Central Florida Health News February 2023

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tude of excited Jollibee patrons waiting to get their hands on their Jollibee favorites, but also first-timers waiting to have their own Jollibee experience," said Jose Miñana, Jollibee Foods Corporation's Group President for North America. "There's no greater joy for us than serving the needs and tastes of Jollibee fans in the community. At Jollibee, we aim to bring families together for happy moments over great tasting food with superior value, served with warm and friendly service –our own brand of joy." The brand has become a symbol of nostalgia and warm childhood memories for many overseas Filipinos in the U.S. To many, Jollibee is the go-to restaurant of Filipinos for both special get to try Jollibee's signature menu items such as the world famous Chickenjoy. This dish is delicately breaded to be crispylicious on the outside and juicylicious inside. The well-loved Jolly Spaghetti is a favorite of both kids and kids-at-heart because of its signature sweetstyle sauce, loaded with chunky slices of savory ham, ground meat, and hotdog. Other classic menufavorites include the juicy and cheesy Jolly Hotdog, and the Peach Mango Pie, which is made with real Philippine sweet mangoes and a flaky golden brown crust.

largest Asian restaurant company, is now open in Jacksonville. This is the 36th store in the US, as well as

See JOLLIBEE page 15

ASSOCIATION

CentralFloridaHealthNews.com ENROLL PAGE 12
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THE ENDORSED Heart Health EDITION HANDS-ON APPROACH Students Learn to Use Puppets for Occupational Therapy COMMUNITY HEALTH Taking a Multidisciplinary Approach to Heart Disease
PUBLICATION DANGER IN DISGUISE Heart Attacks Can Look Different for Women KNOW THE FACTS Risk Factors for Black Americans OF THE POLK POP QUIZ! Don’t Miss a Beat: Let’s Talk Arrhythmia COUNTY MEDICAL volume 12 | issue 11 | february 2023 FREE — TAKE ONE!

CONTENTS | February 2023

Access the 2023 Central Florida Physicians Directory online!

For more photos from this edition, follow us on Facebook. Scan the QR code here with your smart device.

On the Cover

Meet Your Providers…

K.S. Chandrasekhar, MD, FCC

…established his clinic over 20 years ago. He is well known in the community and trusted for his accurate diagnosis and compassionate care.

• Board certified in Cardiovascular Disease and Internal Medicine

• Executive Director the Heart Function Clinic, Low Risk Chest Pain Center and the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program for BayCare Winter Haven Hospital

• President of Medical Staff for BayCare Winter Haven Hospital

• Chairman of Cardiology for Lake Wales Medical Center

• Clinical Associate Professor, FSU College of Medicine

Ritu Aparajita, MD, RPVI

A Vascular and Endovascular Surgeon who earned her MBBS at University of Delhi, India. She then completed a research fellowship at Columbia University Medical Center and a residency in general surgery at Staten Island University Hospital in New York, she completed her fellowship training in Vascular Surgery at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Barnabas Medical Center in New Jersey. She’s co-authored more than two dozen journal articles. She was recently nominated for the American Medical Association Inspiration Award that recognizes physicians who have contributed to the achievements of women in the medical profession.

Roan Cadavona, ARNP, FNP-C

…brings a high level of education and experience in Cardiac Catheterization, Electrophysiology and working in the Cardiovascular Progressive Care unit. He serves a vital role in providing patients with optimal cardiovascular care through counselling and screening, as well as disease prevention and management strategies.

• Board certified Family Nurse Practitioner

• Member of Staff for BayCare Winter Haven Hospital

Read more on page 10.

2017 forecast: Steakhouses beef up menus with new twists on American classics

choice of sides. Moreover, new menu categories (such as flatbreads) and service elements freshen the concept. About the Report 2017 Forecast: Culinary Trend Tracking Series offers an outlook on the culinary trends—the foods, dishes, ingredients and flavors—that Packaged Facts expects to grow in popularity in 2017.

Rockville, MD When it comes to American cuisine, there are few things more iconic than steakhouses. The slabs

See JOLLIBEE page 15 and sustainable sourcing, local and seasonal produce, and global flavors and forms, all done within the steakhouse format showcasing cuts of meat entrées with

Chefs and consumers both want their meat taste delicious and feel good about its’ consumption, too. This new breed of steakhouse broadcasts its mission to support local ranchers, factor sustainability and animal welfare, and create

dining experience that showcases culinary flair, not just a grill master's skill at cooking steak to the requested doneness. These operations are also designed to be more inclusive, more of great place for all kinds of people to dine well, not just traditionminded men on expense accounts. As result, the modern steakhouse is increasingly similar to other modern restaurants with focus on distinctive

marbled meat, the sizzling grills, the oozing butter, and the dripping bravado, maybe even a cowboy hat or two for ambiance—it's enough to make even fictional steakophile Ron Swanson misty-eyed. Yet

all the traditional steak dinners ordered daily, there are restaurants nationwide pushing the concept of the all-American steakhouse

new culinary heights, according to market research firm Packaged Facts in the brand new report 2017 Forecast: Culinary Trend Tracking Series. "The steakhouse

back and will capture our attention 2017. Not that the classic restaurant style ever disappeared, but renewal of the model is taking place in response to new sources beef and new flavorful expressions the concept that get chefs and diners excited," says David Sprinkle, research director, Packaged Facts. Today's steakhouse menus increasingly feature grass-fed cattle, locally raised animals, heritage varieties, meat butchered and dry aged in-house, and dishes that stem from the whole animal, not just the premium cuts. And that's just the meat. Creative side dishes

waiting to have their own Jollibee experience," said Jose Miñana, Jollibee Foods Corporation's Group President for North America. "There's no greater joy for us than serving the needs and tastes of Jollibee fans the community. At Jollibee, we aim to bring families together

When you think of a heart attack, you undoubtedly think of intense chest pain. After all, that is one of the most common and recognizable symptoms. But what happens when a heart attack’s symptoms don’t fit the classic profile? For women, that’s a distinct possibility because men and women can present very different symptoms for heart attacks.

lieu of old standards, global and seasonal flavors, and wider menu selection also distinguish these new school operations.

Jollibee's U.S.

with first Florida location opening

happy moments over great tasting food with superior value, served with warm and friendly service –our own brand of joy." The brand has become a symbol of nostalgia and warm childhood memories for many overseas Filipinos in the U.S. To many, Jollibee the go-to restaurant of Filipinos for both special

been the talk the town since 2016. With the opening, Floridians will get to try Jollibee's signature menu items such as the world famous Chickenjoy. This dish is delicately breaded to be crispylicious on the outside and juicylicious inside. The well-loved Jolly Spaghetti is favorite of both kids and kids-at-heart because of its signature sweetstyle sauce, loaded with chunky slices of savory ham, ground meat, and hotdog. Other classic menufavorites include the juicy and cheesy Jolly Hotdog, and the Peach Mango Pie, which made with real Philippine sweet mangoes and flaky golden brown crust.

Heart Health

Pop Quiz!

There are many problems you could experience with your heart, and heart arrhythmia is a common one. It’s a heart condition that can cause everything from mild inconvenience to death. Take our quiz and get all the information you need about heart arrhythmia.

Embracing a Multidisciplinary Approach to Heart Disease

The motto of Central Florida Health Care is “Health Care With a Heart,” and February is American Heart Month, making it the perfect time to consider what we can all do to help protect our heart health. Central Florida Health Care family medicine specialist Dr. Andrew Hein talks about the advantages of a multidisciplinary approach to heart health.

A Hands-On Approach

Puppets have long been used in health care to better communicate with patients, especially children and neurodiverse individuals. Each trimester, AdventHealth University’s Occupational Therapy Assistant program brings in a puppeteer to teach students the benefits of using puppets with patients. The lessons pay off long after class has ended.

2 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com
8 9 14 Departments & Columns 4 PUBLISHER’S LETTER 5 PCMA LETTER 6 MEDICAL ADVICE 11 HEALTHY AGING 16 CALENDAR 18 HEALTHY COOK 19 HEART NEWS
Kollagunta Chandrasekhar, MD, FACC Cardiologist Ritu Aparajita, Vascular Surgeon MD RPVI Roan Cadavona, ARNP FNP-C Nurse Practitioner
20 HEALTHY SKIN 22 BODY, MIND & SPIRIT 23 EDITOR’S DOSE
CentralFloridaHealthNews.com ENROLL PAGE 12 THE ENDORSED PUBLICATION OF THE POLK COUNTY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION volume 12 issue 11 february 2023 FREE — TAKE ONE! Ap petizer s: Entrées: Advertisers Directory 2 Appell Pie Calendar Events 10 Classified Ads 14 What’s Going On 3 Analysis:Catering industry revenues on the rise 4 “Big Data” — Doesyourrestaurantneedit? 7 RiseBisquitsDonuts to open in Coral Springs 11 Del Taco spices up expansion in the Southeast 13 PRSRT US POSTAGE PAID WESTPALMBEACH,FL PERMIT WWW.TRNUSA.COM VOLUME 21 NUMBER 3 ◆ MARCH 2017 FLORIDA’S FOODSERVICE INDUSTRY NEWSPAPER  ◆ $3 FLORIDA EDITION
expansion
Jacksonville, FL After much anticipation and excitement, Jollibee, the largest Asian restaurant company, is now open in Jacksonville. This is the 36th store the US, as well as "As Jollibee debuts in Florida, we anticipate seeing not only multitude excited Jollibee patrons waiting to get their hands on their Jollibee favorites, but also first-timers
continues
page 11
EDITION HANDS-ON APPROACH Students Learn to Use Puppets OccupationalforTherapy COMMUNITY HEALTH Taking ApproachMultidisciplinary to Heart Disease DANGER IN DISGUISE Heart Attacks Can Look Different for Women KNOW THE FACTS Risk Factors for Black Americans POP QUIZ! Don’t Miss Beat: Let’s Talk Arrhythmia
See STEAKHOUSE
centralfloridahealthnews.com CFHN | 3 MEMBER BENEFITS ✱ Physician referrals ✱ Medical malpractice discounts with The Doctors Company ✱ Ongoing relevant communication ✱ Access to CME Programs ✱ Workers compensation insurance benefits ✱ Complimentary Socials/dinners MEMBER BENEFITS ✱ Strong PCMA physician representation in Central Florida Health News and Central Florida Doctor publications ✱ Listing advantages in the annual Central Florida Physicians Directory & Medical Providers Guide ✱ Physician and medicine advocacy at all legislative levels Interested in becoming a member? Join the leading professional association in Polk County for physicians. director@ polkcounty doctors. com CALLING ALL PHYSICIANS Renew your Membership with Polk County Medical Association now!

You Snooze, You … Don’t Lose

Our country has been honoring American Heart Month in February since President Lyndon Johnson made the first proclamation in 1964. Educational material is everywhere, but when is the last time you checked in with your heart health?

The American Heart Association is a fantastic resource for anyone seeking guidance. Since 2010, the association has been focusing on what it called “Life’s Simple Seven,” which is a list of health behaviors and factors that affect your heart health. They are:

• Eating better • Controlling cholesterol

• Being more active • Managing your blood sugar

• Stopping smoke • Managing your blood pressure

• Managing weight They’re all great measures to focus on. I, for one, need to practice more of what I preach and do better on some of these recommendations for a healthier life. We’ll discuss many of these inside this edition. However, did you know that last summer, the association added another factor and renamed the list “Life’s Essential Eight”?

The latest addition: Getting enough sleep. According to the AHA, the move to add another measure wasn’t taken lightly, and the final decision came on the heels of 12 years of research.

The association says both too much and too little sleep are associated with heart disease and that most adults need seven to nine hours of sleep each night.

The benefits of sleep are numerous; it facilitates the healing and repair of cells, tissues, and blood vessels; strengthens your immune system; decreases the risk of chronic disease; improves brain function; and improves your mood and energy.

You can learn more about how to get better sleep at bit.ly/3XksKF4.

HN

Erika Aldrich, Mary Joye, LMHC , Teresa Schiffer, Carol Corley, Dr. Joy Jackson, Kristen Guevara

4 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com
MANAGING EDITOR
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CONTRIBUTING ARTIST Dawn Lewandowski DELIVERY DLS Distribution Published by Central Florida Media Group in cooperation with the Polk County Medical Association Copyright © 2023 Central Florida Media Group. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. This issue of Central Florida Health News is a trademark of Central Florida Media Group. Reproduction or use in whole or in part of the contents of this magazine without written permission is prohibited. Central Florida Health News makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of content published. In the event of an error found herein however, neither the publishers or advertisers will be held responsible, nor do the publishers accept any liability for the accuracy of statements made by advertisers in advertising and promotional materials. Furthermore, the opinions and claims expressed in advertisements and promotional materials do not necessarily reflect those of the Polk County Medical Association or Central Florida Media Group and do not imply an endorsement. 56 Fourth Street Northwest, Suite 100 Winter Haven, Florida PHONE 863.248.7537 PUBLISHER’S NOTE www.CentralFloridaHealthNews.com
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POLK COUNTY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

4315 Highland Park Blvd, Suite B

Lakeland, Florida 33813 863-644-4051

2023 OFFICERS

JAMES J. BOOKER, MD President

GEORGE LYLE, MD Secretary

STUART PATTERSON, MD Treasurer

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

RALPH NOBO, JR., MD, Chair

GEORGE LYLE, MD

STUART PATTERSON, MD

GARY SCHEMMER, MD

SERGIO SEOANE, MD

ARVIND SONI, MD

JACKIE COURTNEY

Executive Director

4315 Highland Park Blvd Suite B

Lakeland, Florida 33813

PCMA LETTER PCMA LETTER

TIME FOR A HEART-TO-HEART

The death of Lisa Marie Presley following cardiac arrest at age 54 shocked the nation and brought heart health to the forefront of our minds. February is American Heart Month, a time when Central Florida Health News takes a closer look at cardiovascular health in order to help you focus on your health.

This month, we spoke with Winter Haven cardiologist Dr. Kollagunta Chandrasekhar about the various ways heart attack symptoms can vary based on gender. While both men and women often report chest pain as the primary symptom, a heart attack can cause other less-recognizable symptoms in women. The broader symptoms can complicate and delay a correct diagnosis.

Our Pop Quiz offers a crash course on the various types of arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat, and our Community Feature explains why a multidisciplinary approach can be so beneficial when treating heart disease.

If you’re looking for something a bit lighter, check out our feature on how AdventHealth University is taking a hands-on approach by teaching students how to use puppets in Occupational Therapy.

Take a moment this month to check in with your heart, both for yourself and for the sake of those who love you.

HN

Sincerely,

James J. Booker, MD

James J. Booker, MD Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Winter Haven President, Polk County Medical Association

Some of the benefits of a PCMA membership include the following: ✱ Physician referrals ✱ Medical malpractice discounts with The Doctors Company ✱ Ongoing relevant communication ✱ Access to CME Programs ✱ Workers compensation insurance benefits ✱

Complimentary Socials/ dinners ✱ Strong PCMA physician representation in Central Florida Health News and Central Florida Doctor publications ✱ Listing advantages in the annual Central Florida Physicians Directory & Medical Providers Guide ✱

Physician and medicine advocacy at all legislative levels.

If you’d like more information about becoming a PCMA member or need to check your membership status for renewal, contact our Executive Director Jackie Courtney at (863) 644-4051 or email director@ polkcountydoctors.com.

centralfloridahealthnews.com CFHN | 5
INTRODUCTION

Know the Heart Disease Risk Factors for Black Americans

February is both American Heart Month as well as Black History Month. While February is a time to celebrate the past and the present achievements of the Black community in America, it’s also a fitting time to contemplate how to improve heart health. While heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, it affects Black populations at a disproportionate rate. Nearly half of all Black Americans have a form of cardiovascular disease and they are 30 percent more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than other groups. This disproportion holds true in Polk County: In 2021, Black populations were more likely to die from heart diseases at a rate of 173.4 versus white populations at a rate of 154:5.

What Is My Risk?

There are several risk factors that play a role in the high rates of heart disease among Black Americans. They range from difficulty accessing routine health care, to genetics, to underlying health conditions and behaviors. There are certain behaviors such as consuming a high-fat diet, lack of physical activity, smoking, and excessive alcohol use that can increase the risk of heart disease. These behaviors can lead to and worsen the health conditions that are risk factors for heart disease.

High blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and obesity are key risk factors for heart disease. Black Americans have higher rates of high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity than their white counterparts.

High blood pressure causes your heart to work harder to pump blood. This can strain the heart and over time lead to heart disease. Our livers make most of our cholesterol, but we also obtain it from foods we eat. When too much cholesterol builds up in the arteries, it can lead to a narrowing of the arteries and the blocking of blood flow to and from the heart. Over time, high cholesterol can lead to heart disease. Excess sugar in the blood, or type 2 diabetes, can lead to heart disease. Obesity can also put an extra burden on your heart. Genetics can’t be changed. Systemic factors responsible for heart disease disparities require complex solutions that can be impossible for one person to fix. But an individual can reduce their own risk by learning what they can control and by acting on it.

If you or someone you know is new to Medicare, it’s important to start with the right answers to your questions. We’re here to help make it easier every step of the way.

TALK TO A LICENSED BENEFIT ADVISOR.

Cesarina (Cesi) Santana Cigna Medicare 863-221-0136

7 days a week, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. cesarina.santana@cigna.com Or visit CignaMedicare.com

Together, all the way.®

6 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com EASE INTO MEDICARE Learn more about Cigna Medicare Advantage plans.
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The Healthy Options allowance* can help you pay for the things you need to be your healthiest. These include rent or mortgage, utilities, bathroom safety devices, healthy food, over-the-counter health items and more. Each month, a Healthy Options allowance of $175 is loaded onto a prepaid card. Unspent money rolls over to the next month. To pay for purchases, just swipe it at the register at participating stores.

New for 2023—one card for plan allowances

The Healthy Options allowance will automatically be loaded to the new Humana Spending Account Card, so you only have one card to keep track of for allowances included in your plan.

FRANCISCO ACOSTA 863-276-1979 (TTY: 711) 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. FACOSTA5@HUMANA.COM

* Allowance amounts cannot be combined with other benefit allowances, used to purchase Medicare-covered prescriptions or converted to cash. Limitations and restrictions may apply.

Humana is a Coordinated Care HMO SNP plan with a Medicare contract and a contract with the state Medicaid program. Enrollment in this Humana plan depends on contract renewal. Applicable to Humana Gold Plus SNP-DE H1036-231 (HMO D-SNP). At Humana, it is important you are treated fairly. Humana Inc. and its subsidiaries comply with applicable federal civil rights laws and do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, ancestry, ethnicity, marital status, religion or language. English: ATTENTION: If you do not speak English, language assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call 877-320-1235 (TTY: 711). Español (Spanish): ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 877-320-1235 (TTY: 711) 繁體中文 (Chinese): 注意:如果您使用繁體中文 ,您可以免費獲得語言 援助服務 。請致電 877-320-1235 (聽障專線:711)。

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POP QUIZ!

Don’t Miss a Beat: Learn About Heart Arrhythmia

Your heart is one of the most important organs in your body, and it affects the healthy operation of most of your other organs and your overall well-being. There are many problems you could experience with your heart, and heart arrhythmia is a common one. It’s a heart condition that can cause everything from mild inconvenience to death. Take our quiz and get all the information you need about heart arrhythmia.

1. Which of the following is the definition of heart arrhythmia?

A. An enlarged heart

B. Inflammation in the heart

C. An irregular heartbeat, either too fast or too slow D. None of the above

2. True or false?

A heart arrhythmia is caused when the electrical signals that coordinate the heartbeat don’t work properly.

3. Which of the following are primary symptoms of heart arrhythmia?

A. A fluttering in the chest

B. A racing heartbeat (tachycardia, or a resting heart rate of more than 100 beats per minute) or a slow heartbeat (bradycardia, or a resting heart rate of fewer than 60 beats per minute).

C. Chest pain D. Shortness of breath E. All of the above

4. Which of the following is NOT a secondary symptom of heart arrhythmia?

A. Anxiety B. A rash on the extremities

C. Fatigue

D. Lightheadedness, dizziness, and/or fainting (syncope), or near fainting.

5. Which of the following are possible treatments for heart arrhythmia?

A. Medications

B. Catheter procedures

C. Implanted devices or surgery to control or eliminate fast, slow, or irregular heartbeats

D. All of the above

6. True or false?

A heart-healthy lifestyle can help prevent heart damage that can trigger certain heart arrhythmias.

7. There are many different kinds of heart arrhythmias that are in the tachycardia (or a fast heartbeat) category. Which of the following are possible complications of different kinds of tachycardias?

A. Atrial fibrillation (A-fib) and atrial flutter. Chaotic heart signaling causes a rapid, uncoordinated heart rate that is associated with serious complications such as stroke.

B. Supraventricular tachycardia arrhythmias cause episodes of a pounding heartbeat (palpitations) that begin and end abruptly.

C. Ventricular fibrillation, when rapid, chaotic electrical signals cause the lower heart chambers (ventricles) to quiver and can lead to death if a normal heart rhythm isn’t restored within minutes.

D. Ventricular tachycardia, when faulty electrical signals cause a rapid heart rate that doesn’t allow the ventricles to properly fill with blood. In those with heart disease, it can be a medical emergency that requires immediate medical treatment.

E. All of the above

8. True or false?

Sometimes it’s normal for a person to have a fast or slow heart rate. For example, the heart rate may increase with exercise or slow down during sleep.

9. If you suspect you have a possible heart arrhythmia, you should see a doctor. Which of the following are symptoms that mean you should not wait and instead seek immediate medical help?

A. You feel like your heart is beating too fast or too slowly

B. You feel like your heart is skipping a beat

C. Shortness of breath, weakness, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting or near fainting, and chest pain or discomfort

D. All of the above

9. C. Shortness of breath, weakness, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting or near fainting, and chest pain or discomfort. These symptoms all present a medical emergency and you should see a medical professional immediately.

8. True. Not all slow or fast heart arrhythmias are causes for concern.

7. E. All of the above. There are many different types of tachycardias, or fast heart arrhythmias; most of them constitute a medical emergency.

6 True. Getting exercise, eating a healthy diet, and avoiding smoking and alcohol can help to prevent heart damage that can trigger certain heart arrhythmias.

5. D. All of the above. There are many treatment options for heart arrhythmia.

symptoms of heart arrhythmia.

4. B. A rash on the extremities. Anxiety, fatigue, dizziness, and anything related to fainting can be

3. E. All of the above

2. True. There are many reasons that can cause the electrical signals that coordinate the heartbeat to not work properly.

1. C. A heart arrhythmia is any irregular heartbeat, either too fast or too slow.

ANSWERS:

8 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com
FEATURE
PREVENTION

Embracing a Multidisciplinary Approach to Heart Disease

The motto of Central Florida Health Care is “Health Care With a Heart,” and February is American Heart Month, making it the perfect time to consider what we can all do to help protect our heart health. This is especially important when we consider the high number of people in Florida who have experienced life-threatening cardiac events.

Dr. Andrew Hein, a family medicine specialist with Central Florida Health Care, provides some shocking perspective on this trend.

“In Florida, much like the rest of the United States, heart disease is an impactful disease. Five percent of adults in this state, from the most recent data available, have reported ever having had a heart attack. So that means a fairly significant number of individuals have had a heart attack.”

When it comes to heart disease, it is not wise to wait until a serious problem emerges before taking action to protect your health.

“We like to think in terms of not just treating heart disease, but really going back to the core concept of prevention,” Dr. Hein explains. “There’s two types of prevention that we think about in the medical community. There’s primary prevention, meaning people

who don’t have risks, people who have never had any problems. How do we prevent them from having problems down the road? And there’s secondary prevention, people who’ve had heart disease or issues. How do we prevent them from having future events, such as future heart attacks or strokes?”

The first step toward proactive heart health is understanding your risk. A patient’s primary care physician should be able to help an individual determine their risk factors with the use of risk calculators. Risk factors include such characteristics as age, race, gender, family medical history, plus lifestyle factors like smoking. However, there are factors that can affect a person’s heart health that aren’t always considered in the standard calculators.

“That’s where having a multidisciplinary approach comes into play,” Dr. Hein says. “We know that stress is a huge factor. How do we help patients navigate the stressful environments that they are living in? Struggling with social determinants of health, with getting food, getting the right foods, they’ve lost a job, they’re struggling with issues at home. We have to be part of

a solution of helping patients, not just giving them medicine or a pill.”

At Central Florida Health Care, different doctors and specialists collaborate to create a unified approach to patient health. This type of teamwork can identify risk factors that might otherwise go unnoticed.

“We like to think in terms of a multidisciplinary approach, a holistic approach,” Dr. Hein comments.

He says the clinic has a behavioral health department that helps patients identify and resolve stress factors.

“There’s recently been a lot of research on this whole concept of mental ischemia that’s come into the conversation about heart disease,” he says. “When we have stressful events, how does that literally, at a physiological level, affect our heart and lead to heart attacks?”

Keeping a patient’s heart healthy is one key component of overall healthcare. Central Florida Health Care provides quality medical care by considering all aspects of patient health in order to find solutions to benefit each individual.

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DANGER IN DISGUISE

Heart Attack Symptoms Can Be Vastly Different in Women

When you think of a heart attack, you undoubtedly think of intense chest pain. After all, that is one of the most common and recognizable symptoms. But what happens when a heart attack’s symptoms don’t fit the classic profile? For women, that’s a distinct possibility because men and women can present very different symptoms for heart attacks.

Since quick action and immediate medical care are imperative when it comes to cardiac events, it’s important to know what other symptoms could be warning signs.

“Men usually present in what we think of as the classic way of heart attack presentation,” says Kollagunta Chandrasekhar, a Winter Haven cardiologist.

Those “classic” symptoms generally manifest as severe pressure or pain in the chest, often accompanied by sudden and profuse sweating and a shortness of breath. The onset of these symptoms often occurs during strenuous activity, especially if an individual leads a relatively sedentary life and then engages in a sudden burst of physically stressful activity.

When someone feels the hallmark symptoms,

a heart attack is immediately apparent. The quick diagnosis means lifesaving measures and treatment aren’t delayed. Unfortunately, this is not always the case for women, who may experience significantly different symptoms than their male counterparts.

“A woman oftentimes will more likely have symptoms that are a little more vague,” Sekhar explains. “They are often not what you would routinely think of as a heart attack.”

He says a woman experiencing a heart attack may complain of back pain that moves toward her chest, shortness of breath, mild sweating, or she may simply state that she feels uncomfortable or generally not well. These unclear symptoms can lead healthcare workers to consider different — less severe — ailments, and can delay the appropriate care.

This struggle is one Polk County resident Elaine Grosse knows all too well. The symptoms she experienced led her to believe she was having a problem with her gallbladder, not her heart.

“For about a week, I had some middle-of-theback pain, right between the shoulders,” the 74-year-old says. “It was consistent – at 2 o’clock

10 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com
EDITION FEATURE

in the morning, I had the pain. It went away after about 15 or 20 minutes. Then, about three days later, I had another one.”

Grosse assumed the pain was digestive upset from something she ate. Her primary care physician agreed and ordered a gallbladder scan. The pain woke her up again on the day of her scan, but this time it didn’t stop.

“It got worse to the point that I started vomiting, but there was nothing coming up,” Grosse recalls.

After a couple of hours of intense pain and retching, she went to the hospital. Tests were performed, and soon she was sent to Heart of Florida hospital in Haines City to see a cardiologist. The cardiologist determined Grosse had indeed suffered a heart attack, and a stent was put in place to open the occluded artery.

Now, only a week later, she is recovering and feeling like herself again. A good rule of thumb for both men and women to remember is to pay attention to when unusual physical sensations happen. If it seems like physical activity precedes the development of uncomfortable symptoms, there is a good chance that the problem is related to the heart.

Sekhar recommends calling for emergency medical care if the problem does not go away within a few minutes of ceasing the physical activity.

“If the symptoms are worse with activity,” he says, “if it’s more in the stomach or you think you pulled a muscle or that it’s gas or whatever, if it’s more activity-related and if it persists, anything that doesn’t clear up in a few minutes, you probably need an ambulance for.”

He advises patients to err on the side of caution and get medical attention sooner rather than later.

“If you have reason to suspect that it could be your heart, go see a doctor and get it checked out,” he says.” HN

HEALTHY AGING

February is here, and Valentine’s Day is around the corner! We see red hearts everywhere as a sign for the holiday, but let’s talk about what red eyes are a sign for. There are several conditions that can cause this very common finding. Depending on the symptoms you’re experiencing, and the amount/severity of inflammatory signs in the eye, a doctor can diagnose the cause for your red eye.

Most commonly, red eyes are caused by a condition called conjunctivitis. There are three main types of conjunctivitis: bacterial, allergic, and viral. Each of these can lead to irritation in the eyes including itching, burning, and discharge. The type of discharge experienced is key to determining the type of conjunctivitis: white/ yellow vs thick/clear vs stringy/clear. Not all conjunctivitis is treated the same either. Most of the time, an antibiotic or steroid/antibiotic combination drop may be required. Sometimes, no drop is needed and the conjunctivitis will resolve on its own within a few weeks. Allergic conjunctivitis can be cleared with over-thecounter medications, although prescription drops may be required for severe cases.

A pinguecula is a very common, benign bump on the white part of the eye, the conjunctiva. Sometimes the pinguecula can become inflamed and turn red, called pingueculitis. The pinguecula can grow over to the clear part of the eye, at which point it’s called a pterygium, and almost always leads to redness in the eye. Most of the time, the pinguecula and pterygium do not cause irritation, but sometimes it can lead to a foreign body sensation, at which point artificial tears are recommended.

Conditions that affect the lids and the lashes, called blepharitis, can also cause red eyes, as well as itching, burning, and dry eyes. This can be due to bacteria buildup on the lashes, mites on the lashes, and capped oil glands. The most effective treatment is to clean the lids and lashes with lid scrubs, such as Ocusoft, and to use warm compresses on the eyes. In severe cases of blepharitis, oral antibiotics may be necessary, as well as prescription eye drops.

Trauma to the eye is another very common cause for red eyes. A foreign body in the eye such as a piece of metal, or even an eyelash in the eye can cause irritation and redness until removed. When a foreign body gets in the eye, it can also cause a scratch on the cornea (the clear part of the eye) or conjunctiva, which is called an abrasion. This may require artificial tears, or antibiotic drops to heal.

Oftentimes, a red eye is simply that: a red bloodshot eye with no symptoms. This is due to a burst blood vessel in the conjunctiva called a subconjunctival hemorrhage. This resolves on its own in a few weeks. It is most commonly caused by physical straining: excessive coughing/sneezing, constipation, heavy lifting, etc. If you experience this often, specific blood work may be necessary to rule out certain systemic conditions and bleeding disorders.

Other conditions that cause red eyes include keratitis, scleritis, episcleritis, dry eyes, and uveitis. So, before you go to your nearest drug store and pick up a bottle of “red eye relief” eye drops, make sure to see a doctor to be properly diagnosed for your red eye. Our doctors can help you with red eyes or any other eye care issues. To learn more or to schedule an appointment call us at 800-2823937 or visit us online at EYESFL.COM

A comprehensive eye examination with careful observation of the eyelids and surface of the eye diagnoses dry eye syndrome. If you feel you could have dry eye, please call our office to schedule an appointment with one of our doctors at 800282-3937 or visit us online at EYESFL.COM.

This column is sponsored by Eye Specialists of Mid-Florida, and the opinions expressed herein may not reflect those of CFHN or of its advertisers.

Bio: Anisa Patail, O.D. is a Board-Certified Optometrist who practices at the Haines City location for Eye Specialists of Mid-Florida. She is currently accepting new patients.

centralfloridahealthnews.com CFHN | 11
There’s More Than Meets the (Red) Eye

A HANDS-ON APPROACH

Students Learn to Use Puppetry in Occupational Therapy

Everyone loves puppets!” exclaims Angela Sampson.

She should know. Sampson uses them not only in her job as a pediatric occupational therapist but also as she and other professors equip the next generation of occupational therapy assistants at AdventHealth University in Orlando.

Each trimester, AdventHealth University’s Occupational Therapy Assistant program brings in a puppeteer to teach students the benefits of using puppets with patients. Students create the puppet from scratch, using found materials and taking into consideration what a patient might like to see. Tracey Conner, executive director of MicheLee Puppets in Orlando, shares her puppetry expertise and tips with the students in lessons that pay off long after class has ended.

Sampson and other professors say puppets not only bring joy to patients but also move the pressure and focus from patient to puppet, allowing a therapist to gain insight and teach necessary skills for development. For a child or neurodiverse individual, expressing what

emotion they are feeling can be intimidating, and often, they may not even know what they are truly experiencing inside. A puppet can be an icebreaker and a stand-in to facilitate an informative interaction between a therapist and a patient while also making interactions fun.

In Occupational Therapy, patients learn how to develop physical, emotional, and social skills so they can perform daily activities following a procedure or accident or as a result of a disorder, illness, or birth defect. Occupational therapists, for example, use puppets to help pediatric and neurodiverse patients express or regulate emotions, practice social skills, face fears, and so much more. Even adult patients can relate to puppets, Sampson says.

“There are certain developmental ages where children play with stuffed animals and do a lot of pretending,” Sampson says. “They use dolls and teddy bears, and those things are very lifelike for them. They will use puppets just like those objects to communicate how they are feeling without even realizing they are doing it. They may have a conversation between two puppets and tell you the puppet is feeling sick or point out where the puppet

is hurting. While they may not be able to articulate directly what they are feeling, they can use the puppet to show their therapist how they feel without intentionally saying it about themselves.”

Students say puppets can help identify where and how patients are in need of therapy in a fun, safe, and comfortable way.

“Oftentimes, physical struggles can lead to emotional struggles, and puppets can be the key to open the door to that discovery,” says Lane Moore, an occupational therapy assistant student at AHU. “If a patient is unable to open a door for example, how might that make them feel, emotionally?”

The puppets also can act as a third-party buffer.

“Puppets can help occupational therapists simulate situations that may cause fear or anxiety for children and neurodiverse patients, such as going to the dentist or getting a haircut,” Sampson explains. “Sitting in a dentist’s chair, for example, having someone in their personal space, touching them, and seeing new tools can frighten them. However, seeing a puppet sit in a chair and experience a

14 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com
EDUCATION FEATURE
CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

West and Central Florida. CarePlus is an HMO SNP plan with a Medicare contract and a contract with the Florida Medicaid Program. Enrollment in CarePlus depends on contract renewal. This plan is available to anyone receiving both Medicare and Medicaid: Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB/QMB+), Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLMB/SLMB+), Qualifying Individuals (QI), Qualified Disabled and Working Individuals (QDWI) and other Full Benefit Dual Eligibles (FBDE). No amounts on the CareEssentials Card can be used to purchase Medicare-covered prescriptions or services, nor can it be converted to cash.Important: At CarePlus, it is important you are treated fairly. CarePlus Health Plans, Inc. complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, ethnicity, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, disability, age, marital status, religion, or language in their programs and activities, including in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, their programs and activities. The following department has been designated to handle inquiries regarding CarePlus’ non-discrimination policies: Member Services, PO Box 277810, Miramar, FL 33027, 1-800-794-5907 (TTY: 711). Auxiliary aids and services, free of charge, are available to you. 1-800-794-5907 (TTY: 711). CarePlus provides free auxiliary aids and services, such as qualified sign language interpreters, video remote interpretation, and written information in other formats to people with disabilities when such auxiliary aids and services are necessary to ensure an equal opportunity to participate. This information is available for free in other languages. Please call our Member Services number at 1-800-794-5907. Hours of operation: October 1 - March 31, 7 days a week, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. April 1 - September 30, Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. You may leave a voicemail after hours, Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays and we will return your call within one business day. Español (Spanish): Esta información está disponible de forma gratuita en otros idiomas. Favor de llamar a Servicios para Afiliados al número que aparece anteriormente. Kreyòl Ayisyen (French Creole): Enfòmasyon sa a disponib gratis nan lòt lang. Tanpri rele nimewo Sèvis pou Manm nou yo ki nan lis anwo an. H1019_MKBNDMFNPRcareneedsplus2023_M

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February 2023 | CALENDAR

Recurring Online Events

Bariatrics Pre-Op Class

On the second Saturday of each month from 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., bariatric patients can prepare for their upcoming surgery online with Zoom or in person at Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center (Mulaney Auditorium), located at 1324 Lakeland Hills Blvd in Lakeland. Sign up for the free class online at www.eventbrite. com, and search for “Bariatrics Pre-Op Class.”

Diabetes Support Group Virtual

On the second Monday of each month, BayCare Health System hosts a virtual support group for diabetics from 12 – 1 p.m., led by a certified diabetes care and education specialist. Educational information is provided, followed by an open discussion. Access to a microphone and camera is required to attend this free online meeting. For more information, please call 855-269-4777 or go to www.baycare.org/ events.

Get Active Walking Group

A weekly walking group sponsored by Lakeland Regional Health meets every Thursday at 8 a.m. at Lake Hollingsworth in Lakeland. Walkers meet up next to the bleachers that are adjacent to the parking lot. Get active and improve your health by committing to a weekly walk!

Restorative Yoga Cancer Program Virtual

This is a stress-reduction yoga program designed to help cancer patients cope with their treatments and improve their quality of life. Learn techniques such as regulated breathing, visual imagery, meditation, and various stretching poses to improve balance, flexibility, and strength. The class is taught by a registered yoga teacher and exercise specialist. Microphone and camera access is encouraged but not required. The free lessons will take place from 7:30 – 8:15 a.m. every Wednesday. Register online at www.baycare.org/events or call 855-269-4777 for more information.

Events and Fundraisers

February 1 – Ribbon Cutting for Central Florida Health Care’s Winter Haven

Integrated Behavioral Health Center

Celebrate the opening of a new community resource from 9:45 – 10:15 a.m. at 244 Ave D SW in Winter Haven. Please RSVP to Julie Plante at jplante@cfhconline.org.

February 2 and 9 – Total Joint Replacement

This free class is for patients who have a total joint replacement surgery scheduled, plus one guest per patient. All attendees must wear a face mask over their nose and mouth at all times while inside the building. The class will be held from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. at Winter Haven Hospital – Wellness Conference Room, 200 Ave F NE in Winter Haven. For more information, please call 855-269-4777, or go online to register at www.baycare.org/events.

February 2 – 2023 1st Responders Award Lunch

Acknowledge the dedication of community heroes from 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. at Lake Wales Arts Center, 1099 SR 60 E in Lake Wales. Register online by visiting https://business.lakewaleschamber.com/events/calendar/2023-02-01.

February 2 – FREE Community Lecture –Managing Low Back Pain

Watson Clinic Chiropractic Medicine provider Jalen Banks, DC, will lead this presentation that covers potential causes of low back pain and some of the most effective and conservative treatments available to manage it. The lecture will begin at 6 p.m. at Watson Clinic Center for Specialized Rehabilitation, located at 2190 E County Rd 540A in Lakeland. You can RSVP by calling (863) 680-7718 or going online to www. watsonclinic.com/events/.

February 4 – 18th Annual VISTEball

Watson Clinic is a proud sponsor of the first in-person VISTEball since 2020. Enjoy an indoor golf event, online auction, and a full buffet dinner with drinks while supporting the Volunteers in Service to the Elderly organization. Tickets are $75 per person. The fun and games will take place from 6 – 9:30 p.m. at SUN ‘n FUN Expo Campus, located at 4075 James C Ray Dr in Lakeland. You can purchase tickets and sign up for the online auction at www.viste. org/about-visteball/.

CALENDAR

16 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com

February 7 – Breastfeeding Support Group Virtual

From 10 – 11 a.m. breastfeeding mothers can get together online to support each other and talk with certified breastfeeding consultants for free. Sponsored by St. Joseph’s Women’s Hospital. For more information, please call 855-269-4777 or visit www.baycare.org/events.

February 7 – Healthy Eating Every Day!!

This is a free 14-week workshop sponsored by Senior Connection Center that equips participants with a workable plan for improving health. Free book and study materials are included. Meetings are held from 2 – 3 p.m. on Tuesdays at United Methodist Temple, located at 2700 S Florida Ave in Lakeland. Participants must be age 60 or over and live in Polk County or Hillsborough County. Register by calling Christina Nowell at (813) 6765568.

February 9 – It’s in Our Hands Paint Party

Grab your friends for an evening of creativity and tasty snacks as the artists from Practically Pikasso guide you in painting a beautiful wine glass that you will treasure for years as a special keepsake. Physicians will lead a discussion about breast cancer awareness and prevention at the BayCare HealthHub (Bardmoor) Atrium, located at 8787 Bryan Dairy Rd in Largo from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. The fee is $25. Register by visiting www.baycare.org/ events. For more information, please call 855269-4777.

February 10 – 11 – 2023 Full Moon Howl

This is an invitation clay pigeon shoot fundraiser to benefit Peace River Center that will take place at Golotko Ranch, located on District Line Rd in Fort Meade, with registration taking place from 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. on Friday, February 10, and the shoot begins at 10 a.m. There will also be an evening event held at Rocking H Ranch, located at 2200 Ewell Rd in Lakeland, at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, February 11. More information on this event is available at www.watsonclinic.com/events/.

February 11 – Boot Camp for New Dads Virtual

BayCare Health Systems is offering a virtual class just for expectant fathers, taught by a certified facilitator. Access to a camera and microphone is encouraged but not required. The $25 course will cover fatherhood, life changes, relationship changes, and hands-on experience. Previous participants will be involved with their own infants to offer their personal wisdom. You will receive course materials by mail before the class. This class will be held from 10 – 11:30 a.m. You can get more information by calling 855-269-4777, or go to www.baycare.org/events to register online.

February 12 – Let’s Talk Puberty for Boys

St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital is sponsoring this informative session for boys ages 10 to 13 to help them understand the physical and emotional changes of puberty, the male reproductive system, and ways to maintain a healthy body during the first half of the class. The second half will give an overview of the female changes of puberty, female reproductive system, and a discussion of conception and abstinence. This course is $35 and will be held from 1 – 4 p.m. at St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital. For more information, please call 855-2694777 or visit www.baycare.org/events.

February 13 – Forget Me Not Pregnancy and Infant Loss Support Group

Families and individuals who have experienced the loss of a child through miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth, or early infant death can gather with others to explore their grief while honoring their loss by learning how to strengthen communication with loved ones and engage in self-care activities. The meeting takes place from 1 – 2 p.m. at Winter Haven Women’s Hospital, Classroom C, 101 Ave O SE, in Winter Haven. It is a free meeting. You can register online at www.baycare.org/events.

February 18 – Gone Country for kidsPACK

Help ensure that no child goes hungry in Polk County even when school is out by supporting kidsPACK. The 10th annual Gone Country event takes place on February 18 from 6 – 10 p.m. at White Horse Ranch, located at 5718 Yates Rd in Lakeland. Learn more by visiting their website at www.kidspack.org or by calling 1-800-598-7871.

February 21 – Maternity Center Orientation Virtual

Prepare for delivery at BayCare by attending a virtual tour of the Maternity Center. This is a free class for expectant mothers. One support person may also attend. The class will take place from 5:30 – 7 p.m. and is sponsored by Morton Plant Hospital. For more information, please visit www.baycare.org/events or call 855-269-4777.

February 25 – March 11 – 30th Polk Senior Games

This is an exciting and much anticipated yearly event in which local seniors participate in 33 Olympic-style sports and games over the course of two weeks. Competitions will take place at various locations throughout Polk County. To take part as a competitor, entries must be received by February 10. You can find complete details at www.polkseniorgames.org.

centralfloridahealthnews.com CFHN | 17

Let’s Go Nuts!

Heart-Healthy Recipes to Incorporate Your Favorites in Your Meal

Eating nuts is a healthy and tasty way to increase protein while remaining heart-healthy.

Even the peanut, which is technically a legume that often gets grouped in with the others, is very high in protein, antioxidants, and flavonoids.

While the American Heart Association says most people get too much protein, the problem more often is that many people choose meat options with saturated fats, which increase LDL, or “bad” cholesterol. Nuts, on the other hand, do not have that bad cholesterol.

Business Insider reports a multi-year study with 81,000 people showed 1014 mixed nuts daily helped lower bad cholesterol, especially in young people.

Eating nuts is encouraged as a protein source. Still, you can’t replace the meat with nuts ounce-for-ounce. A lean 4-ounce chicken breast has about 100 calories, but a 4-ounce serving of walnuts has 740 calories.

A mix of nuts is recommended since each has its own unique nutritional benefits. Almonds are loaded with antioxidants, while walnuts are high in alpha-linolenic acid and can increase the protein content in meat-based dishes. Pistachios are high in essential amino acids, pine nuts are anti-inflammatory, and peanuts are high in biotin.

Plus, they all taste pretty good!

Walnut- and Dijon-Crusted Halibut

(Adapted from cookinglight.com)

Ingredients:

Halibut filets, 4 (6 oz), no tail

Walnut halves, 2/3 cup crushed gently into small pieces

Thyme, 1-1/2 tablespoons fresh chopped

Flour, 2 tablespoons all-purpose Dijon mustard, 1 tablespoon or to taste

Egg white, 1 lightly beaten

Olive oil, 1-1/2 tablespoon

Salt and pepper to taste

Lemon wedges, 4 for decoration

Directions:

Place chopped walnut pieces with thyme in a shallow dish. In another shallow dish combine Dijon mustard and egg white. Place flour in a third shallow dish and press filet tops in flour, shake off excess, dip floured tops in egg mixture, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and finally dip the egg side into the walnut mixture, pressing to adhere.

Briefly place the walnut side of fish in oil in a large ovenproof non-stick skillet, cooking for 3-4 minutes until the nuts are toasted. Then turn the fish and place the skillet in the oven preheated to 400F, baking for 4-5 minutes until the fish flakes easily. Serve with lemon wedges.

Pistachio French Toast

(Adapted from tasteofhome.com)

BREAD Ingredients:

French baguette bread, 16 slices 1/2” thick

White baking chips, 1 cup chopped Cream cheese, 8 oz softened

Half-and-half 1-1/4 cups

Milk of choice, 3/4 cup Eggs, 8 Honey, 1/3 cup

Almond extract, 1-1/2 teaspoons Cinnamon, ground, to taste

TOPPING Ingredients: Butter, 1/2 cup melted Brown sugar, 1/2 cup packed Honey, 4 tablespoons Cinnamon, ground, to taste Pistachios, 1 cup toasted, finely chopped

Directions: Using a greased 13x9-inch baking dish, arrange bread slices in two shingled rows. Combine half-and-half and baking chips in a microwave-safe dish and microwave until melted, stirring occasionally. About 4 minutes. Meanwhile, beat cream cheese and milk until smooth in a large bowl, and whisk in eggs, honey, and flavorings. Blend in the cream mixture and pour over the bread. Hold overnight in the refrigerator, covered.

When ready to cook, remove from the refrigerator and preheat the oven to 350F. While the oven is heating and the bread is coming to room temperature, blend the topping of butter, brown sugar, honey, and cinnamon. Stir in pistachios and baking chips and sprinkle over bread slices. Bake covered for about 40 minutes. A knife inserted in the center should come out clean. Uncover and bake for another 10 minutes or until golden brown. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.

18 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com HEALTHY COOK

Pizza with Spinach, Pine Nut Pesto and Pecans

(Adapted from fishernuts.com)

Ingredients:

Spinach and arugula blend, 3 cups

Pine nuts, 1/4 cup toasted

Pecan halves, 1 cup

Olive oil of choice, 1/4 cup

Lemon juice, 1 tablespoon

Parmesan cheese, 1/3 cup

Basil leaves, 1/3 cup

Ricotta cheese, 1-1/2 cup

Red pepper flakes crushed, 1/4 cup or to taste if desired

Salt to taste

Pizza dough, store-bought, 1 pound

Flour for rolling out dough

HEART NEWS

Meet Our Doctor

Obesity: The #1 Health Epidemic in the United States

Dr. Aparajita is a fellowship-trained vascular surgeon and has been serving the Polk County community for the past 1 year. She earned her Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) degree at University of Delhi, India. She then completed a research fellowship in vascular surgery at Columbia University Medical Center in New York and a residency in General Surgery at Staten Island University Hospital in New York, she completed her fellowship training in Vascular Surgery at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Barnabas Medical Center in New Jersey.

Dr. Aparajita is also a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, UK (MRCS Ed) and completed her Basic Surgical Training in England soon after her medical school.

Dr. Aparajita is the co-author of more than two dozen journal articles, publications and oral presentations, including topics such as endovascular treatment for thrombosis, aortic aneurysm repair, stroke, peripheral artery disease and other vascular conditions.

Overweight and obesity are defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that presents a risk to health. A body mass index (BMI) over 25 is considered over weight, and over 30 is obese. The issue has grown to epidemic proportions, with more than 4 million people dying each year as a result of being overweight or obese

Additional posts and volunteer work include a teaching position at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and as a Member of the Public and Professional Outreach Committee as well as the International Relations Committee at the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS).

Prepare

pressing it gently and turning on a lightly floured surface, rolling it out to about 12 inches. Sprinkle the dough with 1/2 cup of pecans chopped and continue rolling until the dough is about 14 inches in diameter. Place on a baking sheet and bake in the oven preheated to 350 F for about 16 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from the oven.

Meanwhile, in a food processor, mix together 2-1/2 cups of spinach-arugula blend, pine nuts, olive oil, lemon juice, and salt to taste, using a pulse setting. Put the mixture in a bowl and stir in 1/4 cup of Parmesan cheese, basil, and the remaining spinach-arugula blend. Finally, spread ricotta cheese on top of the pizza crust, sprinkle with red pepper flakes if desired, place back in the oven now cooled to 300F, and leave for 8-10 minutes. Remove the pizza from the oven and place it on a serving platter. Spoon pesto mixture on top until evenly covered. Sprinkle with the remaining 1/2 cup of pecans and a bit more Parmesan cheese and serve.

Dr. Aparajita was recently nominated for the American Medical Association (AMA) Inspiration Award that recognizes physicians who have contributed to the achievements of women in the medical profession.

RITU APARAJITA, MD, MRCS (Ed), MBBS

According to the CDC, obesity impacts 49.6% of African Americans and 44.8% of non-white Hispanic Americans, compared to only 42.2% of white Americans. Black and brown children are also disproportionately affected by childhood obesity. 2017 CDC data indicates that among racial groups, obesity impacts 25.6% of non-white Hispanic children and 24.2% of African American children, compared to only 16.1% of white children. These obesity disparities result from a complex confluence of socioeconomic, environmental, cultural, and psychological factors.

Specialty: Vascular & Endovascular Surgery

Joining KSC Cardiology November 9, 2020

Obesity is like a wheel with multiple spokes — the spokes being diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, hypertension, heart disease, kidney disease, malnutrition, stroke. Being obese increases your risk of acquiring these conditions.

Obesity is largely a lifestyle disease. However strong evidence is emerging that there may be a genetic component, as well. For example, it is a well-known fact that entire families are usually obese, pointing to a strong dietary choice that family is making. Child obesity is especially troublesome as it is much more difficult to reduce weight later in life.

Here are five simple things that you can do to start making a difference today

• Cut down on fast food to once a week as cooking at home gives you control over what goes in your food. When a family sits down together for at least one meal a day it has been shown to encourage healthy eating habits.

• You may have heard that “sugar is the new cigarette.” It is true that sugar has an addictive hold on your brain. Children used to consuming sugar in the form of juices and soda from an early age tend to stay on them, thus consuming huge amounts of “empty calories.” Those empty calories can be difficult to burn off. Avoiding sugars and unhealthy carbohydrates is the key to losing and maintaining healthy weight. Ideally, avoiding carbohydrates after 5 or 6 p.m. helps and fighting obesity as calories tend to accumulate during periods of inactivity.

• Watch your portions: Simple measures like eating a salad and having smaller portions of high-calorie food go a long way and weight control. Avoiding fried and sugary food (pasta, rice, bread) can reduce your calorie intake by as much as one-third.

• Exercise: Even a 10-minute walk after dinner has been shown to cut down the risk of obesity and diabetes. Walking for 30 minutes at least three times a week is a good starting point. If you find a friend or partner to accompany you, this may no longer seem like an exercise!

• NO SODA: Soda seems to be the single most important factor responsible for the vast proportion of childhood and adult obesity. You may seem to consume very little food, but drinking any amount of soda adds empty calories to your body. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends water and milk for kids as part of their daily diet. Soda also erodes the dental enamel and can be responsible for dental caries later in life.

This column is sponsored by KSC Cardiology, and the opinions expressed herein may not reflect those of CFHN or of its advertisers.

BIO: Dr. Aparajita is a fellowship-trained vascular and endovascular surgeon. She is a co-author of 20+ journal articles and publications and was recently nominated for an Inspiration Award by the American Medical Association (AMA).

centralfloridahealthnews.com CFHN | 19
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the dough by

A Hands-On Approach

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

Cryosurgery Is a Common Practice in Dermatology

Cryosurgery is the use of extreme cold to treat medical conditions. It works by freezing off harmful cells or skin tags, leaving room for new cells to grow. It can be used to treat a variety of conditions, from warts to early-stage skin cancers, as well as some internal conditions and cancers. It doesn’t have many risks associated with it, and is a low-pain, minimally invasive option compared to surgery.

How It Works

Your doctor will use an agent to administer the extreme cold to the affected area. This can be a cotton swab with the freezing agent, like a carbon dioxide snow slush, or liquid nitrogen applied by spraying or painting. This extreme cold is maintained for different amounts of times depending on the size and depth of the lesion, creating an ice ball on the skin. The freeze causes direct necrosis of the area, allowing it to then fall off.

Conditions It’s Used For

Medical professionals commonly use cryosurgery to treat warts, skin tags and lesions. It’s also used for precancerous skin conditions and early stages of skin cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. It is not a first line of treatment for more advanced cases of skin cancer.

Actinic keratosis, a scaly patch caused by sun damage, is very amenable to cryosurgery treatment, with a complete cure rate of 39-83%. Seborrheic keratosis, a non-cancerous, benign skin growth common as we grow older, can be treated with cryosurgery but typically requires multiple treatments depending on size and severity.

Risks of Cryosurgery

Cryosurgery is minimally-invasive and much lower risk than surgical options, but there are a few side effects you might encounter with treatment. Many treated areas will blister over, however unless there’s pus and an infection, these blisters are harmless and a sign of healing. Patients might also experience local nerve damage, but this is temporary. Contact your doctor if you experience more severe symptoms.

Healing Time

The treated area will likely cause mild pain and redness that doesn’t last more than a few days. Blisters might form that eventually scab over. It’s important not to pick the scab; it will likely fall off in five-10 days if on the face, three weeks for the hand, and up to three months on the leg.

Talk with any of the Lakeside Dermatology providers to learn more and find out if it’s right for your health concern.

This column is sponsored by Lakeside Dermatology, and the opinions expressed herein may not reflect those of CFHN or of its advertisers.

Dr. Alex W. Kennon, MD, FAAD, is a board-certified dermatologist who is fellowship-trained in Mohs micrographic surgery. He received his undergraduate and medical degrees from Florida State University and completed his dermatology residency at Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. Lakeside Dermatology has offices in Sebring and Winter Haven.

hypothetical dentist visit can ease those patients’ feelings.”

In addition, she continues, puppets can be used to help patients with motor skills.

“If patients have goals for self-feeding, meaning that they can hold a spoon, scoop the food, and bring it to their mouth, sometimes they don’t want to do that for themselves but if they have a puppet they will feed the puppet and be able to practice those skills,” Sampson says, adding that puppet play can strengthen patients’ finger and hand muscles and even improve coordination.

According to the National Library of Medicine, puppetry was introduced to the world of occupational therapy in the early 1900s. The goal of occupational therapy, said Vicki Case, MS Ed., OTR/L, Occupational Therapy Assistant program director at AHU, is to get patients to function independently and perform the activities they love.

“If someone has a disability, whether it is mental, physical, cognitive, or emotional, occupations are affected. This includes sleep, play, leisure activities, school, self-care, driving, etc., so our job is to get them back to doing their occupations.”

20 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com
HEALTHY SKIN
centralfloridahealthnews.com CFHN | 21 CENTRAL FLORIDA HEALTH EXPO 2023 SPRING SEASON WE’D LIKE TO WELCOME THESE EVENT EXHIBITORS Spring 2023 Health Expos February 10 • March 17 International Market World 1052 US 92, Auburndale, FL 33823 Central Florida Media Group offers professional content marketing, niche advertising, website development, SEO, social media management, publicity, blogs, videography and more. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO JOIN CENTRAL FLORIDA HEALTH EXPO AS AN EXHIBITOR, REGISTER ONLINE AT CENTRALFLORIDAMEDIAGROUP.COM/CENTRAL-FLORIDA-HEALTH-EXPO OR CONTACT CINDA SHELBY AT 863-248-7537 EXT. 4

Codependency: A Condition of the Heart

Codependency, broadly defined, is a loss of self while caring for others. A codependent person will give out until they burn out or become physically ill. Codependency is not a formal disorder included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-5).

One team of researchers (Barbara Oakley, et. al) named the condition “pathological altruism” describing a person who can believe the best about the worst of people. They often get harmed or taken advantage of and become entangled with people who have personality or substance abuse disorders. They are often known as people who are loyal to a fault. Narcissists and sociopaths love to take and are highly attracted to codependents who love to give.

The roots of codependency and narcissism are both born of a subconscious fear of abandonment and using people to “medicate” themselves. Narcissists love to make people feel badly about themselves and codependents love to please people. They both get feel-good chemicals in relationships, but the narcissist gets dopamine from using or manipulating, while the codependent gets theirs from giving and forgiving the user or abuser. It feels like intense love, but it is a trauma bond that is not easily broken. The bond is treated much like an addiction because of the physiological reactivity that creates anxious withdrawals when attempts are made to break the bond.

The roots of codependency are complex. Many were abused children, the scapegoat,

information, visit www.maryjoyecounseling.com.

or had an alcoholic parent. Some are simply born more empathic and sympathetic. Humans are hardwired simultaneously for connection and fear, and both are meant to keep you safe. When there are mixed messages in the brain, a person can care too much for people who care too little for them. This causes a disconnect with a sense of self. The list below is a guide to codependent traits. Any one of these may impair a person’s life.

• Approval-seeking or people-pleasing

• A need to be needed

• Fear of being alone

• Feeling selfish or guilty for not meeting the needs of others

• Feeling not good enough, or “too much” or “too little”

• Rescuing or fixing behaviors

• Covering up or taking a fall for others

• Giving of finances or other resources to depletion

• Over-responsibility

• False guilt, shame, and eventually anger from self-deprivation

• Finding it difficult to ask for or receive help

• Perfectionism

• Apologizing too much

This is not an exhaustive list, but it is exhausting to read it or do it. We are human beings, not human doings.

Many codependents say, “I can’t take anymore!”

What they mean is, “I can’t give anymore!”

Codependency is like narcissism in reverse. Narcissists are self-absorbed in getting their needs met and codependents are absorbed in meeting the needs of others. Codependency is a form of self-harm because you have allowed others to hurt you. A codependent can begin healing by taking responsibility for the part they played in allowing others to harm them.

When they replace the fear of abandonment with wanting to be wanted instead of needing to be needed, they heal. It is like the difference between saying, “I want a drink” instead of “I need a drink.” The latter is a desperate desire. However, this condition of the heart can be healed through many modalities.

Sheri Fox, a local artist and class presenter, states, “I have become a pro at resilience… When a bone breaks, it becomes stronger… Broken dishes and mirrors can become beautiful mosaics. Some of the best artwork, music, and poetry is created by someone who has been broken. The trick is to allow yourself to break, feel the feelings, cry the tears, explore the shadows, then do what you need to do to return to the light. Never give up!”

Sheri and I will be teaching a class on Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14, titled The Art and Heart of Resilience. The class will be held at Moon Dreamz at 2750 US 17 in Winter Haven from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. It will explore the neuroscience of codependency and talk about how to gain resilience. For more information, call 863-662-4473.

22 | CFHN centralfloridahealthnews.com PCMA LETTER BODY, MIND & SPIRIT
ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Mary Joye, LMHC, PA, is a licensed mental health counselor with offices in Lakeland and Winter Haven. She holds a Master of Arts in Counseling from Trevecca Nazarene University in Nashville, Tennessee. For more

Not a Guarantee, but the Best Defense

Fresh off a two-week tangle with Covid in December, I’m grateful that I got vaccinated. While everyone else was gearing up for the holidays and making plans, I was coughing and cursing every ache in my body. It was the worst experience I’ve ever had with a virus. I know there are people who suffered far worse than I and many that lost their lives, so yes … I’m grateful. I am, however, less than thrilled about flu season. There’s a good chance that you or someone you know has been stuck in bed with the flu recently. Federal health officials have warned that flu activity in the state is high, which is also the case for Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Louisiana. The bad news is that there are still four months left in flu season, and we haven’t hit the peak yet. The season typically peaks in February. The good news is that it’s not too late to get a flu shot! Just like the Covid vaccination, a flu shot doesn’t provide complete protection, but it decreases the risk of serious illness and hospitalization if you do get sick. It is the best defense we have against influenza. Are you ready for more good news? The flu shot is easier than ever to find. For more information or to find out where you can get your vaccination, head to polk.floridahealth.gov. Here’s wishing you the healthiest of flu seasons! HN

What Can I Do to Reduce My Risk?

A healthy lifestyle can prevent heart disease as well as reverse some risk factors.

• Go from a diet high in saturated fats, trans fats, and salt to a lowsodium diet featuring fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat proteins. Start with eating less processed foods.

• Regular physical activity can help with maintaining a healthy weight. The surgeon general recommends two and a half hours of moderateintensity exercise per week.

• Since tobacco use increases the risk of heart conditions, quit smoking. Even secondhand smoke can increase the risk of heart disease in nonsmokers.

• Limit alcohol intake. Women are recommended no more than one drink a day while men are recommended no more than two drinks a day.

• If you already have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes, take charge of your health. Monitor your blood pressure and cholesterol regularly, take your medications as directed, and listen to your doctor’s recommendations. Incorporate these lifestyle changes and watch your progress make a difference. While reflecting on the past, let’s also look to improve the future. HN

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Dr. Joy Jackson, an internal medicine physician, serves the community as director of the Florida department of Health in Polk County (DOH-Polk). For more information about DOH-Polk, visit mypolkhealth.org. Follow DOH-Polk on Twitter at twitter.com/FLHealthPolk.

centralfloridahealthnews.com CFHN | 23
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