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WELCOME BACK CMU ALUMNI – WE’RE GLAD YOU’RE HERE! Central Methodist University • Fayette, Mo.

Vol. 141 • No. 6

October 23, 2013

www.centralmethodist.edu

Something for all at Homecoming 2013 Central Methodist University vis Field at 1 p.m., followed by well celebrate “A Hero’s Home- women’s soccer at 5:30 p.m. and coming” during annual festivities men’s soccer at 7:30 p.m. scheduled for FriEmeritus day through Sunbiology Prof. day, Oct. 25-27. Dan Elliott A busy weekwill serve as end of activities for CMU alumni grand marshal for the parade. and friends, area resiSunday Schedule dents, and faculty, Sunday (Oct. 27) staff and students is events include servicscheduled. es at Linn Memorial Friday Schedule Church (10:30 a.m.), Friday, Oct. 25 and the art exhibit in the will feature various Ashby-Hodge Gallery reunion activities for in Classic Hall (1:30the honored alumni 4:30 p.m.). classes (1948, ‘53, CMU Royalty ‘58, ‘63, ‘68, ‘73, ‘78, The CMU student ‘83, ‘88, ‘93, ‘98, ‘03, body has selected four and ‘08) from 5:30men and four women Dan Elliott 7:30 p.m. at Emmet’s as senior candidates for Kitchen and Tap in 2013 Homecoming King downtown Fayette. and Queen. The eight students will More recent alumni can at- take part in the Homecoming paCandidates for King include tend the Graduates Of the Last rade and will be introduced at the Decade (GOLD) reunion from 7 football halftime. Royalty will be Todd King, a communications studto 10 p.m. at D.C. Rogers lake crowned following the introduc- ies major from Springfield; Austin Long, a music education major near Fayette. tions. from Monroe City; Saturday Schedule Ryan Restemayer, Saturday, Oct. 26 an interdisciplinary highlights include the studies major from annual Homecoming Sullivan; and TaranA major Homecoming Parade downtown startjit “T.J.” Singh from event at 11 a.m. ing at 10 a.m.; dedicaOakville, Ontario, in Saturday will be the tion of a bronze sculpCanada. formal unveiling of ture adjacent to Classic Queen can“Synergy” by noted Hall at 11 a.m.; a taildidates include sculptor Larry Young. gate party on the lawn Amanda Branson, It will be the first of near Howard-Payne environment several planned pieces an Hall from 11:30 a.m. studies major from of art to be placed in -1 p.m.; an art exhibit Koeltztown; Ashthe Washburn Plaza in the Ashby-Hodge ley Hagen, a biolSculpture Park in front Gallery in Classic Hall ogy major from of Classic Hall. This from 1-4 p.m.; and an Kearney; Kendra will be an extension open house in the SteTwenter, an athletic of the Ashby-Hodge phens Museum in T. training major from Gallery of American Berry Smith Hall from Boonville; and SoArt. Additional details noon - 3 p.m. phie Wilensky, a about the planned Also on Saturday, communication sculpture park will be the Homecoming footstudies major from announced soon. ball game against Peru Plano, Texas. State kicks off at Da-

CMU Royalty

Full Homecoming Schedule on Page 2

Dedication Saturday

Candidates for CMU Homecoming king and queen are, from left: Kendra Twenter, Boonville; Austin Long, Monroe City; Ashley Hagen, Kearney; Ryan Restemayer, Sullivan; Amanda Branson, Koeltztown; Todd King, Springfield; and Sophie Wilensky, Plano, Texas. Not present for photo: Taranjit “T.J.” Singh, Oakville, Canada.

Parade marshal Dan Elliott, a longtime Fayette resident, is a retired professor and former curator of CMU’s Stephens Museum. Dr. Elliott joined the faculty in 1974 and retired in 2011 after 38 years as professor of biology and geology. He gained considerable renown in 1997 when, on a paleontological dig with CMU students in Howard County, Elliott discovered a starfish fossil. The fossil, the only one like it ever found, was dated at 350 million years old. It is on display in the Stephens Museum. Widely sought as a speaker, Elliott has published numerous scholarly and scientific articles. He is past president of the Missouri Archaeological Society, received the Missouri Association of Professional Archaeologists’ Carl and Eleanor Chapman Award in 2005, and the Distinguished Service Award in 2011. Prior to joining the faculty here, he taught at public schools in Raytown,

Kansas City, and Liberty. Elliott and his wife, Maggie, have three grown children. Many other events are scheduled. Some of the activities require advance registration, with forms available on-line at http:// cmalumni.centralmethodist.edu/ hc13 or by contacting Melanie Lawson at 660-248-56234 or by e-mail at mlawson@centralmethodist.edu .


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The Collegian •

www.centralmethodist.edu

Central F lashback The Collegian Founded in 1872, The Collegian is Missouri’s oldest college newspaper. It is published by the Central Methodist University student government and the university’s communications department in concert with the Fayette Advertiser and Democrat-Leader and is published every other Wednesday. Additional staff persons are needed in various capacities including news reporting, sports, special columns, and photography. Staffers also are needed for advertising sales and distribution. Contact the editor or advisors. The Collegian welcomes your comments and letters to the editor.

MOST OF THE FLOATS in this Saturday’s Central Methodist Homecoming parade probably will not be this elaborate. Generally, offerings back in the 1940s, ‘50s, and ‘60s were far more extensive than those of more recent years. The scene here is on Church Street in 1941.

Complete 2013 Homecoming Schedule REGISTRATION: Friday: 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Inman Student and Community Center (ISACC), 3rd Floor Rotunda Saturday: 8:00 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. Bandstand, Fayette Square

BOOKSTORE HOURS: Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday: 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 7:15-9:00 a.m. - Breakfast $4.20, Bergsten Dining Hall, ISACC 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Registration, ISACC, 3rd Floor Rotunda 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Alumni College. CMU professors are opening up their classrooms for you! A list of classes will be available at the registration table. 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. - Lunch $4.50, Bergsten Dining Hall, ISACC 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. - Social Hour for all Alumni! Emmet’s Kitchen & Tap, $15, 111 N. Main. Heavy hors d’oeuvres and soft drinks. Honoring class years 1948, 1953, 1958, 1963, 1968, 1973, 1978, 1983, 1988, 1993, 1998, 2003 & 2008 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. - “GOLD” Party, Graduates of the Last Decade, D.C. Rogers Lake 7:00 - 8:30 p.m. - CMU Women’s Alumni Basketball Game, Puckett Field House 9:00 p.m. - Pep Rally, Puckett Field House SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. – Registration, Bandstand, Fayette Square 9:00 a.m. - Visit the Alumni Association in the Bandstand, Fayette Square 10:00 a.m. - Parade, Fayette Square 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 noon – Reunion of Radio Station Alumni (KMOE, KCMC, KCMU) Jim Steele’s Office, 203 N. Main St 11:00 a.m. - Dedication of the Bronze Sculpture “Synergy” at the Sculpture Garden, front of Classic Hall 11:30 a.m. - Greetings from President Drake, Howard-

Payne lawn 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. - Tailgate, Adults - $8.00, ages 6-10 $3.00, ages 5 & under - free, pay at the door, Howard-Payne lawn 12:00 noon - Class Pictures, Howard-Payne lawn 12:00 - 1948, 1953, 1958 12:10 - 1963, 1968, 1973 12:20 - 1978, 1983, 1988 12:30 - 1993, 1998, 2003, 2008 1:00 p.m. - Eagles Football vs. Peru State College, Davis Field Following the game, Alumni Gathering, Rethwisch Home, 301 W. Spring St. All are welcome! Bring your friends and family! 5:00 p.m. - Women’s Soccer vs. Baker University, Davis Field 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. - Dinner $5.75, Bergsten Dining Hall, ISACC 7:30 p.m. - Men’s Soccer vs. Baker University, Davis Field

STAFF MEMBERS: • Kaitlyn Klapperich – Editor kklapper@centralmethodist.edu • Jim Steele, Editorial Advisor jsteele@woodcreekmedia.com • Collin Brink, Faculty Advisor cbrink@centralmethodist.edu • Andie Borchardt • Meredith Brick • Thomas Gilson • Jamie Gisburne • Jane Gonzalez-Meyer • Alexandria Martin • Kelly Petersen • Sabrina Severson • Eileen Stacy • Tarin Stuenkel • Mitchell Swan •Sophie Wilensky

NOTE: The Collegian is dated every other Wednesday. This is done to permit better distribution and more efficient coverage of weekend activities. Material intended for publication must OTHER SATURDAY ACTIVITIES: be submitted on or before noon 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. - The Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Friday before the Wednesday of Art Open House, 1st floor, Classic Hall. Ingrained: Paintings by Jane publication (preferably earlier). Mudd and Wood Creations by Tom Stauder, plus a Memorial Tribute to Future first semester Charles Banks Wilson (1918-2013) publication dates are the 12:00 - 3:00 p.m. - The Stephens Museum open, 2nd floor; following Wednesdays: T. Berry Smith Hall Various times - Sorority & Fraternity gatherings. (A schedule • Nov. 6 will be available for alumni at the registration table.) • Nov. 20 4:00 p.m. - ? - Schluckebier 2013, Emmet’s Kitchen & Tap, on • Dec. 6 (a Friday). the square, BBQ & Cajun specialties This Collegian and all past isSUNDAY, OCTOBER 27 sues for the 2011-2012, 2012-13, 10:30 a.m. - Worship, Linn Memorial UMC and 2013-14 school years may be All choir alumni are invited to join the choir in singing Beautiful Savior. found on the CMU web-site. 11:30 a.m. – Brunch $5.50, Bergsten Dining Hall, ISACC 1:30 - 4:30 p.m. - The Ashby-Hodge Gallery Open House & THE COLLEGIAN Reception, 1st floor, Classic Hall. Ingrained: Paintings by Jane Mudd 411 CMU Square and Wood Creations by Tom Stauder Plus a Memorial Tribute to Charles Fayette, Mo. 65248 Banks Wilson (1918-2013)


www.centralmethodist.edu

• The CollegianOctober 23, 2013 • Page 3

Halloween events planned at observatory For a special Halloween treat, students and area residents are invited to visit the historic Morrison Observatory at Central Methodist University in Fayette on Thursday, Oct. 31. The observatory will hold a special Halloweenthemed public night from 7:30 to 9:30 that evening. Special hands on science experiments, crafts for the kids to take home, and special science demonstrations performed by CMU science faculty will take place. If it’s a clear night, attendees also will be able to observe the stars with the telescopes, according to Dr. Kendal Clark, assistant professor of physics and co-curator of the observatory. There is no fee to participate. The Morrison Observatory, which is celebrating

its 138th anniversary this year, features a 12-inch Clark refractor and a 10-inch reflecting telescope. The observatory was originally located in Glasgow and acquired by Central Methodist in 1927 and moved to its current location in 1935. The facility is located 504 Park Rd. in northwestern Fayette, across from the Fayette City Park and swimming pool. Exit west on Besgrove Street from the intersection of Highways 5 and 240 and go approximately two blocks to Park Road and turn left; the observatory is on the right a short distance from the turn. For additional information about viewing sessions or directions, contact Dr. Clark at kwclark@ centralmethodist.edu or call 660-248-6383.

Missouri poet laureate to speak at Central By JANE GONZALEZ-MEYER COLLEGIAN REPORTER

The English department has been buzzing with excitement for weeks, because William Trowbridge is going to visit with students and faculty on the CMU campus. In April of 2012, Trowbridge was given the government appointed position of poet laureate, a prestigious title that is carried by a Missouri writer for two years. Trowbridge serves as a representative for the literary arts and visits schools across the state discussing poetry. According to Dr. Travis Johnson, professor of English on campus, Trowbridge’s visit is an opportunity for not only the CMU

community, but also for Fayette and neighboring towns. Trowbridge will be on campus on Nov. 7, and along with doing a poetry reading, he also will visiting a class that day. The EN216 Imaginative Writing class students have been writing poetry all semester, and Trowbridge will provide feedback and helpful tips on their works. English Department professors note this will be a learning opportunity for everyone in the class to gain insight from a published poet. Later that evening, after having dinner with English majors as well as members of the English honor society, Sigma Tau Delta, he will present a free poetry reading that will be open to the public.

The reading will be at 7 p.m. on the fourth floor of the Inman Student and Community Center. Trowbridge will read some of his works, followed by a Q&A session, and at the end, he will sell copies of his books and do a signing. The library carries some of his works, which include Ship of Fools, The Complete Book of Kong, and Flickers. Johnson recommends that everyone should come hear the poet laureate, because “with William Trowbridge, they will find an exciting and funny, but also captivating voice.” He went on to say that Trowbridge is an example of a great writer from Missouri, and anyone who attends will benefit from the experience

William Trowbridge

Campus groups adopt their own ‘Superheroes’

The Superheroes CMU Homecoming includes a wide range of campus organizations involved with different superheroes. • TKE: Superman • Sigma: Wonder Woman • Alpha: Fantastic Four • Mokers: Hulk • Delta: Ninja Turtles • Sig Alph: Captain America • Chi Delt: Thor • SAI: The Incredibles • APO: Power Rangers • Phi Mu Alpha: Batman • International Students: X-Men • Psychology Club: Flash • Athletic Training Association: Spider-Man • ALLiance: The Green Lantern —Meredith Brick

What is psychological wellness and how can we maintain it? One student’s take on how we can improve our mental health

By KAITLYN KLAPPERICH COLLEGIAN EDITOR

We are told two things when it comes to maintaining healthy body compositions: engage in routine exercise and eat healthy foods. While most of us are aware of the various books, TV shows, classes, and time spent focusing on keeping our bodies healthy, we are equally unaware of how effective it is to maintain a healthy mind. We obsess over eating healthy, but how often do we hear about routines that should be practiced in upholding a healthy, mental state? Darlene Powell Garlington, Ph.D., licensed clinical psychologist, describes positive mental health not just an absence of mental disorders. It is: • Being comfortable with yourself; • Feeling good about yourself; • Being able to meet the demands of life; • Being able to express emotion in healthy ways; and • Being able to cope with the stress of daily life I’m certainly not taking away from the importance of mental disorders and illnesses (because findings show that mental disorders in young adults are frequent and impairing), but what I am suggesting is for those that aren’t burdened with such illnesses can still reach out and find ways to cope with life’s normal stresses. Because that’s just what they are—life’s NORMAL stresses. Classes, tests, homework, practices, games, social organizations, and relationships are just a few aspects of our everyday lives that can cause various forms of stress. Maintaining psychological wellness allows us to realize our abilities and work regularly and productively.

Approaching positive mental wellness includes understanding the inter-connectedness between both our mind and body. This means we have to look at our health as an integrated system and realize that our attitude affects our brain, body, and emotions. Garlington states that adopting attitudes that incorporate gratitude, appreciation, and love can have a profound effect on our body’s health. She outlines three ways to enhance our positive mental health: 1. The Family Factor Garlington argues the vitality in strong family relationships; but, as most of us are separated from our families by distance while we’re here at CMU, this notion of family unity can be hard to find. This is when we turn to our Central community. By taking advantage of the fact that many of us are experiencing these same emotions of missing home and our families, we can help each other in embracing our family here, on campus. Togetherness helps create a sense of purpose, so, for those of you like myself that have a hard time getting out of your apartment or dorm, think about your CMU family members on the football field, in the classroom, at dinner, in Fayette, and around campus. Just like we make time for our family at home, we have to take time to make a family here. 2. Physical Health Proper amounts of sleep and exercise play an important role in our mental health, as well as good nutrition. The majority of us are at ages we can eat, drink, and sleep whenever we want, but creating positive eating and sleeping habits now will only enhance our physical and men-

tal health in the future. It is also important to realize that coping mechanisms are formed during our college years. How we deal with everyday stresses in terms of what we eat, how much we drink, and how it affects our sleeping patterns, undoubtedly have lasting results. 3. Spiritual Health As college students learning to think in more critical and analytical ways, our individual journeys to spiritual enlightenment may differ drastically. But by discovering our purpose, potential, and passion we can learn to live a successful life; one that can lead us to optimal physical and mental health. If we find what gives our life meaning and purpose, actualize our talents and abilities to the fullest, and experience excitement and reward in what we do, we are not only enhancing our own health, but the health of others around us. The fact that our mental well-being is an over-looked and underestimated aspect of our physical health can be frightening. Most of us are young adults in key phases of socialization in terms of professional career and interpersonal relationships, so now, more than ever, our lives depend on having a healthy, stress-free mind. By exploring our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors in ways that encourage psychological wellness, we can a) increase our sense of well-being, b) eliminate those unnecessary stressors, and c) promote healthy minds for years to come. Visit CMU’s counseling center for a FREE, one on one session with Susan Wason. Appointments can be made by calling 660-248-6274 or stop by her office on the second floor of the Student Center. Office hours are Monday-Thursday 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., and Friday 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.


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Thanks to CMU maintenance and custodial staff!

Dear Editor, As a resident assistant I have plenty of interaction with Central’s plant operations team, and I must say this university has an incredible maintenance crew and an awesome custodial staff. So often these men and women are overlooked and I don’t think that’s OK. A few weeks ago, I accidentally recycled my textbook (it’s a long story). After running to the plant operations office and letting them know what happened, I had my textbook back within 30 minutes. Now, I don’t know the specifics of what they had to do to find it, but I do know that they didn’t have to search for my textbook, but they did it anyway. The maintenance crew is always hard at work to fix our broken toilets, our stuck windows, and our broken heaters and pipes. Our custodial crew is up bright and early, cleaning up the messes that we create, and often fail to pick up. The hard work these men and women put forth is often overlooked, so I challenge CMU students to say “hi” to the maintenance and custodial crew and thank them for what they do. Talk to the maintenance guys when they come to fix your heater so you can stay warm. Be sure to notice this fine team and their hard work. To all members of the plant operations, thank you for everything that you do for this campus. We appreciate you so much! Andie Borchardt

Students Inducted in to Lambda Pi Eta

The CMU chapter of Lambda Pi Eta, honor society of the National Communication Association, inducted new members in a ceremony Oct. 20. From left: Andie Borchardt, Jessica Travlos, Sophie Wilensky, Todd King, Kate Klapperich, Elise Schreiber, Kelsey Forqueran and Stazhia Pleasant.

Commentary:

Is ghost hunter visit appropriate for a church-related university? No!

By SABRINA SEVERSON Collegian Reporter Again CMU will host a “ghost hunter” during the week of Halloween. On Monday, Oct. 28, ghost hunter Ross Allison is scheduled to be at Central where he will speak and then follow-up by conducting a “hunt” around campus. Having a ghost hunter come here is a recurring event, one which provides a real thrill for many. As thrilling as this event may be, we need to ask ourselves whether or not ghost hunting is appropriate for a Christian university. First, one may question why ghost hunting is not acceptable for Christians. If “spirit seeking” is simply for fun, just a part of another spooky yet harmless Halloween observance, why would anyone have a problem? The answer is pretty black and white. Followers of Christ are called to refrain from messing with any kind of spirit world. Yes, this does mean that most Christians recognize the existence of evil spirits. Taking Christian ideology into consideration, such existence would be senseless to deny. If there’s a good God, there must be the opposite out there as well. Belief in a very real God, leads to the point that there is also very real evil. It’s not as if Christians have

their heads stuck in the ground. It’s crystal clear: The Bible They do not embrace the denial of Christians believe is to be the “ghosts,” but instead rest easy in very word of God. It commands spite of an evil spirit realm. They abstinence from ghost hunting. hold to the belief that their Lord Therefore, God commands abhas overcome the enemy: Satan, stinence from ghost hunting. and every one of Well OK, As long as we claim his evil spirits. some may ask the name of Central The God that why others at has entered their Methodist University, no CMU should life is said to be have to miss out ghost hunter should greater. —1 John on the fun of be invited here. 4:4. “He who is having a ghost in you is greater hunter, simply than he who is in the world.” because Christians on camHowever, Christians also are pus have a problem? After all, called to find no entertain- our school is made up of those ment by means of the spirit holding various beliefs, not just world. Deuteronomy 18:10-11 Christians. states: “Let no one be found The answer here is also among you who practices divi- crystal clear. Central Methodnation or sorcery, interprets ist University is affiliated with omens,engages in witchcraft, the United Methodist church, or casts spells, or who is a me- a Christian denomination. Yes, dium or spiritist or who con- anyone of any belief is welsults the dead.” come here, but our name is still Central Methodist University. UM churches take up special offerings for universities related to the denomination. Another question: Will Christians who give their hard earned money to our school approve of a ghost hunter entertaining the students on the CMU campus? Returning to our first question, is ghost hunting appropriate for a Christian university? The answer is no. As long as we claim the name of Central Methodist University, no ghost hunter should be invited here.

SGA President’s Report

Dear fellow students, The homecoming season is again upon us. This is a wonderful time for the student body and the entire school to celebrate those traditions which have been passed down from generation to generation. These traditions will continue long after we have left. This is a once a year event, not only for the school but also for the surrounding community. It’s a time to re-unite with alumni and a time to take pride in CMU’s accomplishments. My request for each and every one of you is to please volunteer to help with all the festivities going on around campus. Homecoming can only be possible if we all work together as a team to make this the best Homecoming yet. I also call on faculty and staff to help out with any special requests because here at CMU we’re a family above all — living together and working together as a family. Throughout the week there have already been a number of SGA sponsored events starting with window decorations on Sunday, putting up banners in the SCC Monday, and Homecoming games on the football field Tuesday. I hope you were able to take part in these events. On Wednesday there is a talent show scheduled at 8 p.m. in the assembly hall where President Roger Drake will be one of the judges as part of his first Homecoming at CMU. On Thursday there will be a coronation practice for the Homecoming court. Everyone who is part of the court should be at the football stadium at 4:15 p.m. and practice will begin at 4:30. On Friday there will be a pep rally and Homecoming dance competition. The pep rally will begin at 9:30 p.m. On Saturday there will be the parade on the square starting at 10 a.m.; the parade line-up begins at 9:30. The football game will start at 1 p.m. On Sunday it will be a clean-up day, SGA hours for refund will be offered. Thank you all, let’s have a wonderful time and let’s make life-long memories this week. God Bless the SGA and Central Methodist University. Go Eagles - take flight! Geofrey Bilabaye, SGA President

Former editor named to post in Texas

Hannah Kiddoo, a 2010 CMU graduate and former Collegian editor, is now the assistant editor of the Texas Bar Journal in Austin, Texas. It is the official publication of the State Bar of Texas and has a circulation of 102,000 readers. The publication contains legal articles, state bar news, features on

Texas lawyers, and information on technology and trends in law. Kiddoo, a communication studies major with a minors in both sociology and earth sciences at CMU, earned a master of arts in journalism from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in December 2012.


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The Collegian October 23, 2013 • Page 5

(Sophie) sticated Style FABULOUS FASHION, FOOD AND FITNESS

Fall Food Favorites

DECORATING FOR HOMECOMING

Homecoming art displayed on Fayette storefront windows is a longtime CMU tradition. Among groups hard at work last Sunday were Alpha Phi Gamma (Mokers) at Market Street Floral and Sigma Pi Alpha at Rhodes Bookkeeping Service. Greek social and professional groups compete in the annual event.

The perfect time of the year is upon us, Fall! Fall has become the perfect season for making fun and delicious food and drinks. The two things that people always rave about are hot chocolate and s’mores. Over the years people have become very creative with spicing up both of these traditional recipes. Below are some ways to change up the boring, old normal ways of eating. S’MORES • Add peanut butter to your traditional s’more and (if desired) your choice of jelly. After heating your s’more, place a fresh-cut strawberry in the middle and enjoy. • After your s’more is warm add a banana slice and some caramel sauce. Instead of using regular milk chocolate, try using dark chocolate, chocolate with almonds, chocolate with caramel in the middle, white chocolate, or maybe even peppermint filled chocolate! HOT CHOCOLATE • Peanut buttercup hot chocolate- add two teaspoons of peanut butter to your already prepared hot chocolate, stir and enjoy! • Candy cane hot cocoa- add four small, smashed candy canes to your prepared hot chocolate, let them sit for a minute and dissolve, then stir, enjoy and relax. • Mexican spiced hot chocolate- this is the perfect combination of sweet and spicy. Most people become weary of mixing spices with normally sweet things, but this is genius. All you need do is add a couple of pinches of cinnamon to your hot chocolate, and you’re done! Now, if you want even more kick, add a pinch of chili powder and you will be set! Xoxo Sophie Wilensky “Who can go wrong with anything chocolate?”

Yearbook staff aims for quality book The yearbook staff will take photos on Halloween (Thursday, Oct. 31) during the lunch period from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Inman Student & Community Center. The staff is working hard to produce a high-quality yearbook for the CMU community and they hope you will help by wearing your costume and posing for a

Commentary:

photo on Halloween. All students, staff, and faculty are welcome! Also, the yearbook staff will be taking regular pictures during the lunch hours from 11 to 1 in the student center during the weeks of Nov. 11 and 18. Photos will be taken on Monday, Wednesday and Friday of each week.

Halloween is a perfect time to share the gospel

By ANDIE BORCHARDT Collegian Reporter

As a child I looked forward to Halloween. I loved carving the pumpkins, dressing up, and getting all the free candy I could manage to fit in my little jack-olantern bucket. I never thought twice about Halloween, where it came from, and what it might represent for others. It wasn’t until last week that I realized some people are up in arms when it comes to celebration of Halloween. I never knew that there were some Christians who were vehemently against the holiday. After reading multiple articles by different Christian organizations and being called stupid and ignorant on Instagram for stating Halloween was more of a mainstream holiday, I decided it was time for me to do some research about the origin of this widely celebrated holiday. The celebration of Halloween could go back as far as 5 B.C. in the British Isles. This version of Halloween is quite opposite of what is celebrated by the average person in America. Hallow-

een began in places such as Scotland, Ireland, and Wales as a pagan celebration titled Samhain and it celebrated their final harvest. It was marked as one of the biggest turning points in their year, and they believed it to be a magical time. They believed the line between the living and the dead became very blurred and the dead, at this time, roamed amongst them. They would gather sacrifices of animals, fruits and vegetables, and would light bonfires to help the dead on their journey to the other side. The wearing of costumes was done with the purpose of warding off the evil spirits and making sure the dead did not stay among the living. The Roman Catholics later viewed this holiday as a danger-

ous holiday and made an attempt to change this celebration and turn it into a something church centered. It was common that saints were greatly honored after death. All Saints Day was moved to Nov. 1 and they kept some of the traditions in the Holy day’s activities, but instead of dress-

ing up as scary creatures or their Gods, they dressed up as saints. Halloween didn’t take off immediately in the United States. The majority of new settlers were Protestant and Halloween (All Saints Day) was technically a Catholic holiday. Even after the American Revolution, Halloween didn’t catch on in America. People were so spread out across the country that sharing different traditions from Europe was difficult. When they would get together at events such as a barn raising, or quilting parties, these events were eventually dubbed Autumn Play Parties. Neighbors would gather and tell ghost stories, sing, dance, and the children would parade around in costumes. These parties lasted

until the Industrial Revolution when people no longer felt the need for these events. The first official citywide Halloween celebration happened in Anoka, Minn., in 1921. After this event, Halloween became a secular yet community centered holiday, celebrated by parades and town parties. In the 1950s young hoodlums would vandalize the towns and the observance was out of control. Treats were handed out to the kids to prevent tricks and vandalism amongst the neighborhoods. Hence, Trick or Treat. Halloween has changed throughout the years, from a celebration of the last harvest, to a mainstream holiday masquerading who you are in an attempt to get free candy. I don’t believe Halloween is an evil holiday. Granted, I don’t like the demonic costumes and scary axe murderer outfits, but I believe it can truly be harmless fun. As a Christian, Halloween to me is a perfect opportunity for community and a chance to share the Gospel. Keep it friendly and keep it safe and have a good time!


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The Collegian •

www.centralmethodist.edu

Spooky happenings abound on CMU campus The following was written by Cathy Thogmorton and originally published in the Winter 2004-2005 edition of the Talon, the official magazine of Central Methodist University. It has been edited slightly to reflect more recent developments. **** The grand dame of the college campus, Howard-Payne, has three resident ghosts, at least one of whom derives from a true incident. This young lady attended college in the 1940s while the dorm was being reconstructed. Unfortunately for her, as she walked past the construction one day, a brick fell and hit her on the head, killing her. Since that time she is said to materialize out of the fog, trying in vain to reach the safety of the dorm. The other two ghosts associated with HP are less visible to the masses. One young lady disappeared from her room on the third floor of HP South and was never heard from again. Of course it’s possible she got homesick. Soon after, something trashed her untouched room, breaking all the furniture and strewing her possessions around. Oddly, no one heard anything. Suspecting a human prank, the college boarded up the room. The next morning footprints were seen going up to the door. When the door was unboarded and opened, the footprints were likewise found on the inside. Unlike the first one, the second co-ed left no doubt about her departure – she hanged herself from the pipes in her room on the fourth floor of HP North. Even today students hear the creaking and rattling of the pipes as her ghost swings on them; and her shadow, hanging over the floor, is still said to be seen. Brannock Hall Brannock Hall (photo above taken around 1910) offers up the oldest of the campus ghost stories. During the Civil War the Union forces appropriated the lone college building to house men and horses. Little was left of the building when they finally abandoned it in 1864. Legend claims, however, they left one thing behind – the buried body of a young stable boy who had been in charge of tending the horses. One night something spooked the horses, and in their panic they trampled the boy to death. People who stay in Brannock late at night have been known to hear hoof beats, screams, and the grave sound of shovels hitting hard ground. According to Bob Rackley of the Advancement Office, other spirits may also roam the building. After the most recent renovation of Brannock in the early 1990s, Bob’s office was in the northwest section of the third floor. One morning campus security told him that they had seen someone at his window the night before. When they went inside to check, there was no one any-

where in the building. “I think I’d have been happier not knowing that,” Bob laughs. With the violence that enveloped the Civil War, echoes of the past in this old building are not unexpected. Library Ghost Libraries are generally considered havens from the real world where one can get lost in the past (or the stacks). One of CMU’s lesser known but certainly most malevolent spirits may spend time in the Methodistica section. A freshman girl purportedly was cornered by the vile ghost of a worker who died while Cupples was being built. According to legend the librarian heard the girl screaming and intervened; the ectoplasmic intruder vanished. The librarian began a search and discovered the man who had died was wanted in Kansas for seven murders. Needless to say, the girl opted to give up college and return home. Swinney Conservatory Nowhere on campus can ghost stories proliferate better than in the Swinney Conservatory of Music. Perhaps it is the number of tragedies connected with the Con. Perhaps it’s the romantic atmosphere of music and the emotional nature of musicians. Perhaps not. The three most prominent night visitors to the Con are Tom Birch, N. Louise Wright, and Opal Hayes, each of whom spent many happy years of life there. If any ghosts truly roam the campus, odds are good these are among them, admits Tom Yancey, former music student and professor. He says, “I figure N. Louise and Tom Birch are probably over there somewhere because they died in the middle of concerts there.” In fact, like most of Fayette, Tom was at the concert when band director Tom Birch died. “It was terrible,” he remembers, “something that stays with you a lifetime.” His comments were echoed by Collegian Editorial Advisor Jim Steele who has a senior was present that fateful night of May 1, 1964. Professor Birch was conducting the band in the assembly hall shortly after the annual spring tour, playing Moussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition.” During a passage in the piece known as “The Catacombs,” Birch died and fell off the stage into a set of drums. More than once since his death, students have encountered the good professor under the clock tower. He appears in a tuxedo, smiles, and says, “Lovely evening for a concert, isn’t it?” Then he walks through the locked Assembly Hall doors and disappears. Former Dean of the Conservatory, Ron Shroyer, has his own take on the ghost. He suspects Fayette’s former resident poet laureate, Mather Marvin, who spent much time on campus, foisting his poetry on unsuspect-

ing audiences and modeling for the art department. “I suspect it was Mather Marvin just being himself,” the Dean said, “because he was always hanging around.” Since his passing the question may be, is it Tom Birch or Mather Marvin who students now encounter? N. Louise Wright, first dean of the Conservatory, died during a performance in the Recital Hall of Swinney Conservatory in 1958, much as Tom Birch would six years later. According to the late Helen Throgmorton who attended the concert, Dean Wright, always flawlessly elegant, was playing a long run on the piano. At the end of the run, she simply continued the movement off the keyboard and fell to the floor dead. “What a wonderful way to go,” Helen says, “doing what she loved…she just finished the flourish and was gone.” Stories abound about N. Louise still playing the piano in the Recital Hall. Often she plays a duet with her lifetime companion, Opal Hayes, who also taught piano at Howard-Payne and at Central. Opal is sometimes spotted visiting the old Phi Beta room above the recital hall to rearrange the furniture, singing as she goes. Tom Yancey insists “any story about N. Louise and Opal both would be benevolent” in keeping with their personalities. Students sometimes look into the Recital Hall from the steps of T. Berry Smith and see the two. One spring night a couple walking by the Conservatory heard music coming through the open windows of the Recital Hall, two people playing a piano duet. They thought it strange that people would be practicing with no lights on, so they walked in to check it out. By the time they got down the hall, the music had stopped and no one was there, but the windows were still open. Perhaps N. Louise and Opal were playing a midnight concert. Could the late Dean Luther Spayde, too, be making nocturnal visits? After one night class, the late voice teacher Nancy Jones admits to hearing organ music coming from the darkened Recital Hall. As the organ is kept locked, she said she hopes it was a student with an

unauthorized organ key! Stephens Museum One of Central’s great founders is reputed to wander the rooms in T. Berry. In the Stephens Museum hangs an immense portrait of Bishop Enoch Mather Marvin, who helped Central gain a foothold in its earliest years. As Tom Yancey points out, the painting is fairly elementary to the point that Bishop Marvin appears to be floating on air. Tom explains how this oddity feeds into the story of an apparition. It looks like he’s floating there,” he says, “because there are no shadows. If a person’s foot is on something, you’ve got shadows steadying the figure onto the ground.” “They say years ago, after midnight, they would hear this kind of bumping in the Stephens Museum like someone was walking around with a cane or something, and it would occur usually

after midnight. The story is that Enoch Mather Marvin comes out of the painting, takes one of Bishop McMurry’s canes from the museum, and goes over the whole historical section, making sure everything is in its place. When he’s finished checking everything out, he walks back into the painting.” Tom has been known to don the role of Bishop Marvin himself during Halloween tours given in recent years; however, he has declined such invitations since he nearly scared a child witless. McMurry Hall Not to be outdone, McMurry Hall demands spectral rights, too. One college student, as history records, committed suicide on the fourth floor. The bathroom where he shot himself supposedly was closed because the bloodstains could not be removed. Years later, after massive renovations were completed, the bathroom facility was reopened. Shortly afterwards, though, a young man was reported hearing a shot while he was showering and having blood come out the spigot. In another legend, roommates once died in McMurry, victims of carbon monoxide poisoning; they can be heard choking still by students who reside in their room. The last of McMurry’s restless spirits is reported to be a maintenance man who got trapped under a boiler when it collapsed in the dorm’s basement. Not unlike HP’s aural wanderer, this doomed ghoul bangs on the pipes and radiators all year long, trying still to free himself from his grisly fate.

Homecoming Reflections By TARIN STUDNKEL

COLLEGIAN REPORTER

This previous Friday, I went back to my little hometown for my high school homecoming. Coming from a small town, it’s tradition for alumni to come back and visit old friends and see family. In this way, college and high school homecomings are the same. Parades with school spirit and clubs, family and alumni come back to visit, and of course, the big football game. Colleges celebrate homecoming in different ways. Some celebrate more, some not very much. Comparing Central to Mizzou, it’s completely different. Granted, you still have the big football game on Saturday that everyone gets drunk and rallied up for. The festivities throughout the week are different at MU. Parties every night at different sorority houses, bar specials downtown for the homecoming events. At Central, some house parties might happen, but normally it’s after the homecoming game Saturday. Taking into account the difference in school size, which makes a huge difference.

Comparing high school homecoming to college is a big difference. Seeing my little sister and friends dressing up for spirit week, t-ping coaches, friends, and teammates houses in the middle of the night all dressed in black. Also, pulling pranks on coaches and at school. If you’re a cheerleader in high school, you spend the whole Sunday before spirit week decorating the school. It’s something you see in photos and go back to visit and find that you often miss that part of high school; I know I do a bit. Homecoming in college is always fun. If you weren’t into the spirit week festivities in high school, then you’ll be just fine in college. In high school, I was always one to dress up for spirit days, stay out late at night to t-p and chalk cars, and pull pranks. It always was a long, tiring week, but worth it. College is all about celebrating at the football game and drinking with old and new friends and family. It can be long and tiring, but the memories and stories that come from the experiences and late nights is what homecoming is all about.


www.centralmethodist.edu

The Collegian October 23, 2013

The COLLEGIAN

Page 7

Sports

No.-10 ranked Baker closes out Eagles with strong finish

In a game with a combined 10 turnovers, No. 10-ranked Baker turned four of its takeaways into 24 points to fuel a 46-12 win over Central Methodist on Saturday in the Heart of America Athletic Conference Game of the Week at Liston Stadium in Baldwin City, Kan. Though it coughed the ball up four times on offense, the Baker defense forced six turnovers for the second-straight game, spread evenly between three fumbles and three interceptions. The last of the three interceptions was immediately turned into a touchdown, as Emmerson Clarke returned a pass 40 yards for a touchdown to put the game away on the first play of the

CMU Lady cagers ranked third in pre-season poll

Defending Heart of America Athletic Conference champion MidAmerica Nazarene received nine of 10 first-place votes to sit atop the 2013-14 HAAC Women’s Basketball Preseason Coaches’ Poll, released on Oct. 15 at the HAAC Basketball Media Day held in Kansas City. The Pioneers received a full 81 voting points (coaches did not vote for their own teams) for the secondstraight preseason poll to finish 12 points ahead of runner-up Benedictine. The Ravens claimed 69 points to edge out CMU for second place by two votes. The Eagles picked up the remaining first-place vote and were the only team to claim a victory against MNU last season. One season after a 14-win improvement, Baker was picked to finish fourth with 58 points. Fifth position was shared by a pair of teams, as Evangel and CulverStockton each received 44 voting points while Avila was picked seventh after claiming 32 points. Two programs with new head coaches were separated by just one spot as Missouri Valley earned 21 points to sit ahead of Peru State on 20 points for the eighth spot. Graceland was the final team in the preseason table after going winless in 2012-13. CMU begins the 2013-14 season with two exhibition games, starting with Oct. 27 at Wichita State University. The Lady Eagles begin the regular season at home on Nov. 2 against Lindenwood University-Belleville.

fourth quarter. The Wildcats scored the first points of the game on a 1-yard run by Dillon Baxter at the 8:53 mark of the opening quarter, but the Eagles used a pair of field goals by Ezequiel Rivera and a 3-yard touchdown run by Francois Matthews to take a 12-7 lead at the 10:52 mark of the second quarter. The Wildcats (6-1, 4-1 HAAC) scored next as Camren Torneden scooted across from six yards to finish off a six-play drive and retake the lead, 14-12. The Eagles were forced to punt with 30 seconds left, a kick that was blocked by Adam Novak and downed at the CMU 35. Clarence Clark finished the half

with a 33-yard field goal. The momentum gained late in the half by the Wildcats continued into the third quarter as Clarke forced a fumble on the first play of the second half. Baker added a field goal after recovering at the Eagles’ 25-yard line, followed up by a 79yard catch and run by Clark at the 7:37 mark after a pair of punts by the Eagles. Baker turned the ball over on its next two possessions, but Central Methodist (4-3, 3-2 HAAC) was unable to capitalize as it was limited to one first down before the interception return by Clarke after a fumble by Dillon Baxter late in the third quarter.

Kaleb Borghardt completed 13of-27 passes for 114 yards and three interceptions for Central Methodist while also rushing seven times for 36 yards. Raymond Bradley paced the ground game for the Eagles with 10 carries for 67 yards while Paul Stevens and Stephone Allen each had six catches for a combined 114 yards. ******** Central Methodist women’s soccer knocks off Graceland in overtime Nicki Noreen’s golden goal in overtime lifted Central Methodist to a 2-1 win at No. 22 Graceland Saturday. The Eagles (9-6-1, 1-3-1) are now unbeaten in their last three matches, all of which have gone

Football Eagles roll over Evangel GREG JACKSON

FAYETTE ADVERTISER SPORTS EDITOR

In 2012, Evangel had a banner day offensively to dominate the Central Methodist football team in its final home game of the season. On Oct. 12, the Eagles decided to return the favor. Central Methodist gained 500 total yards on offense and scored the game’s first 37 points, drubbing the Crusaders by a score of 44-14. “Last year, they thumped us when we were really injury-depleted and down to our fourth quarterback,” Central Methodist head coach Jody Ford said. “Tonight, we caught them with injuries. I hope we’re not taking turns here.” Evangel played the game without three All-Conference offensive threats — quarterback Andrew Brimhall, wide receiver Mitch McHenry and wide receiver Jesse Vaughn, the 2012 HAAC Offensive Player of the Year and All-American. All three players suffered injuries the previous week against CulverStockton College. But there were no major injuries on the Crusaders’ starting defense. The Eagles went right after Evangel to start the game, scoring in the second minute of the first quarter on a 35-yard touchdown run by Maurice Coon. In the blink of an eye, the Eagles led 7-0. “We challenged our offense,” Ford said. “On the coin flips, we’ve been taking the ball. If we win the toss, we want the ball. In the previous games, we haven’t done anything on our first drive. It’s been really frustrating. So tonight, I said, ‘We’re going to take the ball and I’m going to challenge you guys to put a great drive together.’” Central Methodist (4-2, 3-1 HAAC) forced a threeand-out on Evangel’s first offensive possession and got the ball back with great field position. The Eagles found the end zone just as quickly as they did on their first possession. This time, it only took three plays to hit paydirt. Quarterback Kaleb Borghardt pitched the ball to Paul Stevens for a 26-yard touchdown run. It wasn’t even four minutes into the game and Central Methodist already built a 14-0 lead. Evangel was held to one first down in the entire

first quarter and a sack by Hunter Kelley stopped the next drive cold. The Crusaders punted away and pinned the Eagles at their own 1-yard line. No problem. Francois Mathews carried the ball on four consecutive plays to put the Eagles at the 29-yard line. Borghardt then completed first-down passes to Jamall Williams, Martin Bayless and Stephone Allen. Once the Eagles made it inside the 10-yard line, Borghardt scored on a 5-yard keeper up the middle to extend the lead to 21-0. “That’s a tribute to our offense and what they’re learning,” Ford said of the 99-yard drive on 14 plays. “Our offensive coaches have done a great job and they know what they’re doing.” Evangel added to the Central Methodist lead with a safety. On a bad punt snap, Stone Phelps tossed the ball out of the back of the end zone to give two more points to the Eagles before the first quarter ended. Central Methodist had a chance to score on two drives in the second quarter, but both field-goal attempts by Ezequiel Rivera — from 34 and 45 yards — sailed wide left. It wouldn’t be until the 5:52 mark of the quarter before the Eagles scored again. The fourth touchdown came from the fourth different player to score on the ground. After Nick Stephens was sacked, Raymond Bradley came back and scored on a 17-yard run to give Central Methodist a 30-0 lead it would hold at halftime. The play of the game came in the third quarter. With Central Methodist facing second-and-14, Borghardt looked for an open receiver but the Crusaders defense quickly appeared in the backfield. After moving to his right, Borghardt scampered back to the left, breaking four to five tackles in the process. He escaped a broken tackle at the 10-yard line and made it into the end zone for a 26-yard keeper, extending Central Methodist’s lead to 37-0. “That’s a result of Kaleb putting in the work in the offseason in the weight room,” Ford said. “The other thing that’s really cool about that play is, while it’s very easy to watch Kaleb, if you watch the other 10 guys, they’re all working to try to spring him loose and stay on their blocks. I really appreciate the hustle of the other 10 guys.”

into extra time. The Central Methodist men’s soccer team lost (8-7-1, 0-5) 3-2 at Graceland on Saturday, but bounced back on Monday with a 3-2 win at Harris-Stowe State University in double overtime. Guilherme da Silveira scored the golden goal in the 105th minute. ******** CMU volleyball loses to CulverStockton in five sets Down two games, Central Methodist’s furious rally fell short Monday inside Charles Fieldhouse as the Eagles lost at Culver-Stockton in five games. Central Methodist (18-9, 2-4) lost the match by scores of 11-25, 2225, 25-14, 25-17 and 9-15.

CMU men’s basketball ranked fifth in pre-season polling

Defending Heart of America Athletic Conference champion Evangel received seven of 10 first place votes to sit atop the 201314 HAAC Men’s Basketball Preseason Coaches’ Poll, released Oct. 8 at the annual HAAC Media Day festivities. CMUmen’s basketball head coach Jeff Sherman and his Eagles are picked to finish in fifth place. The Crusaders took 79 voting points (coaches did not vote for their own teams) to finish eight points ahead of runner-up MidAmerica Nazarene, which received a pair of first-place votes to finish with 71 voting points. Fresh off a quarterfinal appearance in the national championship event and runner-up regular-season finish a season ago, Culver-Stockton was picked third in the poll with 62 points. The final first place vote went to Benedictine, which was picked to finish fourth for the second-straight campaign with 60 points. Central Methodist rounded out the top five with 52 points. Baker began the second half of the preseason standings with 41 points while Avila (28 points) edged out Peru State (27) for seventh position. Missouri Valley (19) and Graceland (11) finished off the 10-team table. CMU begins the 2013-14 season at the MidAmerica Nazarene Tip-Off Classic, starting Oct. 31 against Park University followed by a Nov. 1 contest against Baptist Bible College.


Page 8 • October 23, 2013

The Collegian •

Family Weekend at CMU

www.centralmethodist.edu

Homecoming Weekend Highlights Friday: Pep-Rally and Homecoming Dance, Pep-Rally starts at 9:30 p.m. in the gym

Saturday: Parade and Homecoming Football

Game, Parade line up at 9:30 a.m. Parade starts at 10 a.m. Game starts at 1p.m.

Sunday: Clean up windows and banners. All should be cleaned and taken down

Football 9/5 9/14 9/21

Lindenwood University-Belleville Bethel College

Fayette, Mo.

L 16-42

North Newton, Kan.

W 38-31

Canton, Mo.

W 37-36

9/28

Culver-Stockton College Graceland University

Fayette, Mo.

W 36-27

10/5

Missouri Valley College

Marshall, Mo.

L 17-48

10/12

Evangel University

Fayette, Mo.

W 44-14

10/19

Baker University

Baldwin City, Kan.

L 12-46

10/26

Peru State College

Fayette, Mo.

1 p.m.

11/2

Benedictine College

Atchison, Kan.

1 p.m.

11/9

Avila University

Fayette, Mo.

1 p.m.

Olathe, Kan.

1 p.m.

11/16 MidAmerica Nazarene University

Sports Schedules & Graphics by Jamie Gisburne, Collegian Staff Under a bright, crisp October sky, CMU students welcomed family members and friends for the annual Family Day Saturday, Oct. 12. At top, CMU President Roger Drake welcomes attendees in the Inman Student and Community Center. Above, visitors enjoy booths and displays set up on the campus quad. Below, nursing students demonstrate the proper technique for taking blood pressure.

Men’s Soccer

Women’s Soccer

8/28

Columbia College

Columbia, Mo.

L 1-3

8/31

Bethany College

Fayette, Mo.

W 5-1

9/3

Missouri Baptist University

Fayette, Mo.

L 1-2

9/7

Mount Mercy University

9/11

Fayette, Mo.

T 2-2

9/15

Hannibal-LaGrange University Jamestown College

Fayette, Mo.

W 2-1

9/18

Ottawa University

Ottawa, Kan.

W 4-3

9/24

William Woods University

Fayette, Mo.

W 1-0

9/28

Benedictine College

Fayette, Mo.

L 0-3

10/2

Springfield, Ill. Olathe, Kan.

W 11-0 L 0-5

10/9

Benedictine UniversitySpringfield MidAmerica Nazarene University Missouri Valley College

Fayette, Mo.

L 0-2

L 2-3

10/13

Avila University

Kansas City, Mo.

L 0-2

Kansas City, Mo.

T 1-1

10/16

Fayette, Mo.

W 2-1

Fayette, Mo.

W 5-4

10/19

Lindenwood UniversityBelleville Graceland University

Lamoni, Iowa

L 2-3

Lamoni, Iowa

W 2-1

10/21

St. Louis, Mo.

TBA

Culver-Stockton College

Fayette, Mo.

TB A

10/23

Harris-Stowe State University Culver-Stockton College

Fayette, Mo.

TBA

Baker University (Senior Night)

Fayette, Mo.

TBA

10/26

Baker University (Senior Night)

Fayette, Mo.

TBA

8/28

Columbia College

Columbia, Mo.

L 0-5

8/31

Bethany College

Fayette, Mo.

W 2-0

9/3

Missouri Baptist University

Fayette, Mo.

L 0-1

9/7

Mount Mercy University

W 3-0

9/11

Hannibal-LaGrange University

Cedar Rapids, Iowa Fayette, Mo.

9/13

Stephens College

Columbia, Mo.

9/18

Ottawa University

Ottawa, Kan.

W 16-1 L 0-1

9/20 9/24 9/28

Tabor College William Woods University Benedictine College

Fayette, Mo. Fayette, Mo. Fayette, Mo.

W 6-2 W 3-2 L 0-4

10/2

Springfield, Ill.

W 4-1

10/5

Olathe, Kan.

L 0-4

10/9

Benedictine University-Springfield MidAmerica Nazarene University Missouri Valley College

Fayette, Mo.

10/13

Avila University

10/16 10/19

Lindenwood University-Belleville Graceland University

10/23 10/26

10/5

W 5-2

Cedar Rapids, Iowa W 3-1


The Collegian: Vol. 142 No. 6