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TALON

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SPRING 2009

THE MAGAZINE OF CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY

GRADUATIONS

ALUMNI REUNION

CMU’S INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY


To Alumni and Friends of Central Methodist University: This spring semester represents another record enrollment for CMU! At the Fayette campus our 937 is an all-time high for the second semester and is 91 percent of fall enrollment. CGES numbers are up as well and are even showing an increase of 17 percent over just the fall, with 1,199 compared to 1,028 last semester. Our dual credit programs continue to grow, and we anticipated serving some 2,500 by the end of the year. It is deeply gratifying to have this affirmation of appreciation for the quality of our programs and our caring personal attention. This issue features the international or global dimension of the lives of a number of our alumni. Central’s 12,000 living alumni—a relatively small number—are making our world a better place. Central Methodist’s impact is far greater than one might expect from any sample of 12,000 persons from the world’s population. We are also pleased to have more international students at the Fayette campus than we have had for some time, with nearly 20 countries represented. One cannot overstate the importance of learning and serving within an environment that is different from the one in which one grew up. We are all the richer for experiences with persons other than ourselves. We cherish the diversity of our university and value highly the work of those whose lives have taken them far from what was always familiar to them. Central Methodist University students have distinguished themselves in many ways this year. Our Students in Free Enterprise team was rated first runner-up in regional competition. Our Spirit Squad took 2nd, 5th, and 7th place in three components of the national cheerleading competition. Our men’s basketball team was one of the Sweet Sixteen teams at the NAIA Division I national tournament in Kansas City; the team that defeated us (Rocky Mountain

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College in Montana) went on to win the entire competition! Two of our players, Jeff Blauvelt and Matt Sherman, were named All Americans. Nine track team members went to the national meet and performed very creditably. Science students continue to have articles about their faculty-partnered research published in scholarly journals. Our spring band tour was wildly successful. A review team from the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education considers that CMU has met all the state’s standards. All of these credits and more attest to the quality and value of the Central Methodist experience. We are grateful for the many ways that our alumni and friends support our efforts and our outstanding students. We will soon complete the Mabee Athletic Facility and anticipate great usage of this weight room extension to Puckett Fieldhouse. This is the last project in the Campaign for Eagle Athletics and will top off all the other upgrades and developments. In early May we hosted the conference track meet for the second year in a row, hosted the conference baseball tournament, and hosted the conference softball tournament as well, probably doubling the population of Fayette during those times! The athletic director at a sister HAAC school, after touring our facilities recently, said, “Who wouldn’t want to be here!” From all indications and statistics from the admission office, EVERYONE wants to be here!!! Many thanks for all you mean to Central and for the many ways that you contribute to our ongoing growth and development. Central Methodist University is well known and respected everywhere. We are deeply grateful for all who daily live the CMU mission and “make a difference in the world [through] academic and professional excellence, ethical leadership, and social responsibility.”

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Table of Contents

President’s Message................................2 Graduation............................................ 5 Selecman Award  ....................................7 Honors Convocation................................9

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Campus News  ......................................10 V-12 and Reunion Classes......................12 Two to National Choir  ..........................20 Denneny Center Updates........................24 First in Fleer Lecture Serie s............... ....26 Academic Excellence .............................28 Cherry Energizes Radio  . ........................31

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What in the World ...............................38 Facing Facebook ...................................45 Hall of Sponsors...................................52 Athletics..............................................54 Helen Thogmorton’s Legacy....................60

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Alumni News .......................................61

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Senior Administration Dr. Marianne E. Inman, President Dr. Rita Gulstad, Vice President and Dean of the University Kenneth R. Oliver, Vice President for Campus Life, Dean of Students, and Director of Athletics Julee Sherman, Vice President for Finance and  Administration Theresa M. Davis, Vice President for Advancement Chad Gaines, Vice President for Information Services On the cover: Students worked diligently all day removing the shingles from the roof of the shelter house in the Fayette City Park as part of Service Day. Photo by Cathy Thogmorton

Talon Editorial Staff and Contact Information Don Cullimore, Executive Editor 660-248-6238 dcullimo@centralmethodist.edu Cathy Thogmorton, Editor and Graphic Designer 660-248-6391 cthogmor@centralmethodist.edu Tracy Crowe Jones Director of Alumni Relations 660-248-6234 tjones@centralmethodist.edu Jenny Martin Anspach Graphic and Web Designer 660-248-6629 jmartin@centralmethodist Kelcey Zutavern Sports Information Director 660-248-6358 kzutaver@centralmethodist.edu

Things in the tech world here at Central are heating up as summer approaches. We are currently in the process of converting an unused classroom in Stedman Hall to a computer lab. Stedman 308 was cleaned out and repainted during the spring semester and will be completed over the summer. There will be 20 workstations in the new lab, which will be used for computer science courses and other classes that need computer access. Stedman Hall also recently added four computers in the second floor hallway for student use as they pass through the building or in between classes. If you haven’t visited the Central website lately, you should! There is information available about every facet of CMU. The newest additions are located on the bottom right corner of every page—links to all the places Central can be found on the web. A link to Central’s Facebook page, YouTube Channel, and Twitter feed are all available. Facebook is a great way to stay connected (see Melissa Williams’ article in this Talon), and our YouTube channel has all sorts of videos, including walking tours of the Mabee Athletic Facility construction. The Twitter feed is the newest venture and allows people to keep up-to-date with what is happening here on campus in real time through “tweets.” You can subscribe and you’ll receive a “tweet” every time we update our feed. (You can visit our Twitter feed at www.twitter.com/cmuniv.) Also, don’t forget you can sign up to receive alerts (email or text message) about your favorite Eagle sports team or about all CMU athletic teams. Scores will be sent as soon as possible after every game along with other important information, such as time changes or cancellations. You can sign up by visiting the CMU eScores website at www. centralmethodist.edu/cmathletics/escores.html.

Melissa Williams Public Relations Intern

Central Methodist University prepares students to make a difference in the world by emphasizing academic and professional excellence, ethical leadership, and social responsibility. – Mission Statement

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Correction: In the fall 2008 Talon Honor Roll, Jeffrey Kendall Wilcox, in whose memory the “Raising the Bar” award is named, was listed as a 1972 graduate. The correct year is 1992.

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CMU graduates one of largest classes

On Saturday, May 16, Central Methodist University honored one of its largest graduating classes in its 155-year history. Baccalaureate was held in Linn Memorial UMC on the CMU campus and Commencement in Puckett Field House with approximately 203 students from the home campus receiving undergraduate degrees and 13 receiving Master of Education degrees. Twenty more students from CMU’s Extended Studies Program, including its regional campuses in Sedalia and Columbia, also received undergraduate degrees during commencement at Fayette. Three students graduated summa cum laude, including Heather Gibson, Lyndi Fuemmeler, and Katelyn Bass (in two degrees). Approximately 261 more students will receive undergraduate or graduate degrees later this school year from CMU’s regional campuses in Union and Park Hills and, through Central’s RN to BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) program, at St. Anthony’s Hospital in St. Louis. Baccalaureate speaker was the Rev. Sue Watson, an ad-

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Scenes from graduation include (clockwise from upper left): the procession to Baccalaureate; Katie Dove (l) and Kiley Lewis line up; processing to Commencement, including Whalen George (in front), who would shortly be named the Selecman Award winner; The Rev. Sue Watson, who delivered the address at Baccalaureate.

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1977 graduate of Central Methodist College (CMU) with a bachelor’s degree in English literature. She received her master’s degree in English literature from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1980. After living some years in Oberlin, Ohio, Jacobs returned to Fayette in 1999 to take an active role in the family banking business. She currently serves as chair of the board as well as executive vice president and trust officer of Commercial Trust Company in Fayette. She is a member of the Board of Trustees of Central Methodist University and has served several terms on the board since 1996. She currently serves as chair of the Trustees’ Committee on Advancement and Alumni Relations. ministrator with the Missouri Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. She graduated cum laude from Central Methodist College (CMU) in 1981 with a bachelor’s degree in religion and philosophy. She later graduated with honors from Saint Paul School of Theology with a Master of Divinity degree. She is the director of the Center for Pastoral Excellence of the Missouri Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. A United Methodist pastor since 1982, Watson is the first female director of the Annual Conference. An ordained Elder in the United Methodist Church, she has served on the Board of Ordained Ministry and on the appointive cabinet. She also served as superintendent of the Ozarks North District for five years from 2002-2007. Other previous appointments include New Hope United Methodist Church in Arnold, Centralia United Methodist Church, and Immanuel United Methodist Church in Canton. Janet L. Jacobs was Commencement speaker. She is a Photos, clockwise from upper left: Honors Program graduates Christopher Janssen, Wendy Dickey, and Laura Williams (r) pose with Dr. Richard Bradley; President Inman presents a diploma; students come down the final steps toward graduation; Lindsey Williams celebrates afterward; Josh Reed (l), Dan Kreienheder, and Kyle McClain await Baccalaureate; Megan Hess, chair of the Division of Health Professions, pins one of 29 new nurses in a special ceremony Friday night for the BSN graduates; Janet Jacobs makes some last minute notes on her way to deliver the Commencement address.

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Whalen George honored with Selecman Award The Selecman Award is the highest honor that a graduating senior can receive from Central Methodist University. That honor went to Whalen G. George, who received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication during Commencement May 16. Whalen was selected by vote of the faculty. Criteria for selection include exemplary scholarship, outstanding leadership, exceptional service, and commitment to the values and ideals of Central Methodist University. The award, established in 1957, is named in honor of Bishop Charles C. Selecman, Central alumnus of 1898 and later a member of the Board of Curators. “He’s amazing,” says Dr. Kristin Cherry, assistant professor of communication. “The very first day Whalen came into my office, he already knew what he wanted to do. He’s been a leader. His level of energy and enthusiasm is amazing.” In the presentation of the Selecman Award to Whalen, it was noted that he had been an extraordinarily active student during his four years on the CMU campus. While attaining a 3.1 grade point average, he also was a member of the CMU Football Team and lettered all four years and served as the “Voice of the Eagle” announcer for CMU Basketball Team games during the past two years. He also served on CMU’s Champions of Character Council and was selected in May as CMU’s Male Student-Athlete Champions of Character Award winner. The Student-Athlete Champions of Character Council was established at Central Methodist in 2007 to enhance the total student-athlete experience at CMU. Council members do this by promoting the opportunity for all aspiring student-athletes to participate in athletics; protecting studentathlete welfare; and fostering a positive studentathlete image, while maintaining the five core

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values of the NAIA Champions of Character Program: Sportsmanship, Responsibility, Servant Leadership, Respect and Integrity. When the NAIA established the Champions of Character program in 2000, Central Methodist was the first institution in the Heart of America Athletic Conference and one of only 31 institutions in the NAIA to receive this designation. Other campus involvements by Whalen have included service on the Student Government Association, the campus Religious Life Committee, and as an orientation leader with the fall semester classes of incoming freshmen. He was also a member of the Residence Life Staff, serving as a resident assistant, was a leader of the Tuesday Chapel Service during his junior and senior years, and sang with the “Brothers United in Praise.” As a communications major, Whalen was one of the students involved in the revitalization of the campus radio station – Eagle Radio – and its transition this past year from a low-power AM station that barely reached beyond the campus to an Internet Radio station that can be heard around the world. This fall, Whalen, who is from Poplar Bluff, Mo., will return to campus as the CMU Director of Campus Ministry for the 2009-10 academic year. In this capacity, he will continue to serve on the campus Religious Life Committee and will also coordinate campus activities such as the Tuesday Chapel Service and the activities of campus spiritual organizations.

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CMU at Park Hills holds 18th annual commencement Dr. Marianne E. Inman, CMU president, and Dr. Rita Gulstad, CMU vice president and dean, conferred degrees May 9 at the Central Methodist University-Park Hills Commencement in the Mineral Area College (MAC) field house. Central Methodist University-Park Hills began classes in 1989 on the MAC campus. Dr. Steven Kurtz, president of Mineral Area College, presented greetings to the largest class of graduates in the history of CMU-Park Hills. One hundred-fifty-five Baccalaureate degrees, seven Master of Education degrees and 11 Master of Science degrees in Clinical Counseling were conferred. Bachelor of Arts or Science degrees were awarded in Accounting, Business, Child Development, Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, General Studies, Human Services, Mathematics, Nursing, Public Administration, Psychology and Sociology. Veteran Missouri corrections official George Lombardi was the keynote speaker. Lombardi, who has been with the Department of Corrections for 33 years, was appointed director in January. Prior to his appointment as director of the Department of Corrections, Lombardi served as the director of the Division of Adult Institutions for 18 years. He was responsible for 21 adult correctional institutions throughout Missouri, en8

compassing more than 8,600 staff and 30,500 inmates. He is a past warden of two correctional institutions. Lombardi served on the Board of Directors and as chairman of the Criminal Justice Task Force for the Missouri Association of Social Welfare. He is a past president of the Missouri Corrections Association and has served as an auditor for the Commission of Accreditation for Corrections. He has lectured on criminal justice matters at the American Corrections Association, Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, colleges and universities and civic organizations. Lombardi has also co-authored two articles: “Mainstreaming Death-Sentenced Inmates” and “Peer Interaction Training for Correctional Administrators.” He earned a bachelor of science degree and master’s in psychology from Central Missouri State University (now University of Central Missouri). Photos, above left: President Inman hands out diplomas to graduates; left: Director of the Department of Corrections George Lombardi gave the Commencement address; below: students file into the gymnasium; above: a group of graduate students, delighted to have received their Master of Science degrees in Clinical Counseling.

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Campus news

Honors Convocation recognizes top students and faculty The Central community came together in April to honor the best and the brightest of CMU students and faculty during the 2009 Honors Convocation. More than 100 students were praised for exceptional work in their fields of study and for supporting the lives and activities of all students on campus. Two of the university’s three highest general honors were presented. The Victoria Award, which recognizes exceptional grades and representation of the ideals of CMU, was bestowed on senior accounting major Heather Gibson. She also earned the Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) Leadership Award, the Outstanding Senior Business and Economic Award, and a CMU Alumni Association Award, and holds memberships Heather Gibson in the honor societies of Sigma Epsilon Pi and Alpha Chi. The Human Relations Award went to senior Katelyn Bass, also an accounting major. The award recognizes the graduate who shows the most promise in the area of human relations. Bass also took home the Susan Estill Award for Total Business Excellence and holds membership in the honor sociKatelyn Bass ety of Sigma Epsilon Pi. Central Methodist University’s highest student honor, the Selecman Award, will be presented at Commencement. Other top award winners included Jordan Rustemeyer, a senior history major, who was honored as the Smiley Library Fellow and received the Harold W. Sunoo History Award, a CMU Alumni Association Award, and holds membership in Sigma Epsilon Pi; senior Todd Jordan Rustemeyer

Borgmann, a music education major, who received the W. D. Settle Memorial Music Education Award, the Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Scholastic Award, and a Red Apple Award; Mason Rivers, a junior

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Todd Borgmann

music education major, who received the Raney-Winter C-MENC Award, the newly established R. Paul Drummond Award and was honored as the Swinney Conservatory Choral Fellow; and Tenderano (Tendie) Muzorewa, a junior mathematics major, who won the Dr. Richard T. Bond Mathematics Award, the Kappa Mu Epsilon Mathematics Mason Rivers Award, and the Glen C. Riegel Student Science Award. On the faculty side, the highest teaching honor presented by Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK), the Chester Hanson Master Teacher Award, was bestowed upon Sally Hackman, associate professor of business and accounting. She has taught at CMU since 1999. The Glen C. Tendie Muzorewa Riegel Faculty Science Award was presented to Greg Thurmon, assistant professor of biology, in his second year of teaching at CMU. Thurmon also was awarded the ODK Harold Momberg Gold Chalk Award for teaching. A second Gold Chalk Award was presented to Dr. John Porter, assistant professor of English since 2006 and co-director of the First Year Program. The Exemplary Teacher Award from the United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry was presented to John Flanders, professor of business and economics and co-director of the First Year Program. Flanders has taught at CMU since 1981. The ODK Award for the outstanding staff member of the year went to Wally Eaton, a member of CMU’s plant maintenence crew. Above, l-r: John Flanders, Sally Hackman Below: Greg Thurmon, John Porter

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Campus news

Inman elected president of university senate

Dr. Marianne E. Inman, president of CMU, has been elected president of the University Senate of the United Methodist Church, an oversight body for the schools and colleges related to the United Methodist Church. Inman was elected to the position during the annual organizational meeting of the University Senate in late January. Her term of office will run from 2009 through 2012. “Colleges and universities related to the United Methodist Church make a substantial difference in the lives

of students and in the betterment of society,” Inman says. The University Senate is committed to standards of quality and strong values. United Methodist-related colleges are evaluated and reviewed by the University Senate of the United Methodist Church. This elected body of professionals in higher education evaluates schools, colleges, universities, and theological schools using the following categories: institutional integrity, program quality, sound management, and clearly defined church relationships. Prior to becoming CMU president in July 1995, Dr. Inman served as vice president and dean at Northland College in Ashland, Wis. Other academic positions held by Inman were at Alaska Pacific University in Anchorage, Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, and Tehran University in Iran. She serves as a peer reviewer for the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools and is a member of several national higher education

boards in addition to the University Senate of the United Methodist Church. Inman is past president of the Independent Colleges and Universities of Missouri and is chair of the board of the Missouri Humanities Council. She is currently chair of the Presidential Advisory Committee for the Missouri Coordinating Board for Higher Education. She serves on the board of the Great Rivers Council of Boy Scouts and contributed to the President’s Commission on Foreign Language and International Studies. She was also selected as a Kellogg Foundation National Fellow and has attended senior administrative institutes at Harvard University. Inman holds a doctorate in Foreign Language Education from the University of Texas, Austin. She earned her master’s degree in French Literature and Linguistics from Indiana University and a bachelor’s degree in French, Spanish, and English secondary education from Purdue University.

President Inman Honored as Community Leader Central Methodist University President Marianne area business economy.” E. Inman was honored as the Significant campus imBusiness Leader of the Year provements include the con2009 by the Fayette Rotary struction of the new Student Club on May 13. The award, and Community Center which given annually to outstandopened in 2005, the total ing business and community refurbishment and expanleaders in Fayette, is voted on sion of CMU athletic facilities, by members of the Club. and major improvements to “Dr. Inman’s selection,” residence halls and academic says fellow Rotarian James buildings during the past (Jim) Steele ’64, “acknowledgeight years. Steele also noted es the strong leadership she Inman’s long history of active has demonstrated as president involvement in Fayette comof CMU during a major period munity affairs. of campus plant improveFayette Rotary began Rotarian Jim Steele presents award to Dr. Inman. ments and increased enrollment the Business and Community and as a community leader in efforts to improve the Leader of the Year award in 1984. 10

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Campus news

Wiegers honored by scouts CMU Professor of History Robert P. (Bob) Wiegers was honored for his many years of involvement as a scouting leader Feb. 7 when he received the Boonslick District Award of Merit from the Great Rivers Council of the Boy Scouts of America. The Great Rivers Council oversees scouting programs in a 33-county area in north and central Missouri. The Boonslick District serves Howard, Cooper and Boone Counties. Wiegers has worked tirelessly through the years to make sure that Fayette, Howard County, the Boonslick District and Great Rivers Council have an excellent scouting program, says Joy Flanders, a fellow scouting leader and colleague of Wiegers at CMU, who was an earlier recipient of the District Award of Merit.

An Eagle Scout himself, Wiegers, has served several scout councils around the world, including the Far Eastern Council and the European Council, including both Germany and Ethiopia. Wiegers is a tenured professor of history at Central Methodist University, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1989 and advises Alpha Phi Omega (APO), a national service fraternity that follows the principles of the Boy Scouts. He is a retired National Guard Officer and a member of the Missouri Society for Military History, and the Fayette Round Table. He holds a master’s degree from Boston University and a master’s and doctorate in anthropology from the University of MissouriColumbia.

Dr. Wiegers as he interviewed members of the V-12 reunion group in April

Carter to publish new book

Dr. John Carter

John J. Carter, professor of history and political science at CMU since 1980, has taken a half-time sabbatical to complete a new manuscript. Titled American Intelligence’s Nazi Connections: A Revisionist Perspective on the Early Cold War, it is slated for publication in late 2009 by Edwin Mellen Press of Lewiston, New York. Carter studied political science and literature at Westminster College

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and holds graduate degrees in political science from the University of Central Missouri and the University of Missouri. He is the author of a number of works on the history of American intelligence policy, including Covert Operations as a Tool of Presidential Foreign Policy in American History From 1800 to 1920 (2000); Covert Operations and the Emergence of the Modern Presidency, 1920-1960 (2002); and Covert Action as a Tool of Presidential Foreign Policy: From the Bay of Pigs to Iran-Contra. Carter’s current book explores the history and ramifications of the employment of former Nazi intelligence officers by the American intelligence community during that critical period of the Cold War, from the fall of Berlin through the end of the Eisenhower administration. The central hypothesis of the work is that the Nazi connection forged during the tumultuous climax of WWII in Europe became a key weakness at the core of America’s Cold War intelligence community.

At its outset most of those privy to this arrangement seem to have agreed that the relationship was necessary in order to allow the United States and her post-war allies to quickly respond to the ominous Soviet threat in Europe and elsewhere. Later, it became clear that many of those former Nazi networks that American intelligence was relying on had long been penetrated by the Soviet Union’s intelligence services. This Soviet penetration effectively compromised many of the efforts by the Western Alliance to contain and rollback Communism throughout Europe and around the globe. The unwillingness of the leadership of the American intelligence community to openly confront the root cause of this catastrophe, and thereby contain its most negative consequences for American national security, offers some new and potentially instructive insights into the shaping of American national security policy during the early Cold War period.

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Alumni and V-12 have memorable reunions Alumni Reunion 2009 was a thoroughly enjoyable weekend. Many gathered on campus to honor the classes of 1939, 1944, 1949, 1954, and the U.S. Naval V-12 units. Over the course of the three-day event, more than 75 alumni and friends gathered on campus to join in the celebration. Events began Friday, as professors opened up their classes for alumni to attend and relive part of the college experience. Friday afternoon, students gave a video presentation showing some of the underwater sights from the scuba diving experience they had during a study abroad trip to Roatan, Honduras. There was also a forum held where more than a dozen students and alumni shared stories from their times at Central. An alumni dinner was held in the Student and Community Center that evening. On Saturday many activities took place, including campus tours and multiple opportunities to see CMU sports teams in action. Dr. Inman gave a presentation on the future of the University. The reunion class luncheon had representation from the classes of 1944, 1949, 1954, and the V-12, as well as other classmates, and members of the Founders Circle were recognized. One highlight of Saturday was the four-hands piano recital given by Paul Kueter ’47, V-12, and his wife, Carolle-Ann Mochernuck. The annual alumni awards banquet was held Saturday night. (See related article, p. 14.) Reunion was a special time for the alumni from the V-12 units assigned to Central Methodist. Many V-12ers, spouses and friends gathered in the Eagle Lounge for an afternoon of reminiscing and catching up. Dr. Inman also dedicated the V-12 Memorial Hall of Sponsors scholarship, which was fully funded by members of the V-12 units. The men received an unexpected treat by the attendance of Kay “Katy” (Assel) Koenig ’46, who was one of two waitresses in their dining hall in McMurry. Events culminated with church and brunch on Sunday. It was a lovely weekend and the campus was once more filled with Central alumni gathering to celebrate their time spent as students and their successes in the years since.

Clockwise from above: Carolle-Ann Mochernuck and her husband, Paul Kueter ’47, a V-12 alumnus, presented “A Recital for Piano, Four-Hands”; Kay (Assel) ’46 and Louis Koenig ’46 won a prize for coming the farthest to reunion at the Saturday luncheon; alumni and students gathered in the Eyrie Café to discuss Central “then and now.”

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Class photos from reunion weekend

CLASS OF 1944: Rebecca (Means) Jones (l) and Anna Mae (Besgrove) Hodge

CLASS OF 1949 (above): (l-r) Louis Koenig, Bob Easterday, Mary (Gaines) Easterday, and Pat (Brown) Robertson

CLASS OF 1954 (left): (l-r) Thomas Yancey, Tom Atkin, Joy Drewel, and Bill Winter

V-12 REUNION CLASS (below): (l-r) John Johnson, Carl Niewoehner, Bob Cosgrove, Katy (Assel) Koenig, Al Hair, Bob Radasch, and Bob Bower. During the celebration Al Hair presented each returning member with one of his hand-carved walking sticks.

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Five honored with alumni awards

Honored alumni included (l-r) Dr. Bedford Knipschild, Beverly Boehmer, Dr. Jessica Quint, Maida McCormack, and Joe McCormack.

Alumni and good friends were honored by Central Methodist University at an April 25 Alumni Awards banquet and ceremony, the highpoint of spring reunion ceremonies at the University. The alumni awards are among the University’s highest honors. Recipients of the Distinguished Alumni Award were Dr. Bedford F. Knipschild ’50 of Marshall, Mo., a physician and community activist, and Beverly (Brase) Boehmer ’68 of Springfield, Mo., conference coordinator of youth and college ministries for the Missouri Conference of the United Methodist Church. Receiving the University Service Award were husband and wife Joseph M. (Joe) and Maida McCormack (Friends of the University) of Ballwin, Mo., long-time supporters of higher education and Central Methodist University. Receiving the Young Alumni Award was Dr. Jessica L. (Grasdorf) Quint ’97 of Fayette, Mo., a dentist and community activist. The Distinguished Alumni Award is presented annually to former CMU students who have distinguished themselves in their professions and in their service to the university and to society. The College Service Award is presented to individuals being recognized for “exceptional, extensive and extraordinary” service to Central Methodist University over a period of years. 14

The Young Alumni Award is presented annually to alumni who have been out of the University fewer than 15 years and have strong commitments to community and university service and have demonstrated high personal achievements.

Dr. Bedford Knipschild Dr. Bedford Knipschild is a retired family-practice physician, community activist and supporter of Central Methodist University. A native of Norborne, Mo., he served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Dr. Knipschild attended Central Methodist University from 1946 to 1948 as a chemistry major. He earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Southern Methodist University in 1950 and undertook a year of graduate studies in chemistry at the University of Missouri. He earned his medical degree from Northwestern University in 1955. Following graduation from medical school, he began a more than 40-year career as a private-practice physician in Marshall and also served as a Missouri Valley College physician until he retired recently. He also served as the Saline County coroner for 38 years. During those years, he created the Free Clinic at the local Public Health office and ran it for 12 years. He also served on the Marshall Public Education Foundation, a non-profit organization that solic-

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its donations to meet new program challenges that enhance the academic programs of the local public school district. Since retirement, Dr. Knipschild has served as co-chair of the Marshall YMCA Capital Building Fund and as cochair of the Fitzgibbon Hospital Capital Building Fund for a cancer treatment center. Dr. Knipschild and his wife, Kathryn (Detring) Knipschild, live in Marshall. Their daughter, Kay Knipschild, a dentist, graduated from CMU in 1981.

Beverly (Brase) Boehmer Beverly (Brase) Boehmer currently serves as coordinator of youth and college ministries for the United Methodist Church Missouri Conference. She began as Missouri East Conference coordinator of youth ministries in 1996 and became an area-wide coordinator of youth ministries when the two United Methodist Missouri Conferences became one in 2000. The position title became coordinator for youth and college ministries in 2008. Boehmer attended Central Methodist from 1964 to 1966 and went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in zoology from Iowa State University, after which she completed an internship in medical technology and worked for several hospitals. She began volunteer work in youth ministry in 1968 when her husband was serving as a student youth pastor in South Bend, Ind. In following years, she continued as a volunteer in church work at the Platte Woods (Kansas City), Webster Hills (Webster Groves), Faith (St. Charles) and St. Charles First United Methodist Churches. She also served as youth director and Christian education director with First United Methodist Church (Jefferson City) and as membership care and assimilation person with the Green Trails United Methodist Church (Chesterfield). Boehmer’s husband, the Rev. Jerrol Boehmer, currently serves as pastor of Wesley United Methodist Church in Springfield, where they have their home.

directors, including a five-year period as board president. Joe McCormack is a graduate of Hendrix College, Conway, Ark., and served as a captain in the U.S. Air Force. He worked for Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. in the accounting department and in information systems, retiring in November 2000. Maida McCormack attended Illinois State University and then began employment with Southwestern Bell, where she worked for 23 years in various positions, including management job evaluation and project management. Joe and Maida McCormack live in Ballwin, Mo.

Dr. Jessica (Grasdorf) Quint Jessica (Grasdorf) Quint, D.D.S., owns a dental practice is Fayette, Mo., where she and her husband, William, and their three children live. Dr. Quint graduated from Fayette High School in 1993 and earned her bachelor’s degree in biology with honors from Central Methodist University in 1997 and doctorate in dental surgery from the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 2002. She worked with ProDental services in Columbia, Mo., from 2002 to 2007, when she purchased the Fayette dental practice of Dr. John Byland. Since establishing her dental practice in Fayette, Dr. Quint has expanded and enhanced the dental services that are offered as part of her practice, including the establishment of a special “Give Kids a Smile” program. She has also become actively involved in many community service efforts. These include participation in the Fayette Armstrong Community Betterment Group and Fayette Chamber of Commerce; service on the board of Equal Opportunities; leadership of Girl Scout Troop 471; and active membership in P.E.O. Chapter AU and Linn Memorial United Methodist Church. She is also president-elect of the Fayette Rotary Club.

Joe and Maida McCormack Joe and Maida McCormack are life-long Methodists who have been strong supporters of the MatchPower program to raise funds for higher education. Married in 1979, the McCormacks have been active volunteers in numerous capacities with the Manchester United Methodist Church in the past 30 years. Since 1984, they have participated in the MatchPower program between Manchester United Methodist Church and Central Methodist University that has resulted in substantial donations of matching funds for the financial support of CMU students. Joe McCormack has served as coordinator of the program for the past decade. Maida McCormack has volunteered extensively in local schools—including tutoring, training and providing program support. She also co-authored a book for room mothers and has presented seminars on self-esteem, motivation, and room parenting. She also served as a member of the Gambrill Gardens Retirement Community board of

Spring 2009

At the pre-dinner reception, honoree Dr. Jessica Quint ’97 visits with Ilene (Morrison) House ’50.

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Campus news

Faculty recital Lyricsoprano Dr. QuigleyDuggan (photo right), CMU assistant professor of music, and pianist Dr. Barb Hamel (photo lower right), CMU professor of music, presented a faculty recital March 23 at CMU and again April 18 at nearby Columbia College. Among compositions performed were a G.F. Handel aria and two pieces for trumpet and voice and piano by Allesandro Scarlatti. Dr. John Perkins, CMU assistant professor of music, assisted on trumpet. Also performed were two pieces for flute, piano and voice, including “Une Flute Invisible” by Camille SaintSaens, and the chamber piece “Lo, Hear the Gentle Lark!” by Henry Bishop. Dori Waggoner, CMU adjunct professor of music, assisted on flute. Quigley-Duggan also sang a group of French melodies by Francis Poulenc and a group of lieder by Robert Schuman and Gustave Mahler, with piano accompaniment by Hamel.

Patience to be performed The third annual performance of a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta will be performed on campus this summer. Dr. Susan Quigley-Duggan will again lead a six-week summer performance workshop that will conclude with a full production of the operetta Patience. The play is a typical romp through the creative minds of Gilbert and Sullivan and centers on a self-important poet and the young milkmaid, Patience, who vows to marry him out of charity because she finds him so repulsive. Needless to say, her true love intervenes and all ends happily and merrily. Dates for the play are July 10 and July 11 at 7:30 p.m. in CMU’s Little Theatre. The production follows on the heels of the highly successful The Mikado (2008) and The Gondoliers (2007). 16

Dr. Susan Quigley-Duggan, left, and Dori Waggoner on flute try to out-trill each other in “Lo, Hear the Gentle Lark!”

Guest recital Tenor Nollie Moore, director of the Jane Froman Singers of Columbia College, and organist Rochelle Parker, also of Columbia, were featured guest performers in a February recital hosted by Swinney Conservatory. Music performed by Moore and Rochelle were set in three categories: Early Standards, including selections from Johann Sebastian Bach, Charles Gounod and Franz Schubert; Arias from Oratorio, including selections from George Fredric Handel, Felix Mendelssohn and F. Joseph Hayden; and Solos from Mass Settings, including selections from Cesar Franck, Charles Gounod, Giochino Rossini and Giuseppe Verde. Dr. Parker also performed two organ solo numbers, selections from Handel and Mendelssohn. Moore was named director of the Jane Froman Singers of Columbia College in spring 1999, and in fall 2001 he joined the faculty as a full-time instructor of music. In addition, he is a sought-after soloist, both locally and on the national level. The summer season of 2002 marked his debut with the Missouri Chamber Orchestra for which he has since sung leading roles in Die Fledermaus, La Traviata, Madame Butterfly, and Carmen; and with the Missouri Symphony Society for which he has served as chorus master for Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Faure’s Requiem and Mozart’s Coronation Mass. Prior to moving to Columbia, Parker was organist and occasional choir director for several churches in the Chicago area. Additionally, she was a free-lance accompanist for vocalists and instrumentalists in the area. Dr. Parker earned her medical degree from Northwestern University School of Medicine and her master’s degree in physical therapy from Stanford University. She is a physician at the University of Missouri Student Health Center in Columbia.

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Campus news

Music festival

Best of Columbia

Forty-two bands, choirs and other musical ensembles swarmed the CMU campus Mar. 6 in the annual Central Methodist University Music Festival. Performances filled every nook and cranny across the CMU campus. Directors from the 42 schools, representing 32 communities, guided approximately 2,500 high school, junior high, and middle school students in juried performances. In addition to the large groups, competitors included small instrumental and vocal groups, as well as soloists. Each presentation received a rating from one to five, with one being the highest. Students were also advised and encouraged in their musical pursuits by the professional musicians and music educators who judged the performances. CMU alumni leading their youth to I- and II-ratings at the festival included, in vocals: Vanessa Miner ’92 (Fayette High School chorus), Aaron Money ’01 (Moreland Ridge Middle School choir), Cheryl Lines ’87 (Bueker Middle School); and in instrumentals: Josh Myers ’02 (Fayette 7th/8th-grade band), Melissa Duren ’96 (Harrisburg High School band), Lindsey Brummet Hansen ’99 and Kirby Spayde ’00 (Odessa 8th-grade concert band), Rose Wilburn ’00 (Community R-6 7-12th-grade band) Chuck Moore ’91 (Fulton 8th-grade band), Jennifer Carr ’04 (Kingsville 7-12th-grade band) and E.E. Pointer ’74 (Richmond High School concert band). This year marked the 31st anniversary of CMU’s Music Festival, which is run by Swinney Conservatory of Music students.

Jazz band The CMU Jazz Band was featured in concert Mar. 10 in the CMU Student and Community Center. The 21member band, under the direction of adjunct professor of music Loyd Warden, performed blues and jazz compositions, including “Hullabaloo”; “Here’s that Rainy Day,” as recorded by the Stan Kenton Orchestra; “The Girl from Impanema,” featuring vocalist Sara Ebersold; and “Moten Swing.” The Jazz Band finished up the year with a joint May concert with the CMU Concert Band.

NATS honors competition Dr. Susan Quigley-Duggan and Conservatory accompanist Mary Jane Nance recently took five students to the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) competition at University of Missouri – Kansas City. Two of the students placed in the competition: Lacey Eaton, second place winner of the women’s lower division and Paul Blanchard, third place winner of the men’s upper division. Also participating were Josh Reed, Katherine Stevens, and Danielle Perez.

Spring 2009

Violet Vonder Haar was listed in the March 2009 edition of Inside Columbia as the “Best Female Solo Musician” in Columbia. The article says of her, “Her guitar and lyrics, sung in an enchanting voice that reverberates with wisdom and soul, have captivated Columbians’ ears and hearts.” Violet is also a saxophonist with the CMU bands and a developing material artist. She was profiled in the Fall 2007 Talon.

Westfall leads clinics Dr. Claude Westfall, director of choral activities and assistant professor of music at CMU, has been busy this year. In addition to taking on the responsibilities of all the choirs on campus, he has been in demand as a guest clinician as well. Last fall, he served as guest clinician for the I-70 Conference; more recently, he served in the same capacity for the Tri-County Conference Choir in Eldon. That choir comprised about 120 students from Blair Oaks, Versaillies, Eldon, California, Warsaw, and Osage. An evening performance followed each clinic.

Vocal workshop The Swinney Conservatory of Music held its second annual Vocal Workshop Mar. 28 in the Conservatory on the CMU campus. Participating students received a coaching session with faculty members Dr. Susan Quigley-Duggan for solos or with Dr. Claude Westfall for ensembles. Students registered through their high school choral directors or individually online. The workshop was held the morning of a Junior Preview Day, sponsored by the Office of Admission, allowing participating students who were interested in attending CMU to attend both events.

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Campus news

MMEA conference includes awards for CMU professor, student Roy D. “Skip” Vandelicht, assistant professor of music at Central Methodist University, and CMU music student Dominik Lehman were recipients of special awards during the Missouri Music Educators Association (MMEA) conference at Lake of the Ozarks in late January. Vandelicht, CMU’s director of bands, was given the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Outstanding Music Educator Award for Missouri, based on accomplishments and service to the Missouri State High School Activities Association and Missouri Music Education. Vandelicht became CMU director of bands in July after retiring from a 31-year career as a public school music educator at Fayette High School. He oversees the marching, concert, and jazz band programs at CMU. He has also received the 2004 Bandworld Legion of Honor Award; the 1991 Orpheus Award, presented by Beta Mu Chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia; and the 1981 and 1982 Music Teacher of the Year Awards, presented by the Missouri Federation of Women’s Clubs. He was also recognized by Central Methodist University in 1990 with the Outstanding Young Alumni Award. The NFHS Music Committee was formed in 1978 and acts in an advisory capacity for the NFHS Music Association and its parent organization. The Outstanding Music Educator Award was first given in 1989 when seven individuals received sectional awards. Since that time, 116 sectional and 204 state awards have been presented. Dominik Lehman, a freshman student at CMU majoring in music education, received the Dr. Wynne Harrell Music Scholarship. Lehman’s award, which is specifically for freshman-level college students majoring in music education, was based on his academic and student achievements in high school and in his 18

first year of college, along with letters of recommendation, including one from a teacher-sponsor who is a member of the MMEA. Lehman is a 2008 graduate of Pacific High School, where he was a member of band and choir. He is currently a member of the CMU band and choral programs. The mission of the 3,000-member MMEA is to effectively serve members in their goals of teaching and learning, by promoting a comprehensive music education program that furthers music-making by all and supports the advancement of music education as a profession. Central always has an informational booth and a reception for alumni at the MMEA conference. Tracy Jones, director of alumni relations, reported that approximately 100 guests visited the reception. Alumni were highly interested in the plans for the upcoming renovation of Classic Hall for the music students and the Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Art. The mood was festive and upbeat at this year’s conference, and very supportive of CMU, according to Tracy Jones, director of alumni relations. “I ran into dozens of our alumni,” she says. “Several mentioned they are now actively pushing their music students toward attending Central for their education.”

Three new music awards Three new music awards were added to the Swinney Conservatory of Music this spring. While they were announced at Honors Convocation, they will be officially presented at the Fine Arts Awards dinner in September. One new award is the Dane W. Nelson Music Service Award, created to honor the memory of Dane Nelson, a 2008 graduate of Central who died tragically in a car accident this winter. His wife, Mallory (James) Nelson ’08 and the rest of Dane’s family established the award. The award was presented to graduating senior music education major David Sahm. The second new award is the Dr. R. Paul Drummond Award, which honors the memory of Dr. Drummond, who was the director of the A Cappella Choir for more than 25 years before he succumbed to cancer in the fall of 2007. His family, including wife Suzanne (Armitage) Drummond ’67, established this award, which went to rising senior music education student Mason Rivers. The third new award is the Helen (Puckett) Thogmorton Excellence in Music Award. It honors the contributions to music of legendary “Mrs. T” who passed away in early March. The first presentation of this award went to a Fayette resident, sophomore Lacey Eaton, also a music education major. These awards will be fully introduced in the fall Talon.

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Campus news

Band tour The Central Methodist University Concert Band participated in its annual tour March 12-17. Some 15 concerts were scheduled over a six-day period and included performances at high schools and churches in Central Missouri. This year marked the 83rd annual tour. Directing the band at its various tour stops was Skip Vandelicht, CMU assistant professor of music and director of bands. The schedule included visits to Cairo, Macon, Fulton, Hermann, Holt, St. Charles, Florissant, Festus, Washington, St. Clair, Laurie, Linn, and Fayette. They played their home concert on Mar. 29. In addition to the requisite “Barnum and Bailey’s” and “Stars and Stripes,” the repertoire included several pieces that were written or arranged by alumni. Included in these were “Abram’s Pursuit” by David Holsinger ’67, “Concert Variations” by Claude T. Smith x’52, “Kaleidoscope” by current dean of the Swinney Conservatory Dr. Ron Shroyer, and “The Melody Shop March” and “Shield of Liberty March,” both arranged by Andrew Glover ’83, the latter dedicated to Vandelicht and this year’s concert band. Vandelicht earned a bachelor’s degree in music education from CMU in 1977 and a master’s degree in education from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He retired in June 2008 after a long career as director of instrumental music at Fayette R-III School District. He also served as adjunct director of the CMU Marching Band from 1983 to 1995 and again in the fall of 2007.

www.centralmethodist.edu Spring 2009

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Campus news

CMU sends two to national choir

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To be chosen for the 2009 American Choral Directors Association (ACDA) College and University Honor Chamber Choir would be a feather in any vocalist’s cap. Only 48 of the top student singers across the country, are chosen to join this group. This year three of the students came from the state of Missouri. Pretty good. However, two of those came from Central Methodist University. Stellar! Senior Paul Blanchard, a baritone from Lake Ozark, Mo., and junior Mason Rivers, a first tenor from St. James, Mo., auditioned with the encouragement of Dr. Claude Westfall, director of choral activities at CMU. The ACDA Convention convened in Oklahoma City, Okla., in March, but preparations for the choir began many months before. Last fall both young men created audition tapes and submitted them. The waiting began. “After the audition,” Paul says, “I waited for results to be posted, and I waited for so many weeks. In December I received a letter saying that I had made the choir.” Both singers credit their CMU music professors for their preparation and for the encouragement to audition. “We have to give our success to our teachers,” asserts Mason. “We couldn’t have done it on our own.” Paul agrees, “When I came here Dr. [Paul] Drummond said, ‘You can do it! I believe in you!’ It hit me really hard (l-r) Paul Blanchard, Gary Graden, Mason Rivers last year when he passed.” Drummond was director of choral activities at CMU until his death in 2007. “He would be so proud of us!” Mason confirms. They are equally delighted to give credit to their current voice professors, Dr. Susan Quigley-Duggan, Dr. Claude Westfall, and dean of the Swinney Conservatory of Music Dr. Ron Shroyer. They feel very lucky. “When you can say you studied with Dr. Westfall or Dr. Drummond, it means something,” says Mason. “We’re at the top of the line, and I’m very proud to be part of it.” In addition to the prestige and experience of singing in the choir, each young man has reason to be pleased with the opportunity. “For me,” Paul states, “it’s a really, really big honor. I’m a performance major, and I want to travel and sing all over the place. This is a huge step for me. Singing and performing in that choir is by far the greatest honor I have ever received in my life.” “I’m a music education major,” Mason explains from his perspective. “This is a resumé builder—when the administration sees that you’ve been in a choir of such se-

lection. They like to hire teachers who know what they’re doing, but also teachers who are talented. My experience in the ACDA choir has reaffirmed my notions that the direction my career is going is the right choice for me.” Both Mason and Paul received their music in December to memorize. They agree wholeheartedly that it was the most difficult music they had ever attempted. While learning their music, they both continued with the ceaseless life of the CMU music student—participating in Opera Fest, practicing for concerts, and preparing for personal recitals. Both belong to CMENC and Beta Mu chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia where Mason is song leader. Both have been members of the Chorale and the A Cappella Choir all their college years, and Mason is the Choir Fellow. Once at the convention, their time was split between practice and attending convention activities—exhibits, workshops, other concerts, and special events, such as the Oklahoma City Memorial Peace Event at the park where the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building once stood. Networking provided them the opportunity to meet an amazing array of artists in the world of music, such as composer Eric Whitacre. “I met many wellknown conductors,” says Paul. “They all seem downto-earth and Paul and Mason with composer Eric Whitacre wonderful.” Mason concurs,“I enjoyed having the opportunity to meet not only the most talented current choral directors in the country, but also the new up-and-coming talent in the world of choral music.” Both especially enjoyed their ACDA conductor, Gary Graden, an American who is choral director at St. Jacobs Church in Stockholm, Sweden. He brought an array of music by Swedish composers with him, most of which was either new or unknown in the United States. “Conductor Gary Graden missed no opportunity to teach us about some aspect of music while rehearsing our literature,” Mason remembers. “He brought a real sense of emotion and meaning to the repertoire we performed.” The choir performed twice, once for the parents and friends who were visiting the convention, and the second time for the ACDA members who rewarded them with a standing ovation. All in all, the experience broadened Mason and Paul’s perspectives, gave them confidence and a chance to rub shoulders with the greats in the industry, and honed their personal talents.

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Campus news

HAVE YOU SEEN THIS MAN? Stories (mostly factual, please) with the subject being “Dean T” (James P. Thogmorton) are being sought for assimilation into a book. There are multitudes of tales that alumni have about the Thogmortons, and specifically about Dean T, that should be shared! Please send your stories (and photos) to Tracy Crowe Jones at

tjones@centralmethodist.edu

“DEAN T”

or by snail mail to Ms. Tracy Crowe Jones, CMU, 411 Central Methodist Square, Fayette, MO 65248.

Central’s “youngest” alumna honored

You have a colorful future after you graduate from CMU! Have you ever wondered how CMU can afford all those scholarships?

Lois (Smith) Johnmeyer ’35 celebrated at a lunch hosted by CMU President Marianne Inman this spring. Mrs. Johnmeyer is the youngest person ever to have graduated Central Methodist University, then Central College. She was 14 when she entered college and graduated at the age of 18. According to Mrs. Johnmeyer, every day she rode the three miles to school on a horse, regardless of the weather! Those who attended the luncheon were Mrs. Johnmeyer, her daughter Linda Wells, her son Bill Johnmeyer, her granddaughter Cheyenne (Wells) Fehling, a May 2009 graduate, Dr. Marianne Inman, president of CMU, and Tracy Crowe Jones ’94, director of alumni relations.

The Central Excellence Fund (CEF) provides scholarship assistance and pays the day-to-day operating costs of the University. Please consider a gift to the Central Excellence Fund. Even a small gift can make a BIG difference. Questions? Need more information? Please contact Peggy Robb at Ext. 660-248-6239 or email probb@centralmethodist.edu. Cheyenne with her grandmother, Lois Johnmeyer

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Campus news

CMU goes to the Capitol A sizable delegation from Central Methodist University traveled to Jefferson City in early April to testify before both House and Senate committees against proposed legislation that would have reduced the maximum financial award for which students attending independent colleges and universities (such as Central Methodist) are eligible through the Access Missouri program. Central Methodist University was represented by staff members, students, and the parents of three current CMU students, who drove four-anda-half hours each way on two successive days to testify about the importance of the Access Missouri program as it is currently funded and administered. Student after student told senators and representatives his or her personal story. Almost all of the state’s 25 comprehensive independent sector inVisiting the Capitol with Sen. William Stouffer x’69 (left) were CMU Advancement stitutions came forward on one, two, or—as in the case of Central Methodist—all three days, not only members Stephanie Lewis, Theresa Davis, and Peggy Robb, along with CMU senior Rachael Selby, who has been serving an internship in the Senator’s office. to testify before these committees but also to visit with individual senators and representatives. followed the issue for our office and kept our constituCentral Methodist senior communication studies ents updated. We were able to keep our scholarships in major Rachael Selby knows first-hand the importance place for our kids, thanks to her help.” Following graduof retaining the Access Missouri program. Her internation, Rachael will continue as a full-time staff member in ship in Senator Bill Stouffer’s office has afforded her the Senator Stouffer’s office. opportunity to be personally involved in the battle to Many thanks to all who have joined your voices to retain this important resource. Senator Stouffer praised CMU’s via the website www.keepmeincollege.org or by Rachael’s work: “Advocating for important issues facing communicating with your state legislators and the media small private colleges would not be as easy without having expressing your support for retaining the Access Missouri Rachael and her real life example of the Access Missouri program as it is. It is serving well the students who need it Scholarship. I’d often point at her and her story to explain most as it extends access to higher education to the instituwhy keeping these kids in school was so important. She tion of a student’s choice.

Inman invited to Biden talk

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President Marianne Inman was asked to attend a town hall meeting in St. Louis in April where Vice President Joe Biden spoke. He discussed ways to close the gaps between family incomes and college costs to make higher education possible for more young people. President Inman was seated on the front row of the meeting as a leader in higher education who has been taking on the Missouri State Legislature to keep the Access Missouri program from being revamped. Biden’s office wanted her close to the Vice President in case he wished to solicit information from an expert in the field. Biden hosted the meeting for about 300 people as part of the work of the Middle Class Task Force that he heads at President Barack Obama’s behest. Biden said that the Obama administration recognizes the need to improve tax breaks for families and increase need-based grants for the middle class and poor. He said that he would ask the Treasury Department to look into how to make family college savings plans more effective and reliable.

To make college more affordable, the administration is seeking to extend its American Opportunity Tax Credit beyond 2010. The credit can be claimed for four years of college, running up to a maximum of $2,500 a year.

The expanded CMU facility in Columbia now boasts more than 5,500 square feet of space and was dedicated in January.

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Campus news

Science division field trip opens eyes and doors

Seven faculty/staff members and two bus drivers braved the construction strewn St. Louis traffic to enlighten 85 math, science, and computer science students on the availability of jobs awaiting them after graduation. The students had the opportunity to tour laboratories for a number of companies, including Sigma Aldrich, Monsanto, Nidus Center for Scientific Enterprise, Charter Communications, and the Center for Emerging Technologies. In order to cover more ground and provide tours for a variety of interests, the students were divided into two groups. The first group’s morning tour consisted of Charter Communications or the Center for Emerging Technologies. Students saw how the skills and interests they are developing in college become real-world projects with income potential. The second group toured Sigma-Aldrich Chemical in the morning. During the hour-and-ahalf tour, the students were introduced to a laboratory environment outside of academia. Gone were the tests and homework of school; in their place students saw cooperative interactions between professional scientists, all contributing to the success of a project. The students received valuable information on the skills, both professional and personal, that employers look for when interviewing a potential employee. After the session of morning tours, students had the

by Justan Blair, graduate assistant

opportunity to eat lunch while exploring the St. Louis Zoo. This in itself served as a tour for those students who are not laboratory inclined. In our short time at the zoo, students dispersed to the far corners of the confines, taking in all of the wonders that the animal kingdom has to offer. In our afternoon session, one group had the opportunity to tour Monsanto and hear about its internship/co-op programs. Tours went from greenhouses to hot little rooms where plants were “engineered.” Another group toured the Nidus Center for Scientific Enterprise, a supplier of laboratory space for up-and-coming companies that are too small to warrant owning their own laboratory buildings. We received personalized tours from Divergence, one of the more successful companies in the center. Students were shown the multitude of jobs that a small biological company offers, from parasitologists to business managers. While there were a few bumps along the way, the day was a definite success that we plan to repeat next year. Students were shown opportunities that otherwise they photo courtesy of Kodak and Wal-Mart Inc. may never have known. Amanda Evans, a student attendee, stated, “When I came to college all I wanted to do was go to Med School. Now I see exciting things I can do in the laboratory and work on a Ph.D. later—and the company will pay for it!”

CMU recycling efforts continue The CMU102 class of retention coordinator Joy Flanders chose for its service project the recycling of fluorescent light bulbs. In this ongoing project, the class is creating a public awareness campaign, both on and off campus. This spring the students hosted two bulb collections at C&R Market in Fayette. The project is slated to continue in the fall.

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Campus news

Denneny Center has active semester

by Hannah Kiddoo, junior

It’s been another eventful semester for the James C. Denneny, Jr., Career Development Center. As soon as students were back on campus, the Center was buzzing with activity. Reality 101: Speed Networking (photo below) kicked off the new year. All students interested in science, math,

and computer science were invited to attend the event, which provided an opportunity to network with employers in the field, the majority of whom were alumni. Students had five minutes to talk with each of the employers before rotating to the next station. Alumni attending included John Bucksath ’89, Dr. Keith Gary ’82, J.B. Waggoner ’91, Kenneth Duzan ’91, Cindy McCutcheon ’85, Michelle Howell ’88, Dennis Hansen ’77, Kevin Beeler ’95, Andy Page ’93, and Dr. Joseph Beckman ’83. Also present were Dr. Scott Koerner and Dennis Potter, both friends of the University. The event started with a lunch in the Courtney-Spalding Rooms and proceeded to the Dealy Room where true networking began. February brought the annual CMU Career EXPO (photo below). The event is an exciting opportunity for students to meet with professionals from a variety of companies and graduate schools and seek positions as employees, interns, or graduate students. This year 62 recruiters, representing 53 organizations, were in attendance, drawing 272 stu-

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dents. Alumni representing their organizations included Ricky Smith ’08, Dennis Hansen ’77, Melia Young ’06, and Kevin Beeler ’95. As it has been since its inception, the event was highly successful. Sophomore Josh McFarland, an accounting major, said of the EXPO, “I really enjoyed meeting all the different recruiters that were gathered in one place.” In the month leading up to the EXPO, students were offered a weekly series of events to prepare for meeting with professionals. An Employer Workshop Series allowed students to hone their interviewing and networking skills, critique their professional dress attire, and update their resumés by working with guest recruiters from State Farm Insurance, ABC Laboratories, Commerce Bank, and Cerner Corporation. Students were impressed with the amount they learned. Krista McShane reported that the most helpful information she gained was “how to approach and talk to a recruiter.” Students preparing to apply for graduate school following graduation had the opportunity to gear up for the transition by attending a workshop co-presented by Dr. Jack Healy, division chair for English, Foreign Languages, Philosophy, and Religion; and Linda Lorenz, director of the James C. Denneny, Jr., Career Development Center. The two presenters discussed the basics of applying to graduate school. Afterwards, Aaron Abernathy from Kaplan Test Prep, gave 30-minute tip sessions for the GRE, GMAT, and LSAT. Students then had the opportunity to take practice exams. The Center also sponsored a Career Boot Camp in March (photo below). This was an opportunity for students to meet with recruiters and “get in shape” for their job search through mock interviews, resumé reviews, professional dress critiques, and a sequence of lectures on topics such as: behavioral interviewing tips, the importance of first impressions, and networking pointers. Assisting the students were alumni J.B. Waggoner ‘91 and Dennis Hansen ’77, along with recruiters from the Missouri Highway Patrol, Boone National Bank, Jos. A. Bank, Kohl’s, Commerce Bank, and State Farm Insurance.

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Campus news

Preschoolers on annual fast track to college In what has become an annual tradition, students from the Millersburg preschool, which is run in part by Dr. Sherri Griffin, CMU professor of education, made the trek to Central to visit with students in the education department. They were escorted from their vehicles by members of Griffin’s CMU Introduction to Teaching Practicum class. The students attended the Creative Arts class where they read Leo Lionni books with those students. They told stories and acted them out with the Children’s Literature students. They also toured the campus and ate lunch with the “big kids” in the Bergsten Dining Hall. After lunch the students got to visit live animals with students in the Utilizing Family and Community Resources class. They created “Leo Lionni” art and purchased homework in the CMU bookstore with Reading Assessment students. With the Child Development class, the youngsters visited the Stephen’s Museum and sketched what they saw. Finally, the kids got to listen to the CMU band play before returning home, no doubt exhausted from a long day in the adult world, but full of exciting stories of their new experiences.

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Photo above, assistant professor of education Barbara Thurmon (in upper left) and Dr. Sherri Griffin, professor of education, show off a snake from Central’s biology department to the delight of the visiting pre-school children.

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Photo upper right: Jeremy Montague leads his young charge into the vastness of the Bergsten Dining Hall for lunch.

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Campus news

CMU’s first Fleer lecture on values-based education The first Gilbert and Ruth Fleer Lecture for Excellence in Values-Based Education was presented on April 15. “We are extremely pleased to announce the establishment of the Fleer Lecture and to mark its inaugural presentation,” said President Marianne Inman. “Gil and Ruth Fleer had a vision to enhance the spirit of excellence at Central Methodist University. Their passion for their alma mater where they met, their strong support for leadership development, and their commitment to opportunities for future generations of students led them to make gifts to the University celebrating the Central experience. This enabled Central Methodist to establish the Gilbert and Ruth Fleer Fund for Excellence in Values-Based Education.” The Fleers were present for the new lecture series premier. Atum Azzahir (above, right), executive director of the Powderhorn/Phillips Cultural Wellness Center of Minneapolis, Minn., presented the lecture titled “The Power of Engagement, Communities and Philosophies of Knowledge” with the subtitle “Creating Models for Community Institution Partnerships to Improve Health.” In 1969 she founded the non-profit Powderhorn/Phillips Cultural Wellness Center, which functions “to provide a place where people can learn their own and each other’s cultural traditions and health practices.” Its mission is to unleash the power of citizens to heal themselves and to build community. A major goal of the Center is to be the recognized authority on cultural approaches for preventing sickness and improving the health of individuals in a community context. In her remarks, which she issued while meandering through the crowd of students, faculty, staff, and visitors, Azzahir emphasized the importance of social community. She talked about the need to be aware of one’s own social community and the need to integrate the knowledge and working relationships with the social and institutional communities. She also stressed that learning the cultural history of one’s social community was an important step in gaining an understanding of oneself in life, a part of life’s education. Azzahir is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Salzburg Fellowship, 1993; Community Health

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Leadership Award, 1995; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Community Camara Award, 1999; Ruby H. Hughes Elder and Outstanding Citizenship Award, 2000; Race Unity Award of the Ba’Hai Faith, 2000; Outstanding Community Leadership, 2002; and one of the 100 most influential Health Leaders in Minnesota, Physicians Monthly, Aug. 2000. She has also served on numerous boards and committees. Azzahir received the Leadership in Neighborhood (LIN) grant to fund travel to Senegal and Benin, West Africa; Grenada in the West Indies; Jackson, Mississippi; and Cairo, Egypt, to study the role of elders in traditional African societies and compare them with the contemporary African elders in African-American communities of the south. Prior to founding the Powderhorn/Phillips Cultural Wellness Center, Ms. Azzahir served as vocational educational advisor, Minneapolis Technical Community College, 1981-84; executive director, Harriet Tubman Women’s Shelter, 1984-89; and executive director, Way To Grow Youth Coordinating Board, 1989-94. Sponsors of the Fleer series, Gilbert and Ruth Fleer, Bentonville, Ark., are both alumni of CMU. Gilbert Fleer ’55 (right) earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Central Methodist; a bachelor of divinity degree from Drew University School of Theology; plus a master’s and educational doctorate in guidance and counseling, from Texas A & M. He was an assistant professor of religion at CMU from 1959 to 1965 and is now retired as a social science professor from Western Texas College and as a United Methodist counselor. Ruth (Hombs) Fleer x’58 attended CMU and later earned her bachelor of science degree from Texas A & M and master of education degree from Sul Ross State University in Alpine, Texas.

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Second service day a success April 16th marked CMU’s second annual Service Day. Approximately 360 students and 100 faculty and staff worked to complete 44 projects, 32 of which were off campus at locations in Fayette, Glasgow, and Armstrong. On this day, classes were cancelled, allowing students, faculty, and staff to sign up for projects. Great participation for the event led to work on many projects, ranging from general maintenance and clean-up around campus to tearing off the roof of the shelter house at the Fayette City Park. Other projects included yard work, farm work, painting, moving furniture, window washing, and house cleaning. Following last year’s success, volunteers had the opportunity to reach out and lend a helping hand to the community around CMU, as well as enjoy a beautiful spring day outside. This year, the number of projects completed nearly doubled last year’s achievements; and hopefully, the event will continue to expand in the future, allowing Central to keep reaching out and giving back.


Academic excellence in action CMU faculty demonstrate a lifelong commitment to education. They, of course, are dedicated to the instruction of students, but Central professors do more than teach in the classroom. Many actively pursue their own professional scholastic achievements to further the intellectual community both at CMU and around the nation. When it comes to measuring the quality of a student’s educational experiences, smaller campuses may hold an advantage because of a lower faculty-to-student ratio (15:1 at CMU). This allows for direct contact with and guidance of students by professors, creating a positive learning environment that encourages scholarly achievements from students as well and leads to many joint scholastic pursuits. The following activities – research, published papers, presentations, performances, projects, and achievements from the last two academic years – show Central’s devotion to outstanding scholarly efforts and endeavors, both from the faculty and the students.

Education

Dr. Sherri Griffin, Professor of Education Griffin, S. “Weaving Literacy Throughout the Curriculum.” Presentation, Kentucky Early Childhood Summer Institute, Louisville, Ky. June 2007. Griffin, S. “My Big World of Wonder: Activities for Learning About Nature and Using Natural Resources Wisely.” Presentation, Kentucky Early Childhood Summer Institute, Louisville, Ky., June 2007; National Association for the Education of Young Children Conference, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 2008; Chicago, Ill., Nov. 2007. Griffin, S. “Natural Inquiry of Nature.” Presentation, KeefeBruyette Symposium: Investigation and Inquiry in Math and Science, West Hartford, Conn., Mar. 2008. Griffin, S. “Exploring Our Natural Resources with Our Natural Resources.” Keynote Presentation, “Keefe-Bruyette Symposium: Investigation and Inquiry in Math and Science, West Hartford, Conn., Mar. 2008; Presentation, Youth in Need, Wentzville, Ky., Apr. 2008. Griffin, S. “Wondering While Wandering.” Presentation, Keefe-Bruyette Symposium: Investigation and Inquiry in Math and Science, West Hartford, Conn., Mar. 2008; Teachers Applying Whole Language Conference, Columbia, Mo., Oct. 2008.

Dr. Nancy Hadfield, Professor of Education Hadfield, N. and Hadfield, G. Translation, Fragments of a Forgotten Genesis. Leafe Press. June 2009.

Dr. Janice Henson, Assistant Professor of Education, with Martin Kossak, graduate student in education Henson, J. and Kossak, M. “Students Calling 911: Literacy Lessons for Cowboys and Gangsta Wannabes.” Presentation, Whole Language Umbrella Literacies for All Summer Institute, Tucson, Ariz., July 2008.

Humanities

Dr. Jason Arthur, Assistant Professor of English Arthur, J. “Beating the Hyphen.” Presentation and Panel member, “In the Canon for All the Wrong Reasons: Narrative Conventions and the Multicultural Category,” The International Conference on Narrative in Washington, D.C., Mar. 2007.

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Arthur, J. “The Chinatown and the City: Kingston, Kerouac, and Boho-Provencialism.” Presentation, American Literature Association Annual Convention in San Francisco, Calif., May 2008. Arthur, J. “Allen Ginsberg’s Biographical Gestures.” Texas Studies in Literature and Language. 2009. Arthur, J. “Revising the Great Depression.” The Minnesota Review, Issue 71. 2009. Arthur, J. “’Where is the Dust?’: James Agee’s Thumbs Down Review of John Ford’s Film Adaptation of The Grapes of Wrath.” The Grapes of Wrath: A Re-Interpretation. Ed., Michael Meyer. Amsterdam: Rodopi P, 2009. 189-214.

Dr. Mary Elizabeth Frieden, Professor of Spanish Frieden, M. B. “A Current Look at Foreign Language Instruction.” Presentation, Delta Kappa Gamma. Nov. 2008.

Dr. Daryl Jefferies, Associate Professor of Religion Jefferies, D. “Scripture, Wisdom, and Authority in 4Q Instruction: Understanding the Use of Numbers 30:8-9 in 4Q416.” Hebrew Studies 49, 2008; Presentation, Meeting of the Central States Region of the Society of Biblical Literature, St. Louis, Mo., Mar. 2009. Jefferies, D. “Re-assessing Ethics in the Dead Sea Scrolls in Light of the Qumran Wisdom Literature.” Presentation, Meeting of the Central States Region of the Society of Biblical Literature, St. Louis, Mo., Mar. 2009. Jefferies, D. Review of Samuel L. Adams, Wisdom in Transition: Act and Consequence in Second Temple Instructions. Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology, 2009.

Jessica Owens, senior psychology student, working with Dr. Elizabeth Gold, Assistant Professor of Psychology Owens, J. “Psychology Courses in Action: School Counseling Internship.” Second Place Applied Learning Oral Presentation. Fourth Annual Missouri Undergraduate Psychology Conference. Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, Mo., Nov. 2008.

Dr. Jeremy Reed, Assistant Professor of English Reed, J. “Same Stores, New Places: Amy Tan and Narrative Passing.” Presentation and panel member, “In the Canon for All the Wrong Reasons: Narrative Conventions and the Multicultural

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Category,” The International Conference on Narrative in Washington, D.C., Mar. 2007.

Missouri Music Educators’ Association Conference, Tan-Tar-A Resort, Osage Beach, Mo., Jan. 2008.

Justin Rutter, senior English student, working with Dr. Jason Arthur

Dr. John Perkins, Assistant Professor of Music, professional performances

Rutter, J. “A Place in Nature: An Examination of Naturalist Elements in ‘South of the Slot’ and ‘The Open Boat.’” Presentation, Sigma Tau Delta Midwestern Regional Conference at Stephens College, Columbia, Mo., Nov. 2008. Rutter, J. “Diminished Tones in William Bradford’s ‘Of Plymouth Plantation.’” Presentation, Annual English Graduate Student Conference at Truman State University, Kirksville, Mo., Apr. 2009.

Guest Trumpet/Cornet Soloist, Karl King Band, Ft. Dodge, Iowa, June 2007. Lead Trumpet, Video Games Live Orchestra, Jesse Auditorium, Columbia, Mo., Oct. 2007. Columbia Civic Orchestra Brass Quintet, Festival of the Arts, Columbia, Mo., Feb. 2008. Guest Trumpet Soloist, Marshall Philharmonic Orchestra, Marshall, Mo., Apr. 2008. 9th Street Philharmonic Orchestra, Missouri UMC, Columbia, Mo., May 2008. Festival Chamber Orchestra, Luhrs Performing Arts Center, Shippensburg, Pa., July 2008. Principal Trumpet, Shippensburg Festival Chamber Orchestra, Luhrs Performing Arts Center, Shippensburg, Pa., July 2008. Solo Trumpet, Odyssey Chamber Music Series, First Baptist Church, Columbia, Mo., Oct. 2007. Solo Trumpet Recital: Helen G. Steele Music Club, First Christian Church, Sedalia, Mo., Sept. 2008. First Cornet, Circus Band, Twilight Festival, Columbia, Mo., Sept. 2007 and 2008. Principal Trumpet, 9th Street Philharmonic Orchestra, Missouri UMC, Columbia, Mo., Oct. 2008. Principal Trumpet, Columbia Civic Orchestra, Missouri UMC, Columbia, Mo., Dec. 2007, Oct. and Nov. 2008. First Trumpet, Little Women musical, Stephens College, Columbia, Mo., Dec. 2008. High Brass Adjudicator, Solo/Small Ensemble Festival, Republic H.S., Apr. 2009. Brass Quartet, St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church, Columbia, Mo., Apr. 2009. Guest Faculty Trumpet Soloist, Dr. Susan Quigley-Duggan Recital, Columbia College, Columbia, Mo., Apr. 2009. Show Me Brass Concert, Linn Memorial UMC, Fayette, Mo., Mar. 2009, Kansas City, Mo.; Apr. 2009, Salvation Army Annual Civic and Volunteer Recognition Dinner, Columbia, Mo., Feb. 2008 and 2009; Hope Episcopal Church, Columbia, Mo., Apr. 2009; and Lee’s Summit United Methodist Church, Apr. 2009. First Trumpet, Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up? musical May 2009.

Matthew Silverberg, senior psychology student, working with Dr. Elizabeth Gold Silverberg, M. “Social Bond Theory as a Predictor of College Student Binge Drinking.” First Place Non-Empirical Poster. Fourth Annual Missouri Undergraduate Psychology Conference. Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, Mo., Nov. 2008.

Information Science

Cynthia Dudenhoffer, Assistant Professor of Library Science and Director of Smiley Library Dudenhoffer, C. “Expanding Services to Distance Learners through Cooperation.” Poster session, Missouri Library Association Annual Conference, Oct. 2007. Dudenhoffer, C. “Peer-to-Peer Networking for New Librarians using Web 2.0.” Forum presentation, Missouri Library Association Annual Conference, Oct. 2007. Dudenhoffer, C. “Keeping the Beast at Bay: Fighting Mold at the University of Missouri-Columbia Journalism Library.” Public Library Quarterly, V. 25, (2007) 143-150. Dudenhoffer, C. “Creative Learning Spaces on a Shoestring Budget.” Poster session, Missouri Library Association Annual Conference, Oct. 2008. Dudenhoffer, C. “Dealing with Disasters in Libraries.” Panel Presentation, Missouri Library Association Annual Conference, Oct. 2008.

Fine and Performing Arts

Paul Blanchard, senior music student, under the direction of Dr. Susan Quigley-Duggan Blanchard, P. Third place, Men’s Upper Division. National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) Honors Competition, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 2009.

Dr. Susan Quigley-Duggan, Assistant Professor of Music, Dr. Barbara Hamel, Professor of Music, pianist, and Dori Waggoner, Assistant Professor of Music, flutist

Lacey Eaton, junior music student, under the direction of Dr. Susan Quigley-Duggan

Quigley-Duggan, S. Director of regional summer workshops for the study and presentation of Gilbert and Sullivan operettas: The Gondoliers, 2007; The Mikado, 2008; and Patience, 2009. Quigley-Duggan, S., with Hamel, B., Waggoner, D., and Perkins, J. Soprano and piano recital with flute and trumpet, Columbia College. Apr. 2009.

Eaton, L. Second place, Women’s Lower Division. National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) Honors Competition, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 2009.

Sara Malan, 2008 graduate, under the direction of Dr. John Perkins Malan, S. Trumpet performance, All-Collegiate Band,

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Claude Westfall, Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities Guest clinician, I-70 Conference, 2008.  Guest clinician, Tri-County Conference Choir, Eldon, Mo., 2009.

Mary Barile, adjunct theatre professor  Barile, M. Leaving Hannibal. Anchorage Press Plays. Barile, M. Founder, MOHip (Missouri History in Performance Theatre), sponsoring The Lion of the West, Reader’s Theatre, Santa Fe Trail National Symposium, Boonville, Mo., Sept. 2009.

Social Sciences

Dr. John Carter, Professor of Political Science Carter, J.J. American Intelligence’s Nazi Connections: A Revisionist Perspective on the Early Cold War. Edwin Mellon Press. New York. Aug. 2009.

Science and Mathematics

Geoff Karhoff, 2008 graduate, working with Dr. Robert Wiegers

Elliott, D. R. “Sponge Predation by a Mississippian Asteroid and Feeding Behaviors, Food Selection, and Feeding Habits of Fossil Asteroids.” Transactions of the Missouri Academy of Science. 2009.

Haylie Loges, senior social science education student, working with Dr. Robert Wiegers

Dr. Dan Elliott, Professor of Biology and Curator of Stephens Museum

Dr. Linda Lembke, Professor of Mathematics and Mathematics Education Lembke, L. Peer Reviewer, Journal for Research in Mathematics Education.

Austin Crawford, junior biology student, Joe Terrell, junior biology student, and Michael Forck, 2008 graduate, working with Dr. Paul Porneluzi, Professor of Biology Crawford, A., Forck, M., and Terrell, J. “The Effects of Unburned and Burned Forest Management on Spider Density in the Missouri Ozarks.” Presentation, Missouri Natural Resources Conference, Osage Beach, Mo., 2008.

Dr. Michael Tilley, Assistant Professor of Biology and Advisor for Pre-Med

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Roe, B., Haab, T., Beversdorf, D., Gu, H.H., and Tilley, M.R. “Risk Attitude Selection Bias in Subject Pools Volunteering for Phlebotomy.” Journal of Economic Psychology. 2009.

Tilley, M.R. “Psychostimulant Use on College Campuses.” Presentation, The Ohio State University Alcohol Coalition, 2007. Tilley, M.R, Cagniard, B., Zhuang, X., Tiao, N., and Gu, HH. “Cocaine Reward and Locomotion Stimulation in Mice with Reduced Dopamine Transporter Expression.“ BMC Neuroscience June 21; 8:42. 2007. Tilley, M.R. and Gu, H.H. “The Effects of Methylphenidate in Knockin Mice with a Methylphenidate Resistant Dopamine Transporter.” J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 2008: jpet.108.141713v1, JPET. Presentation, Society for Neuroscience Convention. 18.7. San Diego, Calif. Online. 2007. Tilley, M.R, and Gu, H.H. “Dopamine Transporter Inhibition is Critical for Psychostimulant Produced Stereotypy.” Neuroreport, 2008: 19, 1137-40. Smith, R.M., Edwards, K.S., Tilley, M.R., Gu, H.H., Givens, B.S., and Beversdorf, D.Q. “Serotonin Transporter Function and Prenatal Stress Interact to Modulate Sociability in Mice.” Presentation, International Meeting for Autism Research, London, England. May 2008. Tilley, M.R, O’Neill, B., Han, D.D., and Gu, H.H. “Cocaine Does Not Produce Reward in the Absence of Dopamine Transporter Inhibition.” Neuroreport, 2009 20(1):9-12.

Karhoff, G. “Missouri Institutions Afloat: Higher Education and the Victory Ship Program.” Presentation, 51st Annual Missouri Conference on History in Springfield, Mo., Apr. 2009.

Loges, H. A. “World War I Memorial, Once Forgotten, Is Now Restored.” Bear Facts, Vol. 33, No. 03, Mar. 2009. Loges, H. A. “A Missouri World War I Memorial in Cheppy, France.” Presentation, 51st Annual Missouri Conference on History in Springfield, Mo., Apr. 2009.

Crystal Quist, senior sociology student, working with Dr. Brent Myer, Assistant Professor of Sociology Quist, C. “Knight Time Reading from the Boudoir.” MSA Online Journal. First place, Missouri Sociological Association, Alvin Gouldner Undergraduate Paper Competition, Oct. 2008; Presentation, MSA Conference, Oct. 2008.

Christina M. Thompson, 2008 graduate, working with Dr. Robert Wiegers Thompson, C. M. “Missouri’s Involvement in the Seminole Wars at the Battle of Lake Okeechobee.” Presentation, 49th Annual Missouri Conference on History in St. Louis, Mo., Apr. 2007.

Dr. Robert Wiegers, Professor of History Wiegers, R. P. “Missouri Guard’s Sacred Places: Preserving Guard History.” Bear Facts, Vol. 31, No. 3, Mar. 2007. Wiegers, R. P. “The Liberty Memorial: A Missouri Guard Sacred Place.” Bear Facts, Vol. 32, No. 3, Mar. 2008. Weigers, R. P. Chair and Commentator, “Lost Ships: Defeat in the Orient.” 50th Annual Missouri Conference on History in Columbia, Mo., Apr. 2008. Weigers, R. P. Chair and Commentator, “National Guard History.” Annual National Guard Association Meeting in Jefferson City, Mo., Apr. 2008. Wiegers, R. P. “Clark Rifle Range Ushered in New Era for Marksmanship.” Bear Facts, Vol. 33, No. 3, Mar. 2009. Weigers, R. P. Chair, “Memorializing Missourians at War.” 51st Annual Missouri Conference on History in Springfield, Mo., Apr. 2009.

Melissa Williams, a freshman public relations intern, compiled the information for this article.

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Professor Cherry energizes CMU radio by Don Cullimore, director of public relations Effervescence can be a prized quality in an academic setting. With the beginning of the fall 2008 semester at CMU, it arrived in the persona of the newly hired assistant professor of communication … and in measure roughly proportionate to her nearly six-foot three-inch frame. Dr. Kristin Cherry, herself not long from the classroom as a graduate student, brought a bright, fresh and positive presence to the classrooms of Central Methodist University, one that has already paid large dividends in student involvement in campus communications – especially the campus radio station. Sitting in on her class in Advanced Radio and Digital Audio Production, one is enveloped in her enthusiasm for teaching and for the subject – it rains down on the class like champagne from a freshly uncorked bottle. She later explains that she initially became interested in radio while attending a small college in Decatur, Ill., where she became director of its campus radio station. “I lived and breathed it!” she exclaims. At CMU, along with the advanced radio course, Cherry also teaches Mass Communications and Communications Skills (public speaking) and is planning to take on two more sections – Web Site Design and the First Year Program course Freshman 101 Survival Skills – in the fall. She adds that she likes teaching in classrooms where the number of students is relatively low. “I really don’t think I could function in a large, 300- to 400-person class,” she adds. “At CMU, I feel personally invested in each student’s future – I want to watch them grow.” Cherry’s passion for radio and strong personal interest in her students are reflected in her academic training: a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Millikin University, along with a master’s in sociology and doctorate in communications from the University of Missouri-Columbia. She was living in Tucson, Ariz., in the spring of 2008 when she saw the CMU faculty position listing on the Internet for a communication professor. “It was just like the job description was me,” she says. “I couldn’t believe it!” And after an on-campus interview, she was hired. When Cherry arrived at CMU last August to begin teaching communication studies, she was approached by fellow CMU Division of Social Sciences faculty member Collin Brink, who serves as advisor to the campus newspaper, The Collegian. He asked Cherry if she would oversee the campus radio station. She learned that outdated and worn-out equipment had resulted in a temporary close-down of the station. “I saw cobwebs on the radio equipment,” Cherry notes and adds, “but I saw the potential to create a radio experi-

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ence for students here.” Cherry was then approached by senior Whalen George, a communication major, and several other students who wanted to get the radio station back on line and broadcasting regularly. Thanks to a major donation of modern radio equipment by In photos above and below, Kristin Cherry discusses plans for programming and opportunities to do liveCMU alumfeeds for upcoming campus events in her radio class. nus Clyde Lear ’66, owner of Learfield Communications, and assistance from Learfield Internet technical guru Steve Mays, Cherry and her radio students were able to resurrect the old low-power AM campus radio station, KCMU, that barely reached across the campus, as a state-of-the-art Internet radio station that can be heard around the world – the new Eagle Radio. (See adjacent story.)

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Cherry also had approached Dr. Rita Gulstad, vice president and academic dean of the university, in the fall with a proposal to attend an Internet Broadcast Society conference to learn more about Internet radio. “It [the conference] was really eye-opening,” Cherry says, noting that she was able to meet a number of students and others already involved in Internet radio. “Everything sort of fell into place; but it’s not something I could have done by myself – it’s amazing the amount of help I’ve had from people on campus.” “The resurrection of radio, in a new high-tech form, is a welcome addition to the communication program at CMU,” says Dr. Robert (Bob) Wiegers, professor of history. “Credit for this accomplishment goes to Dr. Cherry and her band of students who wanted this to happen as much as the Social Science Division and Central desired it.” Wiegers says the new Eagle Radio Internet station provides a hands-on radio capability to match the theoreti-

cal aspects of communication students learn in class. “We expect great things from Eagle Radio in the future and even more from graduates as they take their radio skills to the marketplace.” Cherry’s initiative in getting the radio station back in operation and the changeover to Internet broadcast capabilities also prompted praise from her students. “Dr. Cherry’s efforts have resulted in the CMU radio broadcasting program becoming one of the key areas in communication studies,” says Whalen George. He points out that Cherry makes sure her students are involved in every aspect of the station and also makes a point during class sessions of seeking their opinions and suggestions. “The work she has done with the communication department is amazing,” George adds, “and I feel that the many changes being made to the department will cause it to grow tremendously [through] the number of communication majors that will be drawn in.”

Eagle radio debuts Internet format by Don Cullimore, director of public relations After nearly a half century of traditional broadcast operations over the air, the Central Methodist University campus radio station has taken to the Internet. What began as KMOE radio in 1960 and later became KCMC, then KCMU radio, broadcasting as a low-power AM station that

Above, the official launch day of the newly-energized CMU radio station brought a live remote program to the air, which was broadcast into the Bergsten Dining Hall during lunch. Right, President Inman issues a hearty congratulations over the air.

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did not reach beyond the city limits of Fayette, is now Eagle Radio accessible through the Internet. Eagle Radio is now part of the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System Student Radio Network through the station’s online server, Backbone. One of the major advantages of this is that the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System partnered with CMU to become an iTunes station. When someone opens iTunes, he or she will have all of the choices on the left side of the screen: Music, CD, and Radio. If “Radio” is selected and then the category “College,” a list of college radio stations appears. CMU’s station is noted on that list as “Eagle Radio.” Then listeners can access CMU’s Eagle Radio both through iTunes and through the radio webpage – www.centralmethodist.edu/ eagleradio.html. This has dramatically increased the station’s listenership. “Central Methodist University moved into the digital age with the debut of Eagle Radio,” says Dr. Kristin Cherry, assistant professor of communication and faculty advisor for the radio station. “Broadcasting via the Internet opens up many new opportunities,” she adds. “It allows

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students to broadcast from anyplace that has an Internet connection. Sports, live news reports, and [campus] chapel are a few of our initial priorities. Not only does it provide mobility to our broadcast location, but it also allows anyone with access to an Internet connection to listen.  Alumni, friends, and family can keep in touch with the Central Methodist community with the click of a mouse.” The station programming is done through the online server, Backbone. Playlists are created and then scheduled to play at various times. The station plays a variety of music. Student DJ’s are allowed to play whatever genre of music they would like during their live shows. They can also bring in their own music to play, after it has been approved by the music director. During the Spring Semester the station had a weekly format (some programming will be automated during the summer): • Mellow Mondays- Sit back and relax to some mellow music at various times. • Trivia Tuesdays- Stay tuned for fascinating trivia facts throughout the day. • Wacky Wednesdays- Listen for some crazy music that you’ve probably never heard before! • Thumpin’ Thursdays- You’re guaranteed to hear hip hop music that will make you want to dance. • Flashback Fridays- Listen for your favorites from the 70s, 80s, and 90s. • Sportscast Saturdays- Listen for the broadcast of the CMU featured sporting event of the week. • Study-Buddy Sundays- You and your pals will definitely be able to study to the relaxing music. Throughout the day several hours of programming fit the above format, however not all day long. During the spring semester, that station had 10 key student staff members: Whalen George, station manager/ program director; Reggie Hatton, co-music director; Kevin James, co-music director; Chelsea Fuemmeler, news

Radio students, including station manager Whalen George (center) talk about issues involved in radio production.

director; Matt Sherman, advertising and sales director; Rachael Selby, sports director; Travis McDowell, community coordinator; Jessica Brooks, promotions director; Andy Cornilsen, production director; and Rashad Lee, PSA director. Students involved with the early radio station at CMU in the 1960s included Clyde Lear, who graduated from Central Methodist in 1966 and is now chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Learfield Communications in Jefferson City. Active in the broadcast field since 1973, Learfield Communications also has a Sports Division that is the preeminent leader in the collegiate sports marketing arena, with nearly 50 collegiate institutions and associations using Learfield Sports as their exclusive athletic marketing partner. As a Central Methodist alumnus, Clyde Lear has maintained a close relationship with the University. He recently donated a substantial amount of equipment to the campus radio station. This included two production studios complete with computers. “The equipment will enhance the quality of our in-house production,” says Dr. Cherry. “Now we can create PSAs, commercials, even pre-record a radio show at a professional level using the equipment.” To learn more about and listen to Eagle Radio, log onto

www.centralmethodist.edu/ eagleradio.html.

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Campus news

Lydia Patterson Institute/Central Methodist University partnership

by Michael D. Pope,CMU-UMC Liaison

Lydia Patterson Institute (LPI), El Paso, Texas, and Central Methodist University are partners in higher education and ministry. This historic relationship dates from the 1970s, and over the years there have been several LPI students who have attended CMU. One of CMU’s former LPI students, Hector Bencomo, originally from Juarez, Mexico, graduated with his B.A. from Central Methodist in 1986, went on to get a master’s from Lindenwood University, and now teaches in the Clopton School District in Pike County, Mo. More recently, Dr. Socorro de Anda, president of LPI, recommended two LPI students from the LPI graduating Class of 2007 to attend CMU: Esther Macias and Luis Yuen. Dr. Marianne Inman, president of CMU, agreed to accept Esther and Luis because of their academic ability and leadership promise. Both Esther and Luis were admitted to CMU for the fall of 2007. Esther enrolled and declared her major in early childhood education. Luis enrolled at the same time and declared his major in nursing. Unfortunately, Luis transferred to El Paso Community College in El Paso, Texas, after one year, leaving Central for family reasons. However, he was replaced by Gabriela “Gaby” Hernandez who entered as a freshman in the fall of 2008. She has also declared her major in nursing. Esther and Gaby are two of the finest graduates from LPI that Central has known and are making a significant impact on the CMU community through their activities and involvement in various organizations on campus. Their leadership is exemplary and their commitment to Jesus Christ and the church is without question. We are proud of our LPI and CMU connection! Michael Pope, who is the United Methodist Church Liaison for Central Methodist University, is responsible for helping promote the LPI and CMU relationship and raise scholarship funds to assist Central’s LPI students in achieving their goal of a CMU education. Contact him for more information or to schedule an LPI/CMU program at (660) 248-6390 or at mpope@centralmethodist.edu. His mailing address is 411 Central Methodist Square, Fayette, MO 65248.

Esther Macias (above) and Gabriela Hernandez (below) are both Lydia Patterson graduates enrolled at CMU.

Students study abroad

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During the summer of 2008, current CMU seniors Collin Johnson, a Spanish major, and Jordan Rustemeyer, a Spanish minor, studied in Costa Rica for a month, living with a Costa Rican family near San José. They attended La Universidad de Costa Rica from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. every day. They then had the rest of each day and the weekends to go on trips, explore the city, or do whatever else they found interesting. Places they visited include Arenal Volcano, Tortuga Island, the National Park in Manuel Antonio, and the National Theater and National Museum in San José. The trip was relatively inexpensive, thanks to the William Denny Baskett Study Abroad Fund and the Thomas and Lora Perry Award in Comparative Literature. Collin and Jordan agreed that the experience really helped to increase their knowledge of both the Spanish language and Latin American culture.

Collin Johnson (l) and Jordan Rustemeyer enjoy some ocean time off the coast of Costa Rica.

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Campus news

CIC conference builds on vocational exploration In March, five representatives from CMU traveled to Indianapolis, Ind., for a conference titled “Vocation in Undergraduate Education: Extending the Theological Exploration of Vocation.” Those attending included Dr. Marianne E. Inman, president; Dr. Rita Gulstad, vice president and dean of the university; Kenneth R. Oliver, vice president for campus life, dean of students, and director of athletics; Joy D. Flanders, assistant professor and retention coordinator; and Dr. Daryl Jefferies, assistant professor of religion. The VUE (Vocation in Undergraduate Education) Conference is intended to foster vocational exploration in campus communities through the formation of a Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE). This new initiative is being administered by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) with generous support from Lilly Endowment Inc. Over the past ten years, the Lilly Endowment has funded initiatives on 88 college and university campuses through its programs for the theological exploration of vocation. Following the success of this campaign, the CIC has begun to develop a national campus-supported network that would expand and extend the conversation about the theological exploration of vocation among both the original grant institutions and additional colleges and universities. To begin building this network, the Council scheduled the VUE Conference. The VUE Conference program defines five major purposes: deepening the understanding of the intellectual and theological substance of vocational exploration; examining the role of theological reflection and vocational exploration in a variety of institutional contexts; sharing knowledge, best practices, and reflection on experiences among cam-

puses; facilitating the incorporation of additional colleges and universities into this enterprise; and developing a network for sustaining an extended program in the theological exploration of vocation. Dr. Inman chaired the opening address, offered by Nathan O. Hatch, president, Wake Forest University (NC) titled “Higher Education and the Thirst for Meaning in Life and Work,” which set the stage for the remainder of the conference. Sessions covered curricular issues such as embedding vocation in the core curriculum, including a theology of vocation in the full curriculum, and advising for vocation. Beyond the curriculum, the conference addressed the effects of campus ministry and co-curricular activities on developing a “culture” of vocation on a college campus. Dr. Jefferies will facilitate the initial efforts at CMU by bringing the information gained from the conference to the campus. Informal meetings designed to gauge current interest and generate new awareness are being scheduled with the faculty and staff. From these meetings, it is hoped that a more formal process can be established to help CMU highlight areas where the idea of vocation is currently emphasized on campus, and identify where programs and curriculum can be created to advance the ideas. Says Jefferies, “CMU has an excellent foundation in its ‘character core’ and ‘leadership’ outcomes in the General Education program on which to build.” He is excited about the effect the conference will have on the University’s efforts, noting, “The conference was an important opportunity to connect with leaders from other campuses. We learned firsthand which approaches to ‘vocation’ were successful and what it took to make them succeed.”

YOUR Alumni now have the option to receive The Talon online instead of a printed copy. Email notifications will be sent when the Talon is available to all who choose that option. Login to the CMU Eagle Connection at: http://cmalumni.centralmethodist.edu and click the “I’d like to receive my Talon online” box under the Home Information tab in your account information.

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Campus news

Marshall new director of individual giving Alan G. Marshall (right) has been appointed director of individual giving at Central Methodist University, announced Theresa Davis, vice president for Advancement. As a staff member of CMU’s Advancement Division, Marshall will be responsible for developing and strengthening alumni and other constituent relationships and promoting their involvement in activities leading to financial support of the University. “We are very pleased that Alan has joined the Advancement Division and look forward to his key participa-

tion in the many good things occurring at CMU and planned for the future,” said Davis. Marshall graduated from Central Methodist College (CMU) in 1992 with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. He brings to the job 15 years of experience in sales and fundraising. Prior to coming to CMU, Marshall worked in sales at Joe Machens Ford in Columbia, Glen Martin Engineering in Boonville, and as a consultant with Great American Opportunities Inc. Marshall and his wife, Candy (Moser) ’94, live in Boonville, Mo., with their three sons.

Healy appointed associate dean of CLAS John F. (Jack) Healy (below), associate professor of English and chair of the CMU Division of English, Foreign Language, Philosophy, and Religion, has been appointed associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, effective July 1. He replaces Nancy Jones, who is retiring in June. It is a second retirement from CMU for Jones, who retired in June 2006 as a member of the Swinney Conservatory of Music faculty and was granted rank as Professor Emerita of music, and then was appointed associate dean. In his new position as associate dean, Dr. Healy will be responsible for special projects in the university

dean’s office. These include matters relating to the general curriculum, faculty development and other academic enhancements. Healy has been a member of the CMU English faculty since 2000 and a teacher for 24 years. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Creighton University and a Master of Arts and doctorate from the University of Kansas.

Two retiring from CMU Central is losing two of its finest academic members this spring. Dr. Ron Nutter, assistant professor of religion and philosophy, and Nancy Thompson Jones, professor of music emerita and associate dean of the University, are both retiring. Nutter has taught at Central since 2004. He brought a wealth of knowledge and a broad perspective to the religion and philosophy department. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Milligan College, an M.A. from Western Kentucky University, a Master of Divinity degree from Christian Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburg. Jones has been associate dean for three years. She retired from the Swinney Conservatory of Music in 2006 after a 19-year career teaching voice and pedagogy to CMU music students and 41-years of teaching voice and singing professionally. She was lured back to work in the Dean’s Office, working with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences on the Fayette campus. She will be teaching private voice lessons from her home in Columbia. Both will be missed by the entire campus community.

The Charitable IRA Rollover is back for a repeat performance! Thanks to recent federal legislation, persons age at least 70½ can make charitable distributions from their IRAs in any amount up to $100,000 directly to qualified charities, such as Central Methodist University, tax free. Please contact your financial advisor or Theresa Davis, VP for Advancement, toll free at 877-268-1854 or 660-248-6214, or via e-mail at tdavis@centralmethodist.edu for more information on how to make gifts of this type.

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Campus news

SIFE team makes its mark Julie Bennett, assistant professor of business, took members of SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) to the regional competition March 27 in Rogers, Ark., where they placed as first runners-up in a highly competitive group of teams. Bennett praised the hard work and dedication of the team and reported that most of them were offered internships or jobs with SIFE partner companies who helped sponsor the competition, including PepsiCo-Frito Lay, Kraft Foods, and Dannon. Following the competition, the SIFE team held an encore of their presentation for students, faculty, and staff on campus. With dignity and professionalism they talked about the group’s criteria and how they met each one. Criterion one was Market Economics. Projects included teaching elementary school children about “Kiddy Economics” and leading a seminar on improving economic development within Howard County. The second established criterion focused on Success Skills and included involvement at this year’s Career EXPO, as well as Dress for Success, a seminar for men and women entering the job market; both were in conjunction with the James C. Denneny, Jr., Career Development Center. The focus of the third criterion was Entrepreneurship. For this effort, SIFE worked with local Girl Scouts by first, helping them gain their business badges through a workshop on business skills; and second, helping with Girl Scout cookie sales on campus. The team also taught more than 55 business owners how to successfully build online businesses. Criterion four dealt with Financial Literacy, for which SIFE set up external programs for college students that explained about costs that accrue after college and about credit-building and mortgages. Criterion five focused on Environmental Sustainability. Not only did the group teach elementary students ways to become more “green,” but it also began a recycling effort on campus to reuse worn out athletic shoes. Some shoes went to be recycled into playground and track surfaces, while others found their way (intact) to youngsters in third world countries to be worn awhile longer. This goal will continue into the coming school year. Business Ethics was criterion six and was carried out via a business ethics oversized crossword puzzle. Used during the CMU Family Day, the puzzle provided an easy means of informing students, parents, faculty, and staff about business ethics. The last criterion dealt with Sustainability, primarily ensuring the CMU SIFE team’s long-term viability. During the year, students sold T-shirts, raised money from local businesses, increased membership, worked on their website, and attended a leadership fair. Bennett gave special recognition to Amy Dykens, assistant dean for institutional research, for serving as presentation coach, calling her “one of the best presentation coaches I have ever worked with.” Dykens responded by saying, “I was proud to be associated with this stellar group of students, and Heather Gibson (president) and Julie Shahan (vice president) should also be congratulated for their leadership of the team this year.” Representatives from the presentation team also explained their work to the CMU Board of Trustees in its May meeting. To see the full two-part presentation, go to youtube.com/centralmethodist.

The presentation team for SIFE included (l-r) Joe Garrett, Lisa Scrivener, Colleen Melanophy, president Heather Gibson, vice president Julie Shahan, and technical leader Matt Schieffer.

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What in the world . . .

by Cathy Thogmorton, editor

What in the world are we doing? It might be surprising to discover there are a number of intrepid CMU alumni who have chosen foreign, nomadic, and even exotic lifestyles. Not satisfied to spend their professional careers on known soil, these expats have scattered themselves across the globe to make differences in the lives of people in other nations and cultures. The Talon recently visited with a cross-section of former students of varying class years and careers who are taking the dreams and aspirations for a better world into the global community. A number of alumni currently in residence outside the borders of the United States of America were invited to participate. The following alumnae were gracious enough to share their lives with all of us.

Laura Etheridge Reese (in blue) takes her students to competitions all over Europe and the Middle East.

Laura Etheridge Reese Class of 1982 Laura Reese graduated from Central with a bachelor’s in music education. She taught for six years in Marceline and Boonville, and even a brief time in Taiwan and Japan, but she was always a wanderer at heart. She had found and married her husband, Tom Reese, while teaching at Kemper Military School in Boonville, but they were both restless. “I had always wanted to go traveling as a student,” Laura remembers, “but I just couldn’t make it happen

A Nigerian basket weaver takes the wares to market (above) and a rider participates in a Nigerian Culture Day (right). Life abroad can be varied, fascinating, and exotic.

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financially.” They decided to attend a hiring fair where international schools recruited— and found themselves teaching Your gifts to the Central Excellence Fund will in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. “We loved it so much,” give our students the opportunity to have new she says, “we stayed for 12 experiences and to make a difference in the years, working for a school owned by Saudi-Saudi Arabian world. Won’t you consider making a difference Airlines. We had benefits like in the lives of our students today? pilots and traveled all over the world. If Saudi flew there, we went!” It was there that their For more information email family grew to include daughter Rhiannon, born in 1995. probb@centralmethodist.edu After teaching in Jeddah, the or visit the CMU website. Reeses wanted to stay in the Middle East, so they taught for two years at the American Community School in Beirut, Lebanon, leaving only when the political unrest became too PASSPORT dangerous for them to remain. PASSEPORT CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY They are both currently PASAPORTE Code/Code/Codigo Passport No/No du Passport/No de Passporte Type/Type/Tigo employed at the American USA 150000578 P International School of Lagos Surname/Nom/Apellidos SCRIVENER in Lagos, Nigeria, where Given Names/Prenoms/Nombres Laura teaches band and choir LISA and Tom teaches humanities. Nationality/Nationalite/Nacionalidad Although Laura graduated UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Date of birth/Date de naissance/Fecha de nacimiento with a BME from Central, 14 Jul 1987 she is now qualified to teach Place of birth/Lieu de naissance/Lugar de nacimiento Sex/Sexe/Sexo English as a Second Language MISSOURI, U.S.A. F (ESL), drama, and International Date of issue/Date de delivrance/Fecha de expedicion Authority/Autorite/Autoridad 21 Aug 1999 Baccalaureate music as well. United States Date of expiration/Date d’expiration/Fecha de caducidad “One has to be flexible to teach 21 Aug 2009 Department of State overseas!” she says. Spring is Endorsements/Mentions Speciales/Anotaciones the busiest time of her school See Page 27 year since she takes her stuP<USASTUDENT<<CENTRAL<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< dents to music contests; but, 1500000035USA5759210MO652480<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<09 instead of going to district and state contests, their trips take them to Europe and other exciting locations. “Two to three times a year,” she explains, “I’m travel- for the last nine years. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in religion from CMU and followed it with a Master ing with kids to places such as Paris, Luxembourg, Rabat, of Divinity from Candler School of Theology at Emory London, Brussels or Geneva. I’ve also done choir festivals University in Atlanta. Her journey began, she says, in her in Oman, Qatar, and Kuwait. It’s so fun!” Laura’s daughter is a typical expat kid, raised entirely studies at Central Methodist, where she prepared for the ministry as a religion major. She was active in the Wesley overseas. She is fluent in English, French, and Arabic and is adaptable to any situation. It would seem that she comes Foundation and in chapel services. Early in her work at Candler, Emily had the chance to by that honestly enough. visit Dublin (Republic of Ireland) for the World Methodist Evangelism Seminar, where she got acquainted with many Emily Davison Hyland people from the Irish Methodist Church. After she reClass of 1997 turned to the states, she couldn’t get Ireland off her mind. “I certainly never expected to move outside of the Reverend Emily Hyland has lived in Northern Ireland country,” she explains, “but I feel it is where God wants 39

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Emily Davison Hyland shows off baby Hannah (left) and prepares her for her very first sermon! Bottom photo: she is peacemaker and pastor of this Irish Methodist Church in eastern Belfast.

bombing, one of the worst in Ireland’s history. One time during a church service several years ago, she remembers, a barricade was erected down the street from the church during a riot and then set on fire. “In the spirit of perseverance that is so inherent here,” Emily says, “we finished our worship before we got too smoked out!” She feels her background at Central has helped her to mediate when necessary, especially between Catholics and Protestants. “I am able to come into these situations as a neutral party . . . I find I am able to talk to different people without being perceived as a threat,” she explains. “Perhaps my time at Central has equipped me best for this place through the legacy of giving me an open mind to different people and viewpoints.”

Nancy Khalifah Moyer Class of 1963

me to be, at this time at least.” She was invited to Ireland to serve as a minister for a year and went with the blessings of the Missouri Conference of the United Methodist Church, which had just ordained her as a Probationary Elder. Moving to Ireland not only fulfilled Emily’s desire to serve God, but it also eventually gained her a husband, David, and two children, Ben and Hannah. The church she pastors sits in east Belfast, Northern Ireland. Times have not always been easy. “I moved here two years after the Good Friday Peace Agreement,” she recalls, “but in my first years here I still experienced remnants of ‘The Troubles’ regularly through seeing military road checkpoints and armoured vehicles.” She served as a Chaplain during the inquest of the Omagh

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“Until student teaching, majoring in education was only a goal and an academic process,” says Nancy Moyer. “However, the moment I walked into that first grade classroom at Fayette Elementary School, I knew being a teacher was the right way to use my gifts and talents. I’ve never regretted it.” Nancy Moyer graduated with a degree in elementary education from Central and has worked in education ever since. She began her teaching experiences in the United States, including schools in Independence and Kansas City, Mo., Williamsburg and Newport News, Va., and San Antonio, Texas. When she moved to Germany, teaching for the Department of Defense Dependent Schools (DoDDS) Europe was a natural fit. DoDDS is the largest American school system located outside the continental United States and is charged with educating the dependent children of military personnel and civilian employees in Europe. It is a branch of the Department of Defense Education Activities (DoDEA), which operates 192 schools in 12 foreign countries, seven states in the U.S., Guam, and Puerto Rico. Except for a three-year break, Nancy has been part of DoDDS ever since she began working for it. She has taught students, teachers, administrators. Currently she is an instructional system specialist; as such, she coordinates curriculum events and conferences, and places student teachers from stateside colleges and universities in military schools in Europe. “Over a five-year period,” she asserts, “I was able to impact an enormous number of students through instructing approximately 900 teachers. I also trained teacher study group leaders and provided facilitation, consultation, presentations, and coaching to the different school groups with whom I worked.” Being based in Germany has allowed Nancy to travel for both work and pleasure. She has worked with other educators at schools in Bahrain, Belgium, England, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, and Turkey. She has been in Germany since before the Berlin Wall fell.

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Maria (Mimi) Yaeger Tindall Class of 1975

Nancy Khalifah Moyer: serving military and civilian families

“I will always remember the differences between the stark coldness of the East and the hustle and bustle of the West,” she reflects. “Although I didn’t go to Berlin to be part of the celebration at the historic time when The Wall came down, it was with great excitement and a breath of relief that I returned there to do some work and see the reconstruction of a city that again became the capital of a nation unified.” Comfortable on either side of the classroom, Nancy loves learning. It has led her to earn a master’s in education from the College of William and Mary and additional studies at the Principals’ Center at Harvard Graduate School of Education, Boston University, George Mason University, Indiana University, and the Continuing Education Program of the University of San Diego. She says, “My education degree from Central has served as a strong foundation. I received a liberal arts education as well as skills to enter a profession. “The size of a college or university isn’t necessarily the qualifying factor that makes it great,” she continues. “Central’s Christian principles are the same as those on which I was raised. “Living and traveling around the world has been exciting beyond my wildest expectations and has broadened my mind, tried my patience, and strengthened my sense of humor.” Nancy says if she were living in the states, she would still be teaching; but there is a special benefit to being able to teach in DoDDS. “If I were living at home, I would be doing what teachers do—teach and support the youth of our nation,” she explains. “My teaching in an American school system for military children living overseas is doing the same thing. This experience provides a way to say thank you to those who wear the uniform.”

When Maria (Mimi) Tindall graduated from Central with a Bachelor of Science in Education, she never expected to be living in Canada and working with special needs children. A chance encounter on a French tour led to love at first sight with her husband, Bruce, who was from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Her life of working for Catholic and St. Louis public schools and as a child support investigator for the state of Missouri became merely memories. She’s been in Canada ever since. Mimi applied for and received an Alberta teaching certificate, but she decided to stay home to raise their daughter. By the time she went back to education, that certificate had expired. “I was intrigued by a newspaper ad to learn Applied Behavior Analysis in preparation to work with a preschooler with autism. I was hooked!” she admits. “I love the challenge of special needs children and the diversity of working with different disorders.” Currently Mimi is employed by the Edmonton Public Schools as an outreach consultant, working with a variety of special needs children in the schools. She says, “I deal with occupational, speech/language, physical therapy, behavior issues—whatever it takes to include these KG-ers [kindergarteners] in a regular classroom.” However, autism has become the focus of her efforts. “My passion is children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD),” she admits. With autism on the rise, one in 150

Mimi Yaeger Tindall in the classroom. Autism has become her calling.

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Alberta winters can be brutal with temperatures dropping to -35F. Nonetheless, school is never canceled and recess is held inside only if the temperature drops to -9 degrees!

persons now has the disorder (many more boys than girls), and the earlier the intervention, the greater the likelihood of success. “I have had the satisfaction of taking a non-verbal autistic child and getting him to verbalize,” she says. “Very rewarding, very thrilling, and at the same time, totally emotionally draining!” An autistic boy she is currently working with is attempting kindergarten for the second time this year. In his first attempt, Mimi says, “he couldn’t even sit for two minutes, had major meltdowns, no social skills, little language, and no eye contact.” The improvement has been remarkable. “This year is wonderful!” she beams. “His parents think I am a miracle worker, which really enlarges my head size! He has turned into a butterfly—verbalizing more, having fewer meltdowns, initiating conversations, and picking up social cues.” Her Central education, she thinks, prepared her to make a difference in a special way, other than teaching “normal” students in a regular school setting. “I liken my job to taking a piece of clay and molding it into something useful,” she admits. “I love the thrill of constantly ‘tweaking’ my strategies to find out what will work!”

admits. “None of which are here,” she adds. “I could be doing ministry in a place that has all the comforts . . . but, at this particular point in my life of ministry, this is where my gifts and talents are being used for the Kingdom of God.” Schooled in many religious doctrines, Thera is currently school advisor for the North Karamoja Diocese of the Church of Uganda, which is Anglican, arranged through the Mennonite Central Committee. She hopes Thera (r) is welcomed by her to be used as a bridge to new friend Nakiru Nancy on her join God to people, neighfirst day in Uganda. bors to neighbors, and cultures to cultures. Her work is rewarding in unconventional ways. Her job is to “come alongside students in their spiritual walks and be a conduit for their spiritual nourishment by forming relationships with, and encouraging students, head masters, teachers, and local persons in pastoral roles.” The effort is complicated by the sheer size of the undertaking, as well as other factors, such as language and poverty. “I hate the poverty,” she stresses. “My white skin is spotted and I spend many afternoons with a string of people asking for money. There are language difficulties as well as cultural differences to navigate.” It is hard. The image of crying babies and desperate mothers sometimes keeps her up at night.

Thera Freeman Class of 2005

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The most recent graduate, Thera Freeman, earned her bachelor’s degree from CMU, followed by a Master of Divinity from Duke University. During her time at Duke, she served as an intern in a number of capacities, including three months in Uganda on the African continent. Surprising even herself, she has returned to Uganda as a missionary on a three-year assignment. “I am a big fan of electricity, and hot water, broadband wireless Internet, coffee shops, drinking water out of the tap and going to the ballet,” she

Thera met these Ugandan women one afternoon. They tried out their English and she tried out her ngaKarimajong!

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On the other hand, she has had such warm and lovely experiences, too. “I love spending time with people and hearing about their lives . . .” she says, “slowly becoming a part of their lives. I love spending time with students, being a part of their spiritual nourishment. I love the music and dance and the lessons in hospitality.” She feels Central was core to her preparation for this work. In her own words: “One can never underestimate the power of a well-rounded liberal arts education, and I received a top-notch, well-rounded education at Central. My classroom education gifted me knowledge and taught me how to apply it and formed my time-management. “My education outside the classroom from professors, staff and fellow students is at least equal. It is outside the classroom that what was learned through reading, research, and writing was synthesized—where it all came together. This happened through discussions over meals. Cups of coffee. In student groups. Observation of those teaching living out what they taught with integrity and honesty.” Thera says she is not a “traditional missionary.” Rather she practices the ministry of presence. She learned some of that from CMU as well. “I learned a lot about myself and my gifts,” she points out, “but perhaps most importantly, I learned a lot about love. Loving to learn, loving to live a full and unafraid life, loving friends. In the long run,” she concludes, “making a difference boils down to loving people. The rest seems to follow.” [you may follow Thera’s blog at www.kissthejoyasitflies.wordpress.com]

Heather Burres Petry Class of 1994 Heather Petry and her husband, Lance, live in the farthest-flung region of the world from the United States in the Shandong Province of China. They have been there for almost two years. Heather graduated from Central Methodist with a bachelor’s degree in music, and she is certainly putting it to good use. She teaches singing for students from pre-school through high school at an international school, a private school for children of foreigners living in China. “The majority of our students are Korean,” she says, “but I have also had students who were

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Chinese-Canadian, French-Brazilian, Russian-Romanian, Russian, Norwegian, and American.” Fortunately, at least for the Petrys, the spoken language in their school is English. “I love teaching at the international school,” she says. “The children are very good students and are motivated to learn. I’ve been able to make friends with people from four different countries.” She admits, however, to being a bit intimidated by small children who can already speak three languages. She also discovered another challenge with languages. “One of the biggest challenges I face with my choir is that the children have a variety of accents. However, the training I received from Prof. Nancy Jones [at CMU] provided me with the tools I need to help my students overcome these obstacles. As they learn the proper mechanics and placement of singing, the accents fade and disappear. One of my happiest moments was when I closed my eyes during one of my classes and couldn’t tell that the children were from various countries,” she says. Heather remembers that she already had an interest in going overseas when she was in high school. She also recalls fondly the Janaway trip she took her sophomore year at Central with Dr. Joe Geist and Prof. Tom Yancey to New York City—Broadway plays, symphony, ballet, opera, museums, sightseeing. Then, she says, “I had the opportunity to spend a summer in Paraguay before my senior year. After that experience, I thought that I would like the opportunity to live or work overseas at some point.” Her husband already had experience teaching in China and dreamed of returning some day. That dream became a reality when Heather and Lance were offered their current teaching positions. Their son, Timothy, began first grade at the international school this year. “We’ve had a great time living in China,” Heather concludes. “Of course there are cultural differences, but it is fascinating to live in a country with such a long, rich history. Life here is challenging, but—at least for now—it really feels like home.”

Heather directs her joined choirs in their 2008 Christmas concert, singing a modified “Hallelujah Chorus” (above), and leads them in the closing song “O Come All Ye Faithful” (right).

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Campus news

Highway patrol visits campus The two law enforcement officers met with officers of Two Missouri Highway Patrol officers, Sergeant Paul Reinsch and Trooper Bruce McLaughlin, assigned to Troop LAE during a reception prior to the organized sessions. Reinsch, who F Headquarters in has been with the Jefferson City, made Highway Patrol several presentasince 1990, currently tions on campus in serves as the Troop February in a joint F public informaeffort by the crimition and education nal justice departofficer. He holds an ment, Lambda Alpha Associate of Arts Epsilon (LAE) crimidegree from Mineral nal justice organizaArea College and a tion, and the James C. Bachelor of Science Denneny, Jr. Career degree from Missouri Development Center. State University. During an open McLaughlin, session, Reinsch and who has been with McLaughlin made an the Highway Patrol informational presenfor 13 years, currently tation about their expe- Clockwise from left: Trooper Bruce McLaughlin, LAE member Kaitlin Rundel, LAE president Andrew Shelley, and Sgt. Paul Reinsch discuss law enforcement before the serves as a recruiter. riences, missions, and presentations. He holds a bachresponsibilities with elor’s degree in Latin the Missouri Highway American Studies and a master’s degree, both from the Patrol. They followed with a lunch forum for interested University of Missouri-Columbia. students.

Psychology students recognized for excellent presentations Five CMU students attended the fourth annual Missouri Undergraduate Psychology Conference, hosted by Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Mo., in November 2008, and two of those students presented and received awards for their original work. Matthew Silverberg (above) took first place in the Non-Empirical Poster Category for his “Social Bond Theory as a Predictor of College Student Binge Drinking.” Jessica Owens (left) took second place for her Applied Learning 44

Oral Presentation titled “Psychology Courses in Action: School Counseling Internship.” These presenters were supported by classmates and fellow psychology majors Marla Heldt, Kiley Lewis and Alethea Hansen, and Dr. Elizabeth Gold, CMU assistant professor of psychology.

New nursing news Dr. Shirley Peterson, associate dean of the College of Graduate and Extended Studies (CGES), has relayed good news just received for the nursing department. Official word has been sent that the CGES Master of Science in Nursing— Clinical Nurse Leader program has been granted a full five-year accreditation. This is the longest initial period granted by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

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Facing Facebook™

by Melissa Williams, Public Relations Intern

As Internet communication possibilities expand at an exponential rate, the online world is opening up to a larger portion of the population. Gone are the days when teenagers were the only ones participating in this trend. The Internet is now easier than ever to access and use. In fact, facing your fears is easier than ever with Facebook, a social networking website that allows members to search for and connect with friends, family, and classmates. The site lets users post photographs, videos, news, and information on their personal pages for all their “friends” to see and comment on. In addition, finding friends and family is easy using the site’s search tools, which allow members to connect with “friends” from all different areas of life—all in one place. Facebook allows users to contact all these “friends” in one place, using a centralized communication website with private and public communication tools. Since its creation in 2004, Facebook has expanded rapidly and now has over 175 million members. The original target audience was the college-age crowd (18- to 24-yearolds); but because of updates and improvements in the ease of use, the fastest growing member group today is women 55 and older. The hip and trendy Facebook is now for anyone and any age. Central Methodist University has also joined in the Facebook community. CMU has a fan page with 288 current fans, a group with 314 current members, a student group with 83 current members, an alumni group with 512 members, as well as an alumni band group with 115 members. Smiley Library and The Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Art also have fan pages with 69 and 49 fans, respectively. Many other student groups and organizations also have Facebook accounts or groups, such as the Humanities Division and alumni groups for several campus organizations and residence halls. Membership increases almost daily as new groups and pages are added. Clearly, Facebook is the new way to connect, for both current students and alumni; and getting connected is not as complicated as many believe. Peggy Robb ‘76, director of annual giving and donor relations, joined the Facebook

community in Feb. 2009, in order to communicate with the students who work for her during Phonathon. She realized students check their Facebook pages more than their email accounts. She says she likes the idea that students can “know right away our [donation] totals or any news that we might have for them.” Robb has also made connections with her family through the site and was surprised she could use Facebook to communicate with them, in addition to her students and colleagues. Even though she is new to the Facebook community, she hasn’t had trouble navigating through the site. Amy (Sneed) ’00 and Jeromy Hodge ’98 also joined the Facebook community within the past year, and like Robb, haven’t had much trouble with the site, saying it is easy to use. Amy observes, “[Facebook is] very user friendly.” They both currently use Facebook more than other alumni connection tools because it is more effective, only occasionally using regular email and other online networking sites. With Facebook, CMU is actively involved in the connection process with the University groups and pages. These pages have current information on campus events and trivia contests, and provide places for open communication on topics related to CMU.

There is now a link to Facebook in the bottom right corner of the CMU website. Also in this location are links to Central’s YouTube page (www.youtube.com/centralmethodist), an online video database, as well as CMU’s Twitter page (www. twitter.com/cmuniv), another new online social networking website. Profile page of the CMU Facebook page.

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One of Facebook’s best features is the handiness of all communication found in one location. Facebook is free and the only requirements are an e-mail address and being more than 13 years old. Because of this widespread availability, Facebook is certainly an easy way to communicate online with almost anyone. Jeromy has found that he uses Facebook to connect with more than just alumni, sometimes talking with coworkers who live out of state, as well as some local family and friends. As a teacher, Amy has begun to use Facebook

to communicate with her own students, as well as her family and other alumni. She explains, “I talk with a few family members, and sometimes post information to students who are terrible with answering their phone or e-mail. And, there are times when I post assignments and sound files.” Robb and both the Hodges note the opportunities for alumni and current students to connect via Facebook’s groups and pages. On one page, alumni offer advice to incoming freshmen; others post current campus events for

Questions? Worried about Privacy?

What if I change my mind?

Facebook has customized privacy settings that let you control who can see you, as well as the information you post. After choosing who can search for your account in order to add you as a friend, you can also control what information is seen in the search. Facebook also lets you block any specific individuals you do not want to have access to your information. All of these settings can be controlled by clicking the privacy controls within the settings tab located at the top of the page in the list of links. You can also control who you accept as friends, as well as delete them at any time. This way, you can enjoy the benefits of Facebook connectivity without having to go out of your privacy comfort zone.

If you are unhappy with your Facebook account, it can be deactivated by clicking the settings link at the top of the page and then the “Deactivate” button at the bottom of the list of setting choices.

Need help getting started? It is easy to sign up. Just go to www.facebook.com and follow the simple on-screen instructions for activating an account. Then, you can search for friends and family, either by name or through the Friend Finder, which allows you to search, using networks and people with whom your friends are friends. Facebook is very user-based, so it can be as simple or complex as you want it to be. Facebook caters to you and your needs by allowing you to personalize your settings and controls.

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What about the CMU Eagle Connection, CMU’s other alumni connection service? CMU Eagle Connection is similar to Facebook, but it is private—for Central alumni only. Both websites have their advantages and can be good tools for staying in touch with classmates. The main difference is that Facebook lets you connect and communicate with friends and family, both from CMU and from other areas of life, all in one place. CMU Eagle Connection, however, is more private and specific, with more direct ties to the University’s information database.

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Facebook Glossary Important Words to Know APPLICATION n. 1. A standard addition to every member’s Facebook account, such as Virtual Gifts, Notes, Photos, Groups, and Events. 2. An optional addition to a member’s account, such as Scrabble or Bumper Stickers. My newest application lets me play Scrabble with my college lab partner. FAN n. A supporter of a product, organization, or person who shows devotion by adding the chosen page to his or her profile. Gary became a fan of Smiley Library. FRIEND n. 1. A person allowed, after your approval, to see and post on your wall. I have 112 friends. – v. 2. To request that a member add you to their list of Friends. My daughter just requested to friend me on Facebook. GROUP n. A page for members with shared interests, such as work, religion, simple fun, and hobbies, which allows members to post comments, photos, and other content to share with all the group’s members. Susan joined a group to connect with her alumni sorority sisters. HOME PAGE n. The opening screen after login, which displays the news feed, requests, applications, and the status update box. My home page shows my friends’ daily activities. INBOX n. Facebook’s email-like messaging center where users can send and receive private or group messages. No one can see these messages but the sender and recipient(s). I have two messages in my inbox. NEWS FEED n. A constantly updated, but not all inclusive, list of friends’ activities, such as status updates, changes to their profiles, wall posts, or the addition of new friends or groups. I saw Mike’s new profile picture in my news feed. PROFILE n. A member’s personal page, which shows the wall, profile picture, and friend lists, and may contain links to additional pages containing other information, applications, and photos. Have you been to my profile to see my new picture? STATUS UPDATE n. 1. A space where a user can provide updates on his/her daily activities. 2. New information on friends’ activities. Jill’s status update says she is at work. WALL n. A space where members can post messages, photos, videos, web links, or other content to share with friends. I have three new wall posts.

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the benefit of both students and alumni. Networking is also another potential benefit. However, one of the greatest advantages to Facebook is the opportunity to expand publicity for CMU. Potential students can connect to current students or alumni before they even come to campus. Because Facebook is great for connecting with old friends from different times of life all in one place, more people are also exposed to the great things that are happening at Central, simply because of the incidental learning that comes from the public nature of posts and information. All of a person’s Facebook “friends” can be accessed in one convenient location, so it is easy to communicate with everyone, both from CMU and not. Consequently, everyone also has access to information about Central. More alumni need to join in the online support of Central and its students, especially since Facebook is a free and easy method of online interaction. If we continue to expand our Facebook community, more and more publicity and communication potential will exist. The possibilities are endless. In fact, some alumni and students are already beginning to note this benefit and appreciate the possibilities, so hesitant alumni should face their fears and get involved. Says Amy, “More of the world should know about CMU!”

CMU Eagle Connection CMU Eagle Connection (http://cmalumni.centralmethodist.edu ) is a private way to contact other Central Alumni. This online communication database is for CMU only and allows users to search for classmates by name, graduation year, and major. Eagle Connection allows alumni to post pictures and videos, as well as update information to their personal profiles about address changes, marriages and name changes, and the birth of children. This information is available for other alumni through the website, as well as to the University. Like Facebook, CMU Eagle Connection has groups, a new feature that allows alumni to gather based on common interests. There is also information about current events on campus and within the alumni community. Users can RSVP to these events through the site. All alumni can also read The Talon online through Eagle Connection, although an account login is required to view the Class Notes section. Users can also send information via Eagle Connection to the University to be published in the Class Notes section. Users can even make an online request to receive a copy of The Talon magazine exclusively online to conserve resources and lower printing costs. In order to use CMU Eagle Connection, alumni need their ID number to log in. If you do not have this number, you can find it on the label of your copy of the Talon magazine, or you can contact the University and we will send it to you. (ID inquiries can be sent to advance@centralmethodist.edu).

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Campus news

Opera fest The Swinney Conservatory of Music gave two performances of the spring CMU Opera Fest in February, presented by the CMU Opera Workshop, an annual spring production of the faculty and students of the music department. Some years the performance is a single opera, such as last year’s Magic Flute; however, this year saw a smattering of music from Viennese and American operetta works, including selections from Don Giovanni, Rigoletto and Lakme. Performances also featured Mozart divertimenti by CMU students plus a guest performance by CMU alumnus Tom Arnold ’79, a tenor. Guests of the Opera Fest sampled international desserts while enjoying the performances.

Singing and a little dancing (upper left) were the order of the day for Opera Fest. Performances included those by senior Lauren Hardcastle and alumnus Tom Arnold ’79 (above) and senior Josh Reed (below).

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This semester saw The Little Theatre present two major works that ran the full gamut of emotions. The Little Theatre first staged the well-known play Oleanna in early spring. Written by David Mamet, it premiered in 1992; in 1994 it was adapted into a film, which Mamet also directed. It is considered to be one of Mamet’s more controversial plays and can be seen as a critique to modern idealism. The inspiration for the play came from the writings of an 18th Century Norwegian composer who, through his music, conceived a Utopian society called Oleanna; it symbolized the ideals of a supposedly perfect world, ideals that he subsequently ridicules in order to reveal their contradictory nature. In the Little Theatre’s production of the play, John, a college professor deals with accusations of sexual harassment by his student, Carol. The more they converse, the deeper the web entangles both of them. “This production approaches the script in a multi-faceted and engaging fashion involving multiple actors play-

ing the parts of Carol and John,” said Mark Kelty, CMU assistant professor of theatre and director of The Little Theatre. The second play, presented in April, was a rollicking musical mystery comedy called Lucky Stiff, by Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty. The action centers around a hapless man, Harry Witherspoon (Richard Mitchem), who inherits $6 million from his uncle. Of course there is a catch—he must take the corpse of dear uncle Anthony (William Jackson) on “vacation” to Monte Carlo to do all the things he himself had enjoyed. Trailing along are a woman (Violet Vonder Haar) whose dog shelter will inherit everything if Harry fails to follow every instruction to the letter, and an optometrist (Jordan Brennan) and his ditzy sister, Rita (Kristen Jennerjohn), who has embezzeled all the money Harry will supposedly inherit. It was an evening of madcap mayhem and theatrical twists, and a wonderful way to end the semester.

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Campus news

Providing opportunities for future generations of students Terry and Elaine Henderson, both class of ’83, look back on their days at Central Methodist University with appreciation for “the education, the opportunities, and the experiences” that would help them develop both personally and professionally. Terry, a successful businessman, and Elaine, a superintendent of schools, are now in a position to offer Central the financial support that will help new generations of CMU students reach their own goals— and they provide this support gladly. “We both came to Central as kids from small towns,” Elaine says. “This is where we met, where we began our life together, and where we developed our potential. We see ourselves as a link in a chain, and we want to make sure the same opportunities that were available to us are available in the future to other students.” The Hendersons annually contribute to the Central Excellence Fund, are involved in the Eagle Athletic

Campaign, helped finance the new Student and Community Center, try to participate in the University’s capital campaigns, and have named Central a beneficiary of their estate plan. Terry, who serves as vice-chair of the Board of Trustees at Central, says that his and Elaine’s bequest is unrestricted, meaning the University can use it where the need is greatest. Still, they would like to see at least a portion of the gift go toward scholarships, as they received scholarships when they were students. “Someone else’s gift made it possible for us to continue at Central,” Elaine says. “Central just feels right for a lot of kids, but without scholarships an education can be out of reach.” Terry and Elaine agree that it is very exciting to help today’s students open doors to personal success and hope that more graduates will get involved. “It is important,” Terry says, “that we help Central continue to prosper.”

To discuss establishing an estate gift, please contact Vice President of Advancement Theresa Davis at 660-248-6214 or tdavis@centralmethodist.edu.

A Christmas gift for CMU Shortly before the end of the calendar year 2008, Central was the recipient of almost $2.3 million designated to the endowment. Because of the recent economic downturn, Central’s endowment has been adversely affected and the boost from this gift was a true blessing. This gift has a long history. The donor, James T. Eaton, class of 1928, set up a trust in 1961. In a letter at that time, he stated that 46 percent of his estate was to go to Central after the death of his mother and his wife. He estimated the proceeds for Central to be between $40,000 and $60,000 and hoped that it would be at least 20 years before Central received this money. Eaton died in 1968 at the age of 61. The trust continued to take care of his loved ones for 37 years after his death. The trust matured in 2005 when Mrs. Eaton passed away. This is an excellent example of what a planned gift can do. While Eaton intended for this gift to make a differ-

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ence, he probably had no idea of the tremendous impact he has made on the students of CMU.

The Magazine of Central Methodist University

This photo of James Eaton was taken in 1961. He received a Distinguished Alumni Award from Central in 1963. Although he died in 1968, his legacy lives on through his bequest to CMU.

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Campus news

Bench dedicated to memory of Medlock

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Spring 2009 The Magazine of Central Methodist University

Support the Central Excellenc Fund today.

Members of Alpha Phi Gamma, family and friends gathered on the campus of Central Methodist University on the afternoon of May 3rd to celebrate the life of Derek A. Medlock ’05, dedicating a granite bench in Epple Park in Derek’s memory. President Marianne Inman accepted the granite bench on behalf of the University from Derek’s Alpha Phi Gamma fraternity brothers in a program given by the fraternity. The ceremony, filled with memories and emotions, celebrated the life of a young man who came to Central full of energy and dreams of conquering the world. Derek A. Medlock earned his B.A. in mathematics with a minor in physics from Central Methodist University in 2005. During his time as an undergraduate, he was a member of Central’s men’s soccer team under the direction of “Coach Moz,” a tutor, and a physics lab assistant. Derek aspired to be the best… the best soccer player, the best student, the best friend…simply the best at everything he did. Following his graduation from Central, he entered Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla, Mo., to seek a degree in civil engineering. Unfortunately, Derek’s life was cut short on October 10, 2008, when he was fatally injured in a car accident. Derek A. Medlock will continue to live on in the hearts of his fraternity brothers, family, and friends, and he will continue to inspire those who knew him as the “true gentleman.”

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Campus news

Biochemist Keith Gary ’82 newest member of the Board Central Methodist alumnus Keith Gary has been elected the newest member of the CMU Board of Trustees. A 1982 graduate with a B.A. in biology from Central, Gary has an extensive and impressive list of credentials and experience to bring to the board. These experiences began with his service while in college as an EMT-paramedic for the Howard County Ambulance Service in Fayette. Gary earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry in 1993 from the University of Missouri – Kansas City (UMKC). He also has completed postdoctoral training as a fellow in the Department of Psychiatry and as a fellow in the Neuropsychopharmacology Training Program, Department of Psychiatry, both at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Currently Gary serves as the director of program development for the Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute Inc. in Kansas City, Mo. Prior to that appointment, he served a joint appointment at the Department of Pharmacology, University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington, Conn.; as assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry, at the same university; and as research assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School in Hanover, N.H. Gary serves in more than a dozen advisory positions, mostly in the Kansas City area, including: co-founder,

WIRED Biosciences Interest Group, Kansas City; co-chair, Clinical Research Advisory Committee, Kansas City; co-chair (Summit Planning), Missouri Math, English, Technology, and Science Coalition, Jefferson City; vicechair, Board of Directors, National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Kansas City; and vice-chair, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, UMKC, Kansas City; as well as membership on numerous medical and medicine-related boards. Gary has been honored by UMKC with the Alumni Achievement Award; by the University of Connecticut Health Center with the RISE Award; by Dartmouth Medical School with the Hitchcock Foundation Award; and by the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders with the Young Investigator Award. He serves as a reviewer for several organizations and journals, holds one patent, and has published extensively. Gary makes his home in Pleasant Hill, Mo. In a related vein, three CMU Trustees have stepped down. Robert Siler ’47 retired for personal reasons, and both Jim Kimball ’80 and The Rev. Jim Bryan have completed their eight-year cycle of service to the Board.

Homeless . . . for a day Members of Alpha Phi Omega (APO) staged a homeless demonstration, a box-a-thon, on campus in May. Their “box city” represented the kind of life many people survive on a day-to-day basis. The service organization was raising awareness and raising money at the same time for a homeless shelter in Columbia, Mo. They raised $80.20 from the campus community in their 24 hours of living on the street. Senior Lindsey Williams says it got a little cold overnight, but someone brought them warm brownies at 3 a.m. to keep their spirits up!

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V-12 Navy Hall of Sponsors The V-12 Navy College Training Program (photo above) was designed to supplement the force of commissioned officers in the United States Navy during World War II. Between July 1943 and June 1946, over 125,000 men were enrolled in the V-12 program in 131 colleges and universities throughout the United States, including Central College. Following a reunion in 1994 of Central’s V-12 men, they began collecting funds for a scholarship. That scholarship was first awarded in 2003. This spring, with the advent of another reunion of the V-12ers (see article, p. 12), the scholarship fund grew to $25,000, bringing it to the Hall of Sponsors Level. The group will continue to add to the fund, hopeing to reach the Presidential Level.

Those present for the unveiling of the V-12 Hall of Sponsor Scholarship included (from left): Paul Keuter, Bob Cosgrove, Carl Niewoehner, John Johnson, Bob Bower, Al Hair, and Warren Alford.

Three new Hall of Sponsor scholarships named June Chon Neville Hall of Sponsors

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A new Hall of Sponsors scholarship has been named for alumna June (Chon) Neville ’58. Originally from North Korea, she was sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Teas to attend Central her junior and senior year. She was active in Alpha Phi Alpha social sorority, Student National Education Association, Phi Beta Fraternity for the Creative and Performing Arts, and Kappa Chi. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in music education in May 1958 before marrying Dr. Pat Finley Neville, also a Central graduate. The couple lived in Texas and Oklahoma before Dr. Neville’s passing in 2005, after which Mrs. Neville lived with her brother in Oklahoma until her death on April 12, 2008. The June Chon Neville Hall of Sponsors Scholarship

was established through a planned gift by Mrs. Neville, which matured upon her death.

Dr. Raymond Holden Jr. Hall of Sponsors Dr. Raymond Holden Jr. x’29 established an estate gift that became a Hall of Sponsors scholarship. He attended Central from 1926-1929. While here, he participated in track, was a member of the Collegian staff, and was president of the Chemistry Club. He earned his bachelor’s and doctorate degrees from Washington University. The Dr. Raymond Holden, Jr. Hall of Sponsors Scholarship was established by an estate gift prior to his death on April 7, 2008.

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Campus news

Hairston Hall of Fame inductions

NAIA honor to Oliver

Central Methodist University's Hairston Sports Hall of Fame held a special induction session Feb. 7 (photo below) to recognize outstanding basketball teams from past years. The 1996-1997 Women’s Basketball Team (28-8) that won the Heart of America Athletic Conference Championship and made it to the Sweet Sixteen in NAIA competition and the 1999-2000 Women’s Basketball Team (28-9) that also made it to the Sweet Sixteen in NAIA competition were honored. Also recognized was the 1997-1998 Men’s Basketball Team (26-8) that made an NAIA National Tournament appearance in the HAAC Conference.

Kenneth Oliver, CMU’s vice president for campus life, dean and athletic director, has been elected to serve on the National Administrative Council of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). Considered one of the most prestigious arms of the NAIA, the Council is comprised of four committees that oversee NAIA operations involving Awards and Statistics, Championships, Rules and Ratings, and Experience and Enhancement. Oliver has served as vice president of campus life and dean of students since July 2005 and was given the added responsibilities of athletic director in July 2006. He joined CMU in 1999 as assistant football coach, head women’s golf coach and physical Central Methodist University is heading to New York City. education instructor. Prior to coming to CMU, he had Tour leader is none other than Dr. Joe Geist (with umbrella). served on the football coaching staffs at William Penn Estimated cost is $1700-2000/double occupancy College in Iowa (where he also (Price includes round-trip airfare from Kansas City, 4 nights lodging in served as director of student the heart of the city, 4 Broadway shows, entrance fees to museums, and all athlete retention), Fort Scott Community College in Kansas, transfers.) and Northwest Missouri State University. Oliver holds a bachelor’s If you . would like to make an advance degree in physical education and health and a bachelor’s reservation or receive more information, degree in communications and please contact Tracy Crowe Jones ’94, theatre from CMU (1993), and director of alumni relations, at a master’s degree in athletic 877-268-1854 x56234 or administration and health Space is limited. from Northwest Missouri State tjones@centralmethodist.edu University. He holds faculty rank as an assistant professor.

Remember Janaway? Broadway Shows! World Class Museums! June 23 – 27, 2010

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Athletics

Spring Sports Recaps Spirit Squad The CMU Spirit Squad had a very active and successful year during 2008-09. In January, the dance team earned top-three finishes in all three categories of the UDA National Dance Competition in Chicago, Ill. The ladies finished first in hip-hop dance and second in open dance. In the solo dance category, sophomore Lauren Darby (St. Charles, Mo.) received first place. The spirit squad later took fifth overall at the Heart of America Athletic Conference Spirit Squad Championships Feb. 14 at Benedictine College. They placed in the top five spots in all five categories. Over spring break, the squad traveled to Myrtle Beach, S.C., to participate in the Cheer LTD Nationals at CANAM. In its first time competing in the all-girl group stunt category, CMU finished as the runners-up. Central Methodist also earned a fifth-place finish in coed cheer, while placing seventh in all-girl cheer. The CMU squad competed against 32 teams from across the United States and Canada at the competition.

Women’s Basketball The Central Methodist women’s basketball team had the program’s best season in more than five years, qualifying for the Heart of America Athletic Conference tournament. The Lady Eagles nearly pulled off a big upset in the first round of the tournament, falling to top-seeded Evangel University by just five points in Springfield. One of the biggest wins of the season came Jan. 12, when CMU knocked off MidAmerica Nazarene University 78-70 in Olathe, Kan. The Lady Eagles made 17-of-21 free throws in the last seven minutes of the game to clinch the win. More than half of Central Methodist’s losses on the season were margins of eight points or less, with eight losses by five or fewer points. Two players earned All-HAAC Conference honors for the Lady Eagles. Junior Brittany Elliott (Chicago, Ill.) was named to the third team, while junior Marquita Smith (Chicago, Ill.) made the honorable mention team. Smith was also named the HAAC’s co-Newcomerof-the-Year and was selected as conference player-of-the-week twice during the season.

Baseball The CMU baseball team battled rain and poor weather throughout the season, forcing the team to cancel all but four non-conference games. Despite the conditions, the Eagles improved their record from a year ago, including doubling their number of Heart of America Athletic Conference wins from the 2008 season. Central Methodist, which had only five seniors on its roster, recorded one of its biggest wins of the season April 5 when the Eagles posted an 11-0 win in five innings over Lindenwood University. It was one of just eight conference losses this season for the Lions, who finished as the HAAC regular-season and tournament champions. A pair of sophomores, third baseman Tyler Belt (Macon, Mo.) and catcher Jeremy Middendorf (St. Charles, Mo.) received All-HAAC honorable mention honors for Central Methodist.

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Athletics

The Mabee Athletic Facility is nearing completion. Its dedication will be part of the Homecoming 2009 festivities Oct. 1-4.

CMU goes 1959

1964 1969 1974 1979

1994 1999

1984 1989

2004

Thursday

• Gaddis Lecture presented by Clyde Lear ’66

Friday

• Friday Forum presented by Dr. C. Fred Bergsten ’61, “The Global Economic Crisis and the Obama Administration” • All-Class Social Hour from 5:30-8:00 p.m.

Saturday

• Parade at 10:00 a.m. • Tailgate lunch at 11:00 a.m. • Football game vs. William Jewell College at 1:00 p.m. Additional events include an alumni baseball game and dedication of the new Mabee Athletic Facility. For a complete schedule visit the Homecoming Event page at http://cmalumni.centralmethodist.edu/hc09.

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Athletics

Men’s Basketball The men’s basketball team completed one of the most successful seasons in school history in 2008-09, finishing 28-7 with a berth in the NAIA Division I Men’s Basketball Sweet 16. The team’s 28 wins marked the third-most ever at CMU and the ninth season in Head Coach Jeff Sherman’s tenure that he has led his team to 20-plus wins. The team opened the season winning its first 12 games, then added another 10-game winning streak in the second semester of play. The Runnin’ Eagles spent five weeks ranked in the NAIA Top 25 Coaches’ Poll, getting as high as number 18. After finishing as the Heart of America Athletic Conference regular-season and tournament runner-up, CMU made its sixth appearance in the NAIA national tournament. The trip to nationals was a memorable one as the Runnin’ Eagles knocked off number 4-seed and annual tournament powerhouse Georgetown College (Ky.) in one of the biggest wins in school history during the first round. The team’s season ended with a loss to eventual national champion Rocky Mountain College (Mont.) in the Sweet 16. Senior Jeff Blauvelt (Linn, Mo.) and junior Matt Sherman (Fayette, Mo.) both earned All-America Honorable Mention honors for CMU. The two players became the 32nd and 33rd players to join Central Methodist’s 1,000-point club. Sherman surpassed the milestone in a Dec. 8 victory over Iowa Wesleyan College, and Blauvelt joined him on senior night Feb. 19 in a win over Lindenwood University. Jeff Sherman earned his second consecutive HAAC Coach-of-the-Year honor, while three players were named to the All-HAAC Conference teams. Blauvelt was a first team selection, Matt Sherman a second team pick, and junior Brock Edris (Carthage, Ill.) was named to the honorable mention team. Edris also set a school record by shooting 91.5 percent from the freethrow line during the season, shattering the previous record of 88.7 percent by Brad McCarty during the 1993-94 season.

N A I A The chance to play in the NAIA National Tournament was a great experience for athletes, band members, students, college personnel and alumni!

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Track & Field The Central Methodist University track & field teams had outstanding indoor and outdoor seasons in 2009, setting 19 new school records. The Eagle men earned a runner-up finish at the Heart of America Athletic Conference Outdoor Championships after placing third as a team at the Indoor Championships. Head Coach Jeff Hoskisson was awarded the HAAC Men’s Coach-of-the-Year title at the outdoor championships. The women’s team also had a strong season, placing fifth indoor and sixth outdoor at the conference meets. During the indoor season, freshman Rebeca Barajas (Ashland, Mo.) set school records for the CMU women in the high jump, long jump, and triple jump. Her triple jump record came at the HAAC Championships to help her qualify for the NAIA Indoor National Championships. On the men’s side, six school records were set during the indoor season: freshman Eric Peer (Stockton, Mo.) in the 200 meters; sophomore John Lehman (Jefferson City, Mo.) in the 55 hurdles and 60 hurdles; junior Will Freeman (Bloomsdale, Mo.) in the shot put and weight throw; and freshman Josh Whitener (Imperial, Mo.), senior Austin Mallott (Odessa, Mo.), sophomore Kevin Couty (Jefferson City, Mo.) and freshman Colton Gehrke (Grove, Okla.) in the 800 relay. In the outdoor season, Barajas duplicated her indoor performance, breaking CMU records in all three jumps. Fellow freshman Jaime Guffey (Browning, Mo.) also got her name in the record books in the 100 hurdles, while sophomore Megan Turner (Fulton, Mo.) set the discus throw record. The CMU men’s team has also set five school records outdoors. Freeman, sophomore Josh Vaughn (Fulton, Mo.) and junior Lloyd Dugan (Perry, Kan.) set records in the hammer throw, 110 hurdles and discus throw, respectively. Two relays also had recordsetting performances: the 400 relay team of Whitener, Mallott, Couty and Peer; as well as the 1,600 relay of Whitener, freshman Gary Jones (Jefferson City, Mo.), Couty and sophomore Daniel Jacobs (New Haven, Mo.). In addition to the 19 school records, seven men and three women also received HAAC athlete-of-the-week honors during the indoor and outdoor seasons. Barajas led the way as a six-time selection.

Softball The CMU softball team had another record-breaking season, but they came up one win shy of the NAIA Softball National Championship Tournament for the second straight year. The Lady Eagles posted a 37-16 record on the season, which was three more wins than their school record from 2008. The Lady Eagles’ season came to an end with a heartbreaking 3-2 loss in game three of a best-of-three series against Missouri Valley College in the Heart of America Athletic Conference tournament championship May 3. Central Methodist finished as the conference regular-season and tournament runners-up. After opening the season 5-0 at a tournament in Ridgeland, Miss., CMU returned to earn wins over Stephens College Feb. 24 in its first doubleheader at the new Cox Softball Complex. Head Coach Pat Reardon achieved another milestone when the Lady Eagles defeated Stephens April 16, marking his 400th win as CMU’s head coach. Reardon repeated as HAAC Coach-of-the-Year in 2009, after also earning the award in 2008. Senior first baseman Katie Dove (Webb City, Mo.), sophomore third baseman Stephanie Sullivant (Liberty, Mo.), junior pitcher McCall Kenney (Cookville, Texas) and junior pitcher Chelsea Fuemmeler (Salisbury, Mo.) all received HAAC player- or pitcher-of-the-week honors during the season. Fuemmeler and Sullivant were each recognized twice. Dove, Sullivant, Kenney and Fuemmeler also represented CMU on the All-HAAC first team, while freshman right-fielder Kelsey Johnley (Troy, Mo.) and junior second baseman Jessica Taylor (Milan, Mo.) were selected to the second team.

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Athletics

Jeff Blauvelt

Eagle All-Americans

Jessica Henderson

Katie Dove

Athletic Awards

Jeff Blauvelt, Men’s Basketball Justin Gerald (preseason), Football Rael Rotich, Volleyball Matt Sherman, Men’s Basketball

Estes Prize in Athletics Jeff Blauvelt Darla Pannier Outstanding Female Athlete Award Katie Dove James M. Luetjen Award Jessica Henderson Cavanah True Eagle Award Michael Forck (not pictured)

NAIA Scholar-Athletes Katelyn Bass, Women’s Soccer Tyler Belt, Baseball Elizeba Boit, Cross-Country, Track & Field Garett Cook, Football Andrew Eggert, Baseball Michael Forck, Football Amy Geurin, Volleyball 58

Rachael Gorman, Spirit Squad Jessica Henderson, Softball Abby Holman, Spirit Squad Emily Jahrling, Cross-Country Emily Jahrling, Track & Field Chris Janssen, Football McCall Kenney, Softball Christy Laxton, Cross-Country,

Track & Field Danielle Leggett, Volleyball Lisa Macon, Spirit Squad Kari Salmon, Softball Jessica Taylor, Softball Andrea Tessereau, Volleyball Lindsey Williams, Track & Field Michelle Wilson, Volleyball

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Athletics

Three coaches receive HAAC honors Three CMU Head Coaches received a great honor from the Heart of America Athletic Conference by being named Coach of the Year. Head Coach Jeff Sherman earned Coach of the Year honors for the fifth time in his tenure at CMU, including the second year in a row, while leading the Runnin' Eagles to a 20-plus win season for the ninth time in his career. The 2008-09 CMU Jeff Sherman Pat Reardon Jeff Hoskisson team currently boasts an overall record of 25-5, and earned an automatic bid to the Buffalo Funds-NAIA Division I Men's Basketball Championship by finishing second in the HAAC regular-season standings. Central Methodist University head softball coach Pat Reardon was recognized as the 2009 Heart of America Athletic Conference Coach-of-the-Year, earning the honor for the second straight year. This season, Reardon led the Lady Eagles to a school-record 37 wins, after recording 34 wins a year ago. On April 16, Reardon surpassed a coaching milestone by recording his 400th win as Central Methodist’s head coach. Reardon’s 2009 squad also finished the season as the HAAC regular-season and tournament runners-up. His team, which will lose just two seniors, had six athletes named to the HAAC All-Conference first and second teams. For more information about Central Methodist University athletics, visit www.centralmethodist.edu/cmathletics. Sign up for eScores at escores.stretchinternet.com to receive score updates via e-mails or text messages. Jeff Hoskisson, Central Methodist University’s head track & field coach, was recognized as the 2009 Heart of America Athletic Conference Men’s Outdoor Track & Field Coach-of-the-Year. Hoskisson, who received the coach-of-the-year as voted by the head coaches from the HAAC, led the CMU men to a runner-up finish at the 2009 HAAC championships last weekend, after the team placed third at the indoor championships in February. Six of the Central Methodist men received HAAC athlete-of-the-week honors during the outdoor season. Hoskisson’s men’s team has also set five new CMU records during the outdoor season, while having five athletes achieve NAIA “A” or “B” standards in their events.

JOIN CMU FOR THE 2009 HAIRSTON HALL OF FAME INDUCTIONS

On Sept. 5, the 2009 Hairston Hall of Fame inductions will be held during halftime of the CMU vs. Culver-Stockton College game. The game begins under the lights at 6 p.m. Individuals who will be honored include Leigh Yarick Trumbore ’99, women’s basketball team; and Michael B. Davis ’83, women’s basketball coach from 1988-2000. Five teams will also be inducted into the Hairston Hall of Fame: the 1935-36 Men’s Track Team, 1975 Football Team, 1975 Baseball Team, 1979 Volleyball Team, and 2002 Men’s Cross-Country Team. Spring 2009

2009 Dr. James Luetjen Golf Tournament The 18th Annual Luetjen Golf Tournament will be held on

Friday, July 17, 2009 at

Hail Ridge Golf Course Boonville, Mo. 4- Person Scramble $100 per person

Registration, 8:30 a.m. Shotgun start at 9:00 a.m. Contact Ken Oliver, 660.248.6224, or Sherry Wells, 660.248.6346, for more information

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Central matriarch, Helen Thogmorton, leaves warm legacy

Helen Gertrude Puckett—Mom—Mrs. T, as she was known to legions of college students—loved Central Methodist University. Her mother was Anna Pryor Puckett, and her father, Dean E.P. Puckett, was academic dean and acting president on multiple occasions at Central. She grew up a child of this campus. She began piano at age 4 with Dr. N. Louise Wright, beginning a love affair with music that lasted 86 years. She went to college here and met her other true love, Jim Thogmorton. They would have celebrated 65 years of marriage on March 23, 2009, had she not passed away on March 2nd. Mom and Dad were married in 1944 while he was serving as a World War II U.S. Naval officer. Later they lived in Denver, Colo., and Warrensburg, Mo., before returning home to Fayette in 1955 where he joined the Central staff as dean of men. Later, he would spend many years as dean of students and finally serve as Central’s director of alumni relations. Mom loved the role of hostess, beginning when we moved to McMurry Hall (which was then a men’s dorm) in 1955. She and Dad had students in the apartment much of the time, either discussing issues or babysitting my sister, Louann, and myself. Their first 4-year student group graduated in 1959; many of those former students became lifelong friends. Mom’s favorite time of year was autumn because it meant the campus would be alive with students once again. Mom and Dad spent many years traveling for the college after he became alumni director. They knew everyone and together remembered the names of most of the people they encountered. People would search them out at Homecoming and alumni events, remembering how much both of them loved, supported, and guided them as students. Everyone knew “Dean and Mrs. T.” For Mom, music was life. She played piano and organ; she sang alto in the A Cappella Choir while in school. Luther T. Spayde, then Dean of the Conservatory, was her instructor, mentor, and lifelong friend until his death in 1972. She earned a Bachelor of Music degree in 1943 and a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1957. She taught piano for many years, her students performing each semester 60

by Cathy Thogmorton, editor

in what is now the Willie Mae Kountz Recital Hall. Aside from her students, she preferred no external music playing because she always had sweeter music playing in her head. Parties were common at our house on Gridiron Street, especially around Christmas when Central’s Phi Betas (now SAIs) and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonians would end up at our house for hot chocolate, gooey butter cake, and singing around the piano. Mom was irrepressible. She kept her inner child alive and happy, a fact that could be both invigorating and frustrating. In the later years, no Christmas was complete without the yard display. When the first “children skating on a pond” were stolen, she engineered a house, an entire family of children, their dog, a snowman, and an angel to replace them. To be her daughter was to see and hear creativity in action. I remember listening to her play the piano every night after my sister and I had gone to bed. We’d call down our requests for her to play. She was also an artist in oils, watercolors, pencil, pen and ink, and sculpture. She had the unbridled mind of an artist, too. She would concoct great ideas and expect Dad to carry them out, a fact which often caused him great angst. Besides her husband, she is survived by her daughters, Louann Thogmorton Shaner of Hilton Head Island, S.C., and me, Cathy Thogmorton of Fayette. In addition, she is survived by a sister, Florence Puckett Morton of San Antonio, Texas, grandchildren Jami Shaner Mataya (Jim) and Rob Shaner (Thowaiba), and several nieces and nephews. A sister, Sue Puckett Koch, preceded her in death, as did her son-in-law, Robert Shaner. Mom belonged to all of us. She belonged to Central. She belonged to the thousands of students who came here and graduated four years later taking her laughter and love with them. She will be missed by many. Memorials are suggested to CMU. A new music award, The Helen Puckett Thogmorton Award for Excellence in Music has been established in her memory.

Helen Thogmorton was a remarkable woman who touched he lives of many thousands of people in a positive and beautiful way. Through her generosity and unselfish devotion [she] enriched the lives of so many. We will always remember the smile and the love and the way she had of making everyone feel special. She leaves a wonderful legacy of giving and caring and making a positive difference. Our memories are of her wisdom and laughter, of good times and a full life very well lived. The Hon. Ted House ’81

Spring 2009 The Magazine of Central Methodist University

The Talon


Alumni news

Alumni Association elects new leadership Newspaper publisher James H. (Jim) Steele of Fayette, of Commerce, Rotary Club, Round Table Club, and Mo., has been elected president of the Central Methodist Fayette Area Heritage Association. Steele was Fayette’s University Alumni Association Board of Directors and Business Leader of the Year in 2002. Judith (Judy) Engel Rethwisch of Fenton, Mo., has been Judy Rethwisch earned a bachelor’s degree in speech elected vice-president. from Central Methodist in Steele succeeds Ginger King 1965. In 1983 she received Luetkemeyer of Jefferson her master’s degree in theater City, a 1993 CMU graduate, from Lindenwood University. who had served as presiShe retired in 2000 after 35 dent since 2007. Steele and years of teaching drama, but Rethwisch will serve twoshe continues to be the fine year terms. arts coordinator at Affton Steele has been active High School. with the association, serving Rethwisch was a charter on the board for more than member of the American six years, most recently as Alliance for Theatre and vice president. Currently the Education (AATE) and owner, publisher and editor served as its president from of The Fayette Advertiser and 1999-2000. She also estabBoard members who attended the March meeting included (front, The Democrat-Leader, he has lished the Affton Center l-r): Judy Rethwisch, Jim Steele, Ginger Luetkemeyer; (back) Larry had a long career in the field Stage Community Theatre of communications, including Anderson, Tim Puyear, Dee Wyckoff, and Todd Oberlin. (ACT) in 1987 and still serves experience in public relations, as executive director. In adbroadcast, and print journalism. dition, she developed and serves as artistic director of He earned a bachelor’s degree in history and political scithe Metro South Arts Council. ence from Central Methodist in 1964 and a bachelor’s degree Rethwisch has been the recipient of many awards in journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia in and honors, including being honored by Affton High 1966. School with the naming of the Judith E. Rethwisch Steele received a Distinguished Alumni Award from CMU Auditorium. She was honored by CMU in 2006 with a in 1991. He is active in Fayette affairs, including FayetteDistinguished Alumni Award. Armstrong Area Betterment Group, Fayette Area Chamber

REMEMBER??

Time for the Class of 1959 to gather again!

50TH REUNION October 2-4, 2009 Come for:

REMEMBER!! Spring 2009

• Dr. C. Fred Bergsten’s Friday noon speech on the economy • The Homecoming Parade and Game • Drawing for the Class’ 10th Scholarship • And Surprises in our Future

Don’t miss the fun!

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Alumni news

Greetings to the alumni These are exciting times for all of us who have connections with our alma mater. As this is written, nearly 250 students on the campus here in Fayette are slated to receive degrees May 16, with an even larger number soon to graduate at the regional campuses. Think about it — a total of more than 450 graduates! Earlier this year, a goal was achieved which had eluded Central for decades as the number of students on the main campus topped the 1,000 mark. Enrollment projections for next fall are equally optimistic, if not more so. Other notable accomplishments, awards, accreditations, and physical improvements are noted elsewhere within these pages. Now to the point: This sense of enthusiasm and upward momentum has “taken hold” with members of your alumni association board of directors. For several years now our focus has been on working as a group in support of tangible, specific projects to supplement the work already being carried out by our energetic executive secretary, Tracy Crowe Jones ’94. For example, at Homecoming 2007, your board hosted a much-enjoyed display of Central memorabilia at a downtown Fayette storefront. And for the first time last spring, newlyminted graduates received a certificate of membership in the association featuring a personalized photo montage of the CMU campus. This effort is continuing with the 2009 commencement. Last summer, your board also hosted a special family event at the St. Louis Zoo and a similar gathering is set for this summer on June 28. The board also has been active with such projects as the Alumni Connections program, business mentoring, and so forth. A significant recent initiative is a plan to have ultimately a permanent display of historic Central photos and memorabilia to be located in the ground floor hallway and elevator lounge of the Student and Community Center. It’s our hope to include a museum-quality time-line which will tie CMU’s history with that of the nation and world. Innovative electronic technology

James H. Steele ’64, President

Alumni News

Newsmakers Daniel Schores ’50 serves as president of the Texas Senior Foundation. He led an endowment fundraiser adding $35,000 to its capital funds. Lee Woodward ’55 delivered the keynote address at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies in New Orleans. His address was entitled “Crisis and Recovery in Latin America.”

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will be part of this effort. Already a task force is in place for this project (including persons outside the board with particular areas of expertise). Another task force has been named to be part of the Homecoming planning process. In a nutshell, our alumni board is on the move, and we hope you can sense some of this vision. The board will gather for its annual retreat Aug. 7-8 here in Fayette. At that time we will look at a plan to reactivate a program of having class agents. As always, we strive to include a broad representation of alumni from various decades on the board. If you’re interested in serving, please contact Tracy Crowe Jones at tjones@centralmethodist.edu. Whether or not you serve in an official capacity, I hope you’ll find some avenue to involve yourself in one or more facets of CMU alumni activities. In addition to the zoo event noted earlier, the annual Alumni Band Concert in Fayette is set for the evening of June 20. Other activities also are on the calendar. But most important is Homecoming. This is that one special time of the year when alumni are invited to return to campus to renew old acquaintances — and at the same time to see what’s new. Fall is always a busy time, so I encourage you now to protect the weekend of Oct. 2-4 on your calendar. It promises to be a great event. (And we may even have an improved Highway 240 to make your trip into town a bit more enjoyable.) It’s a real honor to have been elected as your alumni board president, and I look forward to serving in the months and years to come. Also, I hope you’ll join me in expressing a heartfelt word of appreciation to Ginger King Luetkemeyer ’93 for her splendid work as president in 2007-2008. Please visit anytime you’re in Fayette, and I hope you have a great summer.

Al Rohrer ’57 plays tuba with the Sullivan (Mo.) Brass Band. He was a founding member of this group who joined together to “fill the empty city bandstand.” Since then, they have performed at the Harney Mansion Festival and held a Christmas concert at Sullivan

High School. Additionally, they play at nursing homes and other charitable events. Maurice Graham ’60 was named a 2008 Super Lawyer by the Missouri and Kansas Super Lawyers magazine. He was listed as one of the top 10 lawyers in the two-state region. Marilyn (Ashe) ’63 and John ’62 Macumber of St. George, Utah, are members of the Dixie Archeological Society and have spent many years traveling the world appreciating, studying, and advocating for protection and preservation of petroglyohs and pictographs, also known as rock art.

Paul King ’68 was a guest lecturer in an upper level managerial economics class at Central Methodist University and an employment law class at the University of Missouri - Columbia. He was selected as a 2008 Super Lawyer by the Law & Politics magazine and named to The Best Lawyers in America list for 2009. Dan Trampe ’69 practiced dentistry for 20 years and has retired from his two dental locations in Phoenix, Ariz. Steven Townley ’73 was the featured speaker at an environmental conference focused on river restorations and the Dead Sea Basin in Jerusalem. Attendees included government officials

Spring 2009 The Magazine of Central Methodist University

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Alumni news from Israel, Palestine, and Jordan. John Craig ’74 lives in Steelville, Mo., and plays horn with the Sullivan Brass Band. John, along with fellow alumnus Al Rohrer ’57, plays with several other musicians and performs many concerts throughout the year. The group members originally gathered to “fill the empty city bandstand.” They have also performed at the Harney Mansion Festival and held a Christmas concert at Sullivan High School. Sherry Roberts ’76 co-authored a textbook for secondary education, Personal Financial Literacy, through Pearson-Prentice Hall. She has also co-authored a secondary workbook, Math for Personal Finance, through the same publisher. Roberts is currently an assistant professor with the Jennings A. Jones College of Business at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tenn. Brad Broome ’78 works for The Hartford Insurance Group as a general adjuster working on claims in excess of $1,000,000. Allen Lee Edwards ’78 most recently worked as a worship leader in Blue Springs and Lone Jack, Mo. He also was the assistant band director at Oak Grove High School. He recently moved with his wife, Sharon (Smith) ‘78, to Ozark, Mo. Sharon (Smith) Edwards ’78 retired after teaching for more than 30 years, most recently in the Lafayette County School District in Higginsville, Mo. David Goodwin ’78 was named Teacher of the Year for 2008 in the Chillicothe (Mo.) R-2 School District. Sally Schwab ’78 is president-elect of the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, a national multicultural, multi-faith organization. It is devoted to providing education and improving the quality of ministry and pastoral care offered by spiritual caregivers of all faiths through the clinical educational methods of Clinical Pastoral Education. Sharon (McCall) Zoellner ’78 will be the superintendent for the Louisburg (Kan.) School District, beginning July 2009. Charles Broadus ’84 was recently awarded the Kay (Assel) Koenig ’46 volunteers much of her time both stateside and abroad. Since retiring from teaching in 1984, she has logged more than 18,000 hours volunteering at a hospital in her community. She has been on multiple mission trips, including 12 trips to foreign countries where she volunteers in orphanages, hospitals, and impoverished villages. Kay’s next mission trip abroad will be to Lithuania in September. Her husband, Lou Koenig ’49, has over 4,000 flowers and plants that he raises in their yard and private greenhouse.

Spring 2009

The Peterson Institute for International Economics, directed and founded by Dr. C. Fred Bergsten ’61, continues to be tied with the Brookings Institution as the “Top Think Tank in the World.” The institute is also recognized as ranking second (to Brookings) as having the most “Outstanding Policy Oriented-Public Policy Research Program.” These designations were given based on a survey that assessed more than 5,000 top institutions worldwide. Elite Edition Award from his employer, MBS Textbook Exchange. He also was the first recipient of the award in 1991. Robin (Bennett) Lyons ’85 is a charge nurse III with The Permanente Medical Group in California. Michael Ponder ’86 was appointed by Gov. Jay Nixon to serve on the Missouri State Board of Education. Patrick Brown ’87 is the pastor at Koinonia Missionary Baptist Church in Dallas, Texas. He recently received the Young Pastor of the Year award at the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance Human Relations banquet. He also is president and CEO of Zephaniah Enterprises. Eugene Peebles ’87, “The Talking Sax,” performed the national anthem at the Sacramento Kings vs. L.A. Lakers basketball game on April 7, 2009. Steve Watts ’88 has been performing at the Fireside Dinner Theatre in Ft. Atkinson, Wis., and was a featured performer in their New Year’s Eve production. He is now performing in New York City. Billy Webber ’88 is the head football coach at Thayer (Mo.) High School. His team made it to the 2008 State Championship high school football game. Kellie Weilbrenner ’89 lives in New York City and works as an intellectual property legal assistant for Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. John Bailey ’91 is the vice president and business development officer for Central Trust and Investment Company in Columbia, Mo. Dale Fearnley ’91 is a music teacher and choir director in the Affton (Mo.) School District. Chris Guerrero ’92 works as a quality manager for POETBiorefining in Macon, Mo. Holly (Loveall) Statler ’92 owns a homemade food com-

CMU Trustee Gregory Chandler ’76 was unanimously re-elected president of The AMOS Project in Cincinnati, Ohio. The project focuses on issues affecting low-income and working families, such as providing pre-apprenticeships for unskilled people wanting to learn a trade in the construction industry. Chandler is also senior pastor of World Outreach Christian Church. pany, Celebrate The Day Gourmet. All recipes are created by her. Matt Cordon ’94 received an award as a Rising Star Alumnus by the College of Information, Library Science, and Technologies at the University of North Texas. Polly (Burgess) Jackson ’94 recently passed the CCRN critical care certification exam and is now certified as a critical care nurse. She currently works as a bedside nurse in the medical surgical ICU in Washington, Mo., where she lives with her husband, Michael, and two children, Benjamin and Hannah. Brad McCarty ’94 is a regional sales manager for AAA Insurance. He lives with his family in Eureka, Mo. Tracey (Cross) Bechtel ’95 is the assistant director of special education for the Missouri Virtual Instruction Program. This is her second year with the program. Felicia (Gibb) Netolicky ’95 is the associate principal at Shawnee Mission School in Shawnee, Kan. Samantha Cardwell-Ward ’96 recently published the American Bar Association’s Spanish Legal Phrase Book. Linda (Ziegler) Fischer ’98 serves as the representative in the Missouri House for the 107th District. Justin Nabors ’98 is the music instructor for the Southern Boone County (Mo.) School District.

Andrea Johnson ’85 is the lay representative for Revolution, a United Methodist Church located in the urban core of Kansas City. Andrea and her sons have been involved with Revolution since its inception. The mission of Revolution is to create a Christ-like culture in which ordinary people are empowered to do extraordinary things by rethinking societal norms, removing the dividing barriers, and reshaping the future of the world. If you are looking for a church home, Andrea invites you to visit Revolution. Find out more information at their website— www.kcrevolution.org.

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Alumni news Christy Bischoff ’99 is the project coordinator for the Minneapolis Urban Initiative, a collaborative effort to implement evidence-based sex education in all Minneapolis middle schools. She also serves as a coordinator for the Anchor Project, a church-based initiative that serves the community in a way that addresses poverty issues, promotes social inclusion, and encourages relationships between people of different ages, cultures, and religions. Eric Eckhoff ’99 is the band director for the Van-Far School District. He lives with his wife, Sarah (Schroeder) ’99, and their children in Bowling Green, Mo. Lori Ann (Williams) Graves ’99 works at Research Psychiatric Center in Kansas City, Mo., as an RN liaison. Charles Barker ’01 works for H&R Block in Kansas City as a business analyst. Jenn (Rogers) ’01 and Rehan “Ray” ’03 Malik live in London, Ontario. They have two children. Ray is a mountie for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Rich Nixon ’01 coaches football at Hazelwood (Mo.) Central High School and won the 2008 state title. His coaching staff consists of fellow alumni Van Vanatta ’99 and Andy Bauer ’02. Kyle Platz ’01 deployed in March with the U.S. Army to Afghanistan as a battalion surgeon for the 501st Infantry Battalion from Fort Richardson, Alaska. Melissa (Krog) Savaiinaea ’01 was named the 2008 K-12 School Health Educator of the Year by the Missouri Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance. Bart Denbow ’02 is head coach for the School of the Osage (Mo.) boys basketball team. Before assuming this position, he coached at St. Clair where he guided the teams to two district

championships and two state quarterfinals. Beth Hilkerbaumer ’02 graduated from Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary in May with both a Master in Divinity and a Master in Marriage and Family Therapy. She lives in Chicago where she serves as the associate pastor at the Clarendon Hills Community Presbyterian Church. She was ordained on Dec. 28, 2008. Melissa (Ward) Knight ’02 is a behavior support classroom teacher in the Sherman Independent School District located near Dallas, Texas. Kellie (Piesbergen) Platz ’02 is continuing her residency in anesthesiology at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, Ga. Abby (Brummit) ’03 and Morgan ’02 Mayer have recently moved back to Lake of the Ozarks, Mo. Their oldest daughter, Scout, is almost 6, and their newest addition, Molly, will turn 1 in June. Sandy (Sumner) Holtgrewe ’03 works as a research partner at Florida State University in Panama City, Fla. Mark Snider ’03 is teaching K-4th grade music in the Emporia (Kan.) School District. Tiffany Brown ’04 teaches English and theatre at California (Mo.) High School. She is also English department chair, theatre director, and middle school volleyball coach. Todd Weakley ’04 is a Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper with Troop A in Lee’s Summit, Mo. Sarah (O’Hanlon) Land ’05 passed all four parts of the CPA examination. Only 28 percent of candidates pass all four sections the first time they take the test. She is employed at Crouch, Farley and Heuring CPAs of Farmington, Mo. Ty Moore ’05 and wife Ashley recently purchased CJ’s, a chicken wing restaurant in Columbia, Mo. Ty also is a claims adjuster for Shelter Insurance. Janet Baker ’06 works for Rusk Rehabilitation as a registered nurse. She specializes in physical in-patient rehabilitation for spinal cord injuries, strokes, traumatic brain injuries, and amputees. Adam Mustoe ’06 serves as youth director at Living Word United Methodist Church in Wildwood, Mo.

Alumni gathered at ChefBurger, owned by Rob Dalzell ’97, following the Runnin’ Eagles’ win in the first round of the NAIA National Basketball Tournament. About 75 friends and alumni attended the game. Pictured (l-r): Dale Hotze ’69, John Cater ’68, Joe Whisler ’69, vice president of campus life and dean of students Ken Oliver ’93, C.E. Mohn ’69, and Larry Tucker ’69.

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Jordan Willer ’06 graduated from the St. Louis County Police Academy. He is continuing his training with the fourth precinct St. Louis South County District. Kim Cullom ’07 teaches high school business in the California (Mo.) School District. She is also sponsor for the yearbook, FBLA,

Rachel (Crowl) McClain ’08 (right) and Erica (Smith) Trusty ’08 were honored by the Missouri Association of Colleges for Teacher Education as outstanding first-year teachers. They both teach at South Park Elementary in Moberly, Mo. and the junior class. Jamey Diffee ’07 completed his Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper training and now works Zone 16 in Troop C, serving Perry and Ste. Genevieve Counties. Glenna Parks ’07 is a corporate journalist for News Link Inc. in Lincoln, Neb. Jeri Bader ’08 teaches 4th grade in the Zalma School District. Nancy Sikobe ’08 is an assistant volleyball coach at Central Methodist Univeristy.

Marriages Melissa White ’92 and Patrick LeMay were married Dec. 20, 2008. Felicia Gibb ’95 and Eric Netolicky were married Aug. 30, 2008. Brenda Hays ’97 and David Ingwald were married Oct. 16, 2008. Katie Katcher ’00 and Chris Bauman were married Nov. 15, 2008. Kyle Schroer ’02 and Jamie Lynn were married May 24, 2008. Daniel Robertson ’04 and Cara Cooley were married March 14, 2009. Amber Boyce ’05 and Christopher Wingler were married Oct. 4, 2008. Tiffany Huey ’05 and Michael Treadway were married Nov. 22, 2008. Amy Proctor '05 and Kenny Secaida ‘04 were married July 19, 2008. Missy Distler and Gary Abramovitz, both class of ’06, were married Nov. 17, 2007. Derek Skaggs ’06 and Brandy Schlotzhauer were married Aug. 2, 2008. Molly Thompson ’06 and Joshua Monnig were married June 28, 2008. Crystal Keune and James Diffee, both class of ’07, were married Sept. 27, 2008.

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Alumni news Rachel Crowl ’08 and Kyle McClain ’09 were married June 7, 2008. Jill Sickmann ’08 and Jason Schmelz were married May 24, 2008.

Births John Gawason ’71 announces the birth of his granddaughter, Caleigh Catherine Palmer, born Oct. 28, 2008. Leah (Murphy) ’90 and husband Myron Gwinner ’91 announce the birth of their daughter, Jaelyn Marie Richelle, born Jan. 29, 2009. Mindy (Stillwagon) Bailey ’96 and husband Dave announce the birth of their daughter, Claire Katherine, born Nov. 14, 2008. Lisa (Kellogg) Aanonsen ’97 and husband Eric announce the birth of their daughter, Peyton Marie, born Jan. 21, 2009. Steve Foote ’97 and wife Andrea announce the birth of their daughter, Meaghan Elizabeth, born Jan. 17, 2009. Emily (Davison) Hyland ’97 and husband David announce the birth of their daughter, Hannah Lois, born Sept. 17, 2008. Sarah (Schroeder) and husband Eric Eckhoff, both class of ’99, announce the birth of their twin daughters, Ella Jacqueline and Allison Mildred, born March 17, 2009. Jenni (Pomajzl) Hackman ’99 and husband Samuel announce the birth of their son, Lane Henry, born March 26, 2008. Heather (Gandy) Sims '00 and husband Zach announce the birth of their son, Nathaniel Zachary, born Jan. 6, 2009. Lindsay Blaisdell ’02 and husband Wesley Guilliams announce the birth of their son, Van Alexander, born June 15, 2008. Rebecca Oaks ’02 and Steven Williams II announce the birth of their daughter, Samantha Lynn, born April 28, 2008. Erin (Keebler) Sullenger ’02 and husband Tim announce the birth of their son, Thomas Steven, born March 16, 2009. Mark Snider ’03 and wife Jessica announce the birth of their daughter, Amelia June, born April 28, 2009. Kristen (Conrow) ’04 and husband Greg Hough ’06 announce the birth of their son, Tatum Cole, born Nov. 20, 2008. Maria (Reid) Bickell ’06 and husband Dan announce the birth of their daughter, Madison Alana, born Feb. 7, 2009. Amber (Mason) Jones ’06 and husband Chad announce the birth of their son, Connor Edward, born Feb. 23, 2009. Proud grandfather is Dale Mason ’79.

Spring 2009

Deaths 1930s Elmer Jackson ’31 of Encinitas, Calif., died Feb. 26, 2009. Harold State ’32 of Meadville, Pa., died April 7, 2008. Hazel (Robinson) Tiberghien ’32 of Chillicothe, Mo., died Aug. 8, 2008. Emerson Hare ’33 of Bossier City, La., died Jan. 2, 2008. Vera (Grothe) Benson ’34 of O’Fallon, Mo., died Nov. 11, 2008.

Ernest Laske ’42 of Springfield, Mo., died Oct. 12, 2008. Charles Rouse ’42 of Columbia, Mo., died Oct. 13, 2008. Herbert Vollmar ’42 of Indianapolis, Ind., died Jan. 22, 2009. Charles Adams ’43 of Chillicothe, Mo., died Feb. 28, 2008. J.C. Patrick ’43 of Decatur, Ill., died April 30, 2009. Cathleen (Jenkins) Slaughter ’43 of Columbia, Mo., died Dec. 1, 2008.

Susan (Mason) Robuck ’34 of Mission Woods, Kan., died Nov. 13, 2008.

Helen (Puckett) Thogmorton ’43 & ’57, of Fayette, Mo., died March 2, 2009. (See article p.59.)

Darrell Seltsam ’34 of Columbia, Mo., died Oct. 19, 2008.

Charles Murphy Jr. ’44 of Decatur, Ill., died June 4, 2008.

Amy (Norton) Carey ’35 of Marshall, Mo., died Nov. 25, 2008.

Hanna (Bentley) Nagel ’44 of East Concord, N.Y., died March 1, 2007.

Ora (Kelley) Burlingame ’37 of Bellevue, Neb., died Dec. 30, 2008.

Betty Jo (Butler) Vogel ’44 of Hamburg, Iowa, died Nov. 20, 2008.

Rex Ross ’37 of Sun City, Ariz., died April 2, 2009.

Zona (Semmler) Craghead ’45 of Glen Carbon, Ill., died April 8, 2009.

Ernestine (Knight) Latimer ’38 of Bossier City, La., died Oct. 16, 2007.

Maxine (Brown) Lindsey ’45 of Waverly, Mo., died Dec. 16, 2007.

George Parrigin ’38 of Houston, Texas, died June 6, 2008.

Edna “Nitchie” (Clare) Sentenne ’45 of Bellingham, Wash., died Aug. 11, 2008.

John Breckenridge ’39 of Evansville, Ind., died Feb. 17, 2009.

Ruth (Walker) Tuggle ’45 of New Franklin, Mo., died Nov. 25, 2008.

Charles Cooper ’39 of Salisbury, Mo., died Dec. 24, 2008.

Robert Haynes Jr. ‘46 of Charlottesville, Va., died Dec. 23, 2008.

Anne (Swaim) Fritts ’39 of Sapulpa, Okla., died Nov. 4, 2008.

Steve Pauliny ’46 of Tulsa, Okla., died Oct. 19, 2008.

Raymond Fritts ’39 of Sapulpa, Okla., died Jan. 25, 2008.

Donna (Breckenridge) Betts ’47 of Pacific Palisades, Calif., died April 18, 2009.

Harold Harmon ’39 of Birmingham, Ala., died Aug. 3, 2007.

Donald Dierks ’47 of San Diego, Calif., died March 16, 2009.

1940s

John Lipscomb ’47 of Alpharetta, Ga., died Feb. 27, 2008.

Eleanor (Brown) Aubuchon ’40 of Dexter, Mo., died Dec. 26, 2008.

George Maupin ’47 of Northville, Mich., died April 14, 2008.

Ernestine Bennett ’40 of Overland Park, Kan., died Dec. 23, 2008.

Robert McRoberts ’47 of St. Louis, Mo., died Feb. 9, 2009.

John Nelson ’40 of Versailles, Mo., died April 6, 2009. Nannie (Payne) Hughes ’41 of Fayette, Mo., died Feb. 1, 2009. Mary Kate (Pflaumer) Casteel ’42 of Craig, Mo., died May 11, 2008. John Bird Jr. ’42 of Walnut Creek, Calif., died Feb. 10, 2009.

Ruth (Givens) McIlroy ’38 of Bowling Green, Mo., died Feb. 13, 2009. A native of Fayette, she remained close with many friends in the Fayette area and was a great supporter of the Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Art. She was the great-granddaughter of Mary (Kring) Givens, for whom Givens Hall is named.

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Alumni news Dorothy Mae (Murray) Ryan ’47 of La Mesa, Calif., died Jan. 15, 2009. John Young ’47 of Sapulpa, Okla., died Jan. 17, 2009.

Eagle Connection Join the other 600+ alumni who have already registered! UPDATE CONNECT COMMUNICATE Log in Today! Simply follow the easy steps below. 1. Visit http://cmalumni.centralmethodist.edu 2. Click on the “First Time Login” link at the bottom left. 3. Enter your last name. 4. Follow the instructions after “Account Lookup.” Enter your 1 to 6 digit ID number listed above your address on any copy of The Talon.

5. After you log in the

first time, you can create your own user name and password. Be sure to update your SECURE personal profile to help you stay in touch. That’s all it takes to become a member of the CMU Eagle Connection and explore all of the fun features it offers. Log in NOW! Questions? Contact Jenny Anspach at 660-248-6629.

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Marvin Perry ’49 of Fayette, Mo., died March 31, 2009. Harriet (Triplett) Stockbridge ’49 of Independence, Mo., died April 14, 2009. Betty Lou Sutton ’49 of Belton, Mo., died Dec. 1, 2008. Robert Vaughan ’49 of St. Joseph, Mo., died Nov. 10, 2008.

1950s Beatrice (Sheffield) Arnold ’50 of Sedalia, Mo., died Nov. 6, 2008. Ruth (McClanahan) Bicknell ’50 of Omaha, Neb., died Sept. 23, 2008. Gibson Cameron ’50 of Leesburg, Fla., died Jan. 21, 2009. Dale Cordes ’50 of Memphis, Tenn., died Jan. 23, 2009. Edward Frank ’50 of Howard, Ohio, died Nov. 17, 2008. Era Price Hatcher ’50 of Lake Ozark, Mo., died Jan. 6, 2009. Esther (Johnson) Newman ’50 of Fayette, Mo., died Jan. 19, 2009. Charlotte (Livermore) Parkhurst ’50 of Cleveland, Ohio, died Oct. 10, 2008. Eleanor (Stapleton) Perkins ’50 of Flushing, Mich., died Nov. 6, 2007. Galen “Mike” Radke ’50 of Palm Harbor, Fla., died Jan. 30, 2009. Donald Weakley ’50 of Nevada, Mo., died March 29. 2009. William Weber ’50 of St. Charles, Mo., died Sept. 18, 2008. Phyllis (Bruun) Ballew ’51 of Baldwin City, Kan., died Dec. 31, 2008. Kenneth Cotter ’51 of Colorado Springs, Colo., died July 2, 2008. Jo Anne Beard ’52 of Jacksonville, Ill., died Jan. 5, 2008. Dean Canan ’52 of Louisville, Ky., died Feb. 10, 2008. Gordon Olson ’52 of Chesterfield, Mo., died April 14, 2009. He was the father-in-law of Rev. David Stewart ‘83. Glennon Hollrah ’52 of Fredericksburg, Va., died July 8, 2008. Arthur Hampton ’52 of Columbia, Mo., died April 25, 2008.

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Alumni news Robert Bayley Jr. ’48 of Eugene, Ore., died July 25, 2008. Over the years, Dr. Bayley established four Hall of Sponsors (HOS) scholarships - the William Goff Caples HOS, the Julia Bayley Brewer HOS, the Mary Louise Perry HOS, and the Perry-Bayley Presidential HOS. All four scholarships were named in memory of members of his family who attended Central Methodist or were instrumental in its founding. After graduating from Central, Dr. Bayley earned a doctorate in education administration from the University of Oregon. He had a long career in education—from teacher to administrator. His establishment of so many scholarships at CMU exemplifies the importance he placed on a good education. Charles Kirkpatrick ’52 of St. Louis, Mo., died March 25, 2008.

Mary Jane (Anderson) Roberts ’67 of Fairbanks, Alaska, died Dec. 22, 2008. James Schmidtke ’67 of Alma, Mich., died Feb. 14, 2009. Kathy (Christie) Wills ’67 of Higginsville, Mo., died Dec. 15, 2008. Donald Simmons ’68 of Otterville, Mo., died Feb. 20, 2009. Pete Thornton ’68 of Mobile, Ala., died Dec. 23, 2008. Larry Foster ’69 of Blue Springs, Mo., died Nov. 12, 2008.

1970s Doyle Phillips ’74 of Maysville, Mo., died Nov. 5, 2008.

1980s

Joan (Brueggemann) Skelton ’52 of St. Louis, Mo., died Feb. 2, 2009.

Linda (Byrd) Terry ’84 of Spokane, Wash., died Sept. 15, 2008.

Charles Branch ’54 of Pinos Altos, N.M., died Aug. 29, 2007.

1990s

James Dalton ’55 of Steele, Mo., died Nov. 17, 2008. Buell LeFevre ’55 of Jonesboro, Ark., died Feb. 7, 2009. Lois (Scott) Bilbrey ’56 of St. Louis, Mo., died Feb. 10, 2008. Philip Edson ’57 of Ashburn, Va., died Nov. 13, 2008. Billy McKown ’57 of Flint, Mich., died June 6, 2007. James Morgan ’58 of Peachtree City, Ga., died April 26, 2007. Dorothy (Buermann) Knipmeyer ’59 of Bismarck, Mo., died Jan. 22, 2009. Robert Koch ’59 of Prescott, Ariz., died Aug. 29, 2008. Charles Spencer ’59 of Poplar Bluff, Mo., died Jan. 7, 2007.

David Austill ’95 of Columbia, Mo., died Aug. 18, 2008. Becky Moodie ’95 of Fort Worth, Texas, died March 3, 2007.

2000s Dane Nelson ’08 of St. Joseph, Mo., died Jan. 18, 2009. A memorial fund has been established by family and friends. This award goes to a senior music education student, who is chosen by the Conservatory faculty. The first “Dane W. Nelson Music Service Award” was awarded to David Sahm at Honors Convocation on April 19, 2009.

Friends of Central Jane Cochran of Columbia, Mo., died Jan. 5, 2009. She was a former instructor in Central’s nursing program. John Downing Sr. of Malden, Mo., died Dec. 15, 2008. Numerous generations of his family attended Central, including his wife, Marion ’34 and his daughter, Anne ’67. Jo-an Higgins, of Jefferson City, Mo., died March 6, 2009. She is survived by her husband, The Honorable Andrew J. Higgins ’43, a retired chief justice of the Missouri Supreme Court and a former member of Central’s Board of Trustees. Cornella Jackson of Kansas City, Mo., died Jan. 20, 2009. She was the wife of Central’s former business manager, Irving S. Jackson Sr. Her son, Jesse Jackson, graduated from Central in 1991. Willis Calhoun Royall Jr., of Winchester, Va., died April 22, 2009. He taught ornithology for Central Methodist in the mid-1990s. Nancy (Hodge) Shy, of Liberty, Mo., died Jan. 7, 2009. Her parents, Anna Mae (Besgrove) ’44 and Robert Hodge ’42, co-founded The Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Art, located on the campus of Central Methodist. Lois Winn of Plattsburg, Mo., died Feb. 28, 2009. A friend of Central, her late husband, Willis, graduated in 1939. She is survived by her brother, Gordon Gengelbach ’42.

Martha (Shelkop) Hartsock ’73 of Pocomoke City, Md., died April 4, 2009. Besides earning a degree at Central, Martha was a residence hall director and later secretary of the alumni relations office. After earning her degree, she founded Camelot Nursery School in Fayette. The family has established a memorial fund in Martha’s memory at Central Methodist University.

1960s Norman Burmont ’60 of St. Joseph, Mo., died Dec. 3, 2008. Nancy Borders ’63 of Gilliam, Mo., died Dec. 26, 2008. Margaret (Hansen) Krausch ’64 of Ellisville, Mo., died Feb. 11, 2008. David Mohme ’64 of St. Charles, Mo., died Oct. 17, 2008. Annie (Lowe) Hunt ’66 of Tipton, Mo., died Nov. 15, 2008.

Spring 2009

James Innes of Charleston, S.C., died Jan. 20, 2009. Innes was a former professor of art and art history at Central Methodist. Many of his works are held in permanent collections throughout the country. He also had countless solo and juried shows throughout his career. He is survived by his wife, Joanna (Dunnington), class of ’59.

Mary Crigler of Kansas City, Mo., a friend of Central, died Dec. 22, 2008. She was 103 years young. Before moving to Kansas City, Mary was an active resident of Fayette and supporter of CMU. Her husband, Edgar ’24, predeceased her. She is survived by her daughter, Mary Jane ’61 and sons, William ’59 and Lynn.

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Inscape winners The annual unveiling in May of CMU’s literary magazine Inscape was an occasion of pride and reward for students, faculty, and staff who participated in creating this unique book of literature and art. The book is published each year by Central’s Mu Lambda chapter of Sigma Tau Delta and is financed by the CMU Student Government Association. Faculty advisor is Dr. Jason Arthur, assistant professor of English. The work of approximately 20 writers and photographer was showcased in this year’s tome. Prize winners for the 2009 Inscape, are: • Marla Heldt, Gordon Hadfield Award for Poetry for “Kindergarten” and the Thomas F. Dillingham Award for Non-Fiction for “Volcano” • Amy Elliott, Kilgore Trout Award for Fiction for “Normal” • Melissa Williams, Kilgore Trout Award for Fiction for “Johnson’s Barn” • Brittany Honeycutt, Byrd Cooper Kirby Award for the cover of Inscape, a photo titled “Something Wicked This Way Comes” and the Elizabeth Stapleton Award in Art Education for her photo “Lady in the Window”

email We want your address!

Now is a great time to send your updated email address to the Alumni Office and keep up with what is happening at CMU. Central sends monthly enewsletters along with event notifications, announcements, and other notifications. You can email tjones@centralmethodist.edu to be added to the email list or update your profile on the Eagle Connection at http://cmalumni.centralmethodist.edu.

Top photo, Dr. Jason Arthur shares a laugh with Brittany Honeycutt, whose awards included one for the cover photo of Inscape. Bottom photo, Emily Jahrling (left) and Melissa Williams, two of the editors of Inscape, discuss the process of creating the book.

(We never sell your email address nor do we share your information with anyone without your permission.)

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Calendar of Events June

7 - July 16: “Under the Influence: Works of Penny Brown and her Students Who Have Entered the Art World” at The Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Art 20: CMU Alumni Band, Linn Memorial UMC 28: On the Wild Side - CMU Alumni Family Day at the St. Louis Zoo

July

10-11: Patience, the third annual performance of a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, The Little Theatre 17: Luetjen Golf Tournament, Hail Ridge Golf Course in Boonville 30-August 2: Fayette Area Community Theatre presents Once Upon a Mattress, directed by Jan Bagby, Linn Memorial UMC Assembly Hall 31-August 1: CMU Board of Trustees retreat

August

4: Commencement – CMU-Union Campus 6: Commencement – CMU-St. Anthony’s Hospital, St. Louis 7-8: CMU Alumni Board retreat 25: Classes Begin - Fayette campus

September

5: Hairston Hall of Fame inductions; football CMU vs. Culver-Stockton 12: CMU Tailgate in St. Charles, Mo., football CMU vs. Lindenwood 18: Fine Arts Celebration, CMU Student and Community Center 18-20: CMU Family Weekend, football CMU vs. Benedictine

October

TBA: The Little Theatre 1-4: Alumni Reunion Weekend 1-Gaddis Memorial Lecture, Clyde Lear 2-Friday Forum, Dr. C. Fred Bergsten, “The Global Economy and the Obama Administration” 3: HOMECOMING: Parade, football CMU vs. William Jewel 10: CMU Band Day - street, field, and drum lines 10: CMU Tailgate in Springfield, Mo.; football CMU vs. Evangel 16-17: CMU Board of Trustees meeting 25: Gems of Vocal Literature, Willie Mae Kountz Recital Hall 30: Halloween Organ Concert, Linn Memorial UMC TBA: Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Art Gala

Spring 2009

31: CMU Tailgate in Kansas City, Mo.; football CMU vs. MidAmerica Nazarene

November

1: Choir Concert (Chorale and Conservatory Singers), Linn Memorial UMC 7: Senior Day, Football CMU vs. Avila 19-24: Choir Tour 23-27: Thanksgiving Break for students

December

TBA: The Little Theatre 6: Choir Concert (Chorale and Conservatory Singers) – Linn Memorial UMC TBA: Student One-Act Plays 13: Concert Band Concert – Linn Memorial UMC 14-18: Finals 21- Jan. 4: Winter Break

For more information on these and other activities, go to www.centralmethodist.edu

We Still Have a Spot for You! Yes, there is still time to give to the Central Excellence Fund. The Central Excellence Fund helps provide funding for scholarships, as well as the day-to-day expenses of the University. Gifts received by June 30, 2009, will be recognized in the Honor Roll edition of The Talon. It’s not too late—we saved you a SPOT!

Questions? Call the Advancement Office toll free at 877-CMU-1854, ext. 56239, or email probb@centralmethodist.edu

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Spectacular spring phonathon Our exuberant student callers received $43,780 in total pledges during the recent Spring Phonathon. With your help, the students exceeded their goal by nearly $9,000! The students were divided into three teams for a friendly competition. The student callers were Laura Armstrong, Etsubteru Assefa, Nina Assefa, Curtis Bedor, Sarah Binder, Brandon Draisey, Cassie Eversmeyer, Doug Graves, Samantha Gross, Gabriela Hernandez, Sara Justus, Raissa Kiboko, Colleen Melanophy, Kate Otten, Walker Rice, Corrine Roller, Mara Silva, Julie Shahan, Jessie Terrell, Steve Urquidez, Chasity Wardlow, and Melissa Williams.

Pictured in photo: (l-r) row l, Julie Shahan, Mara Silva, Sara Justus, Gabriela Hernandez; row 2, Cassie Eversmeyer, Laura Armstrong, Chasity Wardlow, Jessie Terrell, Melissa Williams, Nina Assefa; row 3, Steve Urquidez, Brandon Draisey, Curtis Bedor

What’s New With You?

Your fellow alumni want to know what you’ve been up to. Name: _____________________________________________________________________________ Class: ______________ Address: ____________________________________________City: ________________________ State: ________ Zip: _________ Email: ____________________________________ Phone (H): __________________________________ Employer: __________________________________ Phone (W): _________________________________ Spouse’s name: ___________________________ Email: _______________________________ Send your news to: Spouse’s employer: ____________________________ Phone (W): _______________________ Tracy Crowe Jones Names and birth dates of children: _________________________________________________ CMU Director of Alumni Relations Additional news: _______________________________________________________________ Central Methodist University _____________________________________________________________________________ 411 Central Methodist Square Fayette, MO 65248-1198 _____________________________________________________________________________

You can also easily update your information on our website! Visit the CMU Eagle Connection at http://cmalumni.centralmethodist.edu to share your news, update your information, or connect with friends. 70

Spring 2009 The Magazine of Central Methodist University

E-mail: tjones@centralmethodist.edu Phone: (660) 248-6234 Fax: (660) 248-6270

The Talon


Eaglemaniacs fight cancer

Eagle Connection Become a member of Central’s own Online Community! http://cmalumni.centralmethodist.edu

UPDATE COMMUNICATE CONNECT

Spring 2009

For the second year, the CMU Eaglemaniacs Relay for Life team has devoted itself to fundraising for the American Cancer Society (ACS). So far in 2009, there have been a number of events to help the cause. These include a fish fry, the “Baseball for Babes” contest (as evidenced by the International team in photo below), Partylite sales, and coming up, a poker run. So far the Eaglemaniacs have raised a total of $1,700.39, with several more activities planned. This summer, all proceeds from working concessions at a dog show will be donated. On July 4th, the celebration in the Fayette City Park will be not only a great way to celebrate the holiday, but also to raise money for cancer research and have fun doing it. The Eaglemaniacs will sponsor a dunk tank, a bounce house, and water dodgeball. As part of the 12-hour Relay for Life event on the Courthouse Square on July 24-25, the Eaglemaniacs are selling photo luminarias. Similar to regular luminaria bags, these will have imprinted on them photos of loved ones who have battled cancer. The CMU team has had great success so far; with lofty goals and motivation, the ACS is sure to benefit greatly.

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Alumni Gathering Les Bourgeois May 7, 2009

411 Central Methodist Square Fayette, MO 65248-1198 Change Service Requested

Nonprofit U.S. Postage PAID Jefferson City, MO Permit No. 210

The Talon - Spring 2009  

Spring 2009 edition of the Central Methodist University alumni magazine

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