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Gazette The Centre County

www.CentreCountyGazette.com

Be my Valentine

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, Centre County has several unique ways for you and your sweetheart to celebrate. Whether it’s dinner, dancing or a couple’s massage, the Gazette has your guide to something special./Pages 20-22

February 6-12, 2014

Volume 6, Issue 6

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Spike in flu cases prompts health warning By MARJORIE S. MILLER mmiller@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — With flu season in full swing, area medical providers stress the importance of the vaccine and warn about a possible uptick in cases over the next few weeks. As of Jan. 29 flu was considered widespread in Pennsylvania, meaning there are outbreaks of flu or increases in influenzalike illness cases and recent laboratoryconfirmed influenza in at least half of the regions of the state, with recent laboratory evidence of influenza in the state, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Health. From Sept. 29, 2013, through Jan. 25, 2014, 218 cases of flu were reported in Centre County, according to the health department, and as of Jan. 28, 38 influenzarelated deaths were reported in Pennsylvania. Geisinger Health System has documented 61 cases of influenza diagnosed through its medical laboratory as of Jan. 9. The most prevalent strain appears to be H1N1, and in Pennsylvania this strain

makes up 96 percent of the flu that is out there, according to officials at Geisinger. The H1N1 strain affects younger, healthier people. “Our concern is that this year will be worse than last year,” said Dr. Lisa Esolen, medical director of infection prevention, control and health services at Geisinger Health System. “We are seeing a higher incidence of younger adults with serious disease requiring hospitalization.” So far this year, 34 percent of all hospitalizations are in people ages 18 to 49, as compared with only 16 percent last year. The severity of flu season is influenced by the strain of virus that is circulating, Esolen said. “This year the strain is the H1N1 pandemic strain from 2009-10, which has a tendency to afflict younger adults more severely,” she said. The flu season is expected to get worse, Esolen said. She expects the incidence will dramatically increase over the next six to eight weeks. Flu, Page 4

MARJORIE S. MILLER/Gazette file photo

THAT TIME OF YEAR: Officials at the Mount Nittany Medical Center and other area hospitals are dealing with another strong strain of the flu this year.

Hope Express ready to roll once again

Borough delays selling College Heights school By NATHAN PIPENBERG correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

By BRITTANY SVOBODA correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — Temperatures in Pennsylvania were well below freezing most of the month of January. The beginning of February hasn’t exactly been pleasant either. But that won’t stop the runners of the Hope Express this year, though, as they prepare to travel more than 100 miles from Hershey to State College by foot in the 24 hours before the beginning THON on Feb. 21. When Hank and Connie Angus’ son, Gabe, was diagnosed with leukemia, they became a Four Diamonds Family. They attended their first THON in 2006, which led to the idea that became the Hope Express. In the 24 hours before THON starts, runners carry letters from the children and families at Penn State Hershey Medical Center who can’t attend the event to the dancers, who stay awake for 46 hours to raise awareness and money for pediatric cancer and the Four Diamonds Fund. Hope Express, Page 5

Submitted photo

TEAMWORK: Hope Express has a group of “Extreme Team” runners. In this file photo, a runner gets a head start on her fellow participants.

STATE COLLEGE — College Heights residents are urging the State College Borough to hold off on a decision to sell the former College Heights Elementary School building to Penn State. The borough gets to make the first decision on sales of all district property, which includes the former school building, at 721 N. Atherton St. Council has been in talks with Penn State, which has offered to purchase the building for $400,000. But at the meeting, College Heights Association president Donna Queeney said the process would be improved if the sale was discussed further and other interested parties had the opportunity to put in bids. Queeney said the building was never advertised publicly,

and bids have not been accepted from any parties besides Penn State. “Council should take advantage of the six-month time period to consider other offers,” she said. Council chose to heed this advice — and the recommendation of Borough Manager Tom Fountaine — and continue discussion of the sale at a council work session. If the sale to Penn State is approved, the university plans to use the building as office space for the Penn State Press. Council member Peter Morris voted to discuss the matter further, but also said the intended use by Penn State should not be a cause for concern. “They’re book people, editors and so forth,” he said. “I think they’d be excellent neighbors.” Borough, Page 5

Gardners Candies officially opens new location By CHRIS MORELLI

editor@centrecountygazette.com

CHRIS MORELLI/The Gazette

OPEN FOR BUSINESS: Sam Phillips, president of Gardners Candies, talks to local dignitaries about the the company’s chocolate. The new store is located along North Atherton Street in State College. Opinion ............................... 6 Health & Wellness ........... 7, 8

Education ...................... 9, 10 Community ................. 11-16

STATE COLLEGE — On a frigid morning in State College, the Centre County community welcomed Gardners Candies to North Atherton Street. As shoppers sampled some of the Tyrone-based company’s chocolates, president Sam Phillips cut the ribbon outside, signaling the official grand opening. Following the ribbon cutting, Phillips talked about Gardners Candies’ move from the Nittany Mall to North Atherton Street. “This is clearly the hub of business and activity in the Centre Region,” Phillips said. “Business has shifted, as it always does. Downtown is very popular for different reasons. But for the

Wedding Guide ........... 17-19 Valentine’s Day Guide . 20-22

retail consumer, the North Atherton Street corridor is clearly the busiest part of town. It’s where you want to be. It’s where we want to be.” The North Atherton Street store is one of Gardners Candies seven retail stores in central Pennsylvania. “We’ve got a great location, a great spot next to T.J. Maxx and Panera. We feel that with the parking and the visibility that this is the place to be,” Phillips said. There are many reasons why people shop at Gardners Candies, Phillips said. One of the main reasons is the fact that the candy is made fresh locally and not shipped across the country. “That’s always been the appeal of Gardners. We have seven stores in central Pennsylvania.

Sports ........................... 23-28 Arts & Entertainment . 30, 31

We manufacture everything fresh in Tryone and it’s delivered right to our stores. That’s always been a highlight of our candy. The homemade quality, the freshness has always been attractive,” Phillips said. The store had a soft opening in January on the heels of the official grand opening. Guests at the grand opening included CBICC president Vern Squier; state Rep. Mike Fleck, R-Three Springs; and T.J. Maxx plaza owner Mary Jo Yunis. Gardners Candies was founded in 1897 by a 16-year-old boy named James “Pike” Gardner in Tyrone. The young entrepreneur operated out of a small store in downtown Tyrone. Pike later Gardners, Page 4

What’s Happening ...... 32-34 Group Meetings .......... 34, 35

Business ....................... 37, 38 Classified ........................... 39


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The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

February 6-12, 2014

Front and Centre UNDER PRESSURE: For millions of Americans, regular blood pressure checks are essential to maintaining their health. There are several key elements to taking your blood pressure correctly. Page 7

BACKYARD BATTLE: On Senior Night, the Philipsburg-Osceola High School girls’ basketball team jumped out to a 15-point lead and outlasted rival Bald Eagle Area, 58-50. Page 23

BRIDAL GUIDE: If you’re planning a wedding, you’ll want to check out the Gazette’s guide to all things weddings. There are tips for the bride-to-be as well as the groom. Pages 17-19

OLYMPIC CONNECTION: State College native David Mazza plays a vital role in NBC’s Winter Olympics coverage. Learn all about Mazza from the people who know him best — his family. Page 27

CORRECTION POLICY

The Centre County Gazette corrects errors as soon as they are brought to our attention. Please contact us at editor@centrecountygazette.com to report a correction.

Man hospitalized after assault By StateCollege.com STATE COLLEGE — State College police are looking for a suspect after an early morning assault that sent a man to the hospital. The incident happened at about 1 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 2, in the 200 block of South Pugh Street. Investigators say the victim, a 22-yearold Penn State student, was walking near the Days Inn hotel when the suspect crossed the street and attacked him. According to police, the suspect was

walking with a group of people just prior to the assault. The victim was taken to the Mount Nittany Medical Center for treatment of injuries to his head and face, police said. He was later transferred to Geisinger Medical Center. There’s no word on the extent of his condition. Investigators are checking to see if there may be surveillance video of the assault. Anyone with information about the assault is asked to contact the State College Police Department at (814) 234-7150.

Man convicted of assaulting wife By STEVE BAUER StateCollege.com

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BELLEFONTE — A Centre County jury has convicted a man of assaulting his wife at the couple’s College Township home. Darryl Noye was found guilty of simple assault, recklessly endangering another person and false imprisonment. However, the jury also decided that Noye was not guilty on several other charges, including aggravated assault, one count of simple assault and one count of reck-

lessly endangering. Prosecutors say the 36-year-old man attacked his wife on March 20, 2013. When the woman tried to leave, he reportedly grabbed her and dragged her through the house. According to a news release from the district attorney’s office, Noye pinned his wife down on a bed and suffocated her for over two minutes. The victim reported that she began to pass out and thought she was going to die that night. Noye will be sentenced on March 14.

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The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

PaGe 3

Corbett’s fourth budget takes risks to boost spending By MARC LEVY and PETER JACKSON The Associated Press

HARRISBURG — Robust tax collections, new sources of cash and delayed pension and health care payments would help pour hundreds of millions of additional dollars into education and social services under the spending plan Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett presented to lawmakers Tuesday. For Corbett, a Republican facing a tough re-election battle after balancing his first two budgets with cuts to public schools and social services, it’s a turnaround that will require some crafty, and perhaps risky, moves to accomplish. In his speech, Corbett touted an economy he said is recovering from the recession and the benefits of the booming natural gas industry and a major new transportation funding law he signed in November. He called anew for the privatization of the state’s wine and liquor system, an effort that has stalled in the Legislature, and emphasized his administration’s efforts to improve public schools and health care. “This commonwealth is the sixth-largest economy in the United States,” Corbett said during his nearly 40-minute speech. “And we’ll be running at full strength as long as we concentrate on three priorities: a great education for every child, a private sector where every business large and small can grow and hire, and a health care and human services system where everyone has choices and everyone is covered.” Overall, Corbett is proposing $29.4 billion in spending for the year that starts July 1, an increase of almost 3.7 percent over the

current year’s approved budget. The total increase would be more than $1 billion, although a portion would be shifted into the current budget. Perhaps the most notable new spending he is proposing is a $340 million block grant program designed to ensure that children read and do math at grade level by the third grade, plus more money for child care subsidies, county child welfare services, special education and services for the elderly and mentally disabled. It would be the biggest oneyear spending increase under Corbett, who took office in 2011 facing a collision of a slumping post-recession economy, soaring pension obligations and the end of the federal government’s bailout of state governments. The state government for the first time is projected to break $30 billion in revenue for its main bank account that finances public schools and universities, social services, health care, pensions, debt and prisons. That increase is more than 4 percent over the $29.1 billion expected this year, the biggest such increase in revenue since the economy began recovering from the recession in 2009. Corbett is not proposing to increase income or sales taxes, the biggest pillars of the state budget, but is proposing to cut business taxes for the fourth straight year. To spread new money to education and social services without raising taxes, Corbett must deal with more than $1 billion in costs for public employee pensions and health care for the poor. He will count on more than $300 million in new money from taxes on newly legal gambling in

MATT ROURKE/AP Photo

GOV. TOM CORBETT delivers his budget address for the 2014-15 fiscal year to a joint session of the Pennsylvania House and Senate on Tuesday, Feb. 4, in Harrisburg. bars, a stepped-up government seizure of unclaimed investment and bank accounts and royalties from drilling on private lands that also extracts natural gas from beneath publicly owned lands. Meanwhile, he will look to postpone nearly $600 million in Medicaid and pension payments until later years and divert $225 million in securities from a health care investment fund to cover more of the state’s pension costs. Delaying the pension pay-

ments by reducing the allowable increase will also save school districts $130 million next year, administration officials say. Complicating things are a drop in the federal matching rate in the current Medicaid program and new costs under the 2010 federal health care law, the Corbett administration said. To help offset those, Corbett is counting on federal approval of changes he wants to make to the current Medicaid program to

save $125 million in the first year and, later, more than $600 million annually. Those changes include paring back benefits for able-bodied working age adults, getting more federal Medicaid dollars to cover tens of thousands of low-income adults who have a temporary disability and moving others off Medicaid and into the federally run health insurance marketplace created by the health care law.

Strategic plan aims to keep local neighborhoods strong StateCollege.com

STATE COLLEGE — It’s been a long time in the making but State College residents will soon have a chance to review the borough’s new neighborhood plan. The State College Planning Commission has spent the past year assessing each neighborhood’s strengths and weaknesses, while developing a long-range outlook on potential opportunities — and possible threats. For instance, the plan found that people in College Heights are pleased with the general ambiance of their neighborhood and feel it is very safe and attracts a diversity of residents. At the same time, those residents are concerned about the regula-

tion of student housing and football rentals near their homes. The neighborhood plan also reveals some interesting facts and figures about State College residents: n 62 percent of residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher n There are 12,610 occupied housing units in the borough n 20 percent of those units are owneroccupied and 80 percent are rentals n 68 percent of Penn State students live off campus n 305 single-family homes are registered as student housing The neighborhood plan is in-depth, running 194 pages long. It was developed through meetings with residents who helped set goals to keep neighborhoods

Ferguson Township report breaks down costs for services By JENNIFER MILLER StateCollege.com

STATE COLLEGE — Ferguson Township recently released its 2014 Budget Executive Summary, a new publication intended to educate residents about the township’s revenues, expenditures and goals. Dave Pribulka, Ferguson Township assistant manager, says the idea is to provide relevant information to residents in an easy-to-follow format. “It’s part of an overall campaign that we’ve had over the last year ... to be more engaging with residents. To make documents and press releases and any type of communication, to make it a little bit more digestible. Something that’s a little bit more useful to a resident,” said Pribulka. Included in the report is a breakdown of cost-per-resident for the services the township provides. For example, the total 2014 public safety budget per resident is $158.72, and the

township will spend $365,325 on Schlow Centre Region Library, or $20.85 per resident. “If there’s one takeaway that folks get from the executive summary, it’s that their hard earned money is being spent in a calculated manner, it’s being used in a calculated way that’s targeted at improving the services that are provided by the township and to improve the quality of life in the township and the community as a whole,” said Pribulka. Pribulka said residents are encouraged to provide officials with feedback in terms of what they found useful in the report and what they’d like to see included in future reports. Residents can do so by contacting Community Communications Coordinator Ronda Reid at (814) 238-4651. Ferguson Township has roughly 17,700 residents. Residents can also pick up a printed copy of the report at the Ferguson Township Building at 3147 Research Drive.

vibrant and connected to the community. There are quite a few neighborhoods in State College, some of which you may not have heard of before. They include College Heights, Highlands, Vallamont, Nittany Hills East & Penfield, State College South, Tusseyview, Greentree, Orchard Park, Holmes-Foster/West End — plus Penn State’s main campus. According to the neighborhood plan, residents want to protect and invest in their neighborhoods in the face of continuing growth in the Centre Region. After deciding on which goals were worth pursuing, members of the planning commission held a series of meetings last summer, to develop an action plan for meeting those goals. Understanding each neighborhood’s

priorities was a key focus of the planning meetings that followed. Three major themes were identified: n Maintain neighborhood facilities, appearance and high-quality housing stock n Balance renter and owner-occupied housing in borough neighborhoods n Improve relationships among neighbors and with borough leaders The planning commission will host an open house at the State College Municipal Building on Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. That will give residents an opportunity to provide comment before the plan is presented to borough council. If you have questions, please call the Planning Department at (814) 234-7109. You can also send an email to planningdept@statecollegepa.us.

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Page 4

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

CHRIS MORELLI/The Gazette

SAM PHILLIPS, president of Gardners Candies, prepares to cut the ribbon at the new store in the T.J. Maxx Plaza as store employees and local dignitaries look on. Gardners, from page 1 added a horse-drawn wagon so that he could transport and sell candy, popcorn and peanuts at local fairs and carnivals. “We’ve been there ever since,” Phillips said. From there, Gardners Candies became some of the most popular candy in the Keystone State. In addition to headquarters in Tyrone, there are locations in State College, Huntingdon, Johnstown, Altoona (two) and Indiana. Gardners Candies are also sold at various drug stores, grocery stores and gift shops throughout the state. All told, the company employs more than 100 people. “We’re doing well. We’re very pleased,” Phillips said. “We’ve been in State College for 30 years, so we’re not new, but we’re new to this area. We’re really excited about it.” According to Phillips, the new location should be busy for Valentine’s Day next week. However, it’s not their busiest day of the year. Those belong to a couple of other holidays.

“We live for the holidays. We live for Christmas and Easter. Those two holidays are about 70 to 75 percent of our whole year. The five days before Easter are our busiest five days of the year in our retail stores. Valentine’s Day is busy, but it’s just for one day. Christmas, we’re busy for six weeks,” Phillips said. The company also does fundraising for schools, extracurricular activities and youth sports leagues. As far as the new store is concerned, Phillips promised a top-notch product along with four-star customer service. “I always tell people, ‘everyone who comes to one our stores is actually here to buy something for somebody else.’ You’re not going to get in your car and drive here to pick up a quarter-pound of peanut clusters. You’re going buy a gift — whether it’s Easter candy for your children or something for a Christmas stocking — you’re buying for somebody else. It’s got to be good service because you’re coming here for a reason,” Phillips said. For more information about Gardners Candies, visit www.gardnerscandies.com or stop by the new store at 1613 N. Atherton St. in State College.

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PENN STATE students walk by the University Health Center on campus. The center offers flu shots to current students. Flu, from page 1 Dr. Raymond Nungesser, family practice physician at Geisinger in Lewistown, agrees. “Flu season is here,” he said. “(It’s) not yet peaked.” Nungesser saw more flu cases this past week than the previous week, and expects to see even more next week, he said. This season’s virus is causing more than just illness at home, he said. “This particular strain has already killed,” Nungesser said, explaining some of those deaths have been in children. The current flu vaccine covers the H1N1 strain, and it is recommended for all people over the age of 6 months unless they have an allergy or other contraindication. “Influenza vaccination is not indicated in babies under 6 months of age, anyone who has a life-threatening allergic reaction to eggs, anyone who has a history of a severe neurological/paralyzing reaction to a prior influenza vaccine, or if you are currently ill with a fever,” Esolen said. Additionally, the intranasal liquid vaccine, which avoids needles, is available, Esolen said. However, it has precautions of its own, and patients should talk with their physicians before receiving it, she said. Even those who have already had the flu this season should still consider the vaccine, Nungesser said. “There are multiple strains … that are still attacking,” he said. All Geisinger employees are required to get the flu vaccine, Nungesser said. Those who are unable to must wear a mask. Nungesser said the vaccination policy isn’t just to keep health care workers safe; it’s to reduce contagion within the community. “We’re trying to be a good cocoon for the community,” he said. Vaccines are available at all Geisinger clinics. At Mount Nittany Medical Center, 133 patients had tested positive for influenza as of Jan. 28. “That’s probably just the tip of the iceberg,” said Marlene Stetson, infection control coordinator at Mount Nittany Medical Center. Stetson said many people don’t seek care for the flu, many don’t get tested for the flu, and many receive a negative test when they really do have the flu, so the numbers likely are higher than reported. Since the second week of December, cases have really “ramped up,” Stetson said, and have been consistent since. However, she said she doesn’t know if flu has spiked yet, or when it will spike. The typical flu season is November through March, she said. “We can still see flu into April but it will have tapered off by that time,” Stetson said. The bulk of reported cases have been the H1N1 strain, Stetson said, followed by Influenza A. The medical center is seeing a variety of ages affected by flu this season, especially those aged 30 to 50 and those under 10 years of age. Stetson said it is common to associate the flu with the elderly, but H1N1 seems to affect middle-age and healthy folks. The vaccine is recommended for anyone over the age of 6 months, Stetson said, especially high-risk patients, such as those with underlying health conditions and those who are pregnant. The vaccine can be received through the end of March. “We’re seeing some pretty serious ill-

FLU FACTS n Most experts believe that flu viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. Less often, a person might also get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, eyes or nose. n Most healthy adjust may be able to infect others beginning one day before symptoms develop, and up to five to seven days after becoming sick. n Complications of flu can include bacterial pneumonia, ear infections, sinus infections, dehydration and worsening of chronic medical conditions. For more information visit www. cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm. — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ness with influenza,” Stetson said, including hospitalizations and those requiring intensive care treatment. There’s plenty of vaccine available, she said, and it’s not too late to vaccinate. To help protect against the spread of the flu, Mount Nittany Medical Center has established a vaccination campaign for health care workers in which they are given the choice to receive a vaccination or wear a surgical mask within 6 feet of patients. Additionally, the medical center has a variety of hygiene station kiosks which include information about the flu, masks and hand sanitizers, Stetson said. To help improve accuracy of flu testing and reporting, the medical center has implemented new technology to test for the flu. The test, which is a nasal swab, examines a patient’s DNA to detect the virus. The test is nearly 100 percent sensitive, Stetson said, and can even detect a dead virus. The test, which was introduced this year, hopefully will improve the accuracy of testing, she said, and help physicians better treat patients. “(It will help them) hone in on their clinical decision making,” Stetson said. Common symptoms of the flu include a high fever, body aches, and sometimes gastrointestinal symptoms, such as vomiting or diarrhea, most often in children. Whereas a common cold may come on gradually, the flu hits rather suddenly, Stetson said. “We’d encourage all visitors not to visit if they’re ill with influenza symptoms,” she said, adding that anyone who is sick should stay home from work and other activities. People can protect against the flu by practicing frequent hand washing, using alcohol-based hand sanitizer, covering their coughs and receiving the flu vaccine. Those who suspect they might be ill with influenza should contact their physicians, Stetson said. Vaccines are available at Mount Nittany Physician Group practices. Based on the Centers for Disease for Disease Control and Prevention projections, the PA Dept. of Health estimates that 5 to 20 percent of Pennsylvanians get the flu each year and 200 to 2,000 die from complications of influenza. For more information visit www.portal.health.state. pa.us. For more information about Geisinger visit www.Geisinger.org. For more information about Mount Nittany Medical Center visit www.mountnittany.org.


February 6-12, 2014

The Centre County Gazette

Page 5

Submitted photo

HOPE EXPRESS runners prepared to hit the road last year. The group began at the Children’s Hospital in Hershey and finished at University Park. Hope Express, from page 1 The money raised by Penn State students who are members of THON, as well as organizations like the Hope Express, goes directly to the Four Diamonds Fund, which helps families with out-of-pocket expenses such as medical bills that insurance doesn’t cover. For Hank Angus, however, it has never been about the money. “It’s always been about awareness. If we’re doing the right thing, the money will follow,” he said. Raising awareness about THON and the Four Diamonds fund is No. 1, Angus said. “It keeps me up at night thinking that people don’t know about the Four Diamonds Fund,” he said. “But the more we get the word out, the more people we help.” One of this year’s runners, Joel Smith, a 2013 Penn State graduate and dancer at last year’s THON, said that once he learned Hope Express was accepting applications for this year’s teams, he immediately applied. “It caught my eye,” he said. Spreading awareness of THON and the Four Diamonds Fund is important, he said. As part of the runner selection process, Angus said the committee, which is made up of Four Diamonds Families, looks at the fundraising abilities of the applicants. Finalists, he said, get the whole month of October to fundraise for the Hope Express. “It’s not just about the total amount they raised,” Angus said, “but how many people they reached out to. It goes back to our mission about awareness.” Smith said he reached out to family and friends as well as people through his church to raise money. “I feel good about my fundraising,” he said. “Ultimately, it’s all about spreading awareness.” In past years, the Hope Express consisted of two teams: the Hope team, composed of 15 runners who cover a 135-mile route, and the Extreme team, composed of eight runners who cover a 140-mile route. This year, Team Conquer was added to the Hope Express run. It will be made up of 14 runners who will cover a separate 135-mile course than the Hope team. Team Hope Borough, from page 1 In other business, council also discussed its plan for 2014-2015 legislative priorities. Fountaine said the plan forms the basis for ongoing discussion between members of council and state and federal officials on issues that require state or federal oversight or cooperation. One example that the borough is considering on its priority list is the installation of red light cameras that would be installed at high-traffic intersections and automatically ticket drivers for red light violations. By adding the cameras to the priority list, council is requesting the state of Pennsylvania to allow governments in Centre County to install the cameras, following the state’s decision to approve the cameras in other counties near Philadelphia. Fountaine and State College Police Chief Tom King both said that red light cameras have been proven in traffic stud-

and Team Conquer runners will each run three 3-mile legs, and the Extreme team will run three 6-mile legs. Angus said 84 people applied to run in the Hope Express this year. Based on conditions in Pennsylvania thus far in 2014, Angus said he is worried about what the weather be like during the run this year. Although he’s been tracking the forecast, he said long-range predictions aren’t always reliable. The perfect and most comfortable conditions, Angus said, is 45 to 50 degrees. One year, he said, it was 70 degrees and he had to worry about the runners remaining hydrated. Another year, there was an ice storm, which compromised the run. “I’m a little concerned,” he said. All routes go over mountains, which Angus said could be troubling in certain weather conditions. If the runners and RVs, which carry those who aren’t running as well as belongings, can’t use a planned route, Angus said there are alternates. Some routes, he said, only take them five miles out of their way. Others, however, can be as much as a 20-mile detour. Smith said he has always been athletic and played soccer, but he wasn’t a runner. “I never went out and just ran,” he said. It’s hard to just go out and run, Smith said, especially when the weather isn’t good. “But you need to be prepared for anything.” With that, he added that he isn’t particularly worried about the weather since his team only runs for three miles at a time. “What we do is hard,” Angus said. “We’re all volunteers. Nobody gets paid.” Some years, he said he questions the amount of work and effort it takes for Hope Express to happen. But when he and his wife give the check every year to THON for the Four Diamonds Fund, Angus said it makes it all worthwhile. Last year, they wrote a check for $93,135, which he said brought the student who collected it to tears. Fundraising for THON through the Hope Express has averaged an 18 percent increase each year since the run began in 2007.Angus would not give an exact number or estimation. “We’re doing very well this year,” he said. ies to reduce the rate of major car accidents. King also said the cameras, if installed, would come with many safeguards. Any ticket issued based on camera evidence would be reviewed by a police officer, time-stamped and dated, could not affect insurance rates, and would not exceed a $100 fine. Council member Jim Rosenberger supported moving forward with the red light cameras, because he said pursuing “local options” authorized by the state is important for other issues, like anti-fracking and drink tax ordinances. So far, Rosenberger said, the borough has successfully banned fracking by passing a “Community Bill of Rights,” and has considered implementing a drink tax for several years. At the meeting, council also approved a small increase in sewer bill costs with a unanimous vote. The 3.89 percent rate increase will be implemented on April 1, and residents can expect to see their sewer bills reflect the increase beginning in July.

MARJORIE S. MILLER/The Gazette

FROM LEFT, Nicole Foley, Jeremy Gibson and Jeremy Gibson were sworn into the State College Police Department Friday at the State College Municipal Building on Allen Street. The new officers were introduced by police chief Tom King and sworn in by State College Mayor Elizabeth Goreham.

State College Police Dept. welcomes three new hires By MARJORIE S. MILLER mmiller@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — Three new police officers were sworn into the State College Police Dept. Friday during a special ceremony at the State College Municipal Building on Allen Street. Police Chief Tom King introduced Michael Croyle, Nicole Foley and Jeremy Gibson, who were then sworn in by State College Mayor Elizabeth Goreham. “This is another exciting time in the life of the State College Police Department,” King said. He said the department is fortunate to welcome three people with “excellent backgrounds” and “excellent credentials” who will do good work. Croyle began his law enforcement career in Virginia serving as a police officer for eight years with the Chesapeake Police Department. In 2013 he was hired by the Lewistown Borough Police Department. Croyle will enter the department’s 17-week Field Training Officer program on Feb. 3, King said. Foley, who grew up in Philadelphia, graduated from Penn State in 2012. Dur-

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ing college she was a Penn State auxiliary officer, which enabled her to assist Penn State police. Additionally, she interned with the State College Police Department, King said. “Nicole has become very familiar with the State College area,” he said. Gibson, a graduate of the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, owns several local businesses with his wife, Shannon. He volunteered with the Alpha Fire Company and has been involved in high profile court cases, King said. Foley and Gibson do not have prior law enforcement experience. They will begin their career by attending the Allentown Police Academy beginning Feb. 3. The basic academy runs for 23 weeks, according to police officials. “I really enjoy these opportunities,” King said. “This has been an outstanding place to do a career in law enforcement … I just wish for (the new officers) a very happy, fulfilling and especially safe career.” State College Borough Manager Tom Fountaine was also in attendance Friday. For more information visit www. statecollegepa.us.

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Gazette The Centre County

403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801 Phone: (814) 238-5051 Fax: (814) 238-3415 www.CentreCountyGazette.com

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Pete Seeger left us with legacy of song By The Chicago Tribune Word of Pete Seeger’s death arrived in the middle of the night on one of the coldest days in modern history. That seemed appropriate given the gift of warmth the man had bequeathed in his music. By some viewed as the most dangerous man in America, he was an early Communist and determined and passionate critic of everything he believed was wrong. He created a warm, expansive genre of folk music that invited young people in, immersed them in the culture of conflict and sent them out the other end full of argument, passion and song. This was troubling for America in the 1950s, a nation fresh from the big war, longing for calm and looking ahead to soul-searing conflicts over race, assassinations and Vietnam. A lifelong pacifist, Seeger was at the center of the peace and rights movements, helping make “We Shall Overcome” and “Waist Deep in the Big Muddy,” anthems for a generation that was struggling against the currents. He paid a price. He was cited for contempt of Congress, blacklisted and basically forced off most stages at the height of his career. Seeger never actually mellowed, but had his regrets. He rejected Soviet Communism in the early 1980s (long after his career was crippled by blacklisting) and acknowledged he was “probably” not an atheist because he could see God in the people of the world and in every living thing. He became sweet as he aged, his old bitterness locked away in dozens of songs over time that offered no quarter to hatred, racism, brutality, warfare and pollution of his beloved Hudson River. Most of all, he gave everyone permission to sing whenever the urge entered their head. If they asked “Sing what?” he had thousands of great answers.

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Opinion

February 6-12, 2014

Do executive orders overreach?

President Obama says he plans to advance an ambitious policy agenda this year “with or without Congress.” His latest decision: an executive order raising the minimum wage for federal contractors to $10.10 an hour. “I have got a pen and I have got a phone, and I can use that pen to sign executive orders,” the president has said in recent weeks. He echoed the theme in his State of the Union address to Congress last week, saying if legislators refused to act, he would act alone. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, denounced the president’s approach, writing last week in the Wall Street Journal, “When a president can pick and choose which laws to follow and which to ignore, he is no longer a president.” Do President Obama’s executive orders exceed his constitutional power? Or is he using all of the tools at his disposal in the face of congressional opposition? Ben Boychuk and Joel Mathis, the Red-Blue America columnists, weigh in.

JOEL MATHIS

Two words: “Unitary executive.” You might not remember those words — Republicans in Congress certainly don’t seem to. They were the name of a theory, advocated by Dick Cheney in particular, under which the George W. Bush administration unilaterally chose to ignore Congress and its legal obligations, pretty much whenever it chose. Joel Mathis, A law against joelmmathis@ warrantless wiregmail.com, tapping? Ignore it. is a writer in Treaties against Philadelphia. torture? Ignore them. Don’t like the new law Congress passed? Don’t veto it — sign it, but add a “signing statement” explaining why you won’t actually obey it. All of this happened with the neartotal acquiescence of congressional Republicans throughout the Bush ad-

JOEL MATHIS

ministration. (Ron Paul, as always, was the exception.) Much like their love of fiscal austerity and the filibuster, the GOP rediscovered its fidelity to the rule of law with alacrity in 2009, when President Obama took office. It’s clear what’s going on here: Republicans don’t believe in a constrained, limited presidency. They believe in constraining and limiting Democrats. It’s not the same thing, and observers can be forgiven for rolling their eyes at the crocodile tears of self-styled defenders of the Constitution. This isn’t to let Democrats off the hook. They spent the Bush years complaining about abuses of power, and now beg the president to bypass Congress wherever possible. Cynical power-grabbing is a bipartisan exercise. And yes, the president is among the cynical power-grabbers: “Any President takes an oath to, ‘preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States,’” he said when he first ran for president, suggesting he would rein in the excesses of the Bush administration. “The American people need to know where we stand on these issues before they entrust us with this responsibility — particularly at a time when our laws, our traditions, and our Constitution have been repeatedly challenged by this administration.” So much for that. No matter: That ship has sailed. The cat is out of the bag, the worms out of the can: If Republicans want to limit the presidency, let them prove it when one of their own is in the White House.

BEN BOYCHUK

Fact is, U.S. presidents do have vast powers under Article II of the Constitution, especially when it comes to waging war and protecting national security. But “vast” isn’t the same as “unlimited.” Too many presidents — Republican and Democrat — have stretched the interpretation of their powers to the limit, and sometimes beyond. In that sense, President Obama is no different from past presidents. But in crucial ways, he has used and abused his powers in ways his predecessors could only fantasize about. Unilaterally raising the federal minimum wage for government contractors may have had Republicans in

Congress pulling their hair out last week, but that’s among the least of this president’s usurpations of their lawmaking authority. Committing American airpower in 2011 to help overthrow Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi without so much as consulting Congress was a milestone in presidential overreach. Obama called it “leading from behind.” In the aftermath, four U.S. State Department employees were killed in Benghazi on Sept. 11, 2012, and Libya is splitting along old tribal lines and descending further into chaos. Obama decided in 2012 that Congress wasn’t doing enough to reform U.S. immigration laws. ‘So he signed an executive order barring the Immigration and Customs Enforcement service from deporting minors and relatives of U.S. service members living in the United States illegally. The president’s justification was at least somewhat plausible: “prosecutorial discretion” gives him some leeway on enforcement. But immigration enforcement officers complain, with justice, that Obama’s orders have effectively tied their hands. But when the president decided to delay his health care law’s “employer mandate,” he engaged in nothing less than wholesale lawlessness. The reason for the delay boils down to cynical political calculation: forcing employers with more than 50 workers to provide health insurance ahead of the 2014 midterm elections would likely disrupt the Ben Boychuk, bboychuk@cityeconomy and be journal.org, is bad for Demo- associate editor of crats. Nothing City Journal. more to it than that. Congress has for too long delegated far too much of its power to the executive branch. It’s past time the legislative branch used its authority to hold this president to account, starting with enforcing his ill-conceived health care reform law.

BEN BOYCHUK

Our impact on earth must be weighed So, I’m talking to a young truck driver. He’s a kid, really, but old enough to have a bachelor’s degree in something. He’s postponed his career for a temporary but lucrative sojourn in the oil field. The Eagle Ford shale, a major oil and gas play in south Texas, is thriving on improved fracking technologies that extract previously unavailable hydrocarbons and contribute significantly to our nation’s production boom. Fracking requires truckloads of water and plenty of drivers to service John M. Crisp the new wells that teaches English at pop up across the Del Mar College landscape every in Corpus Christi, week. This young Texas. His column driver wasn’t is distributed by McClatchy-Tribune making much per News Service. Email hour, but he was putting in a lot of him at jcrisp@ overtime. delmar.edu. He seemed proud to be about this manly task — the oil patch is a world of husky young guys in pickup trucks and newly

JOHN CRISP

constructed trailer parks dotted with satellite dishes. In fact, his assertion that a fracking operation that he was involved in actually caused an earthquake was a modest boast. Whatever his college major, it probably wasn’t seismology. But peculiar geological events have been occurring in Texas, as well as in other parts of the country where fracking is being deployed to tease from the substratum whatever hydrocarbons remain. Texas is generally an earthquakefree zone, but CNNMoney’s website recently reported 30 small earthquakes since Nov. 1 in a rural area outside Fort Worth, a place where ordinarily the earthquake count would be close to zero. Local residents are blaming deep injection wells that are used to dispose of the noxious wastewater produced by fracking. They made enough noise to persuade the Texas Railroad Commission — a generally industry-friendly entity — to hold a town hall meeting in Azle, where 900 residents showed up to demand an end to the injection of fracking wastewater. This issue isn’t confined to a few small towns in Texas. A web search of “earthquakes and fracking” will produce reports of concerns in Pennsylvania, New York, Arkansas, Ohio, Oklahoma and Kansas, among others. The evidence is impressive. U.S. Geological

Survey geophysicist William Ellsworth recently noted in Science that the rate of earthquakes in the central and eastern United States rose from about 20 to about 100 per year between 2010 and 2013, in correlation with the increased use of fracking. On the other hand, a petroleum engineer with decades of experience making a small fortune from oil and gas tells me that fracking is harmless and emphatically rejects the notion that it could possibly cause earthquakes or release enough gas into underground aquifers to make tap water burn. Of course, a column like this doesn’t have the scope to say much that’s definitive about the impact that fracking has on the environment. But whenever I encounter skepticism about our capacity to affect our environment, I think of Jared Diamond’s “Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed,” a hefty and impressive chronicle of communities, large and small, ancient and modern, that have risen and declined because they pushed up against and then exceeded the capacity of their environments. The Incan and Mayan civilizations collapsed in isolation. But the scale of our communities is much larger, and our capacity for collapse is global. The only thing that’s growing faster than the evidence of our global culture’s effect on the environment is our capacity to deny it.

Unless labeled as a Gazette editorial, all views on the Opinion page are those of the authors.


February 6-12, 2014

The Centre County Gazette

Page 7

Health & Wellness

Knowing the ‘right way’ to check blood pressure From Gazette staff reports HERSHEY — For millions of Americans, checking blood pressure is not something reserved for an annual medical visit. Because one in three American adults suffers from high blood pressure, regular and accurate blood pressure checks are important for correctly diagnosing and treating hypertension. Dr. Robert Zelis, a cardiologist at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, says there are three groups of people who may want to consider checking blood pressure on their own, outside of a medical setting. The first is those with so-called “whitecoat hypertension” — patients who get so worked up about being in a doctor’s office that their readings will always be skewed there. The second is those who already take medication to control their blood pressure and need to monitor how it’s working. The third is those who suffer from chronic conditions such as diabetes or high cholesterol — or who have risk factors such as obesity, smoking or a strong family history of hypertension. Whether a blood pressure check is done at the doctor’s office or at home, it’s important to follow the same procedure: n Make sure the blood pressure cuff is large enough and easy to use. n Sit in a chair with a straight back, with both feet flat on the ground. Your legs should not be crossed. n Make sure your arm is supported on something — a table, armrest, etc. n Don’t take a measurement with the cuff

placed on top of clothing. Bare skin is best. n Wait 30 seconds after sitting down before you take your measurement. n Take a second reading 30 seconds after you have finished the first to confirm your initial results. n Take the measurements at the same time of day. n Record your results to spot patterns. A panel of experts published new guidelines in the Journal of the American Medical Association in December recommending that the upper number of the reading — which records the peak flow of blood when the heart is pumping — be less than 150 for adults age 60 and older. For those younger than 60, it should still be less than 140. The lower number of the reading — which records the flow of blood when the heart is resting — should be less than 90 for everyone. Zelis suggests taking measurements in the morning and evening for two consecutive days and recording the results. Repeat the process every couple of weeks rather than daily. “You can bring those numbers into the doctor’s office so we have a bunch of readings to look at,” he says. “Nobody wants to have to do it every day.” Patricia Williams-Forgenie, attending nurse at Penn State Hershey’s I.O. Silver Cardiovascular Specialties Clinic, is leading an initiative to make sure everyone in the Penn State Hershey system adheres to the same standards when measuring blood pressure. “It is one of the first and most basic skills we learn as health care professionals, but we are human, and so we sometimes devi-

Director of primary care operations named STATE COLLEGE — Mount Nittany Health recently announced the promotion of Sherrill Byron to the position of director of primary care operations for Mount Nittany Physician Group. Byron began with what is formerly known as the Guillard Medical Group in 1997 as practice manager, and then transitioned to Mount Nittany Physician Group in 2010 when the practice joined Mount Nittany Health. Previous to that, Byron worked for State College Urologic Associates and Highmark. She is a certified medical manager (CMM) and a certified medical practice executive (CMPE). In her new position, Byron will be responsible for directing operational aspects of a group of practices and clinic sites for the physician group. Specifically, she will be responsible for family medicine, internal

medicine, pediatrics and occupational health. “We are certainly a patient-centered group that constantly focuses on providing a positive patient experience,” said Byron. “The growth and expansion that Mount Nittany Physician SHERRILL BYRON Group is experiencing is truly a turning point, as we begin to expand hours at multiple clinic locations and realign our focus to navigate the new direction of health care.” For more information on Mount Nittany Health or Mount Nittany Physician Group, visit www.mountnittany.org.

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THERE ARE SEVERAL important elements to taking one’s blood pressure, according to the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. ate from the recommended standards,” she says. “Those readings are the basis for some decisions that physicians make for patient treatment, so if we are not measuring it correctly and consistently, we affect patient care.” She suggests health care professionals and

patients alike adhere to standards published in the Wisconsin Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program’s Blood Pressure Measurement Toolkit. To learn more about high blood pressure, visit the American Heart Association’s website.

New hospitalists announced

STATE COLLEGE — Mount Nittany Health has announced the addition of 10 hospitalists to Mount Nittany Physician Group’s newly created hospitalist program at Mount Nittany Medical Center. Dr. Thomas Covaleski, medical director; Dr. Jonathan Siuta, assistant director; Dr. Robert Coll; Dr. Philippe Leveille; Dr. Karen Paczkowski; Dr. Ryan Ridenour; Dr. Jessica Stevens; physician assistant Heidi Averill; physician assistant Sara Dungan; and physician assistant Ben Steward joined Mount Nittany Physician Group on Jan. 1. A hospitalist is a medical practitioner whose primary focus is taking care of pa-

tients in a hospital setting. When a patient is admitted to the hospital, the hospitalist will spend a great deal of time with the patient, gathering information and going over past health records in order to provide the best care possible while in the hospital. Hospitalists communicate regularly with the patient’s family physician, and when the patient is ready to be sent home, all medical record information, treatment needs, dietary concerns, medication information and more is communicated with the family doctor, ensuring seamless, coordinated care. For more information visit www.mount nittany.org/hospitalist.

Program volunteers needed STATE COLLEGE — The American Cancer Society is looking for licensed cosmetologists and general program volunteers to assist with its “Look Good … Feel Better” program at the ACS’s office at 1375 Martin St. in State College. “Look Good … Feel Better” is a free, nonmedical program that helps women facing cancer combat the appearance-related side effects of treatment and restore their selfesteem. Each session is led by a certified licensed beauty professional.

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Page 8

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

System could identify high-risk osteoporosis patients HERSHEY — An automated system that identifies high-risk osteoporosis patients being treated for fractures and can generate letters encouraging follow-up is an effective way to promote osteoporosis intervention and prevent future fractures, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The researchers identified patients at least 50 years old with a fracture who were seeking medical help at the emergency department of Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. They then analyzed treatment codes to find fractures that seemed to be from bone fragility — a broken bone caused from a fall from standing height or less. In all, 103 patients were identified. To do this, researchers received data monthly from the hospital’s finance department, which was used to auto-populate a spreadsheet created specifically to screen for osteoporosis. This database was then screened further to remove patients whose injuries were not consistent with fragility fractures and letters were then computergenerated and mailed to the final list. Evidence suggests that fewer than 30 percent of postmenopausal women and fewer than 10 percent of men with a prior fragility fracture are treated for osteoporosis. “Our almost fully automated osteoporosis system identifies these patients, requires minimal resources — many of which are already currently in U.S. hospitals, but just need to be tapped — and delivers substantially improved osteoporosis intervention

results,� said Dr. Edward Fox, professor of orthopedics. Each patient was sent a letter within three months of their emergency room visit that explained that they may be at risk for osteoporosis and to schedule an appointment with their doctor or the hospital’s bone health clinic. A follow-up phone call was then placed three months after the letter, asking if follow-up treatment had occurred. For comparison, a group of 98 patients who did not receive letters were also contacted by phone six months after being treated in the emergency department for a fragility fracture. These patients were asked if they were being treated or had plans for follow-up after their fracture. Of those who received letters, 60 percent had followed up. Only 14 percent who did not receive a letter had, or planned, followup care. Results were published in Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation. Past research has been conducted on osteoporosis intervention programs, but the majority of programs have lacked automation or could be difficult to implement in an average hospital. Since it is automated, this system reduces the potential for human error in identifying high-risk patients. Nationally, osteoporosis contributes to more than 2 million fractures per year. “Progressive bone fragility leads to greater risk for fractures,� Fox said. “Hospitals treat fragility fractures, but they have no system in place to evaluate those same patients for

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ACCORDING TO Penn State College of Medicine researchers, a new automated system can identify high-risk osteoporosis patients. osteoporosis to prevent the next fracture. This study’s results are better than no letter or doing nothing, which is what most hospitals are doing, including the one piloting our program before it started this program.� Future studies should examine the effectiveness of using both a phone call and a

letter to improve follow-up rates. Other researchers on this project are Matthew Varacallo, a member of the Penn State College of Medicine Class of 2013; Emmanuel Paul, Susan Hassenbein and Pamela Warlow, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation.

Jensen recognized for nutrition support therapy research UNIVERSITY PARK — Gordon Jensen, professor and head of the Department of Nutritional Sciences and professor of medicine at Penn State, has been named the 2014 Jonathan E. Rhoads Lecturer by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.). The Jonathan E. Rhoads Lecture is A.S.P.E.N.’s most prestigious award. It recognizes scholars for their major contributions to the field of nutrition support therapy and their career-long commitments to improving the nutritional statuses of patients. The lecturer is recommended by A.S.P.E.N.’s board of directors and was invited by the society’s president to deliver a lecture at the society’s Clinical Nutrition Week conference. Jensen’s research focuses largely on nutrition concerns in older populations. He and his colleagues develop and test nutrition screening and assessment tools that focus on specific functional and health care resource outcomes for

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older people. In particular, they study the impact of obesity on these outcomes. Jensen also promotes understanding of the central roles of inflammatory responses in malnutrition and obesity. Board certified in nutrition and internal medicine, Jensen provides consultation for adult nutrition support interventions at the Mt. Nittany Medical Center. These interventions entail the proviGORDON JENSEN sion of specialized intravenous or tube feedings for malnourished patients who are unable to eat. Jensen also conducts outpatient clinics for malnourished patients with the Mount Nittany Physician Group. For his clinical work, he has been nationally recognized by America’s Top Doctors, a national guide that identifies the most outstanding doctors in the country. Jensen is the current president of the American Society for

Director of surgical specialty operations named STATE COLLEGE — Mount Nittany Health recently announced the promotion of Traci Evans to the position of director of surgical specialty operations for Mount Nittany Physician Group. Evans began with State College Urologic Associates in 1981, was promoted to practice manager in 1995, and then became employed by Mount Nittany Physician Group in 2010 when the urology practice joined Mount Nittany Health. She holds an associate’s degree in specialized business from South Hills School of Business & Technology, and is a certified medical prac-

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Nutrition (ASN), a past president of A.S.P.E.N. and a current member of A.S.P.E.N.’s Foundation Board. He also is a past chair of the Association of Nutrition Programs and Departments. He has served on advisory panels, study sections or work groups for the National Institutes of Health, the American Dietetic Association and the Food and Nutrition Board, and he has just completed his second term as a member of the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. Jensen was appointed professor and head of the Department of Nutritional Sciences at Penn State in 2007. He also serves as a professor of medicine at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center and is a specialist in nutrition with the Mount Nittany Physician Group. Jensen earned a doctorate degree in nutritional biochemistry at Cornell University and a medical doctorate degree at Cornell University Medical College. He completed his residency training in internal medicine and his fellowship training in clinical nutrition at New England Deaconess Hospital, Harvard Medical School. In addition, he received a bachelor’s degree in biology from Penn State.

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tice executive (CMPE). In her new position, Evans will be responsible for directing operational aspects of a group of practices and clinic sites for the physician group. Evans will be charged with directing the clinical and operational managers to provide high quality and costeffective patient care, specifically for ear, nose and throat, gastroenterology, general surgery, reconstructive and cosmetic surgery, ob/gyn, wound care and urology. “Keeping quality health care local is very important for our community,� said Evans. “With more than 100 pro-

viders, Mount Nittany Physician Group provides services that are efficient, affordable and within reach of patients, and it’s important to me that we continue to do so.� For more inTRACI EVANS formation on Mount Nittany Health or Mount Nittany Physician Group, visit www.mountnittany.org.

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February 6-12, 2014

Education

Page 9

Liberal Arts faculty awarded NEH Fellowships UNIVERSITY PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Three Liberal Arts faculty recently were awarded National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships to continue their research projects. The National Endowment for the Humanities promotes excellence in humanities teaching and research, and supports new avenues of learning for the American public. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NEH Fellowships awards reflect the exceptional scholarship that distinguishes the College of the Liberal Arts and the university as a world-class university,â&#x20AC;? said Dr. Susan Welch, the Susan Welch Dean of the College of the Liberal Arts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Penn State undergraduates also benefit from this pursuit of new knowledge, which enriches the outstanding teaching being done by our faculty and their graduate students, and has the potential to provide undergraduate research opportunities.â&#x20AC;? Hester Blum, associate professor of English, is working on a book on the newspapers produced during Arctic and Antarctic winters by members of polar expeditions.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Polar Exploration and Anglo-American Print Culture, 1818-1914â&#x20AC;? examines the unexpected role played in polar ventures by what we might call â&#x20AC;&#x153;extreme printingâ&#x20AC;? in order to think more broadly about the emerging field of oceanic studies. HESTER BLUM Her previous book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The View from the Masthead: Maritime Imagination and Antebellum American Sea Narratives,â&#x20AC;? won the John Gardner Maritime Research Award. Blum is a co-founder of C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. She is a Resident Scholar of the Institute of the Arts and Humanities at Penn State. Debra Hawhee, professor of English and communication arts and sciences, is studying the curious and contradictory

role animals played in premodern language theories and language training. Her fellowship will allow her to complete her book on animals in the history of rhetoric from Aesop to Erasmus. Her most recent book, about Kenneth Burkeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interwoven theories of DEBRA HAWHEE bodies and language, won the Diamond Anniversary Book Award from the National Communication Association in 2010. She was a 2011-2012 Resident Scholar of the Institute of Arts and Humanities at Penn State. Janina Safran, associate professor of history, will conduct early research for an upcoming book titled, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Symbols and Politics of Almoravid Rule.â&#x20AC;? The study of a late 11th-century/early 12th-century regime will develop an analysis of three inter-related

subjects relevant to understanding Islamic rule in northwest Africa: how rulers defined and expressed their legitimacy in the Islamic west in ways that integrated or failed to integrate diverse Arab and Berber societies and cultures; how politics between JANINA SAFRAN the ruler and leading religious authorities defined regime and community; how individuals and events challenged regime legitimacy and the structure of rule; and how the regime met those challenges. Safran is the author of two books: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Defining Boundaries in al-Andalus: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Islamic Iberiaâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Second Umayyad Caliphate.â&#x20AC;? She is a Resident Scholar of the Institute of the Arts and Humanities at Penn State.

Poormans establish business scholarships at Lock Haven LOCK HAVEN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Lock Haven University Foundation announced two new annual scholarships for students majoring in business, the Poorman Female Entrepreneurial Leader Scholarship and the Poorman Freshmen Business Scholarship, which have been established by Pamela Fisher Poorman and her husband, Stephen Poorman, an entrepreneur and former concert musician. The Poorman Female Entrepreneurial Leader Scholarship will be awarded to an upperclass female Pennsylvania resident with a GPA of at least 3.0 majoring in business. The Poorman Freshmen Business Scholarship will be awarded to a freshman majoring in business who is also a Pennsylvania resident with at least a 3.0 grade point average. In addition to the two scholarship funds, the Poormans have also donated to the Business Progress fund. Dr. Steven Neun, dean of the College of Business, Information Systems, and Human Services, will allot the donations as deemed appropriate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Poorman Female Entrepreneurial Leader Scholarship will serve to both inspire and empower a female student at Lock Haven University to turn a dream of becoming an entrepreneur into a reality,â&#x20AC;? Neun said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Poorman Freshmen Busi-

ness Scholarship encourages education and higher leaning and will provide our students the opportunity to pursue a worthwhile career in the field of business. These scholarships are so important because they ensure that Lock Haven University plays an active role in developing the emerging business minds of the future.â&#x20AC;? While Stephen Poorman studied both business and music at Elizabethtown College and obtained his masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree from Norwich University, he attended numerous classes at Lock Haven University. He performed keyboard concerts throughout the East Coast and brought those shows to the Price Performance Center during his fouryear music career. His keen business sense began in his early teens. Before obtaining his college degree, he combined his love of business and music to open his first music store, The Big Red Note. This one store, located next to The Lock Haven Express, grew to the ninth largest full-line music store chain in the country and Elizabethtown College named Poorman its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most Enterprising Graduateâ&#x20AC;? in 1982. Through the years, he amassed various real estate holdings in several states, many of which are on the National Register of Historic Places.

Submitted photo

THE POORMAN FAMILY recently established a scholarship at Lock Haven University. From left, Dr. Steve Neun, dean of the College of Business, Information Systems, and Human Services; Dr. Cori Myers, chair, Business and Computer Science Department; Pamela Fisher Poorman, Stephen Poorman and James Gregory, president, Lock Haven University Foundation.

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ADULT STUDENTS in the HVAC program at CPI recently had a unique hands-on experience. Two cast iron boilers are being replaced with state-of-the-art condenser boilers that will service the main building on the CPI campus. As part of the upgrade, adult students assisted the installer with demolition and removal of the old cast-iron boilers. Pictured, from left, are Nathan Martin, Derek Young and Kevin Kolosov.

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Page 10

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

Little Lions honored at FFA Mid-Winter Convention By KELLY BECK For The Gazette

STATE COLLEGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; This year at the 85th Pennsylvania State Future Farmers of America (FFA) Mid-Winter Convention, not only did two current members receive their Keystone Degrees, the highest state degree, but two former FFA members received honorary member degrees and five new members received freshmen jackets. Halee Wasson, the president of the State College Little Lions chapter, and Heather Wasson, the chapterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice president, were honored on Jan. 6 as they received their Keystone degrees alongside 349 other FFA members. Both Wassons are students at State College Area High School. Halee is the current Cen-

tre County Dairy Princess and Heather is a former Pennsylvania State Alternate Dairy Princess. Both used agricultural production projects. Halee grew sweet corn and Heather grew pumpkins to earn their Keystone degrees. Halee and Heatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents, Ron and Candace Wasson, also received recognition for having five children receive their Keystone degrees, all of whom went through the State College Little Lions FFA chapter. Alongside these Keystone recipients, there were five freshmen who received their blue corduroy FFA jackets at the convention. Lane Brown, Justin Kurtz, John Kunig, Megan Royer and Emma Betz all participated in the nowannual jacket scholarship, where students submit short writings on why they want their FFA jackets.

STATE COLLEGE Area High School was well represented at the 85th Pennsylvania State FFA Mid-Winter Convention. George Greig, Dept. of Agriculture secretary, is pictured with sisters and State College Little Lions FFA chapter officers Halee Wasson and Heather Wasson.

Submitted photo

Cole to speak on the Arab Spring, foreign policy and democracy

SPECIAL VISITOR

UNIVERSITY PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Juan Cole, Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan and blogger at Informed Comment, will give a talk titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Arab Spring, US Foreign Policy, and the Prospects for Democracy in the Middle Eastâ&#x20AC;? as part of the Penn Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Democracy Instituteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lecture series. The talk will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 10, in the Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, on Penn Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s University Park campus. This event is free and open to the public. Cole will discuss the ongoing developments throughout the Muslim world by placing the Arab Spring and the West in historical context while also showing the best way forward to peace, prosperity and democratic development. An extended question and answer session will follow the talk. Cole is the author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Engaging the Muslim Worldâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Napoleonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Egypt.â&#x20AC;? His latest book is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The New Arabs: How the Wired and Global Youth of the Middle East is Transforming It.â&#x20AC;? He has been a regular guest on PBSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;News Hourâ&#x20AC;? and has also appeared on â&#x20AC;&#x153;ABC Nightly News,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Night-

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VICTORIA MCKEAN, a 2012 CPI graduate and now a Mansfield University Ambassador, returned to the institute to give recruitment presentations to CPI students. McKean talked with current students about continuing their educations and campus life at Mansfield. McKean is a graduate of CPIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early childhood education program and is majoring in elementary and special education at Mansfield.

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The Children & Staff of OCC would like to thank the following businesses for their support of our EITC Scholarship Programs:

Matson & Associates Northwest Savings Bank Susquehanna Bank â&#x20AC;&#x153;The child is both a hope and a promise for mankind.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Maria Montessori 411 South Burrowes St., SC â&#x20AC;˘ 814-237-1585 â&#x20AC;˘ www.occmontessori.org

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line,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Charlie Rose,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anderson Cooper 360,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rachel Maddow Showâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Colbert Report,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Democracy Now!,â&#x20AC;? and the Aljazeera America network. He has commented extensively on al-Qaeda and the Taliban, Iraq, the politics of Pakistan and Afghanistan, Syria, and Iranian domestic struggles and foreign affairs. Cole also has a regular column on TruthDig.com. For more information, visit www.juan cole.com. Based in the College of the Liberal Arts at Penn State, the Democracy Institute brings together the top faculty and graduate students in several disciplines to develop knowledge and training that will provide legislators, policymakers, voters and the public with better ways to improve debate, discussions and governing both domestically and globally. Through teaching, creative research projects and public programs, the Democracy Institute will explore better routes to deciding controversial issues, like health care and environmental regulation, and address how government can become more responsive to the people. For more information, email democracyinst@psu.edu

205 S. Garner Street, State College, PA 16801 Phone: (814) 238-8110 Fax: (814) 238-4104 Email: glpk@glcpa.org

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February 6-12, 2014

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

TOURING THE FACILITY

PaGe 11

DEPARTMENT LEADER

Submitted photo

ON JAN. 15, the Central Pa. Institute of Science and Technology hosted a luncheon for the Bellefonte Intervalley Area Chamber of Commerce. Following lunch and a short program, chamber members were provided several choices of â&#x20AC;&#x153;experientialâ&#x20AC;? activities including a tour of the new Transportation Training Center (TTC). Chamber member Doreen Koleno was given a special private tour of the TTC by her daughter Quin, a senior enrolled in the heavy equipment operations program. Quin plans to continue education through a union apprenticeship or at a postsecondary institution. Pictured are Doreen and Quin Koleno.

Submitted photo

JENNA WITHERITE was recently appointed the Adult and Community Programs manager by the Central Intermediate Unit 10. In her new role, Witherite will oversee operations of the Development Center for Adults (DCA) at CPI. CPI partners with the intermediate unit to offer adult basic literacy, math and reading refresher, GED preparation, and other classes and services for adults through DCA on the CPI campus. For more information on DCA services available to adults call (814) 359-3069.

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Middle school to stage â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cinderellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; STATE COLLEGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mount Nittany Middle School Drama Club presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cinderellaâ&#x20AC;? at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 14, and Saturday, Feb. 15, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 16. The musical will take place in the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s auditorium at 656 Brandywine Drive. In the musical, Cinderella dreams of a magical evening and is given a chance to find true happiness with Prince Christo-

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pher. But when the clock strikes midnight, Cinderella disappears. Will the two ever find true love? After each performance, Prince Christopher and Cinderella will greet guests in the lobby. Snow dates are Friday, Feb. 28, Saturday, March 1 and Sunday, March 2. For more information, email mnms cinderella@gmail.com

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CommuniTy

PaGe 12

February 6-12, 2014

Road to THON Celebration honors volunteers UNIVERSITY PARK — In less than three weeks, THON Weekend 2014 will commence at Penn State, and more than 700 dancers will stand for 46 hours in the Bryce Jordan Center. As part of its annual countdown, and to honor extraordinary volunteer contributions, hundreds of THON volunteers gathered recently for the annual Road to THON Celebration dinner at The Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel. The event brings together key student volunteers, university liaisons, community and corporate partners and friends of THON — just a fraction of the 15,000 Penn State students university-wide and thousands more supporters across the commonwealth who offer their time, in-kind resources and financial donations to help children, families and their medical teams fight pediatric cancer. The evening celebration began with good news. “During fiscal year 2013, THON was able to donate 95.89 percent of its total funds raised, or $12.4 million, directly to The Four Diamonds Fund,” Jessica Steciw, THON special events director, said. Several annual Four Diamonds-themed THON awards were given to exceptional student, university employee and other volunteers for their contributions to THON: n Chelsea Pierce, who oversees family meals as part of THON 2014’s hospitality committee, received the Diamond of Courage Award; n Ned Brokloff, a Penn State alumnus and Penn State Engineering Alumni Society board member, was honored with the Diamond of Wisdom Award; n Alex Radkoff, executive chair of Ohana, a THON special interest organization, was awarded the Diamond of Honesty; n Kayla Nakonechni, a Penn State student who danced independently in THON 2013 and in August 2013 was diagnosed with a stage four malignant brain tumor,

was recognized with the Diamond of Strength; n Frank Pope, events parking coordinator with Penn State’s Transportation Services, was honored with the Four Diamonds Award; n Brad Wagner, HUB facilities supervisor, was awarded the Kevin A. Steinberg Memorial Award; n Kathryn Hartigan, a Penn State Altoona THON 2013 dancer and soccer team captain, received the Courtney O’Bryan Volunteer Award; n Steven Patrick, a Schreyer Honors College senior and Atlas special interest organization dancer in THON 2013, was honored with the Rick Fund Scholarship Award. The evening’s keynote speaker offered a highly personal perspective. Lauren Schildt Libhart, a 2012 Penn State graduate who now is a Penn State Hershey registered nurse, is also a Four Diamonds child. She shared her personal story about pediatric cancer, beginning with her 1999 diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a rare form of leukemia, at 8 years old. Schildt Libhart thanked the crowd, saying that she didn’t know where she would be today “if it wasn’t for all of your hard work and dedication to children like me.” During the Schildt family’s first visit to Penn State Hershey Medical Center, they were introduced both to their dedicated social worker, provided through the Four Diamonds Fund, and to the Penn State Dance Marathon. In February 2000, about six months after her final chemotherapy treatment, Schildt Libhart attended her first THON. “I was such in awe of all the college students helping out kids like me,” she said, adding, “By the end of the weekend I was running around and enjoying every moment.” Eight months later, following a year of a recently developed treatment of cancer therapy using retinoic acid capsules,

JILL SHOCKEY/Penn State University

RYAN PATRICK, THON 2014 executive director, addresses attendees of the 2014 Road to THON Celebration dinner. THON Weekend 2014 is Feb. 21-23 at the Bryce Jordan Center. she was declared in remission. In the years following her cancer, Schildt Libhart realized she wanted to help others in her career. She attended Penn State Altoona and immediately began her involvement with THON as a student volunteer. “My senior year at Penn State, one of my ultimate dreams came true when I danced in THON 2012,” she said. She danced independently in honor of two Four Diamonds families, with whom she still keeps in contact. One of the girls has been in remission for more than four years, while the other relapsed in fall 2013 and recently recovered from a bone marrow transplant.

THE CENTRE LINE RIDERS recently presented a check to the Milesburg Food Bank. Pictured, from left, are Centre Line Riders Bill Allison and Rachael Focht, food bank treasurer Ann Baughman, Centre Line Riders Michael Roan and Stephen Lamar, and food bank coordinator Nancy Fultz. SAM STITZER/For The Gazette

Milesburg Food Bank benefits from Centre Line Riders donation By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

MILESBURG — On Feb. 1, the Centre Line Riders, which is the Centre County chapter of the Alliance of Bikers Aimed Toward Education (A.B.A.T.E.), presented a check for nearly $716 to the Milesburg Food Bank, which is located in a converted garage building on the property of the Milesburg Presbyterian Church. The Centre Line Riders had collected the money from raffles and donations at their monthly meetings throughout the past year. According to food bank coordinator Nancy Fultz, the Milesburg Food Bank was started in the late 1970s, and now serves about 30 families in the

Milesburg area. Each recipient family receives two boxes of food and one bag of canned goods worth about $100 each month. The food bank relies solely on monetary donations from citizens and churches in the community. A group of community volunteers assists in transporting, boxing and distributing the food each month. “The community has been so generous,” said Fultz. She also noted that the shelving used for food storage in their building was donated to them by the former Bi-Lo food market, which was located on Bishop Street in Bellefonte. “Years ago, they were remodeling, and they gave us some of their old shelving,” said food bank treasurer Ann Baughman.

The Milesburg Food Bank pays a $50 per year membership fee to the Central Pennsylvania Food Bank located in Harrisburg. This allows them to purchase food at a discounted price of just 18 cents per pound for all types of food. The Harrisburg bank ships the food to a drop-off point in Pleasant Gap, and Milesburg Food Bank volunteers transport the food to the Milesburg bank. Stephen LaMar, who handles public relations for the Centre Line Riders, said that their group plans to donate money to local food banks each year, rotating from one to another. The group has donated food to the Snow Shoe Food Bank in several past years.

Following her graduation from Penn State with a nursing degree in May 2012, Schildt Libhart married her high school sweetheart and now works as a registered nurse at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. “Because of you, I was able to do something positive with my life,” she said. The 42nd annual Penn State Dance Marathon, better known as THON, will commence 46 hours of a no-sitting, nosleeping weekend to celebrate the lives of children and families affected by pediatric cancer at 6 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 21, at the Bryce Jordan Center on the University Park campus.

Car wash planned to benefit THON By C.J. DOON StateCollege.com

STATE COLLEGE — Paterno’s University Drive Car Wash is kick starting a weekly fundraiser to benefit THON this weekend, donating all proceeds to the Penn State IFC/ Panhellenic Dance Marathon to help conquer childhood cancer. Every Thursday in February will be “Thon-Thursday,” giving the community yet another opportunity to support the Four Diamonds Fund. All the money collected from self-serve and automatic washes, including vacuums and carpet shampoo, and will go directly to THON. “We’re looking for stronger energy with the community,” says David Paterno, co-owner of the 24-hour car wash located off University Drive behind Snappy’s and Burger King. Although cold temperatures make less-than-ideal conditions for an outdoor car wash, Paterno says the grime left on the road by the combination of melting snow, ice and salt is why many customers to stop in and get a quick rinse. “Salt trucks drive all the business to the car wash,” he says. Thanks to a partnership with Snappy’s gas station, located just a few steps away from Paterno’s on University Drive, buying a car wash will save 10 cents per gallon at the pump. Even if the weather is poor, customers are encouraged to purchase a wash at the gas station on “Thon-Thursdays” and redeem it at a later date. In addition to THON, Paterno says the car wash is looking into organizing more community fundraisers. School parent-teacher organizations, church groups and youth sports teams are just a few of the organizations Paterno’s Car Wash has targeted for future cooperation. “Part of our business approach is giving back to local charities,” says Paterno. “’Thon-Thursdays’ allows us to do this and create more awareness of our car wash.”

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February 6-12, 2014

The Centre County Gazette

Page 13

Chiz Rider concert set PORT MATILDA — Chiz Rider, a professional trumpeter, will perform at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 15, at Halfmoon Christian Fellowship Church, 1776 Halfmoon Valley Road. Rider is touring with a newly designed concert that incorporates a high-impact light show with large screen video enhancement to glorify Christ, present gospel and encourage believers. The concert is appropriate for all ages. For more information, call (814) 231-8896 or visit www. chizrider.com.

Make your own valentine

CONNIE COUSINS/For The Gazette

THE BELLEFONTE AREA Middle School Student Council recently held a dance to benefit Geisinger’s ThinkBIG Pediatric Cancer Fund. Dr. Colby Wesner’s niece, Kaylee Dreese, is a member of the student council and the one who came up with the idea to benefit ThinkBIG.

Area doctor establishes ‘ThinkBIG’ to help families of kids with cancer CONNIE COUSINS

BELLEFONTE — Dr. Colby Wesner, chief pediatric resident at Janet Weis Children’s Hospital at Geisinger in Danville has a heart for the children he cares for. Treating them just as their doctor, however, was not enough for this young man. He started the ThinkBIG Pediatric Cancer Fund to help children diagnosed with cancer and their families. Each year, Geisinger Health System sees an average of 40 newly diagnosed patients with pediatric cancer from all over the state, according to the ThinkBIG page on Geisinger’s website. More than 130 patients were listed recently as being in treatment or follow-up at Janet Connie Cousins Weis Children’s Hospital. covers Centre Wesner is a big fan of THON, the County for the yearly weekend-long dance marathon Centre County Gazette. Email her held at Penn State. THON, first held in at correspondent@ 1997, is the largest student-run philancentrecounty thropy in the world. gazette. com Colby began to entertain a notion about starting his own foundation after caring for a nine-year-old boy named Carmine Monacelli. Carmine was diagnosed with a bone malignancy. “Carmine was an amazing boy,” said Wesner. “Every time I saw him he was positive and enthusiastic. One day he would want to be a WWF star and the next he was planning to be a marine biologist or a priest. He was an inspiration to me. He was always ‘thinking big’ and making plans for his life while

enduring treatments and pain.” Carmine lost his battle in October 2012, but his memory is being kept alive through ThinkBIG. When cancer strikes, it affects the entire family and expenses rise dramatically. Trips to the hospital, hotel bills and higher cell phone bills add money worries to an already stressful situation. One parent typically stays in Danville when the child is hospitalized and too many days of missed work can lead to job loss. These are the types of problems that Wesner hopes to alleviate through Think Big. Electric bills, gas, wigs and prostheses are a few of the items that the foundation plans to help with. Mike McMullen, public relations and marketing specialist at Geisinger, said, “The fund grows through the efforts and generosity of physicians, nurses and other staff people, as well as special events.”

STATE COLLEGE — Free cards, markers, inspirational statements about goodness and love, and scrap-booking materials are available to make a free Valentine’s card for a friend or family member. To make one, stop by the Christian Science Reading Room and Bookstore, 218 S. Allen St. in State College, from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., through Saturday, Feb. 15. For more information, call (814) 234-2194.

Lions Club to host brunch CENTRE HALL — The Centre Hall Lions Club is having a brunch from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 9, at the Lions Club facility. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12. The event is open to the public. The brunch will include eggs, home fries, pancakes, toast, ham, bacon, biscuits, sausage gravy, sweet rolls, orange juice, apple juice, coffee, tea and milk Proceeds will benefit Lions projects.

Potluck bingo scheduled SPRING MILLS — Penns Valley High School’s Lady Rams will host a potluck bingo at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 22, at Penns Valley High School’s cafeteria. Doors open at 4 p.m. and bingo begins at 5:30 p.m. The event benefits Penns Valley Lady Rams softball. Snow date is Saturday, March 1. For more information or tickets, call Charissa Lyons at (814) 777-2845 or Joy Struble at (814) 777-2442.

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Page 14

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

PSU food science experts study why we love snacks By HEATHER HOTTLE Special to The Gazette

UNIVERSITY PARK — Although the Steelers and Eagles didn’t make it to the Super Bowl this year, Pennsylvania and Penn State were well-represented on game day — on people’s plates. And more likely than not, Penn State experts had a hand in developing, or evolving, many of the Keystone State’s famous finger foods. While Nittany Lion alumni represented Penn State Feb. 2 at MetLife Stadium, Pennsylvania food industry specialties were served at Super Bowl parties nationwide. Companies from around the state — referred to as the snack food belt — supply many of the Sunday evening munchies enjoyed while calling plays from the couch. If your potato chips are from Utz, Middleswarth, Martin’s, Snyder’s of Hanover or Snyder of Berlin — just to name a few — the snack came from some region of Pennsylvania. And, the state isn’t just about spuds. Pretzels, Peeps and peanuts also reign supreme. And of course, there’s chocolate — Hershey and Mars among the largest. All kinds of sweet and savory foods are made in Pennsylvania, and Penn State researchers representing one of the top food science programs in the nation have helped improve companies’ products, including some famous brands not readily associated with the Keystone State. “In addition to chocolate and confectionery, you have the chippers — potato chips — nuts and other kinds of things you might even not necessarily consider snack foods,” said Greg Ziegler, Penn State professor of food science. “Then, obviously, pretzels. And then in the best of all worlds — chocolate-covered pretzels.” Why is Pennsylvania home to many of these products? “Both chocolate and pretzels have a heritage extending back to the Pennsylvania German ethnicity that we have around here,” Ziegler said.

Factors like location and infrastructure also play a role. “Since Pennsylvania is within 500 miles of 40 percent of the U.S. population, certainly the East Coast population, we’re very centrally located” for widespread production and distribution of these kinds of shelf-stable foods, he said. In general, Ziegler explained, there are three kinds of operations in the overall food industry: supply-oriented industries, where the raw material, such as meat, is the important factor; demand-oriented industries — like the bread industry — in which it’s cheaper to produce products very close to the market; and footloose industries. “These are not industries that are bound by supply and demand, but they tend to locate where there is the infrastructure, things like shipping and a good labor pool,” he said. “Probably most of the snack food industry in Pennsylvania would be considered the footloose.” For chocolate, Ziegler points to the need for sugar and cocoa, which doesn’t grow locally. “For a long time, a lot of cocoa came in through the port of Philadelphia,” he said.

THE SCIENCE OF SALTY AND SWEET

Penn State shares a slice of the proverbial pie, too. Beyond its famed creamery, the university has a wealth of knowledge and research dedicated to many kinds of sweet treats. In fact, the food science department has had an endowed graduate fellowship from the Pennsylvania Manufacturing Confectioners Association for more than 25 years. The current PMCA scholar is working on astringency, “the puckering, drying feeling that you get when you eat chocolate and some other foods,” Ziegler explained. The work combines Ziegler’s confectionery expertise with assistant professor John Hayes’ sensory research. “This is very relevant to the chocolate industry because if you think about all these high-cocoa polyphenol chocolates that are supposed to be healthy for us,

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WHEN FANS sit down to watch a sporting event, chances are good that there are a plethora of Pennsylvania snack foods in their bowls and on their plates. these dark chocolates are bitter and astringent,” Hayes said. Hayes oversees a wide range of sensory research at the university. “We work on burn, bitterness and astringency, which all seem sort of unpleasant, but when you think about it, beer that isn’t bitter isn’t any good,” he said. “Burn sounds unpleasant, but then when you put it in context — ‘During the Super Bowl, I’m going to serve mild, medium and hot salsa’ — you’re catering to people who prefer different levels of heat. We try to understand why in our lab.” Penn State researchers have found that spice preferences and other types of taste preferences — such as with bitter non-nutritive, or artificial, sweeteners — vary depending on factors including personality and biological makeup. The goal is to help the food industry to understand market segments that are untapped and how to split people into betterdefined groups, rather than by traditional demographics. “We do a lot of work on what we call biological market segmentation and trying to understand the factors that drive people to like certain products,” Hayes said. Researchers have found that taste for a sweetener isn’t universal, so it might not be the case when a person claims to dislike all diet soda products, which use a variety of these artificial sweeteners. “Just because you like or dislike one non-nutritive sweetener doesn’t mean you’re going to like or dislike another,” he said. Hayes also directs the Sensory Evaluation Center, which works directly with food companies, including many from Pennsylvania. “We do a lot of basic research on taste perception, but we also do a lot of applied work for the food industry, everything from straightforward product reformulation — when a local mom-and-pop company in Pennsylvania wants to launch a new product but they don’t have their own sensory group, they’ll come to us — to transnational corporations that want to reformulate a product to make it healthier by reducing the amount of salt,” he said. The center tests between 300 to 500 people a week, and employs about 15 parttime students each semester to run the tests, which may include trying out a new product or testing the shelf life of a food that is microbiologically safe but might not taste as good. The center has a database of about 900 people who have volunteered to be on an email list of participants. For each new project, a questionnaire is sent to screen participants to find users of a product. Participants earn $5 per visit. Student workers, who will often see more than 100 taste-testers in a one- to two-hour window, learn a lot of useful skills, and full-time summer interns have the opportunity to write reports of their findings for company clients. “It’s a really great practical training opportunity for students,” Hayes said. “Our undergraduate students can go out and get a job with a food company with more

experience in routine taste testing than I had at the end of my master’s degree because we have high volume testing going all the time.” Many of those jobs are right here in the Pennsylvania. Ziegler said employers who often hire Penn State food science graduates include companies like Heinz, Hershey, Mars and Giant Eagle, among many others. Whether they apply their knowledge at Pennsylvania companies or multinational companies around the world, graduates are taking with them experience working with a diverse faculty with an eye for improving not only product quality but also health. “Here, we have engineers, we have chemists, we have microbiologists, we have nutritionists, and these are people who have come from all different kinds of backgrounds. One of the things that makes it fun is the ability to bring all of those together in a cohesive approach to food,” Ziegler said. “Food science, as an applied science, has some direct connections with not only industry, but consumers in the state, too. We would like a healthy economy and healthy consumers, so oftentimes we do our best in research to bring those two things together.”

DIPPING INTO HEALTHIER CHIPS

Almost 60 percent of U.S. potato sales are to chip, French fries and dehydrated potato processors, according to the Agricultural Marketing Research Center. If you’re feeling a little guilty diving into a bag of deep-fried spuds just weeks after making a New Year’s resolution to watch your diet, reach for a bag of the multicolored chip variety instead. As some small- and medium-sized companies market these rainbow-colored snacks as a healthier option, Penn State researchers are working to determine if there really are increased health benefits even after processing, said Jairam Vanamala, associate professor of food science. His research has shown that colored potatoes, such as purple potatoes, contain more anthocyanins, or anti-inflammatory, health-benefiting compounds. While frying might not be the healthiest potato preparation option, Vanamala said early results show that some of the increased anti-inflammatory compounds found in colored potatoes are retained after frying. So colored potato chips, which originally contained more health-benefiting compounds, still hold more than their traditional fried white potato counterparts. “Typically, it is assumed that the brighter the color the better,” he said. “So, at the end of the day, it’s about eating a rainbow.” As the marketing trend grows, Vanamala and his team are working to find better ways to fry a potato to keep more of the anti-inflammatory compounds. “Right now we are trying to optimize the processes to make these potato chips maintain most of their health-benefiting properties,” Vanamala said. “As far as the research is concerned, my goal is to improve the health benefits of food products, particularly the snacks.”


February 6-12, 2014

The Centre County Gazette

Page 15

Snow Frolics delighted audiences in the 1960s SPRING MILLS — “We’ve gotta have a great show, with a million laughs ... and color ... and a lot of lights to make it sparkle! And songs — wonderful songs! And after we get the people in that hall, we’ve gotta start ‘em in laughing right away! Oh, can’t you just see it?” So said Judy Garland to Mickey Rooney in the 1939 movie “Babes in Arms.” It was one of a series of similar films in the 1930s and ’40s where the plot line revolved around an orphanage or some other establishment facing foreclosure and someone saying, “hey, let’s put on a show,” to raise money to save it. Of course, the shows were always great, the money was raised and Sam Stitzer covers the movies ended hapPenns Valley for pily. the Centre County In the mid-1960s, Gazette. Email him someone in the Penns at pennsvalley@ Valley High School centrecounty Band Boosters organigazette.com. zation, looking for ways to raise money for band activities, must have said something like “hey, let’s put on a show” and the Snow Frolics were born. The Snow Frolics were a series of musical/ comedy/variety shows put on in the school auditorium by the boosters. The shows were held in late January or early February each year for about a decade and were produced professionally by the Jerome H. Cargill Company of New York City. Cargill sent a director to Penns Valley for three weeks or so to organize and direct the shows. The stars of the shows were band parents, students and a host of Penns Valley residents. The first show was in 1965, and was called the Snow Follies. The next year the name was changed to the Snow Frolics. The shows were filled with group song and dance numbers, vocal solos and duets, comedy skits, and jokes. They were very popular in Penns Valley, and a packed auditorium was the norm for most of the performances. As fundraisers, they were very successful. The timing for having shows like this was perfect. In the 1960s, Ed Sullivan was the king of Sunday night TV with his iconic variety show. Musical shows like “Hootenanny” and “Shindig!” were popular with the younger set, and “Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In” was the TV comedy leader with its rapid-fire jokes and silly skits. The Snow Frolics combined elements of all of these shows to create enjoyable evenings of entertainment for its audiences. In the program for the 1968 Snow Frolics, Band Boosters president Marion Sharer said, “Talent comes in many a disguise, but I think the greatest surprise is the discovery of your friends and neighbors as talented performers.” He was right. It was great fun for the audiences to see the farmers, merchants, businessmen, housewives and other citizens of the valley performing as singers, dancers, actors and comedians. The shows were given newspaper public-

SAM STITZER

ity by the Centre Daily Times and especially by the Millheim Journal, which gave the show full front page exposure with many photos of rehearsals and a full list of cast members. In fact, Millheim Journal editor Don Heggenstaller performed in the 1969 “Melody Queen Revue” as the interlocutor of the old-time minstrel show, and in the circus-themed 1970 show as the ringmaster. In 1965, Centre Daily Times columnist Dorothy Meyer reviewed the first show saying, “The acts were fast moving in themselves, but the stage crew worked on the double and with unbelievable smoothness. Familiar faces on the stage gave performances that showed they had put much time in rehearsal.” On a personal note, I was a band member when the first shows were performed, but I declined to help in the shows because of stage fright. However, my mother, Polly Stitzer, at the urging of friends, performed in shows from 1965 through 1972. Mom was a talented singer, and sang duets with Bill Snyder of Spring Mills and Guy Homan of Centre Hall, as well as presenting solo performances of “Let There Be Peace on Earth,” and Kate Smith’s iconic “God Bless America.” Her enjoyment of the experience was typical of the hundreds of Penns Valley participants who got a rare chance to experience the thrill of floodlights and applause. The 1969 Snow Frolics, “Melody Queen Revue,” was a Mississippi riverboat minstrel-themed show and it was taken on the road, making a trip to the nearby Sugar Valley High School in Clinton County. It was a successful performance, adding some Sugar Valley residents to the cast. As the 1960s rolled into the 1970s the times changed, the culture changed, the world changed and the Snow Frolics came to an end. But many residents of Penns Valley still remember the Camelot days of “one brief shining moment” when the folks down here got a taste of Broadway.

SAM STITZER/For The Gazette

THIS POSTER FROM Snow Frolics shows Polly Stitzer waving and high school student dancers in background.

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THE DANCING LADIES of the Snow Frolics wore elaborate Broadway-type costumes.

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PaGe 16

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Interpreting Poetryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; exhibit runs through March 30 at BAM By CONNIE COUSINS

during his career including the Neich Award at the Japan Print Association Biennial. His work was featured also at the Tokyo International Print Biennial and he was recognized by Japan as a National Treasure. In the theme of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Interpreting Poetry,â&#x20AC;? Makiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art was poetic to him. He created new visual poetry by interpreting calligraphy, objects and scenery using old Chinese and Japanese kanji characters and refining them into abstract compositions. Maki used classic woodblock as well as cement, collage and paper block in printing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We selected the works as we try to rotate shows in the Windows of the World Gallery and we had last showed an Asian exhibit almost two years ago,â&#x20AC;? said Patricia House, the director of the Bellefonte Art Museum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was classic Chinese calligraphy and Chinese ethnic costumes. We considered doing a collection of Japanese woodblock prints by various

correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

BELLEFONTE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Bellefonte Art Museum (BAM) for Centre County will host â&#x20AC;&#x153;Interpreting Poetryâ&#x20AC;? through Sunday, March 30. The museum, located at 133 N. Allegheny St. in Bellefonte, is open from 1 to 4:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. The new exhibit will be in the Windows of the World Gallery and feature woodblock prints by Japanese artist Haku Maki. Maki was born in Ibaraki Perfecture, Japan, in 1924. In 1945, he was a member of a special squadron of kamikaze pilots. The surrender of Japan saved his life and with the end of the war, he became a high school teacher. While teaching, he studied art under Koshiro Onchi and began showing his work in galleries in the 1950s. Maki won many honors and prizes

artists, but found this collection held several works from different periods in the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. That made the collection more interesting and also the time period of Haku Makiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. We were interested in showing a collection that was created either during or after WWII.â&#x20AC;? John McCarthy, professor of sociology at Penn State, owns the works that will be shown in the exhibit. Other new exhibits and programs at BAM include: n Guest educator Nancy Toepfer n Landscape drawings by Michael A. Vollero n Centre County landscapes by Jeff Mathison in the Sieg Gallery n â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cold Winter in Bellefonteâ&#x20AC;? and other computer paintings by Mary Vollero in the Community Gallery n Printmaking workshop exhibit by workshop students in the Tea Room Gallery n Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art activities the first Sunday of each month.

SMART SHOPPERS

February 6-12, 2014

HOOP SHOOT VOLUNTEERS

Submitted photo

ALL ELKS PROGRAMMING requires volunteerism in order to complete various events, but none more than the Elks Hoop Shoot program. Shown here are the volunteers who gave of their time to complete the State College Elks Local Lodge Hoop Shoot finals, held earlier this month. Pictured, from left, are David Wasson, Bud Graham, Joe Hart, Jeff Weyman, Dann Cornali, Perry Schram, Bill Asbury, Jack McKinley, Ken Hart, Lee Morris, Dick Mulfinger, Eric Waltz, Matt Shetler, Lauren Shetler, Randy Aikens and W. F. Reiber.

CRPR to host tea STATE COLLEGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Centre Region Parks and Recreation will host â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tea for Three: Mommy, Doll & Meâ&#x20AC;? from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 8, in the community room at the State College Borough building. Girls ages 5 through 8 are invited to a tea party with their mothers or grandmothers and a favorite doll. The event includes a craft project, photo station and treats. Attendees should dress in tea party clothes. Gloves, hats and boas are encouraged. For more information or to register, visit www.crpr.org.

Household hazardous waste collection dates set STATE COLLEGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Centre County Recycling and Refuse Authority will be holding its annual household hazardous waste collection event this spring. On Friday, May 2, and Saturday, May 3, items such as insecticides, weed killers, pool chemicals, cleaners, poisons, corrosives, oil based paints, CFL bulbs and more will be collected. The items collected will then be properly recycled and disposed of. For more information, contact the authority.

Elks plans beach party

Submitted photo

HEALTHSOUTH NITTANY Valley Rehabilitation Hospital recently teamed up with Weis Marketsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cart Smart program for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nutrition and Your Heart: Making Choices for Healthy Livingâ&#x20AC;? at the Weis Market in Bellefonte. Attendees walked the aisles with Kathryn Long, left, Healthy Living coordinator for Weis, as they learned to shop and make smart choices for their hearts. Participants also received recipes, coupons and a shopping essentials kit valued at more than $20. For more information about HealthSouthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stroke or heart failure rehabilitation program and support groups, visit www.nittanyvalleyrehab.com or call (814) 359-3421.

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February 6-12, 2014

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

SAMI HULINGS

I have just less than a year to go before I say “I do” (254 days), and I’m finally getting into intense weddingplanning mode. Instead of trying to plan wedding details every couple weeks, I’m now obsessively talking to my fiance, my mom or my bridesmaids about some sort of detail every single day. I watch “Say Yes to the Dress” like it’s my job, even though I’ve already purchased my dress — but, honestly, what red-blooded woman doesn’t love the wonderland that is Kleinfeld Bridal? As I am “Pinteresting” like a maniac, I have come across hundreds of Sami Hulings is a “dos” for brides, but I haven’t come correspondent for across a lot of “don’ts” besides the big The Centre County “don’t be a bridezilla.” What does that Gazette. Email her even mean exactly? Don’t throw tanat shulings@centre countygazette.com. trums and be a micromanager? Good luck finding a bride who doesn’t try to control every aspect of her wedding. I mean, it is her day. To make sure that planning my wedding is as stress-free as possible, I’ve come up with a list of “dos” and “don’ts” for myself. Hopefully, other brides will check out this list, have an “a-ha” moment and take what they learn to make planning their big days easier and, dare I say, even fun!

DON’T PUT SO MUCH PRESSURE ON YOURSELF

Guilty as charged writing right here. Of course I want my day to be perfect. Yes, I want it to go off without a hitch. But there will be stress, conflict and issues. It is bound to happen. You are planning a huge event and relying on other people to help make it wonderful. What you need to remember is, even though your wedding day may be one of the most important days of your life, it is only one day in your amazing, extraordinary life. Take time to enjoy your engagement and the planning process. Lord knows, I have. Once we are finally married, our engagement will have been for two-and-a-half years — making for a lot of enjoyment time.

CHOOSE A REALISTIC BUDGET

No bride wants to start her marriage off broke. If your parents are helping cover costs, you don’t want to drain their bank accounts, savings and retirement funds. Think ahead, DIY like a crazy woman and compare everything and every aspect. If you feel like you are spending an absurd amount, you probably are. Dial back and reevaluate what is important to you.

MAKE SURE YOUR DRESS FITS

One of the most important aspects of your day is your dress. You need to feel beautiful and confident while still feeling comfortable. I found “the dress” nine months ago. I know, I’m crazy. But it was “the one.” It fits like it was made for me, but there still is a little give-and-take so I can be a comfortable and happy bride. If I gain a few pounds between now and then, it will be okay. If not, even better! Alterations will have it fitting like a glove, and me feeling like a princess.

SET A GUEST LIST COUNT AND STICK TO IT

Once you ask for lists from your mom and your future mother-in-law, be prepared for huge lists. Every single person you have ever met in your entire life and people who you’ve never met but should know will be on those

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lists. Even though we are having a buffet, we will be paying per plate. If we invite all of our 18th cousins, the food bill will be out of this world. Set a guest count limit and don’t go over. Invite those who are most important to you and your fiance first. And, whatever amount is left over may allow some of those 18th cousins to make the cut. It’s your wedding and your day. Invite those who matter to you.

DON’T STRESS OUT OVER THE LITTLE THINGS

Will your guests shower you with bubbles or confetti? Ours is neither, but you will have to wait and see what we choose. Will the font on your place cards match the savethe-dates or the invitations? Who knows? Let the details work themselves out. Plan, but don’t sweat the little things. It will all come together.

INCLUDE YOUR FIANCE IN THE PLANNING

Even though everyone always talks about how it is the bride’s day, don’t forget your fiance is an important part of the party. Granted, men don’t necessarily obsess over weddings like women do, so he probably won’t care about the color of the napkins or if you have real flowers or silk. Involve him in the decisions that he cares about like tux rentals, food choices, alcohol packages, the cake and your first dance song selection. If you ask for his opinion on issues that matter to him, he will give it.

DON’T PROCRASTINATE

We have already been engaged for almost two years. We have our bridal party picked; save-the-dates purchased and almost ready to be sent out; the ceremony and venue location, baker, photographer and DJ booked; my dress bought; and the pastor confirmed. Still, I feel like we still have so much to do and not a enough time to do it. In reality, we still have plenty of time, but I don’t want to be a bride who puts things off until the last minute and isn’t happy with the results. I’m putting my heart and soul into this wedding to make it a day full of magic and love. I’m taking time, making decisions and consulting those I love. Though our engagement is longer than normal, I would rather have too much time to plan than not enough. I don’t want any regrets. That’s why we will be taste-testing our cake and menu choices and meeting with our photographer to go over what photos we are desperate to have in two months.

MAKE NICE WITH THOSE TRYING TO HELP

Yes, it’s your day and it should be the way you want it, but don’t upset those who are trying to help you. Give real thought to the opinions of your mom, his mom, any sisters and your bridesmaids. They will be there for you all the way and they are only trying to help. Don’t let the power of being “the bride” go to your head.

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DON’T GET SO INVOLVED IN THE DETAILS THAT YOU FORGET WHAT THE DAY IS ABOUT

Remember why you said “yes.” Your love for your fiance is indescribable. Show him that. Don’t fight about details. Take what he (and his mom) say into consideration. This is the beginning of your life together. Make it special and memorable. Don’t make it a mess that you regret. Plan with love and happiness and your wedding will be everything you ever dreamed of and more.

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Page 18

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

Get creative with place cards, escort cards By HILLARY SPEED Associated Press

For their May wedding reception in Bourne, Mass., Jason and Amelie Neese turned to their shared love of literature as inspiration for table names and homemade escort cards. Guests sat at tables named after the couple’s favorite books, such as “The Great Gatsby,” ‘‘A Movable Feast“ and ”Sophie’s World.” And the escort cards, which tell guests which table they’ve been assigned to, were made of old-school library cards and pockets that the Neeses ordered on Etsy.com and decorated with vintage paper. “We met at a poetry reading in 2007 and fell in love with each other’s work, which led to us falling in love with each other, so we wanted to represent that part of ourselves and our relationship in the little details of our wedding day,” Amelie Neese said. Many couples are incorporating homemade themes to help guests navigate seating assignments at wedding receptions. Everything from wine corks and fruit to seed envelopes and clothespins can be repurposed as place cards at individual table settings, or escort cards at the front of a reception area. “Couples are getting increasingly creative,” said Christina Friedrichsen, founder and editor of IntimateWeddings.com. “For a barn wedding, for instance, they might tie a place card to a pear or apple. For a literarythemed wedding, they might use Scrabble tiles as place cards. For a destination wedding, luggage tags might be used.” Friedrichsen details a number of playful do-it-yourself ideas on her website, including one using vintage fashion illustrations and another using found sea glass. “Place cards can be the perfect way to infuse a little whimsy or add the element of surprise,” she said. One couple featured on her blog fastidiously spelled out each guest’s name using Legos. Friedrichsen favors place cards that are multi-functional. “For instance, you can pin vintage brooches to card stock, add the guest’s name and voila, you have a favor and place card in one. Stamp or stencil the guest’s name onto a linen napkin, and again you have something that is multifunctional,” she said.

AP Photo

SUNPRINT KITS are one of several ways to add a personal touch to your wedding day. The project is inexpensive and simple enough to do at home. Kelsie Evans and Douglas Woodhouse, who got married in Antrim, N.H., made seed packets that doubled as escort cards for their 110 guests. Woodhouse handmade the packets and decorated them with 16thcentury botanical illustrations. They were marked with the guests’ names and assigned tables, filled with assorted wildflower seeds and hung with clothespins in an empty picture frame, which was displayed in a tree. “We wanted to plan a very intimate, detailed wedding,” Evans said. “Getting married at a family member’s farm where we,

along with many of our friends and family, had devoted time and energy to getting the space ready already made it a very personal experience.” Wedding blogs and Pinterest contain many ideas for turning just about any found object into a place card or escort card. These include: small rocks, painted with colors that correspond to the assigned table; names and table numbers written onto leaves or seashells; and little name cards held in place by wine corks or pinecones. “One of the biggest trends we’re seeing is edible escort cards,” said TheKnot.com’s site director, Anja Winikka. “From mini basil leaf pots and jam jars to full fruits like clementines, apples or pears and cutely packaged containers of candy, they’re pulling out the stops to get creative and have guests well fed before the ceremony has even started.” Here’s just one idea for DIY place cards:

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Try revisiting your favorite 5th-grade science-class project with a sun-based art project called Sunprint Kits. The project, featured on the blog Ruffled (ruffledblog. com), is simple enough to do at home. “Brides and grooms want their guests to feel cherished, so there’s a lot of interest in expressive, handmade stationery,” said Jessica McCarty, a calligrapher and designer from southern Illinois who runs a wedding stationery business, Magpie Paper Works (magpiepaperworks.com). As an added convenience, the Sunprints place cards take care of your “something blue.” Materials: Sunprint Kits (you can order online at www.sunprints.org) Your favorite font (consider using McCarty’s original Vermandois font)

8.5-by-11-inch printable transparency film Inkjet or laser printer Sunprint Template (make your own 4-by4-inch squares or visit Ruffled to download from their blog post: http://ruffledblog. com/diy-sunprint-place-cards/) Cardboard Scissors Water Directions: Type guests’ names in your chosen font onto the 4-by-4-inch squares. Print the squares onto transparency paper. Cut your squares out, leaving the black border behind so it doesn’t show up on the print. In a dim room (avoiding sunlight), put your Sunprint paper on a piece of cardboard. Put your transparency paper cutout with your guest’s name on top of that. If you want, add a flourish, like a leaf or flower. Finally, put the acrylic pressing sheet that comes with the kit on top of that. If you want to do many at a time, buy a larger acrylic sheet at a home-improvement store. Bring all of it outside into the sun. If it’s a sunny day, it will take three to five minutes to achieve the right exposure. If it’s cloudy, wait a little longer (up to 20 minutes). You are finished when the blue paper has faded to white. Take the Sunprint paper inside when it’s white and rinse it in cool water. You can soak it in a tray of water or run it under cool water. The water changes the blue to white and the white to blue. When the color has changed completely, blot-dry the paper. Dry further by placing paper towels and a book on top of the paper. Once all the water has evaporated (about 12 hours later), the cards are good to go.

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February 6-12, 2014

The Centre County Gazette

Page 19

A groom’s guide to getting involved (sort of) By DAN ZEVIN Associated Press

Generations ago, planning a wedding was 100 percent the bride’s job, but in today’s age of gender equity, it’s a mere 99 percent. Yes, we modern men are more involved than ever, but many of us are still left wondering, “How can I take a more active role in the stress and panic of planning the happiest day of my life?” Gentlemen, you’ve come to the right guy.

GROOM JOB 1: PLAN THE MENU.

When it comes to cuisine, the crucial question is: cash bar or open bar? Once you’ve chosen the latter, tackle other mealrelated matters. Will you keep your open bar open throughout the reception or for the first hour only? (Hint: throughout the reception.) What about hors d’oeuvres? Will your guests be sipping them through bottles, glasses or cans? Remember, you can’t please everyone. Therefore, it’s best to inscribe BYOB under RSVP on your wedding invitations. You may also want to consider serving some food.

GROOM JOB 2: BOOK THE MUSIC.

Wedding musicians are expensive, so cut costs by asking your groomsmen to lip synch and air guitar to a playlist you’ll download from iTunes. Alternatively, you can hire a DJ. A DJ is an individual who sees your wedding as an opportunity to act out his fantasies of being Eddie Van Halen, Rock God, by dancing in place to all his favorite hits. Remind him that it is your special day, not his. Inform him that the song you’ve chosen for your first dance isn’t actually “Hot For Teacher.” Request that he blend into the background, perhaps by streaming his set to the dance floor from his booth in the banquet hall boiler room.

GROOM JOB 3: MANAGE THE GUEST LIST.

Tradition dictates that the groom cut everyone off his list to make more room for his bride’s list. This is easier than it sounds. Just review all the people on your list and think of one reason not to invite them. Let’s start with your best man, “Bob.” Remember that time “Bob” borrowed your drill and returned it without recharging the battery? Put a big red slash through “Bob’s” name right now. Before you know it, the only

AP Photo

THE GROOM HAS been taking a more active role in wedding planning. One of those ways is to help select the band or DJ that will provide music at the wedding reception. one left on your list will be you. To demonstrate what a generous husband you’ll be, cut yourself from the list, too. Dude, you’ll be spending the rest of your life with your bride. Is it really going to kill you if you’re not together on one lousy day?

bowls. So go help your bride pick out punch bowls, bisque bowls, bowls to hold other bowls. If you don’t, you’ll miss out on the most rewarding groom job of all: returning them for a full cash refund as soon as you get back from your honeymoon.

GROOM JOB 4: HELP REGISTER FOR GIFTS.

GROOM JOB 5: PLAN THE HONEYMOON.

From the male point of view, there are three kinds of gifts: 1. things you already have; 2. things you don’t need; and 3. bowls. To help your guests select stuff you actually want, you may be tempted to register at offbeat places like Sports Authority and Home Depot. This is fine as long as you realize that no one’s going to get you anything from these places. They are going to get you

Choosing a destination typically falls to the man, which explains why many couples are slapped with steep penalty fees upon cancelling their flights to the National Base-

ball Hall of Fame. Remember, your honeymoon is a time to rest, to recuperate, to experience the phenomenon of everyone being uncharacteristically nice to you. Dan Zevin is the author of “The NearlyWed Handbook: How To Survive The Happiest Day of Your Life” (Kindle edition 2013) and “Dan Gets a Minivan” (Scribner, 2013), among other books. The 2013 winner of the Thurber Prize for American Humor, he can be reached at www.DanZevin.com .

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Page 20

The Centre County Gazette

Centre

February 6-12, 2014

FEBRUARY 14, 2014 There are plenty of ways for couples to celebrate By SAMI HULINGS shulings@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; To show your sweetheart just how much you care this Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, plan a night out on the town. Head to local restaurants, hotels and spas for special

dinners and packages in celebration of the day of love, or shower your valentine with love at special events including a chocolate and wine tasting, a concert and a special movie showing at the State Theatre. However you choose to celebrate Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, make your special someone feel loved and appreciated, Happy Valley-style.

EVENTS: Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Concert State College Area High School South Auditorium 3 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 16 Principal conductor Dr. Ned Deihl and 75 volunteer band members will perform the Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Concert. Admission is free, but donations will be accepted at the door.

Wine and Chocolate Pairing Mt. Nittany Vineyard & Winery Noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 15 Treat yourself and your valentine to Mt. Nittanyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award-winning wines and Boalsburg Chocolate Company chocolate. For reservations, call (814) 466-6373.

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Valentine’s Day Overnight Stay — Carnegie Inn & Spa This package includes luxury overnight accommodations, dinner for two, a $75 spa credit, chocolate dipped strawberries, a bottle of champagne and full breakfast. Call (814) 234-2424 to make reservations.

Overnight Passport to Paradise Romantic Spa Retreat For Two SusTus Health Club & Spa Lisa Robin in Toftrees This package includes King Bed Spa Suite (and, if available, an in-room whirlpool Jacuzzi tub) at The Hampton Inn and Suites Williamsburg Square, Marriott Courtyard or Toftrees Resort, heated indoor pool and Jacuzzi (if at the Marriott or Williamsburg Square), a 30-minute couples spa/massage package in a deluxe spa suite, and an optional “private for two” yoga/dance class. Call (814) 272-0420 to schedule.

Valentine’s Day For Both of You — Nittany Lion Inn Friday, Feb. 14, and Saturday, Feb. 15 Celebrate with your sweetheart at the beautiful Nittany Lion Inn in a package designed with both of you in mind. Overnight packages on Friday or Saturday night include a bottle of the current selection of house wine, six roses and two tickets to the men’s basketball game on Saturday, Feb.15. Complimentary transportation will be provided to and from the Bryce Jordan Center for the game. This package requires a full deposit and is non-refundable. Best available game tickets will be requested at time of booking. Make reservations at (814) 865-5000 or at www.nittanylioninn.psu.edu. Very Romantic Lion — The Penn Stater Upon your arrival you’ll find champagne and chocolates in your luxurious, graciously appointed room or suite. You’ll enjoy a candlelit dinner for two at The Gardens. In the morning, a breakfast will be delivered to your room. Please allow 24 hours notice prior to your arrival. Make reservations at (814) 863-5000 or at www.thepennstaterhotel.psu.edu. Valentine Celebration Package — Days Inn Penn State Friday, Feb. 14, and Saturday, Feb. 15 This package includes room and tax for one evening, bottle of champagne, two PSU hand-etched champagne glasses, $20 Downtown State College gift card, complimentary downtown covered parking at the hotel, free Wi-Fi, heated indoor pool and late check-out. This has limted availability, with only 20 packages available for Friday or Saturday. To make reservations, call (814) 238-8454.

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Day Spa Couples Vitality Package SusTus Health Club & Spa Lisa Robin In Toftrees This package includes a Spa Rejuvenator for her, a Men’s Zone Time Out package for him and an optional “private-for-two” yoga/dance class. Call (814) 272-0420 to schedule. Couples Massages SusTus Health Club & Spa Lisa Robin In Toftrees Enjoy a peaceful and soothing massage side by side in a candlelit suite. Call (814) 272-0420 to schedule. Couples Delight Package ESSpa Kozmetika Spend the day lounging in thick, comfy robes while enjoying a glass of champagne and having a team of professionals waiting to pamper you. Each guest will enjoy a Hungarian Long facial, a 60-minute Swedish massage, and spa manicure and pedicure. Call (814) 380-9772 to schedule.

Very Romantic Lion — Nittany Lion Inn Upon your arrival you’ll find champagne and chocolates in room or suite. You’ll enjoy a candlelit dinner for two at The Dining Room. In the morning, a breakfast will be delivered to your room. Please allow 24 hours notice prior to your arrival. Make reservations at (814) 865-5000 or at www.nittanylioninn.psu.edu.

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Page 22

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

These plants are the next best thing to chocolate By LEE REICH The Associated Press

With Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day coming up, thoughts naturally turn to chocolate. How nice it would be for gardeners to give their beloved a living, growing, chocolate expression of affection. Alas, chocolate, native to steamy equatorial lowlands, is not usually productive when grown as a houseplant. Even if you could get the football-sized pods dangling from the trunk of a chocolate tree, fairly intricate processing

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A number of plants â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chocolate Ruffles coral bells, Chocolate Cake gladiola and Sweet Chocolate pepper, for example â&#x20AC;&#x201D; have chocolate-y looking leaves or fruits. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shy away from them, though, because their chocolate is only skin deep. Plants with chocolate-y aromas offer instant gratification more akin to Hersheyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kisses. For an affair on shaky ground and needing a quick horticultural chocolate fix, I suggest a peppermint geranium plant. Peppermint geranium makes a nice houseplant for a sunny windowsill, and, in spring, feathery white blossoms add to the sensual pleasure. OK, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not chocolate, but there is that common association of peppermint and chocolate. The Chocolate Mint variety of peppermint is another plant that shares its aroma as soon as it is in hand. Close your eyes and this oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a stand-in for a Peppermint Patty. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really any chocolate in that peppermint-y aroma; perhaps itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the chocolate-y hue of the leaves and the power of suggestion. Chocolate Mint, like other mints, is easy to grow and multiply. Mints do become scraggly indoors, so plan on eventually planting chocolate mint outdoors in a sunny garden bed. Wax plant (Hoya carnosa) is an easy-to-grow houseplant with a genuine, sweet, chocolate-y aroma, though it might require some patience. The aroma comes from the flowers, which are not borne continuously. Still, if you and that special person can stand the wait, just hold hands and admire the way the fleshy leaves twist around in their waxy smoothness. The pure chocolate aroma is worth waiting for.

ANNUAL AND PERENNIAL CHOCOLATES

Other plants could cement a romance with the smell of chocolate in the months and years ahead. Despite its name, summer snowflake offers up its fragrance â&#x20AC;&#x201D; admittedly slight and, to some noses, just sweet rather than chocolate-y â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in spring. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;snowflakeâ&#x20AC;? part of the name is apt, however, for this bulbâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nodding blooms are indeed snowflake

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WITH VALENTINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY coming up, thoughts naturally turn to chocolate. Chocolate mint peppermint is a chocolate-y plant alternative.

white, much like those of another bulb, snowdrops, except larger. Summer brings chocolate-y scents from two annual flowers: chocolate cosmos and birdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; eyes. This cosmos has dark, almost black blossoms. Chocolate cosmos grows from a fat tuber, which you lift in the fall and replant each spring, just as you do dahlias. Birdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; eyes (Gilia tricolor) was once a popular half-hardy annual, loved for its profusion of creamy white flowers, which have dark brown throats and petals edged in purple blush. The chocolate scent is there, but slight. Chocolate daisy (Berlandiera lyrata) is a perennial flower that is strong in scent and tough in disposition. And the plantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also pretty, displaying characteristic daisy heads of yellow petals around green eyes for weeks and weeks through summer. Cut some blossoms, plunk them into a vase of water, and I guarantee your lover will be looking for hidden chocolate bars or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kisses.â&#x20AC;? Chocolate also wafts from a perennial vine. Crossvine (Akebia quinata), also known as five-leaf akebia, is native south of Virginia but root-hardy much further north. Grown in full sun, this vine covers itself with brown or reddishbrown trumpet-shaped blooms that blare out a mocha scent for a few weeks each spring. The flowers are followed by sausage-shaped, violet fruits that split lengthwise when ripe to reveal a jellied pulp â&#x20AC;&#x201D; interesting and edible, but not even a hint of chocolate. Caution: In some regions, akebia is listed as an invasive plant. Contact your local department of environmental conservation or cooperative extension office to find out if this is so in your area. So between long-lived vines like akebia and an annual like birdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; eyes, the plant world abounds with chocolate-y aromas even if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t accommodate the real thing. Inhale to your heartsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; content; no one ever got fat or sick from too much of this kind of chocolate.

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Sports

February 6-12, 2014

Page 23

Senior Celebration

On senior night, the Lady Mounties take care of business against rival BEA By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

PHILIPSBURG — Appropriately, as it was the beginning of Super Bowl weekend, Philipsburg-Osceola high school girls’ basketball coach Doug Myers called his favorite long pass play in the final minute against BEA on Friday night. It worked perfectly. Nursing a five-point lead and facing an all-out press from BEA, P-O’s Abby Showers lined up outside looking to get the inbound pass. But instead of coming to the ball, she faked up and went long. Teammate Alyssa Myers lofted a perfect pass that hit Showers in stride and she coasted in for an uncontested layup. The basket put the game out of reach for the Lady Eagles as P-O held on for an exciting 58-50 victory on Senior Night. It was also the culmination of an impressive late-game rally by the Lady Mounties. With just over five minutes left in the game, P-O found itself down 49-43, but the Mounties went on a tear and scored 15 of the final 16 points in the game. That stretch included making 9 of 10 pressure-packed free throws during crunch time. “We call that ‘jet,’” Doug Myers said. “I’m a big New York Jets fan, and we’ve run that for a couple years now. We hope that they go flying up with our half-court people, and we just fake a screen and she takes off. We scored on that quite a bit in the last couple years.” The way the game began, it didn’t look as if P-O would need any special plays at the end at all. The Mounties, led by Showers, Myers, and Haylee Hayward, lit things up in the first quarter and sprinted out to a big 21-6 lead. But BEA center Logan Fischer, along with guards Haley Giedroc and Megan Peters, led the Eagles back into the game with a 14-6 run that made the score a much more manageable 27-20 going into the locker rooms at halftime. “The first quarter, Philipsburg was on fire,” BEA coach

Troy Butterworth said. “I told our players that we have to weather the storm, we have to execute, and one basket at a time, get ourselves back into the game. And we did. “Philipsburg cooled off in the second quarter, and we started hitting shots in the second and third quarters.” BEA made its comeback complete with two minutes left in the third quarter when Peters nailed a 3-pointer that gave the Eagles their first lead of the night at 37-35. BEA extended that lead to 43-39 after Fischer made a follow-up in the last minute of the third quarter. And then early in the final quarter, Maddie Cingle gave BEA its biggest lead of the game, 47-41, with 6:53 still to play. “I think we started getting lazy on defense,” Showers said. “Our hands weren’t out, they need to be up here but they were down. We just started getting lazy.” After Cingle’s basket, the P-O defense was anything but lazy — BEA would score only three more points in the rest of the game. P-O retied the score at 49 with three minutes to play on two free throws by Hayward, went ahead on two more free throws by Cheyanne Cowfer, and then extended the lead to 55-49 after a score by Myers. Fischer made it 55-50 with 55 seconds left, and then the Eagles took a time out to set up their last-ditch press. At the same time, P-O drew up its pass play. “We run that play when we’re up,” Showers said, “and the other team team is pressing us. They think the ball is going to Hayward, but really it’s a play to get an easy layup.” That layup put P-O ahead 57-50 and essentially locked up the game for the Mounties. “We got a win, and that’s what we are really happy about,” Hayward said. “Our record doesn’t show how much hard work we put into the season. In our minds, we are a great team, even though our record doesn’t show it. We just want to win.” Fischer led all scorers in the game with 17 points, and Giedroc had 13 and Peters had 12. For P-O, Showers and Hayward both scored 16 points, and Myers added 13.

MICHAEL CZAP/For The Gazette

PHILIPSBURG-OSCEOLA’S Cheyanne Cowfer drives through a pair of Bald Eagle Area defenders during last week’s game at P-O. The Lady Mounties won, 58-50.

On a roll: Nittany Lions avenge loss to Purdue By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — That was one way to close out a game. The Penn State men’s basketball team has had well-documented issues late in games this season, but in Saturday’s 79-68 victory over Purdue, the Nittany Lions found a very effective solution: build a lead, take care of the ball, and make your foul shots. Ahead by as many as 10 points throughout the second half, Penn State weathered Purdue’s brutal pressure and then sank 11 of 12 free throws in the final two minutes to claim the win. For Penn State, now 11-11 overall and 3-6 in the Big Ten, it marked the team’s third consecutive conference win, something it hasn’t done since 2009. D.J. Newbill, playing perhaps his best basketball as a Nittany Lion, led a balanced attack with 19 points. He was followed by Tim Frazier with 18 and Brandon Taylor with 15 as PSU put eight players in the scoring column in all. But it was the Nittany Lions’ play down the stretch, especially from the line, that was the difference in this game. “We are getting the confidence to go to the line,” Penn State coach Patrick Chambers said, “and we want to be there. Guys wanted to be there and they made their shots, which is great for us because we needed to do that. “We were up seven and we needed to make it a free throw shooting contest and we needed to get it done. And they (PSU players) did a real good job of getting it done.” In a way, Penn State has come full circle since that heartbreaking 65-64 loss to Purdue on Jan. 18. Since then, Penn State has beaten Nebraska, 58-54, and Ohio State in a thrilling 71-70 win in overtime.

TIM WEIGHT/For The Gazette

PENN STATE’S Ross Travis slams home two points during Sunday’s game with Purdue at the Bryce Jordan Center. Now Purdue, but nothing is easy in the Big Ten. “Purdue plays really hard, and we knew that,” Chambers said. “They are tough and physical and they were really rebounding the ball the last couple of minutes, so let’s give them their credit. “But with a 10-point lead, you have to start putting teams away and get yourself to the

foul line and really start to execute as well a getting stops.” Actually, Penn State led for three-quarters of this game. The Nittany Lions took their first lead, 16-14, at the 11-minute mark in the first half after a layup by 7-foot Jordan Dickerson. From there, PSU did not relinquish the lead for the rest of the game, building it to

34-29 at halftime and then holding margins as big as 10 points in the second half. Purdue, though, was not going anywhere. Led by extremely strong, 7-foot center A.J. Hammons (18 points), the Boilermakers constantly made runs at Penn State and at one point cut PSU’s advantage to two points with 10 minutes to play. But Frazier, Newbill, and John Johnson made consecutive baskets to bump the Lions back up by eight. Then again, at the four minute mark, Purdue crept to within four after a score by Hammons, and again Penn State responded. This time with a drive and a follow up by Taylor. “Of course, it’s about getting it done,” Frazier said. “In the Big Ten there are rarely any blowouts. It comes down to the end with free throws. Today, together, I thought we shot pretty well.” In the final two minutes, the Lions went to the line in six consecutive possessions. Newbill was 4-4, Frazier was 4-4, Taylor made two, and Johnson added one. The Boilers simply could not gain ground, and when Frazier made the score 79-68 with two foul shots with 20 seconds left, Purdue was out of time. “Our goal at the beginning of the year was to be the best we can be at the end of the year,” Frazier said. “We’ve been through ups and downs, so I think we are a very cohesive team right now “We’ve been through a lot — a lot of losses at the end of games, a lot of wins at the end of games. It was up in the air. I think that’s good for us. We are going to continue to play better and learn how to close out games.” Penn State is next back in action tonight at Michigan State in another Big Ten showdown before returning home to play Illinois on Sunday.

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PaGe 24

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

February 6-12, 2014

Winning streak makes postseason viable for PSU UNIVERSITY PARK — First, there was the game they needed to win against Nebraska. Then came the upset victory in Columbus. Finally, there was the home contest the Penn State men’s basketball team had to win to salvage interest for the rest of the season. The Nittany Lions did just that, and although a trip to the NCAA Tournament still seems unlikely, an NIT bid doesn’t just seem probable but expected. It’s been a weird season with Big Ten basketball, as Penn State is just one game back of traditional contenders such as Ohio State and Wisconsin and ahead of usually competitive Illinois. Penn State won at John Patishnock Ohio State, Northcovers Penn State western won at Wisathletics for the consin and Iowa won Centre County at Illinois, all breaking Gazette. Email long, winless droughts him at sports@ in those specific road centrecounty arenas. gazette.com. On Sunday, during a contest enveloped in activities related to The Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (THON), Penn State upended Purdue 79-68 to put together the program’s first three-game winning streak in the conference in five years. If the Nittany Lions had lost, it would

JOHN PATISHNOCK

have been easy to surmise an up-and-down remainder of the season that may or may not end in postseason play. Now, there’s a chance Penn State will play at home through the middle of March, with contests being played at the higher seed’s home arena in the NIT. Making the NCAA Tournament is technically still possible, though after Sunday’s win, Penn State (12-10, 3-6 Big Ten) sits tied for 10th in the conference and it’s doubtful more than seven teams make the tournament from the Big Ten. More likely, it’ll be six, considering traditional tournament teams such as Purdue (13-9, 3-6) and Illinois (13-9, 2-7) probably won’t make it and Indiana (14-8, 4-5) is 50-50 at best, though the Hoosiers greatly increased their chances after Sunday’s home win over Michigan; all records are as of Sunday night. That’s really not the point, though. For a season that was on the verge of being lost a week ago, making the NIT with a reasonable chance of winning a game or two is reason enough for fans to make the Bryce Jordan Center an imposing atmosphere for opponents, something that isn’t always done. Sunday was different. With approximately 70 THON families in attendance and a home crowd that was bigger than usual (7,832), thanks to a strong student contingent, Penn State was the team that played with poise. Purdue was the squad missing free throws and committing turnovers, not Penn State. Season-long problems such as questionable shot selection and continually racking up team fouls still surfaced for Penn State, with Donovon Jack and John Johnson con-

Spring football begins soon STATE COLLEGE — The State College Assembly of God boys’ developmental football program will host a football open house on Tuesday, March 18, from 6 to 8 p.m.. Parents can meet coaches, ask questions, check player weight, view 2013 fall awards shows and pick up registration forms. Sign-

ups for spring football will be accepted. The league is open to all boys, ages six through 13. For more information, call (814) 238-3800 or email football@scassembly.org. Information is also available online at www.scassembly.org/football.

TIM WEIGHT/For The Gazette

FOLLOWING AN 0-6 start in conference play, Penn State head coach Patrick Chambers has righted the ship and has his Nittany Lions thinking about the postseason. tinuing their obsession with quick shots, especially beyond the arc. The duo finished a combined 4-of-12 from the field, including 1-of-8 on 3-point attempts. Penn State accumulated 22 team fouls, though a big part of that was the referees’ wishy-washy inconsistency that resulted in 54 free throws for both teams; Purdue was whistled for 29 team fouls.

The last five minutes took more than a half-hour to play, with Penn State forced to keep its composure longer than expected. That’s what happened. And with some very winnable games left in the remaining nine-game regular season, the BJC suddenly seems like it’ll be more than just a concert venue throughout March.

Teener League accepting registrations BELLEFONTE — The Bellefonte VFW Teener League is accepting new and late registrations for its 2014 season. The Bellefonte VFW Teener League is open to any Bellefonte baseball player, ages

13 to 16. For more information or registration instructions, contact Rich Rogers at (814) 353-3391 or Tom Menges at (814) 8839313.

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February 6-12, 2014

The Centre County Gazette

Page 25

No. 1 Nittany Lions dismantle Michigan, MSU Home or away, full lineup or partial, nothing has stood in the way of the No. 1 Penn State wrestling team and dual meet wins thus far this season. The Nittany Lions made their biennial bus trip to Michigan over the weekend to take on Michigan State and Michigan. And, like everything else they’ve touched this season, the trip was pure gold. Penn State pounded Michigan State, 42-3, Friday night in East Lansing and followed that up with a 32-9 dismantling of No. 11 Michigan on Sunday in Ann Arbor. Andy Elder The Nittany Lions covers Penn State won 17 of 20 bouts, wrestling for The scoring bonus points in Centre County 11 of them, in improvGazette. Email ing their Big Ten record him at sports@ to 7-0 and overall mark centrecounty to 13-0. They did all of gazette.com. that without starting 125-pounder Nico Megaludis, who stayed at home with an illness, and with backups at heavyweight. That’s the way it’s been for Penn State this year. No team, not even a very good Iowa squad, has been able to match the Nittany Lions’ depth of talent. Arguably their two biggest tests are upcoming. They travel to Minnesota to take on the No. 2 Golden Gophers on Sunday, Feb. 9. That should be a dandy. Penn State is home to Oklahoma State and Clarion the following two Sundays to finish out the dual meet schedule. Then they’ll have two weeks for some fine tuning before heading to Madison, Wis., for the Big Ten Championships on the weekend of March 8-9. But, before we get ahead of ourselves, let’s take a look back at the weekend that was. Poor Jordan Conaway is a victim of circumstance. Unable to beat Megaludis at 125 or Jimmy Gulibon at 133, Conaway is relegated to valued backup and primo workout partner status. He would start for a majority of the other teams in the country. So, it was no surprise that Conaway had

ANDY ELDER

his weight under control and went out and notched two wins, a major and a decision. Which leads into what happened at 133. All season coach Cael Sanderson and his assistants have insisted Gulibon had the talent to compete with the best wrestlers in the country, he just had to unleash it. Well, with the exception of the Southern Scuffle, where Gulibon finished a promising second, that potential went unrealized. When Gulibon dropped a sudden victory decision against Illinois on Jan. 24, Sanderson assured the media his freshman 133-pounder would wrestle better the next weekend. Clearly the coach knew what he was talking about. Gulibon put together back-to-back wins, a 10-3 decision and 9-0 major decision, in Michigan. Granted, neither was against a ranked opponent, but at least Gulibon was scoring points. The coaches must see Gulibon’s awesome potential in the room and have confidence they can coax it out of him in the postseason. Otherwise, they would have inserted Conaway into the lineup at 133. The other weight with a true question mark is 149 pounds. Andrew Alton was thought to be the rightful starter as soon as his surgically repaired shoulder would allow him. However, Zack Beitz took his place and, while not as dynamic as Alton, was solid in all three positions and competitive with any wrestler, no matter his ranking. Sanderson has tiptoed around the subject for weeks now, which made Alton’s return to the lineup last weekend interesting. He had a 9-5 decision against Michigan State, but that wasn’t the litmus test people wanted to see. On Sunday against Michigan, he was paired with dynamic Eric Grajales, who was ranked No. 7. Alton roared out to an 8-2 lead only to see Grajales wear him down and take the lead in the third. When Grajales tossed Alton to his back late in the third period, it didn’t look like Alton had enough gas in the tank to fight off his back, even for the three seconds that were left. Grajales got the pin in 6:57. The interesting question will be whom the coaches insert into the lineup for the huge dual against Minnesota. You would think whoever gets the nod has a good chance of remaining the starter for the rest of the

TIM WEIGHT/For The Gazette

ONCE AGAIN, Penn State wrestling coach Cael Sanderson has his team running like a well-oiled machine as it guns for another national championship. season. Andrew’s brother, Dylan, is still rounding into shape at 157. He got two wins over the weekend. He started with an 8-3 decision vs. MSU. Against No. 14 Brian Murphy of Michigan, Alton was pushed into a second sudden victory period before scoring a takedown for a 3-1 win. Penn State had to use backups at 285 pounds, but only because starter Jimmy Lawson is still working his way back from a knee injury. With No. 2 heavyweight Jon Gingrich fighting a fever Friday night, Nick Ruggear stepped in and battled No. 7 Mike McClure tough before falling, 5-1. On Sunday, Gingrich was feeling better and was one takedown away from upsetting No. 2 Adam Coon. The Michigan freshman won, 2-1. All indications are that Lawson is on track to return before the regular season ends. If not, Gingrich is a nice alternative. He’s not quite as athletic as Lawson, or as good a scrambler, but he’s still tough to score on. The coaches have no decisions to make at 141, 165, 174, 184 or 197. Those weights are locked and loaded.

Freshman Zain Retherford (No. 2 at 141) and senior David Taylor (No. 1 at 165) each remained undefeated with pairs of easy wins. Retherford had a pin and a 7-1 decision. Taylor cruised to a first-period fall and 17-2 technical fall in 5:13 over No. 6 Dan Yates. Matt Brown (174) and Ed Ruth (184) continued their dominance. Brown rolled up 18-3 and 21-6 technical falls, while Ruth scored a pin and a 17-2 tech. Morgan McIntosh was nearly as dominating at 197. He paired a second-period fall with a 17-7 major decision. So, with a month to go before Big Tens, Penn State is well positioned to defend its Big Ten and NCAA titles. Even with questions at 149 (Alton or Beitz?) and 285 (Will Lawson’s knee recover in time?), the Nittany Lions are the clear team to beat. Andrew Alton at his best, Gulibon realizing his potential and Lawson at full strength would only strengthen the Nittany Lions. Can they defend without any of those three? Now, there’s the million dollar question.

Send sports information, schedules and photos to ... editor@ centrecountygazette.com

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Photo courtesy State College Spikes

SPIKESFEST will delight area baseball fans again this year. The winter carnival will take place at Penn State’s Multi-Sport facility.

SpikesFest scheduled for Feb. 16 STATE COLLEGE — The State College Spikes recently announced that their annual free indoor winter carnival event known as SpikesFest will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 16, at the Penn State Multi-Sport Facility. SpikesFest is a giant indoor baseball carnival designed to simulate the experience of fun ballpark activities in the heart of winter. The event will feature free autograph sessions, inflatable games, kids activities, video games, mascot appearances, performances by local entertainment groups, door prizes, ticket specials and much more. The event will be held at the Penn State Indoor Multi-Sport Facility, which is located adjacent to the Bryce Jordan Center on the Penn State Campus.

In partnership with Mount Nittany Health, SpikesFest will feature the first-ever “Get Active Community Sign-Up Event,” which aims to provide the community with a onestop opportunity to gather information and sign up for sports leagues, fitness activities, races and other events during the spring and summer months. Any community group, sports league or non-profit organization interested in the free opportunity to distribute information and conduct sign ups as part of SpikesFest 2014 should contact Ben Love with the Spikes at (814) 272-0312 or blove@statecollegespikes.com. You can also find a complete list of SpikeFests activities and events at www.statecollegespikes.com.

State College Knights of Columbus 850 Stratford Drive, State College

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Page 26

The Centre County Gazette

PSU hoops stayed the course, and it has paid off By BEN JONES StateCollege.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — Eleven days ago Penn State guard Tim Frazier dove on the floor of the Bryce Jordan Center for a loose ball. Snatching it up, Frazier flicked a pass ahead to DJ Newbill who scored an easy basket. As Frazier rose from the court, he pointed to the bench. “Did you get that dive?” he asked, alluding to the team’s internally kept “Attitude Stats,” a metric that gives meaning to extra effort plays. Those are the kinds of plays that have helped Penn State close the gap between the bottom of the Big Ten and the various collection of Top 25 ranked elite of the conference. You may not always be more talented, but your effort is something you can always control. The bench confirmed that it had seen the dive. At its core, it’s a play that has happened countless times over the three years of head coach Pat Chambers’ tenure at Penn State. Players diving on the ground, giving a little bit extra, has become a staple of his teams. Opposing — and often winning — coaches have been praising Penn State’s effort after almost every game with an honesty that goes beyond coaching platitudes. Frazier’s play didn’t come during practice. It didn’t come early in a blowout victory. It came in the final minutes of Penn State’s first conference win of the season after starting the year 0-6 in Big Ten play. Just about every season, Penn State basketball stands at a crossroad. Right the ship or abandon it? It’s the same choice any growing program has to make on more than one occasion. No matter how good the plan may be, something will try and turn it on its head. How you respond is what determines your ability to succeed. This season’s speed bump included three losses in conference play by three or fewer points. And that’s what makes Frazier’s dive a noteworthy moment in Penn State’s 201314 season. Frazier is a captain, a veteran who’s expected to make those plays. With Penn State now sitting on a three game winning streak it has become apparent that he’s not the only one choosing to right the ship. Frazier’s dive was a symbolic gesture that even in the wake of multiple — and often last minute — losses the team hadn’t forgotten it’s identity. “We were 0-6 a couple weeks ago,” Chambers said after Penn State’s victory over Purdue on Sunday. “What these kids have done to turn this around is just kept working, kept digging, kept getting better and they really just bought into what we’re doing with each other. And it looks like they are really playing for each other. “That Purdue game was devastating, I gotta tell you. I give these kids a lot of credit for staying the course, because it could have gotten really ugly. It could have been a perfect storm. And they just kept plugging away,” Chambers said. “We stayed positive and we looked at our mistakes and looked at what we needed to do a better job in. “We have a good bunch, we have good heads and we have uncharted waters right now because we haven’t won three games in a long time, so it’s going to be interesting to see how they react and how we come back to work tomorrow.

“They believe in themselves and they have faith in one another and they just want to go out there and compete and get better. If that is our mantra, compete and get better, you’re going to put yourself in a great situation to win a lot of games.” The irony is that many fans and casual observers don’t see it that way. Tweets fly about Chambers’ inability to do X,Y, or Z — almost all of them related to winning or basketball strategy. The true accomplishment at this point is Chambers’ ability to get his team within reach of victories. The gap between Penn State and the top of the conference is closing slowly but surely. While Penn State fans may have been frustrated with the idea of losing, Chambers has gotten Penn State closer to the point where winning is possible. That itself is a victory for the program. The feat is even more impressive considering that Chambers inherited the nation’s 290th least-experienced team just over two years ago. The departure of Ed DeChellis and his upperclassmen heavy team is not something that’s overcome in a single season. The fact that his team is trying hard doesn’t clear Chambers of any and all blame on any given night. To judge Penn State’s success based on just wins or losses grossly over simplifies the obstacles the program has been facing. Recruiting has improved, but doesn’t change in a single summer, and there is nothing you can do about trying to build a program up in the toughest conference in America. Those aren’t excuses, they’re just facts. “We’ve been through a lot. A lot of losses at the end of games and wins at the end of games, I think it’s up in the air. I think that was good for us. We’re going to continue to get better and I think we’ve learned how to finish out in close games,” Frazier said Sunday. So the Nittany Lions stay the course. And that’s what Penn State should continue to do, because it has gotten them this far. Progress is difficult to quantify in sports, but the Nittany Lions have made progress. Penn State could be a six-win team, but they’re “only” a three-win team in conference. Either way, it’s directly related to the team’s willingness — and Chambers ability to get them — to buy into each other. The maturation of a team over the span of 125 minutes has taken the Nittany Lions from the “almost there” gang to the “told you so” gang. While Nebraska came off an emotional victory, Penn State was looking for its first one. While Ohio State was trying to figure out what happened to a former Top 5 team, Penn State was making big plays down the stretch. And while Purdue was trying to find chemistry, Penn State was realizing that maybe winning wasn’t all so impossible after all. How far Penn State can go is still up in the air. With nine regular season games left on the schedule, there is a lot of basketball left to be played. The Nittany Lions have figured out how to win, though, and that’s often half the battle. It may not mean anything for the remainder of this season, but the program’s ship is floating and headed in the right direction. And that’s all Penn State fans can really ask for.

QUARTET OF CHAMPIONS

Submitted photo

THE BALD EAGLE AREA Junior High wrestling team recently crowned four champions at the Penn Cambria Wrestling Tournament. The team was also second of 14 teams in the team standings. Pictured, front row, from left, are Seth Koleno and Garret Rigg. Second row, from left, are Hunter Hockenberry and Leo Bomboy. Koleno was selected as the tournament’s outstanding wrestler.

SOCCER STARS

Submitted photo

ON JAN. 5, Kara Bates and Wyatt Moore represented Bellefonte Elks No. 1094 at the Elks State Soccer Shoot in State College. Pictured, from left, are Pat Liersaph, Bates, Moore and Terry Liersaph, Elks State president. Bates took second in the U-12 girls, while Moore was fourth in the U-8 boys.

Plans in place for BEA Golf Tourney WINGATE — While the weather outside is frightful, it’s never too early to start thinking of hitting the golf course. On Saturday, June 21, the Bald Eagle Area Varsity Club will be conducting the 25th annual Gary Confer/B.E.A. Varsity Club Scramble Tournament at Belles Springs Golf Tournament outside of Mill Hall. The money raised from this event is used to for two $250 annual senior awards in memory of Gary Confer, as well as wants and needs for the athletic program. Registration begins at 7:15 a.m., with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Cost for the event is $80 per golfer. This price includes 18 holes of golf, riding cart, commemorative gift, on-

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course refreshments and door prizes. There will be an awards presentation directly after golf has concluded. Golfers are asked to pre-register by June 1. Make checks payable to BEA Varsity Club. Registration is limited to the first 36 foursomes. Foursomes that pre-register by Sunday, June 1, will receive a $5 discount per golfer, paying only $75 per golfer for the event. Golf attire is required; no cutoffs or tank tops. No steel spikes are allowed on the course. Anyone interested in playing or being a sponsor should contact Doug Dyke at (814) 355-5721 or (814) 280-0250.

Milesburg Little League sign-ups scheduled MILESBURG — Milesburg Little League Baseball sign-ups will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 7, and Monday, Feb. 10, in Room 22 of Bald Eagle Area

High School. Cost is $45 per player. For more information, email Don at djbasalla@msn.com.

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February 6-12, 2014

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

PaGe 27

Mazza plays a vital role in Winter Olympics coverage By SAMI HULINGS shulings@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — From a young age, David Mazza wanted to understand how electronics worked. “He was always into things,” said his mother, Maralyn Mazza, president of South Hills School of Business and Technology. “He was always taking things apart and putting them together as a little boy.” She and her husband, the late S. Paul Mazza Jr., founders of the business and technology school, supported this interest, even allowing David and his late older brother Tommy to stay up all night to learn how to run the family’s Radio Shack Model 1 computer. Little did they know, this early love of learning how things worked, combined with their encouragement, would put David on track to become the senior vice president and chief technology officer for NBC Sports Group and NBC Olympics. Now directing NBC’s coverage of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, David began his audiovisual career at Park Forest Elementary School as a member of the AV Club. According to his mother, many of David’s first interactions with audio and visual equipment came under the direction of Mr. Robert Williams, director of the State College Area School District audiovisual department. “If people from a room would call for a certain piece of equipment, he (Mr. Williams) would send David over to take it,” she said. This experience only allowed David’s love of electronics to blossom. Maralyn Mazza said as a child, he even built his own computer. “He was programming it and he knew everything he could know about it.” Once he reached high school, Mazza received a production assistant internship with WPSX-TV at Penn State. There, he gained experience with cameras, audio equipment and stage management and served as a runner for Penn State football television broadcasts. “He got involved with sports right away,” Maralyn Mazza said. Mazza then attended college for a short period, but explained to his parents that he felt he was wasting his time. Instead, he could learn things faster on his own. “He would go to any kind of a seminar or training session or anything that he would hear about or find people that would teach him,” his mother said. “He just kept learning. He was highly technically organized.” David’s love for sports and electronics gave him his first experience in the television industry, working as a timer at ski races across Europe for Omega Timing. From there, Mazza began freelancing for various organizations throughout the 1980s. Projects included Wimbledon championships, Olympic coverage, HBO boxing championships, NHL Stanley Cup Playoff coverage and MTV’s Video Music Awards. In 1994, Mazza was offered a full-time director of engineering position with NBC to cover the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games. What he and his family believed to be a two-year assignment would become a 20-year career. Pennsylvania’s Largest Travel Trailer Dealer

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“NBC got interested in him because they found this kid who was traveling around the world doing different sports who was so talented,” Maralyn Mazza said of her son. David’s expertise, innovativeness and ingenuity were exactly what NBC needed, as it had decided to become the network known for hosting the Olympics. As the Olympics were expensive to cover, it was necessary to re-think how broadcasts would be done. David’s brother Paul Mazza described the Atlanta games as a traditional sports broadcasting effort, meaning NBC built everything it needed to broadcast the games. At the end of the games, NBC would tear it all down, a costly, somewhat wasteful endeavor. “At that time, they weren’t thinking ‘how do we make use of this energy, this work and this labor in subsequent games?’ because this was their first into the series,” he said. As director of engineering, David was instrumental in the technical design, building and operations of NBC’s International Broadcast Center (IBC), initially used at the Atlanta Olympics. This also involved developing new technology and systems for the ‘Virtual IBC,’ which would allow parts of the broadcast centers to be located in different locations.

“He has done very innovative things,” Maralyn Mazza said. Because of his innovation, NBC can now transport and reuse the IBC. “They’re not wasting money. They’re not wasting materials. They are able to re-use things.” Mazza’s innovation once again came into play in the 2006 Torino and 2008 Beijing games with the development of the complex “@home effort,” after NBC was asked to scale back the amount of workers it sent to host cities. “Essentially, it said ‘how can we get people to work stateside and still provide the coverage and the quality that we had from having them on site?’” Paul Mazza said. The @home effort now allows some of the engineering and production talent needed to cover the Olympics to stay in the United States. Paul Mazza said for some events, announcers are actually in the United States completing “offtube announcing,” or watching the feed from the games and providing commentary. In addition to his Olympic engineering and production duties, David Mazza was also enlisted to design and build the new home for the NBC Sports Group in Stamford, Conn. Mazza, Page 28

Coaches vs. Cancer Sunday, February 9, 2014 Bryce Jordan Center Game Tipoff – 4:15PM

Vs. Band Together is back! Join your Penn State Nittany Lions, the Penn State Coaches vs. Cancer committee and your local American Cancer Society in support of cancer patients and survivors in our region by attending the PSU men’s basketball game against Illinois. The Band Together event will also feature a Silent Auction of sports and celebrity memorabilia on the BJC concourse. Auction begins when the doors open at 3:15pm. All proceeds from the auction benefit CVC.

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Page 28

The Centre County Gazette

By The Associated Press

February 6-12, 2014

OLYMPIC TELEVISION SCHEDULE

All Times EST. (Subject to Change)

THURSDAY, FEB. 6

NBC 8-11 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (Team Event: Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Short Program, Pairsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Short Program); Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Snowboarding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Slopestyle Competition; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Freestyle Skiing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Moguls Competition 1:35-4:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Primetime Encore

FRIDAY, FEB. 7

NBC 7:30-11:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Opening Ceremony 1:05-5 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Primetime Encore

SATURDAY, FEB. 8

NBC 2:30-6 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ski Jumping â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual K-95 Competition; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Biathlon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 10km Sprint Gold Medal Final; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speedskating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 5000 Gold Medal Final; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cross-Country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Skiathlon Gold Medal Final 8-11:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (Team Event: Ice Dancing Short Dance, Ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Short Program); Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Snowboarding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Slopestyle Gold Medal Final; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Freestyle Skiing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Moguls Gold Medal Final Midnight-1 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (Team Event: Pairsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Free Skate); Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Luge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Singles Competition 1-4:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Primetime Encore NBCSN 3-5:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United States vs. Finland (LIVE) 5:30-9:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cross-Country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Skiathlon Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speedskating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 5000 Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 9:30-11 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Team Event: Ice Dancing Short Dance (LIVE) 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Team Event: Ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Short Program (LIVE), Pairsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Free Skate (LIVE) 6-8 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Game of the Day: Hockey MSNBC 8-10:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Canada vs. Switzerland (LIVE)

SUNDAY, FEB. 9

NBC 2-6 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (Team Event Gold Medal Final: Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Free Skate); Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Biathlon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 7.5km Sprint Gold Medal Final; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speedskating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 3000 Gold Medal Final; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cross-Country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Skiathlon Gold Medal Final 7-11 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (Team Event Gold Medal Final: Ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Free Skate, Ice Dancing Free Dance); Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alpine Skiing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Downhill Gold Medal Final; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Snowboarding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Slopestyle Gold Medal Final; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ski Jumping â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual K-95 Gold Medal Final 11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Team Event Gold Medal Final Postgame; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Luge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Singles Gold Medal Final Runs 12:35-4:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Primetime Encore NBCSN 3-5:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sweden vs. Japan (LIVE) 5:30-8:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cross-Country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Skiathlon Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speedskating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 3000 Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 8:30-10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Luge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Singles Competition (LIVE)

10 a.m.-1 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Team Event Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 1-2 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ski Jumping â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual K-95 Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 4-5 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hockey Encore 5-7 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Game of the Day: Hockey MSNBC 8-10:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Russia vs. Germany (LIVE)

MONDAY, FEB. 10

NBC 3-5 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speedskating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 500 Gold Medal Final; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Biathlon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 12.5km Pursuit Gold Medal Final 8-11:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alpine Skiing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Super Combined Gold Medal Final; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Freestyle Skiing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Moguls Gold Medal Final; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Short Track â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1500 Gold Medal Final 12:05-1:05 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Short Track â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Competition; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Luge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Competition 1:05-4:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Primetime Encore NBCSN 3-5 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Germany vs. Canada 5-7:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United States vs. Switzerland (LIVE) 7:30-11:15 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speedskating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 500 Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 11:15 a.m.-3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Luge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Competition (LIVE); Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sweden vs. Britain 3-5 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Curling Encore 5-7 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Game of the Day: Hockey MSNBC 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Finland vs. Canada (LIVE) CNBC 5-8 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United States vs. Norway USA 5-8 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United States vs. Switzerland

TUESDAY, FEB. 11

NBC 3-5 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cross-Country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual Sprint Gold Medal Finals; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Luge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gold Medal Final Runs; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Freestyle Skiing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Slopestyle Competition 8-11:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Snowboarding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Halfpipe Gold Medal Final; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pairsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Short Program; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Freestyle Skiing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Slopestyle Gold Medal Final; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ski Jumping â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual K-95 Gold Medal Final 12:05-1:05 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speedskating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 500 Gold Medal Final; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Biathlon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 10km Pursuit Gold Medal Final 1:05-4:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Primetime Encore NBCSN 3-5 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United States vs. Russia 5-6 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cross-Country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual Sprint Competitions (LIVE) 6-10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cross-Country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual Sprint Gold Medal Finals (LIVE) 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pairsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Short Program (LIVE) 1:30-3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ski Jumping â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual K-95 Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speedskating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 500 Gold Medal Final 5-7 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Game of the Day: Hockey

MSNBC 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Russia vs. Japan (LIVE) CNBC 5-8 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United States vs. Britain USA 5-8 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United States vs. China (LIVE)

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

NBC 3-5 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nordic Combined â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual K-95 Gold Medal Final 8-11:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alpine Skiing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Downhill Gold Medal Final; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pairsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Gold Medal Final; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Snowboarding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Halfpipe Gold Medal Final; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speedskating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1000 Gold Medal Final 12:05-1:05 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Luge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Doubles Gold Medal Final Runs 1:05-4:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Primetime Encore NBCSN 3-7 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United States vs. Denmark; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nordic Combined â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual K-95, Ski Jumping (LIVE) 7-10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Canada vs. United States (LIVE) 10 a.m.-1:45 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Figure Skating â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pairsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nordic Combined â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Individual K-95, Cross-Country 1:45-2:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Luge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Doubles Gold Medal Final Runs 5:30-7 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Game of the Day: Hockey MSNBC 3-5:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Switzerland vs. Finland (LIVE) Noon-2:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Latvia vs. Switzerland (LIVE) CNBC 5-8 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Switzerland vs. Britain USA 5-8 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Curling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United States vs. China (LIVE) Noon-3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Czech Republic vs. Sweden (LIVE)

Photo courtesy Mazza family

DAVE MAZZA poses in front of the Great Wall of China during one of his many stops with NBC Sports. Mazza, from page 1

The 2014 Odyssey puts everything in perspective.



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The headquarters needed to combine and house all of the NBC Sports Group, NBC Sports Network, NBC Olympics, NBC Digital and the NBC Regional Sports Network management teams. The new state-of-the-art 300,000-square-foot facility opened in December 2012. Paul Mazza will work on Sochi coverage from this building. David Mazzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innovation, creativity and ingenuity has earned him many awards, including 22 Emmys for Olympics coverage, cableâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Monitor Award, ACE and BDA Awards for Graphics Compositing, and the GE Edison Award for technical innovation. In April, Mazza will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the New York Festivals International Television & Film Awards. The award recognizes industry leaders whose accomplishments and contributions have made a lasting impression in the field. At just 56, Mazza has definitely accomplished and contributed a great deal to his field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have no trouble believing he deserves it,â&#x20AC;? his mother said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was just impressed that someone as young as he is was able to get it.â&#x20AC;? Maralyn Mazza attributes his continued success to his ability to get along with others, something she believes he learned from his late father. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of his big base strengths,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I see the respect that the men with which he works with have for him. There isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a question of the most minute significance that he canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t answer. He has to have a split-second response if something goes wrong over there. The whole world is watching.â&#x20AC;? Paul Mazza agreed, saying his brother does well because of his ability to draw the best out of his team and his willingness to sacrifice himself so his team will be successful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is all about making it possible, providing the resources to the folks underneath him so they can excel and they can be effective and successful in the efforts they have been tasked with,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are always improving and perfecting their game and sharpening their skills. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what he encourages. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what he does to himself and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what he exhibits to others.â&#x20AC;?


February 6-12, 2014

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

PaGe 29

Gazette The CenTre CounTy

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Page 30

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

Arts & Entertainment

‘Beauty and the Beast’ coming to Eisenhower UNIVERSITY PARK — Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast,” the award-winning worldwide smash hit Broadway musical, is coming to the Center for the Performing Arts at Penn State. Produced by NETworks Presentations, this elaborate theatrical production will come to life on stage at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 25, and Wednesday, Feb. 26, at Eisenhower Auditorium. “Beauty and the Beast” features the animated film’s Academy Award-winning score, with music by Alan Menken and lyrics by the late Howard Ashman, and additional songs with music by Menken and lyrics by Tim Rice. The book is written by Linda Woolverton. The original creators of the Broadway production are together again for this new touring production. The play is directed by Rob Roth and choreographed by Matt West, with costume design by Tony Award-winner Ann Hould-Ward, lighting design by Natasha Katz, scenic design by Stanley A. Meyer, sound design by John Petrafesa Jr. and music supervision by Michael Kosarin. “It has been wonderful to bring the entire original design team back together to work on this new production of ‘Beauty and the Beast,’” said director Roth. “As a

Submitted photo

THE SPECTACLE that is “Beauty and the Beast” comes to the Eisenhower Auditorium stage on Tuesday, Feb. 25 and Wednesday, Feb. 26. director, it is rare to have the opportunity to revisit your work 15 years later. Hopefully I’ve grown and developed as an artist, along with my collaborators, and we can bring 15 years of experience to this

new production. “We have remained very close as a team over the years of producing the show around the world, and it has been so much fun getting together to re-explore and re-in-

vent the show for this new NETworks tour. The theme of ‘Beauty’ is about seeing past the exterior into the heart of someone, and this is reflected in the design for the show, which is about transpar-

ency and layers, seeing past one thing and into another.” “Beauty and the Beast” is the classic story of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped in a spell placed by an enchantress. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed to his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for all eternity. The show has become an international sensation that has played to more than 35 million people worldwide in 21 countries. Tickets can be purchased online at http://cpa.psu.edu or by phone at (814) 863-0255 or (800) ARTSTIX. Tickets are also available at four State College locations: Eisenhower Auditorium (weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.), Penn State Downtown Theatre Center (weekdays, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.), HUBRobeson Center Information Desk (weekdays, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.) and Bryce Jordan Center (weekdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.). A grant from the University Park Allocation Committee makes Penn State student prices possible. For more information on the production, visit www.beauty andthebeastontour.com.

City Lights events feature Penn State standouts UNIVERSITY PARK — From a discussion of Lincoln’s second inaugural address to a special look at New Jersey’s Adventure Aquarium, Penn State’s alumni and faculty stars will headline a number of City Lights events through May. To register for a City Lights event or to find out more information on each, including cost, program schedules and speaker biographies, visit the Alumni Association’s website at www.alumni.psu.edu/events. City Lights is presented by the Penn State Alumni Association and sponsored by The Village at Penn State. n “Lincoln’s Second Inaugural and the Meaning of the Civil War” National Civil War Museum, Harrisburg, Pa. 6 to 9:30 p.m., Thursday, March 6 Explore the impressive National Civil War Museum with historian Jeffry Wert, Class of 1976, who will take visitors through Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address, delivered nearly 150 years ago on March 4, 1865. Considered the shortest — yet finest — of all presidential inaugural addresses, Lincoln’s words gave meaning to our country’s watershed event. n “From the Pentagon to the Podium” National Press Club, Washington, D.C. 6 to 9:30 p.m., Thursday, March 27 Presented in partnership with Penn State’s College of Information Sciences and Technology. Visit Washington, D.C.’s National Press Club, where global leaders convene and news happens every day. Retired Marine Cobra pilot Jake Graham will take attendees

on his journey from the Pentagon’s halls to Penn State’s podium. Learn about Graham’s Analytic Decision Game, which he developed as a pedagogical approach to teaching security and risk analysis. n “Past, Present, Future: Baseball and the Media” PNC Park, Pittsburgh 6 to 9:30 p.m., Wednesday, April 16 Enjoy the scenic vistas from PNC Park, an intimate, classic-style ballpark that embraces Pittsburgh’s progressiveness while saluting the spirit of early ballparks. Marie Hardin will explain how baseball in the United States was key to the rise of modern sports journalism. Journalists, in turn, influenced the way the game is played and understood by fans, leading to a symbiotic relationship between baseball and the media. n “Behind the Seams on Broadway” The Pershing Square Signature Theatre, New York City 7:30 to 10 p.m., Monday, May 12 Presented in exclusive partnership with Penn State’s College of Arts and Architecture. Enter the world of renowned costume designer Carrie Robbins, Class of 1964, and her work of 40 years for Broadway, theater, opera and ballet. Find out why Robbins has been ahead of the curve in technology in her field, as she shares visual aids, slideshows and actual garments. The new Frank Gehrydesigned Pershing Square Signature Center and its Alice Griffin Jewelbox Theatre provide an unparalleled and intimate setting for this unique program. n “Adventures in Aquatic Animal Care” Adventure Aquarium, Camden, N.J.

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PITTSBURGH’S PNC PARK will be the site of Penn State professor Marie Hardin’s City Lights lecture on April 16. 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Saturday, May 31, followed by aquarium access (included) presented in partnership with Penn State Abington. How can you do surgery on a fish, draw blood from a hippo or remove coins swallowed by a penguin? Take part in a familyfriendly day at the Adventure Aquarium and gaze upon a 550,000-gallon Shark Realm

exhibit with more than 20 sharks, as former Adventure Aquarium chief veterinarian Donald Stremme, Class of 1971, captures the imagination with interesting, odd and funny aquatic animal care stories. The aquarium is the fifth largest in the country, the only one in the world to exhibit hippos, and one of only two in the country to exhibit a hammerhead shark.

‘Vita and Virginia’ to be staged at Webster’s STATE COLLEGE — Webster’s Bookstore Café will present “Vita and Virginia” at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 15, at 133 E. Beaver Ave. “Vita and Virginia” is based on the women’s correspondence over the course of their ardent romance and enduring friendship. Elaine Meder-Wilgus will play Virginia Woolf and Cynthia Mazzant will play Vita Sackville-West. This production marks the second in a new series of dinner theater and cabaret shows in the State College area.

A pre-show dinner will be available at Webster’s at 7 p.m., which will be prepared by Webster’s Catering using organic, gluten-free ingredients that are locally sourced when possible. The dinner menu consists of fennel-crusted salmon, Portobello Wellington, white cannelloni beans, quinoa, a garden salad and dessert. For more information and to purchase tickets, call (866) 248-5091, visit www. tempeststudios.org or visit www.vitaand virginia.bpt.me.

ELAINE MEDERWILGUS, left, plays Virginia Woolf and Cynthia Mazzant portrays Vita SackvilleWest in “Vita and Virginia,” which will be performed on Saturday, Feb. 15, at Webster’s Bookstore Café in State College. Submitted photo


February 6-12, 2014

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

PaGe 31

Live

t n e m in a t r e Ent Schedule

Thursday, Feb. 6 through Wednesday, Feb. 12 ALLEN STREET GRILL, 100 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 231-4745 Thursday, Feb. 6 Bill Filer, 10:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday, Feb. 7 Bill Filer, 10:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Bill Filer, 10:30 p.m.-1 a.m.

Photo courtesy Penn State Public Media

“WATER BLUES, GREEN SOLUTIONS” is an interactive film project telling the stories of communities creating green solutions for our water blues — flooding, pollution and scarcity.

PSU documentary addresses the nation’s ‘water blues’ By CHELSEY SCOTT Special to The Gazette

UNIVERSITY PARK — The nation’s potable water sources are chronically threatened by an out-of-date water infrastructure, storm water runoff and record-breaking droughts. Filmmakers at Penn State Public Media recognized this environmental dilemma and produced an interactive documentary project exploring how cities across the country are adopting innovative green solutions for their water blues. “Water Blues, Green Solutions” takes the viewer on a journey to Philadelphia, Portland, Ore., San Antonio, Texas and the Bronx, N.Y., showcasing communities that are using green infrastructure — land conservation, green roofs, rain gardens, porous surfaces and other methods — to remedy the challenges of flooding, pollution and scarcity. The documentary will air at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 13, on WPSU-TV. The film has been distributed to public broadcasting stations nationwide, and additional air dates will be listed on the “Water Blues” website at www.waterblues.org/schedule as they become available. Air dates have already been confirmed in Los Angeles, Denver and Kansas City, Kan. “Water Blues, Green Solutions” is narrated by Majora Carter, an urban revitaliza-

tion strategist and Peabody Award-winning broadcaster. “We want ‘Water Blues’ to attract a national audience to move people to think differently,” said Frank Christopher, the film’s director, producer and writer. “I want people to ask the question, ‘Why aren’t we doing that?’” As part of Penn State Public Media’s outreach efforts, the 60-minute film is also available for community screenings and events. Several screenings have already been scheduled for Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Washington, D.C. and San Antonio among others. Penn State Public Media filmmakers traveled across the country in search of innovative “green solutions.” Penn State Public Media has launched an in-depth website that allows visitors to create their own virtual experiences of the film’s locations and themes. Loaded with extra footage and new, interactive ways to explore “Water Blues,” the site additionally includes an online toolkit designed to help organize and promote screenings. Stories produced by public radio stations across the country through the project’s grant initiative can also be found online. For more information, visit www.water blues.org.

Troubadour returns to concert series LEMONT — Following a sold-out performance in 2010, singer/songwriter Verlon Thompson returns to the Center for WellBeing in Lemont on Saturday, Feb. 8, for what promises to be another great concert. Thompson has been performing for more than 30 years. As a solo artist and as the trusted sidekick of Texas Americana songwriting icon Guy Clark, he has viewed the world from stages everywhere from Barcelona to Binger, his hometown in Oklahoma. Along the way, Thompson’s compositions have been recorded by Jimmy Buffett, Alan Jackson, Anne Murray, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Kenny Rogers, Randy Travis, Del McCoury, Sam Bush, Trisha Yearwood and

many more. Thompson’s latest project, “Find Your Angel,” is a collaboration with fiddler Sue Cunningham and photographer Frank Serio. Thompson and Serio provide the musical backdrop to Serio’s images of Lorena, a Southern belle whose seemingly perfect life was interrupted by the Civil War. Thompson will perform at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 8, at the Center for WellBeing, 123 Mount Nittany Road, Lemont. Tickets can be purchased online at www. acousticbrew.org, at Webster’s Bookstore Café or Nature’s Pantry in State College, or at the door. For more information on Thompson, visit www.verlonthompson.com.

AMERICAN ALE HOUSE, 821 CRICKLEWOOD DRIVE, STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-9701 Thursday, Feb. 6 Domenick Swentosky, 8-11 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7 Tommy Wareham, 6-8 p.m. and 9 p.m.-midnight Sunday, Feb. 2 Ted and Molly, 8-10 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 5 Scott Mangene, 8-10:30 p.m. THE ARENA BAR & GRILL, 1521 MARTIN ST., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-8833 Friday, Feb. 7 Big Bear Chase Me, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Hitchcock, 10:30 p.m. THE AUTOPORT, 1405 S. ATHERTON ST., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-7666 Thursday, Feb. 6 Kate and Natalie, 9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7 TBA BAR BLEU, 112 S. GARNER ST., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-0374 Thursday, Feb. 6 Velveeta, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Ted McCloskey & The Hi Fis, 10:30 p.m. BILL PICKLE’S TAP ROOM, 106 S. ALLEN ST., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 272-1172 Friday, Feb. 7 Bill Filer, 5-7 p.m. THE BREWERY, 233 E. BEAVER AVE., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-2892 Wednesday, Feb. 12 Karaoke, 9:30 p.m. CAFE 210 WEST, 210 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-3449 Thursday, Feb. 6 Public Domain, 10:30 p.m. CHUMLEY’S, 108 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 238-4446 Thursday, Feb. 6 Kelly Countermine & guests, 8-11 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Harold Taddy, Andy Tolins and Anna Lisa Barron, 8-10 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 9 Harold Taddy’s open mic and variety show, 8 p.m. EDGES PUB AT TUSSEY MOUNTAIN, 301 BEAR MEADOW ROAD, BOALSBURG, (814) 466-6266 Saturday, Feb. 8 The Nick Miller Project featuring Gabe Green, 5-8 p.m. ELK CREEK CAFÉ AND ALEWORKS, 100 W. MAIN ST., MILLHEIM, (814) 349-8850 Thursday, Feb. 6 Doug and Stetz do Keystone Ballads, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Hoots & Hellmouth, 8 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 9 James McMurtry, 6 p.m. THE GAMBLE MILL, 160 DUNLAP ST., BELLEFONTE, (814) 355-7764 Friday, Feb. 7 Jmac and Junior, 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Grain, 7-9 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 9 Andy Tolins Bluegrass Revue, 5-7 p.m. GOVERNORS PUB, 211 W. HIGH ST., BELLEFONTE, (814) 353-1008 Thursday, Feb. 6 JT Blues, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12 Biscuit Jam, 6:30 p.m. HOME DELIVERY PIZZA PUB/ROBIN HOOD BREWING CO., 1820 S. ATHERTON ST., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-7777 Friday, Feb. 7 Chris Good, 7:30-10:30 p.m. INDIGO, 112 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 234-1031 Thursday, Feb. 6 DJ Ca$hous, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Friday, Feb. 7 DJ Keigo and Nammo, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 DJ Kid A.V., 9 p.m.-2 a.m. INFERNO BRICK OVEN & BAR, 340 E. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-5718 Thursday, Feb. 6 DJ Kid A.V., 10 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7 DJ Fuego, 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 DJ Ca$hous, 10 p.m. OTTO’S PUB & BREWERY, 2286 N. ATHERTON ST., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 867-OTTO Friday, Feb. 7 Miss Melanie and The Valley Rats, 9-11 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Kevin Briggs, 9-11 p.m. THE PHYRST, 111 E. BEAVER AVE., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 238-1406 Thursday, Feb. 6 Lowjack, 8 p.m., Maxwell Strait, 10:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Friday, Feb. 7 Dominic & Noah, 8-10 p.m. Ted McCloskey & The Hi Fis, 10:30 pm-2 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Lowjack, 10:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12 Go Go Gadget, 10:30 p.m. THE RATHSKELLER, 108 S. PUGH ST., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-3858 Friday, Feb. 7 Mr. Hand, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Skoal Brothers, 10:30 p.m.

State College Premiere

Wednesday, February 12, 2014 / 6:00—9:00 p.m. at the State Theatre Join us on a journey in search of communities that are adopting new ways of thinking about how to protect, restore, and preserve our rivers and the sources of our drinking water. 6:00 p.m. / Penn State Student & Community Displays 7:00 p.m. / Premiere of the 60-minute Documentary 8:00 p.m. / Panel Discussion

REGISTRATION REQUIRED http://wpsu.org/waterblues

THE SALOON, 101 HEISTER ST., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 234-0845 Thursday, Feb. 6 My Hero Zero, 10 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7 John and Chad, 8-10 p.m., Velveeta, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Mr. Hand, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 Shake Shake Shake, 10:30 p.m. ZENO’S PUB, 100 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-4350 Thursday, Feb. 6 Nightcrawlers, 10:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7 AAA Blues Band, 7 p.m., Spider Kelly, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8 Harold Taddy, 8 p.m., Pure Cane Sugar, 10:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 10 DopplerPoppins, 11 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 Natalie Race, 10 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12 Haystack Lightnin’, 8 p.m., The Cave Tones, 11 p.m. ZOLA NEW WORLD BISTRO, 324 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 237-8474 Friday, Feb. 7 TBA — Compiled by Marjorie S. Miller Schedules subject to change. Call the venue for details. The Centre County Gazette is committed to providing readers with a complete list of upcoming live entertainment in Centre County. If your establishment provides live entertainment and would like to have it listed free in The Gazette, simply email listings to mmiller@ centrecountygazette.com.


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The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING To be included in What’s Happening, submit your events by Wednesday one week prior to publication to community@centrecountygazette.com or mail information to The Centre County Gazette, Attn: What’s Happening, 403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801.

ONGOING Bookmobile — Centre County Library Bookmobile is a fully accessible library on wheels. Look for it in your community and join Miss Laura for story times, songs and fun. Visit the website at www.centrecountylibrary.org for days and times. Exhibit — First-year M.F.A. candidate work will be displayed at the Zoller Gallery, University Park, through Friday, Feb. 7. Gallery hours are Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, visit www. sova.psu.edu/facility/edwin-w-zoller-gallery. Craft Activity — Make your own Valentine’s card from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Saturday, Feb. 15, at Christian Science Reading Room and Bookstore, 219 S. Allen St., State College. The Reading Room will provide cards, markers, inspirational statements and scrapbooking materials. Exhibit — Prints from workshops will be on display through Friday, Feb. 28, in the Tea Room Gallery at the Bellefonte Art Museum for Centre County, 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Gallery hours are from 1 to 4:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Call (814) 355-4280 or visit www.bellefontemuseum.org. Exhibit — The work of local artist Adrienne Waterson will be displayed at The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. Waterson’s influences range from biology, history and architecture to physics, politics and garbage. Her current work is a reflection of her unconscious mind while on the phone, the gastronomic experience of Little League games, drive-thru banks, flowers, fruit and dirty dishes. For more information, visit www.thestatetheatre. org. Exhibit — “On the Wild Side,” a joint exhibition of artwork by Jim Mikkelsen and Sylvia Apple, will be on display through Sunday, March 2, in the HUB Gallery, University Park. Mikkelsen, a sculptor, creates figurative pieces out of wood. Apple allows prehistoric and folk art to inspire her as she constructs her quilts. A reception will take place from 4 to 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 11. For more information, visit www.studentaffairs.psu.edu/hub/artgalleries. Exhibit — “Preserving the Past for the Future” by the Farmland Preservation artists will be displayed though March 31 at the Village at Penn State, 260 Lion Hill Road, State College. There will be a public reception from 3 to 5 p.m. on Feb. 6 with talk from artists Susan Nicholas Gephart and Kim Gates. Exhibit — “Landscapes Near and Far” by Sean Bodley will be on display through Monday, March 31, at Schlow Region Centre Library’s Betsy Rodgers Allen Gallery, 211 S. Allen St., State College. His photographs represent scenes from the Centre County Grange Fair and Civil War reenactments. Gallery hours are Mondays through Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Thursdays from noon to 9 p.m., Fridays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call (814) 237- 6238. Exhibit — Japanese Prints will be on display through Sunday, March 30, in the Windows of the World Gallery at the Bellefonte Art Museum for Centre County, 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Gallery hours are from 1 to 4:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Call (814) 355-4280 or visit www.bellefontemuseum.org. Exhibit — Work by Mary Vollero will be on display through Sunday, March 30, in the Community Gallery at the Bellefonte Art Museum for Centre County, 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Gallery hours are from 1 to 4:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Call (814) 355-4280 or visit www.bellefontemuseum.org. Exhibit — Work by Jeff Mathison will be on display through Sunday, March 30, in the Sieg Gallery at the Bellefonte Art Museum for Centre County, 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Gallery hours are from 1 to 4:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Call (814) 355-4280 or visit www. bellefontemuseum.org. Tax Assistance — Schlow Centre Region Library will host a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program for lowand moderate-income individuals and families Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. by appointment through Friday, April 11, at 211. S Allen St., State College. For more information, call (814) 355-6816. Exhibit — British watercolors from the Permanent Collection will be featured at the Palmer Museum of Art through Sunday, May 4. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesdays through Saturdays and from noon to 4 p.m. on Sundays. For more information, visit www.palmermuseum.psu.edu. Exhibit — The Palmer Museum of Art will feature “Forging Alliances” through Sunday, May 11. This exhibition draws on the Palmer Museum’s collection of postWWII mingei ceramics. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Tuesdays through Saturdays and from noon to 4 p.m. on Sundays. For more information, visit www. palmermuseum.psu.edu. Exhibit — The Palmer Museum of Art will feature the exhibition “Surveying Judy Chicago: Five Decades”

through Sunday, May 11. The exhibit charts Chicago’s remarkable and ongoing career. Museum hours are from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Tuesdays through Saturdays, and from noon to 4 p.m. on Sundays. For more information, visit www.judychicago.arted.psu.edu or www.palmermuseum. psu.edu. History/Genealogy — Learn about local history and genealogy with expert researchers at the Historical Museum and PA Room, 203 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Hours are Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Tuesdays and Thursdays from noon to 5 p.m. Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org.

THURSDAY, FEB. 6 Craft Class — The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will host “Hooks & Needles,” an adult craft class, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Story Time — Holt Memorial Library will have preschool story time from 2 to 3 p.m. at 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. Today’s theme is “For the Love of Birds.” Call (814) 342-1987 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Children’s Program — The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will host its Lego club from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Event — Liberty Baptist Church will host vacation Bible school for kids in preschool to sixth grade from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at 101 Main St., Blanchard. For more information, call (570) 962-2214. Family Program — Holt Memorial Library will host “It’s Elementary,” a series of activities and presentations for elementary school students and their families, from 6 to 7 p.m. at 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. Tonight’s theme is “STEAM,” with Carey Huber from Parker Dam to talk about birding and an upcoming event. Call (814) 342-1987 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Concert — The Verein Orchestra with conductor Philippe Entremont and pianist Sebastian Knauer will perform in the Vienna Concert at 7:30 p.m. at Eisenhower Auditorium, University Park. For more information, visit www.cpa.psu.edu. Musical — FUSE Productions presents “Annie,” directed by Richard Biever and choreographed by Jill A. Brighton, at 7:30 p.m. at The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. The production is sponsored in part by the Centre Daily Times, The Atherton Hotel and Robert M. Sides Family Music Centers. Tickets can be purchased by calling (814) 272-0606 or visiting www.thestatetheatre.org.

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IF YOU NEED help with your taxes, Schlow Centre Region Library will host a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program for low- and moderate-income individuals and families Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call (814) 355-6816.

SATURDAY, FEB. 8

to 11 a.m. in the Children’s Activity Room at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. For more information, contact the Children’s Department at (814) 235-7817. Farmers’ Market — The Millheim Farmers’ Market will take place at 10 a.m. at the Old Gregg School, 106 School St., Spring Mills. For more information, visit www.central pafarmers.com. Children’s Program — “World Stories Alive: Tales in Many Tongues” for children ages 3 to 8 and their families to learn about different languages and cultures will take place from 11 a.m. to noon at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. This week’s language will be German. For more information, visit www.schlow. org. Book Evaluations — WAIYOCB book evaluations will take place from 11 a.m. to noon in the Children’s Activity Room at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. For more information, contact the Children’s Department at (814) 235-7817. Games — Hone your strategy for the ancient game of “Go” from 1:30 to 5 p.m. in the Sun Room, Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Call (814) 237-6236. Musical — FUSE Productions presents “Annie,” directed by Richard Biever and choreographed by Jill A. Brighton, at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. Tickets can be purchased by calling (814) 272-0606 or visiting www.thestatetheatre.org. Dinner — The Hope Fund of Penns Valley will have a spaghetti dinner from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Centre Hall Elementary School, 211 N. Hoffer Ave., Centre Hall. There will be live entertainment and 100 percent of the money raised will financially assist families in the Penns Valley School district with a medical crisis or personal disaster. For more information, email pennsvalleyhopefund@gmail.com. Dinner — New Hope Lutheran Church will have a roast turkey dinner from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at 119 Cobblestone Court, Spring Mills. Attendees can eat in or take out. Games — Snow Shoe EMS will host bingo at 7 p.m. at 492 W. Sycamore St., Snow Shoe. Doors open at 5 p.m. Dinner — The Runville United Methodist Church will have a 1950s-style mission dinner at 5 p.m. in the Yarnell Community Building, 1216 Runville Road, Bellefonte. There will be burgers, hot dogs, fresh-cut French fries and root beer floats. For more information, call (814) 353-8380. Concert — The Penn State School of Music presents Ogni Suoni, the Kent State saxophone duo made up of Noa Even and Phil Pierick, at 5:30 p.m. in Room 128 of Music Building II, University Park. The duo formed in 2009 to promote contemporary music. For more information, visit www.music.psu.edu. Event — Liberty Baptist Church will host vacation Bible school for kids in preschool to sixth grade from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at 101 Main St., Blanchard. For more information, call (570) 962-2214.

Workshop — Get tips on how to dazzle through writing and illustrating at the “Young Writers Workshop” from 10

What’s Happening, Page 33

FRIDAY, FEB. 7 Developmental Screenings — Certified therapists will administer developmental screenings and evaluations for newborns to children age 5 from 9 a.m. to noon in the Children’s Activity Room at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Skills in five major areas will be evaluated: motor, social, cognitive, language and adaptive. For more information, call (814) 235-7818 or visit www. schlow.org. Support Group — The Alzheimer’s and Dementia Support Group will meet at 1 p.m. in the Mount Nittany Dining Room at The Inn at Brookline, 1930 Cliffside Drive, State College. Line Dancing — Centre Region Parks and Recreation presents line dancing at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., No.1, State College. No experience necessary or partners needed. Call (814) 2313076. Farmers’ Market — The Downtown State College Farmers’ Market will take place at 11:30 a.m. in the State College Municipal Building, 243 S. Allen St., State College. For more information, visit www.centralpafarmers.com. Children’s Program — The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will host “First Friday Film” at 1 p.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. This month’s movie is “Some Like It Hot,” rated PG. Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www. centrecountylibrary.org. Event — Liberty Baptist Church will host a vacation Bible school for kids in preschool to sixth grade from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at 101 Main St., Blanchard. For more information, call (570) 962-2214. Little League — Milesburg Little League baseball signups will take place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bald Eagle Area High School in Room 22, 751 E. Eagle Valley Road, Wingate. Event — ClearWater Conservancy will present “For the Love of Art and Chocolate” from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at the Ramada Conference Center and Golf Hotel, 1450 S. Atherton St., State College. There will be live auctions, raffles, hors d’ourves, live music and gourmet chocolate. For more information, visit www.clearwaterconservancy.org. Musical — FUSE Productions presents “Annie,” directed by Richard Biever and choreographed by Jill A. Brighton, at 7:30 p.m. at The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. Tickets can be purchased by calling (814) 272-0606 or visiting www.thestatetheatre.org.


February 6-12, 2014 Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Happening, from page 32 Event â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Bellefonte Elks Lodge will have a fundraiser to benefit the State Elks Major Project, the Home Service Program, at 7 p.m. at 120 W. High St., Bellefonte. The program provides in-home nursing services for those with M.S., CP, spina bifida and other birth defects. For more information, call (814) 321-4638.

SUNDAY, FEB. 9 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Activity â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Celebrate the start of the Winter Olympic Games with SPSEA while making your own medal, carrying your own Olympic torch and creating a Q-tip snowflake from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. For more information, contact the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department at (814) 235-7817. Musical â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FUSE Productions presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Annie,â&#x20AC;? directed by Richard Biever and choreographed by Jill A. Brighton, at 3 p.m. at The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. Tickets can be purchased by calling (814) 272-0606 or visiting www. thestatetheatre.org.

MONDAY, FEB. 10 Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Penn State School of Theatre presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cultural Conversations,â&#x20AC;? a festival devoted to fostering and promoting new dance, visual and theatre pieces based on issues of local and global diversity. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Right to Remain Violent: Gun Control F/Or a New Civilization.â&#x20AC;? For information on specific events during the festival, visit www. culturalconversations.psu.edu. Volunteering â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bellefonte Area Mission Central HUB will be open from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Trinity United Methodist Church, 128 W. Howard St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-9425. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Baby & Me story time with sweet stories, songs and action rhymes will take place at 9:30 a.m. in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Activity Room at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. For more information, contact the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department at (814) 235-7817. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Centre Hall Branch Library will have preschool story time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at 109 W. Beryl St., Centre Hall. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day & Kindness.â&#x20AC;? Call (814) 364-2580 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will have toddler story time from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love & Friendship.â&#x20AC;? Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www.centrecounty library.org. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tales for Twos story time for parents and their toddlers will take place at 10:30 a.m. in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Activity Room at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. For more information, contact the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department at (814) 235-7817. Line Dancing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Centre Region Parks and Recreation presents line dancing at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., No.1, State College. No experience necessary or partners needed. Call (814) 231-3076. Adult Program â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Holt Memorial Library will host a screening of the movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;War of the Rosesâ&#x20AC;? from 6 to 8 p.m. at 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. Call (814) 342-1987 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Information Session â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will host a legal and identity theft information session from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Kenneth Hart from Legal Shields Associates will talk about how to plan for this. Call (814) 3551516 or visit www.centrecountylibrary. org. Bingo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The State College Knights of Columbus will host bingo at 7 p.m. at 850 Stratford Drive, State College. Practice/Performance â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Nittany Knights will perform a capella barbershop songs at 7:15 p.m. at the South Hills School of Business and Technology, 480 Waupelani Drive, State College. For more information, call (814) 777-7455, visit www. nittanyknights.org or email jimkerhin@ yahoo.com.

The Centre County Gazette

Page 33

TUESDAY, FEB. 11 Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Penn State School of Theatre presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cultural Conversations,â&#x20AC;? a festival devoted to fostering and promoting new dance, visual and theater pieces based on issues of local and global diversity. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Right to Remain Violent: Gun Control F/Or a New Civilization.â&#x20AC;? For information on specific events during the festival, visit www. culturalconversations.psu.edu. Coffee Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bring a friend and savor that second cup of coffee and conversation from 9:30 to 11 a.m. in the Fellowship Hall, Howard United Methodist Church, West Main St., Howard. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Baby & Me story time with sweet stories, songs and action rhymes will take place at 9:30 a.m. in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Activity Room at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. For more information, contact the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department at (814) 235-7817. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Holt Memorial Library will have a toddler story time from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. Call (814) 342-1987 or visit www.centre countylibrary.org. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tales for Twos story time for parents and their toddlers will take place at 10:30 a.m. in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Activity Room at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. For more information, contact the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department at (814) 235-7817. Luncheon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mid-Day Connection Luncheon will be at 11 a.m. at Mountain View Country Club, 100 Elks Club Road, Boalsburg. This monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is valentines and romance. The guest speaker will be Christine Koons, with music from Mary Ann Hagen. Event â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Town&Gown Magazine presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Experience the Pink Zoneâ&#x20AC;? from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Guest speakers include Lady Lions Basketball head coach Coquese Washington and Pink Zone executive director Miriam Powell among others. There will also be a chance to win tickets to the annual Pink Zone game on Sunday, Feb. 16. For more information, visit www.pennsylvaniapink zone.org. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Program â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Centre Hall Branch Library will host a program for home-schooled students in grades one through five from 1:30 to 3 p.m. at 109 W. Beryl St., Centre Hall. The group will read and discuss an adaptation of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frindleâ&#x20AC;? by Andrew Clement. Call (814) 364-2580 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will have preschool story time from 1:30 to 2 p.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love & Friendship.â&#x20AC;? Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www.centrecounty library.org. Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Boalsburg Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market will take place from 2 to 6 p.m. in St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s United Church of Christ, 218 N. Church St., Boalsburg. Vendor products include fall greens and root vegetables, meats, dairy items, breads and apples. Yoga Class â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A gentle yoga class will take place from 5 to 6 p.m. at the Howard United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall, 144 W. Main St., Howard. The class is designed to have all flows on the floor. Gain flexibility and strength and leave feeling calm, open and rejuvenated. Call Kathie at (814) 625-2852 or email kathieb1@ comcast.net. Yoga Class â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A basics level yoga class will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Howard United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall, 144 W. Main St., Howard. The class is intended for those who may have had some prior yoga experience. Gain flexibility and strength and leave feeling calm, open and rejuvenated. Call Kathie at (814) 625-2852 or email kathieb1@comcast.net. Support Group â&#x20AC;&#x201D; An Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Dementia Support Group will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the Mount Nittany Dining Room at The Inn at Brookline, 1930 Cliffside Drive, State College. Line Dancing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Centre Region Parks and Recreation presents line dancing at 7 p.m. at the Mt. Nittany Residence, 301 Rolling Ridge Drive, State College. No ex-

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THE PENN STATE School of Music will present Ogni Suoni, the Kent State saxophone duo made up of Noa Even and Phil Pierick, at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 8 in Room 128 of Music Building II on Penn Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s University Park Campus. perience necessary or partners needed. Call (814) 231-3076. Model Railroad Club â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nittany Valley Model Railroad Club meets at 7 p.m. at Old Gregg School Community and Recreation Center, Room No. 1A,106 School St., Spring Mills. Call Fred at (814) 422-7667.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12 Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Penn State School of Theatre presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cultural Conversations,â&#x20AC;? a festival devoted to fostering and promoting new dance, visual and theater pieces based on issues of local and global diversity. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Right to Remain Violent: Gun Control F/Or a New Civilization.â&#x20AC;? For information on specific events during the festival, visit www. culturalconversations.psu.edu. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Activity â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toddler Learning Centre,â&#x20AC;? where children ages 18 months to 3 years can play with the op-

portunity for parents to talk, will take place at 9:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. in the Downsbrough Community Room, Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Registration is required. For more information, contact the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department at (814) 235-7817. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will have baby book time from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Book themes will vary throughout February. Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www.centrecounty library.org. Story Time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Story time for children ages 3 to 5 will take place at 9:30 a.m. in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Activity Room at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. For more information, contact the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department at (814) 235-7817. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Happening, Page 34

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Page 34

The Centre County Gazette

What’s Happening, from page 33 Children’s Program — Children ages 6 months to 2 years can explore science through books and movement during “Baby Explorers” from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at Discovery Space, 112 W. Foster Ave., Suite 1, State College. Activities are free with paid admission. Call (814) 234-0200, email info@mydiscoveryspace.org or visit www. mydiscoveryspace.org. Story Time — Holt Memorial Library will have preschool story time from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. Today’s theme is “Feel the Love.” Call (814) 342-1987 or visit www.centre countylibrary.org. Story Time — The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will have preschool story time from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Today’s theme is “Love & Friendship.” Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www.centrecounty library.org. Story Time — Story time for children ages 2 to 7 will take place at 10:30 a.m. in the Children’s Activity Room at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. There will be interactive stories, fingerplays and music. For more information, contact the Children’s Department at (814) 235-7817. Line Dancing — Centre Region Parks and Recreation presents line dancing at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., No.1, State College. No experience necessary or partners needed. Call (814) 231-3076. Parents’ Program — Connie Schulz, SCASD family outreach specialist, along with community resource guides, will talk to parents during “Tuning Into Kids” about how to manage and prevent tantrums and meltdowns from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Registration at least one week in advance is required and can be done by visiting www.scasd.org/communityed or calling (814) 231-1070. Childcare will also be available, but must be reserved by calling the Children’s Department at (814) 235-7817 at least one week prior to the program. Volunteering — Bellefonte Area Mission Central HUB will be open from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Trinity United Methodist

Church, 128 W. Howard St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-9425. Children’s Program — The Centre Hall Branch Library will host its Lego club from 3 to 3:30 p.m. and 3:45 to 4:15 p.m. at 109 W. Beryl St., Centre Hall. Call (814) 3642580 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Event — Centre Region Parks and Recreation presents “Fly Kids,” a new young bird-watching club from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Millbrook Marsh Nature Center, 548 Puddintown Road, State College. For more information, visit www.crpr.org or call (814) 231-3071. Event — Centre Region Parks and Recreation presents an after-school drama camp where kids can learn about Shakespeare from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Fairmount Avenue Elementary School, 411 S. Fraser St., State College. For more information, visit www.crpr.org or call (814) 231-3071. Class — Sean Bodley will teach “Exploration of Illustration” from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Bellefonte Art Museum, 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. For registration forms and a full list of 2014 art classes, visit www. bellefonteartmuseum.org/classes.html. Zumba — New Hope United Methodist Church will sponsor a free Zumba class at 6 p.m. at the church, 1089 E. College Ave., Bellefonte. Call Amanda at (814) 321-4528. Group Meeting — Celebrate Recovery will meet from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Christ Community Church, 200 Ellis Place, State College. The group uses the “Eight Recovery Principles” with a 12-step approach to help members cope with life’s troubles. For more information, visit www.cccsc.org or call (814) 234-0711. Event — The Spring Creek Watershed Commission will sponsor “Medications in the Environment” at 7 p.m. in the Dreibelbis Auditorium at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College.

THURSDAY, FEB. 13 Festival — The Penn State School of Theatre presents “Cultural Conversations,” a festival devoted to fostering and promoting new dance, visual and theater pieces based on issues of local and global diversity. This year’s theme is “The Right to Remain Violent: Gun Control F/Or a New Civilization.” For information on specific events during the festival, visit www. culturalconversations.psu.edu.

February 6-12, 2014

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IF YOUR CHILD is interested in learning more about bird-watching, be sure to check out Centre Region Parks and Recreation’s “Fly Kids,” a new young bird-watching club that will be held from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 12, at the Millbrook Marsh Nature Center in State College. Meeting — Centre County Triad will meet from 10 to 11 a.m. at 420 Holmes St., Bellefonte. This month’s speaker will be Dan Tancibok, 911 director, who will give a facilities tour and explanation. For more information, call (814) 238-2524 or (908) 902-3122. Craft Class — The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will host “Hooks & Needles,” an adult craft class from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Story Time — Holt Memorial Library will have preschool story time from 2 to 3 p.m. at 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. Today’s theme is “Feel the Love.” Call (814) 342-1987 or visit www.centrecounty library.org. Children’s Program — The Centre County Library and Historical Museum will host its Lego club from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at 200 Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www.centrecounty library.org. Family Program — Holt Memorial Library will host “It’s Elementary,” a series of activities and presentations for elementary

school students and their families from 6 to 7 p.m. at 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. Tonight’s theme is “Elementary Craft Night: Make a Unique Craft.” Call (814) 342-1987 or visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Embroidery Club — An embroidery club will meet from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Sun Room, Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. All skill levels are welcome. Call (814) 237-6236. Meeting — The Centre County Green Party will meet at 7:15 p.m. at Webster’s Bookstore Café, 133 E. Beaver Ave., State College. They will discuss and make plans for the party’s annual convention in March. For more information, visit www. centrecountygreenparty.com. Concert — Live Nation presents Kanye West: The Yeezus Tour at 7:30 p.m. at the Bryce Jordan Center, University Park. Tickets can be purchased at the Bryce Jordan Center through www.livenation.com, www.bjc.psu.edu, www.ticketmaster.com, Bryce Jordan Center Ticket Office, Eisenhower Auditorium, Penn State Downtown Theatre or by calling (800) 745-3000. — Compiled by Gazette staff

GROUP MEETINGS The Gazette will publish the regular meeting dates and times for all Centre County social and service groups, organizations, clubs, etc. that have membership open to the public. To be included in the weekly listing send information by Wednesday one week prior to publication to community@centrecountygazette.com or mail to: The Centre County Gazette, Attn: Group Meetings, 403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801. Adult Bible Study and Kids Program, offering practical help from the Bible and a fun and productive time for kids, will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesdays at Nittany Baptist Church, 430 Mountain Back Road, Spring Mills. Call (814) 360–1601 or visit www.nittany baptist.org. Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse — Men’s Support Group sponsored by The Centre County Women’s Resource Center, meets from 5:30–7 p.m. Tuesdays. Call (814) 237–5220 ext. 247, email edteam@ccwrc.org or visit www.ccwrc.org. Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse — Women’s Support Group sponsored by The Centre County Women’s Resource Center, meets from 5:30–7 p.m. Wednesdays. Call (814) 237–5220 ext. 247, email edteam@ ccwrc.org or visit ccwrc.org. ALIVE Teen Club meets at 6 p.m. Sundays at First Baptist Church, 539 Jacksonville Road, Bellefonte. Call (814) 355–5678 or visit www.fbcbellefonte.org. Alzheimer’s/Dementia Support Groups meet the first Friday at 1 p.m. and second Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. of every month in the Mount Nittany Dining Room at The Inn at Brookline, 1930 Cliffside Drive, State Col-

lege. Contact Anne at (814) 234–3141 or teadmin@ brooklinevillage.com or Janie at (814) 235–2000 or iwpcommrel@brooklinevillage.com for information. AWANA Club meets at 6 p.m. every Sunday at the First Baptist Church, 539 Jacksonville Road, Bellefonte. Activities and Bible lessons will be held for children ages 3 through sixth grade. Materials provided. Call (814) 355– 5678 or visit www.fbcbellefonte.org. Bald Eagle Grange No. 151 meets at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of every month at the Grange Hall in Runville. Bald Eagle Watershed Association meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Monday at the Milesburg Borough Building, 416 Front St., Milesburg. Visit www.baldeaglewatershed.com. The Bald Eagle Area Class of 1959 meets at 6 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month for dinner. Location changes each month. Call Joyce at (814) 383–4337 or email ljt2342@embarqmail.com. Bald Eagle Area Class of 1960 meets for lunch at 11:30 a.m. the third Thursday of every month at The Bestway Restaurant, 1023 N. Eagle Valley Road, Howard. Call Barb (814) 466–6027. Bald Eagle Area Class of 1962 meets for breakfast at 9 a.m. the first Saturday of each month at Bestway Truckstop Restaurant, Route 150, Milesburg. Call Sandy at (814) 387–4218. Bald Eagle Area Class of 1964 meets for breakfast at 9 a.m. the fourth Saturday of the month at the Bestway Restaurant, Route 150, I–80 exit 158, Milesburg. Dinner will be at 5:30 p.m. on the third Friday of the month at the Bellefonte Moose, 125 N. Spring St., Bellefonte. Call Sue (814) 625–2132 or bea.1964@yahoo.com.

Bald Eagle Area Class of 1965 meets for dinner at 5:30 p.m. the last Friday of each month at Bellefonte Elks, 120 W. High St., Bellefonte. Call Bob (814) 383–2151. Bellefonte High School Class of 1956 meets for dinner at 5:30 p.m. the second Friday of each month at Bellefonte Elks, 120 W. High St., Bellefonte. Call Kay at (814) 359–2738. Bellefonte High School Class 1967 meets for breakfast at 8:30 a.m. the first Saturday of each month at Sunset West, 521 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. The location is subject to change. Call Vic at (814) 360–1948. Bellefonte Elks Lodge meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of each month at Bellefonte Elks, 120 W. High St., Bellefonte. Bellefonte Encampment No. 72 and Ridgeley Canton No. 8 meets at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of each month, Windmere Hall, 454 Rolling Ridge Drive, State College. Bellefonte Garden Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month at the First Presbyterian Church, 203 N. Spring St., Bellefonte. Visit www.facebook.com/bellefontegardenclub or call (814) 355–4427. Bellefonte Historical Railroad Society meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at the Train Station, Talleyrand Park, Bellefonte. Call (814) 355–1053 or www. bellefontetrain.org. Bellefonte Kiwanis Club meets at noon Tuesdays at the Moose Club, 125 N. Spring St., Bellefonte. Call Jeff Steiner at (814) 359-3233 or email teamsteiner@comcast.net. Bellefonte Sunrise Rotary Club meets at 7:30 a.m. Group Meetings, Page 35

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February 6-12, 2014 Group Meetings, from page 34 Fridays at Diamond Deli, 103 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Call Mary Jane Fisher at (814) 355–5905. Bellefonte Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1600 meets at 8 p.m. the second Thursday of every month at Post Home, Spring Street, Bellefonte. Bellefonte Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1600 Ladies Auxiliary meets at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month at Post Home, Spring Street, Bellefonte. Better Breathers Support Group meets at 2 p.m. the third Thursday every month at HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Call James Williamson, respiratory manager, at (814) 359–3421. Better Breathers is affiliated with the American Lung Association. Business Networking International meets at 7 a.m. Thursdays at Celebration Hall, 2280 Commercial Blvd., State College. Members share ideas, contacts and business referrals. Fee is $10 for room and breakfast. Call Kelly Swisher at (814) 280–1656. Boy Scouts of America BSA Troop 66 meets from 7–8 p.m. every Tuesday at Pleasant Gap United Methodist Church, 179 S. Main St., Pleasant Gap. Email Scoutmaster Bill Weaver at standinten@aol.com. Brain Injury Support Group meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month at HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Call Sharon Poorman, nurse manager, at (814) 359–3421. There will be no meetings in January and February. Breast Cancer Support Group meets from 5:30–7 p.m. the first Monday of every month in the ground floor conference rooms, Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. If the first Monday of the month is a holiday, the meeting will be held on the second Monday of the month. Call Cheri at (814) 231–7005. The Caregivers Support Group of the Cancer Survivors’ Association meets at 10:30 a.m. the first Monday of the month in Conference Room 6, Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. Catholic Daughters of the Americas social begins at 6:30 p.m. and meets at 7 p.m. the first Thursday of every month at St. John’s Catholic School auditorium, 134 E. Bishop St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355–7730 or email jmoest@yahoo.com. Central Pennsylvania Holistic Wellness Group will meet to share and learn about many methods and techniques to support a holistic, homeopathic and spiritual lifestyle from 6:30–8 p.m. the second Wednesday of each month at the Inspired Holistic Wellness, 107 S. Spring St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 883–0957 or visit www.meetup.com/ central–pa–holistic–wellnessgroup. The Centre County Down Syndrome Society meets from 7–9 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month in the offices at 111 Sowers St., Suite 504, in State College. Email ccdssociety@gmail.com or visit www.centrecountydown syndrome.org. The Centre County Green Party meets at 7:15 p.m. on the second Thursday of every month at Webster’s Bookstore Café, 133 E. Beaver Ave., State College. Centre County Real Estate Investment Club meets from 7–9 p.m. the third Thursday of every month at RE/ MAX Centre Realty, 1375 Martin St., State College. Call (814) 280–5839 or email len@decarmine.com. Visit www. centrecountyreiclub.org. Centre Hall Lions Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month and at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month at Centre Hall Lions Club Building, 153 E. Church St., Centre Hall. Centre Line Riders — ABATE of Pennsylvania, Chapter 18 meets at noon the third Saturday of each month at the Centre Hall American Legion, 2928 Penns Valley Pike, Centre Hall. Centre Pieces Quilt Guild meets from 7–9 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month (March through December) at the Mount Nittany Middle School Cafeteria, 656 Brandywine Drive, State College. Visit www.centrepiecesguild.org or call (814) 237–6009. Centre Region Model Investment Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of the month at the Mazza Room, South Hills Business School, 480 Waupelani Drive, State College. Call (814) 234–8775 or email cr20mic@aol. com. The Centre Region Wargaming and Miniatures Group will meet each week. Meeting times and place changes each week. Join the website to become active: www. meetup.com/centre–region–wargaming–and–miniatures– group. The Compassionate Friends Group meets from 7–8:30 p.m. the second Monday of each month at New Hope, 1089 E. College Ave., Bellefonte. TCF is a national nonprofit support organization offering understanding, friendship and hope to families following the death of a child of any age, from any cause. Contact Peg Herbstritt at (814) 574–5997 or email mah10@comcast.net. FHA Center for Weight Management and Nutrition hosts a bariatric surgery support group from 6–7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month in Classroom 4, Lewistown Hospital, 400 Highland Ave., Lewistown. Sessions are moderated by Virginia M. Wray. Call (717) 242–7099 or visit www.myfamilyhealthassociates.com. Girls of Bald Eagle Area High School Class of 1961 meets at 11:30 a.m. the second Tuesday of each month at

The Centre County Gazette the Mt. Valley Diner, 850 S. Eagle Valley Road, Wingate. Call (814) 355–3686. Halfmoon Garden Club meets at 1 p.m. the first Thursday of the month. Membership is open to Halfmoon Township residents. Contact Barbara Fleischer by phone at (814) 693–0188 or by email at barb.fleischer@gmail.com; or contact Lori Clayton by phone at (814) 692–8077 or by email at lafc30@gmail.com. Halfmoon Grange No. 290 meets at 7:30 p.m. the first Monday of every month at the Grange Hall in Centennia. Call Diane at (814) 692–4580. Hearing Loss Association of America meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month at Foxdale, 500 E. Marylyn Ave., State College. Learn the latest technology available for hearing loss. Heart Failure Support Group will meet at 4 p.m. the fourth Monday of every month at HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Call Traci Curtorillo, nurse manager, at (814) 359–3421. Heritage Museum Board meets at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of the month at the Boalsburg Municipal Building, Main Street, Boalsburg. Call Dr. Pete Ferretti at (814) 574–0939 or email par2@psu.edu. I.O.O.F. Centre Lodge #153 meets at 7:30 p.m. the first and third Thursday of each month at I.O.O.F. Lodge Hall, 756 N. Main St., Pleasant Gap. Junior Rockhounds meets at 5 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month in Room 121, Earth and Engineering Sciences Building, University Park. Call (814) 867–6263 or visit www.nittanymineral.org. Keystone Guild of the Watchmakers Association of Pa. meets at 1 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at Bull Pen Restaurant, Washington Avenue at First Street, Tyrone. Call George at (814) 238–1668. Ladies Grief Support Group meets at 2 p.m. every second and fourth Tuesday at Living Faith Church, 113 Sunset Acres, Milesburg. Call Hazel at (814) 387–4952. Marion Grange 223 meets at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of every month at the Jacksonville Grange Hall. For more information, call Brenda at (814) 383–2796. The Milesburg Lions Club meets at 7 p.m. the first and third Tuesday of every month at Milesburg Center across from Uni–Mart. MOPS, Mothers of Preschoolers, sponsored by New Hope Church, is designed to nurture every mother with children from pregnancy through kindergarten and meets the first and third Thursday of each month at The State College Evangelical Free Church, 1243 Blue Course Drive, State College. Child care is provided for each monthly meeting. Visit www.statecollegemops.com. Mount Nittany Health’s Diabetes Network diabetes support group meets from 10:15–11:15 a.m. the second Wednesday of every month at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., No. 1, State College. Call Carol Clitherow at (814) 231–3076 or visit www.mountnittany. org/diabetes. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets at 6 p.m. every third Tuesday at HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, Outpatient Entrance, 550 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. The support group is affiliated with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Harrisburg office. Call Steve Uberti at (814) 359–3421. National Alliance on Mental Illness meets at 7 p.m. every second Tuesday at South Hills School, State College. June is the last meeting of the summer. Meetings resume in September. Call Dave (814) 238–1983. The Neuropathy Support Group of Central Pennsylvania will meet at 2 p.m. the fourth Sunday at the Mount Nittany Medical Center, Conference Room 3, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. Call David Brown at (814) 531–1024. Nittany Knights Barbershop Chorus meets at 7:15 p.m. every Monday at South Hills School, State College. Men who like to sing are welcome. Visit www.nittanyknights. org or call Bill (814) 355–3557. Nittany Leatherneck Detachment meets from 7:30–9 p.m. at the Bellefonte Elks Club on the second Tuesday of every month, January through October. All Marines and F.M.F. corpsmen are welcome. Nittany Valley Model Railroad Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Old Gregg School, Room 1A, 106 School St., Spring Mills. Call Fred at (814) 422–7667. Nittany Mineral Society will hold a social at 6:30 p.m. and meet at 7:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month in Room 116, Auditorium of the Earth and Engineering Sciences Building, University Park. Call (814) 867–6263 or visit www.nittanymineral.org. Nittany Valley Woodturners meet from 7–9 p.m. every first Thursday in the woodworking shop of State College Area High School, South Building, 650 Westerly Parkway, State College. Email reg@marketvaluesolutions.com or visit www.visitnittany valleywoodturners.org. The Nittany Valley Writers Network meets for an early– risers breakfast at 7 a.m. every third Wednesday at The Waffle Shop, 1610 W. College Ave., State College. The Nittany Valley Writers Network meets from 7–8:30 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Old Gregg School Community and Recreation Center meets at 7 p.m. the first Thursday of every month in Room 106, 106 School St., Spring Mills. Call (814) 422–8582, email ogsrobin@gmail.com or visit www.oldgreggschool.org. Parent Support Group for Children with Eating Dis-

Page 35 orders meets from 7–8 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month in Conference Room 3, Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. Call Kristie Kaufman at (814) 466–7921. Penns Valley Grange No. 158 meets at 7:30 p.m. the second Thursday of every month in Grange Hall, Railroad Street, Spring Mills. Pleasant Gap Rotary Club meets at 6 p.m. every Thursday at The Oaks, 220 Rachel Drive, Pleasant Gap. Reiki Group will meet from 6:30–8:30 p.m. the first Thursday of the month at Inspired Holistic Wellness, 107 S. Spring St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 883–0957, email beth@ inspiredholisticwellness.com, or visit www.inspired holisticwellness.com. RSVP is appreciated. The Romans 12:2 Group meets from 7–8:30 p.m. Mondays at 204 W. High St., Bellefonte. The group is an addictions breakaway program sponsored by Lifegate Baptist Church, and is open to all who are suffering from any form of addiction as well as to family members that may be affected by the addict’s behavior. Call (814) 353–1942. Sacred Harp Singing meets from 7–8:30 a.m. the second and fourth Monday at the University Mennonite Church, 1606 Norma St., State College. Visit www.state collegesacredharp. com. The Snow Shoe Lions Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the first and fourth Wednesday of every month at the Moshannon Community Center, Route 144, Snow Shoe. Soroptimist International of Centre County meet at 6 p.m. the first Monday of the month at the Atherton Hotel, 125 S. Atherton St., State College. Call (814) 234–0658 or email hjlaw11@aol.com. State College Area High School Class of ’65 meets for brunch at 10:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month at Way’s Fruit Market, 2355 Halfmoon Valley Road, Port Matilda. State College Downtown Rotary Club meets at noon on Thursdays at Damon’s, 1031 E. College Ave., State College. State College Elks Lodge meets at 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at Mountain View Country Club, 100 Elks Club Road, Boalsburg. State College Lions Club meets at 6:15 p.m. the first and third Thursday of the month at Damon’s, 1031 E. College Ave., State College. State College Rotary Club meets at 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Nittany Lion Inn, Faculty Staff Lounge, 200 W. Park Ave., University Park. State College Sunrise Rotary Club meets at 7:15 a.m. Wednesdays at Hotel State College, 106 S. Allen St., State College, above The Corner Room. State College Weavers Guild meets from 7:30–9 p.m. on the third Thursday of the month, September through May. Meetings are held in members’ homes. Refreshments are served at 7 p.m. For meeting location, visit www.state collegeweaversguild.weebly.com or call (814) 234–7344. Support Group for Family & Friends of Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors, sponsored by The Centre County Women’s Resource Center, meets from 5:30–7 p.m. Mondays. Call (814) 237–5220 ext. 247, email edteam@ccwrc. org or visit www.ccwrc.org. Stroke Support Group meets at 4 p.m. the last Tuesday of every month at HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. There will be no meeting in August and December. Call Caroline Salva–Romero, speech therapy manager, or Linda Meyer, speech–language pathologist, at (814) 359–3421. The Survivors’ Support Group of the Cancer Survivors’ Association meets at 11:30 a.m. the third Monday of the month in Conference Room 3, Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, will meet at 6:20 p.m. every Tuesday at the American Legion, 2928 Penns Valley Pike, Centre Hall. Weigh–in will be held from 5:30–6:20 p.m. Call Aurelia Confer at (814) 574–1747. TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, PA 473 support group meets at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in the conference room of Windsong Apartments at Brookline, 1950 Cliffside Drive, State College. Call Jane Wettstone at (814) 404–1689. TRIAD, a public safety group for senior citizens, meets each second Thursday in various locations. Call Dick Kustin at (814) 238-2524 or Don Hohner at (908) 902-3122. Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit conservation organization, meets at 7:30 p.m. every first Thursday at Comfort Suites Hotel, 132 Village Drive, State College. Walker Grange #2007 meets the second Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Walker Township Building, 816 Nittany Valley Drive, Bellefonte. Weight Loss Challenge meets at 6 p.m. Tuesdays at the Park Forest Baptist Church, 3030 Carnegie Drive, State College. Membership fee is $35. Contact Darlene Foster at (814) 238–8739 or rdf55@ verizon.net. WiNGs, the Women’s Network Group for women entrepreneurs, has a social from 8–8:30 a.m. and meets from 8:30–10:30 a.m., the third Wednesday of every month at the Patton Township conference room, 100 Patton Plaza, State College. Email membership@wngs.org or call (814) 360–1063. Women’s Welcome Club of State College meets at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month at Oakwood Presbyterian Church, 1865 Waddle Road, State College. Visit www.womenswelcomeclub.org or email wwcmembership@ gmail.com. — Compiled by Gazette staff


Page 36

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

PUZZLES CLUES ACROSS 1. Int’l. language specialist’s org. 6. Filament container 10. Amounts of time 14. Double curves 15. Clumsiness 17. Incapable of compromise 19. Mekong River people 20. Chinese broadsword 21. Rescue squad 22. Cablegram (abbr.) 23. Mold-ripened French cheese 25. Don’t know when yet 27. Rivulet 30. Wild Himalayan goat 32. Astronaut’s OJ 33. Scientific workplace Fun By The Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Sudoku #1

Sudoku #2

35. Xenophane’s colony 36. Exchange 38. Semitic fertility god 39. Chit 40. Sylvia Fine’s spouse Danny 41. Sole 42. Benne plant 44. Small amount 45. Sodas 46. Sino-Soviet block (abbr.) 48. UC Berkeley 49. Express pleasure 50. __ Paulo, city 53. History channel’s #5 show 59. Divertimento 60. Ridge on Doric column 61. Pastries 62. The “It” Girl 63. Hand drum of No. India CLUES DOWN 1. Labor 2. North-central Indian city

3. About aviation 4. The sheltered side 5. Salem State College 6. Twofold 7. Unusually (Scot.) 8. Floral garland 9. Birthpace (abbr.) 10. Tooth covering 11. Confederate soldiers 12. Signing 13. Point midway between S and SE 16. Ground where each golf hole begins 18. A lyric poem with complex stanza forms 22. Atomic #73 23. Thin wire nail 24. Ancient Germanic alphabet character 25. Jupiter’s 4th satellite 26. Woman’s undergarment 28. African antelope 29. Afrikaans 30. Vietnamese

offensive 31. Expression of sorrow or pity 32. Scot word for toe 34. Journalist Nellie 36. Compress 37. Whiskies 38. Feathery scarf 40. White clay for porcelain 43. Keeps in reserve 44. Infectious lung disease 46. Draws off 47. Chinese chess piece 48. Parrot’s nostril opening 49. Once more 50. One from Serbia 51. Fleshy, bright seed appendage 52. Plural of os 53. The horned viper 54. Japanese apricot tree 55. Taxi 56. Bustle 57. Feline 58. Malaysian Isthmus PUZZLE #1 SOLUTION PUZZLE #2 SOLUTION

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business

February 6-12, 2014

PaGe 37

GridSTAR partners with solar schools initiative Collaboration will give students a hands-on solar learning environment From Gazette staff reports PHILADELPHIA — The GridSTAR Center (Grid Smart Training and Application Resource Center), which is coordinated by the Department of Architectural Engineering at Penn State, has announced a collaborative effort with Solar States and the Philadelphia Solar Schools Initiative. As part of a program to teach students about the benefits of solar energy, the GridSTAR Center will host groups from local school districts and YouthBuild Philadelphia Charter School to visit the handson solar energy education center at The Navy Yard in Philadelphia to gain direct experience with the most advanced solar energy technologies. One of GridSTAR Center’s central missions is to serve as a regional hands-on education and research resource for Smart Grid technologies, policies and business practices. Through collaboration with the Philadelphia Solar Schools Initiative and the shared-use of the “Smart Grid Experience Center,” the center will provide Philadelphia students with a unique learning experience that will help them better understand the value of renewable energy and at the same time, contribute to the creation of solar arrays that will help schools reduce utility bills. The GridSTAR Center’s learning environment includes a Net-Zero Energy Residence built with hyper-efficient modular

construction, solar PV/thermal systems integration and a grid interactive 10kWh battery for security and demand response. It also includes a Solar Training Center with a range of solar PV demonstration and training tools, an advanced weather station for data collection and forecasting, and flat and sloped roof training surfaces with permanent and removable demonstration systems. A 125kWh grid interactive storage system with revenue grade metering and controls communicates with PJM for rapid demand response frequency regulation as well as a Power Purchase Agreements to demonstrate the economic model. Finally, an advanced electric vehicle charging infrastructure allows for the demonstration of a range of EV charging technologies. Each of these elements contributes to a rich educational setting in which students will gain the necessary skills to contribute to the planning and installation of solar arrays on their schools. The Philadelphia Solar Schools Initiative has partnered with Solar States, Clean Currents, Finanta, SMP Architects and YouthBuild Philadelphia Charter School to promote rooftop solar energy while educating and training the next generation of green collar workers. The GridSTAR Center was created to develop and deliver responsive professional and skilled workforce educational programming that is aligned with caliber and pace of the emerging smart grid invest-

Submitted photo

STUDENTS FROM YouthBuild Philly Charter School examined the PV Troubleshooting Learning System with Solar States founder Micah Gold-Markel and tour guide Parhum Delogoshaei in GridSTAR’s Solar Training Center. ments and markets. For more information, visit www.gridstarcenter.psu.edu. Solar States is a commercial and residential solar developer using solar as a vehicle to promote clean air, education

KCF developing new system for monitoring prosthetic fit STATE COLLEGE — KCF Technologies has been awarded a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project to improve sensing technologies used to monitor socket fit and the health of the residual limb in amputees. Current prosthetic technologies allow amputees to return to a form of normal life, but create new inconveniences and risks. Improper socket fit, for example, can mean discomfort, instability and heightened risk for tissue damage that could ultimately lead to infection and hospitalization. Using a sensor system to actively monitor socket fit and residual limb health could mostly eliminate these problems for amputees. There are currently socket-monitoring technologies available. However, they are bulky and rigid, which makes it difficult to achieve perfect socket fit. Additionally, these sensors

often monitor only one aspect of fit, instead of using a range of parameters. “Currently, the only way to monitor the fit of a prosthetic socket in the clinic is to wait until the patient reports pain or has skin breakdown issues, and/or to take a simple circumference measurement of the limb at periodic follow up appointments,” said Ability Prosthetics and Orthotics’ clinical outcome and research officer, Brian Kaluf. “This poses a high risk of costly secondary complications and potentially causing the patient not to be able to wear the prosthesis. (A small, wireless sensor) will potentially maximize the function of advanced prosthetic limbs and ensure that the device fits the patient’s limb and life best.” The solution being developed by KCF will include a new socket sensor system that will employ KCF’s exist-

ing wireless technology along with an array of thin, flexible, ultra-low power sensors to measure pressures and temperatures at the surface of the skin, and additional miniature sensors to track other aspects of limb health. “This project has the potential to greatly improve the lives of amputees,” said project lead Greg Harkay. “The sensors will be low profile and flexible, preventing patient discomfort while still providing data to monitor the health of the amputee’s residual limb.” KCF Technologies develops and commercializes embedded intelligence solutions for industry and the military. The company vision is to be a leader in the development of federally funded technologies and bridge the gap to successful commercial products by establishing strategic partnerships.

5 integrated marketing trends for 2014 As we move into a new year, you might be searching for new ways to creatively reach your customers and prospects. Here are my top five integrated marketing trends for 2014 to help you build your plan. n Clearly defining and drilling down key target markets will become even more essential to success. Build ideal customer profiles based on marketing data, then focus your marketing efforts David M. accordingly. Mastovich is n Video will president of be the undisMASSolutions Inc. puted format of For more choice. Social information, visit www.mas Media sites like solutions.biz. SnapChat and

DAVID M. MASTOVICH

Vine understand video is the quickest, most memorable way to tell and share stories. Embrace one- to threeminute long videos that present your products or services in a simplified manner. Utilize different types of production. Some video should still be produced at a high quality, but other video can be produced quickly at a modest cost. n Content will finally drive the new search engine optimization (SEO). For years, we’ve heard “content is king.” Yet traditional SEO tactics like keyword usage or links to other sites made as much of an impact as content. But as Google continues to change ways to search, quality content increases in value. Create content for your target markets. Make it about them in blog posts, videos and other types of media that can be shared. n Multi-screen marketing moves to “must do” status. Mobile traffic will overtake desktop in 2014. The majority of shoppers have a smart phone, tablet or both. Your messaging needs

to be tailored for multiple screens. Your website must look — and work — as good on a mobile device as it does on a desktop or laptop. Right now, most don’t. Make the customer experience universal regardless of device. n Small and midsize businesses must expand their online presence. Some have ignored social media while others have dabbled in it. The winners in 2014 will make a meaningful commitment. Invest in creating a true social media and online strategy. Stop just going through the motions or hoping it will go away.

To advertise in The Gazette, call (814) 238-5051 or email sales@ centrecountygazette. com

and economic development. Solar States has expertise working with commercial, residential and educational solar installations. For more information, visit www. solar-states.com.

Smeal proposes new certificate program UNIVERSITY PARK — The Penn State Smeal College of Business Department of Accounting has proposed a new certificate program for accounting majors interested in careers outside of the attest and tax functions performed by public accountants. Graduates with the Corporate Control and Financial Management (CCFM) certificate will be prepared for careers in industry, government, consulting and advisory service firms that can lead to executive positions as treasurer, comptroller, budget director and chief financial officer. “We designed the CCFM certificate program in response to recruiter demand for accounting majors embarking on careers in corporate accounting. The CCFM curriculum should appeal to students with superior analytical skills. It specifies coursework in advanced managerial accounting, financial statement analysis and communications that exceed the requirements for the bachelor’s degree in accounting. Candidates in this program will be encouraged and prepared to seek a professional credential in management accounting, such as the Certified Management Accountant designation, or CMA. They will be positioned to enter the financial management training programs of the leading corporations that recruit at Smeal,” said Steven Huddart, chair of the department of accounting. Applications for the proposed CCFM certificate are now being accepted from sophomores who are applying now to the accounting major. For more information, visit www. smeal.psu.edu/acctg/ccfm.

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Page 38

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014

CBICC workforce development breakfast held at CPI PLEASANT GAP — More than 40 community members learned more about workforce development in the Centre Region at the recent CBICC Workforce Development Breakfast hosted by CPI. Margie Eby of PA CareerLink Centre County, Alex Halper of the PA Chamber of Business and Industry, Cheryl Johnson of the Private Industry Council of Centre County, Jeffrey Krauss of The HR Office Inc. and Todd Taylor of CPI formed the panel of experts sharing initiatives and updates. Cheryl Potteiger of the Bellefonte Area School District served as the panel moderator. The panel addressed issues regarding Centre County’s labor pool, wages, programs and industry training. The discussion also focused on ways employers will be able to meet their future workforce needs. “The skill sets of our local workforce will be very different within the next five years due to the workforce training that is and will be taking place in our region,” said Krauss, co-owner of The HR Office Inc. Employers were encouraged by the panelists to provide training to their employees and to include professional development within their budgets to lead to employee and business success. The group was invited to participate in guided tours of CPI after the panel discussion. Taylor, director of CPI’s Adult and Post-Secondary Education program, added: “This breakfast forum highlights the growing importance of economic and workforce partners aligning their efforts to attract and retain labor talent in an increasingly competitive environment.”

CPI HOSTED a breakfast recently to promote workforce development in Centre County. The panel discussion was led by, from left, Cheryl Potteiger, Alex Halper, Todd Taylor, Margie Eby, Jeffrey Krauss and Cheryl Johnson.

Submitted photo

DEED TRANSFERS The following property transactions were compiled from information provided by the Centre County Recorder of Deeds, Joseph Davidson. The Gazette is not responsible for typographical errors. The published information is believed to be accurate; however, the Gazette neither warrants nor accepts any liability or responsibility for inaccurate information.

Catherine D. Lehman and Chris R. Lehman to Richard K. Wilber and Kathryn R. Wilber, 121 Chester Dr., Pine Grove Mills, $535,000. S&A Homes Inc. to Meshal K. Algharaib, 2437 Prairie Rose Lane, State College, $310,349.66. Spectrum Control Inc. to Store SPE State College 2013-8 LLC, 1900 W. College Ave., State College, $10.

RECORDED JAN. 13-17, 2013 BENNER TOWNSHIP

HAINES TOWNSHIP

Kenneth G. Burzynski and Shirley A Burzynski to Timothy R. Edkin and Pamela Edkin, 381 Millgate Road, Bellefonte, $325,000. Laura Lloyd-Smith and Stanley S. Smith to Jennifer L. Boughton and Jason M. Richard, 184 Chicory Ave., Bellefonte, $1. Thomas P. Rider to Thomas P. Rider and Tammy L. Zeigler, 1678 Purdue Mountain Road, Bellefonte, $1.

CENTRE HALL

Calvin W. Witmer Jr. and Ruth Ann Witmer to Gregory S. Leitzel and Tracy L. Leitzel, 236 S. Hoffer Ave., Centre Hall, $215,900.

COLLEGE TOWNSHIP

Billy Brewer and Norma J. Brewer to Billy Brewer and Norma J. Brewer, 135 Willow Ave., State College, $1. Edwin W. Dunkelberger estate and Edwin W. Dunkelberger Jr. executor to Ruth E. Dunkelberger, 1214 Charles St., State College, $1. Michael C. Shapiro and Janice K. Shapiro to Michelle S. Miller, 1501 W. Branch Road, State College, $190,000.

FERGUSON TOWNSHIP

Anges M. Kelley Trust, Edna J. Anderson, Randall K. Kelley and Beryle J. Thomas trustee to Rothwell Partnership, 135 Cardinal Lane, State College, $94,000.

Jean L. Hazel and Neal E. Hazel to William E. Hazel, Barry N. Hazel, Jean L. Hazel and Neal E. Hazel, 117 E. Vine St., Aaronsburg, $1.

HARRIS TOWNSHIP

Kim D. F. Bartoo estate, Janice Bartoo Becker co-executor and Jill C. Lillie co-executor to Sara Bartoo Becker, 517 Boalsburg Pike, Boalsburg, $183,000. Calvary Baptist Church of State College and Boalsburg Investment Group to Calvary Baptist Church of State College, 107 Harvest Fields Drive, Boalsburg, $1.

HOWARD TOWNSHIP

Michael Calvin Spayd and Kaleena Sue Spayd to Elizabeth Hackett, Glen A. Hackett Jr. and Kimberly J. Hackett, 2569 Old 220 Road, Howard, $30,000.

PATTON TOWNSHIP

Galen S. Hall and Marie E. Hall to John M. Slaby and Mary G. Slaby, 200 Presidents Drive, State College, $367,000.

PENN TOWNSHIP

Naomi R. Bartges estate and John David Bartges executor to John David Bartges, Poe Valley Road, Spring Mills, $1. Theresa M. Lucas to Leonard J. Lucas Jr., Poe Valley Road, Spring Mills, $1.

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Men’s & Women’s Dress Pants $1.99 Purple Tags 3/$1.00 Thurs., Feb. 6, Fri., Feb. 7 & Sat., Feb. 8 “Don’t forget about our new Book Store!”

110 W. High St. Bellefonte, PA 355-2238

Proceeds benefit our food bank & community. — Thank you

Mark A. Newman, DC 817 Willowbank St. Bellefonte, PA 16823 814-355-4889

PHILIPSBURG BOROUGH

Homesales Inc. to Adrianna A. Albizu, 206 N. Tenth St., Philipsburg, $9,000.

POTTER TOWNSHIP

Peter S. Bair, Marla Q. Bair, Lawrence E. Bair II and Lois Arnold Bair to Peter S. Bair and Marla Q. Bair, 591 Decker Valley Road, Spring Mills, $1. Peter S. Bair, Marla Q. Bair, Lawrence E. Bair II and Lois Arnold Bair to Lawrence E. Bair II and Lois Arnold Bair, 600 Decker Valley Road, Spring Mills, $1. Mildred M. Foust estate and Stephen L. Foust executor to Frederick C. Teti, 137 Foust Road, Centre Hall, $137,500. Rosella C. Hess to Gregory A. Smith and Elisa K. Smith, 215 Church Hill Road, Centre Hall, $1.

RUSH TOWNSHIP

Michael L. Bainey to Michael L. Bainey and Kiley A. Bainey, 322 Walker St., Osceola Mills, $1. Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company to Equity Trust Company, Robert John Langton IRA and Robert John Langton, 508 Kinkead St., Philipsburg, $47,799. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to John F. Mekis and Marianne Mekis, 395 Ernestville Road, Osceola Mills, $10,000.

SPRING TOWNSHIP

Wells Fargo Bank to Russell D. McCrea and Cathy McCrea, 147 Valentine Hill Road, Bellefonte, $39,900. STATE COLLEGE BOROUGH Keith J. Anderson and Stephanie Shum Anderson to Michael Smoyer and Jennifer Smoyer, 428 E. Hamilton Ave., State College, $345,000. George M. Baumer and Vivian H. Baumer to Vivian H. Baumer, 117 E. Doris Ave., State College, $1. Zahi Elihaj and Akram Nasrallah to Zahi Elihaj, 534 Waring Ave., State College, $1. Thomas R. Gyory, Maureen T. Gyory, Maureen T. Gyory and Clint T. Gyory to Allen M. Wilson, Heather B. Wilson and Derrick R. May, 447 E. Fairmount Ave., State College, $305,000. James H. Hulse and Linda M. Hulse to Hulse Family Revocable Living Trust, James H. Hulse trustee and Linda M. Hulse trustee, 255 E. Beaver Ave., State College, $1. Kevin J. Lloyd to Anne N. Layng, 202 E. McCormick Ave., State College, $1. Daniel M. Overmoyer and Carol J. Overmoyer to Overmoyer Family Limited Partnership, 131 Sowers St., State College, $1. John M. Slaby and Mary G. Slaby to Xin Gu and Qiong Yang, 928 Hart Circle, State College, $177,700. Eugene E. White by agent and Roberta White by agent to White Family Trust and Jennifer Lynn White trustee, 1402 S. Garner St., State College, $1.

TAYLOR TOWNSHIP

James Ronald Dunkel and Roberta M. Dunkel to Donald Simondale and Sherrie Lynn Simondale, 748 Gardner Lane, Tyrone, $1.

WALKER TOWNSHIP

LYONS SALVAGE LLC. We buy junk cars, trucks & scrap metals 1806 Zion Rd. Bellefonte

814-355-3974

BOB HOLDERMAN Commercial & Industrial/Bottled Water 814-357-8410 • Cell: 814-769-6880 Fax: 814-357-8415 bob.holderman@culliganwater.com www.culliganwater.com 565 E. Rolling Ridge Dr. • Bellefonte, PA 16823

Bank of America to Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, 1343 Snydertown Road, Howard, $1. Brian D. Julius and Rebecca Suzanne to Jeremy Christopher Spotts and Janel Renee Spotts, 250 Lorinda Lane, Bellefonte, $247,000. Ben B. King and Naomi Mae King to Henry M. Glick and Salomie E. Glick, 2375 Nittany Valley Drive, Howard, $1. Keith O. Taylor and Nicole L. Taylor to Nicole L. Taylor, 210 Meadow Lane, Bellefonte, $1. — Compiled by Gazette staff


The Centre County Gazette

Phone 814-238-5051 classifieds@centrecountygazette.com

FREE

REAL ESTATE PACKAGE

Total value of all items for sale must be under $2,000 • Must have price of item for sale in ad • Run up to 6 lines for 3 weeks • PRIVATE PARTY ONLY

One local call. One low cost.

OVER 37 MILLION JOB SEEKERS!

Real Estate, Rentals, Auctions, Financial, Services/Repairs. Garage Sales, Pets, Bulk (firewood, hay, etc.) not eligible. No other discounts or coupons apply.

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here. Get FAA approved Aviation Techician training. Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance.

REQUEST FOR BIDS/ PROPOSALS The Board of Education of the Bellefonte Area School District is seeking bids for the following: General Supplies (school and office); Art Supplies, Custodial Supplies, Physical Education Supplies, Health Room Supplies, Athletic Training Supplies, Band & Music Supplies, Lumber and Accessories and Science Supplies. The bid must conform to the description and specifications requested. Specifications may be obtained by contacting: Judy Ripka Bid Coordinator Bellefonte Area School District 318 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte, PA 16823-1613 Telephone: 814-355-4814 x3012 e-mail: jripka@basd.net Bids will be received in the Business Office until 2:00pm on Thursday, March 20, 2014 at the above address. Bids will be opened Friday, March 21, 2014 @ 9:00am. The school district reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids/proposal, and to place orders that are In the best interest of the school district.

CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1‑888‑834‑9715

DENTIST

RENT TO OWN

We can arrange “Rent To Own” on any property for sale by any broker, owner, bank or others.

New Horizons Real Estate Co. 814-355-8500

Some ads featured on statecollege.com

George Monios DMD, PC seeks Dentist (Managing Clinical Di‑ rector) to provide qual‑ ity dental care to pa‑ tients in State College, PA. Req.; DDS or DMD or equiv. & PA dental license. Resumes to: Code KR‑MCD, Tina Bough, Aspen Dental Management, 281 Sanders Creek Parkway, E. Syracuse, NY 13057

4 Weeks 8 Lines + Photo

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ACTION ADS

The Central PA Institute of Science and Technology Joint Operating Committee is soliciting bids for the following items: CDL Power Unit-. Sealed bids, clearly marked as equipment bids, will be accepted in the Business Office until 12:00 PM prevailing time on Friday, February 21, 2014. The JOC reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. Specifications are available at the School at 540 North Harrison Road, Pleasant Gap, PA (Business hours are 8:00 am – 4:00 pm), by calling CPI’s Director of Business and Development at (814)359-2793, or by visiting www.cpi. edu (specifications are located in the What’s Happening Section).

Call by Noon Monday to run Thursday. All ads must be pre-paid.

GAZETTE

Placing a Classified Ad?

Page 39

THE CENTRE COUNTY

February 6-12, 2014

Go to www.MyJobConneXion.com or call 814-238-5051.

FOR RENT

APPLY NOW LIMEROCK COURT 2/3 Bedroom Apartments available Jan. Rents starting at $682. Located next to Giant on E. College Ave.

Income Restrictions Apply

814-954-1667 www.prm-mgt.com

TRUE HANDYMAN SERVICES

No job too small! facebook.com/BillysLittleFixes

Snow Blowing, Painting, Electrical/Lighting, Carpentry, Plumbing, Flooring, Trim, Remodels, Tile, Landscape, Mulch, Hauling

814-360-6860 PA104644

FIREWOOD Barkless Oak For Sale $150.00 Cut To 17.5” FREE DELIVERY . within 15 miles of Centre Hall CALL 814‑364‑2007 FIREWOOD FOR SALE $150/CORD Firewood for sale in the State College area for $150 a cord. FREE DELIVERY Please call 814‑280‑1783 if interested. Thank you!

Large 1 Bedroom Apt. $825/Offer. Fully furnished, very clean, large one bedroom available for immediate sublet in parkway plaza. The apartment is walking distance to downtown and to the campus. All utilities (water, heat, electricity), cable & internet, washer & dryer, parking, 333 Logan Ave. State College 16801 Phone: 347‑988‑2409

3 bdrs, 2.5 baths, In State College. Call (814) 880‑4045 in evening. MILLHEIM: 3 bdr, 2 bath, water & sewer provided. Call (215) 586‑0505

FIREWOOD ‑ $180.00 One full pickup load and one trailer load of wood. $180.00, Delivered. Call after 5pm. 814‑667‑2188 ask for George 7124 Stone Creek Ridge Rd Huntingdon 16652

WALKS FIREWOOD & LAWN CARE Seasoned, Barkless, Oak Firewood. Cut to your length, split, & delivered. We sell our firewood year round. Dont hesitate to call. CALL NOW Matthew R. Walk (814)937‑3206

Exciting Opportunities await you at Hearthside RNC!!

only

76

$

DESK CHAIR: gray up‑ holstered, swivels, full arm desk chair w/ up & down lever, excellent condition. $35 Call (814) 355‑4132 DESK: oak, roll top, 51”w x 51”h x 32”d. $600 Entertainment Center: 57 1/4”L, 56”H, 20”W, 2 drawers & 2 shelves on left. 27 1/2” W x 29 1/4” H TV opening. Call (814) 486‑3262 SHOWTIME Rotisserie and BBQ machine. Will do 4 chickens at one time. New in box $125 Call (814) 486‑3262 TABLE/DESK: Spectra Wood, 60”x30” $75 Call (814) 826‑2457 TV CABINET: cherry wood, 98” wide, w/ 2 side sections. $400 Call (814) 826‑2457

GIRL’S w/ 16” wheels. $20 Call (814) 486‑3262

HOUSES FOR SALE

COUNTRY 5 min. from town. This 3 bdrn home sits on 1/2 acre with open living room, dining room, and kitchen. Three car garage. Bellefonte area. Asking $250,000 firm. Ph. 814.222.3331.

BAMBOO fishing rods: (2) 3 pcs. unknown make $50 each Call (814) 486‑3262

MADISON HANDBAGS are stylish, unique, classic bags that are designed by YOU, the customer. Host a party to enjoy a night with the ladies and create a bag that screams YOU! Over 80 fabric options to choose from! www.madison handbags.net/scrater

SAWMILLS

from only $4897 MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills. com CALL 1‑800‑578‑1363 ext 300N

CNA

PRN positions All Shifts available PA Lic/Cert & LTC Exp. Required!

H Competitive Pay Rates H Email resumes to: Jobs@horizonhrs.com Or apply in person: 450 Waupaleni Drive, State College, PA 16801

FILE CABINET: beige, 2 drawer. 25”h x 24”d. ex‑ cellent condition. $25 Call (814) 355‑4132 FREE HORSE MANURE: for fertilizing lawns, gar‑ dens & farm fields. Call (814) 422‑0534

FT positions All Shifts available

PT/SLP/OT PTA/COTA

COMIC BOOK SALE $10 We have a ton of great comics for sale with a wide variety to choose from. Batman, Super‑ man, X‑Men, You name it. Great Prices Too. Check us out at http://botropolis. ecrater.com

Full-time caregiver positions available Our compassionate Caregivers provide light housekeeping, meal preparation, and personal care services to local elderly who need extra assistance to live independently in their homes. Comfort Keepers is seeking full-time caregivers in the Centre County area. Benefits include major medical, dental and vision, 401(k), and paid time off. To begin your career of caring, Contact Michelle at 814-861-1628 or apply online www.comfortkeepers.com/office-551. EOE.

Over 650 Independently Owned & Operated Offices.

NIKON Camera coolax s4, 10x zoom, 40x digital, like new, in box $75 (814) 359‑2596 RECOIL reducer bench: rest & vise for rifle $100 Call (814) 486‑3262 RED oak boards. rough cut clear. 3 pieces 1 x 17 x 75. 3 pieces 1 x 15 x 45 12 smaller pieces. $90 for all. Call (814) 359‑2596 SHARK floor steamer, Like new $35. Rainbow Sweeper $50 Call (814) 826‑2457 SNOW FENCING: roll of 50ft $20, 70ft K‑type steel gutter w/ downspout. $40 7x9x8 1/2ft timber $10 Emporium. 814‑486‑3262 WINDOWS: (2) 28x26 $10, (4) aluminum 28x50 $20, (2) storm windows, 51 1/4 x 55 1/2 $10/ea. Call (814) 486‑3262 WINDOWS: steel frame windows (3) 31x21” (1) 33 3/4 x23” $5/ea. Empo‑ rium. Call (814) 486‑3262


Page 40

The Centre County Gazette

February 6-12, 2014


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