynasty could be the wrestlers themselves. In the months after the Nittany Lions won the school's first national title in more than half a century, team members were making headlines for all of the wrong reasons. The most high-profile case was Andrew Long, who was accused of sexually assaulting a friend's mother, but he was just one of a half-dozen Nittany Lions who faced legal problems prior to this season. Still, Penn State was able to push all of the legal issues and distractions aside and post another championship season. The Nittany Lions went 13-1 in dual meets and claimed a share of the Big Ten title with a 7-1 record in the conference. They captured their second straight Big Ten tournament championship after never having won one before Sanderson's arrival. And, most impressively, most of the Lions seemed to peak at the right time: at the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championship in St. Louis. Quentin Wright, a Bald Eagle Area graduate, could be the poster child for getting hot at the right time. A year after he won the NCAA title from the ninth seed, Wright made a run to the finals this season from the sixth spot. He ended up dropping a 4-2 overtime decision to State College graduate Steve Bosak in the 184-pound final, but Wright seems to have a knack for wrestling his best at the end of the season. “I might not have had the best year, didn't go undefeated, all the perfect things you want, but life's not perfect,” Wright said the night before facing Bosak for the title. “You just go to keep waking up the next day and have a positive attitude. “I learned a lot about myself last year,” he said. “Just using those lessons and the lessons from Coach Cael that he preaches every day in practice to us. Just go out there and enjoy it, have fun, take risks. Wrestling is fun. Keeping that positive attitude really keeps us going.” Wright went 30-4 as a redshirt junior and is one of three Nittany Lions that will be back after reaching the national finals this season. The other two, 165-pounder David Taylor and 174-pounder Ed Ruth, return after dominating even the nation's best competition. Taylor had four pins and a technical fall in the national tournament. That capped a 32-0 season and gives him a career record of 70-1. Those kinds of numbers are impressive even to Sanderson, who went 159-0 in his college career. “I'm not a history buff in any way, but I don't know if there's ever been a more dominant performance at the

TAMI KNOPSNYDER/Special to The Gazette

PENN STATE’S Quentin Wright will be back for his senior season in 2012-13 as the Nittany Lion wrestling team looks to win its third consecutive national championship. NCAA tournament than what we just saw right there,” Sanderson said in St. Louis. “Four pins and a tech fall in the finals? Just sitting back like everybody else and just saying ‘Wow.’” Ruth made more than a few people say “wow” on his way to a 31-0 season. He is now 69-2 in his career and, like Taylor, is just a redshirt sophomore. Both Ruth and Taylor have the ability to post falls and light up the scoreboard, which gives Penn State an edge in tournaments as well as dual meets. This year's run to the NCAA team title got a big boost from a true freshman in Nico Megaludis. The 10th seed in the national tournament, he made it to the 125-pound finals before falling to Iowa's Matt McDonough. Still, his 28-8 season gives the Nittany Lions plenty of hope for the future. Another freshman, 157-pounder Dylan Alton, earned All-America honors by placing third at the NCAA tournament. After taking a redshirt his first year on campus, the Central Mountain graduate went 30-6. His twin brother, Andrew, redshirted this season after going 30-10 as a true freshman in 2010-11 and falling one victory short of becoming an AllAmerican. Both Altons are expected to find a spot in the lineup next season. While they are losing just the two starters, the Nittany Lions will have some big shoes to fill. Frank Molinaro was a four-time All-American and went 33-0 this season on his way to the 149-pound title. Sanderson also will lose 285pounder Cameron Wade, a four-time national qualifier who won 94 career matches for the Nittany Lions. The pain of losing those two will be eased by the talent that Sanderson is bringing into the program and what he already has in the wrestling room. Andrew Alton likely will step in at 149 pounds while Jon Gingrich, a

BEA grad who went 21-4 and won the National Collegiate Open tournament as a redshirt freshman, or Jimmy Lawson, who is transferring to Penn State after spending two seasons with the Monmouth University football team, will take over at heavyweight. The Nittany Lions also have one of the nation's best high school recruits coming into the program in Jimmy Gulibon, a Derry Area senior who is just the 10th wrestler to win four PIAA titles. He won the title at 126 pounds this season and either he or Megaludis could bump Frank Martellotti, a national qualifier at 133 pounds, from the lineup next season. There's also the possibility that Megaludis and Morgan McIntosh, who qualified for the NCAA tournament at 197 pounds as a true freshman, could redshirt next season. That could lead Wright to move up to 197 pounds, which could open a spot for Matt Brown, who might have been the nation's best backup this season as well as one of its most versatile. The redshirt freshman from Utah went 27-2 while competing in open tournaments – one of his losses came to Ruth – and spot duty for the Nittany Lions. He backed up Ruth at 174 and McIntosh at 197, and went 50 in dual meets, including a big victory over Michigan's nationally ranked Max Huntley in a match where Brown was outweighed by 23 pounds. After winning his second national title as a coach, Sanderson wasn't about to start talking about how next year's lineup will look. “It's up to them, really,” he said. “You have to plan three years out ... as a coaching staff,” Sanderson said. “And that's what we're doing and that's recruiting. And when you recruit a kid, you look at them a couple of years down the road. “So we'll do what's in the best interests of the kid and the team, and we expect to be better every year.”

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PAGE 20

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

New coach, old questions as PSU opens spring ball By GENARO C. ARMAS The Associated Press

Submitted photo

2012 CENTRAL PA NFF College Award Winners: Penn State head football coach Bill Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien poses with seven of the eight college award winners. Front row, from left: Matt Knouse (Susquehanna), Ray Bierach (Lycoming), Coach Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien, John Franco (IUP) and Jarryd Burkett (Lock Haven). Back row: Timothy Bolte (Bucknell), Shawn Sopic (Clarion), Brett Shippey (Juniata), Jon Rohrbaugh (Penn State), Luke McConnell (St. Francis).

Submitted photo

2012 CENTRAL PA NFF Scholarship Winners: Front row, from left: Taylor Garman, Clayton Filipowicz, Matthew Ritchey, Luke Zearing, Patrick Mehta, Anthony Unger and Matthew Dill. Back Row: Lucas Hearn, Tyler Palfey, Jack Hafner, Evam Heiser, Dan Nagle, Connor Pierce, Bradley Hengst, Matthew Dillon and Benjamin Fowler.

STATE COLLEGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Surveying the throng of media waiting patiently at desks in front of him at Beaver Stadium, Bill O'Brien looked like a teacher on the first day of school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I'm going to do my class, start putting in some routes,â&#x20AC;? Penn State's rookie head coach said with a grin Monday, sitting at a spot at the podium where his predecessor, the late Joe Paterno, held court just five months earlier. With O'Brien now leading the way, the Nittany Lions opened spring practice Monday without Paterno as head coach for the first time in nearly a half-century. There were signs of change around the football complex, for sure. Some more subtle than others. A few players strolled on to the field with facial hair â&#x20AC;&#x201D; once a no-no under Paterno, especially in-season. Even staffers at times got a polite scolding from JoePa if they weren't clean shaven. Reporters were allowed to watch almost an hour of practice on the first day of drills. Paterno rarely opened up practice, and when he did, access was usually limited to about 20 minutes. And new signage adorned a weight room in the midst of a remodeling to accommodate more Olympic-style lifting and free weights. On display were words in big, blue and bold letters such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;FAMILY,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;HARD WORKâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;PLAY FAST.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those are his words,â&#x20AC;? strength coach Craig Fitzgerald said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;for our program.â&#x20AC;? The former offensive coordinator of the New England Patriots, O'Brien promised to build the Penn State attack around the â&#x20AC;&#x153;core basicsâ&#x20AC;? of the Patriots' high-scoring offense. One big difference: star quarterback Tom Brady isn't around to run the show anymore for O'Brien. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were no quarterback controversies in New England,â&#x20AC;? he joked before acknowledging that he'd rather use the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;competitionâ&#x20AC;? than controversy. Whatever the word, it's now a three-way race for the starting quarterback job with the offense getting an overhaul. Matt McGloin ended 2011 as the starter before sitting out the 30-14 loss to Houston in the TicketCity Bowl because of a concussion. Rob Bolden opened 2011 as starter but gradually lost playing time to McGloin before being inserted back into the lineup for the bowl. The new entry is Paul Jones, a rising third-year sophomore who has been saddled with academic problems. O'Brien said Jones has been doing well in school this semester. Bottom line: Don't expect a starter to be named any time soon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I'll be real clear â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it's an open competition. There's no starter and there won't be a starter named until possibly the night before the Ohio game,â&#x20AC;? O'Brien said, referring to the season opener against the Bobcats on Sept. 1. It's unclear if another quarterback might enter the fray by the fall. Former Maryland quarterback Danny O'Brien,

who was granted his release from the Terrapins last month, was in attendance at Penn State spring practice wearing a blue Nittany Lions jacket. A redshirt sophomore, Danny O'Brien was granted his release from the Terrapins last month after completing 150 of 266 passes for 1,648 yards with seven touchdowns and 10 interceptions last seasons. Bill O'Brien, who isn't related to the quarterback, declined comment when asked earlier Monday about Danny O'Brien, citing NCAA rules on talking about prospects. But from the sideline, Danny O'Brien was able to watch the new Penn State coach finally mentor the offense. It wasn't pretty at times on a sunny day with a brisk wind blowing across the practice field, though it was just the first day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I were you guys, I'd get back,â&#x20AC;? Bill O'Brien told onlookers with a straight face before beginning sideline passing drills, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because I don't know where these throws are going.â&#x20AC;? Everyone starts with a clean slate, the coach said, especially on offense. So much so that O'Brien hasn't watched film of Penn State's offense the last couple seasons. That might be a good thing, because the Nittany Lions weren't very good â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 11th in the 12-team Big Ten in scoring (19.3 points per game) and 10th in total offense (342 yards). O'Brien added that he didn't want to make any judgments about what was done in the past because he wasn't familiar with Penn State's prior offensive schemes or the last staff's coaching style. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the things I wanted to do was start with a clean slate with these guys and just evaluate them in the winter conditioning and now into spring practice,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To this point, I've been very pleased ... we'll start evaluating them on the football field this afternoon.â&#x20AC;? O'Brien plans to call the plays and primarily run the offense, while veteran defensive coordinator Ted Roof will call the defense. O'Brien plans to stick with a base four-down defensive scheme, similar to the one Paterno employed with much success, though â&#x20AC;&#x153;Linebacker U.â&#x20AC;? will also shake up coverages with new wrinkles. O'Brien, though, did watch some film of the Penn State defense from previous seasons. Overall, the spring is about â&#x20AC;&#x153;mixing and matching,â&#x20AC;? O'Brien said, likening the 15 March and April workouts to NFL minicamp. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We'll probably be lucky to get a first down. We'll be lucky to gain an inch this spring,â&#x20AC;? he said, speaking about the newlook offense going against the defense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But we'll see how it goes.â&#x20AC;? Notes: O'Brien declined comment on reports of a potential off-field issue involving rising senior WR Devon Smith and former DE Jack Crawford, who is graduating. O'Brien said he had just received information about it Monday morning regarding Smith, who practiced. ... Star LB Michael Mauti (left knee) will not take part in contact drills this spring but is expected to be ready for the fall. ... Backup RB Curtis Dukes will miss spring practice because of academics.

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 21

‘Best and brightest’ honored at awards banquet From Gazette Staff Reports UNIVERSITY PARK — Bill O’Brien said he “couldn’t think of a better place to be on the eve of our first practice,” speaking to “the best and brightest” high school scholar athletes Sunday afternoon. Penn State’s new football coach was the featured speaker at the Pennsylvania Chapter of the National Football Foundation annual awards banquet at the Penn Stater Conference Center. “It’s very rare that you can have a group BILL O’BRIEN of kids in one room that a really the future leaders of our country,” O’Brien said to an audience of more than 600 people, including scholar-athletes representing 42 high schools and nine colleges in Pennsylvania. At a news conference prior to the event, O’Brien stressed the importance building relationships with high school coaches and recruiting the core of his roster from Pennsylvania. “We are the state university. We are in

the center of the state. It’s very important to recruit in Pennsylvania. I got the distinct feeling that they want their kids to go to Penn State,” said O’Brien, referring to the many high school coaches he has spoken to in his first two months on the job. “The reception from high school coaches around the state has been excellent. We have 160 majors, a stadium full of 106,000 people and a great campus. Who wouldn’t want to come here?” Penn State will host a high school coaching clinic Friday. O’Brien said he has been very pleased with the effort of his players during the winter conditioning and weight training drills. “We’ve got a good bunch of kids and we are looking forward to starting,” O’Brien said. “I am so sick of sitting in that office. I can’t wait to get out there and start coaching football.” Jon Rohrbaugh, a long snapper for the Nittany Lions, was among the college seniors honored at the banquet. Rohrbaugh, a Management Information System major, was an Academic All-Big Ten honoree in 2011. Four area high school scholar athletes received recognition at the event:

MATTHEW DILLON, BALD EAGLE AREA Dillon, the son of Thadd and Lisa Dillon of Howard, played tailback and safety for the Bald Eagles. “Matt’s unselfish work ethic and positive attitude makes him the ultimate team player,” coach Jack Tobias said. Dillon, who also lettered in wrestling, intends to study science at Lock Haven University with plans to become a Physician’s Assistant. CLAYTON FLIPOWICZ, BELLEFONTE A three-year starter on the offensive line, Flipowicz has yet to decide where he will continue his college career. “Clayton proved you need to practice as you play to be truly successful,” coach Duffy Besch said of the Red Raider captain. Flipowicz is the son of Charles and Theresa Flipowicz.

EVAN HEISER, PENNS VALLEY “Evan has been a leader, a hard worker and a positive influence on his teammates,” coach Martin Tobias said of Heiser, who starred at wide receiver and linebacker for the Rams. Heiser, the son of Brian and Theresa Heiser of Centre Hall, plans to continue his education at Penn State. He plans to major in Mechanical Engineering. JACK HAFFNER, STATE COLLEGE Haffner has starred both on and off the field for coach Al Wolski’s Little Lions. Haffner rushed for more than 2000 yards and won All State honors at Running Back. “Jack inspired his teammates to excel,” Wolski said of his senior captain. Haffner, the son of Steve and Amy Haffner, will continue his football career at Penn State.

Lady Lions bow out of NCAA tourney with loss to top-seeded UConn Huskies By DOUG FEINBERG The Associated Press

KINGSTON, R.I. — Geno Auriemma and his UConn Huskies found a balanced offense to go along with their already stingy defense. That combination moved them one step away from a fifth straight trip to the Final Four. Bria Hartley scored 20 points, Kelly Faris added 15 and No. 1 seed Connecticut advanced to the NCAA tournament's regional finals for the seventh straight year with a 77-59 win over Penn State on Sunday. “We're finding a certain comfort level with each other which is really helping us right now,” Auriemma said. “We made a couple tweaks to our offense when the Big East tournament came around.” The results were five players in double figures on offense. “People are taking shots within the offense,” Auriemma said. “For us to get five players in double figures that makes up for not having someone who can get 30. Not having Maya (Moore) is a huge loss going into the NCAA tournament, we've had to replace her with four players instead of just one and it's paying off.” While the offense clicked against Penn State, the defense continued to be superb. The Huskies stymied the Nittany

Lions, who averaged 87.5 points in the first two games of the Kingston regional. “It’s something we take a lot of pride in,” Faris said of the defense. “It's something we work on day in and day out. Our offense stems from that. We play with four guards and a lot of switching and everyone has to know all the personnel. Today, it came down to everyone talking and helping each other out. We covered well for each other.” Leading 36-27 late in the first half, UConn (32-4) used a 17-2 run spanning halftime to blow the game open. Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis started the spurt with a 3-pointer. Two free throws by Tiffany Hayes made it 43-29 at the break. UConn then scored the first 10 points of the second half to extend the margin to 5329. Hartley capped the run with a lay-in. Penn State (26-7) scored the next nine points to pull to 53-38, but the Nittany Lions could get no closer. “We played too fast,” Penn State coach Coquese Washington said. “We shot a lot of quick shots. We didn't show enough patience on the offensive end. When you do that against a team like Connecticut, you give up a lot of points in transition. Once they get on a roll they're tough to stop.” Mia Nickson scored 19 points and Maggie Lucas added 15 for

Penn State. Alex Bentley, the team's second-leading scorer, had just eight points. UConn made Bentley and Lucas work hard for every point. The Huskies, who lead the nation allowing just over 45 points a game, didn't allow the pair many open looks at the basket and they combined to shoot 7 for 31. “We knew going into the game that UConn was a good defensive team,” Bentley said. “They gave a great effort and played good team defense.” The Huskies got off to a quick start, opening with a 14-4 run. Hartley had six during the opening spurt. UConn appeared ready to blow the game wide open, extending the advantage to 24-10 on Hayes' layup, but Penn State scored 11 of the next 13 points to cut its deficit to five on Nickson's free throws. That's when Mosqueda-Lewis and Hartley took over. The pair scored the next 11 points for UConn, with Mosqueda-Lewis' 3-pointer beginning the key run. This was the Huskies' 19th straight trip to the round of 16, while the Nittany Lions advanced this far for the first time since 2004 — when they lost to Connecticut in the regional finals. “I think it's a very good step for us,” Washington said. “We wanted to improve every single season and we've done that. When I look at the game one thing I saw was that Connecticut

PENN STATE'S David Taylor, a sophomore, captured the prestigious Hodge Trophy for his efforts during the 2011-12 season. Taylor defeated Lehigh's Brandon Hatchett to win the 165-pound NCAA title. TAMI KNOPSNYDER/Special to The Gazette

MARK SELDERS/Penn State Athletic Communications

ALEX BENTLEY, Penn State’s leading scorer during the regular season, had just eight points in the Lady Lions' loss to No. 1 seed Connecticut on Sunday in the Sweet 16. played like a team that has played in a Sweet 16 before. They understood how long the game was and the patience you need to execute with.” Washington has done an incredible job rebuilding the program since taking over in 2007. The Nittany Lions won their first Big Ten regular-season title since 2004 this year. They also posted their highest win total since 2004-05. This was the second straight

NCAA bid under Washington's watch for Penn State, once a Top 25 staple before slipping during the last few years of longtime coach Rene Portland's tenure. Penn State was able to advance to Kingston by winning two games at LSU, including beating the host team in the second round. Winning on the road has been no problem for this squad, which was 7-1 away from home in Big Ten conference games this season.

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT State High thespians to present musical ‘The Drowsy Chaperon’ By PAT PARK Special to The Gazette

STATE COLLEGE — The State College Area High School thespians will present the musical “The Drowsy Chaperon” Thursday through Sunday in the State College Area High School North Auditorium, 653 Westerly Parkway, State College. “The Drowsy Chaperon” is a musical with book by Bob Martin and Greg Morrison, and music and lyrics by Lisa Lambert and Morrison. It debuted in Toronto, Canada, in 1998 and opened on Broadway in 2006. It won two Tony Awards for best book and one for best score. Originally written as a spoof for a private party, the show has been adapted for a general audience. Older audience members will enjoy the retro-jazz music and, the fact that it is short, for a musical, makes it ideal for the young crowd. The members of the cast called the musical “funny, clever, witty and hilarious.” The show-within-a-show starts as a very forlorn man sits in his drab chair in his dull little room and listens to a recording of his favorite musical. Soon his room transforms into a glittering stage filled with showgirls in glitzy costumes. Cast members include: Jesse Moore as Aldolpho, Emily Dennis as the Drowsy Chaperone, Mitchell Cornwall as Robert Martin, Morgan Sichler as Janet Van De Graff, Jason Doll as Man in Chair, Brittany Farnsworth as Trix the Aviatrix, Tyler Weakland as George, Erin McQuay as Mrs. Tottendale, Zak Kalp as Underling, Madeline Lusk as Kitty, Stephen Zimmerer as Gangster #2, Jacob Hopkins as Feldzieg and Jeremy Edelstein as Gangster #1. Thespian faculty advisors are Jill Campbell, director and Laura Julius, producer.

DREW FRANK/Meadowlane Photography

BRITTANY FARNSWORTH as Trix the Aviatrix, Mitchell Cornwall as Robert Martin, Morgan Sichler as Janet Van De Graff and Tyler Weakland as George perform in the State High thespians musical production of “The Drowsy Chaperon.” “The Drowsy Chaperon” is a chance to see a new show that is sure to become a classic.

Rodney Laney headliner at charity comedy show

Show time will be 7 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday.

State Theatre hosts local film ‘The Pact’

From Gazette Staff Reports

From Gazette Staff Reports

STATE COLLEGE — Centre County PAWS in cooperation with Wise Crackers Comedy Club presents the fourth annual PAWS Comedy Club featuring comedian Rodney Laney with two shows at 6 and 9:30 p.m. on March 31 at Celebration Hall, 2280 Commercial Blvd., State College. A reception will precede the 6 p.m. show where PAWS adoptable pets will attend and hors d’oeuvres served. In addition, show goers can become an Animal Rescue Sponsor, where their name will be listed in

STATE COLLEGE — Centre County residents and Penn State students are invited to attend the premiere of a new film, “The Pact,” which will run at the State Theatre from March 31 to April 4. “The Pact” is a romantic comedy written, produced and directed by Penn State professor and local filmmaker Matt Toronto. The film is about two brothers, who, after getting dumped, decide to swear off women for an entire year. These brothers soon realize that the pact has an almost magical hold over them, punishing or rewarding them based on their dedication to it. Eventually the brothers come to learn that their pact, a symbol of brotherly love and devotion, is really about loyalty to one another. “Hollywood isn't the only place to find people making movies,” said Toronto. “By coming out to see 'The Pact' you're not only supporting independent filmmaking, you're supporting Penn State artists. You're supporting your own community.” The premiere will take place at 7 p.m. March 31 at the State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. The cast and crew of “The Pact” will be in attendance. Following the film, there

Submitted photo

RODNEY LANEY, who has appeared on Comedy Central, is the headliner March 31 at the fourth annual PAWS Comedy Club at Celebration Hall.

the printed program and on the AV screen during the reception. Tickets are $60 per person for the show and reception and $75 per person for the show, reception and Animal Rescue Sponsorship. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. The 9:30 p.m. show is $20 per person and the doors open at 9 p.m. PAWS adoptable pets will be in attendance and appetizers will be available for purchase before and during the performance. Tickets may be purchased online at www.centrecountypaws.org/comedyclub or at Centre County PAWS, 1401 Trout Road, State College; Designer’s Denn Salon and Spa, 212 East Calder Way, State College; Metzger Animal Hospital, 1044 Benner Pike, State College; Penn State University Marketing Class 497D, University Park; J. Ritchie Veterinary Hospital, 2790 W. College Ave., Suite 1000, State College. There will be a 50/50 cash raffle before each of the shows. All proceeds benefit Centre County PAWS.

For tickets, call 814-231-4188. The box office will be open from 3:45 to 5:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday.

will be a talkback, as well as a small reception in the lobby. Tickets are $8 for the general public or $6 for students and seniors and can be purchased at the State Theatre box office. For information find “The Pact” on Facebook, follow them on Twitter @PactMovie, or visit the website, www.facebook.com/Watch ThePact.


MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 23

Lancaster’s Stray Birds bring roots music to Acoustic Brew By KAREN DABNEY For The Gazette

LEMONT — Lancaster musician Oliver Craven is no stranger to the Acoustic Brew Concert Series. On March 31, he will return with his current band, The Stray Birds, for their debut performance. The concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Center for Well Being, 123 Mt. Nittany Road, in Lemont. Hailing from Lancaster County, the trio consists of Craven on fiddle, guitar and mandolin; Maya De Vitry on banjo, guitar, and fiddle; and Charles Muench on bass. They sing three-part harmony and alternate the lead vocals. Craven describes their music as “Americana, original American roots music. We create our own songs but use instruments popular in Appalachia, with respect to that heritage.” Most of their music is written by Craven and DeVitry. “We do a couple songs that are not original to ourselves,” Craven said. “A Grateful Dead tune, a John Hyatt song, Appalachian old-time music in the public domain.” They perform ballads about people, places and personal experiences, and tunes that create a “stompin, flat-footed, dancing good time.” The band 's first visit to the region was as faculty for the May 2011 Folk College at Juniata College. Craven has deeper ties to the State College area. He is familiar to many local folk music fans from two recent Acoustic Brew con-

certs — the Craven Family Band in 2010 and The Steel Wheels concert in 2011. He is the son of Tim Craven, the head of the Craven Family Band and the lead singer and rhythm guitarist for the Rustical Quality String Band, a popular 1970s acoustic group that still plays annually at the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. After touring with the Steel Wheels for a year, Craven left to pursue playing full time with the Stray Birds. The band started as the duo of Craven and De Vitry, after they met in December 2009. Muench played bass on their “Borderland” EP and became a full member of the band. Craven said they faced a deadline to name the band before they could release the EP. “We like birds. We were looking for an adjective to go in front of bird and I thought of ‘stray.’ It's a bit of a conundrum. You think of birds as free, not lost. We like to wander around, as people. In that way we're kind of stray, wandering around,” Craven said. They are currently recording a fulllength CD at Stonebridge Studios in Leesburg, Va., with an anticipated release date in late spring or summer 2012. “It's exciting to be going to Acoustic Brew with this band,” he said. “I've been in this room twice with two bands that I love. Maya and Charlie are my best friends and some of my favorite musicians. I want to share with them how good this place is. “We sound the best when we're playing off each other and there's nothing else (no

Interactive play offers celebration of women Special to The Gazette STATE COLLEGE — Remember the time “when a girl changes from bobby socks to stockings” and believed that “love will keep us together?” Tempest Productions will perform “Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows,” a play about women, their relationships and their lives. The play will run March 30-31 at The University Club, 331 W. College Ave., State College. This show features many wedding traditions women love to hate. The audience may choose to join in the festivities — offering marriage advice, singing songs from the past, playing games and enjoying refreshments. The mother of the groom is overly protective, the mother of the bride is a ghost, the stepmother of the bride is younger than the bride and the bride’s best friend is rip-roaring drunk. This new production was developed by author Cynthia M. Mazzant with works by

local writers Heather Holleman, Robin Kramer, Elizabeth May, Mary McGuire, Jessica O’Hara, Mary Rohrer-Dann, Sheila Squillante and Camille-Yvette Welsch. The production also features New York City-based actors Sherri Quaid, Lissa Ramirez and Jo Wadsworth. There are also several local actresses performing in the play, including Stephanie Gates, Grace McDill, Debbie Meder, Elaine Meder-Wilgus and Lori Wilson. The March 30 performance will begin at 8 p.m. The March 31 performances begin at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. General admission is $20 and student and senior tickets are $18. They can be purchased at www.brownpapertickets.com. Tickets are $25 at the door, with special rates for groups of five or more (available in advance only). For more information, visit www.tempeststudios.org, email info@tempeststudios.org or call 814-4046027.

amplification).That's when it's most natural. We like to do our music with as little amplification as possible. It's pretty neat that there's a place that feels so strongly about this too.” Tickets are $16, available at Nature's Pantry in State College, online at

Submitted photo

THE STRAY BIRDS appear Saturday at the Center for Well Being in Lemont.

Save the date Future items continued on the Gazette website, www.centrecountygazette.com.

Admission for the luncheon is $25. Call 814-272-0606.

ACOUSTIC BREW CONCERT SERIES

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LIVE IN HD!

The Stray Birds 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31 Center for Well Being, 123 Mt. Nittany Road, Lemont. The Stray Birds is a trio of multi-instrumentalists and three-part harmony that features original music based on oldtimey, bluegrass and Appalachian sounds. Tickets are $16 and available and at the door, online at www.acousticbrew.org, or at Nature’s Pantry, 2331 Commercial Blvd., State College, 814-861-5200.

THE CRUCIFIXION 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 4 Grace Lutheran Church, 205 S. Garner St., State College. Performance of John Stainer’s Passion oratorio, The Crucifixion, by a Centre Region ecumenical choir. Free will offering to benefit Interfaith Human Services. Call Laurel Sanders at 238-2478 or visit www.glcpa.org.

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LIVE IN HD! Massenets’ Manon Noon Saturday, April 7 The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. The performance will be broadcast, classical, live simulcast, opera et opera video concerts. Duration is four hours and eight minutes with two intermissions. Admission is $22 adult, $20 senior, $18 student and $15 children. Call 814-272-0606.

GOSPEL SING 7 p.m. Friday, April 13 Fellowship Bible Church, 263 Reeder Road, Spring Mills The concert features The Needhams from Murfreesboro, Tenn. The Fellowship Bible Church located off route 144 near Potters Mills. Visit www.theneedhams.com or call 814-422-8640.

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LIVE IN HD! Submitted photo

SUNSHINE, LOLLIPOPS AND RAINBOWS: from left, Stephanie Gates, Elaine Meder-Wilgus, Grace McDill, Debbie Meder and Lori Wilson will perform in a play about women, their relationships and their lives.

acousticbrew.org and at the door. Penn State students receive a $2 discount if they show their student ID. The venue is on CATA's M route. The next Acoustic Brew Concert will feature folk and blues musician Steve James on April 28.

An Opera Luncheon 11 a.m. Saturday, April 14 Upper Studio, The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. Guest Speaker, librettist Jason Charnesky will speak, “A Love Story Ripped from the Headlines.”

La Traviata – Verdi 1 p.m. Saturday, April 14 The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. Duration is three hours and seven minutes with one intermission. Admission is $22 adult, $20 senior, $18 student and $15 children. Call 814-272-0606.

AFTERNOON OF MUSIC 2 p.m. Sunday, April 15 Penns Valley Area High School Auditorium, 4545 Penns Valley Road, Spring Mills. The musical concert will feature the Penns Valley Men’s Chorus, the Little German Band, the Brush Valley Community Choir, the Coburn Brass Band and others. Donations are welcomed to support the Guy H. Rachau Excellence in Music Scholarship Fund.

BRUSH VALLEY COMMUNITY CHOIR SPRING CONCERT 3 p.m. Sunday, April 22 Madisonburg United Church, Madisonburg. Call 814-237-3687.

Methodist

SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT THE LIBRARY CONCERTS Nittany Wind Quartet 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 29 Centre County Library & Museum, 200 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Featuring Anne Sullivan, harp; Diane Toulson, flute; Cathy Herrera, flute, and Susan Kroeker, flute. Admission is free.

“CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN” 7 p.m. Friday, May 18; and at 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, May 19 State College Area High School South Auditorium, 653 Westerly Parkway, State College Class Act Productions presents “Cheaper by the Dozen.” A movie based on the true story of Frank Gilbreth, pioneer of industrial efficiency and father of 12 children. The comedy is for all ages. Tickets are general admission and cost $10 adult, $5 child 16 and under, $40 for a family of six or more people. Compiled by Sandie Biddle


PAGE 24

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

T N E M IN A T R E %NT 3CHEDULE

,IVE

Thursday, March 29 through April 4, 2012 AMERICAN ALE HOUSE, 821 CRICKLEWOOD DRIVE, STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-9701 Thursday, March 29 Scott Mangene, 8 p.m. to midnight Friday, March 30 Tommy Wareham, 6 to 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. to midnight Saturday, March 31 Tommy Wareham, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 1 Ted and Molly, 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 3 17 Piece Jazz Band, 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 4 Tommy Wareham, 7:30 p.m.

THE ARENA BAR & GRILL, 1521 MARTIN STREET, STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-8833 Friday, March 30 Saturday, March 31

Superbob, It Is Written and Scarlet Carson 10:30 p.m. Hitchcock, 10:30 p.m.

THE AUTOPORT, 1405 S. ATHERTON ST., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-7666 Thursday, March 29 Kate and Natalie of Pure Cane Sugar, 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 30 Kenna Corbet and Special Guest, 8 p.m. Saturday, March 31 Natascha and the Spyboy, 9 p.m.

Friday, March 30 Saturday, March 31

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

AKA Total Whitout, 10 p.m. Continental Breakfast, 10 p.m.

Tuesday, April 3 Wednesday, April 4

THE DELI RESTAURANT, 113 HIESTER ST., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-5710 Sunday, April 1

Jazz Brunch, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

ELK CREEK CAFÉ AND ALEWORKS, 100 W. MAIN ST., MILLHEIM, 814-349-8850 Thursday, March 29 Hannah Bingman and Doug McMinn, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31 Cory Harris, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 1 Chris Rattie and Junior Tutwiler with Natalie Berrena, 4 p.m.

THE GINGERBREAD MAN, 130 HEISTER ST., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-0361 Thursday, March 29 Friday, March 30 Saturday, March 31 Tuesday, April 3 Wednesday, April 4

DJ Cup Cake, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. DJ Boner, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. DJ Cup Cake, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. DJ Boner, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Team Trivia, 9 to 11 p.m. Karaoke, 11 p.m. to 2 a.m.

INFERNO BRICK OVEN & BAR, 340 E. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-5718 Thursday, March 29 Friday, March 30 Saturday, March 31 Wednesday, April 4

DJ Manik Mike, 10 p.m. DJ Fuego, 10 p.m. DJ Cashous, 10 p.m. Jason & Greg Acoustics, 10 p.m.

KILDARE’S IRISH PUB, 538 E. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, 814-272-0038

BAR BLEU & BAR QUE, 112 S. GARNER ST., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-0374 Thursday, March 29 Royal Benson, 10:30 p.m. Friday, March 30 Lowjack, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31 Ted McCloskey & The Hi-Fi’s

MOUNTAIN VALLEY DINER, 850 S. EAGLE VALLEY ROAD, WINGATE, 814-353-1221

Friday, March 30 Saturday, March 31 Sunday, April 1 Tuesday, April 3

Brew Devils Lowjack, 10:30 p.m. Karaoke, 9:30 p.m. Ken Volz, 10:30 p.m.

CAFÉ 210 WEST, 210 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-3449 Thursday, March 29 Public Domain, 10:30 p.m. Friday, March 30 JR Mangan, 6 p.m. My Hero Zero, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31 JR Mangan Band, 10:30 p.m.

THE DARKHORSE TAVERN, 128 E. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-0490 Thursday, March 29 Fred Smooth & the Midnight Social, 10 p.m.

Thursday, April 5

Open Mic Night with Tommy Wareham Low Jack, midnight to 2 a.m. Table Ten, 10:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. The Nightcrawlers, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

THE RATHSKELLER, 108 S. PUGH ST., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-3858 Thursday, March 29 Team Trivia, 7 p.m. Friday, March 30 Mr. Hand, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31 Table Ten, 10:30 p.m.

RED HORSE TAVERN, 104 N. MAIN ST., PLEASANT GAP, 814-359-2082 Friday, March 30 Saturday, March 31

Black Coffee, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. They are Them Ocktoberfest, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

THE SALOON, 101 HEISTER ST., STATE COLLEGE, 814-234-0845 Thursday, March 29 Friday, March 30 Saturday, March 31 Sunday, April 1 Monday, April 2 Tuesday, April 3 Wednesday, April 4

My Hero Zero, 10:30 p.m. Velveeta, 10:30 p.m. Mr. Hand, 10:30 p.m. Atomic Supersonic, 10:30 p.m. Smokin’ Karaoke, 10:30 p.m. Hotdog Cart, 10:30 p.m. Table Ten, 10:30 p.m.

Z-BAR, 113 HIESTER ST., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-5710 Thursday, March 29 Domenick Swentosky

ZENO’S PUB, 100 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-4350

Thursday, March 29 Table Ten, 10 p.m. Friday, March 30 DJ, 10 p.m. Saturday, March 31 Ken Volz, 8 to 10 p.m. DJ, 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 3 Pub Quiz with Bebey, 9 p.m. Wednesday, April 4 Ken Volz, 9 p.m.

THE BREWERY, 233 E. BEAVER AVE., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-2892

Monday, April 2

Joe Casher

OTTO’S PUB & BREWERY, 2235 N. ATHERTON ST., STATE COLLEGE, 814-867-6886 Thursday, March 29 Acoustic Thursdays with 18 Strings, 9 to 11 p.m. Friday, March 30 Miss Melanie and the Valley Rats, 9 to 11 p.m.

Thursday, March 29 Wilgus & Bishop & Waffles, Belly Dancers, 7 p.m. The Nightcrawlers, 10:30 p.m. Friday, March 30 Ms Melanie & the Valley Rats, 5 p.m. AAA Blues Band, 7 p.m. Spider Kelly, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31 Pure Cane Sugar, 10:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 3 Natalie Berrena, 11 p.m. Wednesday, April 4 Andy Tolins Bluegrass Revue, 7 p.m.

ZOLA NEW WORLD BISTRO, 324 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, 814-237-8474 Friday, March 30

Jay Vonada Trio, 9 p.m. to midnight

Compiled by Abigail Miller

THE PHYRST, 111 E. BEAVER AVE., STATE COLLEGE Thursday, March 29 Lowjack Lite, 8 to 10 p.m. Maxwell Strait, 10:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Friday, March 30 Noah and Domenick, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Ted and the Hi-Fis, 10:30 pm to 2 a.m. Saturday, March 31 Table Wars, 7 to 10 p.m. My Hero Zero, 10:30 p.m. to 2a.m. Sunday, April 1 2Twenty2, 10:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.

Schedules subject to change. Call the venue for details. To be included in the Live Entertainment Schedule please send schedules to The Gazette by Wednesday, one week prior to publication to editor@centrecountygazette.com.

Send Calendar Items To ... editor@centrecountygazette.com

Centre County library activities CENTRE COUNTY LIBRARY BOOKMOBILE The Centre County Library Bookmobile is a fully accessible library on wheels, which travels to many communities and reaches thousands of visitors each month. Visit www.centrecountylibrary.org for locations and hours.

THE FOLLOWING BOOKMOBILE ACTIVITIES ARE COMING UP:

■ April is library card sign-up month. Support your library by sharing it with a friend. Bring a friend in to sign up for a library card and get a free DVD rental. ■ The 27th annual Young Author Contest Award and Participation Ceremony is scheduled for April 18 at 6 p.m. at Bellefonte High School auditorium.

CENTRE COUNTY LIBRARY BELLEFONTE The Bellefonte branch has the following activities available: ■ Preschool story time is held every Monday and Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. and Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. (except April 17), and features stories and crafts for children under 5 with an adult. ■ “Book Baby Storytime” is held every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. Stories for babies and toddlers up to 2 years old with an

adult. ■ “Hooks and Needles” is held every Thursday from 1:302:30 p.m. for those who love to knit. Please bring projects and ideas and tips to share. ■ “After-school Adventures” on Thursdays from 3:30-4:30 p.m. is a program offering educational and fun crafts for kids ages 5 and over. ■ On April 2 at 6:30 p.m., Hope Boylston, local author of the adventure novel, “Hay Locos,” will be available to sign books, and will be on hand for a photo presentation, empanadas and author talk. ■ The after-school science program will be held April 5 at 3:30 p.m., and will feature egg experiments. ■ Lego Club will meet April 12 and April 26 at 3:30 p.m., and those in attendance can participate in the Lego construction challenge. ■ Family story time is scheduled for April 14 at 10:30 a.m. Bring the entire family and share stories, songs, rhymes and finger plays with Miss Katie. ■ The adult book discussion group will meet April 18 at 6:30 p.m. Join others who love to read and discuss what they liked and didn’t like about the particular book. Check out the website for book titles. ■ The spring wellness series will start April 16 at 6:30 p.m. with

“Nutrition: The Stress Connection,” presented by holistic nutritionist Angie Wallace. ■ A well-being workshop is scheduled for April 20 at 3:30 p.m. This workshop will feature discussion on the benefits of chiropractic procedures and participants can get a massage to help promote general health and wellbeing. ■ An Internet safety program will be held April 25 at noon and will offer easy ways to make online activities safe, with discussion on online banking, email and identity theft. ■ A “Drop-in Gadget Crash Course” is set for April 25 at 1 p.m., which offers one-on-one help with e-readers, smart phones, tablets, digital cameras and other gadgets. ■ A used book sale will be held April 27-28. Visit during regular operating hours for used books, video and music. Call 814-355-1516 for more information.

EAST PENNS VALLEY BRANCH

■ “Needles at the Library” is a program held each Thursday at 6 p.m. Participants can bring portable needle projects and share ideas and tips with others. ■ “Fizz Bang Eureka” is a program held each Monday in March from 3:30 to 5 p.m. and features crafts and science exper-

iments. ■ Preschool story time is held every Monday at 10:30 a.m. and Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. Stories and crafts are offered for children under 5 with an adult. ■ An Internet safety program will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. and will offer easy ways to make online activities safe, with discussion on online banking, email and identity theft. ■ A “Drop-in Gadget Crash Course” is set for April 3 at 1 p.m., which offers one-on-one help with e-readers, smart phones, tablets, digital cameras and other gadgets. ■ The 27th annual Young Author Contest Award and Participation Ceremony will be held April 3 at 1 p.m. ■ The adult book club will meet on April 10 at 12:30 p.m. to discuss “Bury Your Dead,” by Louise Penny. Call 814-349-5328 for more information.

CENTRE HALL AREA BRANCH

■ “Fizz Bang Eureka” is held every Wednesday at 3 p.m., and offers after-school educational science experiments and fun activities. ■ Preschool story time is held everyThursday at 2:30 p.m., offering stories and crafts for children under 5 with an adult. ■ Adult craft nights are set for

April 3 and/or April 4 at 6:30 p.m. The sessions will focus on homemade lemon thyme soaps, bath salts and sugar scrubs. All materials provided. ■ An Internet safety program will be held April 12 at noon and will offer easy ways to make online activities safe, with discussion on online banking, email and identity theft. ■ Green cleaning is a program scheduled for April 12 at 6:30 p.m., where participants will learn how to make their own environmentally friendly household cleaners. ■ A “Drop-in Gadget Crash Course” is set for April 25 at 1 p.m., which offers one-on-one help with e-readers, smart phones, tablets, digital cameras and other gadgets! ■ A teen night is scheduled for April 19 at 6:30 p.m., with “Part 2: The Ides of March Story Building,” in which teens will be filming promotional videos. ■ A kite making program will be held on April 21 at noon. Families are invited to work together to make kites in celebration of Earth Day. ■ The spring wellness series will start April 25 at 6:30 p.m. with “Nutrition: The Stress Connection,” presented by Angie Wallace, holistic nutritionist. Call 814-364-2580 for more information.


MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 25

WHAT’S HAPPENING To be included in What’s Happening, submit your organization’s events by Wednesday one week prior to publication to editor@centrecountygazette.com. Please see our website for the complete What’s Happening calendar, including additional future events.

ARTS, CRAFTS AND SALES March 31 – Craft ‘N’ Flea Market There will be a Craft ‘n’ Flea Market to benefit Queen of Archangels Banquet Hall and Recreation Center (RINK), South 4th Street in Snow Shoe – from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Saturday, March 31. Crafts, baked goods, quilts, collectibles, sport cards, comic books, NASCAR items, yard sale items and antiques. Kitchen will be open. Fifty/Fifty chance drawing. $10 per table/space. Vendors, call 814387-6785 to reserve a table. April 14 – Yard and Bake Sale There will be a Relay for Life yard/bake sale from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. April 14 at the Centre Hall Lions Club on E. Church St. Baked goods, chili, soup, hot dogs, gently used items. Sponsored by CH Relay for Life team: Generations Decking Cancer. Contact Wanda Hockenberry 814-3649515 or Sherri Cramer 814-571-5989 for more info.

LENTEN EVENTS Through March 30 – Lenten Fish Dinners From 4:30 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. on Friday, March 30 the final Lenten Friday Fish Dinner will be served at the State College Knights of Columbus Hall, 850 Stratford Drive, State College Menu includes: Fish: baked, baked breaded, beer-battered fried; macaroni and cheese, stewed tomatoes, halushki, cole slaw, vegetable, rolls and butter, beverage and dessert. Admission is $9 for adults, $4.50 for ages 6 to 10 and free for children 5 and younger. Take outs available. Public welcomed. Through March 30 – Lenten Fish Fry The final Lenten fish and shrimp dinners will be served from 4 until 7 p.m. at Saint John the Evangelist Catholic School on Bishop Street in Bellefonte, PA. The menu includes fish ‘n' chips, fried beer-battered haddock, clam chowder, fish sandwiches, fried shrimp, stuffed sole and cheese pizza. Dinners include macaroni & cheese, stewed tomatoes, roll, dessert, beverage (for eat-in only) and cole slaw or fruit cocktail. Desserts feature a variety of home baked cakes and other baked goods. Prices are $8 for adults; $4 for children aged 5 through 11, and free for children 4 and younger. The public is welcome. Carryout and group delivery service to limited areas are available. March 31 – Seder Meal Berean Baptist Church invites you to “Christ in the Passover: A Seder Meal,” at 5 p.m. March 31 at Mount Nittany Middle School, 656 Brandywine Dr., Boalsburg, PA. Suggested donation $10 per person; children age 5 to 10 $5. Reservations please, by March 27, 814-308-3066 or 814-364-9671. April 6 – Easter Musical The Halfmoon Christian Fellowship Church will present an Easter musical, “The King Is Coming” at 7 p.m. April 6. This musical is filled with classic songs and hymn to be enjoyed by all. The church is located on route 550 east of Stormstown, 1776 Halfmoon Valley Road. April 8 – Easter Dinner From noon until 1 p.m. Easter Sunday, April 8, the Pleasant Gap United Methodist Church, 179 S. Main St., Pleasant Gap, invites you to their annual free Easter dinner in their fellowship hall. Deliveries are also available to shutins. For more information or to make reservations call 814359-3011 between 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday or leave a message. Reservations are not necessary.

DINING AND TAKE OUT March 27 – Spaghetti Dinner for PAWS Spaghetti Dinner to Benefit Centre County PAWS will be at from 5 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 27 at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church on the corner of Fraser and Foster in downtown State College, PA. Enjoy all-you-can-eat spaghetti, meatballs, salad, drinks and desserts. Take out is available. Tickets are $6 in advance at PAWS, $7 at the door, half price for children under 6. For info, visit www.centrecountypaws.org. March 31 – Turkey Supper The Presbyterian Church of Pine Grove Mills, West Pine Grove Road, will host a turkey supper at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 31. The cost is $8. Call 814-238-8801 for tickets. Proceeds benefit the local food bank.

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EDUCATION AND LIFE MATTERS March 29 – Spiritual Talk John Tyler, international speaker and former political science professor, will give a free talk titled “Can We Break the Chains of Materialism?” on at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 29 at the First Church of Christ, Scientist, 617 East Hamilton Ave., State College, PA. Tyler travels internationally speaking about the power of prayer to promote health and healing in people’s lives. Free childcare provided. For more info, call 814-234-2194 or visit www.abouthealing. org. April 3 – Yoga Classes The Howard UMC, 305 Curtin Village Road presents yoga classes for all individuals, body types, ranges of ability and needs. Gentle yoga class is from 5 p.m. until 6 p.m. This class is designed for those who are new to yoga and will focus on breathing, stretching and deep relaxation. A basics-level class is from 6:30-8 p.m. The gentle and basics sessions both begin April 3. Cost is $30 for six weeks. Free scholarships are available. Any questions, contact Kathie Baughman: kathieb1@comcast.net or 814-625-2852. Preregistration is recommended. April 11 – Career Day and Open House South Hills School of Business & Technology is holding a “Career Day and Open House” at all four school locations from 8:30 a.m. until noon Wednesday, April 11 at all locations - State College, Altoona, Lewistown and Philipsburg. Explore various Associate Degree career options at all South Hills Schools by sitting-in on classes, speaking with instructors and current students and discussing financial aid options. Free lunch. Register online www.southhills.edu or call 888-282-7427. April 14 – 2012 Spring Outdoor Festival Appalachian Outdoors’ 2012 Spring Outdoor Expo will be from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. April 14 at 123 South Allen Street. Also, at 7 p.m. April 14 and 15 the Banff Mountain Movie Festival is presented at the State Theatre. The Outdoor Expo will take place in conjunction with the first-ever State College Spring Festival. Allen Street will be closed to house the event. April 19 – Seminar, Calories and Health Mount Nittany Medical Center’s Family Medicine Seminar Series presents “Calorie Restriction and Health” from 6 p.m. until 7:30p.m. Thursday, April 19 at Galen and Nancy Dreibelbis Auditorium at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 Park Ave., State College. To register or for more information, contact Jessica Bird at jbird@mountnittany.org, or call 814-234-6738.

FUNDRAISERS AND SOCIAL EVENTS April 13-14 – Ice Show The Penn State Ice Rink on the University Park campus will present its 29th Ice Show at 7:30 p.m. April 13 and 14. This year’s theme, “Skating on Broadway,” is a musical tour of Broadway shows. The ice show will feature skaters from the Ice Rink professional figure skating staff, Penn State Ice Rink programs, the Student Figure Skating Club and local skating clubs. All seats are reserved: $12.50 for adult, $10.50 for youth/senior citizen/PSU student. Tickets may be purchased at the PSU Ice Rink, or by phone at 814-865-4102. Phone sales are by credit card only.

KIDS’ STUFF March 31 – International Children’s Festival International Children’s Festival takes place at State High South Building, Westerly Parkway, from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m., Saturday, March 31. Entry fee is $5 family, $3 individual, to benefit Global Connections. For info, call 814-8633927. April 1 – Hands on Crafts for Children Dana Morrison will lead free hands-on crafts for children from 1 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. Sunday April 1 at the Bellefonte Art Museum, 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte, PA. Also on Sunday April 1, is the opening for April's featured artist in the Community Gallery, John Mangan of Julian Woods. April 5 – Nature Program for Small Children Bring your youngster to Bald Eagle State Park, Howard, PA, for an interactive program designed for children aged three to five. Each month a new topic will be explored via basic crafts, stories, short walks and nature games – inside or out. Dress for the weather. The event is from 10 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. the first Thursday of each month (except May) through December. Pre-registration required. Call the Park Office 814-625-2775. Meet at the Environmental Learning Center, off Rte. 150, Howard.

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April 7 – Community Easter Egg Hunt The Bellefonte community Easter egg hunt is at 2 p.m. Saturday April 7 at Talleyrand Park, Bellefonte, PA. It is free for kids 12 and under. The hunt is sponsored by Bellefonte clubs, churches and businesses.

COMPETITIONS FOR CHARITY March 31 - Kumbathon Brownie Troop #4 of Centre Hall will sponsor a Kumbathon from 8:30 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. March 31 in the basement of the Old Fort American Legion Hall, Centre Hall, PA. Kumba is a fitness activity consisting of a combination of Zumba, cardio and dance moves. The cost to participate is $10, and all proceeds go to help 10-month-old Tessa Watson who suffers from brittle bone disease. Tessa and her family have incurred large expenses traveling to Delaware for Tessa to receive treatments to make her bones stronger. Contact Krista Winkelblech at kwinkeleblech@yahoo.com. March 31 – Walk For Easter Seals All are invited to participate in Walk with Me, a 1.5-mile walk/wheel March 31 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The walk begins at 220 N. Burrowes St., State College and benefits more than 2,600 children and adults with disabilities served by Easter Seals Central Pennsylvania. Register online for a day of food, fun and music. Special Guest: Rep. Glenn Thompson. Donation is $25. April 1 – April Fools 5K The second annual April Fools 5K Medlar Field at Lubrano Park Sunday, April 1. Registration begins at 10 a.m. The race is hosted by the Centre County Chapter of the Penn State Alumni Association. Proceeds go to a scholarship fund for Penn State students from Centre County high schools. The mostly flat course is on the Penn State campus. Race begins at noon. Visit http://www.facebook.com/ psucentre?sk=events. April 14 – Faith Centre 6th annual Walk/Run The Sixth annual Walk/Run of Faith will begin at the Bellefonte Middle School, 830 E. Bishop St., at 10 a.m. April 14. The course is 5 kilometers in length, beginning and ending at the school. New for this year is the 10-Kilometer King of the Hills Challenge. The event benefits the Faith Centre Food Bank and the Pet Food Pantry of Centre County. For more info, or to register online, go to www.faithcentre.info, email Nicole Summers: nsummers@faithcentre. info or call 814-355-0880 April 15 – Dog Jog for Pets Come First The annual Dog Jog to benefit Pets Come First is April 28 at the Grange Fair Grounds, Gate 2 in Centre Hall, PA. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., the 5K Race is at 10 a.m., 1.5K Walk/Fun Run at 11 a.m., and the pet fair and silent auction are from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. Racers with and without dogs are welcome. Visit www.petscomefirst.com. April 18 – Spelling Bee Ron and Mary Maxwell Community Spelling Bee is at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 18 at Foxdale Village Auditorium, 500 E. Marylyn Ave., State College. Foxdale Village is hosting this spelling bee to benefit the Mid-state Literacy Council. Community teams sponsored by community businesses will compete for the trophy and prizes. For additional info, call Amy Wilson 814-238-1809. May 6 – March for Babies March of Dimes’ March for Babies holds registration at noon with the walk kicking off at 1 p.m. May 6 at Medlar Field at Lubrano Park on the Penn State campus. It’s the nation’s oldest walk fundraiser honoring all babies: born healthy, who need help, and who didn’t survive. It’s a family event, including team photos, face painting, games for the kids, radio broadcasts and more. To register, visit www.marchforbabies.org or call 814-696-9691. Compiled by Sandie Biddle

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PAGE 26

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

Group meetings The Gazette will publish the regular meeting dates and times for all Centre County social and service groups, organizations, clubs, etc. that have membership open to the public. To be included in the weekly listing send information by Wednesday one week prior to publication to editor@centrecountygazette.com or mail 403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801. 9-12 Project of Central PA meets 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, Community Room, Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Featured guest speaker will be U.S. Rep. Glenn Thompson. Topics will be the National Defense Authorization Act recently signed into law and the national debt. A business meeting will follow. Meetings are free and open to the public. Adult Bible Study and Kids Program meets 7 p.m. Wednesdays. Visit www.nittanybaptist.org or call 814-3601601. ALIVE Teen Club meets Sundays, First Baptist Church, Bellefonte. Call 814-355-5678 or www.fbcbellefonte.org. Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Support Group meets 6:30 p.m. every second Tuesday, Mount Nittany Dining Room, The Inn, Brookline. Contact Anne Campbell 814-234-3141 or Janie Provan 814-235-2000. Ancient Mystic Order of Samaritans meets 7:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday every month, I.O.O.F. Hall, 756 N. Main St., Pleasant Gap. Antique Truck Club of America, Keystone Chapter meets at 3 p.m. the third Sunday of March, July and November, Milesburg Bestway Travel Center. Anyone with an interest in transportation history is invited to join. Call 814-360-4177 or www.antiquetruckclubofamerica.org AWANA Club meets 6 p.m. Sundays, First Baptist Church, Bellefonte. Activities and Bible lessons will be held for children ages 3 to sixth grade. Materials provided. Call 814-355-5678 or www.fbcbellefonte.org. Bald Eagle Grange #151 meets at 7 p.m. first Tuesday of every month, Grange Hall, Runville. Bald Eagle Watershed Association meets at 7 p.m. fourth Wednesday of each month, Milesburg Borough Building. Visit www.baldeaglewatershed.com Bald Eagle Area Class of 1962 meets for breakfast at 9 a.m. first Saturday of the month, Mountain Valley Diner, Wingate. Call Sandy 814-387-4218. Bald Eagle Area Class of 1964 meets monthly for breakfast at 9 a.m. on the fourth Saturday, Bestway Restaurant, Milesburg and monthly dinners at 5:30 p.m. on the third Friday, Bellefonte Moose. Call Sue 814-625-2132 or bea.1964@yahoo.com. Bald Eagle Area Class of 1965 meets for dinner at 5:30 p.m. the last Friday of each month, Bellefonte Moose. Call Bob 814-383-2151. Bellefonte High School Class of 1956 meets for dinner at 6 p.m. the second Friday of each month, Bellefonte Moose. Call Kay 814-359-2738. Bellefonte High School Class 1967 meets for breakfast at 8:30 a.m. the first Saturday of each month, Sunset West. The location is subject to change. Call Vic 814-360-1948. Bellefonte Elks Lodge meets 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of each month, Bellefonte Elks. Bellefonte Encampment #72 and Ridgeley Canton #8 meets 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of each month, Windmere Hall, 454 Rolling Ridge Drive, State College. Bellefonte Historical Railroad Society meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month, Train Station, Talleyrand Park, Bellefonte. Call 814-355-1053 or bellefontetrain.org. Bellefonte Kiwanis Club meets every Tuesday at the Moose Club on Spring Street at noon. For information on Kiwanis, contact Richard King, 814-355-9606. Bellefonte Sunrise Rotary Club meets 7:30 a.m. Fridays, Diamond Deli, North Allegheny Street. Open to the public. Call Debbie Rowley 814-880-9453. Bellefonte Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1600 meets 8 p.m. the second Thursday of every month, Post Home, Spring Street, Bellefonte. Bellefonte Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1600 Ladies Auxiliary meets 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month, Post Home, Spring Street, Bellefonte. Better Breathers Support Group meets 2 p.m. the third Thursday every month, HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, Pleasant Gap. Call 814-359-3421. Business Networking International meets 7 a.m.

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Thursdays, Celebration Hall. Fee is $10 for room and breakfast. Members share ideas, contacts and business referrals. Call Kelly Swisher 814-280-1656. Boy Scouts of America BSA Troop 66 meets at 7:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Pleasant Gap United Methodist Church, 179 S. Main St. Meetings will be about one hour long. Interested boys or volunteers can email Scoutmaster Bill Weaver at standinten@aol.com. Brain Injury Support Group meets 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month, HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, Pleasant Gap. Call 814-359-3421. Breast Cancer Support Group meets from 5:30 p.m. Monday, April 2 at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. Contact Cheri Woll at cwoll@mountnittany.org or call 814-231-7005. The Business of Art Workshop meets 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month, Sozo Institute of the Arts, KeyCentre building, 1224 N. Atherton St., State College. The workshop is free for writers, artists and other creative people. Call Will Snyder at 814-880-9933 or info@sozoart.org. Centre County Real Estate Investment Club meets 7 p.m. the third Thursday of every month, 1609 N. Atherton St., State College. Call 814-280-5839. Centre Hall Lions Club meets 6:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month, and 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month, Centre Hall Lions Club Building, 153 E. Church St., Centre Hall. Centre Pieces Quilt Guild meets 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 10, Mt. Nittany Middle School Cafeteria, 656 Brandywine Drive, State College and 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 11, Brookline Village, Windsong Building, Conference Room, State College. The program will be a round robin of quilting techniques by guild members. Visitors welcome. Call 814466-6121. Centre Region Model Investment Club meets 6:30 p.m. on second Monday of the month, Mazza Room, South Hills Business School, State College. The interactive educational stock model investment club is open to the public. Call 814-234-8775 or email cr20mic@aol.com. The Central PA Civil War Round Table meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 3 at the Pennsylvania Military Museum Auditorium, 602 Boalsburg Pike, Boalsburg. Richard Simpson will speak on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas.â&#x20AC;? March 78 marked the 150th anniversary of this two-day decisive and bloody battle that occurred on two separate battlefields in northwest Arkansas. Mr. Simpson is the historian for the town of Westmore, Vt. where he lectures on local history. Contact Central PA CWRT President, Lynn Herman 814-861-0770. The Compassionate Friends Group meets 7 p.m. every second Monday, Bellefonte Middle School. The support organization is for families following the death of a child of any age, any cause. Bereaved parents and adult family members welcome. Call Amanda 814-321-4258 or Peg 814355-9829. Circle of Hope, a support group for special-needs children and families, meets 7 p.m. every second Thursday, Tyrone Public Library. Call Angie 814-386-1826 or alavanish@live.com. Diabetes Support Group meets at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 12 at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. Contact Amy Leffard at aleffard@mountnittany.org or call 814-231-7095. Grief Support Group meets 6 p.m. every first Wednesday, Centre Crest, 502 E. Howard St., Bellefonte. Call Anne Boal 814-548-1140. Hearing Loss Association of America meets 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month, Foxdale. Learn the latest technology available for hearing loss. Halfmoon Garden Club meets the first Thursday of the month. Membership is open to Halfmoon Township residents. Call Alice McGregor 814-692-7396, almcgregor@comcast.net or Susan Kennedy 814-692-5556, susank81@gmail.com. I.O.O.F. Centre Lodge #153 meets 7:30 p.m. the first and third Thursday of each month, I.O.O.F. Lodge Hall 756 N. Main St., Pleasant Gap. Junior Rockhounds meets 6:45 p.m. third Wednesdays, Room 116, Earth and Engineering Sciences Building, University Park. Call 814-867-6263 or visit nittanymineral.org. Keystone Guild of the Watchmakers Association of Pa. meets 1 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month, Bull Pen Restaurant, Tyrone. Call George at 814-238-1668. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life with Diabetesâ&#x20AC;? meets at 6 p.m. every Tuesday in April, beginning April 3 at the Galen and Nancy Dreibelbis Auditorium (Entrance D), Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life with Diabetesâ&#x20AC;? is a four-day education series on managing diabetes for yourself or a loved one. Contact Amy Leffard

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Harry Shaw

132 W. College Avenue Downtown State College

at aleffard@mountnittany.org or call 814-231-7095. The Milesburg Lions Club meets 7 p.m. first Tuesday and the third Wednesday every month, Milesburg Center across from Uni-Mart. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets 6 p.m. every third Tuesday, HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, Outpatient Entrance, Pleasant Gap. The support group is affiliated with the National MS Society. Call 814359-3421. Nittany Knights Barbershop Chorus meets 7:15 p.m. every Monday, South Hills School, State College. Men who like to sing are welcome. Visit www.nittanyknights.org, or call Bill 814-355-3557. Nittany Mineral Society meets 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesdays, Room 114 Auditorium of the Earth and Engineering Sciences Building, University Park. Call 814-8676263 or visit nittanymineral.org. Nittany Valley Woodturners meet every first Thursday, the woodworking shop, State College Area High School, South Building. Email Reg@MarketValueSolutions.com or visit www.NittanyValleyWoodturners.org. The Nittany Valley Writers Network meets for an earlyrisers breakfast at 7 a.m. every third Wednesday, The Waffle Shop, 1610 W. College Ave., State College. The Nittany Valley Writers Network Social meets at 5:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month, The Autoport, State College. Parent Support Group for Children with Eating Disorders meets 7 p.m. every second Tuesday, Mount Nittany Medical Center. Call Kristie Kaufman 814-466-7921. Penns Valley Area Class of 1962 committee is planning the 50th class reunion from Penns Valley Area High School for Sept. 29, 2012. Interested class members should contact Ruth Ann Williams, Carol Colestock, Jean Brown, Tom and Lois Runkle, Susan Foster, or Carol Billett. Penns Valley Grange #158 meets 7:30 p.m. the second Thursday of every month, Grange Hall, Railroad Street, Spring Mills. Pleasant Gap Rotary Club meets 6 p.m. every Thursday, The Oaks. The Ruffed Grouse Society, Red Brush Chapter, 25th Anniversary Banquet, cocktails at 5:30 p.m. and dinner at 7:15 p.m. Saturday, March 24, Penn Stater Conference Center, University Park. The Society will honor the legacy of Jim and Sylvia Bashline. Sacred Harp Singing meets 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays, University Mennonite Church, State College. Visit www.StateCollegeSacredHarp.com. Soroptimist International of Centre County meets at 6 p.m. Monday, April 2 at The Atherton Hotel, 125 S. Atherton St., State College. This monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program is a presentation from Humphrey Fellows, who describes what life is like for women in their respective countries. Contact Linda Wilson 814-234-0658 or email hjlaw11@aol.com for information and dinner reservations. State College Downtown Rotary Club meets noon Thursdays, Damonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, E. College Ave., State College. State College Elks Lodge meets 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays, State College Elks Country Club. State College Lions Club meets the first and third Thursdays Damonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of State College at 6 p.m. State College Rotary Club meets 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Nittany Lion Inn, Faculty Staff Lounge, University Park. State College Sunrise Rotary Club meets 7:15 a.m. Wednesdays, Hotel State College, above The Corner Room, Allen Street, State College. Stroke Support Group meets 1 p.m. last Tuesday of every month, HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, Pleasant Gap. Call 814-359-3421. TRIAD, a public safety group for senior citizens, meets each second Thursday in various locations. Call Helen Evans, chair, 814-237-8932. The April 12 meeting is at 8:30 a.m., Centre LifeLink EMS, Puddingtown Road, State College. It is a public forum on crime scene processing presented by Detective John Aston. Trout Unlimited, a non-profit conservation organization, meets 7:30 p.m. every first Thursday, Comfort Suites Hotel, off North Atherton Street, State College. The Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Welcome Club of State College meets 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month, Oakwood Presbyterian Church, State College. Call Kathi 814-4666641. Zion MOPS and Beyond meets 9:30 a.m. Thursdays, 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, 3261 Zion Road, Bellefonte. The group is for moms with children of all ages. Childcare will be provided. Call 814-383-4161.

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MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

Red Cross schedules blood drives in region

Community announcements ■ Painting and sculpture exhibit at Schlow “Four Directions” by central Pennsylvanian artist Clay Anderson are on display until March 30 in the Betsy Rodgers Allen Gallery, Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Anderson’s exhibition, presents four richly different stylistic explorations of the artist’s core themes. He is an alumnus of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and he draws on the techniques and styles he developed while traveling on scholarships in Europe. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

■ Campground hosts needed Bald Eagle State Park is looking for campground hosts for spring and summer of 2012. If you or someone you know may be interested please call the park office 814-625-2775. ■ Beauty parlor volunteers needed The Centre Crest Beauty parlor is in need of volunteers to help around the shop. No experience is necessary. Please call Karen 814-355-6777 for more info. ■ Need auction items The Pleasant Gap Area Lions Club will hold their annual spring charity auc-

tion at 6 p.m. May 4 at the Central Pennsylvania Institute of Science And Technology, 540 N. Harrison Road, Pleasant Gap, to raise money for scholarships and other community charities. Ronald S. Gilligan will be the auctioneer. Please make any items, gifts or services suitable for auction available for pick up before April 13. Call David Walker 814383-4248, Terry Horner 814-359-3311, Perry Courter 814-359-2546, Randy Kern 814-355-5946 or mail your response to the Pleasant Gap Area Lions Club, c/o David Walker, 151 Hancock Road, Bellefonte, PA 16823.

MONDAY, APRIL 2

■ 1-7 p.m. - PSU/West Halls - Waring Lounge, Burrows Rd. **OSC Fight for Life. Home Delivery Pizza in the canteen

FRIDAY, APRIL 6

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4

**OSC indicates a blood challenge with Ohio State. All presenting donors will receive coupons for Appalachian Outdoors and McLanahans. ** Mudd Run indicates that all presenting donors will receive a discount coupon for registration to participate at the Hard Core Mudd Run at Tussey Mountain on Sept. 8 and 9. One lucky donor will receive a free registration worth $100. (The Hard Core Mudd Run is a six mile obstacle course run on foot.)

■ 10 a.m.-4 p.m. - Red Cross Donor Center, 135 S. Pugh St., State College. Giant fresh baked cookies in the canteen ■ 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. - Moshannon Valley High School, 4934 Green Acre Road, Houtzdale ■ 1-7 p.m. - PSU/North Halls, Warnock Lounge, Shortledge Road. **OSC Fight for Life. Jersey Mike’s sub in the canteen

6. Music, ballet and literature 7. What part of (abbr.) 9. Informal term for data

35. Kiln for drying hops

10. Chinese gelatin

37. Misrepresentation

11. Repair fabric

38. Absence of sound

12. Nellie __, journalist

40. Many blood vessels

53. Insatiable

13. Single Lens Reflex

42. Satisfies to excess

54. Source of chocolate

15. Away from one’s home

43. Glandular fever

55. Sulk

17. Mined minerals

56. CCC

21. Longest division of geological time

45. Hit sharply

22. Affirm positively

47. Payroll tax

CLUES DOWN

23. Paul Adrien __, Br. physicist

1. Popular Mexican dish

48. Freshwater duck genus

25. Ballroom dance

49. In the past

26. Tai (alt. sp.)

50. A small drink of liquor

43. Famous grandma artist 46. Freedom from difficulty 47. Supervises flying 50. In spite of

57. Amounts of time

2. Fe 3. Obstruct

27. Dental group

4. Fixes firmly in

28. Aba ____ Honeymoon

32. Sock repair

5. Indian frocks

29. Female sibling

20. Narrow inlet

33. Gather fabric in rows

22. Fed

35. Muscat is the capital

13. Brand of clear wrap

23. Hall of Fame DJ Rick

36. Goat and camel hair fabric

14. Gabriel was one

24. Most loathsome

16. Famous for his window’s & glass

27. Farewell (Spanish)

37. Raised meeting platform

18. H. Potter’s best friend

29. Plant germination vessel

Sudoku #1

38. Oral polio vaccine developer 39. Yield to another’s

44. Capital city of Shiga, Japan 46. This (Spanish)

51. Own (Scottish) 52. Daughters of the Am. Revolution PUZZLE #2 SOLUTION

30. Am. Heart Assoc.

PUZZLE #1 SOLUTION

19. Tennessee’s flower

9. Metrical foot used in poetry

33. Deriving pleasure from cruelty 34. Went quickly (archaic)

42. Partner of pepper

21. Puts it on the chopping block

31. Today host Curry

8. More deceitful

41. Hero of Spain El ___

5. Depletes gradually

■ 1-7 p.m. - Old Fort American Legion, 2829 Penns Valley Pike, Centre Hall ■ 10 a.m.-4 p.m. - Red Cross Donor Center, 135 S. Pugh St., State College.

40. A country’s entry permit

1. Medical products manufacturer

THURSDAY, APRIL 5

TUESDAY, APRIL 3

wish

CLUES ACROSS

PAGE 27

Sudoku #2

Fun By The Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!


PAGE 28

BUSINESS

SageMinder.com voted among Web’s best sites From Gazette Staff Reports STATE COLLEGE — Sage Life Technologies recently announced that its website, SageMinder.com, was selected by a SeniorHomes.com contest as best of the web in the “Best Websites and Newsletters for Caregivers” category. The SeniorHomes.com 2012 contest aims to identify the most valuable resources across the web for seniors, caregivers and industry professionals in numerous categories. Winners in each of the 10 categories were chosen by a panel of leading experts in the senior living industry. SageMinder.com was selected as the winner based on the website’s quality and breadth of family caregiver content, unique resources and the ease of navigation. SageMinder covers a broad range of topics, such as medication management and caregiver stress.

Launched last year in response to the needs of a growing number of family caregivers, SageMinder.com offers an online community, articles, tools and the best tips for seniors and family caregivers. The judges praised SageMinder and issued the following comments about the company: ■ “Great depth and breadth; not just marketing but real content.” ■ “Great resource for seniors and caregivers alike. I will be using this often.” ■ “Nice to see a website that provides such a wide variety of information and resources for caregivers.” Sage Life Technologies, based in State College, has been providing telemedicine consulting to healthcare providers since 2004 and provides coordination and consulting in state and federal health information technology and infrastructure initiatives.

Penn State SBDC sets business workshops From Gazette Staff Reports UNIVERSITY PARK — The Penn State Small Business Development Center is a resource open to all entrepreneurs, offering seminars, workshops and resources about business financing, startups, regulations and other essentials. Seminars are scheduled throughout April for free or low-cost learning opportunities. ■ The First Step of Start a Business, 9 a.m. Tuesday, April 3, 200 Tech Center, Room 221, University Park. Admission is free. ■ A Look Back, a Look Forward: Partnering Traditional Marketing with a Social;

Media Twist, 1-3 p.m. Thursday, April 11. Admission is $49. ■ How to Increase Your Website’s Visibility, Rankability and Findability, 9 a.m. through noon, Friday, April 13. Admission is $49. ■ Introduction QuickBooks, 8 a.m. through noon, Thursday, April 19. Admission is $99. ■ Advanced QuickBooks, 8 a.m. through noon, Thursday, April 26. Admission is $99. Visit www.sbdc.psu.edu/calendar.htm. To register and pay for all Penn State SBDC seminars on-line, visit www.sbdc.psu.edu/ seminar-registration.asp or call 814-8634293 or 717-247-1280.

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

Consumer confidence remains optimistic By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK — Americans’ rosy outlook about the U.S. economy remains resilient as they focus on the good in the barrage of conflicting economic news. A widely watched barometer of consumer confidence barely budged in March after hitting its highest level since before the financial crisis began in the previous month. Americans continued to be upbeat in March despite mixed economic signs. The stock market is up, but gas prices are, too. Unemployment is falling, but home prices also are declining. Lynn Franco, director of private research group The Conference Board Consumer Research Center, said in a statement that consumers “feel the economy is not losing momentum.” The Conference Board said this week that its Consumer Confidence Index fell slightly to 70.2. That’s down from a revised 71.6 in February — the highest level it’s been since the same month in 2011. Consumer confidence has made a recovery since it fell to an all-time low of 25.3 in February 2009. But the March reading is below the 90 reading that indicates a healthy economy. The index hasn’t been near 90 since December 2007. Economists watch consumer confidence closely because Americans’ spending on things from clothing to health care accounts for about 70 percent of the nation’s economic activity. One gauge of the Consumer Confidence Index, which measures how shoppers feel now about the economy, rose to 51.0, from 46.4 in the previous month. That measure now stands at the highest level in more than three years. But the other barometer, which assesses shoppers’ six-month outlook, declined to 83.0 from 88.4 in February. “The moderate decline was due solely to a less favorable short-term outlook,

while consumers’ assessment of current conditions, on the other hand, continued to improve,” Franco said. The preliminary survey of consumers, conducted from March. 1 through March 15, showed shoppers’ worries about inflation rose to the highest level in a year. as gas prices rose. In fact, the nationwide average for a gallon of gas reached $3.90 at the start of the week, which is now less than 10 cents away from last year’s high. The price typically climbs in the weeks ahead of Memorial Day weekend — the traditional kickoff of the summer driving season. The national average peaked last year in early May at an average of $3.98 per gallon. The record high of $4.11 was set in July 2008. But steady improvement in other areas of the economy is offsetting worries about gas prices. The economy expanded at an annual rate of 3 percent in the final three months of last year. That was better than the 1.8 percent rate in the previous quarter. Most economists expect growth to slow in the current quarter to below 2.5 percent, despite more hiring. Companies also are adding workers as the economy picks up. The economy has added an average of 245,000 jobs per month from December through February. The unemployment rate has declined to 8.3 percent, the lowest in three years. Those saying jobs “are plentiful” increased to 9.4 percent from 7.0 percent, while those stating jobs are “hard to get” also rose, to 41.0 percent from 38.6 percent. Additionally, consumers’ six-month outlook for the labor market was less upbeat: Those anticipating more jobs in the months ahead declined to 17.3 percent from 18.8 percent, while those anticipating fewer jobs increased to 18.3 percent from 16.4 percent. AP Real Estate Writer Derek Kravitz contributed to this report in Washington.

DEED TRANSFERS The following property transactions were compiled from information provided by the Centre County recorder of deeds, Joseph Davidson. The Gazette is not responsible for typographical errors. The published information is believed to be accurate; however, the Gazette neither warrants nor accepts any liability or responsibility for inaccurate information. RECORDED MARCH 5-9, 2012 BELLEFONTE Gary L. VonGunden, Vickie S. Eaton and Vickie Eaton to Nationstar Mortgage LLC, 350 Highland Drive, Lewisville, TX 75067, $1. Nationstar Mortgage LLC, to Federal National Mortgage Association, 3900 Wisconsin Ave. N.W., Washington, DC 20016, $1. FERGUSON TOWNSHIP Autumnwood Development Company LLC, to S&A Homes Inc., 2121 Old Gatesburg Road, State College, PA 16803, $240,000. Ralph H. Gorver and Vicki L. Grover to National Residential Nominee Services, 10125 Crosstown Circle, Suite 380, Eden Prairie, MN 55344, $253,000. PATTON TOWNSHIP Richard H. Yahner to James R. Antoniono and Susan M. Antoniono, 320 W. Pittsburgh St., Greensburg, PA 15601, $178,000. SNOW SHOE TOWNSHIP Helen N. Soster Estate and Michael C. Soster, Executor to Tobias Properties LLC, 208 West Sycamore St., Snow Shoe, PA 16874, $90,000. SPRING TOWNSHIP Robert W. McClincy Sr., and Sandra A. McClincy to Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., Mail Stop #SV-103, Simi Valley, CA STATE COLLEGE BOROUGH Ross M. Rath Jr., and Janet H. Rath to Mercator Realty LLC, 123 S. Broad St.,

Philadelphia, PA 19109, $225,000. RECORDED MARCH 12-16, 2012 BELLEFONTE Belljay Corp. to Bellefonte Area Industrial Development Authority, 236 W. Lamb St., Bellefonte, PA 16823, $590,000. Northwest Bancshares Inc., to Commonwealth of PA Department of Transportation, 1924 Daisy St. Extension, Clearfield, PA 16830, $1. Northwest Bancshares Inc., to Commonwealth of PA Department of Transportation, 1924 Daisy St. Extension, Clearfield, PA 16830, $1. CENTRE HALL Ruth H. Garman Estate and Thomas Garman, Executor to Thomas Garman, 148 E. Church St., Centre Hall, PA 16828, $1. COLLEGE TOWNSHIP John M. Corneal to S&A Homes Inc., 2121 Old Gatesburg Road, State College, PA 16803, $60,000. John M. Corneal to S&A Homes Inc., 2121 Old Gatesburg Road, State College, PA 16803, $65,000. Donald O. Clouser Estate and Delores Ann Clouser AD to Delores Ann Clouser, John L. Clouser, Donald R. Clouser, Mike D. Clouser and Donna E. Clouser-Homan, 1241 Houserville Road, State College, PA 16801, $1. Wen C, Chien to Natalie J. Nau and Daniel Healy, 146 October Drive, State College, PA 16801, $180,000. Avalayne F. Lykens Living Trust and Avalayne F. Lykens, Trustee to Dawn E. Veeder, P.O. Box 571, Lemont, PA, 16851, $180,000. FERGUSON TOWNSHIP Edwin L. Stewart and Barbara J. Christ to Ferguson Township, 3147 Research Drive, State College, PA 16801, $1. Ferguson Township to Ferguson Township, 3147 Research Drive, State College, PA 16801, $1. Gary D. Keck, Ralph W. Keck and Paul E.

Keck to Ferguson Township, 3147 Research Drive, State College, PA 16801, $1. Gary D. Keck, Ralph W. Keck and Paul E. Keck to Ferguson Township, 3147 Research Drive, State College, PA 16801, $1. Gary D. Keck, Ralph W. Keck and Paul E. Keck to Ferguson Township, 3147 Research Drive, State College, PA 16801, $1. Gary D. Keck, Ralph W. Keck and Paul E. Keck to Ferguson Township, 3147 Research Drive, State College, PA 16801, $1. Gary D. Keck, Ralph W. Keck and Paul E. Keck to Ferguson Township, 3147 Research Drive, State College, PA 16801, $1. S&A Homes Inc., to Dominic F. Pugliese and Rebecca A Pugliese, 128 Meadowhawk, State College, PA 16801, $240,663. Charles C. Way and Debra A. Way to Debra A. Way, 3334 Pamela Circle, State College, PA 16801, $1. GREGG TOWNSHIP John T. Sutton, Patrick S. Albright, Donald Warntz II, Jeffery A. Gibbons, Steve Jones, Joseph E. Ughetto II, Denise Hahn, Paul A. Kine and Melissa H. Kline to Paul A Kline, Melissa H. Kline, John T. Sutton, Patrick S. Albright, Donald Warntz II, Jeffery A. Gibbons, Steve Jones, Joseph E. Ughetto II and Denise Hahn, 728 Dry Valley Road, Lewistown, PA 17044, $1. Chad J. Crater and Audrey L. Sweeley and Audrey L. Crater to Audrey L. Crater, 3854 Penns Valley Road, Spring Mills, PA 16857, $1. HAINES TOWNSHIP Marla L. Jaksch to Joshua R. McCracken, 116 Mountain Ave., Woodward, PA 16882, $35,000. HARRIS TOWNSHIP Amanda S. Tomlinson to Richard Albertson and Justine Wetzel, 711 Jacks Mill Drive, Boalsburg, PA 16827, $122,450. Henry Keller, By Attorney to Henry Keller, c/o Nancy P. Keller, 914 Cornell Court, Madison, WI 53705, $1. Ronald J. Gatehouse and Pratima S. Gatehouse to Colleen L. O’Brien and

William J. O’Brien, 101 Norwich Blvd., Boalsburg, PA 16827, $1. HUSTON TOWNSHIP Penngolf Corporation to J. Garry McShea, 1220 Earlystown Road, Boalsburg, PA 16827, $1. Craig A. Fisher to Russell K. Hartstock, 1121 Julian, PA 16844, $ 25,000. LIBERTY TOWNSHIP Robert L. McGhee Sr. to Robert L. McGhee Sr. and Angela J. McGhee, 104 Oak St., Beech Creek, PA 16822, $1. Samuel L. McGhee Jr., Robert L. McGhee Sr. and McGhee Scrap Metal to Samuel L. McGhee Jr., 105 Pine St., Beech Creek, PA 16822, $1. Samuel L. McGhee Jr., to Samuel L. McGhee, Jr. and Kelly L. McGhee, 105 Pine St., Beech Creek, PA 16822, $1. PATTON TOWNSHIP David P. Veeder and Dawn E. Veeder to Larry S. Popovitch II and Colleen A. Popovitch, 20 Wilts Lane, State College, PA 16803, $261,000. Arlen L. Smith Estate, Stacey L. Kelley, Administrator and Debra A. Way, Administrator to Scott L. Lucchesi, 847 Bayberry Drive, State College, PA 16801, $ 137,500. Crust Charitable Remainder Unitrust to Patton Township, 100 Patton Plaza, State College, PA 16803, $223,080. PHILIPSBURG BOROUGH Kelly A. Kephart and Kelly Kephart Rees to Kelly Kephart Rees, 202 Philips St., Philipsburg, PA 16866, $1. RUSH TOWNSHIP William Kolton and Elizabeth Kolton to Jacqueline M. Jenkins, 503 Doe Alley P.O. Box 43, Mahaffey, PA 15757, $1. Caroline F. Lingenfelter to Richard A. Nybeck and Lyndsay N. Nybeck, 3471 Casanova Road, Munson, PA 16860, $170,000.

Transfers, Page 29


MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

transfers, from page 28 SNOW SHOE BOROUGH Betty A. Hockenberry to Samuel K. Rees Sr. and Doreen M. Rees, P.O. Box 186, 526 Sycamore St., Snow Shoe, PA 16874, $65,000. SNOW SHOE TOWNSHIP Dorothy Smolko and Angel Smolko to Dorothy Smolko and Angel Smolko, 367 Hartline Road, Clarence, PA 16829, $1. Rosewood Investor LLC, to Francine A.

Bosak, 114 E. Sunset Ave., Snow Shoe, PA 16874, $27,900. Judith R. Burlingame to Beckmyer LLC, 966 Ragers Hall Road, South Fork, PA 15956, $313,921.50. SPRING TOWNSHIP Donald E. Robison and Mary J. Robison to Sabrina R. Williams and Dana R. Warrender, 836 Half Moon St., Bellefonte, PA 16823, $1. Koltay Homes Inc., to Jamie Ann Corman, 158 Rosewood Cove, Bellefonte, PA 16823, $213,000.

PAGE 29 Meadow Lark Lane, Boalsburg, PA 16827, $103,550. Grace Black Wood, Trustee and Grace Black Wood to Grace Black Wood, 722 Homes St., State College, PA 16801, $1. Gregory P. Halpin and Elisha Clark Halpin to Seven Continents Hotels & Resorts LP, 3089 Shingletown Road, State College, PA 16801, $128,000.

Jeremy D. Hoy and Molly E. Hoy to Jason K. Snyder and Jessica L. Snyder, 434 Gregory Lane, Bellefonte, PA 16827, $235,000. STATE COLLEGE BOROUGH Bryan R. Woodward and Cindy M. Woodward to Bryan R. Woodward, Cindy M. Woodward and Jay Woodward, P.O Box 520, Bridgeport, WV 26330, $1. Kevin W. Houser to Kevin W. Houser and Xiangyou Shen, 913 Ringneck Road, State College, PA 16801, $1. Susan C. Baker to Kunal Vakharia, 181

WALKER TOWNSHIP Mary L McNelis to Patricia A. McNelis and Pamela A. Supenia, 1255 Logan Ave., Tyrone, PA 16686, $1.

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Rem. 870 Super Mag Camo Turkey .... $469.99 Rem. 870 12Ga Express Mag ............... $319.99 Mossberg 12Ga or 20Ga ...................... $229.99 Mossberg 835 Ulti-Mag ........................ $339.99 Mossberg 930 Tuurkey 12Ga Semi ....... .$529.99

Fishing & Fly Fishing supplies, trrout lurres, e rods Flytech Neopreen Waaders w/Felt ...................... $74.99 Fishing Vests e .............................................. $15.00 & up New/Use Fly Fishing & Spinning Combos $ 9.99 & up George Harvey Tied Flys ............................ $ 1.50 each English Toorel Tied Flys ............................... $ 1.00 each

BUY UY SELL TRADE CONSIGN CCOONSIGN ONSIGGGNN

M-F M-F 12-6

S Sat at phone: 814-548-0088 web: www www.hunterswarehouse.net w.hunterswar .hunter . ehouse.net 12-4 email: hunterswarehouse@comcast.net hunterswarehouse@comcast.net

Always Call First!

WE BEAT ALL RETAIL PRICES STATEWIDE

All prices subject to availability and order AVI, V might have to o order

NY Triple Play TELE-MEDIA COMPA

814.355.4519

Hours: Cloosed Sun & Mon Tuee 10 - 5; Wed 10-7 Thuu 10-3; Fri 10-7; Satt 9-3

1212 Purdue Mountain Road Bellefonte, PA 16823 (814) 355-4963

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AUTO A UTO REPAIR REPAIR

$10 i cuts Hair

s$ECKS s4REE4RIMMING s"RICK"LOCK 3TONE s)NSURANCE*OBS s2OOF#LEANING

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640 Bu Buds uds Aly B Bellef ll fonte Bellefonte

Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jac Ja acckkkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ss ac

s0AINTING s3IDING s$RIVEWAY3EALING s"ASEMENT#LEAN /UTS s2EMODELING

We W e have a professional for your needs! n YOU N NAME AME IT T-W WE ED DO O IT IT! T!

Elec le ec ctr tro ro on nic ic c Filing Filin ng

HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 12-7 â&#x20AC;˘ Sat. 9-3

s,ANDSCAPING s-OVING(ELPERS s0RESSURE 7ASHING s2OOlNG s#ONCRETE

Proceeds benefit our food bank & community. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thank you

PA PA AT TRICIA A A. LOSE

PLEASE CALL FOR APPOINTMENT

(717) 43 (7 4377--079 793 93

HANDYMAN MAN SERVICE SER RVICE V

Blue B lue Ta Ta ags 3/$1.00 3/$1 3/$1.0 /$1.00 00 Bookss 4/$1.00 0

2E ESIDEN SID ID DE ENTI TIIA IAL AL#O OMM MMERC RCIAL R CIA IAL3E ER R VI VIIC CES

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Aâ&#x20AC;? Qual Quali liity ty ty M Ma a aso asso so onry nry ry Compplet leete te Massonry * Maanuf nu ufa fac act ctu tu ured St Sto to one * Coonccrrete ette Work *Fu ully In Ins nsu su urred *

$5 Waxin ing

Cable TV High Speed Internet Unlimited Phone

$

99.95* a month

CALL TODAY! 1-800-704-4254 OR 814-353-2025

167 N. Main St. Pleasant Gap 238-2828 Open Mon.-Fri. 9-5

814-355-3782

LARGE SELECTION OF ALL BRANDS

MICROS, SPECIAL LTIE T ES, KEGS, TAPS, A ICE DRIVE THRU SER VICE

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WOR WORTH TH THE TRIP $ $ $ ONLY 10 MINUTES FROM THE OTHER GUYS

ROARING SPRING WATER DISTRIBUTOR

1235 Zion Road Bellefonte Caall For Direction ns

NOTICE! Please Leave Your o UNDERAGE friends at Home! Must be 221 or older to enterr, unless accompanied by parent or legal guardian

Winter Indoor Farmers' Market Fridays through April 27 11:30am to 5:00pm

Lobby, State College Municipal Building 243 S. Allen St., State College Supported by Spring Creek Homesteading Springcreekhomesteading.wordpress.com


PAGE 30

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

HE C CENTRE ENTRE C COUNTY OUNTY TTHE

GAZETTE

Placing A Classified Ad? Call By Noon Monday To Run Thursday • All Ads Must Be Prepaid

238.5051

PHONE... 814.

classifieds@centrecountygazette.com

REAL ESTATE PACKAGE

EMPLOYMENT PACKAGE

4 Weeks 8 Lines + Photo only

$

76

COUNTRY 5 min. from town. This 3 bdrn home sits on 1/2 acre with open living room, dining room, and kitchen. Three car garage. Bellefonte area. Asking $250,000 firm. Ph. 814.222.333.

2 Weeks 12 Lines

$

ACTION ADS

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

ASSISTANT OFFICE MANAGER

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE

FRONT DESK & HOUSEMAN POSITIONS

full-time. Responsible for assisting with: •Financial statements • Bank statement reconciliation •Credit card statement reconciliation • Invoices and accounts payable •Accounts receivable • Day’s receipts and bank deposits •Payroll •Receiving & vendor returns • Daily sales reports Starting pay $10-12 per hour based on experience, medical after 180 days, retirement and vacation after one year. Our application is available at www.appoutdoors.com and can be droppped off at 123 South Allen Street, State College, PA 16801

Some ads featured on statecollege.com

60

or 4 Weeks

FREE Part time customer service representative wanted for our University Park airport location. Needed to work Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 10:00am through 4:00pm. Possibility for the need to work additional and/or flexible hours in future. Candidate must be at least 21 years of age, Possess valid driver’s license with clean driving record, ability to pass employment background check, and thorough knowledge of greater State College area. Hertz Car Rental 2493 Fox Hill Rd State College, Pa 16803

GARAGE SALE

P L E H TED WAN

HOUSES FOR SALE

The Residence Inn is currently hiring both Front Desk and Houseman positions. We are looking for people who are customer friendly, hard working and looking to make this a long term position. Please come in for an application: 1555 University Dr. State College, PA 16801 ADVERTISE in the Centre County Gazette Classifieds. Call 814238-5051. SELL YOUR unwanted items for FREE! Ask about action ads.

pressmen Wanted for web offset printing. Full time, benefits. Experience on a Goss Urbanite or Harris V-15 helpful. Looking for quality control and ability to work well with others. Shifts vary and weekend work is also required. Send resume to:

Box 2466 c/o The Indiana Gazette P.O. Box 10, Indiana, Pa 15701

GARAGE SALE PACKAGE

MOVING sale. Thurs, Fri, Sat. 9a,-4pm.7341 Manor Heights, Bellefonte. Toys, tools, antiques, furniture, kitchen appliance, Bayou Fitness Center, lots of book, lawn furniture, dishes, girls clothes, fax machine, Computer desk, CD racks, stereos, fans, heaters, bikes, much more. No early birds

HELP WANTED DISPATCHER for trucking company., Must have experience. Good phone and computer skills. Willing to work in fast paced office. Medical benefits available, plus 401K. Please send resume and probable salary requirements to: P.O. Box 012, Bellefonte, Pa. or fax to 814.000.1111.

$

105

1 Week 12 Lines

$

75

18

Total value of all items for sale must be under $2,000 • Must have price of item for sale in ad • Run up to 6 lines for 3 weeks • PRIVATE PARTY ONLY • No early cancellation refunds Real Estate, Rentals, Auctions, Financial, Services/Repairs. Garage Sales, Pets, Bulk (firewood, hay, etc.) not eligible. No other discounts or coupons apply.

HELP WANTED Healthcare

DIRECT CARE WORKERS Make a Career of Caring Comfort Keepers is seeking experienced Direct Care Workers for full-time, benefitted positions in the Centre region. Our compassionate caregivers provide light housekeeping, meal preparation, and personal care services to local elderly consumers who need extra assistance to live independently in their homes. Daylight 7 am - 7 pm Overnight 7 pm - 7 am Schedules are available. Benefits include major medical, dental and vision, 401(k), paid time off, and training. Now offering a $500 signing bonus! To learn more, contact Amy: 814-861-1628 or visit www.comfortkeepers .com/employment EOE DESCRIPTION brings resuts. Use adjectives in your classified ads.

HELP WANTED MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST Our steady growth in the Bellefonte area has created the need for a full-time Receptionist. Candidate will be responsible for directing incoming calls in a courteous manner, greeting patients, obtaining new patient information, scheduling appointments and assisting with other clerical support duties. Will require working a flexible schedule, and participation in the company’s Saturday/holiday rotations. Position requires a high school diploma or equivalent. Our company offers a competitive compensation and benefit package to those who share our high organizational values and believe productive work should be fun. Qualified applicants should submit resume and salary history to: Vicky Barto Email: hiresmart1 @gmail.com Fax: (814) 692-0099 Equal Opportunity Employer

CLOTHING

SPORTS EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE

VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS OUTFIT: Includes skirt, shawl, hat, gloves and purse. Fits 36” waist to 44” waist. Green $150 for set (814) 355-2811

GOLF CART: 2008 YAMAHA G-Max 48 volt, electric. Folding windshield. Golf bag cover. Hunter Green. Ex condition! Charger included. $2500 (814) 237-3701

1998 BUICK CENTURY: White in good condition for sale. Asking for $3500. Pictures available upon request. 814441-4540

FUEL & FIREWOOD

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

FIREWOOD

POOL STEPS for an above ground pool. Call (814) 355-7771

Seasoned, Barkless, Oak Firewood. Cut to your length, Split, & Delivered. We sell our firewood year round. Don’t hesitate to call. Call Now: Matthew R. Walk (814)937-3206

MACHINERY & TOOLS KING CUTTER: finish mower for sale. 4 FT Like new. Asking $600.00 OBO 814-360-5527

MUSICAL & STEREO EQUIPMENT FOR SALE VIOLIN, BOW & CASE: Violin , FNIAA Inscription Ex condition. $500. Bow $55. Case $65. Includes pitch pipe & resin. All for $600 (814) 383-2748 centrecountygazette.com

PARTS & ACCESSORIES FOR SALE

WANTED TO BUY WA N T E D T O B U Y: CASH PAID for old men’s and women’s clothing and accessories including shoes, hats, purses, and costume jewelry from the 1800s-1980s. Please call Lisa (814) 353-8586.

HARLEY DAVIDSON ENGINE PARTS: 2003 Road King seat, 4 tappet lifters, 2 cylinders, 2 pistons, 2 cams & bearings and exhaust muffler (814) 404-1305.

AUTOS FOR SALE

BOATING NEEDS

2002 CHEVY CAMARO: 35th anniversary edition. 127,000mi. new tires and snow, good condition, 25 mpg. red, needs some minor body touch up. runs great. Arizona car. V6, automatic transmission. 814-505-4385

14’ JON BOAT: 2 seats & trailer, Johnson 9.9hp motor. All new: Minn Kota trolling motor, optimax battery, oars, fuel tank, etc $1200. 814-308-9008. Gazette Classifieds call (814) 238-5051.


MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

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www.Facebook.com/BobbyRahalofLewistown www.Facebook.com/BobbyRahalofLewistown

PAGE 31


PAGE 32

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

EXPANDING

OUR TEAM , EXPANDING ACCESS TO

CARE. Mount Nittany Physician Group is dedicated to delivering the highest quality of care to serve the unique needs of the Bellefonte community. By expanding our team of providers, we’re giving you more options and access to the care you need, from routine health exams and screening tests to treatment of chronic conditions and illnesses. Making expert care more available in our community. That’s L I F E F O R WA R D. Schedule an appointment today at 814.355.7322, or visit mountnittany.org for more information.

LEFT TO RIGHT

| Christopher Hester, MD | Tara Shapich, PA-C | Betsey Eggler, MD

Theresa Yebernetsky, PA-C | Kerry Whitelock, DO | Dennis Shannon, MD

141 Medical Park Lane | Bellefonte, PA 16823

© 2012 Mount Nittany Health System

MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2012

CentreCoGaz 3-29-12 low  

KEN REEVES hunters from all over Centre County descended on Penn State’s Ag Arena, looking for treasures in boxes, on tables and stacked on...

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