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autumn SPRING 2015

Unearth the Treasures

TEMORA town feature

Australian travel

ADVENTURES

NEW SERIES: Follow the Bushranger Tracks PEOPLE • HOMES • GARDENS • FOOD • AGRICULTURE • STYLE • EVENTS • TRAVEL CULTURE • BUSINESS • AND MORE FROM OUR BEAUTIFUL REGIONAL AREAS

Showcasing the best of rural and regional New South Wales


• Selling in every auction sale week • Leading wooltrade broker • Forward contract with Riemann • Offering Auctions Plus wool • Accredited & modern rehandle • Cash settlement on small lots • Merchandise • Shearing finance • Web access to client account • One competitive flat rate for all bales • Comprehensive market reporting • Detailed clip analysis

Since taking over our family farm I have been using Jemalong wool exclusively to market our annual woolclip. Using a combination of the traditional auction system and the internet based Wool Trade™ we have been able to take advantage of any upward movements of wool prices. This is due to personalised attention to detail and flexibility due mainly to Jemalong understanding our needs as a business. - Simon Squire-Wilson, Tiverton, Harden, NSW


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CENTRAL WEST LIFESTYLE PTY LTD

CONTENT COVERAGE AREA

trading as Central West Magazine ABN 151 6322 9418 ADDRESS PO BOX 1050 DUBBO NSW 2830 PHONE 0429 441 086 FAX 02 6867 9895 WEBSITE www.centralwestmagazine.com.au FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/CentralWestLifestyle PUBLISHERS, ACCOUNTS & ADVERTISING Elizabeth & Alex Tickle info@centralwestmagazine.com.au EDITOR Elizabeth Tickle editor@centralwestmagazine.com.au CHIEF WRITER & PHOTOGRAPHER Jake Lindsay shotbyjake@hotmail.com ART DIRECTOR Zora Regulic artdirector@centralwestmagazine.com.au

DISTRIBUTION Central West Lifestyle magazine is published quarterly (available at the beginning of each season) and distributed to selected newsagents and retail outlets within the Central West and in the bordering regions of the Far West, North West, Southern Highlands, Canberra, Goulburn, Northern and Eastern suburbs of Sydney, in addition to a selection of other rural and coastal areas of New South Wales.

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE To order a subscription or back issue (mailed or online), visit www.centralwestmagazine.com.au. Š Central West Lifestyle Pty Ltd 2017

All Rights Reserved

Subscriptions and back issues are also available to read online, on desktop and mobile devices.

No part of this magazine may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the publisher.

Unsold magazines are distributed to cafes, health waiting rooms, quality hotels/motels, bed and breakfast establishments, hair and beauty salons and tourist outlets.

While every care is taken in the publication of Central West Lifestyle magazine, the publishers will not be held responsible for omissions, errors or their subsequent effects.

Environmentally responsible, Titan Plus Gloss, produced in an ISO 14001 accredited facility ensures all processes involved in production are of the highest environmental standards. FSC Mixed Sources Chain of Custody (CoC) certification ensures fibre is sourced from certified & well managed forests. 2 CWL


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CONTENTS AUTUMN 2017

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108-PAGE TOWN FEATURE: TEMORA It is widely known as "the friendly town", and Temora's constituents are doing everything in their power to uphold this fine reputation. Surrounded by golden countryside, Temora is alive with a champion community spirit and characters galore.

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RUNNING WILD

SOLUTION IN SIGHT

TEA AND EMPATHY

SPREADING THE WORD

Gregory Powell shares the story of the Lady Bushranger.

Young Eyes and a vision for a crystal clear future.

John Dunk prides himself on being a good listener.

Tech-savvy Alexandria Kelly knows how to get a message across.

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150

142 A THING OF BEAUTY

STYLE COUNSEL

FANCY FARMHOUSE

Sarah and Andrew Ryan's magnificent "Hillandale" garden represents wise and wonderful plant choices.

Gemma Sewell dons some country classics.

We visit Emma and Matt Barrett's gorgeous "Glengarry".

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WE'VE BEEN EVERYWHERE, MAN

TREAT YOURSELF

NO SECRETS

Alistair and Nellie Brown travel all over the countryside with their two sons, creating memories to last a lifetime.

Seasonal dishes to delight the dinner guests.

Family favourites that are well worth passing down.

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EVENTS IN THE WEST

WEDDINGS

THE LAST WORD

Orange Young Professionals soak up the carnival atmosphere.

The Central West's blushing brides and gallant grooms tie the knot in true country style.

Touching bass with Temora Town Band's Taz Rundle.

ON THE COVER autumn SPRING 2015

Unearth the Treasures

RA TEMOfeatu re town

Australian travel

ADVENTURES

Photography: Shot by Jake NEW SERIES: Follow the Bushranger Tracks $12.00

inc GST

608002

>

AUTUMN 2017 VOLUME 16

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The magazine could not exist without them, and their loyalty shows their commitment to the communities of the Central West.

Story featured page 40 in the Temora Town Feature.

• EVENTS • TRAVEL AGRICU LTURE • STYLE GARDEN S • FOOD • AL AREAS PEOPLE • HOMES • OUR BEAUTI FUL REGION SS • AND MORE FROM CULTUR E • BUSINE

Wales region al New South best of rural and Show casing the

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WE ENCOURAGE OUR READERS TO SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS.

A Family Affair: Lizzie, Angus, Evie and Charlie Cooper tending to their farm duties in their henhouse at Temora.

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From the Publishers Welcome to autumn in the beautiful Central West! We trust you are all in a relaxed mood after a memorable Christmas and a holiday break, however small, that helped you to renew and refresh. Another year in and let us hope for an even better one than 2016. The Summer 2016 magazine featuring Blayney and villages, Carcoar and Millthorpe was launched in great style at the historic Carcoar Courthouse. We have been receiving excellent feedback on this newest edition and a selection of our valued feedback can be seen on the Your Letters page. A highlight of our visit to the Blayney area (apart from the launch) was attending the Blayney Farmers Markets on the Sunday morning where we met many of the wonderful locals who have grown to love their fresh, locally grown produce available every third Sunday of the month. The Blayney Council staff were out in force at the markets and enjoyed manning a stand under the guidance of Blayney Council General Manager Rebecca Ryan, where the new release of CWL was sold. All proceeds were donated by Council to the Palliative Care Unit in Blayney. Central West Lifestyle has been profiling some of our loyal and staunch advertisers, mayors and newsagents across the Central West through two-minute video clips. These video clips can be seen on our CWL Facebook page as well as on the CWL Youtube channel. We thank talented videographer Josh Cornelissen-Birch, who skilfully created footage that tells the authentic stories of these remarkable people. Some team members, friends and family made the trip to Crookwell in early November to attend the two-day Crookwell Garden Festival. Although Crookwell welcomed us with some brisk weather, it was a very inspiring time, admiring stunning gardens and meeting their creative owners. We had the pleasure of staying at the beautiful Pinn Cottage in Crookwell, a special and unique piece of Australian history.

Blayney Council General Manager Rebecca Ryan and CWL Publisher Elizabeth Tickle at Blayney Farmers Markets. All sale proceeds of CWL were donated by Council to the Palliative Care Unit in Blayney.

A pleasure for me (Elizabeth) was being able to go back to my former career of teaching and facilitate a writing and publishing workshop at Macquarie Anglican Grammar School recently. Our daughter Jane Sanderson is most fortunate to teach in the secondary department at this school. Not only were the students a pleasure to work with but I witnessed some outstanding creative talent that I am certain we will hear of in the years to come. We thank CWL Dubbo writer Dayna Tierney for sharing her story with the students and giving them the vital encouragement so necessary for success.

Elizabeth Tickle and students from Macquarie Anglican Grammar School, who took part in a writing and publishing workshop.

In this edition, we welcome travel writers (and photographers) husband and wife team Alistair and Nellie Brown, who took the plunge with their two young boys and travelled throughout Australia for nine months pulling their camper van. The images they captured are phenomenal, as reflected in one of our favourites seen on this page. Watch out for our 100-page Winter Town Feature on Coonabarabran (Warrumbungle Shire) and Gilgandra in edition number 17. So many inspiring and innovative people have been able to share their stories. CWL looks forward to taking you on a personal tour of these inviting and progressive western communities! Until next time, enjoy the Autumn edition featuring beautiful Temora and share the good news about the Central West! Warm regards,

Elizabeth and Alex Tickle 6 CWL

A stunning image from husband and wife travel-writing team Alistair and Nellie Brown.


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ALIVE & KICKING GREETINGS AND SALUTATIONS to our esteemed CWL readers. Say goodbye to those long, hot summer nights as we usher in the vibrant colours and cooler temperatures of autumn in these, the days of our lives. Forget if you are young or old, or somewhere in between, it’s time to start feeling alive! Reach for the stars and enjoy all the good things we’ve been blessed with simply by living in this great country. Reading about our feature town Temora, in the heart of the graingrowing district of southern NSW, is a positive start! Scratch the surface of this friendly Riverina town and you will find it has everything, and much more. Temora, like many towns in the bush, was created during the exhilarating days of the gold rush before making its name as a prosperous wheat and sheep district. By 1880 the goldfield was producing half the state’s gold. The population swelled to 20,000, mostly hopeful miners, who extracted 4000kg from the ground, including a monstrous 7.3kg nugget unearthed at the Mother Shipton mine. The all-important railway arrived in 1893 from Cootamundra, transforming Temora into an impressive wheat terminal (nearby Ariah Park was the first place in Australia to try out bulk grain handling 100 years ago). With the gold came money and the inevitable fine buildings that still stand tall in Temora today. De Boos Street has one of the most impressive concentrations of churches to be found anywhere in rural Australia, not to mention a most inviting B&B. As you have come to expect in this magazine, we prefer talking about people rather than monuments. Sports fans can read about local hero Scotty Reardon, who proved, yet again, that anything is possible with sheer determination and a heart like Phar Lap. Speaking of horses, there’s a life-size statue of the legendary pacer Paleface Adios in the main drag. Then there are our farming stories – and aren’t our farmers the most resilient and optimistic lot you’d ever care to meet. I guess they have to be. I met some great families – always around the kitchen table – and yarned about wet weather, past deeds, challenges, hopes and dreams. 8 CWL

You will read an uplifting tale about the Colonel and the progressive farmer who works alongside his three sons and their families. Reminds me of that great Australian songwriter John Williamson, who wrote that classic line: “How fortunate, how proud, can an old fellow be, three sons in their swags around the stock camp with me.” OK, we might swap the campfire for a big red tractor, but you get the point. I survived long lunches, movie premieres, flying in a Vietnam War plane and art exhibitions. Along the way I met countless country women making their mark on society, from pilots, vets, funeral directors and lawyers to a gifted portrait photographer and her seven special little Australians. During my visit, the countryside was a kaleidoscope of green and gold, our national colours and best seen from a few thousand feet up. Council call it the Canola Trail and I was on it. Farming is big business in these parts but there’s so much more. The Aviation Museum is among the best in the country, while the Rural Museum, located at the opposite end of town, takes you on a colourful journey into the past. Perhaps my most meaningful chats were with three proud but weary WW2 diggers. All in their 90s, these are the last of the last. Old people and nursing homes go together and Temora is fortunate to have the best of both. There are some great spots to stay in and around this place. You can stay in a quaint railway carriage under the stars, at a former pub right in town or camp at the Koreela Park Motor Inn, where my gracious host Michael went out of his way to ensure a comfortable stay. A big thank you to Council’s highly competent Craig Sinclair, who put our team in touch with the right people and welcomed us like old friends. I know you will love reading about Temora, a quietly efficient town that relies on the collective strength of the community to get things done. Now it’s time to settle down into my new life in Coonabarabran and enjoy more of Mother’s tantalising spinach pie! I’m so glad to be finally settled in the Central West and look forward to unlocking some great yarns here and in Gilgandra for our next feature. Until next time, keep happy, positive and on track. The Central West is alive and kicking!

Shot by Jake Above: Temora’s famed Canola Trail; taking notes in Temora.


AUTUMN 2017 CONTRIBUTORS

Meet your team

ELIZABETH TICKLE

ALEX TICKLE

JAKE LINDSAY

GINA CRANSON

Publisher, Editor, Advertising

Publisher, Distribution, Advertising

Chief Writer & Photographer

Sub-Editor & Proofreader

KATE BOSHAMMER

ZORA REGULIC

MITCH BRAKENRIDGE

CATHERINE PLAYER

ANNA TICKLE

ELIZABETH SWANE

ANGUS WADDELL

JANE SANDERSON

AMANDA O’SULLIVAN

HAYLEY MAUDSLEY

ROBERT I BRUCE

DAYNA TIERNEY

HEATHER CROSBY

ZENIO LAPKA

SUE MEIKLE

NELLIE & ALISTAIR BROWN

Business Strategist

Writer & Social Media Manager

Home & Style Writer, Photographer

Writer

Art Director

Garden Writer

Household Hints Writer

Advertising Designer

Photographer

Photographer

Photographer

Social Photographer

LORRAINE HILLS

PAUL & ANNE LOVERIDGE

Country Cuisine Writer

Seasonal Food Writers

Writer

Wedding Writer

Writer

Photographers & Writers


SECTION After spending most of my working life as a rural journalist, editor and managing editor, and many of those years in Cowra, Wellington, Harden and Young, I love reading Central West Lifestyle magazine. Congratulations on the Summer 2016 edition. Your magazine is becoming richer with each edition, because of the diversity of country life it presents. I am always drawn to producers from the land, and know many other people who don’t come from rural areas are too, because of their honest toil. The difference with this magazine is it captures their authenticity for a broad cross section of readers, as well as farming communities. Despite the digital era, a voracious appetite remains for print media, most especially when presented on quality gloss stock, and with superb photos and time-tested characters. I can imagine people from the regional towns featured in Central West Lifestyle magazine feel a little prouder, and happier, with where they live, after leafing through its beautifully presented pages. My mother gave me my first edition knowing I would enjoy it, and I have ever since. John Thistleton, Goulburn

your letters Here’s a true story. A mate Robbo and I headed down from Sydney to Temora last September for the air show. We were in the Terminus pub on the Friday night when a bloke called Jake Lindsay approached us. He told us how he was a writer and photographer for a glossy mag, Central West Lifestyle, which was going gangbusters; family driven and walking off the newsagency shelves, at a cover price of $11. Yeah Jake, you bet! At last count, Robbo and I have, combined, about 90 years in advertising and media, running ad agencies and media shops. So we know “the media” and we certainly knew that there was no way that Jake’s story could be the case. It was entirely counter-intuitive, given our professional experience. In the digital age printed mags were closing, not opening and growing. So we had a lively beer with Jake and then parted. But, the next morning, something still niggled. We were sure Jake was having us on. We trotted into the Temora newsagent and asked if they carried the mag. Yep, she had one copy left! Apparently they always walked out the door so we were “lucky”. Robbo and I therefore had to share it. (I bought it but he got first go at reading it!) Back in Sydney and three weeks later, he dropped it over to our place, with a note pinned to a page featuring the Royal Hotel in West Wyalong. The note simply read: “We’ve gotta go here!” I grabbed it to have a quick look and ended up reading the mag for four hours straight. (Retirement is a wonderful invention.) So we two couples, plus a third coming across from Naracoorte, are now booked in to the Royal for three nights in April ’17. And we’ll work our way back to Sydney via a couple of other nearby towns; away 10 days in all. And those 60 tourist days are all down to your mag. It is that persuasive. The reading/advertising environment that you’ve created – yes, OK, my apologies to Jake – is simply so positive and attractive. For city dwellers it makes promises that, in our recent experience, the local tourism product then delivers. Friendly places, with nice people and a welcoming vibe. And positive stories of community, of effort, innovation and success in The Bush – a welcome balance to the devastating downside of “droughts and flooding rains”. Congrats on a fantastic publishing initiative. You do your communities very proud. Ian McDonald Chateau d’Espair Chatswood

David and I would like to express our sincere thanks for the feature you did on our home in Carcoar. We are thrilled with the coverage and quality of the photos and have received many comments from friends and family. My budget is being stretched, sending copies overseas and interstate! Of course, our whole area was featured and it is outstanding. As you must know, there are many old dwellings in and around Carcoar that are worthy of exposure, both historically and in appearance, for your lovely magazine. We also greatly enjoyed the launch at the Courthouse. It was amazing to see so many familiar, and unfamiliar, faces. The catering was delicious also! Keep up the great work and congratulations to you all at CWL. Libby and David Pickett, “Kentucky”, Carcoar Thank you for inviting Blayney Shire and the historic villages of Millthorpe and Carcoar to be featured in the Central West Lifestyle Summer edition of 2016/17. The value add to our branding of the Shire of Villages has been tremendous. The final result is a testament to the high-quality stories and images that have revealed to the world our heritage, local tourist attractions, artists, beautiful homes, amazing gardens, businesses and interesting locals. It is refreshing to collaborate and work with committed people who care about the region and showcase the benefits of living and working in a great part of the NSW Central West. Looking forward to future issues and features. Rebecca Ryan, General Manager, Blayney Shire Council The recent Central West Lifestyle magazine featuring Blayney and our villages has been a wonderful promotion of our area. The package that Council purchased from Central West Lifestyle (enabling the area to have a 100-page feature) has proved to be great value for money. The feedback I’ve received has been exceptional, with people enjoying the quality photography and stories. This magazine has been sent all over Australia to family and friends to read and enjoy. The Central West of NSW is a great place to live and work and your magazine is a beautiful showcase of our scenery, buildings and people. Best wishes for 2017. Cr Scott Ferguson, Mayor, Blayney Shire Council Share your feedback Email: info@centralwestmagazine.com.au Facebook “f ” Logo

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TEMORA

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TEMORA

Welcome to

TEMORA TOWN FEATURE WORDS & IMAGES: SHOT BY JAKE

TEMORA CWL 13


FROM THE MAYOR Temora Shire is a very special place! As Mayor, I am delighted to support Central West Lifestyle in showcasing the wonderful people, lifestyle and destinations that make Temora Shire a memorable place to visit and a deeply satisfying place to live. Comprising the township of Temora, the villages of Ariah Park and Springdale, and a strong and diverse agricultural base, there is so much that our shire has to offer – adventure, discovery, relaxation, innovation, sport, culture, heritage – supported by outstanding facilities and services. it is with pride that I see our community – with a population of 6100 and growing – maintain its heritage and salute a rich past while warmly embracing our exciting future. I trust you will enjoy discovering some of our many attractions and features on the following pages, and I also hope you gain a sense of our strong belief in community and belonging. A spirit of generosity and kindness runs very deep within the community, reflected in our large volunteering network for a diverse range of community and charitable interests. All my fellow citizens of Temora Shire truly do care for each other. No wonder it has been dubbed the “Friendly Shire” – a title we hold dear. This spirit of warmth and welcome echoes throughout our community. Temora Shire is home to many families who have been here for generations, which is very special indeed.

We will continue proudly serving our citizens and working tirelessly to remain one of the most successful councils in NSW.

We also have many new residents from all demographics and walks of life bringing their considerable talents, people who choose to come to Temora Shire and wish to make a positive difference. Many a time someone has come for a visit or short stay, only to be captivated by the community and lifestyle and decide to make it their home.

My fellow Temora Shire councillors, together with our dedicated staff, will continue to do all we can to ensure our continued strength and prosperity, building on our solid foundations for present and future generations.

Our community was strengthened even more when the council recently won the right to continue as a stand-alone Local Government Area. This didn’t happen without major effort; it occurred because we have a strong and united group of councillors, executive and general staff, but even more importantly, we have a community that believes in us and each other very deeply.

Temora Shire is truly a wonderful place. Whether it’s to live, work and play, or simply to spend a few days on a holiday, one way or another our communities will touch your heart and inspire you to meet up with us again.

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I am deeply honoured to be the Mayor, a councillor, a businessman and a citizen of Temora Shire. It is home to my family and generations before us.

Cr Rick Firman OAM, Mayor of Temora Shire


TEMORA

Yesterday, today,

TEMORA

I

deally situated in the eastern Riverina, the Temora Shire impresses and delights visitors, and provides a fabulous rural lifestyle that attracts people of all ages.

The shire comprises the town of Temora, villages of Ariah Park and Springdale, and rich, gently undulating farmlands yielding a diversity of produce, with cropping and livestock prominent. The first inhabitants of the region were the Wiradjuri people. European settlement dates from 1836, with gold discovered in the area in 1869. The goldrush of the ensuing years culminated in the proclamation of Temora Goldfield in 1880. The potential of the area for farming saw large farms established by early selectors, and German settlers, in particular, played a major part in early pastoral days. Today the shire has a strong and innovative farming sector and a successful agribusiness industry. The Temora Agricultural Innovation Centre, a partnership of Temora Shire Council and FarmLink Research, is a leading centre of excellence for mixed farming research and development. A visit to Ariah Park, 20 minutes west of Temora, is a step back in time, with the well-preserved, heritage main street harking back to the 1920s. The village offers impressive facilities, a museum and shopping including antiques. Springdale also displays the results of a strong community spirit and is perfect for a stopover with excellent amenities. Temora has a long and proud association with aviation. During WWII, it was the base for the No.10 Elementary Flying Training School, the largest operated by the Royal Australian Air Force. Now it is home to the internationally acclaimed Temora Aviation Museum, an outstanding facility with one of the world’s best collections of flying historic aircraft. Regular aircraft showcase days provide an interactive and memorable experience. Temora also has an aviation estate, which offers its residents a unique lifestyle with direct access from residence to runway.

Backed by a strong and proactive council, it is a vibrant shire looking confidently to the future.

The award-winning Temora Rural Museum, with its many interesting collections and exhibits, pays tribute to Australia’s rural heritage. It is located in the Bundawarrah Centre, which also houses the Visitor Information Centre and NSW Ambulance Museum. Experience the hospitality of the state’s friendliest town while enjoying some of the many activities and events year round. From aeroplanes to jet boats, harness racing to theatre, extensive sporting options and a thriving arts community, there is something to appeal to all. Enjoy Temora’s picturesque Lake Centenary, magnificent parks and gardens, recreation centre with heated pool, boutique cinema, and stunning heritage buildings and architecture. Temora is also an RV friendly town and will host its inaugural RV Muster in April. Backed by a strong and proactive council, it is a vibrant shire looking confidently to the future, exemplified by the recent opening of a new medical precinct, adding to outstanding facilities in health, education, aged care and recreation. A progressive attitude to new development underpins a healthy local economy with a growing mix of excellent retail, industrial, agricultural and service businesses. There are plenty of inviting accommodation options in the shire, and a tempting line-up of eateries, from great cafes, to classic pub fare and fine dining. Visitors and new residents can be assured a warm welcome from a community proud to share the many wonderful aspects of a rural lifestyle and tourist destination among the best in the country! CWL TEMORA CWL 15


Best of both WORLDS A PERFECT BALANCE OF TIME-HONOURED TRADITION AND PROGRESSIVE THINKING PROMISES A BRIGHT FUTURE FOR TEMORA.

“This spirit of warmth and welcome echoes throughout our community.”

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TEMORA

MUSIC • FOOD • ADRENALINE SPORT • HERITAGE • CULTURE

SIGN UP TO OUR MONTHLY ‘WHAT’S ON’ GUIDE WWW.TEMORA.COM.AU TEMORA CWL 17


TEMORA

Days gone by

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TEMORA

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TEMORA

FLIGHT of FANCY A WORLD-CLASS COLLECTION OF 14 MILITARY AIRCRAFT THAT SERVED AUSTRALIAN TROOPS FROM WORLD WAR II TO VIETNAM HAS BECOME TEMORA’S TRUMP CARD IN THE TOURISM STAKES.

D

ecades after they were consigned to the scrapyard, the restored vintage aircraft, or “Warbirds”, attract more than 30,000 visitors a year to the Temora Aviation Museum. And the big difference with other museums around the world is that most of these aircraft are actually flown. The visionary behind the collection, and indeed the museum, is David Lowy, son of billionaire Frank Lowy, of Westfield Shopping Centre fame, and he is a man who doesn’t do things by halves. His commitment to the project is motivated by his father’s history and the story of the Holocaust survivor who arrived in Australia as a penniless immigrant before carving out his fortune. David possesses the same dogged determination to make things happen. Having become fascinated by aerobatics, he didn’t rest until he’d become national champion. It was this focus that saw him establish the museum, built in stages and dedicated to aircraft and pilots who defended Australia. Temora Aerodrome ticked all the boxes for this one-of-a-kind attraction - rich in aviation history, an encouraging and cooperative local council, good weather, flat terrain and uncontrolled air space below 20,000 feet. The first hangar was completed in early 2000. The museum opened for public viewing later that year while construction commenced on the exhibition buildings, a theatrette, gift shop, children’s playground and picnic area.

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The final stage of the complex was completed three years later with the opening of a massive display hangar, which houses all the aircraft. All are maintained in pristine working condition and taken out for regular air shows. The museum exhibits include Unsung Heroes, The History of the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation, The Magic of Flight, The RAAF in Korea and CAC Sabre. There are also tributes to the Martin Baker Ejection Seats and the Women’s Australian Auxiliary Air Force. The most fascinating display, to the locals at least, is the history of No.10 Elementary Flying Training School, set up by the Royal Australian Air Force in May 1941. No.10 EFTS was the largest of all the flying schools scattered throughout the country, with 2741 young recruits earning their wings on 97 de Havilland Tiger Moth aircraft. Four satellite airfields were set up around the district to cope with the demand to train the RAAF pilots. In March 1946, it became the last flying school to close. Since then, Temora has continued its aviation heritage, becoming the preferred airfield for a growing number of sport aviation activities including gliding, parachuting, aerobatics, ultra-light aircraft operations and model aircraft. >


TEMORA

Temora has continued its aviation heritage, becoming the preferred airfield for a growing number of sport aviation activities.

Facing page: The Supermarine Spitfire Mk VIII. Clockwise from left: The Lockheed Hudson; Big crowds converged at the 2015 Warbirds Downunder Show; the CA-13 Boomerang; General Manager Peter Harper.

TEMORA CWL 21


TEMORA

Temora Aerodrome ticked all the boxes for this one­-of-a-kind attraction rich in aviation history, an encouraging and cooperative local council, good weather, flat terrain and uncontrolled air space below 20,000 feet. Above: Volunteers Malcolm Chaplin and John Ricket; Temora’s No.10 Elementary Flying Training School during WW2; engineers Marty Lancaster and David Finch at work on the Hudson Bomber. Below: The Temora Aviation Museum; Jenny Manning from the gift shop.

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TEMORA

TEMORA AIR SHOWS Around 20 days each year the Temora Aviation Museum celebrates its existence with a flying day, when many of its military aircraft are put through their paces. The entertainment is superbly organised and designed to appeal to everyone from experts to novices. With great views, excellent commentary and interviews with the pilots, there is something for everyone. “Warbirds Downunder” is held every two years, with the next one staged for 2018. It is Australia’s largest gathering of “Warbird” aircraft and provides a colourful history lesson. Stars of the show are the Dh-82A Tiger Moth, CA-16 Wirraway and CA-13 Boomerang. Most afternoons end with a display from the Vietnam War era, which combines a slow-flying small Cessna 0-2A, some spectacular aerial displays and a dramatic victory roll from a Cessna A37B Dragonfly. The highlight, however, is always the flight of one or both of the museum’s Spitfires. The design beauty of this small plane and the distinctive roar of its Rolls-Royce Merlin engine conjures images of the Battle of Britain and the tragic loss of life of the young men who flew them into battle. The museum holds the only two flying Spitfires in the country. The Spitfire Mk VIII was donated to the Museum by David Lowy in 2000, and the Supermarine Spitfire Mk XVI, which flew 12 sorties over Germany and was subsequently used in the films Reach for the Sky and Battle of Britain, was purchased in 2006. At the end of a flying day the barriers are taken down and spectators can walk out onto the tarmac in front of the viewing area and talk to the pilots and inspect the planes. General manager Peter Harper is part of the 14-strong team at the museum, including five aircraft engineers, a salesperson in the gift shop, three in administration and gardeners and maintenance personnel. The former firefighter, born and raised in Temora, loves the fact that the museum is constantly evolving, as new aircraft appear and old models are painstakingly restored in the workshop. From his upstairs office he enjoys a marvellous view of work carried out on the aircraft. Right now he’s watching the Museum’s Hudson Bomber - the only flying Hudson in the world - being fitted out with two new engines. “On flying days you might meet a few of the old veterans who once flew these historic aircraft,”he says. “The new batch of pilots, who cut their teeth on anything from crop dusters to F-111s, are equally as happy to share their passion with anyone keen to listen.” Next time you hear the distinctive throb of a Spitfire going through its paces somewhere over Temora’s sprawling wheat belt, quietly marvel at one of the greatest flying machines ever produced and perhaps even spare a thought for those pilots and engineers who worked and flew these aircraft during the darkest days of WW2. CWL Aerial images courtesy of Gavin Conroy

Above from top: CA-16 Wirraway; RAAF CA-27 Sabre; Gloster Meteor F.8.

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Familiar territory KEN AND IRENE HARPLEY’S PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE ARE ALL IN ONE HANDY LOCATION.

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emora childhood sweethearts Ken and Irene Harpley never strayed too far from home – about a block and a half, at a pinch.

Not many couples can say that, but the truth is they grew up literally around the corner of their eye-catching home, “Bodalia”, on the rise of Vesper Street. The two first met in the 1950s as young children living across the road from each other. After 50 years of marriage, four children and five grandchildren, Ken and Irene are enjoying their retirement years in the house they’ve always had a soft spot for. As teenagers they often spied on the old place, enthralled with its old-world charm, windmill and tank stand, plus the fact it stood so majestically on a two-acre block at the very top of the road.

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It’s always been one of those houses in town you just can’t miss – as any local motorist will attest – despite most of the home being shrouded behind a massive hedge, signs and a nice planting of trees. Rumours that it was haunted only added to the house’s mystique. When it came up for auction 16 years ago the Harpleys were the first on the scene. As a small crowd assembled, Ken cast one final eye over the property but shook his head, conceding there was too much work involved. With hands firmly entrenched in his pocket, the property was passed in at auction before selling to a local builder, who started long-overdue renovations to the front verandah. Over the following months, Ken often dropped in to see how things were progressing. One evening he revealed that he and Irene had been secretly eyeing off the place for years. >


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IT’S ALWAYS BEEN one of those houses IN TOWN YOU JUST can’t miss.

Although this little bit of information came as a surprise to the builder, he was nonetheless prepared to move onto other projects, leaving Ken and Irene to become only the third family to live in the home since it was built at the turn of the 20th century. “The actual age of the house remains a contentious issue,” Ken says with a sigh. “I’ve got an old photograph of the building when it was first built and the writing on the front indicates 1903. It was given to me by the grandson of the McCrones, the people that built and lived here until about 1937.” They eventually sold it, complete with furniture, to the Coleman family, who made it home until the Harpleys became the latest custodians. Ken knew only too well the house needed a lot of work before moving in but this time there was no turning back. The kitchen was virtually a “black hole” and the bathroom very basic. Both were totally overhauled after 10 months of hard work by themselves and family members. Ken has always loved gardening and enjoys growing and nurturing anything that has strong shades of green. His other great passion is painting. He painted the place before they moved in, some sections twice since then, and is about to start all over again. “When I first began, we were washing the walls and discovered it was just chalk paint, with the original colours still there underneath. Apart from one room inside, we’ve used the original colours that the house was painted in 100 years ago.” Reaching high points can be hazardous. Ken, now 73, only recently fell from a ladder and bruised his back. Irene’s pleas for Ken to refrain from climbing ladders seem to have fallen on deaf ears. Ken’s always had a steely determination to finish what he starts, a trait that saw him spend the last 20 years of his working life managing a nursery for Jeff Cornford, following a decade of running his own nursery and florist, Occasionally Yours. Irene, meanwhile, trained at Royal North Shore Hospital before nursing at the Temora and District Hospital. She finished her career with a long and enjoyable 32-year stint as an RN at the Temora Medical Centre. Irene admits her dream was always to end up in a cosy, old home on a decent-sized block. When she’s not tending to her quilting, you’ll often find her sitting out on the back verandah, reflecting on her growing family. It’s calm and peaceful, especially in the cooler winter months. Sometimes Ken will join her and they will reminisce, sometimes about their life-long friendship but always about the big old house on the hill. CWL 26 CWL TEMORA


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SCREEN LEGENDS FOR THE ULTIMATE CINEMATIC EXPERIENCE, LOCALS AND VISITORS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO A NIGHT AT THE MOVIES, TEMORA-STYLE.

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emora Town Hall Theatre, right in the heart of town, is a community-based facility, owned by Council and operated by the community it serves. It blends state-of-the-art facilities (including Blue Ray or DVD with high quality 7.1 Dolby Digital surround sound) with country hospitality. Patrons get to sit back in one of the 82 reclining theatre seats to enjoy Friday Night Flicks or perhaps a Sunday afternoon matinee. Six weekly screenings (and 10 during school holidays) accommodate all moviegoers. Expect to be greeted by ticket sellers, ushers, candy bar assistants and a projectionist – all volunteers rostered on each session. Most undergo training, are provided with a uniform and perform six hours’ duty each month in return for free movie admission.

EXPECT TO BE GREETED BY TICKET SELLERS, USHERS, CANDY BAR ASSISTANTS AND A PROJECTIONIST – ALL VOLUNTEERS ROSTERED ON EACH SESSION.

The Mayor’s mother, Beth Firman, is one of the 30 adult volunteers, with ushers drawn from a pool of about 20 mostly school students.

The Movie Club appeals to film lovers, with the showing of foreign, art house features or some of the old classics of the silver screen.

Beth says the movie-going experience in Temora is still exciting seven years after it was first launched. The “special” nights, with champagne on arrival, are held about eight times a year and not to be missed.

The local group is so committed it won the national award for the animated movie Cars. There was a fellow dressed up in racing gear, surrounded by chequered finishing flags, special T-shirts and even a little red sports car out the front.

“It’s great fun and you have the chance to meet people you’d never normally meet,” she says. “When we first started the ladies got dressed up in fur coats, but not so much these days.”

With professional lighting, the theatre also doubles as a performing stage and is popular for conferences and lectures.

It’s also perfect for kids’ birthday parties, school fundraisers, sporting and community groups. Take advantage of the quality facilities for your next work function or become involved as a volunteer. Either way, you won’t be disappointed. CWL Above: Robert and Sue James love going to the movies; Georgia Campbell, Mark McClintock, Lyn James and Frances Dwyer; James and Kathleen Broad are regular cinema goers; Ajit and Nuala Kamath; volunteers Beth Firman, Trevor Player and Jenny Devereux. TEMORA CWL 27


A tribute to TEMORA TEMORA’S RURAL MUSEUM TELLS THE CAPTIVATING STORIES OF THE TOWN IN COLOURFUL DETAIL.

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emora’s Rural Museum is one of the region's finest tourist attractions. Located in a vast landscaped area, which includes the Visitor Information Centre, the museum boasts a growing number of excellent exhibitions.

The town’s gold mining past is recalled by the Pirate King mine’s fivehead ore crusher and a replica of the huge “Mother Shipton nugget”.

The museum’s ebullient general manager, Bill Spiers, says the chance of sharing history with visitors is an important part of the job.

The unusual Ambulance Museum is a combined effort from ambulance organisations in NSW and the ACT and features vehicles and equipment from the past 120 years, while the collection of rocks and minerals is a gift from Athol Stean, who spent his life accumulating the impressive collection.

A gifted storyteller, Bill has an intimate knowledge of virtually every single piece on the grounds, all delivered in an informative and engaging style.

Perhaps most impressive, for those who remember, is the memorabilia of the famous boxing promoter and showman Jimmy Sharman.

His infectious personality and genuine passion for keeping alive the stories of various old treasures is contagious. A good place to start is a walk through the Tomb of the Old Tractors – the ones that replaced the once mighty Clydesdale as the beast of burden on the land. There’s an array of them, both restored and working, along with stationary engines and farm machinery. In the grounds surrounding the museum is a collection of buildings, including a hardwood slab cottage that was Sir Donald Bradman’s first home, a worker’s cottage restored to reflect life in the 1920s, a one-room public school, bush church, public hall, printing works and flour mill. 28 CWL TEMORA

It’s all a very natural fit for Bill, who has enjoyed 12 years in the manager’s chair. His history with the museum, however, goes much further back to 1981, when he started out as a committed volunteer. A life-long interest in all things historical, combined with the skills developed during an innovative three decades of farming and community leadership roles in the P&C, scouting, progress and heritage committees and the church, have all helped him serve the museum well. Two significant developments in recent years have seen the extension in museum hours to open all day, every day, and a pro-active approach to attracting like-minded community organisations to share the museum site. The Family History Group, Men’s Shed, Visitor Information Centre and local radio station have all made the move.


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The museum has brought many locals together and continues to inspire and bring joy to so many. In the end, it’s a community project that’s having a positive impact on all who tread her hallowed grounds. The Bundawarrah Centre, the brainchild of Bill and Temora Shire engineer Fabio Giacomin, houses a temporary exhibition gallery and function centre, allowing the museum to host a wide range of community events. The Temora Fire Brigade Exhibition, Wagon Shed, Shearing Shed, Header Shed, Rural Fire Service Exhibition and Temora Ambulance Museum have all been added to the complex within the past decade. Closest to Bill’s heart are the subterranean Temora Community Archive and Willo’s Wiradjuri Keeping Place, each an eloquent and practical expression of his deep personal commitment to preserving and sharing his community’s collective heritage. You’ll often find Bill in his office, up to his ears in papers, or down in the storage bunker, home to priceless documents, books, journals, newspapers and old photographs. Soaking up so much history has made Bill Spiers another jewel in this national treasure. The museum is open from 9.30am to 5pm daily. Check out www.temoraruralmuseum.com or phone (02) 6977 1086 for further information. CWL

Facing page clockwise from top left: Temora locals Dale McIntosh and Jane Gilbert learn crochet from teacher Jean Luck at the Bundawarrah Centre; Keen local historian and museum manager Bill Spiers; The Men’s Shed has 60 followers including Jeff Sargood, Jack Oliver, Jeff Cornford, Horrie Mortlock, Brian Sandow, Adden Baker, Gavin Abra and Tom Haines.

TEMORA AMBULANCE MUSEUM Showcasing the heritage of the Ambulance Service in Australia

A feature exhibition of the TEMORA RURAL MUSEUM A beautifully presented showcase of Australia’s changing country lifestyle Other highlights: Sir Donald Bradman’s First Home, Temora Rock & Mineral Museum, Willo’s Wiradjuri Keeping Place, A working collection of tractors & stationary engines

Open 7 days: 9-30am to 5-00pm Group bookings welcome | Catering available Annual Exhibition 2nd Saturday of March each year 29 Junee Rd., TEMORA | Tel. 02 69 771 291 Email: ruralmuseum@temora.nsw.gov.au

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Don Bradman was born in Cootamundra – everyone knows that! Indeed he was, but the house in which he was born in Adams Street, was “Irena”, a two-bed “lying in” hospital, run by local midwife Eliza “Granny” Scholz, not his parents’ home, which was on their small farm located half an hour north of the town. Our “Bradman Cottage”, is that family home, dismantled when it had fallen into disrepair, and reconstructed on the present site to closely reflect the 2½-year period when the infant Bradman lived there before his family moved to Bowral in 1911.

IF YOU’VE GOT IT, FLAUNT IT! Why else would anyone give a headstone pride of place in their landscaped grounds half a world away from the grave it commemorates? Quite simply, Marie Narelle was one of us – a very special “one of us”. Born at Combaning into the pioneering Comans family, Molly Ryan was blessed with both a three-octave vocal range of operatic quality and a rich heritage of Irish music upon which to build a career.

“Who’ll take a glove?” Jimmy Sharman’s challenge rang out at country shows up and down the Australian east coast for decades, indeed, for generations! Jimmy began his boxing career in 1906 and he progressed to become the Lightweight Champion of the Riverina in 1910. A year later he became a boxing promoter for bouts in the Star Theatre and in 1912 opened his first boxing tent at the Ardlethan Show. Jimmy Sharman was succeeded by his son, also Jimmy Sharman, in the mid 1950s, who conducted the boxing tent until its close in the early 1970s.

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She made her international debut under the stage name “Marie Narelle”, at the Irish Exhibition in 1902 and went on to repeated tours of the concert halls of Europe and America, promoted as “The Queen of Irish Song”. In 1905 she became the first female vocalist to be successfully recorded by Thomas Edison on his phonograph. She recorded the Irish air Killarney. She married into comfortable circumstances in 1911 and, thereafter, performed mainly for charitable causes, although she continued to record until 1923. Her last public performance was in 1938 in London where she was living with her daughter.


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Central West Lifestyle Autumn 2017 Preview - Issue 16