a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

SPECIAL SECTION! BOOMERS & BEYOND BUYER’S OR SELLER’S MARKET?

WE EXPLAIN HOW TO KNOW MARCH 2020

MARCH 2020

AT HOME WITH HGTV INTERIOR DESIGNER BRIAN PATRICK FLYNN


56 MODEL IN A MODEL We recruited a local model, the beautiful Lily, to model the latest spring fashions in this model home in Oldfield.

WHAT’S INSIDE

Styled by Kaila Jeffcoat

26

A NOTE FROM OUR MAYORS

29

SECURE OR NOT SECURE? THAT IS THE QUESTION.

82

BELMONT INSURANCE SERVICES: PUTTING A FACE ON YOUR INSURANCE COVERAGE

87

SETTING THE STAGE: IS YOUR HOME NOT SELLING? TERESA KUNICH OF GROUP 5 DESIGN CAN HELP YOU WITH THAT.

95

WHAT WILL YOUR RETIREMENT YEARS LOOK LIKE?

111

STOP THE CLOCK! I DON’T WANT TO GET OLD!

115

THE NO-NONSENSE INVESTING GUIDE FOR BOOMERS

120

LIVING THE DREAM: DREAM BOUTIQUE NOW OPEN AT SHELTER COVE HARBOUR & MARINA

128

MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS FEATURING CANDACE WOODSON

99

HOW’S YOUR HEARING? We chatted with Randy Rose, of Rose Hearing Healthcare Centers about what the first signs of hearing loss are, what to expect on an initial visit to a specialist, and how technology is improving the landscape for those in need of hearing aids.

101 HOW TO BE A FIT FEMALE AT ANY AGE. Becca Edwards chats with three local women about staying fit after forty.

O N O U R C OV E R S

BUYER’S OR SELLER’S MARKET?

CB2 CELEBRATE BLUFFTON AND BEYOND!

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

SPECIAL SECTION! BOOMERS & BEYOND

124

CB2’S MARCH FASHION FEATURE: A MODEL HOME IN OLDFIELD SPECIAL SECTION! BOOMERS & BEYOND

WE EXPLAIN HOW TO KNOW MARCH 2020

INCLUDING:

C2 Exclusive with HGTV Interior Designer Brian Patrick Flynn Photography by Krisztian Lonyai See page 46

MARCH 2020

MARCH 2020

AT HOME WITH HGTV INTERIOR DESIGNER BRIAN PATRICK FLYNN

FIT AT ANY AGE 5 QUESTIONS TO ANSWER BEFORE YOU RETIRE STOP THE CLOCK! LOCAL RETIREMENT & ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITIES INVESTING FOR RETIREES

MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS WITH CANDACE WOODSON

MARCH 2020

Dress by Birdie James Hair and Makeup by Salon Karma Photography by M.KAT See page 56

MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME AT THE SILVER GARDEN GALLERY Your one-stop source for unique handcrafted jewelry and local art


GENIUSES AT WORK

play

Architect of Ideas Maggie Marie Washo Technology Mastermind Carolyn Hunter Kostylo Financial Warden Marion Elizabeth Bowser Influencer-In-Residence Kim Conrad Crouch Culture Maven “Just Kandace” Wightman In-house Jeweler on Retainer Kaila Jeffcoat Intimacy Mentor Lucille Rosita Gonzalez Washo The Gatekeepers Greta Von Bowser Vincent Von Bowser The Real Yard Cats Grey and Dae May The Cut & Paste Crew Jeff Cline Fran Sherman Robin Ross Monica “Mika” St. John Writing Specialists Iain Denholm Becca Edwards Fred Gaskin Linda S. Hopkins Barry Kaufman Matthew G. Kovalcik, CFP John McCann Michele Roldán-Shaw Colette Stevenson Lisa Sulka Samantha Summers Kent Thune Lighting Experts M. Kat Photography Krisztian Lonyai Robert Peterson/Rustic White Moonlight Productions Find Us Here PO Box 22949 Hilton Head Island, SC 29925 843.689.2658 m.washo@celebratehiltonhead.com

EDITOR’S NOTE M A R C H

I

2 0 2 0

n late September of last year, local stylist Danielle Galella sent me a text message asking if Lucy could be a dog model for HGTV. We were headed out of town for a fashion shoot in Greenville on the date they were shooting, so unfortunately, I had to tell them she couldn’t swing it. Danielle got back to me again and said they would adjust their schedule; they really wanted a Bernese Mountain Dog for the shoot. At this point, I knew no details, and I guess I just assumed it was some sort of real estate-based show, since I knew local realtor Brad Wilson had been involved in a few of such episodes for “Island Life.” Lucy spent the morning of her shoot getting a bath, and we rolled up to a beautiful blue house in Windmill Harbour, presumably the set. That’s when I met the interior designer of HGTV’s 2020 Dream Home, Brian Patrick Flynn, and his team. Everyone was so nice and welcoming, and you could tell they all really liked dogs. Lucy spent the morning walking in and out of the house a few times, greeting her “pretend mom,” Hannah Joy Cages, and walking into the giant dog crate that was actually built into the mudroom/laundry room of the home. Funny thing about that crate shot—and a little back story. Lucy was my first puppy-raising experience, and I did my due diligence when it came to reading up and asking for advice on the right way to do things. Everyone told me I should crate train her. So, I borrowed a giant crate from my friend Kelly and set it up in my bedroom. I had to run to the grocery store a few days after I got her, and up until that point, she had come with me everywhere. It was time to try out that crate for 30 minutes. When I returned and walked into my house, she was so beside herself at being shut up in that thing, she was anxiously pawing between the bars to get out. And that’s how she broke her toe and had to be in a little cast for a week. Needless to say, she was never crated again … until we needed to walk into a crate on camera at the HGTV Dream Home. I was dying inside. Of all the things they could have wanted her to do. It was actually quite funny. Thankfully she sucked it up and went in with a little nudging from Hannah, who has dogs and knows how to handle them. After spending the day with the HGTV crew, I started following them on Instagram. It was then that I became a big fan of Brian Patrick Flynn and his work. I’m interested in the bold colors he uses. I find it refreshing after seeing so many “coastal

chic” homes in bland palettes of white, grey and light blue being featured again and again. I reached out to him on Instagram, and he was kind enough to invite our photographer, Krisztian Lonyai, into his home in Atlanta for a shoot. If you read one thing in this issue, full of home and garden topics, reads our interview with him. We’ve also spent a good bit of this issue on our first ever Boomers & Beyond special section, with topics ranging from how to stay fit at any age to Five Questions you should ask yourself before retirement. Many boomers are approaching that time of life when they are making choices for their parents with regard to elder care, so we’ve also included listings of some local continuing care retirement communities as well.

The crate life isn't for me!

BABY LUCY Lastly, be sure to check out our This & That section—the longest we’ve ever had in one issue. Everything is happening in March it seems, from TEDx Talks and The St. Patrick’s Day parade to our favorite festivals (Wingfest and the Hilton Head Wine and Food Festival), and several high school productions. I don’t know about you, but I love it when our island blossoms in spring and we get to come out of our winter hibernation. I’m sure I’ll see you around town. Have a magnificent March!

MAGGIE WASHO Publisher / Editor-in-Chief


Hilton Head Island Mayor

M A Y O R

A Note from John McCann Photography Photography by M.Kat by M.Kat

ISLANDER TURNS PASSION INTO SUPPORT FOR PARKINSON’S DISEASE

H

ilton Head Island has beautiful scenes from sunrises and sunsets to our beaches and golf courses. These very scenes captured the attention of islander and photographer Jeffrey Keefer, whom I would describe as a pretty amazing and giving person. I was so moved by Jeffrey’s photo art at his gallery that I thought I would share about a project he is passionately involved in. I think it’s good to know about people in our community who are doing great things to benefit others. Jeffrey is chairman of the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research and owner of VIVID Gallery in the Shops at Sea Pines Center. There is a unique connection between these two entities. Jeffrey is among the seven to 10 million people worldwide who suffer with Parkinson’s disease, a brain disorder that leads to shaking, stiffness, and difficulty with walking, balance and coordination. To help people understand the effects of this disease and raise money for Parkinson’s research, Jeffrey compiled many of his wonderful photos into a book titled Vivid. Proceeds from his book will be donated to the Michael J. Fox Foundation and two local charities: Hilton Head Heroes and the Sea Pines Forest Preserve. That is a wonderful gesture from someone in our community. Jeffrey’s act of kindness is worth knowing about. A retired DuPont company executive, Jeffrey was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2007. In his bio, Jeffrey shared that he never took photographs and did not have a creative bone in his body before his diagnosis. He described his diagnosis as a new awakening that spurred a heightened sense of creativity and a desire to be more spontaneous. After retiring in 2010, Jeffrey pursued his new passion and became involved in Parkinson’s research. He co-founded the Panorama Patient Educational Foundation and continues to serve as an advisor. He also joined the board of directors of the Michael J. Fox Foundation in 2013 and assumed the chairmanship in 2015. He serves on the Advisory Board of the Institute on Aging at the University of Pennsylvania, and the board of directors of the Philadelphia Parkinson Council. Jeff and his wife, Anne, established the Jeff & Anne Keefer Fund for Parkinson’s Research at the University of Pennsylvania. We live in a community with an aging population, active retirees and working adults. Diseases like Parkinson’s can afflict persons in any of these groups, and when

< Bluffton Mayor

Photography by Krisztian Lonyai

#9PMROUTINE

H

ave you ever gotten out of your vehicle with your hands full, or when you are trying to get your kids inside and thinking about

26

MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

they do, we search for answers and cures. Jeffrey’s labor of love will certainly contribute to answers we need and perhaps help sufferers of Parkinson’s lead better lives. I appreciate that he is using his photography to raise support for a national organization and giving back to charities in our community. This is important work and I commend Jeffrey for using his condition to advance education and research.  John McCann is the mayor of Hilton Head Island. JohnM@hiltonheadislandsc.gov. To learn more about Jeffrey’s work, visit www.VIVIDgalleryhhi.com; to learn more about Parkinson’s Disease, visit www.michaeljfox.org or https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/parkinsons-disease.

A Note A Note from from Lisa Lisa Sulka Sulka

M AY O R

what to cook for dinner, and forgotten to lock your car? We are all busy. I get it. But we have to get better at locking our vehicles when we get home, go to the store or the office, or when we run into the gas station quickly. Too many people in Bluffton are becoming victims of a preventable crime, and that is theft because of not locking their vehicles. Personal items like cell phones, computers, purses and wallets are being stolen from vehicles that are unlocked. What’s even worse, there are a few cases in which handguns have been stolen out of unlocked vehicles. The Bluffton Police Department has been publicizing the #9PMroutine on their social media sites for several month, and I would like to remind everyone to get in the habit of doing the #9PMroutine. The hashtag reminds residents to make sure: • Vehicles, residences, garages, windows, gates, and sheds are locked. • Exterior lights, security cameras, and alarm systems are activated. • Valuables (including keys) from vehicles, yards, and patios are brought inside. Police worry about criminals noticing an item in a car, checking the doors to see if they’re locked, and then committing the burglary because they aren’t. Everyone, this is a small action that can have a big payoff! Sometimes I find that remembering to do the simplest things can save a lot of stress in many ways. I am a person who has a lot on my mind in the afternoon, and now I remind myself at 9 p.m. to check the locks on cars and our house. Nowadays, even if your hands are full as you enter your home, you can go back and hit the lock button on your key fob from your front door. You don’t even have to go outside. If you tend to forget to lock your vehicle (and we aren’t perfect), at least please bring in all valuables or lock the valuables in your glove compartment or trunk. Lock it or lose it. Do the #9PMroutine. 


SECURE

OR NOT

SECURE?

That is the question.

HOW THE SECURE ACT AFFECTS YOU

O

n December 20, 2019, President Trump signed the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act. The acronym “SECURE” is curious to me because many Americans may find themselves paying a little more in taxes as a result of the Act. In fact, the government is counting on roughly $15 billion of tax revenue with the passage of the Act. The good news is, with proper planning, one should be able to partially sidestep the accelerated tax burden. There is no doubt, though, that the Act has a wide-reaching impact on retirement savings and estate planning strategies for many Americans. Following are a few of the changes: STRETCH IRAS. The most significant change in the new law pertains to the treatment of “Stretch” IRA’s. Previously, non-spousal beneficiaries of individual retirement accounts could spread or “stretch” distributions from the IRA over their life expectancy, thus allowing the beneficiary to withdraw a small amount each year and pay a lesser tax. Beneficiaries of account owners who passed away in

A RTICLE BY MATTHEW G. KOVALCIK, CFP

2019 and earlier are grandfathered under the old rules and may continue to stretch distributions over their life expectancy. The SECURE Act affects beneficiaries of account owners that pass in 2020 and beyond. The Act requires most beneficiaries to take distributions (and pay the corresponding tax) from the inherited retirement account over a 10-year period. This is not a one-size-fits-all rule; exceptions to the 10-year payout period include spousal beneficiaries, beneficiaries who are chronically ill or disabled, and beneficiaries not more than 10 years younger than the original account owner. Minor child beneficiaries of the decedent may use the stretch provision until they reach the age of majority (age 18 in S.C.) and will then follow the 10-year rule. If you have named a living trust (known as a “pass-through trust” or “conduit trust”) as a beneficiary of your retirement account, you should make it a priority to speak with your financial adviser and estate attorney and review the impact of the new legislation on your plan. Living trusts often have language that allows trust beneficiaries to receive only required minimum distributions (RMD’s). The problem under the new Act is that there are no RMD’s C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020 29


until the tenth year. Accordingly, the trust may require a distribution of the entire account in the final year, creating a substantial tax liability (not to mention a lack of liquidity in the first nine years). To avoid this trap, your attorney may recommend switching from a conduit trust to an accumulation trust. Or, if you drafted your trust long ago and your beneficiaries have proven they would be good stewards of the inheritance, you can consider removing the trust and listing the beneficiaries individually. REQUIRED MINIMUM DISTRIBUTIONS (RMD’S). Under the old law, required minimum distributions from IRA’s were mandatory by April 1 of the year following the year in which the account owner turned age 701/2 . Accordingly, if you turned 701/2 in 2019, you will be required to take an RMD in 2020 and every year going forward. Under the SECURE Act, anyone who turns 701/2 in 2020 will not be required to take an RMD until April 1 of the year following the year in which he/she turns age 72. CONTRIBUTIONS TO INDIVIDUAL RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS. Previously, you couldn’t contribute to a traditional IRA after age 701/2. The new law has removed the age limit. This is particularly significant for those who continue to work later in life. If making qualified charitable distributions (QCD) from your IRA is a common practice of yours and you wish to contribute to an IRA post-701/2, you should first familiarize yourself with how these two strategies marry in the new tax code; like everything else in the tax code, it’s complicated! PENALTY-FREE DISTRIBUTIONS. The Act allows for penalty-free distributions for the birth or adoption of a child. Five thousand dollars per parent may be distributed from a retirement account without the 10%

30 MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

penalty in the event of a qualified birth or adoption. The distribution must occur within one year of the child’s birth or the adoption’s finalization. “KIDDIE TAX” LAWS. The 2017 tax law changed how unearned income for some children was taxed, using the rates for estates and trusts rather than the parent’s marginal rate. Now, this change has been reversed, and unearned income for some children in 2020 and beyond will once again be taxed at the parent’s marginal rate. Furthermore, parents have the option of applying the new kiddie tax rules retroactively for 2018 and 2019. 529 PLAN DISTRIBUTIONS. The list of qualified expenses for 529 plan distributions has been expanded—notably, distributions for apprenticeship programs and “qualified education loan repayments” are now allowed. Up to $10,000 may be distributed to pay both principal and interest for qualified education loans for the plan beneficiary, and an additional $10,000 may be used to repay loans for each of the plan beneficiary’s siblings. Kovalcik & Geraghty Wealth Partners does not accept orders and/or instructions regarding your account by email, voice mail, fax or any alternate method. Transactional details do not supersede normal trade confirmations or statements. Any information provided in this article has been prepared from sources believed to be reliable but is not guaranteed by Kovalcik & Geraghty Wealth Partners and is not a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision. Any information provided is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a recommendation.


This This&&That That

C2 Magazine • March 2020 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

TEDxHiltonHead to Bring Together Prestigious National and Local Speakers on March 14

Ovie Mughelli

Michelle Meissen

Ovie Mughelli, considered one of the best fullbacks in the NFL and the only NFL player in history to found an environmental foundation, will be sharing his “Ideas Worth Spreading” when TEDxHiltonHead returns to HHI bringing together an illustrious panel of speakers addressing this year’s theme of “Making Waves.” In addition to Mughelli, speakers include: • Candace Blair, Soul Fire Social • Dr. Chloe Carmichael, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist/Author • Tyler Crispen, TV Personality/Co-owner of Naut & Chain • Kenny Hamilton, CSH Management Group • David Lauderdale, The Island Packet • Francesca Lobban, The Arrhythmia Alliance • Michelle Meissen, Palmetto Ocean Conservancy • Janet Porter, Ph.D., Stroudwater Associates • Sheila Roemeling, Fresh Start Healing Heart • Dr. Sidney Smith, Georgia Skin and Cancer Clinic • Tony Wartko, CMCA, The Sea Pines Resort • Jennifer Winzeler, Island Academy • Lester Young, Jr., Path2Redemption TEDxHiltonHead will take place on Saturday, March 14, from 8:45 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., at the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, 14 Shelter Cove Lane on HHI. Tickets, which include morning refreshments, lunch, and attendance at all TEDx presentations are $72 and can be purchased at http://tedxhiltonhead.com/. For more information and a full list of speakers and their TEDxTalks, visit http://tedxhiltonhead.com/.

Tyler Crispen

Hilton Head Island Wine & Food Festival, March 9-15 The Hilton Head Island Wine & Food Festival presented by Publix announced 260 award-winning wines in association with the Hilton Head Island International Wine Judging for 2020. Each year, hundreds of wines pour in from around the world to be judged by sommeliers, certified wine educators, and other highly credentialed individuals gathered at the Hilton Head Island Beach & Tennis Resort. This year, the wine festival takes place from March 9 through 15, with major tasting events happening Friday and Saturday at The Sea Pines Resort. More than 50 labels will be present, pouring over 250 different wines. All 259 award winners will be available for reference, and tickets are on sale now for all of the week’s events at www.hiltonheadwineandfood.com. The Hilton Head Food & Wine Festival is dedicated to assisting students in their educational needs, having donated over $95,000 in scholarships since 2013.

The SERG Group is pleased to announce the opening of Signature Catering and Events by SERG. Since signing on to the brand in November, Geist Ussery, along with Molly Kennedy and Chef Andy Borgmeier, has worked to mold a new format that offers private, wedding, and corporate dining solutions and event planning.

Charlie’s L’Etoile Verte will host a fourcourse wine dinner featuring PlumpJack Winery on Tuesday, March 3 at 6:30 p.m., $135 per person, all-inclusive. On March 14 & 28 at 11 a.m., they will offer a small handson cooking class with Chef Josh and Chef Joe, followed by dinner and a glass of wine, $125 per person, all-inclusive.

Ten outstanding Beaufort and Jasper County seniors were named Heritage Classic Foundation Scholars at a recent luncheon at the Sonesta Resort. The following graduating seniors were selected: Albert (Cal) Harvey, Beaufort Academy; Rhea Desai and Brigid Murphy, Beaufort High School; Ethan Helms and Elena Senouillet, Bluffton High School; Daniel Harrington and Joseph Reindl, Hilton Head Christian Academy; Felipe Mendoza, Hilton Head Preparatory School; Caroline O’Neal, Holy Trinity Classical Christian School; and Brodie Brant, Homeschooled.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

33


This & That

C2 Magazine • March 2020 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

Bud Scully recently joined the Charles Schwab branch in Bluffton. As a financial consultant, Scully is looking forward to leveraging over 30 years of investing experience on behalf of clients to develop customized personal wealth management solutions.

Hilton Head Christian Academy Brings Elvis-Inspired Production to the Stage Get ready to shake, rattle and roll as Hilton Head Christian Academy’s (HHCA) awardwinning theater department brings the Elvis-inspired jukebox musical All Shook Up to the stage March 19-21, at HHCA’s Performing Arts Center. The show will be performed “in-the-round.” This unique format, in which the audience completely surrounds the stage, will be a first for the department. Loosely based on Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, All Shook Up will have you jumping out of your blue suede shoes with hits such as, “Jailhouse Rock,” “Heartbreak Hotel,” “Hound Dog,” and “It’s Now or Never.” The 18-member cast is led by senior Daniel Harrington (Chad) and junior Gracie Auld (Natalie). Along with Harrington, seniors Floyd Hargrove (Dennis), Emma Stewart (Matilda), Ellie Lentz (Sandra), Ben Jones (Jim), Kaleigh Montgomery (Sylvia), Ben Pyrlik (Earl) and Rashad Gadson will be taking their final bow with HHCA. HHCA’s theater director Michelle McElroy has worked with this year’s seniors since they were in the fifth grade. “We added All Shook Up to our regular season as an opportunity to showcase their talent and give them a proper send-off,” she said. “They are a special group and will be greatly missed!” Along with McElroy, the production team boasts the musical direction of Cynthia Cullen and choreography of Jamal Edwards. All Shook Up will run March 19-21 at 7 p.m. and March 21 at 2 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at www. hhcadrama.eventbrite.com.

34

JANUARY 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

Cindy Creamer, Realtor® with Dunes Real Estate, was recently installed as 2020 treasurer of the South Carolina Realtors. Creamer has been a Realtor since 2006 and has served as 2019 secretary of SCR and president of the Hilton Head Area Association of Realtors in 2015 and 2018; she was also named HHAAOR’s Realtor of the Year in 2016. Greenwood Communities and Resorts recently announced that Brad Marra has been promoted to the position of Chief Operating Officer (COO), Palmetto Dunes Oceanfront Resort. Previously Marra was VP of Resort Operations for Greenwood. He has been with the company for 15 years.


This This&&That That

C2 Magazine • March 2020 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige. After eight and a half years in the Village at Wexford, the Karis Art Gallery will be closing its doors on April 4. Owner Maggie Karis would like to invite the public to come and celebrate great art and meet all the artists she represents at a reception on March 19 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

The Palmetto Plant Eaters Club is free, open to the public, and meets monthly to teach and support whole-food, plant-based vegan eating. The club will host Chef Thomas Carrig as its guest speaker on Wednesday, March 4, at 6:30 p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Lowcountry building, 110 Malphrus Road, Bluffton. He will discuss grains and why we should be eating them every day. Learn more about the Palmetto Plant Eaters Club at www.PalmettoPlantEaters.com.

Greater Bluffton Jasper County Volunteers in Medicine (BJVIM) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Kathleen Casey as the new medical director. Casey recently completed a 32-year career at the Jersey Shore University Medical Center in central New Jersey. She joined the Bluffton Jasper Volunteers in Medicine in April of 2019 after moving to the Bluffton area with her husband.

2020 HILTON HEAD WINGFEST PRESENTED BY HARGRAY The Island Recreation Association and Hargray Communications are proud to present the twenty-fifth annual Wingfest, where over 7,000 pounds of chicken wings will be served. Wingfest will be held Saturday, March 21, from 11 a.m. -5 p.m., at Shelter Cove Community Park. Admission is $8; children age 10 & under free. Concessions and activities sold separately. Local restaurants will cook their best wings to compete for the 2020 Best Wing of Hilton Head. There will be many activities such as a Kids’ Zone, rock climbing wall and bungee jump. Catch a March Madness game on the big screen, provided by Custom Audio Video; vote for your favorite wing at the Hargray People’s Choice Booth; and participate in the wing-eating competition or the kids’ bobbing contest. Live music will be provided by Bobby Lee and The Magpies, Deas Guyz, and The Naked Karate Girls. For more information, visit www.islandreccenter.org or call us at (843) 681-7273.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

35


This & That

C2 Magazine • March 2020 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

WinWin a Cool a Cool $1 Million $1 Million andand BMW BMW at Palmetto at Palmetto Electric’ Electric’ s Touchstone s Touchstone Energy Energy Million Million Dollar Dollar Hole-in-One Hole-in-One Shootout Shootout

Golfers from throughout the Lowcountry will descend on Old South Golf Links, March 26-28, for a chance at $1 million, a BMW X5, and thousands more in prizes at the eighteenth annual Touchstone Energy Million Dollar Hole-inOne Shootout presented by Palmetto Electric Cooperative. “This event will support local teachers by raising money to benefit Bright Ideas, which provides funding for innovative classroom projects,” stated Berl Davis, president and CEO for Palmetto Electric Cooperative. All amateur golfers, age 18 and older, are invited to try their luck at winning the $1 million prize. The cost to participate in the Million Dollar Hole-in-One Shootout is $1 per ball or $10 for a bag of 12 balls. Cash and credit cards will be accepted. No advance registration is required; golfers should come to the driving range at Old South during the hours of the competition and be ready to play! There will be a silent auction for golf packages and his/her gift items. Also, back by popular demand will be the daily putting contest, which is open to all ages. Qualifying rounds will be held Thursday, March 26, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday, March 27, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, March 28, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Old South Golf Links located at 50 Buckingham Drive, off Hwy 278 across from the entrance to Moss Creek Plantation. Twenty-eight golfers will qualify to compete in the $1 Million Shootout to be held at 6 p.m. on Saturday. Qualifying shots will be from approximately 105 to 120 yards. Daily prizes will be awarded. Each golfer participating in the final shootout will get one shot at the grand prize hole from 165 yards (150 yards for lady qualifiers). A $1 million, 40-year annuity will be awarded if there is one contestant making a hole-in-one in the finals. Also, this year, the first hole-in-one in the finals will win a two-year lease on a BMW X5. Should more than one contestant make a hole-in-one in the finals, the $1 million prize will be split equally amongst those making a hole-in-one. Should no one make a hole-in-one, the closest shot to the hole will win $1,000 cash and a 101 Driving Experience at BMW Spartanburg. Second through fifth-place prizes include rounds of golf at area courses.

Hopeful Horizons is pleased to announce the officers for its 2020 board of directors: Meredith Bannon, Esq., chairperson; Sandy Berthelsen, chair-elect; Sandi Atkins, treasurer; and Jennifer Moneagle, secretary. Hopeful Horizons is a children’s advocacy, domestic violence and rape crisis center that works to create safer communities by changing the culture of violence and offering a path to healing.

36

JANUARY 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

The Boys & Girls Club of Bluffton will host its annual spring gala on Saturday, Mar. 14, at the Montage Palmetto Bluff. This year’s theme is “Bluffton Built,” a celebration of the community coming together to shape the lives of local children and teens. All funds raised will support Boys & Girls Club of Bluffton programs. This black tie-optional affair opens at 6 p.m. with a cocktail party and silent auction, followed by a plated dinner, special performances by members of the Boys & Girls Club of Bluffton, and live auction. Guests will be entertained throughout the evening with live music by the Whitley Deputy Band. For sponsorship and ticket information please visit www.bgcbluffton.org/gala.


This This&&That That

C2 Magazine • March 2020 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

GriefShare is a weekly seminar and support group designed to help persons rebuild their lives after losing a loved one. This group is led by caring people who have experienced grief and can help others through the difficult days ahead. Gatherings are held on Mondays, from 6-8 p.m., in the Mills Education Center of Providence Presbyterian Church, 171 Cordillo Parkway. Registration fee is $20. Call Carol Moorehead at (843) 338-3128 to register.

On March 9, Telfair Museums in Savannah, Ga. will host a coffee reception and program featuring Courtney McNeil, chief curator and deputy director for curatorial affairs at Telfair Museums, who will share her experience curating the Collecting Impressionism: Telfair’s Modern Vision exhibition, which opens March 6. Members and their guests are welcome to attend. Nonmembers desiring to attend, please contact Betsy McCullar, betsy2mccullar@gmail.com or (917) 566-9101.

SEAHAWK STAGE COMPANY PRESENTS MATILDA THE MUSICAL

Hilton Head Island High School’s Seahawk Stage Company is proud to present Matilda the Musical. Inspired by the twisted genius of Roald Dahl, the Tony® Award-winning musical is the captivating masterpiece from the Royal Shakespeare Company that revels in the anarchy of childhood, the power of imagination, and the inspiring story of a girl who dreams of a better life. From the book by Dennis Kelly with original songs by Tim Minchin, Matilda has won 47 international awards and continues to thrill sold-out audiences of all ages around the world. HHIHS theater director Kimberly Guinn decided to team up with Hilton Head Island Middle School, Hilton Head Island Elementary School for the Creative Arts, and Hilton Head Island IB Elementary School. Joined by directors Helen Ashton and Soraya McCune, Guinn has developed the show into a work that explores the ideas of bullying and self-acceptance. The creative team also includes guest choreographer Kathleen Watkins alongside music director Josh Wall, with sound design by Chris Sykes and lighting design by Dick Sanders. Matilda (Channing Coulter) is a little girl with astonishing wit, intelligence, and psychokinetic powers. She’s unloved by her cruel parents (Coulson Geltz and Shelby Olive) but impresses her schoolteacher, the highly loveable Miss Honey (Laney Hawkins). Over the course of her first term at school, Matilda and Miss Honey have a profound effect on each other’s lives. Matilda’s school life isn’t completely smooth sailing, however; the school’s mean headmistress, Miss Trunchbull (Emerald Lofton), hates children and just loves thinking up new punishments for those who don’t abide by her rules. But Matilda has courage and cleverness in equal amounts and could be the pupils’ saving grace! Performances are at 7 p.m. March 19-21 and March 26-28 and at 2 p.m. March 22 and 29. Tickets are $20 for adults/$10 for students and are available at www.seahawkstagecompany.com or at the box office the day of the show.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

37


This & That

C2 Magazine • March 2020 Edition

Sip for a Cause

On March 26, Zonta Club of Hilton Head Island will host its spring fundraising event, Sip for a Cause, on Hilton Head Island. Join them for an evening of wine and beer tasting, hors d’oeuvres, and silent and chance auctions. The event takes place at USCB Hilton Head Campus, 1 Sand Shark Drive, from 5:30-8 p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance/$40 at the door. Proceeds will be used to help fund local organizations such as Hopeful Horizons (formerly CODA and Hope Haven); educational scholarships for young women in the Hilton Head area; representation of the club in state and national programming; and the club’s on-going local and international campaigns that bring awareness to eliminate violence against women and hope to survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence.

SERG Group to heads up Tournament confessions The Heritage Classic Foundation, host organization ,for the RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing, is proud to announce The SERG Restaurant Group has been named the new operator of the tournament concessions food & beverage program. The SERG Restaurant Group (serggroup.com) is made up of 17 unique culinary concepts in Hilton Head and Bluffton, South Carolina, and has been a staple in the Lowcountry community for over 35 years. The Heritage Classic Foundation continually works to make the RBC Heritage a world class event by always looking for ways to improve our spectators’ experience. Over the past few years, the Foundation has put an increased focus on our concession food offerings. The goal was to explore new ways to provide a “Fan First, Best in Class” experience during the 2020 RBC Heritage and beyond. Increased safety, accountability, quality and variety were also a priority along with maintaining the maximum amount of revenue and involvement for our dedicated service clubs. “The tournament has depended on service clubs to run our on-course concession stands since the event began in 1969,” said Heritage Classic Foundation President Steve Wilmot. “It was critical to us to find a partner such as The SERG Restaurant Group, who would work alongside our service clubs while delivering exciting new local specialty items from SERG Restaurants.” The SERG Restaurant Group plans to introduce some specialty items into the RBC Heritage’s concessions, from Poseidon’s Fish Tacos to One Hot Mama’s’ boneless wings to Skull Creek Boathouse’s shrimp & grits and much more, there will be something for every taste and fancy of tournament patrons. “We are excited to partner with The SERG Restaurant Group,” said Heritage Classic Foundation Chairman Simon Fraser. “They are a local company who knows the importance of the tournament to this community. We look forward to offering our fans a wide variety of unique culinary options at the 2020 RBC Heritage and beyond. ”

38

JANUARY 2020

C2 MAGAZINE


This & That

C2 Magazine • March 2020 Edition

JEWELS & JEANS

The Beaufort County Foundation for Educational Excellence will host its annual “Jewels & Jeans” event on Saturday, March 7, from 6 to 9:30 p.m., at Hilton Head Beach & Tennis Club, 40 Folly Field Road. This year’s event will honor Kathy Cramer for her passion of providing opportunities to people with disabilities in the community. Proceeds fund innovative teaching grants in Beaufort County’s public schools. Grant recipients will be at the event sharing their stories. The evening also features a live auction, great food, and entertainment by Deas Guyz. Tickets are $75/ person. For more information or tickets, visit www. FoundationEdExcellence.com or call (843) 301-7150

Pictured Left to Right: Linda Dreisbach, Sheila Ferguson, Tracy Harris, Linda Bloom, Cappi Wilborn, Barbara Catenaci, Louise Cohen, Rita Kernan, Dr. Jean Fruh, Amber Kuehn, Tina Tyus Shaw

WAHHI GRANTS

At its February event, “Celebrating the Craft of Writing,” The Women’s Association of Hilton Head Island (WAHHI) announced Community Grants to eight nonprofit organizations. Through the WAHHI Charitable Fund, administered by The Community Foundation of the Lowcountry, WAHHI awards grants to local charitable organizations to support specific program needs that align with the core values expressed in WAHHI’s mission statement. The 2020 grant recipients are: Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, Heritage Library Foundation, Coastal Discovery Museum, Hilton Head Island Sea Turtle Protection Project, The Outside Foundation, Gullah Museum of Hilton Head Island, Hilton Head Island Audubon Society, and The Children’s Center.

VILLAGE AT WEXFORD TO HOST “SPRING SHOP HOP” ON MARCH 28 On March 28, the Village at Wexford will be “hopping” with great deals, gourmet treats and more as the premier shopping village kicks off its annual Spring Shop Hop. The event, which will take place from 2– 5 p.m., will not only be a great day to take advantage of the exciting shopping at the Village’s many shops, but will provide an afternoon of fun for the whole family and an opportunity for kids to have their photo taken with the Easter Bunny. The Spring Shop Hop will also feature the return of the popular “Bunny Hop Trail” at the Village at Wexford. The VAW Bunny Hop Trail gives kids the opportunity to receive a complimentary Easter basket, and then fill it with goodies from participating merchants at the Village at Wexford (the first 100 kids will be gifted with the complimentary Easter basket.) In addition to the fun and Easter treats from the Bunny Hop Trail, the Easter Bunny will be on hand from 2-5 for Instagram-worthy, on-the-spot photos to capture the fun and joy of the season. Free crafts and games will also be available for the young creators in your family.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

39


This & That

C2 Magazine • March 2020 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

HILTON HEAD DANCE THEATRE’S TERPSICHORE: WHERE CLASSICAL MEETS CONTEMPORARY

Hilton Head Dance Theatre will present an exciting program of classical and contemporary dance, featuring company members and distinguished guest artists, on Saturday, April 4 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 5 at 2:30 p.m. The program takes its name from Terpsichore, the Greek muse of dance, and is always an audience favorite. Opening the program will be the second act of Swan Lake, starring Brittany Hanna as the Swan Queen and Samuel Chester as Prince Siegfried. Known as the White Act, this is the masterpiece choreographed by Petipa and Ivanov, set to the beloved music of Tchaikovsky and staged by Hilton Head Dance Theatre’s artistic director Karena Brock-Carlyle. Also on the program is “Hoedown,” a new work by ballet master Jamal Edwards, inspired by Balanchine’s Western Symphony and his love for all things American. “Ramalama Bang Bang,” a fun and funky contemporary piece that is also by Jamal Edwards follows. Kathleen Watkins, former dance captain for Broadway’s Fosse, has chosen the jazz masterwork “Sing, Sing, Sing” as her contribution to the program. This piece from the Tony Award winning Dancin’ was a tribute to Benny Goodman’s composition of the same title. The evening concludes with the wedding scene from Raymonda, with music by Glazunov, choreography by Petipa, and staging by BrockCarlyle. Featured as Raymonda and Jean de Brienne are Sophia Nimmer and Journy Wilkes-Davis. Tickets are $40 for adults and $30 for students 18 and under. Tickets are available at the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina box office located at 14 Shelter Cove Lane or by calling (843) 842-2787. For more information and to purchase tickets online, visit www.artshhi.com.

The Low Country Kappa Delta Alumnae Chapter is hosting a Pancake Breakfast from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 22 at Skillets Café in Coligny Plaza, 1 N. Forest Beach Dr., Hilton Head Island, to benefit CAPA (Child Abuse Prevention Association) of Beaufort. The $10 breakfast special ($5 for children) includes a short stack of pancakes, bacon or sausage, and coffee or juice. No reservations necessary.

40

JANUARY 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

Tommy Suggs, president and CEO of HUB Carolinas, a region of HUB International, has been honored by the South Carolina Broadcasters Association with an Honorary Life Membership Award. The award was presented to Suggs during the SCBA Awards of Distinction ceremony. The Honorary Life Membership Award recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to the broadcast industry on a statewide and national level.


This This&&That That

C2 Magazine • March 2020 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

Southern Tide Signature Store coming to Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina Southern Tide, the premier apparel brand that continues to be the authoritative voice behind coastal style, has announced plans for a new Signature Store that will open on Hilton Head in March 2020. The new store will be located in Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina, which is situated in the middle of Hilton Head Island across from Palmetto Dunes Oceanfront Resort, just off the Intracoastal Waterway. The store will be owned by Palmetto Dunes, who looks to bring Southern Tide’s coastal charm and laidback lifestyle to the Hilton Head community. “We are thrilled to join forces with Palmetto Dunes, a community that shares our love for the outdoors and an adventurous lifestyle. As we continue to push the boundaries of what coastal style means, Southern Tide will always put community first as we look to widen our retail footprint. Hilton Head Island is the perfect setting for our brand and we couldn’t be happier with the opening of another Southern Tide Signature Store,” said Christopher Heyn, Southern Tide CEO. The spring opening comes just in time for the 52nd annual RBC Heritage Golf Tournament held in mid-April; Southern Tide is the official style sponsor of the event. Each year, thousands flock to Hilton Head to watch the pros dominate the course in one of the South’s most popular social and sporting events of the year. Now golf fans and Southern Tide enthusiasts alike can enjoy the new Signature Store in one of Hilton Head’s premier dining, shopping, and entertainment destinations. The Southern Tide Signature Store will offer an assortment of apparel for men, women, and kids, along with footwear and accessories. Southern Tide’s commitment to quality, value, and comfort has helped the brand not only grow its name, but also its fan base of loyal customers. The company’s continued expansion has enabled Southern Tide to create a successful wholesale business now in 49 states, a growing direct-to-consumer business with e-commerce, company stores, as well as build a well-developed presence in the clothing and accessories industry. Brad Marra, Chief Operating Officer at Palmetto Dunes Oceanfront Resort, said, “We are very excited about the addition of the Southern Tide Signature Store at Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina. We believe this nationally-recognized brand will bring many visitors and locals to our harbour to enjoy everything from the wide array of merchants to the water activities at the marina.”

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

41


HUB CAROLINAS PRESIDENT AND CEO, TOMMY SUGGS, RECEIVES HONORARY LIFE MEMBERSHIP AWARD

T

ommy Suggs, President and CEO of HUB Carolinas, has been honored by the South Carolina Broadcasters Association with an Honorary Life Membership Award. The award was presented to Suggs during the SCBA Awards of Distinction ceremony. The Honorary Life Membership Award recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to the broadcast industry on a statewide and national level. Suggs has served as the color analyst for the University of South Carolina’s Gamecock Radio Network for 47 years. He is also tied as the second longest NCAA Division 1 football broadcaster. With this award, he joins a list of distinguished leaders and broadcast professionals who have set the bar for excellence in South Carolina broadcasting. Suggs is President and CEO of HUB Carolinas, a region of HUB International, the fifth largest insurance brokerage in the world. Residing in Columbia, S.C., his responsibilities include managing HUB’s 10 offices throughout North Carolina and South Carolina. The SCBA Honorary Life Membership Award is added to a list of honors Suggs has earned throughout his professional career. Notably, Suggs has received an Honorary Doctorate degree from The University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business. He is also a member of the USC Athletic Hall of Fame and the South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame. Suggs was honored by friends and family with the establishment of The Tommy Suggs Endowed Quarterback Scholarship in 2012. About HUB International HUB is the fifth largest insurance, benefits, and risk services broker in the world, headquartered in Chicago, IL. Offering a broad menu of property and casualty insurance, employee benefits and personal lines, as well as investment and risk management products and services, HUB also brings unmatched global capabilities to international clients. HUB Carolinas is a region composed of North and South Carolina and is headquartered in Columbia. Offices are

located in Bluffton, Charleston, Columbia, Hilton Head Island, and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; and Burlington, Charlotte, Greensboro and Raleigh, North Carolina.

Visit us at either of our locations Hilton Head Office 50 Palmetto Bay Rd Hilton Head Island,SC 29928 OR Bluffton Office 1160 Fording Island Rd Bluffton SC 29910 or call us toll free at 1-855-351-6247.

Connect with HUB C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

43


HOME & GARDEN CONTENT

46

SPECIAL FEATURES 46

BRIAN PATRICK FLYNN Bold, unconventional, and imperfectly perfect

56

MODEL IN A MODEL We recruited a local model, the beautiful Lily, to show off the latest spring fashions in this model home in Oldfield.

69

INTERIOR TREND PREDICTIONS FOR 2020

72

OLD WORLD/NEW WORLD Gascoigne Bluff home dances on the line between modern and Lowcountry

79

EDIBLE LANDSCAPING For a healthy, tasty, beautiful yard

82

BELMONT INSURANCE SERVICES Putting a face on your insurance coverage

87

SETTING THE STAGE Is your home not selling? Teresa Kunich of Group 5 Design can help you with that.

89

WHEN HOUSING TRENDS TRIGGER A BUYER’S OR SELLER’S MARKET

72

87

69


Brianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite spot in the house is his entryway featuring a 12-foot-tall steel door, the Truax chandelier from his lighting collection with Crystorama and an art collection including op art by Nashville artist Gina Julian. Photography by Krisztian Lonyai


A

R

T

I

C

L

E

B

Y

I

A

I

N

D

E

N

H

O

L

M

b RI A N B

O

L

D

PATRiCK U

N

C

O

N

V

E

N

T

I

O

N

A

L

&

fLYNN I

M

b

P

E

R

F

E

C

T

L

Y

P

E

R

F

E

C

T

rian Patrick Flynn, the resident interior designer on HGTV’s Urban Oasis and HGTV’s Dream Home, describes his design aesthetic as “softmasculine,” and the spaces he creates are characterized by his own mix of styles and his bold, unconventional color palettes. Here, Brian discusses how he turned his passion into a career and how he enjoys shining a light on the imperfections of a perfection-oriented industry.


Photography by Robert Peterson/Rustic White

Photography by Robert Peterson/Rustic White

Photography by Krisztian Lonyai

CHILI’S MY HOUSE A pastel living room designed by Brian was in partnership with Chili’s for a project called Chili’s My House. The Texas-based brand hired Flynn and his team to merge the fun, care-free vibe of the iconic restaurant with his bold, colorful, 1960s-inspired aesthetic.

MASCULINE HUES Of all colors in the spectrum, Flynn uses muted blue-greys more than any other. In this master bedroom, he brought pattern and texture to the walls with an ombre stripe wallcovering from Thibaut.

GEOMETRIC WOOD Flynn’s own family room is packed with mid-century comfort including geometric wood walls and an extra deep modular sofa.

CHERRY BLOSSOM DINING ROOM A fun and flirty traditional dining room is given a fresh touch with cheerful cherry blossom wallpaper, classic furnishings and a rich textural jute rug. .

Iain Denholm: Brian, you have such a creative eye. When did you decide that interior design was your calling? Brian Patrick Flynn: I guess it started while I was in college. I was studying to become a film director, and I was really broke. So, to make money, I started picking up old pieces of furniture to strip and refinish. Then I’d host garage sales, and I’d make more money in one day than I would in a whole month of working. But I never thought I’d turn it into a career. It was just something I really liked doing. About six years later, I was working behind the scenes on television and some of the network executives began noticing that I was really good with the set decorating and began hiring me on weekends to do their homes. Then, unexpectedly, two years later, all of these little design projects that had just been fun to me got published in a magazine, and I began to realize that maybe I could actually make this into a real career. But it was never a part of the plan. The opportunities really came to me, and I ran with it. 48

Photography by Robert Peterson/Rustic White

MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

ID: Do you feel that not having a formal education in interior design has given you a freer approach? BPF: Yes, I think that not having had a traditional background in interior design is what’s made me successful and is what sets me apart. I don’t do things the way everybody else does, and I don’t necessarily only use super high-end things. I like to mix an antique with something custom and with something remarkably affordable. When people are self-taught at whatever they do, they end up doing it differently and standing out from the crowd in a good way. ID: How would you describe your design aesthetic? BPF: I see it as ‘soft masculine’. There’s definitely a lot of bachelor vibes, but it’s also super soft and warm and a little more on the gender-neutral side. There are touches of rusticity and ruggedness, but then there are also really soft curvatures and lines and really high-end, soft fabrics that are maybe more on the feminine side. That blend of strong architecture

and softness, mixed with some rugged elements, is what really defines my personal style. ID: In an area of the South where Coastal Chic has been the default décor for the last five years, your use of color is incredibly refreshing. BPF: Thank you. When it comes to coastal homes, there are definitely a lot of clichés that people immediately go towards. They use a lot of beige and sky blue or colors that make them think of the beach. But in interior design, you are supposed to abstract things. When I’m doing a coastal home, instead of doing the same color scheme again and again, I like to keep everything white and navy, then layer in unexpected colors that you probably wouldn’t pair. For example, sea green or a muted shade of pink—colors that could possibly be tropical but don’t scream Florida billboard. ID: Do those bright color palettes come from the client or from yourself? BPF: I definitely have a go-to palette that always seems to work, regardless of


Admittedly one of his all-time favorite projects, this dining room was designed in partnership with Chili’s. Brian surprised Chili’s self-appointed biggest fan with a dining room inspired by the fresh, fun look of the iconic restaurant. Photography by Robert Peterson/Rustic White in partnership with Chili’s


b RI A N

PATRiCK

fLYNN

who the client is or the architecture. It tends to be a combination of black and white with brown and really deep shades of navy or forest green. Those are colors that are always in style, regardless of what the application is. But the color palette I use the most with my clients, regardless of gender or taste, is faded blue grey, blush and really muted pinks— and that’s for women and men. Those colors seem to always hit the nail on the head, and people don’t seem to tire of them. A lot of men have really embraced blush and millennial pink because it’s warm, it’s fresh, it’s young, it’s happy and it’s not a super trend. People have been using muted shades of pink forever. It’s just enough color to add warmth and personality, but it works with almost every other color and accent. ID: Have you ever revisited a home you have designed long after the project was completed to see how it has evolved? BPF: Yeah, it’s actually one of my favorite things to do, and it’s also one of my least favorite things to do at the same time (laughs). I try to choose furnishings, art, light fixtures, rugs and accessories that can be interchangeable throughout the house, so it’s fun to go back and see if all my choices have stood the test of time and how they’ve been mixed up. If it looks good then, that makes me really happy. However, there have been times I have gone back to a house that I’ve made absolutely perfect, and, months later, the person then went on a spending craze and bought more stuff that didn’t fit the architecture and made the space way too cramped, overpowering all of the other things that we had balanced. That makes my skin crawl, and I can’t keep quiet about it. Just like with art or music, if you move

Believe it or not, this den is both kid- and pet-friendly. Brian designed this for a young family with two large dogs. The walls are covered in a faux bois vinyl that’s totally washable. Flynn chose an indoor-outdoor area rug that stands up to muddy paws and sticky fingers. An aged leather sofa is equal parts comfortable and effortlessly chic.


Photography by Robert Peterson/Rustic White


Photography by Robert Peterson/Rustic White

Photography by Krisztian Lonyai

Brian revamped what was a dated living room by painting its paneled walls glossy white, then adding luan behind its shelves to install a fun wallpaper in shades of pink and aqua. The designer at home in his industrial-modern kitchen. To bring the 1965 mid-century modern ranch into 2020, he added custom steel windows and doors throughout.

one thing or take one element out, it changes everything, so I try to coach people on what to not take out of a room. That’s just as important as what you put in. ID: Do you have a favorite space to design in a house? BPF: My all-time favorite room to design is the dining room, because people don’t seem to change them up, and they are not used that often, so they always look really polished. I think that’s what makes me happy. Also, dining rooms make me think of the old days where people sat down and talked and exchanged ideas. I like spending time in the dining room because that’s where the best ideas come to life. ID: You recently finished the 2020 HGTV Dream Home in Windmill Harbour. Of the HGTV homes that you have been the designer on, do you have a favorite? BPF: I have two HGTV series that I’m the interior designer on: HGTV Urban Oasis, where I renovate a house that’s in a very pedestrian, up-and-coming city, and HGTV Dream Home, which is a house that’s built from the ground up on a dreamy piece of property that instantly makes you think of vacation. My favorite HGTV Urban Oasis home was in Minneapolis in 2019. It has a special place in my heart because it was the first house that’s been my own personal style. It’s all black and white, super low slung, mid-century modern, almost industrial and very Scandinavian. My favorite HGTV Dream Home is a tie between Hilton Head Island and Whitefish Montana. Both are big houses situated on absolutely jaw-droppingly beautiful pieces of property, but they offer completely different types of lifestyles. On Hilton Head Island, you can enjoy the sun during the day, and at night it’s still warm enough to sit around an outdoor fire pit, whereas Montana is totally different. In the winter, there could be 15 feet of snow, and you can’t leave your house, and you have caribou and deer all around you. So, I love them both, but in different ways. ID: What other shows on HGTV do you love? BPF: I watched the HGTV series House Hunters International religiously, so it was fun to actually be on that show. I bought my summer home in Reykjavik, Iceland through it too, so that’s definitely my favorite HGTV show. ID: You mentioned Scandinavia in relation of your personal style. Tell me more. BPF: The Scandinavian aesthetic entered my world when I bought my home in Iceland, and I fell in love. I was inspired by the simplicity, the laid-back warmth and the whole Hygge style of Scandinavia, and it made me rethink how I’d been living in my

own home. I immediately started to get rid of stuff, and now I ensure that whatever I buy is super comfortable and is something I’ll use. I definitely now have that Scandinavian mentality of only buying things I truly need and which make me happy. ID: Your Instagram stories are fun and give a great insight into your life and your work. What do you hope your followers get from your Instagram feed? BPF: My Instagram is far from perfect, and I think that’s what makes it fun. What’s interesting is, we interior designers have a job where we’re making houses look perfect, and if you go through any interior designer’s Instagram feed, you’ll see hundreds of beautiful, perfect pictures of gorgeous homes. But what comes with that is a seriousness, and that’s what I don’t like. When people view my Instagram and they actually see my life, they realize that interior design is not perfect. I love to use my stories to show all the trials and tribulations of things that go wrong and how to fix them and also how to embrace the imperfection. I think that by pulling back the curtain and showing imperfection, I’m shedding a new light on an industry that’s really all about perfectionism, and I kind of like being the underdog and showing when I mess up. People really relate to that. ID: You were recently married in Antarctica, which doesn’t seem like a typical place for a destination wedding. BPF: No (laughs). I’m not a big wedding person, so I never really wanted to have a big wedding. But I wanted an experience that would be totally out of this world. It took two years of planning a lot of logistics to get there, but it was so special. I was born and raised in Florida and spent 27 years of my life in a tropical environment with humidity and bugs, so there is something about a polar environment that’s so pristine and beautiful and mysterious to me. I find it super romantic. I also love the silence you find in Antarctica. Working in interior design, I show up to a job site and there are 50 to 100 people there. It’s total chaos. So, when I’m not working, I want the complete opposite. To me, a place that is pristine with very few people and no noise is paradise. ID: When it came to designing your home together, do you guys have a similar style, or did you have to compromise? BPF: So, the thing that sucks for Hollis, who is my significant other, is that I’m a bit of a bulldog when it comes to interior design. I wanna do it my way (laughs). Luckily, he works in fashion; he’s a costume designer for movies and TV shows, so the way we have worked it out is that, when it comes to clothes and our closet and organizing, he has 100 percent creative control because I’m C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

53


b RI A N

PATRiCK

fLYNN

Brian turned to bold color to design the main spaces of his sister’s Paces neighborhood home in Atlanta. The living room is navy, while the neighboring dining room is a cheery shade of red. Photography by Robert Peterson/Rustic White Photography by Robert Peterson/Rustic White

not good at it. The great thing is, we’re both really all about comfort, so we tend to like anything that’s super comfortable and laid back. That’s good news because we’ll both look at the same sofa, and if it makes us wanna cuddle up in it, then we know we both love it. ID: When traveling for work and staying in hotels, are there any items you take with you to give a feeling of home? BPF: Apart from my Bluetooth speaker, because I constantly have music on, I always travel with a picture that a friend’s kid drew for me. It’s a picture of a bear and a giraffe and it says, “I love you.” It’s totally messy and crazy, and it’s the sweetest little thing. Having that little piece of art made by a kid almost makes me feel like a kid again myself. Every time I go somewhere, I have it in my backpack, and when I set myself up in an Airbnb, I take it out and it makes me happy. ID: What advice would you give aspiring designers on how to break into the interior design industry? BPF: My tip would be to always hire a professional interior photographer to capture your work, because it’s very hard to capture a room the way you see it in your mind through a lens. Interior photographers aren’t cheap, but they understand interior design and light. One of the biggest mistakes young designers make when they start out is, they just take a few pictures with their phone and put them on their Instagram. However, they’ve spent months, or years, trying to complete a project, so to not spend a few thousand dollars to have it immortalized is doing themselves a huge disservice. When I started out, I tried to take pictures of my rooms myself, and no magazine wanted anything to do with me. So, for the first two years of my career, all the money I made, I put back into hiring a professional photographer. That way I knew I would have a really strong portfolio and people would take me seriously. Also, I would say, never compare your work to other people’s. With social media, people are too quick to do that, and they make 54

MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

themselves feel bad. However, in the world of interior design, there is enough work for everyone, and somebody who is gonna hire a designer who does all neutrals is not gonna hire the designer who does hot pink walls. So, comparing is ridiculous. It’s apples to oranges! ID: In our social media driven world, where everyone seems to have an opinion, how do you maintain your own confidence? BPF: I never read comments, I never leave negative comments, and I don’t really look to see what other people are doing. I post my own work then I leave it and move on. I grew up in the ’90s, so I didn’t have a cell phone until I was in college. But all these kids who grew up in the early 2000s, who had Facebook when they were still in middle school, have this burden of having a real life and an internet life. Luckily, to us Gen Xers, the internet was just an extra thing you got to do for fun, and I don’t know how I’d have navigated that. My feelings don’t get hurt when people bash me on the internet because, to me, the internet is an imaginary place. But if you are six and all your other friends have Instagram, then that’s a whole different world. ID: Finally, you work incredibly hard. What so you do to truly relax? BPF: The most relaxed I’ve felt in a long time was when I was alone in Iceland. I went out to dinner by myself for two or three nights in a row, and I took a book with me. By the time I finished that book, I felt like a brand-new person. Nowadays, everything feels so instant, with our iPhones and social media, and people don’t really read books like they used to. But there is something to be said about the art of reading. It really replenishes you. Another thing that really relaxes me and that I find remarkably fulfilling is writing, and I’m currently working on my first design book. I’m not really good at sitting still and doing nothing, but I’m working hard, doing something that makes me really happy, and I’m getting paid for it. It doesn’t even seem real! 


Buddy Love dress $78, Baguette Choker $68, V Necklace $78 Available at Coastal Bliss

a model in a model WE RECRUITED A LOCAL MODEL, THE BEAUTIFUL LILY, TO SHOW OFF THE LATEST SPRING FASHIONS IN THIS MODEL HOME IN OLDFIELD.

A FAIRLY NEW TREND IN MASTER BATHROOMS IS ADDING A FREE-STANDING SOAKING TUB TO THE TRADITIONAL WALK-IN TILED SHOWER.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT STYLING BY KAILA JEFFCOAT HAIR & MAKEUP BY SALON KARMA SPECIAL THANKS TO MATT GREEN AND FRONTLIGHT BUILDING COMPANY FOR HOSTING US.


COFFERED CEILINGS ARE A GREAT IDEA TO ADD HEIGHTAND DIMENSION TO A MASTER BEDROOM. HARDWOOD FLOORS THROUGHOUT A HOUSE ARE ALL THE RAGE AND CAN BE WARMED UP WITH AREA RUGS IN BEDROOMS.

Mystee tutu slip $38, Birdie James overlay dress $218, Bittersweet Designs necklace (cross) $498, Bittersweet Designs Long Pearl necklace $498, Matisse boots $188 Available at Birdie James


BRICK BRINGS WARMTH, ADDING AN ELEMENT OF AUTHENTICITY TO ANY FIREPLACE DESIGN, AND IS THE FOCAL POINT OF THE MAIN LIVING AREA.

Tempo top $79.95, A.Z.I jacket $135, Lysse pants $98, Bueno shoes $130, Jen & Co. clutch $36, Earrings $49 Available at Pink Pineapple

a model in a model


THE MASTER BEDROOM IS SPACIOUS ENOUGH TO ACCOMMODATE A READING NOOK OR SEATING AREA.

Fashque Studio dress $58, Fashque Studio shawl $42, Mark Jenkins shoes $99, Hilton Head Jewels necklace $59 Available at So Sandra


Marie Oliver dress $375, Chocolat Blu shoes $185, Selena King earrings $295 Available at Palmettoes

ACCENT WALLS HIGHLIGHT AND POP COLOR INTO ANY DESIGN.

a model in a model


a model in a model Emory Park tank $22, Timing jumpsuit $42, Long Bar Pendant necklace $12, Stone Pendant necklace $14 Available at Egan + Ella

THREE DIFFERENT TILE PATTERNS ARE USED THROUGHOUT THE GUEST BATHROOM IN COMPLEMENTARY TONES TO CREATE SOFT INTEREST.

Molly Bracken top $80, Just Black jeans $59, Sheila Fajl earrings $50 Available at Gigiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boutique

THE NEUTRAL KITCHEN IS ALWAYS IN STYLE, AND THIS ONE IS ACCENTED WITH A DARKERPATTERNED BACKSPLASH.


On Twelfth top $40, She + Sky shorts $36, Ted Baker purse $88 Available at Dream Boutique SHIPLAP CAN BE USED IN MANY FORMS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; HERE IT IS USED AS A WAINSCOTING FOR DEPTH IN THE MAIN LIVING AREA.


A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING

C

losets by Design recently completed a luxurious hisand-her closet for a customer that gained space from a home recent expansion. Overall design, color palette and textures convey the aura of a couture boutique, blending drama and warmth with supreme spaciousness and functionality. Standout features abound, including glass door panels; dimmable mood lighting; shelves that display while protecting clothes shoes and accessories; a large center island with built-in beverage/wine cooler; and a corner with three-way mirrors and flat-screen television. Along one side of the main room is a sitting area, offering views of nearby the waterway. In harmonious contrast to the femininity of the main salon, the adjacent gentlemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closet hosts many of the same features but with deep earth tones and larger hardware, purposefully yet elegantly organized for his professional and leisure wardrobes. Additional amenities include tilt-out hampers, slanted shoe shelves, jewelry and sunglass drawers, pull-out trays with dividers and a bench with custom velvet cushions. Through the vision, insights and craftsmanship of Closets by Design, the homeowners now have much more than closets. They now enjoy their perfect escape rooms. Locally owned, Closets by Design offers free consultations and estimates. In addition to closets, they design and build pantries, wall beds, garage cabinets, laundry rooms, home offices, entertainment centers, hobby rooms and more. ď&#x201A;? Closets by Design (843) 225-6725 www.closetsbydesign.com

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

67


INTERIOR TREND PREDICTIONS FOR 2020 A R T I C L E

B Y

S A M A N T H A

S U M M E R S

WITH 2020 FAST APPROACHING, INTERIOR DESIGN SPECIALISTS HAVE LOOKED AT CURRENT STYLES, PATTERNS, AND SALES IN ORDER TO PREDICT WHAT INTERIOR TRENDS WE WILL SEE SKYROCKET IN POPULARITY THROUGHOUT 2020.

CLASSIC BLUE/GREY Pantone just named its color of the year ‘Classic Blue,’ and we predict this will come through in lots of key trends in 2020. Pantone likened the color to that of the sky or sea, and we think this will translate into natural decors with lots of natural wood and neutral, earthy shades. Classic Blue can also transport you to a celestial realm when paired with rich, darker tones and metallic flashes. Grey will continue to be the choice of many, particularly when paired with splashes of mustard or blush pink for added warmth. Grey provides a solid base to build upon; you can add bolder accents of color if your base color is grey. It also goes with everything, meaning if you get bored of your accents, you can easily switch things up.

BOHO Boho style is going to be big this year: think Ibiza soul mixed with ’70s disco. Simple, retro patterns will dominate with lilacs and oranges coming through. There will be an emphasis on handcrafted textiles and accessories, so dig out your old arts and crafts box and get busy. UPCYCLING Not just a fantastic way to save money, but you can truly get the furniture you want for your space by upcycling and decorating to your own tastes. Whether that means using furniture paint to restyle your kitchen cupboards, stripping the paint off an antique cabinet, or reupholstering your sofas or chairs, you’ll truly have something unique to you and your home. One of the biggest

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

69


changes you can make to your kitchen for the smallest amount of money is changing the cupboard handles. You can find beautiful unique handles at charity shops or antique fairs.

ECLECTIC DECOR Maximalism is here to stay this year with clashing patterns, styles and colors forming a key trend of 2020. Thrift stores are going to be major style inspiration, and the less matchy the better, especially if you add major vintage vibes. A great way to incorporate this trend into your home is to buy one roll of each of some wallpapers that you love, instead of numerous rolls of just one style, and cut out either pentagons or hexagons (the same size and shape across all styles), before applying to your wall in a random order.

GLAM Decadent art deco is the main theme of this trend; we are back in the ’20s, after all, and it’s going to start coming through in our interiors. Imagine Gatsby’s party but more glam—lots of champagne, shimmering tassels and fringes and geometric, velvet prints.  70

JANUARY 2020

C2 MAGAZINE


“The grand aspect of the house was the massive room connected to the kitchen. I love to cook. I love to feed people. We are constantly opening our home to friends, family and our ministry. This space works so beautifully and functions so well for crowds but still has that sense of intimacy for family nights.” —Jennifer Harsta

old world/ G A S C O I G N E B L U F F H O M E DA N C E S O N T H E L I N E B E T W E E N LOWC O U N T R Y A N D M O D E R N


new world W hen it comes to luxury homes, there are two distinctly different schools of thought in our little slice of the South. There is the classical “Lowcountry” luxury: think vast open spaces, natural textures, outdoor living and sense of Southern graces. Then there is the more traditional luxury, skewing contemporary with crisp lines, monochromatic color palettes with accent pieces here and there and materials that skew metallic.

ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN / PHOTOGRAPHY BY MOONLIGHT PRODUCTIONS / DESIGN BY JEFF CLINE


old world

Every once in a while, you’ll find a home that mingles the two to some extent. Either it’s a Lowcountry-style home that flirts with a few modern touches, or a modern home with some farmhouse elements. These are but a flirtation between the two styles. The Gascoigne Bluff home of Jennifer and Roel Harsta goes well beyond flirtation. It is a bonding of the two philosophies as deep as a lifelong friendship. Which is fitting, because it was born of one. “Not only were Scott and Anne (Middleton, owners of Southern Coastal Homes) great to work with, they have become friends,” Jennifer said. “The better the relationship, the better the finished product,” echoed Anne. “To us, it’s the most rewarding part of it.” Jennifer and Anne worked hand in hand in the design of the home, starting with blueprints that Jennifer defined herself. Despite not having any formal architectural training, Jennifer drew up the plans for the home from her own vision. (“I took the footprint, and on New Year’s Day a few years ago, I sat down and drew up the whole thing.”) “It was super fun to have a client who basically had no experience doing this, but it was as if she’d been an architect for years,” Anne said. “That part was literally all her. We can take no credit for that.” Central to Jennifer’s floorplan were open spaces for entertaining, peppering the layout with individual pockets of space where smaller more intimate gatherings could take place. The main living space’s twin fireplaces and catwalk lining the loft above speak to the results of this vision, offering a chance for guests to mingle and for the home to fill with friends without ever feeling crowded.

new world

“The grand aspect of the house was the massive room connected to the kitchen,” Jennifer said. “I love to cook. I love to feed people. We are constantly opening our home to friends, family and our ministry. This space works so beautifully and functions so well for crowds but still has that sense of intimacy for family nights.” Accenting these spaces are what Jennifer calls her “big wows,” explosive visual spectacles that pop against the European style minimalism of the rest of the house. Great examples of the home’s “big wows” come in the stonework found on the kitchen counters, where a Cambria stone pattern of dramatic black on white finds its counterpart in the stone around both fireplaces. The result is compelling, even if the process was labor intensive. “Because the islands and the fireplaces are so big, matching up the seams on the stone was not easy,” Scott said. “It was a mini science project,” echoed Anne. “Leslie from Precision Granite was a magician.” There’s a story behind every one of the home’s big wows. The stacked stone wall in the bedroom, for example, came to Jennifer in a dream. “It is absolutely stunning. I love the hard texture with the softer element of the bed. It’s this nice contrast. We ended up putting that into the bathroom as well to relate the two rooms.” The stylish doors to Roel’s office represent around two tons of steel, custom crafted for the space, shipped to the worksite on an 18-wheeler and hefted into place by a crew of six. It was labor intensive, but Scott considers it his favorite aspect of the house. The design on the kitchen’s accent wall was partially inspired by pinstripe trousers and represents one of the few times Jennifer and Anne hesitated in trying out bold ideas. “That was one where I was a little nervous,” Jennifer said. “We

EXPANSIVE KITCHEN WITH TWO OVERSIZED ISLANDS FEATURING CAMBRIA QUARTZ - THE OVERALL DESIGN MAKES THIS KITCHEN A CHEF’S DREAM.

MIRRORED TILES IN THE COCKTAIL BAR ADJACENT TO THE KITCHEN REFLECT THE GORGEOUS RIVER VIEWS TO THE REAR OF THE HOME.


THE UPSTAIRS GALLERY WITH GLASS RAILS OVERLOOK THE VOLUMINOUS LIVING AND DINING AREA AS WELL AS THE MAY RIVER.

“My husband is European and I’m a Southern girl, so we were trying to merge those two influences together,” Jennifer said. She calls the resulting melding of styles organic modern, equal parts minimalist and naturalist, old world and new. CUSTOM DESIGNED OPEN STAIRS WITH GLASS RAILINGS HIGHLIGHT THE MAIN ENTRY FOYER.

THE DINING ROOM FEATURES A GORGEOUS HAND MADE TABLE.

THE POWDER ROOM FEATURES A HIGH SHINE CONTEMPORARY WALLPAPER THAT PERFECTLY COMPLEMENTS THE FURNITURE PIECE VANITY.


old world

new world

have this bold countertop and then the bold stripes on the cabinets, I thought, ‘we can’t put that together.’ But it just became one of those moments where I said, ‘No way. We’re going for it.’” The result is a dazzling accent wall that enhances, rather than competes with, the many big wows around it. “We definitely approached it by asking, ‘When is too much too much?’ When will we have so many wows that they start distracting from each other and becoming tacky?’ Southerners don’t like tacky,” Jennifer said.

Call it organic modern; call it the best of both worlds; call it what you want. It represents a singular vision and a deep friendship forged around seeing it come to life. Her Southern sensibilities make their way through the more natural elements found in the home, like the live edge table made of California redwood and the accents of stone, leather and seagrass. They also balance out the more modern elements, a dichotomy that echoes its residents. “My husband is European and I’m a Southern girl, so we were trying to merge those two influences together,” Jennifer said. She calls the resulting melding of styles organic modern, equal parts minimalist and naturalist, old world and new. It fell to Southern Coastal Homes to execute on that uniquely intercontinental vision. “Everything she approached us with was different. The outside, when you pull up to it looks like a Gascoigne Bluff house on the water, but when you walk in the front doors it’s a totally different vibe,” said Ian Anderson, director of construction. “She went really modern—that was her whole goal. There’s a good mesh of a few different design aspects, but that was her vision.” “When I initially met with her, it wasn’t going to go as modern as it ended up being, but it morphed into extremely contemporary. We kept the reclaimed wood floors to give it that warmth, but we didn’t want it to feel too institutional. Sometimes in a big modern space it feels like a commercial building,” Anne said. “We wanted to keep mindful of keeping it cozy, comfortable and inviting, but at the same time, lean into her modern taste.” The result is a home both exquisitely modern and effortlessly Lowcountry. Call it organic modern; call it the best of both worlds; call it what you want. It represents a singular vision and a deep friendship forged around seeing it come to life. 

THE MASTER BEDROOM ORIENTS THE BED FOR A PERFECT VIEW OF THE MORNING SUNRISE.

STACKED THE STACKED STONESTONE WRAPSWRAPS THE FLOATING THE FLOATING WALL WALL IN THEIN MASTER THE MASTER BEDROOM. BEDROOM.

THE MODERN MASTER BATHROOM PROVIDES A RELAXING RETREAT WITH THE STACKED STONE TUB FACING AND SUSPENDED HIGH GLOSS CABINETRY.


F

olks have caught on to the lifestyle benefits of fresh organic produce and the joy that growing your own food brings. But the latest trend has people utilizing yard space in unconventional ways to make the most of what’s available, whether an enclosed back patio, flower beds out front, or a few containers on the porch. Landscaping is no longer just for ornamentals! There are so many fun and attractive ways to produce food around your home. GROW WHAT YOU LIKE Consider the staples of your household, and the treats you look for again and again. Can any of those be grown in our climate? For example, if you eat a lot of salads, a nice variety of lettuce and mixed leafy greens such as spinach, arugula and cress can be grown here through fall, winter and spring. Maybe your kids drink a lot of lemonade, so it would be worth planting a lemon tree or two. Juice from the lemons can be squeezed and frozen into ice cube trays and enjoyed all year round. If spicy food is a big hit in your house, hot pepper bushes are exciting on

edible

L A N D S C A P I N G FOR A HEALTHY, TAST Y, BEAUTIFUL YARD ARTICLE BY MICHELE ROLDÁN-SHAW

the eye as well as the tongue and will yield abundant fruit for homemade hot sauce, pepper vinegar, and more. For the grazers, cherry and grape tomatoes make great hanging baskets in place of ferns or flowers. Related to the tomato, but with a fruity taste and paper-lantern husk, the ground cherry is delicious and very easy to grow—possibly one of the best garden snacks ever! Whatever you plant, go for things you’ll actually want to eat, in quantities you can use, that way you’ll reap the rewards of your work. INTERPLANTING The neat thing about edible landscaping is that it’s unconstrained and uncompartmentalized. You no longer have to have flowers in flower beds, herbs in herb gardens and veggies in veggie patches. You get to mix it up! That means being creative with different combinations of colors, textures and uses. A winter garden might have collards, kale and purple cabbages beside daffodils and irises. Some striking red- and yellow-veined Swiss

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

79


edible

chard could be paired with fiery marigolds (which are natural pest repellents) or zinnias and geraniums. A planter with strawberries might have a few culinary herbs thrown in. Climbing cucumber vines could be interspersed with flowering creepers like jasmine. Or maybe try eggplants and Thai basil alongside purple-leaved canna, and golden zucchini near butterfly-attracting lantana. Do some research on companion planting and especially take into consideration those that are naturally pest repellant such as basil, chives, rosemary and garlic. Lavender and citronella are two very pretty aromatic plants that mosquitos hate! EDIBLE FLOWERS AND HERBS The cheeriness of flowers has pleased humanity through the ages. But why not combine purposes and grow flowers that can be eaten too? Pansies and roses are favorites for garnishes and desserts. Nasturtium can be thrown in the salad bowl, and their greens have the same wonderful peppery taste. Tear the petals off bright yellow, red, and orange calendulas then sprinkle over salads, or dry the flowers to boil in tea, put in the bath, or make into homemade healing oils and salves. Herbs like thyme, rosemary, sage and oregano have long been used in ornamental gardening, but consider what other flavors you most enjoy— cilantro, lemongrass, parsley, dill, fennel—and see if those can be incorporated into your landscape plan as well. FRUIT TREES Perhaps one of the most satisfying things in an edible landscape—or so-called “food forest”—is a fruit tree. Once it’s established, you do very little for it, yet it keeps showering you with sweet treats year after year! Traditional fruit trees in this area include figs, persimmons, Meyer lemons, grapefruits, plums and pears. But there are so many more to experiment with. Other types

80

MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

of citrus, such as Persian limes, kumquats, cold-hardy satsumas and tangerines are productive. Guavas can be successful here; even bananas and papayas can be coaxed into bearing fruit. Loquats are often seen in local yards as attractive evergreens with delicate blooms that smell like honeysuckle, but few appreciate the fruit— although it’s small with a large pit, the flavor is exquisite! They make great snacks or even smoothies if you have the patience to pick them apart. And in the shrub department, blueberries provide seasonal interest with their tiny white flowers in spring, delicious berries in summer, and red foliage in fall. TRELLISES AND ARBORS There is something magical about a leafy, shady arch forming overhead, perhaps with luscious fruits hanging down, leading you into the space beyond—an orchard perhaps, or a little seating nook. Vertical gardening is both an age-old tradition and a spacesaving, urban chic trend. There is a wide variety of edibles that either require support to grow upward or can be trained that way. Here in the South, the classic choice is grapes (scuppernong or muscadine), but passionfruit can also thrive; the flowers are breathtaking, and the fruits taste divine. A bit more challenging to grow, but still possible, is the kiwi arbor. Pole beans make wonderful climbers, covering the support in a luxurious burst of leaves and maybe even some showy blooms before yielding an abundant crop. Certain veggies can also be trained up trellises, including cherry tomatoes, cucumbers and chayote. Perhaps the most exciting and unusual fruits to cultivate vertically are melons. They will need a special structure and mesh bags (even pantyhose) to grow in, but if you are a melon lover and have limited space, this will be well worth it. Whatever you decide to plant, don’t be afraid to get imaginative with a creative design that reflects your unique tastes by intermingling flowers, fruits, veggies, herbs and ornamentals. Do a little online research for inspiration, then let your green thumb run wild! 


BELMONT INSURANCE SERVICES PUTTING A FACE ON YOUR INSURANCE COVERAGE ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS

The Belmont Team: (from left to right) Esmeralda Carrillo, Alan R. Spachman, Angie Gauer, Kathy Kinard, Ruth Harper, Brian Spachman and Tiffany Ross


TIFFANY ROSS: LICENSED AGENT

I

RUTH HARPER: OFFICE MANAGER

magine: (1) You’ve just returned from a hurricane evacuation to find extensive roof damage, a flooded garage, and ruined furnishings. (2) Your teenage son was involved in a fender bender. He’s fine, but your car is being towed to a local garage. (3) You need knee replacement surgery but are concerned about the out-of-pocket cost. (4) Your employee slipped and fell in the office and is at the emergency room with a possible concussion. Who are you going to call? When you have an insurance claim, whether it’s home, auto, health, liability or something else, do you want to sit on hold for hours while waiting for someone at a call center in another state or country to process your information? Or do you want to call someone local, whom you’ve met face-toBRIAN SPACHMAN: LICENSED AGENT

ANGIE GAUER: RECEPTIONIST/CSR

“We know the market, we know the builders, we know the Realtors, we know the people. I can speak specifically to the needs of the homeowner in Bluffton or on Hilton Head Island. We are dealing with different risk factors in our coastal community, hurricanes being one of the biggest.” - kathy kinard

KATHY KINARD: AGENCY TEAM LEADER

ESMERALDA CARRILLO: LICENSED AGENT

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020 83


BELMONT INSURANCE SERVICES

face, who knows you, understands your coverage, answers your immediate questions and most important, provides you with the advice and direction you need at this critical time? That personal connection is a strong reason to buy all your insurance from Belmont Insurance Services, a local independent agency. “When you have a claim, you can call me directly,” Kathy Kinard, Belmont’s agency team leader said. (Yes, you may also have to report the claim to the policy provider, but you will have a trusted friend to provide professional advice every step of the way, she explained.) “When a claim occurs, we want to make certain you receive every benefit available from the insurance you purchased. We know exactly which benefits you have coming, and I have no problem stepping in and advocating for our clients when they may not be receiving everything they deserve.” In addition to the personalized claims service, perhaps the most compelling reason to choose Belmont is the perspective they have on our area and the options they offer to mitigate risks before a claim occurs. “When you walk into Belmont, you’re going to receive options because we have the ability to provide quotes from many different carriers,” Kinard said. “We know the market, we know the builders, we know the Realtors, we know the people. I can speak specifically to the needs of the homeowner in Bluffton or on Hilton Head Island. We are dealing with different risk factors in our coastal community, hurricanes being one of the biggest.”

84 MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

According to Kinard, when Hurricane Matthew blew through the Lowcountry in 2016, it came as a shock to many area property owners that much of the necessary repair work would fall under their wind or named storm deductible. “Because we hadn’t had a hurricane threat in so long, people got numb to what their policy said. And at the time they purchased their policy, even the lowest wind deductible was pretty high,” she explained. The resulting concern caused some of the carriers to change the way policies are written. “I have insurance companies now that will offer a wind, hail or named-storm deductible as low as $1,000. Premiums may not be any higher than what you are paying today, and your wind or named storm deductible will be much lower.” Another surprise delivered by Matthew was confusion about flood insurance. “In this area, we have many different flood zones. The important thing to know is that everyone here is in a flood zone; it’s just a matter of how significant the risk of flooding is where your home is located,” Kinard said. “Standard homeowner’s insurance does not cover flood damage, and this can catch some people by surprise.” THE BOTTOM LINE While Kinard and her team are all about careful shopping and getting the best rates possible for their customers, she cautions against focusing solely on the premium “We can assist you in selecting the coverages, limits and features that best match your needs. If you secure the right coverage up front, it will eliminate any unpleasant surprises if you have a claim. Three hundred and sixty-four days out of the year, most people don’t think about their insurance. It’s on that one day when they pay the bill,” she said. “Yet many people don’t consider the end game—how much this is going to benefit me if I have a claim vs. how much I have to pay right


now. It’s all about which insurance program offers the best value proposition.” There is often a long interval between the time a client pays a premium for protection and the occurrence of an insured loss, so it’s easy to become complacent. “When I start talking to someone about their insurance needs, I often learn how little they understand their existing policy. I then have a responsibility to share with them the important terms of that policy,” Kinard said. “It’s not just about the bottom line, but the value of the protection you are receiving for the premium you will pay. Do you know what you’re getting, and how valuable is that to you?” The agents at Belmont are committed to helping you find just the right coverage to meet your needs. Unlike companyemployed agents, they can recommend coverage from multiple insurance companies, including specialty insurers that focus on unique situations and exposures. “This is not a sales job,” Kinard said. “We want to provide you with the best options for your needs. Our objective is to provide knowledge, service and value in everything we do for you.” Determining that perfect fit is a matter of getting to know you, and that’s what Kinard and her team do best.

Belmont specializes in serving families, businesses and individuals with customized insurance coverages specific to your situation. “The rubber meets the road when there’s a claim. If I didn’t provide you the right insurance, you’re going to be upset with me. I don’t ever want you to lose sleep thinking that you don’t have enough. I don’t want to undersell or oversell my clients.” Belmont Insurance Services, founded in 2009 by Alan Spachman and his son Brian, brings three generations of industry service to the Lowcountry to provide the precise amount and type of insurance coverage for individuals or companies. “We are licensed in all 50 states, so if someone has homes or exposures in multiple states, we can help them as well,” Kinard said. From personal lines such as home, auto, life and health, to commercial lines specific to your company’s needs, the insurance experts at Belmont offer customized protection and deliver a total solution. Isn’t it time you put a face on your insurance coverage?  Belmont Insurance Services is located in Bluffton at 1 Westbury Park Way, #101. Learn more at www.belmontins. com or call (843) 757-3838 for an appointment.

“When I start talking to someone about their insurance needs, what I often learn how little they understand their existing policy. I then have a responsibility to share with them the important terms of that policy.” - kathy kinard

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020 85


Setting the Stage IS YOUR HOME NOT SELLING? TERESA KUNICH OF GROUP 5 DESIGN CAN HELP YOU WITH THAT.

Ar ti cl e b y B a r r y K a uf m a n p h o t o g r a p h y b y m .k a t

I

t’s impossible to overstate how important proper staging is to selling a house. It’s one thing to tell a potential buyer that a home has mesmerizing waterfront views, spacious open living spaces and updated appliances. It’s another to set a stage for the buyer, to welcome them into the space and allow them to discover on their own how perfect this home is. It’s a unique craft, home staging—one that blends the artistry of interior design with the psychology of physical spaces and how we interact with them. And it’s a craft that Teresa Kunich has mastered over the last 15 years. “When I go into a property, it’s not only about placing furniture to make the home more inviting. It is about getting that property ready to sell. I’m going to look for little things that are red flags for buyers,” she said. “When they see little things that are not in order, they start to wonder about what bigger issues they might not be seeing.” But minimizing the negative is just a small part of what Kunich’s Group 5 Design does in staging a home. The much larger part of proper staging is accentuating the positives. “We try to highlight spaces that are unique to the property,” she said. “If your outdoor living area, for example, is your big selling point, I’m going to put in furnishings and décor that draw you back there. We try to keep everything inviting and neutral, with plenty of open spaces where the buyer can flow freely through the house.” And when a home is properly staged, the truly unique nature of the home is allowed to shine. “If I do my job well, they don’t notice the furniture at all. They see the house, which is what we are trying to help sell.” It’s an art form that produces results. “I just had a villa that I staged on Monday; we uploaded the photos later in the week, and it was under contract over the weekend, sight unseen.” For Kunich, staging homes actually began as her contribution to her husband Donnie’s contracting business. Back during the early-2000s housing boom, he would build spec homes and Teresa, then a self-described “mom running PTAs and fundraising events for church and school,” would furnish

g

Teresa Kunich at home.

“WHEN I GO INTO A PROPERTY, IT’S ABOUT GETTING THAT PROPERTY READY TO SELL. I’m going to look for little things that are red flags for buyers.”

them to make them truly pop. In fact, she was staging their spec homes before anyone knew what staging was. The work she was doing on her own properties soon caught the attention of the local real estate community, always hungry for talent. “I had the furniture, so I started staging for other people,” she said. Group 5 Design was born, evolving to not only encompass home staging, but also interior design and villa “refreshes,” whether a light sprucing up for the rental season or a fullfledged remodel of the kitchen and bath. Kunich’s background in the contracting business gives her a unique skill set of not only envisioning the beautiful final product, but knowing exactly which permits to pull and which subcontractors to work with to bring that vision to life. That means whether you’re putting your house on the market or simply looking to refresh your space, Group 5 Design has a plan. “We work with clients who are putting together their forever home and clients who are looking to be in a home for five years and then downsize. I’m able to guide them toward their optimal goal. Together, we will help you maximize your real estate.”  For more information, visit www.furnishedwithstyle.com.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

87


HousingTrends WHEN

TRIGGER A BUYER’S OR SELLER’S MARKET

I

BY COLETTE STEVENSON

f you have ever shopped for a home or sold one, you probably have heard your real estate agent mention that it is either a “buyer’s market” or a “seller’s market.” But what does that mean, and how can you tell which real estate market it is today in the Hilton Head Island area? Sellers have more power when it is a seller’s market. Homes sell faster; multiple bids for the same home are common; the final price is often higher than the listed price; and buyers might make more concessions in order to elevate their offer above others. When it’s a buyer’s market, buyers are the ones who have more power. Homes take longer to sell; multiple bids on the same home are scarcer or even disappear; the final price is either near or below the listing price; and sellers are the ones willing to make concessions. The good news is there are certain things that are happening in the economy—and specifically in the Hilton Head Island area real estate market—that will tell you when it is a seller’s market or a buyer’s market. This will help you know what to expect. Let’s take a look at the differences.

of local tourism and local business and also to seasonal tourism patterns (buyers might find better deals during “off-season,” for example). Rising home prices can also strengthen a seller’s market. Historically low mortgage interest rates boost a seller’s market because lower rates mean more buyers can qualify to purchase a home. Another key indicator is how quickly homes are selling. Called days on market, this number tells you the average time it takes to sell a home listed on HHIMLS.com. When the days on market number is low (60 is about average nationally for singlefamily homes), that suggests it is likely a seller’s market. In a seller’s market, there also are fewer seller concessions. More homes are often sold “as is,” meaning that no matter what a home inspection finds, a seller won’t make adjustments to the sales price or correct issues called out in the report. Finally, look at the trend in final sales prices. If the trend in average sales prices shows buyers paying more than the listed price, that is another factor that suggests a seller’s market.

WHEN IT’S A SELLER’S MARKET One of the first indicators of a seller’s market is the number of homes listed for sale. Real estate agents call this inventory. When real estate inventory is low, that means buyers are competing for few homes, giving sellers an advantage in the marketplace. Buyer motivation is important to a strong seller’s market. People have to want to buy homes—and the greater their desire, the more they are willing to pay for a home. This is where economic factors can help you identify a seller’s market. A strong local economy helps strengthen a seller’s market. Local job creation, lower local unemployment, and real wage growth are key indicators of a strong real estate market overall. In the Hilton Head Island area, this is primarily tied to the health

WHEN IT’S A BUYER’S MARKET High real estate inventory is one of the most important factors needed to create a buyer’s market. It really is supply and demand. When there are more local homes listed for sale for buyers to choose from, they gain control. The size of the pool of buyers is another critical factor to drive a buyer’s market. Fewer buyers shopping for a home means less competition among buyers. What is happening in both the national economy and your local economy can influence how many people are shopping for a home. This is one reason why Hilton Head Island sellers might want to consider listing during peak tourism season and why buyers might want to think about shopping when things are quieter. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020 89


Current mortgage interest rates, as well as any significant movement in interest rates, can have a huge impact on how many people can qualify for a mortgage, which influences the size of the buyer pool. Low mortgage interest rates potentially allow more people to buy a home. But rising rates can have an immediate impact on the number of buyers in the market for a home. Our local economy also influences the creation of a buyer’s market. A slowdown in job creation, a trend toward higher unemployment, and a slowing of wage growth can limit the number of buyers. Remember, the fewer buyers there are, the more likely it is a buyer’s market. Home price appreciation or depreciation are two more key indicators that point to buyer’s or seller’s market. Appreciation shows rates of increase, and depreciation shows rates of decline; local home values appreciating more slowly or home appreciation price becoming flat or actually declining all contribute to strengthening a buyer’s market. Days on market indicates a buyer’s market too; when homes are on the market for longer, that will create pressure on sellers to lower their sales price. Locally, the average days on market for residential and villas on HHIMLS in 2019 was 90 days. Because sellers have less power in a buyer’s market, they are often willing to make more concessions to sell their home. After a home inspection, in a buyer’s market, sellers are willing to either make an adjustment to the sales price or correct defects found during inspection, such as replacing flooring, carpet, or an aging water heater. Finally, when homes are selling for less than their listing price, that tells you it is more likely a buyer’s market. The month with the highest ratio of sold price to original list price locally last year was in August at 96 percent, according to HHIMLS. OTHER INFLUENTIAL FACTORS Keep in mind that the real estate market transitions from being a seller’s market to a buyer’s market and vice versa. That’s why you need to focus on trends. Your local real estate agent (who is a member of HHIMLS) has easy access to information that will help you see the trends that indicate when a market is shifting. Seasonal buying patterns also can cause small shifts in the marketplace. More homes are often listed for sale beginning in the spring, for example, with fewer homes listed at the beginning of a new year, historically. Plus, December can often bring a bump in home sales, often as a result of the influence of tax consequences on the sale of a home. This proves true locally. In the Hilton Head Island area, our lowest inventory months are May-August and December. Historically, March has the highest number of new listings. A professional real estate agent can help you understand the opportunities available to you—whether it is a seller’s market or a buyer’s market—and keep you well informed of what you want to know. Because they are members of HHIMLS, they have the best, most trustworthy, reliable and up-to-date information available on your local real estate market.  Colette Stevenson, CEO of HHIMLS, also known as the “chief happiness officer,” works to provide innovative real estate services while maintaining the most dependable and powerful market data in the marketplace, updated in real time, to empower real estate agents to better serve their clients throughout South Carolina and Georgia. Founded in 1976, HHIMLS is a statewide premier multiple listing service in South Carolina, facilitating more than $4 billion in annual real estate transactions. 90 MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE


HOW TO BE A

FIT FEMALE DON’T START A FITNESS REGIMEN SOLELY TO LOSE WEIGHT.

S

tudies show that working out to “slim down” often backfires. First of all, because muscle weighs more than fat, some women gain weight with an increased exercise program. Also, many women who soldier through that early morning gut- and butt-burning bootcamp inadvertently end up consuming more calories than they expend via energy drinks and bars, meal replacement products that do not specifically address a woman’s nutritional needs, and/or the erroneous logic that, “I can eat whatever I want today because I already worked out.” Furthermore, sports coaches and nutritionists will tell you that it’s not just what you eat but when you eat, and they often recommend consuming macronutrients like fiber, carbohydrates and protein at specific times. Don’t join a fitness facility because you simply think you should either. Of the approximate 45 million adults in the United States who have joined a gym, 80 percent do not go, and 12 percent sign up in January and quit or stop going after 24 weeks. Attempting to work out for perceived external benefits or unrealistic internal expectations often leaves people feeling guilty, and that guilt builds into resentment—not muscle mass—resulting in conscious and/or subconscious rejection of a wellness routine.

Do, however, be driven because you appreciate and adhere to the key concepts of being fit at any age. To illuminate these key concepts, meet three dynamic, inspirational, and fit women who lead by example.

Denise Agee Denise Agee is the director of tennis at the South Carolina Yacht Club. She is 61 years young. Her father turned her on to the sport of tennis when, at a young age, he took her to a Virginia Slims professional tournament, where she watched Billie Jean King kick ass. From then on, every single weekend Agee played tennis with her brother and father. “I was not groomed at the Country Club of Virginia. I had to fight,” Agee said. And her hard work paid off. She earned a partial scholarship to play tennis at Clemson. But, during Agee’s sophomore year, she listened to her heart. She, as well as other teammates, left the team because of a negative coach. “It was very hard to call my parents and say I was quitting,” Agee said. “I think I heard a heart breaking over the phone.” Agee then became a competitive runner until, at age 35, she returned to tennis and began competing in local, state and regional tournaments. After a several years of competing, Agee decided to be a tennis instructor. This year Agee will be inducted into her high school’s hall of fame for her contribution to her alma mater’s tennis team, and she will celebrate almost two decades of coaching.

“I LOVE TO SEE WHAT A SPORT SHOWS AND EXPOSES ABOUT A PERSON,” AGEE SAID. “WHETHER IT IS A SOCIAL SPORT LIKE DOUBLES TENNIS, A LONG-DISTANCE SPORT LIKE A TRIATHLON THAT IS MADE MORE FUN BY TRAINING WITH OTHERS, OR A NICHE SPORT LIKE CONTORTION AND POLE DANCING, CREATE YOUR OWN SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITY.”

61

AT ANY AGE B Y B E C C A E D WA R D S DESIGN BY JEFF CLINE


ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN

of the trade. “You don’t want us to have to come out for every minor cleaning issue, plus we want to make sure customers aren’t doing anything that might damage their carpets or furnishings,” Burdick said, pointing to harsh ingredients in products like Resolve that can do more harm than good. “There are a lot of safer, more natural products you can use, from vinegar to Woolite to Ivory soap. That way you can keep everything in shape between visits.” Giving their customers the tools to do the job themselves is just one way Mighty Mac dedicates itself to the art of cleaning. More than clean rugs, it’s about protecting your investments, protecting your family, and keeping your home looking amazing. 

FROM THE GROUND UP MIGHTY MAC OFFERS SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST CARPET CLEANING.

M

ore than likely you can remember that last time you had your carpets cleaned. Maybe it was six years ago, maybe it was last year. Maybe you’ve never had your carpets cleaned (and if that’s the case, eew. You need to get on that). But while you may be at least somewhat aware that your carpets should be cleaned, what about the rest of your house? When’s the last time, for example, you had your upholstery cleaned? Probably never, right? As with your carpets, you probably should get on that. You can Google it for yourself, or you can just trust us that furniture can get pretty gross over the years. The point is, there is a lot more to keeping a house clean than just steaming the carpets periodically. Few people around here know that more than John & Mary Myer and Ivy Burdick, the family behind Mighty Mac Premier Cleaning. “A lot of people think we just do carpet cleaning,” Burdick said. “But we do everything—upholstery, stone, wood, tile, area rugs. We have a whole warehouse here just for careful cleaning of area rugs.” Locally owned and operated, Mighty Mac is a true family company, with technicians who have been certified and trained to handle any and all stains, soils and messes. With some of Mighty Mac’s technicians boasting more than two decades of experience, you won’t find a more qualified set of professionals for handling all of your cleaning needs. You might think of Mighty Mac as just a carpet cleaning service, but their range of offerings is geared toward one thing: protecting your investments— not only by cleaning them, but by restoring them with expert repair services that take everything from water damaged or burned carpet to cracked and dried leather and return them to glory. And after they finish, you can count on their Teflon protection by Dupont to protect your carpets from damage down the road. “People spend a lot of money on high-quality furnishings, carpeting, rugs and flooring for their home,” Burdick said. “We’re helping them add years to the lifespan of their home décor by not only cleaning it but cleaning it right.” Beyond the dollars and cents, Mighty Mac is there to provide a safe and healthy environment for everyone who shares your home. “You think about children and pets, and how much time they spend on your carpet, you definitely want to make sure you’re keeping everything clean for their health,” Burdick said. Mighty Mac is there for all the day-to-day cleaning, but their expertise can also be called on when disaster strikes. The same skill and care that goes into each cleaning goes into their 24-hour emergency service, offering drying services and cleanup after water damage or other calamities. There’s a lot more to cleaning than you might think. Check out their website and you’ll find a series of “consumer information/bulletins” sharing a few tricks

For more information, visit http://www. mightymacclean.com/ or call (843) 842-3994.

MEET OUR TEAM

Pictured top to bottom: Ivy Burdick, John Myer, Mark, Thomas, Anthony, Miguel, Cristian, Rene, and Matt C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

93


Retirement Years WHAT WILL YOUR

LOOK LIKE?

BY FRED GASKIN

A

s a financial advisor, I have the pleasure of working with and speaking to a vast number of very different people. Everyone has their own story, different circumstances and a unique explanation of how and why they ended up in our community. Many of the conversations I have are with neighbors that are either in or approaching retirement. Fortunately, many people to whom I have spoken have thought about what they want their retirement to look like. However, for most people, getting to retirement has been the goal, and it’s not until they’ve retired that they start thinking about what their retirement will look like. The good news is, even if you’ve already retired, it’s never too late to start planning. Not surprisingly, the most common question I get is ‘How much can I afford?’ While that is an important question, it shouldn’t be the single consideration when you’re planning for your future. Here are a few other questions to think about in order to define what “retirement” means to you: 1) HAVE YOU CONSIDERED A “SECOND ACT” CAREER IN RETIREMENT? According to a Charles Schwab survey published in 2019, more than 40 percent of people within five years of retirement said they wanted to continue working in retirement. Whether you’re scaling back hours at your current job, planning to embark on a new career, or pursuing a passion project, this has some practical advantages when it comes to retirement planning. Along with the benefits of staying active, by continuing to earn a paycheck, you mitigate the need to deplete existing savings.

2) WOULD YOU RATHER TAKE “MINI-RETIREMENTS” AND POSTPONE LONG-TERM RETIREMENT? While most people still envision retirement as a point later in life when they stop working altogether, the idea of taking time off from work for extended periods—to travel, raise a family or simply take a break—at various life milestones is becoming more common. If this sounds appealing, it will require some diligent planning and saving along the way and will impact the way you think about saving for a traditional retirement down the road. 3) HOW IMPORTANT IS IT TO LEAVE A FINANCIAL LEGACY? Ask yourself, would you rather spend every penny or leave money to family, friends or a charity after you’re gone? This answer will impact your financial decisions in retirement. Estate planning isn’t just for the ultra-wealthy. Most people should create a basic estate plan, including a will that outlines how they would like their assets to be distributed. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020 95


4) DO YOU AND YOUR SPOUSE OR PARTNER HAVE THE SAME RETIREMENT LIFESTYLE VISION? If you are in a relationship, it’s a good idea to get on the same page when it comes to retirement. Do you want to be active? Are you planning to stay in your current home or retire elsewhere? These questions will not only help determine how much you need to save, but also can inform whether you will merge your finances or keep some separate to meet differing goals. 5) DO YOU HAVE A PLAN FOR FUNDING YOUR RETIREMENT ONCE YOU DECIDE TO TAP YOUR SAVINGS? You’ve spent most of your life saving, so before flipping the switch, make sure you have a plan in place for how to make those savings last. To do this, consider consulting a professional to help you create a retirement income plan and start with the basics: • Choose an appropriate mix of conservative and aggressive investments to provide diversified sources of return. • Determine how much you need to withdraw on an annual or monthly basis. • Learn about products and services designed to help manage and deliver retirement income. As an advisor, I like to work with my clients to anchor their financial expectations. This often involves discussions about

financial planning, their lifestyle and any potential legacy considerations. While it may sound limiting, in my experience, for most clients the process is quite liberating. It helps inform them as to what is possible during their ‘Golden Years’—which for many will extend over three decades. Keep in mind that whether it’s starting a second career, serving your neighbors, volunteering or leading an active life, how you spend your retirement is ultimately a personal choice. If you would like help thinking through these questions, you can visit a Charles Schwab branch and talk to a financial advisor. Schwab has also created a card game called “The Next Chapter” with more retirement questions to explore.  Fred Gaskin is the branch leader at the Charles Schwab Independent Branch in Bluffton. He has over 35 years of experience helping clients achieve their financial goals. Some content provided here has been compiled from previously published articles authored by various parties at Schwab. Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., Member SIPC.

DISCLOSURES Investing involves risk, including loss of principal. The information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision. The information provided is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax, legal or investment planning advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, Schwab recommends that you consult with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner or investment manager. 0220-0AAR/(01/2020)

96 MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE


How’s Your

Hearing? I

n our special section on Boomers and Beyond, we thought it pertinent to address hearing loss, as the average age hearing loss begins to present is 65. We chatted with Randy Rose of Rose Hearing Healthcare Centers, about what the first signs of hearing loss are, what to expect on an initial visit to a specialist, and how technology is improving the landscape for those in need of hearing aids. Celebrate Magazine: What are some of the first signs of hearing loss? Randy Rose: Glad you asked. Too many people wait until they are distressed by hearing impairment. Early detection will save you time, money, and aggravation. If you find yourself asking others to repeat, struggling to hear in noisy environments, or increasing volume on TV, please get a hearing test from a licensed hearing care professional. C2: What causes loss of hearing? RR: Hearing loss gets a bad rap! Too many people associate hearing impairment with old age, and though this may be a factor, it is really not the entire story. Some are born with hearing loss, but most hearing loss is due to noise. For example, a baby’s cry over a long period can cause high frequency hearing loss. We live in an industrialized country: cars, music, factories, airplanes, and some medications are all factors in hearing loss. Although there are many ways to lose your hearing, noise is the number one cause of hearing loss. C2: Is everyone with hearing loss a good candidate for hearing aids? RR: Another great question. The short answer would be no, which is why it is important to see a licensed hearing healthcare professional. There are several types of hearing impairment, sensorineural being the most prominent, which is a loss of hair cells in the cochlea, generally associated with noiseinduced destruction of the hair cells. Hearing aids are the only solution for this type of hearing loss. Conductive loss is a blockage of sound before the sound gets to the cochlea. In most cases, there are medical procedures that could treat this. And the last is a mixed loss combination of sensorineural and conductive. Generally, hearing aids work really well for this. Again, do not wait too long; you begin to lose your cognition of speech, and it limits the success of rehabilitation to help you hear again. C2: What are some of the new advances in hearing aid technology? RR: Wow, wow, wow! Technology is amazing today; the sky is the limit. The sound of today’s hearing aids is absolutely fantastic, including your ability to use phones and TV. You can stream to phones, iPads, or TVs, or just enjoy the natural sound quality of this

Randy Rose, owner of Rose Hearing Healthcare Centers

The waiting room at Rose Hearing’s Hilton Head location in Main Street Village

new technology. We really get excited when our clients come in for a follow-up appointment and they tell us how great life is again. C2: How long does an initial consultation with a hearing specialist take, and what should a person expect to happen? RR: Our initial consultation is generally one hour and sometimes up to an hour and 10 minutes. It may be shorter if we find no loss or a minimum loss that does not require hearing aids. We focus on the client’s hearing and a solution to the client’s needs. We are also the only accredited tinnitus care provider in South Carolina. We have a lot of tools to help people hear well again.  C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

99


Hilary Hattler “When I was six, I was thrown in the pool. My mother made me swim because I was a klutz and she thought the pool was the place that I would do the least damage,” 62-year-young Hilary Hattler joked. It worked. Hattler swam competitively until she was 13 years old. “Swimming was not a forgiving sport for girls back then. This was before goggles, so we had red eyes. Your hair turned green. You didn’t go to parties because of practice, and swimmers get huge shoulders,” Hattler said. “Plus, I was living in Puerto Rico, and swimming was not popular. It was volleyball, volleyball, and more volleyball.” Though she played volleyball and ran in her 20s and 30s, Hattler, like many of us, said life got in the way and prevented her from being focused on fitness. “My job was very time consuming, and I was a single mom of kids below three years of age.” But, as someone who believes in setting goals, Hattler made a promise to herself. She would do an IRONMAN triathlon when she turned 50. And she did just that. “My sister Andrea turned me on to triathlons. I completed my first one right after my fiftieth birthday. I was second out of the water, first on the bike, and last in the run for my age group.” Since then, Hattler has competed in numerous races of various lengths. She considers sprint triathlons (a 750-meter swim, 12.5-mile bike, and 5K run)—something most people half her age cannot do—to be a warm-up. She is currently training for the IRONMAN 70.3 in Puerto Rico on March 15.

SHE CONSIDERS SPRINT TRIATHLONS (A 750-METER SWIM, 12.5-MILE BIKE, AND 5K RUN)—SOMETHING MOST PEOPLE HALF HER AGE CANNOT DO— TO BE A WARM-UP. SHE IS CURRENTLY TRAINING FOR THE IRONMAN 70.3 IN PUERTO RICO ON MARCH 15.

62

Freda Mooncotch Freda Mooncotch knows firsthand the negative physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual effects of chronic pain and illness. She struggled with both chronic pain and illness for almost a decade before she took charge of her health and became a competitive athlete and contortionist. Now, at 48 years young, she is no longer bedridden from auto-immune conditions like Lyme and Crohn’s diseases and does some pretty wild things with her body without the use of pain management medication. Mooncotch’s story began after the economic crisis of 2008, when she “was 35 years old and had lost everything.” By the time Mooncotch was 41, she was so ill she was not sure if she would live or die. But then her father gave her a Yoga Journal magazine. “These women were doing such beautiful things with their bodies that, despite all the pain it caused, I started trying the poses,” Mooncotch said. She also began experimenting with magnesium chloride, eventually launching an all-natural, organic “I AM IN BETTER SHAPE NOW THAN EVER IN MY pain relief and skincare line called LIFE, AND I CAN HONESTLY MOONMAG. SAY IT IS BECAUSE I NEVER “I am in better shape now GAVE UP ON MY HEALTH. than ever in my life, and I can I FOUND AND FELL IN honestly say it is because I never LOVE WITH A SPORT gave up on my health. I found THAT I DID NOT EVEN KNOW EXISTED.” and fell in love with a sport that I did not even know existed,” Mooncotch said.

4848

(continued on next page)


KEY KEY CONCONCEPTS: CEPTS:

‘‘ ‘‘ ‘‘ ‘‘ ‘‘

FIND SOMETHING YOU ENJOY. “If you’re going to commit to a sport, find one you enjoy,” Hattler said. “For me, it’s triathlons, but it might be something different for you.”

CHALLENGE AND COMPETE WITH YOURSELF. “I do not see why anyone would be afraid to compete. In the end, you only look to compete with and improve upon yourself,” Hattler said.

SET GOALS. “Goals allow you to have a positive outlet for your energy,” Agee said.

BE OKAY WITH WHERE YOU ARE. You do not need to be serious,but you do need to be conscientious. You may be too old to do some things, but that doesn’t mean you’re too old to do something. [To improve or progress], you need someone to evaluate where you are andsomeone like a coach to lead you,” Hattler said.

DIG DEEP. I struggle with digging deep every day. Sometimes I think I’m too old to do things, but then my body surprises me. You have to get over your mental limitations. We are brainwashed that after 40 it’s downhill, but that’s not true,” Mooncotch said.

“Training is my psychiatrist,” Hattler added. “Plus, if I’m going to hurt, I’m going to hurt because I did it to myself and not because I’m getting old. I hurt not because of arthritis. I hurt because I ran 11 miles.”

‘‘ ‘‘

MAKE IT A LIFESTYLE. “There is no one-size-fits-all with fitness. Take me, for example. I’m a carnivore. I eat two steaks a day. It might not be for everyone, but it works for me. The point is, find what works and commit to it,” Mooncotch said.

REFLECT ON YOUR ACHIEVEMENTS. “It really gives me a buzz when my Garmin says that I am in the top five percent of my age group and that I have the fitness of a 25-year-old,” Hattler said. 

Becca Edwards is a wellness professional, freelance writer, and coowner of Female IQ Podcast.


Move South! ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEAUTIFUL HERE. SPECIAL TO CH2/ CB2

E

very year, retirees flock to the South in droves for the next (and maybe the best) chapter of their lives. The kids are officially out of the house, first careers are over, and who wants to shovel snow in their sixties? There are many reasons the Lowcountry attracts those looking to start anew. The temperate weather and abundance of outdoor activities call to those who want to spend their retirement on the golf course, playing pickleball or just discovering new vistas by kayak. The South has become a hotspot for culinary delights as well, with over 200 local eateries in our area lone, from Thai and Mexican to Italian, Mediterranean and more. When you finally hit every restaurant in our zip codes, Savannah is just a 30-minute drive for even more options. When itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too hot or cold to explore outdoors, there is plenty to do inside as well. With art galleries to explore and community theatres aplenty, the Lowcountry has a blossoming art and music scene. As part of our Boomers & Beyond special section, we introduce you to local retirement communities and assisted-living facilities. If you are reading the digital version of this issue, just click through on the URLs listed to explore each residence or community more thoroughly. We would love to welcome you to the Lowcountry someday!

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020 107


RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES Margaritaville Hilton Head 356 Latitude Boulevard Hardeeville, SC 29927 https://www.latitudemargaritaville.com/hilton-head Latitude Margaritaville community brings the signature “no worries,” tropical vibe of Margaritaville to the popular resort destination of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. This 55-andbetter community is designed for those seeking a uniquely fun and relaxed lifestyle with FINtastic recreation. Sun City Hilton Head Okatie, SC www.SunCityHiltonHead.org Sun City Hilton Head is a premier active adult community home to more than 16,000 residents. The community is the brainchild of construction mogul Del Webb, who first pioneered the agerestricted active adult lifestyle in Arizona before bringing his vision to the East Coast with Sun City Hilton Head. This is most definitely an active 55+ community, with over 60 chartered clubs covering everything from sports to performing arts.

RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES WITH ASSISTED LIVING OPTIONS The Bayshore on Hilton Head Island Hilton Head Island, SC www.bayshorehiltonhead.com Located on the water near the Squire Pope Rd. entrance to Hilton Head Plantation, The Bayshore offers water views with

108 MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

luxury and convenience. One- and two-bedroom floor plans are available, with independent or assisted living depending on the level of care needed. Unique amenities include a community boat for sunset cruises, a movie theater, spa and an outdoor heated pool with bay views. It’s also within walking distance to three popular local dining establishments: The Boathouse, Dockside and Hudson’s. The Seabrook of Hilton Head Hilton Head Island, SC https://theseabrook.com/ This south-end residence offers 10 different condominium flooring plans, and is bordered by the Sea Pines Forest Preserve. The grounds boast a woodworking shop, shuffleboard court, putting green, and covered gazebos strategically placed near lagoons. The Seabrook is near Pope Avenue and within walking distance to Coligny Plaza and the beach. This was the first continuing care retirement community on Hilton Head Island and it’s the only non-profit CCRC. Fraser Health Center, a Medicareapproved skilled nursing facility and rehabilitation center is on site, making this an attractive option for those whose health may be reclining. Indigo Pines Hilton Head Island, SC www.holidaytouch.com/our-communities/indigo-pines Comfortably nestled into the trees of a small patch of woods near Indigo Run, this retirement community invites older adults to enjoy each other’s company for senior living moments. Residents enjoy independent living that includes sharing three chef-prepared meals a day, spacious social rooms in which to catch up with friends, and a lively activity calendar featuring chair


volleyball, Mahjong and “Quizoid,” a team Jeopardy game. The grounds beckon residents outside to walk along the path under the canopy of trees lining the property, relax on the back porch or in the gazebo, or warm up under the stars around the fire pit. Weekly housekeeping and linen service gives residents more time for fun and less time to get bogged down in chores. The Cypress of Hilton Head Island Hilton Head Plantation Hilton Head Island, SC www.Cypressofhiltonhead.com An unparalleled array of services, activities, amenities and health care options combined with the benefits of equity home ownership make the Cyprus a forward-thinking choice for the evolving lifestyle of today’s active adults age 62 and older. This is an award-winning continuing care retirement community within the gates of Hilton Head Plantation, featuring amenities like a dog park, weekly housekeeping and linen service, a complimentary continental breakfast and transportation to nearby grocery stores, banks, doctors, churches and shopping centers. Independent living, assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing care are all available at the Cypress. Village Cove Assisted Living Main Street Hilton Head Island, SC https://www.navionseniorsolutions.com/senior-living/sc/ hilton-head/village-cove-assisted-living/ Studio and one-bedroom apartments are available for residents, along with an array of supportive services in a comfortable, secure environment. Community rooms are available for socializing, and healthy dining is provided. Exercise programs, guest lectures, scheduled outings and pet therapy are some of entertainment options available to residents.

Bloom at Hilton Head & Bluffton Two locations http://bloomathiltonhead.com/ Hilton Head Island and Bluffton, SC Bloom at Hilton Head or Bluffton offers convenient onsite amenities, personalized services, life enrichment programs and resident centered health care in a professionally managed home setting, licensed by the state. The atmosphere is warm and relaxed, and the ambience embraces the uniqueness of the local culture. Residents have residential choices such as selecting their apartment floor plan and designing their private apartment. Bloom offers affordable month-to-month rentals with no buyin fees or long-term leases—a smart financial option. Before residency, Bloom associates work with residents and their families to complete comprehensive assessments. The assessment is used to develop an individualized care plan tailored to meet the resident’s personal needs and preferences. Okatie Pines 142 Okatie Center Boulevard N. Hardeeville, SC https://rlcommunities.com/south-carolina/okatie-pinesretirement-community/ For many years, Hardeeville has been known as the “Lowcountry Host” due to the prevalence of traveler-oriented businesses. With its recent population boom, high-end shopping, dining, and an overall outstanding quality of life, it is the ideal location for Okatie Pines Retirement Community. The all-inclusive, 55-plus senior living community is home to those who relish living a luxurious lifestyle, complete with 24/7 service, resort-style dining, and lavish accommodations.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020 109


ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS

Stop! THE! Clock! I DON’T WANT TO GET OLD!

D

oes the face you see in the mirror conflict with who you are inside? Is the “real” you younger, more vibrant, less road weary? Many boomers report this phenomenon and are trying to figure out how to bridge the gap. I am one of them. Most of us who were born during the baby boom (between 1946 and 1964) grew up with a concept of what it looks like to be a senior citizen. I think back to my paternal grandmother in a dowdy cotton house dress with her tightly curled gray hair and paper-thin, veiny hands, rocking her life away in front of the television with her embroidery in her lap. A couple of generations ago, people pretty much accepted their biological fate. No one seemed terribly worried about aging, and it was perfectly normal to slow down and shrivel up at mid-life. As I embark on my sixty-third year living outside the womb, I don’t feel that old, but my reflection serves up a daily dose of reality. I see the familiar face I’ve known all my life but with a few scary alterations. I remember the first time a grocery clerk offered me a senior discount. I was not

h!

nc cru

Sm ash !


particularly happy, even though it saved me a buck or two. Surely I don’t look that old, I thought. And then I glanced at myself in the rearview mirror on the way out of the parking lot…. I’m not sure when it happened—when my eyes got crinkly, my jaw line started sagging, and my fanny fell to the floor. Come to think of it, my hands are now webbed with bulging blue tributaries, much like my grandmother’s. It’s funny/not funny how age creeps up—like the bogeyman, only real. One day we are young, bursting with energy and smooth all over, and the next thing we know, we need some replacement parts and a good ironing. It doesn’t really happen overnight. That would be too great a shock. It happens gradually over time, and we hardly notice … until we do, like getting a glimpse of ourselves in a funhouse mirror—our bodies distorted by gravity and our faces like Google maps on canvas. Thankfully, our eyesight begins to dim around the same time, which makes the view slightly less frightening. Nevertheless, low wattage light bulbs and candlelight are recommended to ward off sudden heart attacks. Oh, and ladies, avoid 10X mirrors except when applying eye makeup. Forget the selfies, too, because the camera sees everything you don’t want to see.

IT HAPPENS GRADUALLY OVER TIME, AND WE HARDLY NOTICE … UNTIL WE DO, LIKE GETTING A GLIMPSE OF OURSELVES IN A FUNHOUSE MIRROR—OUR BODIES DISTORTED BY GRAVITY AND OUR FACES LIKE GOOGLE MAPS ON CANVAS. All jokes aside, age has never been a big deal to me, and I’ve always believed I would age gracefully. But I would be lying to say I’m not bothered by the changes that have sneaked up over the last few years. The aging process is certainly humbling, but here’s the deal. If I had the opportunity to go back in time, I’m not so sure I would. While I wouldn’t mind looking like I did 30 years ago, I would not want to relive that period of my life. Not that it was bad. It wasn’t—just different. Each trip around the sun has held its own style of adventure, and each decade has brought new experiences, new challenges and new rewards. Each year has been the best and the worst, the map on my face showing a wellworn path of laugh lines, tear tracks, shock and surprise—every “fine line” earned. HOW BOOMERS ARE PUTTING THE BRAKES ON AGING No one chooses to look or feel old, although few are excited about the alternative. While we can’t stop time, and most of us wouldn’t if we could, we are blessed with many options for putting the brakes on the aging process. Our faces and bodies are subject to the effects of age, but we don’t have to be content to let the ravages of time be the deciding factor in our quality of life. If a knee starts giving us trouble, it’s no longer a life sentence to sit in a rocker and turn to mush. When our sex lives begin to wane, there are new alternatives for restoring vim and vigor. And if we are dissatisfied with our aging appearance, there isn’t much that can’t be lifted, tucked, tightened, frozen, filled or shrunk. From the availability of plastic surgery and innovative cosmetic enhancement procedures to modern hair coloring products and styling techniques, advanced dentistry, and promising new orthopedic interventions, we don’t have to take aging lying down. But here’s what we do have to do. We must accept where we are in life and make the most of every day. A cheerful countenance and a contented heart will go a long way towards not only an attractive appearance but a personal magnetism that is ageless. I’ve come to realize that what makes the golden years golden is the opportunity to see ourselves as whole and complete—our fading looks only a genetic fraction of our being.  112

MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

Stop! THE! Clock! How to Look and Feel Good at Any Age If you are like me and believe that the next magic cream, lotion or serum is going to restore your youthful good looks, I hate to burst your bubble. Quality skincare products and cosmetics are essential for keeping skin looking its best, but nothing in a jar or tube is going to turn back time or stop the clock. The fountain of youth is a myth. Regardless of how much of the Kool-Aid we drink, much of how we age has been in our hands all along and is still within our control. The key to a more youthful appearance and better quality of life as we age lies within our overall health, which ties in to our most basic lifestyle choices. Here are a few tried-andtrue tips for looking and feeling good at any age: Eat nutritious foods. Go ahead and OD on fruits and vegetables. Looking and feeling your best is an inside-out job, and nutrition is where the magic begins! Drink less alcohol. Want to look and feel years younger? Stop drinking alcohol or cut back. Potential side effects include weight loss, improved skin tone, brighter eyes, and a clear head. Add water. Like a lifeless plant will revive with a drink of water, so our bodies will perk up with proper hydration. Say no to smoking. If smoking doesn’t kill you, it will age you prematurely. There is nothing attractive or youthful about yellow teeth, sallow skin and smoker’s lips. Practice good skin care. Get into a routine of cleansing, exfoliating, and hydrating, and be sure to wear sun protection during daytime hours. Your future face will reward you. Get moving! Even moderate amounts of physical activity can shave years off your age by improving blood flow and increasing oxygen intake. With health benefits too numerous to name, exercise is the most miraculous anti-aging tool you can have in your arsenal. Home in on the positive. Nothing ages us faster than a negative attitude towards life. Look for the good in people and find opportunities for growth within your challenges. For an instant face lift, put on a smile. Practice kindness. In the big picture, the most beautiful people are those who make others feel loved and appreciated. Practice kindness in all that you do and say, and your spirit will remain forever young.


THE NO-NONSENSE INVESTING GUIDE FOR BOOMERS

T

he baby boom generation, often referred to as boomers, includes Americans born between 1946 and 1964. This means that current ages range between 56 and 74 years. If you’re a boomer, you’re either approaching retirement or are already in retirement now. In terms of personal finance, you’ve likely done some retirement planning, specifically with regard to investing. Do a Google search for “how baby boomers should invest for retirement,” and you get more than 14 million results. From a (slightly) cynical perspective, at least 10 million of the articles are junk, to use a non-financial term. Much of the information is either too complex, too abstract, or click bait that scares you into reading the story.

As a general, no-nonsense guide to check that your investment strategy for retirement is on track, here are some pointers: Gauge your risk tolerance. The first step in determining the appropriate investments for you is to define as accurately as possible your tolerance for risk. Gauging your risk tolerance is important because the wrong investment mix can threaten the success of your investment objective. For example, if you’ve underestimated your tolerance for risk and the next major market correction hits, you may be tempted to abandon your strategy for fear of short-term market declines. Since assessing one’s risk tolerance is an objective exercise, it’s wise to use an outside source, such as an investment

advisor or an online risk tolerance questionnaire. Vanguard has a good questionnaire, which can be found online at https://personal.vanguard. com/us/FundsInvQuestionnaire. After just a few minutes of answering questions, the results will suggest an appropriate allocation of stocks and bonds. Also, keep in mind that your risk tolerance can change, usually towards more conservative over time. Estimate how many years before you begin making withdrawals. The number of years you have until withdrawals begin will help to determine an appropriate risk level for your investments. Generally speaking, if you have more than 10 years before withdrawals begin, you may take as much risk with your investments as

ARTICLE BY KENT THUNE

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

115


your risk tolerance allows. However, many boomers are in or near retirement already, which means these investors will generally have less risk capacity (they may not be able to afford the market risk associated with a high allocation to stocks). Depending upon your life expectancy, your allocation to stocks may need to be less than 50 percent of your portfolio. Estimate how many years you will need to make withdrawals. Assuming you will need investment income for

116

MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

the remainder of your life, this planning assumption is essentially an estimate of your life expectancy. Since outliving your money is not likely a part of your retirement plan, it’s wise to assume you will live to at least 90. Family health history does impact your own prognosis for life expectancy. However, the younger you are now, the greater the odds of reaching an older age. For example, according to Businessinsider.com, a 60-year-old woman has an 89 percent chance of reaching 70, a 68 percent chance of reaching 80, and a 32 percent chance of reaching age 90. For a 60-year old man, his odds are 85 percent to hit 70, 58 percent to see 80, and 20 percent to make it to 90. Estimate amount and timing of Social Security benefits. If you haven’t already begun receiving Social Security benefits, it’s smart to get an estimate on this income source. The best way to estimate your Social Security income is to get a statement directly from the source. Log in or create a new account with Social Security at https:// secure.ssa.gov/RIL/SiView.action. You can then get a statement of your account. Keep in mind that delaying the start of your withdrawals will increase your Social Security benefit. A general rule is that the longer you expect to live, delaying Social Security benefits becomes increasingly beneficial.

Factor in other sources of income in retirement. Will you receive income from a pension or from part-time work? Funding all of your retirement income with only your investments can be extremely difficult to achieve. Attempting to do this can delay or make impossible your retirement plan. For example, semi-retirement has become a smart means of retiring earlier without the complete reliance on investment income. Consider working in a part-time job that you enjoy and that supplements your retirement income. Once you know how much income you will draw from other sources, you can estimate how much money you’ll need from your investment accounts to fill in the income gaps. Estimate the required rate of return. The average annualized rate of return you’ll need to achieve your retirement goals will depend upon all of the estimations and assumptions you’ve made from the points above. Since the required rate of return is relatively complex, you may need a calculator for help. It’s easy to find a retirement calculator with a simple Google search. Vanguard, Nerd Wallet and Bankrate.com all have good calculators that can help. Use the 4 percent rule as a guide. If you’re not sure how much you can afford to withdraw or how long your money might last, the 4 percent rule of withdrawal


can help. This rule says that you can begin your withdrawals at a rate of 4 percent of your total balance. Every year, you can increase the dollar amount by 3 percent (to adjust for inflation). Assuming an average rate of return of 5 percent on your investments, your money can last up to 30 years following this rule. For example, if your retirement nest egg is $1 million, you could withdraw 4 percent ($40,000) in year one. In year two, you could withdraw $41,200 ($40,000 plus a 3 percent increase). You could continue to increase the withdrawal rate by 3 percent every year for 30 years. Plan for the order of liquidation. If you have multiple investment accounts, it’s wise to begin withdrawals from taxable brokerage accounts first, before your tax-advantaged accounts, such as a traditional IRA or 401(k). This is because tax-deferred growth is generally superior to taxable growth; therefore, you’ll want to maintain this tax advantage as long as possible. Another tax-related benefit of this liquidation order is that the capital gains taxes from your taxable accounts will be lower than the income taxes on distributions from tax-advantaged accounts. Also, if you die with money in an IRA, the assets will bypass probate and pass directly to your beneficiaries. This can be a simple but productive estate planning tool to help your loved ones after you are gone. Monitor your plan and make changes where necessary. The final step in any smart investment strategy or financial plan is an ongoing one. Life happens and changes occur. Births, deaths, marriages, divorces, tax laws, recessions, inflation, changes in health, lifestyle, and short-term market fluctuations can all impact your investments and your strategy. By monitoring the plan, you can make adjustments when necessary. Don’t base your investment strategies on generalities. Hopefully this article has been helpful for you. However, 1200 words does not an investment plan make. Most of the points made here may depend upon several other assumptions and factors. General rules, no matter how tested and reliable they may appear, are best used as a foundation and not as an actual plan for a unique individual such as yourself! With that said, there is a general rule that is universal for wise investing: Keep it simple! Most investors, retired or not, can get what they need out of a handful of passively-managed, low-cost mutual funds or exchange-traded funds (ETFs). You want to enjoy retirement, not spend your time researching and analyzing investments, right? To paraphrase the famously successful investor, Warren Buffett, investing should be boring, not exciting. Kent Thune is a Certified Financial Planner® and is the owner of a Hilton Head Island investment advisory firm, Atlantic Capital Investments. He is also a personal financial counselor to Marines and other service members on Parris Island. Thune’s financial guidance has been published at The Motley Fool, Yahoo Finance, Kiplinger.com, MarketWatch.com, Nasdaq.com, InvestorPlace. com, and his own blog at TheFinancialPhilosopher.com. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

117


THE THE LOCAL LOCAL

CATCH CATCH ISLAND INSTITUTION HITS MILESTONE AS CATCH 22 STARTS 20TH YEAR ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

O

n an island whose shoreline is literally defined by the tides, it seems at times that its restaurant scene moves in a similar ebb and flow. Eateries open with a flourish, then shutter after a few cycles of tourist seasons. It’s a simple fact of nature on Hilton Head Island that the circle of life keeps turning. Because of this rhythm, when a restaurant stands tall against the crashing waves of a sometimes-fickle culinary world, it tends to stand out. When they make it five years, you take notice. At 10 years, you’re impressed. When a restaurant reaches 20 years on Hilton Head Island, you really begin to wonder what their secret is. The good news is, Gary Duren, who owns Catch 22 along with his wife Penny, doesn’t really keep secrets. “We’ve got a good local following, our food is very consistent and high quality and we have a really good staff that has been with us for quite a while,” he said. On paper it all sounds so simple. But executing on that trio of promises every day has been the defining factor of Catch 22. Start with the local following. There are a handful of places you can point to on the island that are truly “local”— places where you’ll find the same crowd in the high season as you will in the shoulder season. Catch 22 is one of them (although you’ll definitely find a few more new faces in the crowd during the high season). “We know 95 percent of the people who come in here by name,” Duren said. “We have regulars who don’t even need to see a menu. It’s just, ‘Hi Larry, you having the duck?’” Whoever you are, Larry, excellent choice. But then, pretty much everything on the menu is. “People who know their fish know that we get some of the best,” Duren said. “And all of our steaks are USDA prime.” Fresh ingredients are just the beginning, with the multi-talented Chef Robin Van Hofen taking this fresh fish and mouth-watering steak in bold new directions that give even the most habitual regulars a chance to try something new. In addition to nightly specials, the menu is revamped with the turn of every season in order to try out new items. Worry not, they know to keep the staples on to keep the regulars happy. Larry, your duck is safe.

Gary and Penny Duren, owners of Catch 22.

Keeping the regulars happy, not to mention welcoming the horde of visitors who descend on the island every summer, isn’t just a matter of supplying the freshest, most delicious food possible. It’s about the little things. It’s about a smile at the front door, a genuine “welcome back,” to regulars and a chance to enjoy an atmosphere built for locals. “You can go anywhere and go to a chain-type restaurant, but we really like to interact with the guests. It makes them feel like they’re enjoying an experience rather than coming in, eating and getting out,” Duren said. On the front lines of this experience is a staff that knows the menu and the customers like the back of their hand. “Behind the line, in the kitchen and out front, everyone is very good at what they do.” And what they do is create a restaurant that has made the experience a priority, the food an artform and the last 20 years delicious for Hilton Head Island’s discerning locals.  Catch 22 is located at 37 New Orleans Rd. on Hilton Head Island. For more information, visit www.catch22hhi. com or call (843) 785-6261. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020

119


D

Lea Mitchell, owner of Dream Boutique in Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina.

120 MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE


Dream LIV ING THE

DREAM BOUTIQUE NOW OPEN AT SHELTER COVE HARBOUR & MARINA

A R T I C L E BY L I N DA S . H O P K I N S

D

o you ever come across someone and feel an instant rapport, as if being drawn by a strong magnet? Someone whose smile feels like a hug? Whose joy and verve are infectious? Prepare for that kind of powerful encounter when you meet Lea Mitchell, owner of Dream Boutique—the newest women’s clothing store at Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina.

.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y M . K AT

You see, Mitchell has a way about her. While she’s always been drawn to the fashion world, what excites her most is the people she meets and her ability to make a positive difference in someone’s day. “We are more than just a boutique. I want to be a place where women feel free to come in and converse,” she said. “It’s like a no-judgment zone. I want people to have the

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020 121


These all-purpose cosmetic clutchs are perfect for makeup lovers and fashionistas alike.

comfort of knowing they can come to Dream, and it doesn’t have to be about finding something to buy. I try to give people what we call ‘the dream experience.’ You may come in looking for a T-shirt, but you might leave with a friend.” Born and raised in Hardeeville, with family and career ties to Bluffton and Hilton Head Island, Mitchell likes to say that she is semi-local. She has always loved Shelter Cove Harbour and jumped at the opportunity to open her boutique in the gorgeous Mediterranean-style setting. “I love Shelter Cove for more than just its beauty. I love it for its wholeness. It feels like family here,” she said.

122 MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

g g

g

Dream Boutique offers customers an intimate, uncluttered shopping environment with an eclectic yet refined array of women’s clothing unlike any other area boutique. Spring is in the air with this Ted Baker mint floral print skater dxress and evening handbag.

Mitchell’s friendly, no-pressure approach to service is the result of her upbringing, education, experience, and faith. She started her career in nursing, honing her people skills in home health care, practicing connection and compassion, while learning to listen and converse with patients and their families. But fashion always held a fascination, and Mitchell often helped style her clients and their children. “I’ve always had jobs where I was interacting with people, which I love. I think I am a natural helper or nurturer,” she said, explaining how learning to deal with different personalities and meet a variety of needs has translated to retail. In addition to her 10-year nursing career, Mitchell has 12 years of retail experience, working for a number of brands. “One of the biggest things I learned working in retail is that people never remembered me for just helping them find the clothing. They came in because they genuinely wanted to see me—and the bonus was getting an outfit or a bag or whatever they needed,” she said. “I always took pride in building relationships.” When she finally mustered the courage to step out on her own, Mitchell’s goal was to create a boutique that would serve her customers and become a reflection of her unique style and sensibilities. Her initial plan was to start a franchise, but God redirected her path, she said. She and her husband Kevin (whom she says is her “biggest cheerleader”) work as a team. While Kevin works fulltime for the Georgia Ports Authority, he also wears many hats in the business, Mitchell explained. “He’s backoffice; I’m front-of-the-house. I guess you could say he’s the brawn and I’m the beauty.” Lea and Kevin are also parents of four children, ranging in age from nine to 23. While she has plenty of fashion expertise, Mitchell draws heavily on her faith for daily strength and confidence. “The company name is FOAMS Mitchell, LLC. FOAMS stands for faith of a mustard seed,” she explained, citing the biblical parable in which Jesus teaches that the tiny mustard seed quickly grows and spreads into something much greater. “When you have the faith of a mustard seed, that’s all you need to create your dreams,” Mitchell said. “On the tough days, that’s what keeps me going. All I have to do is have the faith of a mustard seed. I tell myself if I exude the love of Christ in everything that I do, all the rest will work itself out.” So, beyond the friendly welcome and inviting setting at Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina, what can you expect to find at Dream Boutique? You will find an intimate, uncluttered shopping environment with an eclectic yet refined array of women’s clothing unlike any other area boutique. You’ll also find a distinctive selection of jewelry, handbags, and other accessories to complete your outfit or add to your wardrobe. And if you’re in the mood


g

The boutique has a distinctive selection of jewelry, handbags, and other accessories to complete your outfit or add to your wardrobe.

to sparkle and shine, you’re in luck because Mitchell isn’t afraid to step out of the box and offer something a little bit flashy. Mitchell serves a full range of customers (women of all ages and sizes, including locals and seasonal visitors), making the selection of merchandise a delightful challenge. “At market, I think about what my customers like and what my picks are and tie them together and make sure they are cohesive,” she said. “I often put out feelers on social media to see what people react to, or I’ll post pictures of what I’m already eyeing. People’s responses help me so that I have a game plan when I get there.” Dream Boutique aims to make your fashion dreams become a reality—changing your outlook on life by changing what you wear. Spring styles are in the house now: think flowy

maxi dresses, stylish resort wear, floral wrap tops, chic tote bags, and much more. Stop in for your Heritage outfits, date night attire, and everyday fashion needs, and be sure to watch for upcoming special events. “Right now, we’re working on a lot of fashionista events for spring and summer as well as some collaborative events with other Shelter Cove Harbour merchants,” Mitchell said. “Stay tuned on Facebook @ Dream Boutique or Instagram @ dream_boutique1.” You can also find listings and descriptions of all the upcoming Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina events at www.ShelterCoveHiltonHead.com.  Dream Boutique is located at 9 Harbourside Lane, Suite A-1 adjacent to the mermaid fountain. Call (843) 715-4020 for directions or more information. Better yet, stop in for the dream experience!

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2020 123


E YOURSE K LF A HOME A M T T A

The

Silver Garden

Murano Glass and Sterling Bracelet $225

GALLERY

Your one-stop source for unique handcrafted jewelry and local art

A

rt can be the painting over your couch or the sculpture in your garden. It can also be a necklace, a photograph, a notecard or an oyster shell. In the hands of a gifted artist, objects and images become works of art that add beauty and joy to our lives. In the simplest terms, art makes us feel good, which is one of the best reasons to step into The Silver Garden Gallery in the Village Exchange on Hilton Head Island, a treasure trove of handcrafted jewelry and local art. While a little off the beaten path, once you find it, prepare for a delightful experience, much like going home at the end of the day. The cozy, cottage-like atmosphere invites you to relax and stay a while, and owners Jim and Linda Saylor will always greet you with a warm smile and treat you like one of the family. If you haven’t stopped by The Silver Garden lately, you may be in for more than a homecoming. Just two years ago, the Saylors took a leap of faith, renovating the space next door to their tiny jewelry nook and adding on an art gallery. “Originally, we thought it would be more of a gallery for my personal paintings,” said Linda, who serves on the board of the Art League of Hilton Head. But after inviting a few area artists to display their works, the Saylors saw an opportunity to create an eclectic art experience for their customers, while supporting local artists in their creative endeavors. The Silver Garden Gallery now proudly displays and sells the works of over 40 artists. “Woodturners, paper quillers, watercolorists, photographers, painters, sculptors, potters, raku—we have just about every medium you can think of,” Linda said.

ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M . K AT

Raku Fish Vessel $280

Burl Wood and Resin Earrings - $325


Hand turned wooden bowls $30 - $150

Sterling Repousse Bracelet $395

Raku $65 - $250

Commission Jade Necklace - SOLD

Pottery $65 - $250

Murano Glass and Sterling Bracelet - $325

Sterling and Ruby Repousse Pendant $325


AN EYE FOR

Something Special B Y FA R R A H L AV E R G H E T TA

L

ooking for something more than the usual jewelry and boring art? Well, look no further than The Silver Garden. Linda and Jim Saylor have grown this small jewelry store into a thriving art and jewelry gallery. Here you will find many unique and beautiful pieces of art. This gallery showcases many pieces that would not be seen in any other jewelry or art store. Linda and Jim dance on the fact that many of the artists’ works are only sold in one place: The Silver Garden. “Some of the local artists whose paintings, pictures, or sculptures are displayed in the gallery are not confident enough in their pieces to enter them in competitions or art shows,” Linda explained. “Jim and I are often astounded.” The Silver Garden’s slogan, “Life is too short to wear department store jewelry,” perfectly sums up what the experience in their shop is like. Pieces are unique and different, and you will never again see anything like them, with beautiful, intriguing designs. From golden guitars to gamesome goldfish, this shop has it all. So, stop at The Silver Garden, and try to go a day without thinking about the art it showcases. Farrah Laverghetta is the Saylor’s 12-year-old granddaughter and an aspiring writer. She has a knack for fiction writing and hopes to write a bestselling novel someday.

Original Acrylic Painting Linda Saylor - $275

Burl Wood, Sterling/14k Gold Pendant Necklace $425

Stingray Hide and Sterling/14k Gold and Marcasite Pendant $425

Original Acrylic Painting Linda Saylor $195

“SAYLORS Dream” Juried Entry Necklace - $1,400

“These are unique, one-of-a-kind pieces” the Saylors’ 12-year-old granddaughter Farrah, visiting from Knoxville, said. “They have found many overlooked artists in the area and some of these artists’ works will be found nowhere else.” While Linda is focused on her own art and growing the gallery, Jim continues to refine his craft, creating highly sought-after, original jewelry, straight from his imagination … or yours. In addition to their initial focus on sterling silver, The Silver Garden now offers gold jewelry and mixed media pieces. “We used to work exclusively with silver, but we expanded into gold and other metals as needed,” Jim said, pointing out that the jewelry you buy today might be worth more tomorrow. Expressing a long-term confidence in precious metals, he said, “I’ve been a long-time believer in the value of silver and gold and that prices will be going up. They have been going up this past year, and I think they are going to continue on that upward trajectory.” As always, Jim loves a challenge. His most recent claim to fame is a sailboat pendant that was accepted into the 2019 Biennale Exhibition, a national juried art show held every other year. “Of 800 applicants, only 100 were chosen, and he was the only jeweler. That was a big deal,” Linda said. When he’s not busy dreaming up his own designs, Jim enjoys getting into the minds of his customers who bring in their own ideas and oftentimes stones, metals or parts for customized pieces. “They sometimes push me outside of my comfort zone, and I end up doing things that I otherwise would not have tried to do,” he said. He’s also the go-to guy for broken or tired jewelry, Linda chimed in. “We remake, restyle, repurpose and repair.” While most of the jewelry offered at The Silver Garden is one-of-a-kind, they do replicate some popular pieces. In addition to online offerings in her etsy.com store, Linda is excited to announce that they just got approved to sell on Amazon. “My plan is to put jewelry there that we have made over and over again that can be molded so that it’s always readily available.”

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS, HAPPY TRAILS Like many successful businesses, The Silver Garden Gallery didn’t start out to be what it is today. What began as a hobby for Linda—mostly beading and repurposing broken jewelry to sell online—turned into a second career for the Saylors when Jim became fascinated with metalwork and design. A bit bored with retirement life, the former corporate CFO turned master silversmith found an outlet for his creativity and problem-solving skills, while Linda, a former commercial real estate executive, continued exploring her innate love of the arts. In 2012, when the opportunity first presented itself in the form of a small vacant storage space, the Saylors transformed it into a charming retail store and workshop where they continued producing unique, customized


wearable art. News spread, mostly by word of mouth, as customers seeking the unusual found their way back again and again. Today, with the addition of the art gallery, The Silver Garden Gallery has become the Saylors’ home away from home, and they truly want you to feel comfortable there too. “It’s got the character that I like. It’s homey, and you feel like you’re welcome here,” Linda said. “Come on in, help yourself, try things, wander around.” “We encourage people to open the cases and look at the pieces,” Jim added. And there’s on-site entertainment too. Where else are you going to get to see an artist in action? “People like walking in and watching us actually making the jewelry. I don’t think you can find that any other place here,” Linda said. Plans for this spring include outdoor events where other featured artists will be working on-site as well, she hinted.

Jim and Linda Saylor

“A week doesn’t go by when somebody doesn’t come in and make the comment that we are the most unique shop on the island,” Jim said. “I feel like it’s different from anything else you could see. They’ve become so confident in their work that they can really be different,” Farrah observed. Drop by The Silver Garden Gallery Monday-Friday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. or on Saturday from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Meet the family, see what’s new and different, and make yourself at home.  The Silver Garden Gallery is located in The Village Exchange, 32 Palmetto Bay Rd., Suite 3A. For more information, call (407) 595-2119. For news and upcoming events, follow on Facebook @thesilvergarden.


A Q&A Series with Local Artists

I S CIANS MU in bathrooms M U S I C I AN :

CANDACE

WOODS ON

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y M . K AT

What’s your sign? Taurus Most underrated song that, in your opinion, should be a classic? My original song, “FREE” Biggest compliment you’ve ever gotten from a fan? I reminded them of Ella Fitzgerald. What do you sing in the shower? I don’t sing in the shower. Favorite cereal? Corn Chex What is your favorite piece to perform? “Angel,” by Aretha Franklin At what venue do you most like to perform? Anywhere where people love music

t

rtis tional A Interna mmy for Best Gra Awards e Indie Soul and Th

Do you tweet, gram, or book? What’s your handle? All three. Finish this verse as if it were the hook of a song: “Sally went down to the bayou...” “To check out the scene; only to find the man of her dreams.” Who would star as you in the epic retelling of your life on film? Sanaa Lathan First instrument you learned to play? Viola Song you were thrilled to finally master? “Tonight” What do you wish you knew more about? Music business digital copyrights infringements

Most requested song at shows? “Cry,” Etta James

What animal do you most identify with? My dog Hope, Shih tzu

First concert you attended? Luther Vandross

If you got super-famous and had to change your name, what would your new name be? CW

Favorite artist? I like all the legends of R&B soul.

Place you go to get away from it all? Florida

What famous musician would you love to sing a duet with? Stevie Wonder

Special thanks to SERG and The Whiskey Room for hosting our photoshoot. Candace's dress compliments of Chella D.


MARCH 2020 3-4

1

4

CELTIC THUNDER’S EMMET CAHILL

CUSTOM DESIGN EVENT Forsythe Jewelers Appointments required! Call 843.671.7070 or Andrea@ forsythejewelers.biz

Arts Center of Coastal Carolina Tickets are $65 843-842ARTS(2787)

8-9

9

FULL MOON KAYAK TOUR

10

5-7

11

15

17

18

25TH ANNUAL WINGFEST Shelter Cove Community Park 11am-5pm All event proceeds benefit The Carmines Family Recreation Scholarship Fund

23 22

25

HARBOUR TOWN SPRING FEST PANCAKE Harbour Town BREAKFAST 11am-6pm Skillets Cafe from Car Display: 12-4pm 7am-3pm Deas Guyz Benfits CAPA of Concert; 1-4pm Beaufort Children’s $10 breakfast special Activities; 1-4pm ($5 for children) (843) 842-1979

30 GREGG RUSSELL CONCERT Under the Liberty Oak in Harbour Town 7:30-9pm seapines.com/events

130

MARCH 2020

C2 MAGAZINE

31

Arts Center of Coastal Carolina 11am-1pm Admission to the festival is free (843) 686-3945 EXT. 205

14

37TH ANNUAL HILTON HEAD ISLAND ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE 3-6pm, Rain or Shine Pope Avenue Don’t miss this event featuring 15 marching bands, horses, dogs, floats, friends and fun! www.hiltonheadireland.org

29

Island Rec Center 3-7pm

77

YOUTH ARTSFEST

HILTON HEAD ISLAND’S WINE & SHAMROCK FOOD FESTIVAL HUNT “PUBLIC South Beach TASTING” 10am Harbour Town Remember to wear Yacht Basin your green! Ages 12 and under only, hiltonheadwine please. andfood.com.

SHOPS AT SEA PINES CENTER FARMERS MARKET Every Tuesday (in season)! 10am-2pm

Outside Hilton Head See Hilton Head’s natural waterways from a perspective that few get to experience!

6 FOOD TRUCK FRIDAY

26

21 SPRING FLING OPEN HOUSE Branches and Gifted Hilton Head Village at Wexford 10am-5pm Refreshments, Raffles and Giveaways!

28 28

ZONTA’S SIP FOR A CAUSE

SPRING SHOP HOP

USCB Hilton Head Campus 5:30-8pm $30/advanced $40 at door

Village at Wexford 2-5pm An afternoon of fun for the whole family

SAVE THE DATE! PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE Port Royal Plantation Sunday, April 5th, 2020 1-3:30pm

www.villageatwexford.com


CH2: Celebrate Hilton Head - March 2020  

Candace Woodson, Dream Boutique, Guide for Boomers, Stop the Clock, Teresa Kunich, Belmont Insurance, Not from the Mayors, Fit Female, Model...

CH2: Celebrate Hilton Head - March 2020  

Candace Woodson, Dream Boutique, Guide for Boomers, Stop the Clock, Teresa Kunich, Belmont Insurance, Not from the Mayors, Fit Female, Model...

Profile for celebrat