CH2 Magazine: October 2021

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CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

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OCTOBER 2021

THE ART OF THE MATTER

MEET THE LOWCOUNTRY LOCALS WHO ARE KEEPING LIFE COLORFUL FOR THE REST OF US

HOW TO FALL FESTIVAL SELECTING A REAL ESTATE AGENT

OCTOBER 2021

THE KEY TO YOUR NEW HOME

SALUTING THE OFT-UNSUNG GLUE THAT HOLDS TOGETHER ANY GREAT BAND – THE DRUMMER.

CH2 SPECIAL SECTION

THE LOCAL HOME EXPERTS



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22 THE ART OF THE MATTER Meet the Lowcountry locals who are keeping life colorful for the rest of us

WHAT’S INSIDE

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ART THAT DOESN’T MATCH THE SOFA: GET TO KNOW ROBIN ROSS

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FOR ANN DEVLIN CONNORS ART IS A SHELL GAME

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ASHLEY HAHN: ELEVATING US WITH ART

THE BEAT GOES ON

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ON INSPIRATION AND ART WITH KATIE MOORE HOWSON

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THE BIG BAND THEORY: EVOLUTION BIG BAND IS HELPING THE COMMUNITY ONE TOETAPPER AT A TIME.

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HOME FEATURE: CALM, COOL AND CONNECTED AT MOSS CREEK

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SELECTING A REAL ESTATE AGENT: THE KEY TO YOUR NEW HOME

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N HANCE: TAKE A FRESH LOOK AT YOUR KITCHEN

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C2 SPECIAL SECTION: YOUR HOME EXPERTS

Saluting the oftunsung glue that holds together any great band – the drummer.

64 C2 FASHION: HOW TO FALL FESTIVAL Autumn brings one of the most anticipated times of the year for Lowcountry residents – Festival Season!

O N O U R C OV E R S

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STRONG, COMMITTED, READY TO SERVE

ON THE CH2 COVER Local drummer and real estate agent, Chip Larkby.

ON THE CB2 COVER How to Fall Festival featuring looks from Copper Penny

Photography by M.KAT.

Photography by M.KAT.

Island Realtor®, industry leader Cindy Creamer



GENIUSES AT WORK

EDITOR'S NOTE

Vibe Manager Maggie Marie Washo

OCTOBER 2021

play

Head of Quietly Judging Carolyn Hunter Kostylo Master of Coin Marion Elizabeth Bowser Rainmaker Kim Conrad Crouch Master Handshaker “Just Kandace” Wightman Lead Door Knocker Morgan O'Banion Director of Attracting Talent Kaila Jeffcoat Mascot in Training Buoy Conrad Crouch Pritchard Mr.Back in the Office Jevon Daly The Gatekeepers Greta Von Bowser Vincent Von Bowser The Cut & Paste Crew Jeff Cline Catherine Davies Aspiring Novelists Cheryl Alexander Amy Bartlett Jesse Blanco Courtney Hampson Linda S. Hopkins Barry Kaufman Paula Magrini John McCann Lisa Sulka Tim Wood Lighting Experts M. Kat Photography Krisztian Lonyai Photography by Anne John McManus Find Us Here PO Box 22949 Hilton Head Island, SC 29925 843.689.2658 m.washo@celebratehiltonhead.com

ARTS + MUSIC

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ast October, we put out our first Arts + Music issue, and it was such a big hit that we decided to keep it running— perhaps in perpetuity, like the Pet issue every February. Since last year’s issue was more heavily slanted towards musicians, we overcompensated with more visual artists this year. We kicked off this edition with a Q&A featuring six artists who work in a variety of mediums. One of the questions we asked each of them was what they think an artist’s role is in society. Amiri Farris had this to say: “Art is a communication tool that we can all use in our daily lives.” Debi West reiterated: “…as an artist, you tell your story with every mark you make.” This got me thinking about how CH2 magazine is kind of a scrapbook—an art project that my team puts together every month. The photos are taken and glued together with words, and we make many of the pages come to life now on our Instagram and Facebook pages. It really is a 132-page art project that we create out of nothing. EVERY. SINGLE. MONTH. When I have the time to look back and flip through what is now more than 15 years’ worth of monthly art projects, this magazine tells a lot of people’s stories, and in a greater sense, shows how the Lowcountry and our towns have evolved over the years. It’s basically like an ongoing cave painting … in a very long cave. Speaking of long, ongoing things, one fun project we attempted for this issue was to get as many local singers as we could (in a three week period) to make up a line to a song about nothing and sing it to us live without knowing anything but the one line before theirs. We kicked it off with Gregg Russell under the Liberty Oak, and over 25 verses later, ended up with Cranford & Friends at Coligny Plaza. You can find the lyrics and featured songwriters to this crazy made-up song on page 54. But to really experience it the way it was meant to be, head over to our Facebook page and watch the “music video,” which is a term we use loosely.

Be sure to follow us on Social Media

One of our bigger features this month is “And the Beat Goes On,” a tribute to local drummers. Chip Larkby, drummer for Cornbred (and local real estate agent in his spare time) is featured on our CH2 cover. Head on over to page 64 for this month’s fashion spread, “How to Fall Festival,” featuring looks from Copper Penny that you can pair with any outdoor event this month. It also reads like a calendar, with the details of what and where for most of the bigger festivals in October. Welcome to our second annual Arts + Music feature. Enjoy our cave painting of the month.

MAGGIE WASHO Publisher / Editor-in-Chief

Instagram - @ch2hhimag Facebook - facebook.com/ch2magazine TikTok - @ch2mag YouTube - youtube.com/celebratehiltonhead



Meet the Lowcountry locals who are keeping life colorful for the rest of us.

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rt is everywhere. And if you know where to find it, you will. The act of creation manifests itself in thousands upon thousands of ways, in every imaginable context. It’s in the stroke of a brush, the cadence of a poem or the rhythm of a song. For some of us, it’s an outlet. This stretching of the creative muscles is a way to break free from the monotony of day-to-day life, if only for a moment. For a select few, however, this creativity is a calling. Rather than a respite from the norm, creativity is the norm, and art their bread and butter. Our little slice of paradise would not be the same without their inspiration and brilliance, and for making our lives a little brighter we salute them here.

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colin

NOONAN

Did you always know/think you were going to be an artist, or is this a new venture? Art has always been a big part of my life. I have over 20 years of painting experience, but I have recently started tattooing as well. Where do you personally find inspiration? I love being able to go down to the beach. What role do you think artists play in society? Artists reveal new worlds and connect us to old worlds. Where can we find your artwork locally? The Sugar Shack Canvas and Ink Tattoo in Bluffton. Who is your favorite local artist? I’m lucky to call several very talented people my friends.

ARTICLE by BARRY KAUFMAN | PHOTOGRAPHY by M.KAT | DESIGN by JEFF CLINE

amiri

GEUKA FARRIS

Did you always know/think you were going to be an artist, or is this a new venture? I always knew I was going to be an artist and have been a Professional artist for 30 years. I received my Master of Arts degree from the Savannah College of Art and Design and consider myself a multi-disciplinary artist. I have shown in galleries and museums locally and internationally, and I also have shown my large scale public art works and murals internationally. Where do you personally find inspiration? I find inspiration in the everyday. I find it best to get out of my element or comfort zone, take a walk and ride a bike, and get inspired by nature, sounds, people, etc. I also try to check out new exhibits and museums. What role do you think artists play in society? Art influences society by changing opinions, instilling values and translating experiences, visual and creative. Art, in this sense, is a communication tool we can all use in our daily lives. Art is everything, and I believe art and creativity can be found in everything we do and see. Everyone is creative in something; even an accountant has to be creative with numbers. Where can we find your artwork locally? You can find my work at The Red Piano Art Gallery on Calhoun Street, the upcoming Bluffton Arts and Seafood Festival, the Coastal Discovery Museum on Hilton Head Island, and the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah. Who is your favorite local artist? Some of my favorite local and international artists include Jonathan Green, Hung Liu, Robert Rauschenberg, Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden, Keith Haring, Basquiat, and Mr. Brainwash. C2 MAGAZINE

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debi WEST

Did you always know/think you were going to be an artist, or is this a new venture? I’ve been an artist for as long as I can remember! I was the little girl who was leaving her marks everywhere … from the steam on the shower walls, to the dust on the car, to picking up sticks and “drawing” in the dirt, to finding the crayons and using the dining room walls for my creations! Needless to say, I was often in trouble for my mark-making excursions. It wasn’t until we moved from KC to Philly in 1975 that I was applauded for my marks because that was when I had my first public school art class experience. It was life changing to nine-year-old me because it was when I realized that I might have some talent, and this new knowledge literally shaped my life. I ended up studying studio art at USC, and after receiving my BFA, I worked as a graphic designer for a few years until I realized I was meant to be in the art room.

amos HUMMELL

Did you always know/think you were going to be an artist, or is this a new venture? My inner caveman was expressing itself on the playroom walls by age five. So, it was evident the DNA was primed and glazed. Where do you personally find inspiration? Points of light glint off just about everything. Some beam into the brainium itself, and those become the aha moments, big and small. What role do you think artists play in society? Artists exude the essence of cosmic backpacker, and that serves as a muse for others who should go exploring, too. Artwork serves as an inspirational totem. Where can we find your artwork locally? Hilton Head Art League, and in Old Town Bluffton at La Petite Gallerie. Who is your favorite local artist? Of all time, that artist would be the girl I married, Lynne.

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My company, Crystal Collage ART Wears, has taken off, and I’ve been blessed to take my jewelry-making skills on the road, working at juried art festivals across the country. I’m inspired by my customers and love seeing their joy when I create a custom piece specifically for them!

Art

When I moved to Atlanta in 1992, I started my art ed career, and art education became my passion. I was an art teacher and art department chair for 25 years in Gwinnett County, Ga. and worked hard to earn my M.A.Ed., EdS and my “almost” Ph.D. I’m also nationally board certified, so I sort of take this teaching thing a little seriously, lol! I still teach classes out of the Art League and the Arts Center, but I retired from the classroom in 2017. My educational consulting company is thriving, so my new passion is in mentoring teachers. Check out my website: WESTpectations.com. To answer the initial question, I’ve always been an artist and art has fueled me on every level. Where do you personally find inspiration? I think I find inspiration in the everyday happenings that surround me. Every day is a gift, and so I embrace moments. I had a one-woman art show at the Hilton Head Library two years ago where I exhibited 52 works and called the show “Recycled Memories.” My paintings, drawings, photos and jewelry were all works that I’ve created over the past 50 years, and they came to fruition during this exhibit. Through mixed media and collage, my show shared visual snippets of my life. From here I began focusing more on my custom, hand-stamped jewelry and found that by merging text into my work, I could tell my story as well as my customers’ stories via this wearable art form.

What role do you think artists play in society? Art is everywhere! It’s the house we live in, the bed we sleep in, the clothes we wear, the car we drive, the movies we watch, the music we listen to, the chair we sit in, and the utensils we use to eat our food. Without it, we’re literally naked on a beach. I said that to a class of students one day, and one of my kiddos said, “Well I don’t like the beach.” So, evidently without art, he’s naked in the woods! The point is art is what documents our history. Art is an expression of oneself; so, as an artist, you tell your story with every mark you make. To create is what defines the human race. I think it’s safe to say that art can be the most important subject taught in schools (especially when it’s taught correctly). Art teaches creative and divergent thinking and problem solving, and students learn that hard work pays off! Students explore and achieve through trial and error. There is never just one “right” answer, and students are encouraged to think outside of the box. And when we consider that 85 percent of our current job force is seeking creative thinkers, then how can we ever think it would be okay to dismiss the arts from any child’s education? Forgive me; I just went on one of my rants about the necessities of art, so I guess it’s obvious that I think art is extremely important and plays a huge part in society; in all forms, art is life! Art is definitely my life! Where can we find your artwork locally? I exhibit at the Art League of Hilton Head monthly (I’m a board member), and I currently have work in their gallery as well as in our current members’ exhibit at the library. And I just created a cool pair of mixed media custom art boots for the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina for their upcoming auction supporting the Kinky Boots production! And if you look at the wrists, arms, fingers, ears and necks of many locals, chances are you’ll see some of my jewelry adorning these limbs. My goal is to create a unique piece of “art wear” for every local on the island! Go big or go home! And if you really want to see my work, come and visit me in my studio/garage! Who is your favorite local artist? I have several favorite local artists, so this is a tough question for me. Being an ALHH member I’m blessed with seeing the work of over 100 phenomenal artisans on a monthly basis: Judy Blahut, Dennis Lake, Alex Sharma, Joan Moreau McKeever, and Jami Wright are the first to come to mind, but the list is long! We have such a thriving vibrant artist community here on the island, so I highly recommend that everyone go check out all our galleries. You won’t be disappointed! C2 MAGAZINE

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greg JOHN

Did you always know/think you were going to be an artist, or is this a new venture? I always wanted to be a musician. Guitar mainly, but despite massive effort, I was never really good enough to play in public. Then I picked up the harmonica and that came more naturally. I was able to play in bands and jump in with other real musicians. Music is art, and it lit a desire to explore more physical art, which led to driftwood when I lived on a salt marsh, and I would go for hikes with my wife and kids. We started collecting cool driftwood pieces that we lugged back to the house. We ended up with so many that we created a “driftwood garden.” Then, one of them looked like it would make a cool lamp. I made the lamp, showed it to a Hilton Head interior designer, and she wrote me a check on the spot! I thought hmmm, this is pretty cool. That’s when I really started to look for unique pieces and make items to sell and place in our home about four to five years ago. The oyster crosses are a newer endeavor I started with my daughter within past year. Where do you personally find inspiration? God. His creation is mind-blowing to me! The “natural world” is incredible, bizarre, beautiful, intense, exciting, and just unbelievably magnificent. Physically, the tidal creeks and salt marshes are my favorite places. What role do you think artists play in society? Artists, depending on their craft, create, enhance, or transform a part of the world in a way that gives society a new or different way of seeing or experiencing that particular medium. So, artists do a lot for society. They spark curiosity, ignite wonder, transform living and workspaces, provide entertainment, offer solutions to problems, pull us away from the mundane, open our minds, and promote creativity. Where can we find your artwork locally? Instagram and Facebook @saltycoastdesign. Sometimes the Bluffton General Store. Usually, I do commission pieces that go straight to the client. Who is your favorite local artist? Bluffton is full of many incredible artists so this is tough, but I will say there are two that I have been influenced by the most: Amos Hummell and Roberto Rodriguez at Wildwood Rescue.

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Art


Did you always know/think you were going to be an artist, or is this a new venture? I have always been artistic and felt the need to create. I regret not pursuing art in college. Sometime during the 2007/08 economic crisis, my mom told me to paint a crab on an old canvas. It sold the same week. I was hooked: the act of painting made me feel good; it made another person feel good; and I even made a little money. It’s become my therapy. One day, I hope to paint full time. Where do you personally find inspiration? Most of my art is related to the Lowcountry where I grew up. When I look at oyster shells, I see a myriad of colors. Crabs, shrimp, heron, and lots of other animals become my subjects, as well as the Lowcountry landscape. Since I do not have a lot of time to photograph, I do use friend’s Instagram feeds for a lot of inspiration along with other open source sites. Once I have an image, I rearrange colors inspired by interior design. What role do you think artists play in society? Artists are crucial in making society aware of our feelings. Art is an experience, even if it is just because it goes on a living room wall. Simple or complex doesn’t matter. It is about having a moment of awareness. Where can we find your artwork locally? My work can be found at Eggs ’n’ tricities in Bluffton, and Merchants on Bee in Savannah. I do not have a website … I am just too busy running a restaurant and being a mom these days. Who is your favorite local artist? This is hard, but for me, it is Louanne Laroche. Her work is a testimony to the many Lowcountry people who were not seen in the past. Working in mixed media, her art is layered, complex, and full of color. It definitely evokes emotion.

margaret PEARMAN

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Robin Sue Ross surrounded by her paintings at her home in Bluffton.

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ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

GET TO KNOW ROBIN ROSS AND JUST SAY NO TO BORING BEIGE

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here are two ways of seeing the world: the average way and the artists’ way. To the average person, a tarnished silver pot is just that: a tarnished silver pot— an object that maybe sits on a table or gets stashed away in the attic, largely unnoticed and unappreciated. Crawl inside Robin Ross’s brain, and suddenly that same pot transcends its concept or potential use and comes to life in a celebration of contour and color. “I see the beauty in normal, everyday things,” Ross said. “We’re used to flash and glitter everywhere … but there is beauty in something tangible and something simple. The artworks I like most are paintings of things you see every day.”

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Ross is a relative newcomer to the Lowcountry art scene, but she is no stranger to the world of art. After a lifetime as a performing musician, when Covid granted her some extra time at home, her passion for painting (a talent she stumbled upon in college) was rekindled. Originally from Ohio, Ross attended Kent State University. “I was always into the creative stuff. My mom attended the Cleveland Institute of Art, and at 91, she’s still a watercolorist. My grandmother was a musician, and I had piano lessons at six years old. So, I thought I was going to be a classical piano performance major—for one minute,” she said with a laugh. “I got accepted into college for that but then discovered at 17 years old, my first time away from home, I just did not have the self-discipline to sit there for 12 hours [a day] to become a classical piano performance major.” Next, Ross’s roommate, who was an art major, got mono. “She was sick in the bed, crying, with projects due. So, I helped her finish them. It was only one or two, but I was like, this is cool!” Ross said. “It was another avenue for the creativity that somehow has to come out. I changed my major to art and graduated with a B.F.A. in visual design.” Not quite sure how her diploma would translate in the job market, Ross went on to earn a teaching degree, after which she taught elementary art for a year. It simply wasn’t for her, she admitted. “I was so gung-ho I went to the YMCA with the idea of opening an art school. But at $5 a kid, it didn’t pay the bills. So, I had to go get a ‘real’ job,” she said. She moved to Virginia to be near family and got back to her musical roots, auditioning for a band. Performing Pat Benatar’s “Hit Me With Your Best Shot,” she was hired and went on the road, supporting herself as a musician and working various day jobs to make ends meet. Along the way, on the twisty-turny road of life, Ross had her share of challenges and heartaches, including being

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widowed twice. She moved to Hilton Head Island from New Jersey when her second husband, Ron, who had been diagnosed with a rare form of Leukemia, suggested moving south. After his passing in 1998, Ross found love again, three years later marrying her current husband and musical partner, Greg Ross. You can catch the Rosses at North End Pour House Wednesdays from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. and at LuLu Kitchen Thursday evenings from 6:30-9:30 p.m. FROM MUSICIAN TO ARTIST While still a performing musician, Ross is in transition mode. “I’m trying to phase out of the music just a little bit. Greg is gearing towards a tasteful cocktail piano gig, while I’d like to focus more on my art. But we’re still pretty busy locally with our music, performing in bars and restaurants three to four nights a week as well as providing entertainment for corporate events and resorts.” Picking up a tube of paint from her table, she said, “This little wrinkly tube of paint lived in a box in the attic of every home I’ve lived in for 43 years. It was upstairs with these ancient old things,” she said, pointing out brushes, more


tubes of paint, and other art tools, some of which were handed down from her mother. “Some of these things are 60 years old. I just had them in a box.” Ross’s impressionistic style is enhanced by her bold, imaginative use of color. And while she can paint anything that strikes her fancy, her specialties are landscapes and animals, including pets and wildlife. One of her biggest commission items to date has been pet portraits, which is where it all began. “When Lucy died, I went upstairs and got the paints.” By the way, Ross is our editor-in-chief Maggie Washo’s stepmom (and for any new readers, Lucy was Washo’s beloved Bernese Mountain Dog.) “That’s when the floodgates opened. It started with the Lucy portrait, and then everybody and his brother wanted one of their pet. So, I was doing a bunch of those, and they were fun.” Next, she painted a series of barnyard animals. “I don’t know why I went off on that tangent,” Ross said. “No one’s going to buy the cows or the ‘demonic’ goat…. It would be wonderful to say, I only paint what I love, but I’m trying to make this a career of sorts. I want to get paid for it.” Therein lies the artist’s dilemma. “You don’t want someone to buy your art because it matches the slipcovers on the sofa. But sometimes you have to do that. “Do you have anything in a beige?” “Why yes, I do!” she said, with a laugh. “I would want people to hang art on their walls that takes them someplace or moves them somehow or reminds them of something—like listening to a favorite old song— rather than buying a painting that matches their sofa.” DIGGING THE PROCESS Ross typically starts with a photo. “Everywhere I look, I’m like oh! I want to paint that. I have a collection of photos on my phone and my camera—probably a year’s worth of work,” she said. “Then I do a pencil sketch or value studies to determine where darker colors are going to be. But I don’t always do that. Sometimes I’ll just sketch right on the canvas and block in big areas of color. It’s layers and layers.” Ross says she enjoys the process but it’s never easy. “When you’re looking at this big, empty white canvas and you want to portray a mood or an emotion, it’s a struggle to translate it. So, you do remove yourself from the world. When you’re focused on it, all the stuff that you would be worried about is somewhere else. The hours go by and somehow, all of a sudden, it’s 4 o’clock in the afternoon and you have this thing that’s finished.” Ross insists that anyone can learn to paint if they have an interest. “Music and art are both creative expressions. It does take a talented individual to become good at their craft, but the fundamentals, anybody can learn,” she said. “If you are good at looking at something and being able to translate it so that it looks like what you’re looking at, that’s the talent part. But anybody could become proud of what they do. When I start my Zoom art school, it’s going to be in the evenings where there will be wine involved, of course. We’ll do it step by step.” Meanwhile, Ross encourages you to begin noticing what’s around you. “The next time you go walking and you look across the lagoon, really notice how beautiful it is. Look around with a sense of permanence. Take a photo,” she suggests. And if you’re not up to painting it yourself, get in touch. While she won’t guarantee it will match your sofa, she promises to bring it to life!  To see more of Ross’s art or request a commission, visit robinsueross.com. C2 MAGAZINE

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Article by Tim Wood

For Ann Devlin Connors Art is a Shell Game

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ow do you capture so much detail while being so vague? How do you fit so much life into such a tiny space? These are the questions that Ann Devlin Connors gets every day from her growing legion of fans, marveling at her oyster shell portraits that perfectly capture the aura of everyone from strangers to her beloved community of local bands. Long-time island musicians know Connors as a native groupie, the superfan who is everyone’s unofficial PR manager, promoting their work tirelessly on Facebook. “I have been going to shows since I was barely legal getting in to see Silicone Sister,” 35-year-old Connors said. “It’s how I met my husband, Mick. We connected over that love of music.” Jevon Daly and Craig Coyne performed at their wedding. Chippy the Hippie got ordained to officiate the ceremony. But few knew Connors was a superstar artist in waiting. Growing up on Hilton Head, then-Ann Devlin was well on her way to becoming an artistic child prodigy. She won acclaim as a high school freshman, an award winner for her painstakingly detailed pencil drawings. “It was just meticulous, hours, weeks, trying to nail the perfect scale. That’s what I thought art was at the time,” Connors said. “I remember the feeling of seeing my mom hang my award certificate on the wall. That felt like success.” A series of adult traumas led Connors away from creating, more focused on merely surviving. “The pencil work was so particular. It just wasn’t where I was with life. I didn’t want to wallow in the details,” she said. In her mid-20s, retreat to her mom’s Ridgeland home led Connors to a creative rebirth. “I loved the ocean, took so many jogs along nature trails at that time, and I just reconnected with a passion,” she said. “I loved reading about mermaids, the beauty, the mystery, the magic behind the stories. And I thought, ‘What if I could create a tiny little treasure, a mermaid inside a shell?’” That personal challenge led her away from pencil work. She needed to create in a more fluid manner. “Paint allows me to be more impressionistic; it’s more about the feeling than the scale or the exact shade. I realized that creating for me now was more about how you feel when you look at what you see.” She painted a faceless mermaid and posted it online. Soon, she was asked if she’d be up for trying a similar approach, painting portraits from photos. The shells were initially a one-time gimmick, but she found the hunt for the perfect backdrop to be an instigator of creativity. “Old Oyster Factory dumps all their shells under their back stairs. I’d bring a Walmart bag, grab a bunch of different textures, different colors, clean off all the muck and just stare at them until the right one for the next portrait jumped out at me,” Connors said—once again, leaning on more of a spiritual than literal connection. “I just found not focusing on nailing the eyes, the nose, the detail, I could focus more on the detail of what makes moments special. That began to resonate with some folks. To see the reaction of how I capture a feeling, a moment in their life, just makes me so happy.”

Connors has been her happiest pairing two passions. She painted shells of each member of Shakey Bones as a gift to the band, which led Daly to commission her to do a series of shell portraits of local legends—from Frederick Freon and Coyne to Martin Lesch and John Cranford—each capturing their signature style in stunningly nebulous detail. “Supporting and celebrating the local music scene, especially during COVID, was everything to Mick and me,” she said. She next plans to tackle a series of local chefs and bartenders, an homage to her husband’s world (Mick is chef at Palmetto Hall Country Club). For more information about Connors’ art, search for Lowcountry Reflections on Facebook or call or text Connors at (843) 298-3911.

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Lilly B.

Ashley Hahn in her Bluffton home, surrounded by her work.

Light in the Chapel

Bride to Be


A RT ICLE BY B E CCA E DWARDS

Ashley Hahn: E L E VA T I N G

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rt can elevate the artist and the viewer alike. In his book Concerning the Spiritual in Art, Wassily Kandinsky wrote, “The spiritual life, to which art belongs and of which she is one of the mightiest elements, is a complicated but definite and easily definable movement forwards and upwards.” Local artist Ashely Hahn feels a spiritual connection both in her artistic process and in capturing “the beauty God has provided us,” she said. “Whether it is a drawing or painting, I get lost in my artwork. Stress just falls away, and I find my Zen place. With everything going on in the world, this is a beautiful thing. Whether the subject matter is a portrait or a landscape, I believe everything we see is a gift from God, and I want my artwork to exude that. And I want to put a smile on other people’s faces and give them something to enjoy.” Hahn went on to explain, “A commission at first feels like a job, but when I get a clear vision in my head, that vision becomes a piece of art.” Hahn’s art career has been a delicate balance between honoring both her talent and her commitment to her family. “I studied architecture at Clemson University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in design. I worked for an architecture firm in Bluffton, but then came babies, and I knew my focus needed to be on my son and daughter.” But when her daughter Ava was about three years old and her son Warner was about six years old, Hahn got the idea to do their portraits, which reawakened her love of detailed renderings. “I have been painting really my entire life, but when I worked at the architecture firm, I truly enjoyed beautifying and drawing the clients’ homes more so than the business end of things or actually building the space.”

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Hahn went on to say she is thankful for her architecture background because it trained her to be very precise with her renderings when it comes to scale, realistic portrayal, depth, shading and shadowing. “In architecture school and when I worked in the business, I really had to fine tune my drawing skills and be very exact. I also incorporate math into my work because of my background. People say you will never use algebra when you are older, but I use it every time I sit down to work on my art. When working from a photograph, I correlate it to a bigger scale on the paper to make it more proportionate. Maybe it is a two-to-one scale, but I set pinpoints and do the rest by eye.” Explaining her artistic process, Hahn added, “I work with the client to select a photograph. It’s important to select the right one. Not all photos work. I then go into the basic outline.” Next, Hahn homes in on the subject’s eyes. “Not to sound cliché, but the eyes really are the window to the soul,” she said. “I spend the most time getting the eyes right because the eyes are what convey the subject’s emotion at the time of the photograph, and that’s what needs to be captured.” Mary Bach’s husband Keith commissioned Hahn to paint a portrait of their son Sammy and daughter Lilly. “I could not believe it,” Bach said. “If you put the photos beside the drawings, it’s dead on. I mean it’s crazy. It was the best present Keith could have ever given me. I remember taking those photos. Lilly is holding this doll my mom gave her, and Sammy’s hair is standing up straight in the back. I now have those moments forever. There are a million things I could say about Ashley and her talent, but I’ll sum it up with one word: spiritual.” Mark Cooke had a similar experience with Hahn painting a portrait of his and his partner’s pug Cooper. “I started the process with Ashley and doing the portrait a few months before Cooper passed away. Cooper was deaf and blind, having problems with food, and we were essentially his protectors. I wanted to give my partner a rendering of Cooper as a gift,” Cooke explained.

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Cooper, who passed away one month before his seventeenth birthday, was almost like a mascot at Windmill Harbor’s tennis club. “Ashley is not a passerby type of person. Every Thursday when she would play tennis, I would walk by with Cooper. She would put down her racket, say hello and turn Cooper’s head from side to side studying him. It was as if because he was her subject, she was going to do everything in her power to connect with him and get the drawing right. “I look at Cooper’s drawing every day, and it’s like he is saying, ‘Thank you. This is a very cool thing that you did.’ It is very moving and precious to us,” Cooke continued. “With Ashley, each subject is precious, and her work is beyond art. I remember walking by the tennis courts one day and she said, ‘Cooper’s ready,’ and for a minute I paused and then realized what she was saying. Cooper’s portrait is one of our dearest possessions, and it will be handed down to the people we love and be kept safe just as we kept Cooper safe during his life and sickness.” Hahn admits she feels honor bound to get her commissions perfect for this very reason. Because time can feel fleeting, “a portrait captures a person or a pet in that moment and becomes something timeless that can be passed down from generation to generation,” she said. “There is something so special and powerful about a hand-drawn or handpainted piece of artwork versus a photo.” Hahn went on to talk about the importance of creating movement and depth in her artwork


to intimately bring the viewer in and create an interaction with the subject and the viewer. “Art has the ability to uplift people. For me personally, the paintings and drawings I have done of my family uplift me. No matter what the day holds, I can look at these pieces of artwork, and they put a smile on my face. Ultimately, that is what I want to give to others.” Though Hahn works with several mediums, her favorite medium is oil. “Where we live is so beautiful and so full of color,” she said before stopping and pointing to some plants out in the yard. “When I look at these plants, I see blue, yellow, and orange—not just green. Oil allows me to manipulate the color, depth and shadows. Plus, oil will stay wet for a few days, so it is workable. I can step away from a piece and then come back and add and blend, giving more time for correction.” It’s by stepping back that Hahn completes the final step in her process. Both contemplative and sensitive by nature, she says that stepping back gives her clarity and closure. “I take a step back maybe for 24 hours and then take a picture of the piece so I can see it from a different perspective. It’s then that I decide what needs to be tweaked, and then I sign my name, spray with fixative and look forward to giving it to the client.” When asked if it is difficult being an artist, Hahn smiled and said, “Not here in Hilton Head and Bluffton.” Again, a sense of her faith and her passion for using art to elevate lives is evident. “The patrons and fellow artists and artisans here are so supportive. We encourage each other to keep going— to keep doing something daily, even if it is just a scribble—to continue growing as people and as artists.”  Becca Edwards is a wellness professional, freelance writer, and owner of Female IQ (femaleIQ.com).

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ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

THE BEAT GOES ON SALUTING THE OFT-UNSUNG GLUE THAT HOLDS TOGETHER ANY GREAT BAND – THE DRUMMER.

ou can stop with the drummer jokes now. They’ve heard them all. “How can you tell that the drum riser is level? Because the drool is coming out both sides of the drummers mouth.” “What’s the hole in the guitar for? To hold snacks for the drummer.” Perpetually put upon as either the wild man of the group, the lazy one, or the perpetually wasted one, perhaps no musician is more of a punching bag than the drummer. Fortunately, they have thick skins. (That last joke, appropriately enough, should have just made you hear a rimshot in your head).

Y


“I don’t honestly think about it,” said drummer Chip Larkby, of Silicone Sister and Cornbred, among others. “But I do know that it’s hard to go somewhere and see people dancing without having a drummer.” It’s an interesting dichotomy. While there is almost universal respect for guitar players, drummers only seem to draw attention when they are either supernaturally talented or distractingly bad. But maybe being just off to the side of the spotlight is the way drummers like it. “We don’t seem to be as competitive as guitar players,” said Mark Husbands, long-time local drummer in all sorts of lineups. “We all get along. We’re the brotherhood. We’re the underdogs.” “First in line for verbal abuse is the drummer,” said John Ruxton with a laugh. “It’s definitely not deserved, but I think it’s because of our separation from actual musical notes that we’re put into the back of the bus. But then you look at guys like Greg

Greg Critchley

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Critchley, who is this multi-instrumentalist, I think our gift is much more than time keeping and dynamics.” As a multi-instrumentalist, Critchley has a unique perspective on drummers. He’s been there behind the kit with bands like Soundboy, driving the bus. He’s also been in the studio trying to get the best sound possible out of drummers. “Drums can enhance and ruin a song. I’ve been in a position to produce other drummers and it can be frustrating to get them to do what you want. I both am one and can see objectively,” he said. Judging from the outside and the inside, he doesn’t see drummers as any one stereotype. “Drummers play like their personality. If you’re a chill, evenkeeled, solid dude people are going to hire you. If you’re a crazy guy … that’s what you’re going to get.” There are even some drummers who are both. Dallas Ackerman, drummer for Groove Town Assault, will be the first to tell you that he gets tagged with


“BUT I DO KNOW THAT IT’S HARD TO GO SOMEWHERE AND SEE PEOPLE DANCING WITHOUT HAVING A DRUMMER.” - CHIP LARKBY

Chip Larkby


THE BEAT GOES ON the wild man stereotype from time to time. He’ll also be the first to tell you he maybe comes by it honestly. “I’m just doing my own thing, but I get it. I’ve been called ‘Animal’ plenty of times,” he said, referring to the Muppets’ resident loose cannon. “I think it’s like Harry Potter, where the wand chooses the wizard. The drums choose the crazy person.” But despite owning the stereotype to some extent, Ackerman also embodies another stereotype of drummers: get him on stage and you’ll see the wild man become all business. “To me, it’s more fun to figure it out. It’s time and space and a puzzle. Wherever everything goes, you have to figure it out and put it into a line of four measures.” There is, in fact, something greatly cerebral about drummers. They may not have to think in scales and chords like their musical brethren, but aligning your thinking towards time, physical movement and musical dynamics can be equally taxing. “I like dynamics. You can be a soft side stick; you can even drop out of part of a song and not play at all. That’s what a good drummer does, having that dynamic to play with the song and not just play the song,” added Nate Douglas. Trained up in the high school jazz band and Drum Corps International, his is a highly analytical approach. “I’m always thinking two measures ahead, especially when I’m playing with someone new. As long as you don’t stop, no one knows you messed up.” One thing drummers are is supportive of one another. And when you ask the local drummers about some of their favorites, one name that comes up again and again is Chris

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Mark Husbands

“WE DON’T SEEM TO BE AS COMPETITIVE AS GUITAR PLAYERS. WE ALL GET ALONG. WE’RE THE BROTHERHOOD. WE’RE THE UNDERDOGS.” - MARK HUSBANDS


Russell. Like so many of his fellow drummers, he delights in adapting to different styles, whether it’s the Latin percussion and jazz fusion he played studying in New York to the multitude of bands he’s played with over the last quarter-century here in the Lowcountry. “It does break up the monotony,” he said. “I like to sit in with good players and good musicians. It’s fun to sit with some guys where I’m doing my part and we’re having a musical conversation.” And he knows the fundamental truth about drummers, a sentiment shared by nearly everyone we spoke with. “A great drummer can make a bad band sound good, and a bad drummer make great band terrible.” Make all the jokes you want. Perpetuate whatever stereotypes come to mind. At the end of the day, they may be at the back of the bus, but when it’s time to dance, they’re the ones driving it. And without them, the song just would be the same.

Meet the Drummers CHIP LARKBY Primary band: Cornbred Style: Neutral. “I’m vanilla. I don’t have amazing metal or jazz chops, but I can play almost any popular song.” Thoughts on the importance of a bass drum: “Nobody dances to the snare drum.” GREG CRITCHLEY Primary band: Soundboy Style: Technically sound, but with soul Thoughts on his job description: “I stretch animal skins across hollowed out logs to facilitate mating in primates.” MARK HUSBANDS Primary band: Single Husband Band Style: Dance, with a little jazz and Latin thrown in for good measure Origin story: “I started drumming in 1966 when I was 11 and got my first drum set for Christmas. It came from Sears and Roebuck. I was too small to play football, so I had to find something to do.” CHRIS RUSSELL Primary bands: Martin Lesch Band, Deas Guyz Orchestra, Evolution Big Band Style: You name it. Thoughts on fame: “I’ve never been much for the spotlight. I’m definitely more Charlie Watts than Keith Moon.” NATE DOUGLAS Primary Bands: Pretty Darn, Home B4 Dark, Heavy Honey, Perpetual Care, Zach Stevens Trio. Style: “I’m a chameleon, pretty much. Matt Stock called me a child of the universe.” Origin story: “The first time I played I was two-ish, and the first time I ever picked up sticks was a pair of wooden spoons. I woke my mom at 10:30 at night hitting pots and pans. It scared the crap out of her, but she thought I sounded good. So, I got my first kit at six.” C2 MAGAZINE

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THE BEAT GOES ON The wrong way 'Round While they only make up about 10 percent of the population, it turns out that southpaws are highly represented among drummers. Ringo Starr, John Bonham and Phil Collins are just a few lefties in the rock pantheon. Both Chip Larkby and John Ruxton are both lefties, something they learned about each other during this interview. You’d never know it because most of the time drummers are forced to play righty. “For me it was convenience,” Ruxton said. “When you’d go to a gig and share someone’s kit there were no options.” And maybe there’s something to the distinctive sound a left-handed drummer brings to a band. It seemed to work out okay for the Beatles, after all. In fact, if you ask Chip Larkby, the challenge of playing right-handed adds to the dynamic. “That millisecond of thinking causes a slight delay in the timing of how things flow,” he said. “Because of that, there’s a very distinctive thing that is Ringo. If not for that distinctive thing, the Beatles would probably not be the Beatles we know.”

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Chris Russell


“I THINK IT’S LIKE HARRY POTTER, WHERE THE WAND CHOOSES THE WIZARD. THE DRUMS CHOOSE THE CRAZY PERSON.” - DALLAS ACKERMAN

Nate Douglas

Dallas Ackerman

DALLAS ACKERMAN Primary Band: Groove Town Assault Style: “I’m a metal drummer. We do reggae, funk and stuff; but me personally, I’m metal.” Thoughts on starting out young: “I might have been 12 when I was in the Cross Island Bridge Band. We played three- to four-hour sets, Rolling Stones and ’60s stuff like that. We did that for a few years into high school for $25 and a free meal every gig. It subconsciously taught me a lot about playing live and the professionalism of it.”

John Ruxton

JOHN RUXTON Primary Band: Finkle and Einhorn Style: Technical, with underlying elements of pipe band. “As I’ve progressed and played with more people, I rely less on technicality and let my ears do the work more.” Thoughts on gigging around the island: “Being a drummer or musician on Hilton Head, it’s like six degrees of separation. There’s a certain transience, so I’ve played with an awful lot of people. It’s like surfing the crest of a wave. You don’t know what’s going to happen.” 

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“Ginger Jar”

“Yes And” in home of Griffin Glaze, Charlotte, NC

Katie & OOH Collection


ARTICLE BY COURTNEY HAMPSON

"Baby, Let's Coast"

On Inspiration and Art with katie moore howson I

n late August, Katie Moore Howson released her first collection of paintings, Out of Hiding, a visual and symbolic nod to the journey she has been on for the last 18 months. Born of necessity and soon the salve to her wounds, painting became Howson’s saving grace. In retrospect, this is where she was destined to be all along. “One color, one shape, one item … all can be the inspiration for something bigger,” Howson said of the process behind her art and the trek that brought her to where, and more important, who she is today: an artist, a writer, a mom, and a wife, to a guy named “Art.” What are the chances? Raised in Charlotte, North Carolina, Howson headed to New York City following college. She had “… enough savings to live for, like a week,” she said, and quickly had to find a job. She landed a gig with MTV and was off and running during an era that was like the “Wild Wild West” in TV land. An MTV producer

“Watershed”


Katie & daughter Lee

took a chance on Howson, and she soon found herself in the thick of it all—a high-energy dream job as the creative director behind the Video Music Awards and on-air promotions for the station. “I worked my ass off for four years,” she said. At MTV, Howson learned she was “an abstract thinker and loved taking a story and relating it to the human experience.” But one day, “I just stopped and thought, ‘I need a nap,’” she said. Howson soon left New York “exhausted and lonely,” returned to Charlotte and found her way to Wray Ward, a creative agency that allowed her to flex her abstract muscle and really build her creative portfolio, handling the creative direction for national brands like Sunbrella, Velux, Moen, and Palmetto Bluff. After four years, she parlayed her role into a freelance position, giving herself a little more freedom from the desk and the office atmosphere she’d felt tied to for too long. Along the way she got married and, a year later, pregnant. She was in her third trimester when the pandemic hit. March 2020 forced everyone to slow down and re-assess, but as she slowed, Katie also began to unravel as she realized she would be having a child amid it all. Soon, as a new parent, she was overcome by a lingering anxiety that forced her to continue to push back re-entry into the working world. When she did begin to take on clients and work again, she had a serious panic attack. It scared her. It scared her husband. It scared her mother. Something had to change. Putting brush to canvas was her therapy and began to steady her mind. “I have always made art,” Howson said, but this time was different. This was about putting her natural ambition and drive aside and doing something that soothed her—something for her. In the “rat race” of the agency world, Katie was always creating for clients but never quite comfortable around her colleagues whom she referred to as “the real artists.” It was a request from her sister-in-law, Maddie, that put Howson’s current path in motion. Maddie asked her for a large, abstract painting to represent a hard time she had just experienced. Howson found that channeling Maddie’s feelings, and her empathy for Maddie became therapy. And soon she was thinking 48

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AS MORE REQUESTS CAME IN TO CAPTURE A MOMENT IN TIME—A NEW PUPPY, A FAMILY, CHILDHOOD, GROWTH—HOWSON GREW AS DID HER CONFIDENCE IN HER CRAFT. “I REALIZED … THIS IS HOW I WANT TO TELL STORIES NOW,” SHE SAID. of herself through the process. As more requests came in to capture a moment in time—a new puppy, a family, childhood, growth—Howson grew as did her confidence in her craft. “I realized … this is how I want to tell stories now,” she said. Howson starts with a word or a phrase that is on her mind and says that prompt always leads her somewhere. As she began to take on more commission work, she found joy in interpreting someone else’s story. But soon it was time to tell her own. The idea for her inaugural collection, Out of Hiding, came in the middle of the night, and Howson decided to take a break from commissions and create it. “I had convinced myself that I needed a certain number of years of experience or this many social followers before I could create a collection,” she said. Gratefully, she was wrong. Utilizing her network and “new relationship with social media,” Howson established her creative voice on Instagram, launched her collection there and sold every single piece. So, what is next for Katie? New studio space that is not in her mother’s garage. A second collection premiering before the holidays. Time with her sweet daughter Lenoir, labradoodle Bruce (yes, named for “The Boss”), and her husband, who so fittingly is named, Art. And the realization that anything is possible with vision, empathy, and passion. Howson named one of the pieces in her first collection Yes My Love, You Can. And, she has. 

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T H E

Big Band T H E O R Y

A RTI C L E BY B A R RY KAU F MA N P H OTO G R A P H Y BY R O B I N R OSS

Evolution Big Band is helping the community one toe-tapper at a time.

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t’s a Friday morning in the state of mind, at a rehearsal space inside Bluffton School of Dance. Outside in the hallway, squealing voices greet each other as a mommy and me music class gets ready to set up. But inside the rehearsal space, strains of Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five” drift from the woodwinds, mingling with trilling embouchure exercises from the brass, a few lines of improvisation from a baritone saxophone, and the thumping of a bass guitar. Anyone who’s ever played in a band knows it as the symphony of getting warmed up. And somehow, Evolution

Front Row (L to R): Rick Eckstein, Bill Gwynne, Jeff Shawd, Dave Skinner, and Deb Stephenson. Middle Row: Charlene Gorrell, Steve Ryden, Leon Rivchun, Pete Stephenson, and Bob Higgins. Back Row: Rich Orr, Bill Brewster, George Smedley, Mark Spradley, John Dobson, Chris Russell and Ed Morgret.

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Big Band even makes this rambling cacophony sound sweet. A sign on the back wall, placed there for the dancers but applicable for the room’s current tenants, reads “Excellence is not an act but a habit.” “We’re here every Friday,” said trumpet and band leader (inasmuch as anyone is a band leader in this highly democratic band) Jeff Shawd. “We try to honor the music and, at the same time, enjoy the heck out of it.” When the rehearsal gets into full swing (pardon the expression), one can hear the precision and professionalism of Evolution Big Band in every note. Well, mostly. Drummer Chris Russell is stuck in traffic on the way in, but the consensus is they can get through the Woody Herman arrangement of “Greasy Sack Blues” without percussion. “Let’s start it out pianissimo and then just blood and guts all the way to the end,” Shawd said, directing from the back after taking his place with the trumpets. Blood and guts is right. Even muted by plungers, the trumpets

fill the small space to bursting before the trombones and woodwinds jump in, softening the sound and segueing into a soulful solo by tenor sax Steve Ryden. They wrap up, and in true Evolution Big Band fashion, it’s opened up to the room for critique. Shawd thinks they got kind of loud, to which one member responds, “Well you said you wanted a big finish.” Bill Gwynne on bass guitar asks everyone to speed up, since with their drummer still stuck in traffic, “It feels like I’m dragging a freight train.”

When the rehearsal gets into full swing (pardon the expression), one can hear the precision and professionalism of Evolution Big Band in every note.

Vocalists for the “One Home” concert series; Steve Blanchard, Meredith Inglesby and Daniel Cort, emcee.

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Bob Higgins (guitar), Chris Russell (drums), Bill Gwynne (bass), and saxophones Leon Rivchun, Steve Ryden and Dave Skinne

The fact is the entire band is dragging a freight train. That train is big band music. And Evolution Big Band is dragging it into the twenty-first century one show at a time. What we now know as Evolution Big Band started out in 2004 as Stardust Jazz Orchestra. While the name may have changed, the original mission behind the all-volunteer group hasn’t. Playing regularly at venues all over the Lowcountry, the group has a singular focus: to raise money for area charities and non-profits. To date, the group has raised north of $200,000, with funds going to groups like Bluffton Self Help, Family Promise, the Lions Club, Second Helpings, Backpack

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Buddies, The Junior Jazz Foundation and the Live Oak Performing Arts Center. “It’s not just the opportunity to play big band music but to serve the needs of various non-profit organizations,” Shawd said, “particularly now as the economy has contracted and the need got bigger.” “Our prime beneficiary at this point has been the Junior Jazz Foundation, which is so aligned with our mission,” added Dave Skinner, sax man and senior member of the band. It’s more than just money. Beyond tallying up any discretionary funds at the end of the year and dispersing it to various charities, Evolution Big Band puts on a show laser focused on the organization they’re supporting with each event. “We’ll work on a program for them, and say, ‘Tell us about your mission as an organization … how do we make this


Programs for “Broadway comes to Bluffton”

Evolution Big Band trumpet section (left to right): George Smedley, Jeff Shawd and Pete Stephenson. an audience experience where your messages are integrated with our songs?’” Shawd said. “We don’t try and force it, but organically we try to make sure it’s a meaningful evening.” And, ultimately, putting on a show is what it’s all about—taking big band music and presenting it in ways you’ve never heard. A typical show might start with a Glen Miller standard before launching into a Quincy Jones arrangement of a showtune, a Russian composition called “Brazilian Dance of the Flugel Horn”, or a seasonal standard rearranged by Gordon Goodwin’s Big Phat Band. It is, in short, not big band music. It’s big band music that has evolved. Hence the name. “The name Stardust Orchestra served us well, but… I don’t know what comes to your mind when you hear that, but I think of Lawrence Welk,” Skinner said. “That wasn’t the stuff we were playing. We weren’t playing old stuff; we were introducing contemporary versions of jazz.” It’s unique to find a handful of people who share an overwhelming passion for both big band music and giving back to the community. With Evolution Big Band, there are 17 such souls. “At the end of the day, I feel like I’m talking in my life’s purpose right now,” Shawd said. “And I get to do that with 16 other people who feel the same way I do.” To see the full schedule of upcoming dates, visit evolutionbigband.com.  C2 MAGAZINE

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JEVON DALY

CHIP LARKBY AND JASON LAPORTE

JOS VICARS AND CANDICE RAE

ANDY PITTS

GREGG RUSSELL

LALIE AND JADA MOLE

ANNA BARNES

SHANNON TANNER

DEAS GUYZ

CHRIS CUNNINGHAM


J

SARA BURNS

evon Daly had this idea. “Let’s create a song about nothing, with famous local musicians, by only giving them the lines before them.” Or at least, that’s what we think he said. Check out CH2’s Facebook page to watch all of these familiar faces sing THIS song about dogs, cats, butts, island living, the May River, people peepin’ over fences, hazmat suits and fishing. GREGG RUSSELL

“On a warm summer’s evening, in a bar on the island, I sang Margaritaville, for at least the millionth time.”

GREG CRITCHLEY

Y R T N U O C W O

L

EARWORM P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y M . K AT / S O N G C R E D I T S T O A L L

“Pinch me maybe I’m just dreamin’, But I got that Lowcountry feelin…”

ROBIN ROSS

“The vibe in my head got me leavin’ This world behind.”

TREVOR HARDEN

“Nothing to do, nowhere to be, Just listen to the wind through a live oak tree.”

JEVON DALY

“Listen to your mom and dad have a serious conversation in the front of the minivan… When they thought you were asleep.”

SHANNON TANNER

“There’s a rhythm in the ocean, There’s a rhythm in the trees, There’s a rhythm in the waves, They’re washing over me.”

DEAS GUYZ

“Sing us songs we can all sing On an island by the sea Sing us songs with melody And you can sing in harmony. Everything will be just fine. We livin’ on island time. Hangin’ with these friends of mine. Livin’ on island time.”

JOHN BRACKETT

“I like to fish off the island, Where you can’t see the land, Where the water turns from green to blue, Grab some bait, drop a line – the fish know what to do.”

CHRIS CUNNINGHAM

“When I see that deep blue water, Imagination comes to life. Wonderous creatures below me, Connected through the web of life.”

MARK HUSBANDS

“I can feel a little nibble, As the ocean starts to ripple, Got a good fish on the line, Warm breezes feelin’ fine, Take a little sip of wine, Not a care in the world.” GARY PRATT AND MIKE KAVANAUGH

TREVOR HARDEN

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TARGET THE BAND WITH THE HEADLINER HORNS

KNARLY GAV DALY

CHARLIE SIMPSON & TAYLOR KENT

GARY PRATT AND MIKE KAVANAUGH

“Everywhere I go throughout the day, Singing from my soul, we’re all ok. It’s the only kinda life I wanna live, The only kinda love I wanna give.” Every little part of something nice, Coming from the heart it’s all alright, It’s the only kinda life I wanna live, The only kinda love I wanna give.”

SARA BURNS

“Every day I try to make a change, Anytime I can I do it my way. It’s all about how you do your thing, It’s all in the passion that you bring.” Digeridoo Solo –

JOS VICARS AND CANDICE RAE

“Keep your heart on your sleeve and your toes in the sand, And remember to love every minute you can, Find the joy, joy, joy and give it out, And you will find, find, find what it’s about.”

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GREG CRITCHLEY

CHIP LARKBY & JASON LAPORTE

“Well hey Chip. (Hey Jason!) Do you like cats? (Yeah!) Well I knew that. (You did.) But you know what? (What Jason?) I love to smile (Aweee. You’re so good at it.) All the while…. (It’s true.) You got a nice butt!”

ANNA BARNES

“I like butts too, And my dog named Blue!”

CHARLIE SIMPSON & TAYLOR KENT

“I don’t have a dog and I don’t have a cat, Chuck E. Cheese on the track and you know it’s phat I said hey now, Whatcha think about that?”

FRED CAPERS & TODD TOHO

“Colt Sever and me We’re like hazmat, You need a yellow suit with the hose in the back Watcha think about that, Watcha think about that?”

PRETTY DARN FEATURING RIVER ON DRUMS

“We don’t have to all go crazy, but maybe we should, River on the drums, too young to be this good.”


PHIL SIRMANS, JON BRUNER, ROBIN SUE ROSS JOHN CRANFORD AND MATT ROBBINS

ZACH STEVENS

MARK HUSBANDS

KYLE WAREHAM AND NICK POULIN

JOHN BRACKETT

KNARLY GAV DALY

“Well the May River’s fine, And the Sandbar is great for wastin’ time, But I love that ocean in Hilton Head!”

ANDY PITTS

“Every now and then I stop to remember, Where I’m from, I said where I’m from. A little old beach town in Carolina, It’s my home, I said it’s my home.”

LALIE & JADA MOLE

“Sittin’ on a back porch drinkin’ sweet tea, Saw a man cross the way and he’s lookin’ at me. Oh! You know you better jump back!”

TARGET THE BAND WITH THE HEADLINER HORNS

“Shama Lama, Baby Rama rama rama ding dong

FRED CAPERS & TOD TOHO

Hey You put the Ooh mou mou Oh oh oh oh Back into my smile, child Hey That is why That is why You are my sugar dee dee doo”

ZACH STEVENS

“It’s not easy, being lovely, Words I can’t hold down, But I love you somehow.”

JON BRUNER, JOHN CRANFORD & MATT ROBBINS

“Wagon Wheel Sucks, Wagon Wheel Sucks Wagon Wheel Sucks Wagon Wheel Sucks.”

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Article by Cheryl Strickland Photography by M.Kat

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john Brackett quintet A local jazz phenomenon that began more than three decades ago has not surprisingly evolved in size and impact into what is now known nationally and internationally as the John Brackett Quintet. n 1989, John Brackett started playing the piano and singing with a quartet at a former Hilton Head Island establishment called Big Rocco’s. In 1995, he met guitarist Howard Paul. In the years following Big Rocco’s closure, Brackett and Paul continued performing together, including at The Jazz Corner and eventually their longstanding engagement at Redfish where they’ve been playing every Wednesday night for the past 11 years. Four years ago, they invited Maggie Evans to join them on electric bass and vocals. To tighten up and finish out the sound, the trio welcomed drummer Greg Critchley and conga player Fuzzy Davis to the group, and with those additions, the John Brackett Quintet was born. In addition to the Redfish gig on Wednesdays, the group also plays at The Jazz Corner on Hilton Head Island, the JW Marriott in Savannah, and private functions all around the country. Traditional and Brazilian Jazz are their forte, and audiences crave their take on anything Sinatra, Bennett, Jobim, and otherwise. While you’ve probably listened to a set or two at Redfish or The Jazz Corner, you may not know the most interesting details about this group and its members, so enjoy this deeper introduction: JOHN BRACKETT As a child, Brackett listened to lots of jazz and was especially influenced by Mel Tormé’s vocals and by Eddie Cano on the piano. Brackett initially learned music on the trombone at school and taught himself to play piano as a second instrument—a piano he still owns and plays today. “Ever since I began hearing live musicians perform, by age nine or ten, I knew I wanted to perform,” Brackett said. Brackett left high school his sophomore year and began working as an auto mechanic, a photographer (also self-taught,

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Maggie Evans, John Brackett, Fuzzy Davis, Howard Paul and Greg Critchley pose for a quick photo before playing on a busy Wednesday night at Redfish.

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John Brackett

Howard Paul

“I had a darkroom in ninth grade”), and a musician. He began playing piano professionally at age 20 at the Icehouse Café in Herndon, Virginia. In 1989, when he was 26, he visited Hilton Head. A month later, he moved here. Brackett then began playing piano at Big Rocco’s, where he played for seven years. The rest is group history. When Brackett isn’t playing with the John Brackett Quintet, he continues to do freelance work and photography. He is a fishing boat captain as well. As for his role in the group, Brackett brings the diversity of jazz, Latin rhythms, swing, vocals, and enormous energy. Traditional jazz (also known as The Great American Songbook) is his favorite to sing. “When people see us perform live, they see we are having fun and enjoy playing off each other. That is the ultimate reward,” Brackett said.

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HOWARD PAUL Paul started playing guitar at age four, and by age 10, was playing strictly jazz. At 13, he began playing professionally in Atlantic City jazz clubs. “We felt like grown-ups,” Paul said. “Our heroes were legends from the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s. Here we were, doing exactly what they were doing. It was a remarkable way to grow up.” At age 17, he went to work as an adjunct music instructor at Atlantic Community College. At 21, he attended University of North Carolina and graduated with a degree in political science and history. After college, he enlisted in the army and spent the next decade as an officer, touring in Desert Storm and Somalia. In 1996, Paul left active duties as a Major and settled in Savannah, working as a steel company executive by day and playing guitar at night. In 2006, Paul became president and CEO of Benedetto Guitars, where he is also an endorsing artist. Though Paul and Brackett had met years earlier, Paul has played with the quintet for the last eight years. He offers supporting rhythm with his “straight ahead bebop” guitar style and is a featured soloist. “Hilton Head’s jazz culture is rare,” Paul said. “Nowhere in the country will you find two jazz clubs (Jazz Corner and Redfish)


Maggie Evans

Fuzzy Davis

within a quarter mile of one another that take better care of their musicians or care more about their customers’ experience.” MAGGIE EVANS “Because fewer females play electric bass, people always ask me how I got started,” Evans said. Though she was initially trained as a classical pianist from the age of five, when she was 14, her brother started a grunge rock band, and they needed a bass player. So, her parents (both professional musicians) encouraged her brother to let her play. In college at Utah State, she began playing jazz and other kinds of music with her now husband Jackson Evans, who was also in a band and needed a bass player. In 2003, the two of them moved to Savannah so she could attend Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), where her skills as a bass player were even more in demand. “My music career has been unintentional,” Evans said. “I really intended to focus on painting, but the music gigs are too good to pass up.” Evans still paints and is Professor of Foundations Studies at SCAD where she teaches drawing and design. While playing in Savannah, Evans met and began playing gigs with Howard Paul, who introduced her to John Brackett. She filled in one night while Paul and Brackett were playing at Redfish and brought some Brazilian music to the set, which everyone enjoyed. “It’s a genre that brings a fun vibe,” Evans said, “plus, we can also split up the vocals and make it more interesting.” Evans has been with the quintet since 2015. FUZZY DAVIS Davis doesn’t come from a musical family, but his father made him play horns in the school band. “I hated it,” he said. “I always wanted to play the drums, so when I was 10, my brother talked my dad into getting me a drum set.” Davis, a self-taught percussionist, continued to play the drums and played with various rock bands in the Nashville music scene after high school. During college, he went to an outdoor Santana concert and heard congas for the first time, though he didn’t begin to play them seriously until he was about 45 years old. C2 MAGAZINE

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Greg critchley Davis took lessons from Juan Buzo, a famed Mexican percussionist, and for about 15 years, he played in Buzo’s band. One Wednesday night, Brackett invited Davis to play with his group at Redfish. Then the next week, he invited Davis to play with them again. And so, it began. “The best quality I bring to the quintet is the sound of Latin percussion because, to most people, it is a foreign sound they like, and it adds another dimension to the group,” Davis said. When he is not playing congas, Davis is a fishing guide and owns Silva Dolla Charters. “Another whole layer to

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my friendship with John is that not only do we play music together, but we also get to meet up on the docks and fish together,” Davis said. GREG CRITCHLEY When Critchley was 10 years old and began taking piano lessons, he knew he’d be a musician. “I enjoyed the lessons, and I practiced,” he said, “so I advanced quickly and began playing in our church band.” While playing eighth-grade football, Critchley broke his finger, so he couldn’t play the piano in an upcoming gig. He switched instruments with the drummer and fell in love with the drums. From that point on, he was the group’s drummer, and he borrowed parts of sets from different people until he was 12 years old, and his parents gave him a new set. “I was initially a very aggressive drummer,” Critchley said, “influenced by Rush and The Who. I didn’t even know anything about jazz or Latin music until I went to college.” He began playing professionally at age 15, and by age 19, after only two years of college, Critchley quit school to play drums full time. His repertoire now includes writing, recording, and music production. After coming to Hilton Head for years to escape the Canadian winters and the chaos of the West Coast, Critchley moved here full time in 2017 and opened his own recording studio—which is where he met Brackett, who eventually invited him to join the quintet. Critchley asserts that a good jazz drummer is sensitive to the other elements of the music, provides the right touch, can converse musically with the other sounds, all the while “keeping things cookin’.” 



South Beach Marina Saturday Festivals in October

Photgraphy by M.Kat Modeled by Caroline Molloy Styled by Kaila Jeffcoat Hair by Madyson Mardon Makeup by Erica Horton, Salon Karma

Celebrate a different Fest every Saturday at the Salty Dog Café and South Beach Marina. A month of Saturday fun kicks off October 2, with an Oyster Roast, featuring a toasty firepit, happy hour (4-6p.m.), live music and, of course, loads of fresh local oysters. Saturday, 10/9 Salty Dog’s First Ever BaconFest Saturday, 10/16 Salty Dog’s Annual HushpuppyFest Saturday, 10/23 Shrimp Extravaganza Saturday, 10/30 Haunted BBQ

Autumn brings one of the most anticipated times of the year for Lowcountry residents – Festival Season! Cooler temps and lighter crowds usher in this most wonderful time of the year, and the area is abuzz with outdoor events every weekend through November. We highlighted a few of our favorite upcoming soirees, along with a recommended outfit for each from Copper Penny in Shelter Cove Town Centre.

Fall festival HOW TO

FEATURING LOOKS FROM COPPER PENNY

Rails top $168, Vintage Havana sneakers $130, Paige jeans $230


Hilton Head Oyster Festival 2021 The Island Rec Center’s two-day festival hosts it’s second day on Saturday, November 13 at the new Lowcountry Celebration Park near Coligny Beach. The hours are 1-4 p.m., and you can find more details and ticket packages at www. hiltonheadoysterfestival.com.

Fall festival

Red Haute dress $116, Vintage Havana sneakers $138, Think Royln crossbody $144


Fall festival

Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina Music & Taste on the Harbour is a weekly celebration of local music and restaurant fare at Shelter Cove Marina. This pet-friendly event happens by the Neptune statue every Thursday night, and dancing is highly encouraged. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy this complimentary concert featuring local favorites like Stee & the Ear Candy Band (October 7), Target the Band, featuring the Headliner Horns (October 14), and Deas Guyz (October 21).

Bluffton Arts & Seafood Festival The festival is a weeklong (October 16-24) event offering a myriad of activities, showcasing the locally harvested seafood, delicious Lowcountry cuisine, rich history, great art and Southern hospitality found only in Bluffton. For a list of events, visit https://blufftonartsandseafoodfestival.org.

La Plage dress (local designer out of Beaufort S.C.) $268, Carolina Strung necklace (locally made in N.C.) $76, Dolce Vita sneaker $110, GiGi clutch $126 Kork-Ease bootie $150, Paige jeans $220, Rails star shirt $200, Apricot sweater $72, Earrings $48

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Sofia dress $172, Kaanas heels $120 (sale 50% off), Earrings $30

Polo 4 Heroes at Rose Hill This three-day event (October 14-17) has everything you need for a gorgeous fall weekend in the Lowcountry: horses, champagne, beautiful ensembles with eye-catching bonnets, and the traditional stomping of the divots. Buy your tickets at polo4heroes.com.

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La Isla’s Latin Music Festival The ninth annual Latin Music Festival is set for Sunday, October 10, from noon to 9:30 p.m., in Shelter Cove Community Park on Hilton Head Island. This event is a celebration highlighting the Latino community through music, dance and food.

Fall festival Kleid dress $350, GiGi clutch $126, Virgin Saints & Angels (VSA) necklace $449


Marie Oliver sweater $140, Karlie shorts $98, GiGi clutch $126, Binky & Lulu earrings $40, Carolina Strung necklace (locally made in N.C.) $40

Rockin’ the Dock at Bluffton Oyster Factory Park Eat great local seafood, enjoy live music by the Chiggers and end a full day of activities at the Bluffton Arts & Seafood festival with a finale of fireworks. This event starts Saturday, October 23, at 6 p.m. For more info: blufftonartsandseafoodfestival.org

Michael Stars sweater $168, Sofia jogger $110 Dolce Vita sneakers $110, Think Royln belt bag $78

The Zin Experience with Italian Flair This premier wine tasting event is part of the Italian Heritage Festival (which culminates with the big event on October 23 at Honey Horn). Tickets are $25 and can be purchased at the Wine & Spirit Shop at Shelter Cove. Sip wine while enjoying gorgeous ocean views at the Shorehouse, the outdoor venue at the Omni in Palmetto Dunes.


Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance & Motoring Festival The centuries-old love story between man and machine has no better showcase than at the Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance & Motoring Festival, where over 500 cars, boats, motorcycles, and aircraft are exhibited during the first weekend of November. This year’s event happens November 5-7. To purchase tickets: hhiconcours.com.

Fall festival FRNCH sweater $100, FRNCH skirt $106, Dolce Vita heels $120, Earrings $24, GiGi clutch $126



Article by Amy Bartlett - Photography by M.Kat

DO ALL THE THINGS!

SUPERIOR SERVICES BRINGS ALL THE EXPERTS UNDER ONE ROOF TO MAKE YOUR HOME “SUPERIOR FROM START TO FINISH.”

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ou have choices. You can open your home to a parade of unknown vendors and service reps, restart the conversation from scratch with each one (your goal, what happened, how it connects to other projects, did I tell you this already?), and take on a side gig (nonpaying of course) as general manager and construction contractor of projects in your home. Or you could call Dave Miller and his team of Superior experts, hand off the ball, and call it a very nice day. Opening your home at all, much less to service representatives, can be an intrusive process. When


you’re setting out to complete multiple projects, that level of invasiveness is multiplied every step of the way—the demand on the client’s schedule and info-tracking, trying to manage product and work details, timelines, and points of contact for all the different services and providers. Dave Miller, owner of Superior Services, knows this well and strives to eliminate this challenge for homeowners and commercial contractors alike, providing a streamlined, cohesive approach to creating Superior homes. Unless flipping houses (or ships, apparently) is literally your day job, why add hassle and confusion to a home improvement process that most already dread? Stop the madness. SUPERIOR FROM START TO FINISH When small-project customers attempt to go it alone and do it on their own without hiring a general contractor, they essentially

become the contractor and have to do it all: get bids, manage the work product and quality-assurance, arrange schedules, deal with follow-up or troubleshooting, negotiations, and pass accurate info from one company to another where projects overlap. “Or,” Miller suggests, “they could just let us handle the whole thing start to finish and eliminate the whole complicated process.” “Our vision and plan for customers who trust us and enjoy our work, is for them to be able to depend on us for an allinclusive process and reap the benefits of one-stop shopping for whatever needs to be done,” Miller explained. The benefits of opening your door to one synchronized set of Superiors, are countless and obvious: lower anxiety, save time, focus your point of contact, and remove middleman miscommunications with service experts who are already working together in-house,

Superior Services Team Members (from left to right): Michael Burford, Patrick Jacobs, Alberth Diaz, Aaron Cleland, Bobby McIver, Cristin Kenyon, Mathew Milunec and Michael Guzman


DO ALL THE Things! Dave Miller, owner of Superior Services

coordinated, and already up on all the info. “When you deal with us, we have different experts or department heads, but we’re one company and one team,” Miller said. “We’ll manage the hassle for you.” A HEALTHY HOME It’s more than just making the crooked straight, or the difficult easy. For Miller and the whole Superior crew, their unique holistic whole-home approach has become the company’s philosophy and their client’s advantage to the degree of affecting their family’s health and wellbeing.

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“A whole, healthy home is a Superior home,” Miller said. “When you have us as your full-service provider, we manage the very environment in which you and your family live. We’re the ones who handle the air that moves air throughout your house and the air that your family breathes. We keep that clean with our duct cleaning and filtration processes. We clean the carpets in your home, which act like a filter capturing all dirt, debris, allergens, dust—people don’t clean them nearly enough. We handle plumbing filtration, purifying the water your family is drinking. A healthy whole-home approach is one where all our departments are working together to offer a complete solution instead of a partial solution.” UNDER ONE SUPERIOR ROOF Superior brings together all the elements that bring a structure to life, now available for both residential and commercial properties and clients, offering expertise in all the areas you’ll need: heating and air conditioning, indoor air quality and duct design, electrical, plumbing, carpet and upholstery, computer and IT, and water and fire damage. Consider a common scenario: You’re remodeling your kitchen. Again. (It’s so 2019.) To upgrade, you’ll need plumbing, electrical, sheetrock, trim, and painting. You could start gathering vendors and pour your time into vendor management or you could, as Miller states, “find it all within one company that has streamlined the process for you.” Or maybe you’re dealing with issues that have more of an urgency to set your home right again. “If you have a water leak,” Miller said, “you’ll have to have someone come in to pull the water out, complete a water restoration process, restore the AC—but all of these go hand in hand, full circle; they all complement each other.” Not only do they complement, but they can also clash if handled by separate companies or reps who aren’t in contact with one another. One of the key benefits that defines “Superior Services” is the cohesiveness of communication between different trades. “Your experts are already connected and communicating,” Miller reminds, “because they’re all under the Superior Services brand.”


200 YEARS OF SUPERIOR EXPERTISE Originally known as Superior Heating and Air, the company went through a metamorphosis in 2019—after 20 years in business—to become Superior Services, bringing all service professionals under one roof with one mission. Now covering Hilton Head Island, Charleston, Bluffton, and other nearby areas with over 200 years of combined experience, they launched new divisions to create broader opportunities to serve their clientele. With this new approach (superior by comparison thanks to their comprehensive business model), they experienced immediate growth through responsiveness to a greater need. “We’ve gone into very small service call related jobs and have come out with high-ticket projects because we were able to offer and handle all the other items—and we were already there, onsite, serving the home,” Miller said. From a business perspective, it just made sense. “We’d already made the effort to get our name out there, promote the brand, and set a standard with our reputation,” Miller said. “Why would we limit the possibilities if we can do more than just AC?” This provides job and company security for the Superior team and greater assurances for the community as industries and economies change. Superior can maintain a roster of multi-faceted experts with the ability to cross-train leaders in-house between departments, “so that whenever you call, we have a Superior Expert for your issue or need,” Miller said. “This gives us the ability to always do more for you.” Especially in 2021, with the construction industry at a breaking point, it’s more of a commodity than ever that one company can provide the glue to keep it all together by uniting common services under one roof. DON’T WAIT The greatest advice, Miller said, is simply: “Don’t wait. Be proactive instead of reactive.” Unlike most products or services, what Superior offers applies to literally 100 percent of homeowners or project managers.

Even if you’re not dealing with a breakdown, issue, or “emergency call,” you can (and should) set up proactive care. It saves you time, money, and protects you from additional costs and repairs when preemptive service can catch something that might cause more damage when it breaks down. If you’ve ever seen a water heater blow a hole in your drywall or had to go on a crawl space scavenger hunt to find the extent of water damage, or a variety of other ways your home and Murphy’s law team up to double or triple inconveniences down the road, then you know. Miller can’t stress proactive thinking enough, as the team sees daily what happens when this advice isn’t heeded. “We see it every year, sometimes every day,” Miller said. Especially in the extremes of a Lowcountry summer when unforeseen breakdowns are unbearable, happening in every neighborhood, and happening at the same hour when residents are getting home from work, visitors are checking into VRBOs, and every available expert is out on a call. Don’t be that guy. Be hurricane ready. Be 90 percent humidity ready. Be pollen prepared (or pollen-free) and allergenalleviated. None of this happens by surprise, we know it’s coming, but it can be handled with a Superior approach. “MAKE THE SUPERIOR CHOICE” The collective talent of Superior Services delivers a Superior promise—not only with the obvious application of simply “better” service and streamlined processes, but with their mission to “bring certainty to the customer” in all they do. Whether you’re renovating, repairing, flipping, upgrading, or just being prepared, “Make the Superior Choice” as it says on the side of every highly recognizable yellow van, truck, T-shirt, and calling card. Trade middlemen and boogeymen for acumen by engaging the company smart enough to join forces and combine superior powers to create a streamlined process for your home improvement or construction project. Let a single-source expert team handle the hassle for you as your go-to concierge and get back to living in your whole and healthy Superior home. 

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CALM, COOL & CONNECTED at Moss Creek

Cool gray tones and vintage coastal cottage styling

A polished wood framed entrance provides a warm and welcoming entry


Ambient light and a light airy palette offset impeccable trim work and modern finishes

Wide open, coastal flow

A seamless interface between dining and delighting in lowcountry views

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he low-key coastal sanctuary skirting the banks of Moss Creek is the southern oasis the Songer-Santos family had been longing for, though it took some twists, turns and time amid their busy lifestyle to realize exactly where their wishes were taking them. “We felt like we were always chasing our tails with three girls in elementary and middle school, multiple athletic programs, and a two-hour commute on the D.C. Beltway,” Stephanie Santos said. She explained that her husband’s business was outside Washington (Chantilly), but the family lived in Annapolis. “When the pandemic happened, we took advantage of the opportunity to re-evaluate our lifestyle, and the consensus was that we needed to slow down.”

Article by PAULA MAGRINI | Photography by ANNE CAUFMANN + JOHN MCMANUS | Graphic Design by JEFF CLINE



Bright and white, the signature approach for this waterfront haven.

Designer Sara Wiley Boyles brings the kitchen to life with natural wood grain, contrasting surfaces and healthy culinary choices

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he pause took them first to Hilton Head Island, following Stephanie’s 40th birthday celebration. Since her husband, Scott, had sold his business, he was able to consult remotely. The couple had always leaned toward the Lowcountry, and once they found the right school for their girls, they promptly relocated. “That was just the beginning of a path that took us to Moss Creek and homebuilder Ron Boshaw,” Stephanie noted. She and Scott had committed to Hilton Head Christian Academy, only to learn the school would soon make Bluffton its headquarters. The couple toured multiple Bluffton neighborhoods and were surprised to find their slice of paradise in Moss Creek. “The Moss Creek homesite is a gorgeous, deep-water location, but it posed building and design challenges,” said Boshaw, owner and president of Boshaw Residential. He was glad to partner with Court Atkins Group architects who spent months negotiating critical coastal marsh-front setbacks and other logistics with Beaufort County “The result was an updated take on a coastal, shingle-style home with plenty of room on the rear side for resort-style amenities and dock access to the intracoastal,” Boshaw said.

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The master suite sanctuary, serene and rejuvenating.

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Contemporary cachet, from basin to beaming sconces.

tephanie and Scott gravitated to the rear elevation in planning the “heart” of their new home. “The sunset views are so amazing that we decided we wanted to enjoy them fully year-round,” “We enclosed what was originally intended to be a screened in porch,” Stephanie explained. Months later, she and family are grateful for Boshaw Residential’s flexibility. Boshaw was glad to grant his clients’ wish. “We’re a client-centered team with the goal of building dream homes,” he said. “That may require accommodating special requests and going the extra distance, but in the end, we want all of our homeowners to feel as though they chose wisely when they selected Boshaw Residential.” Boshaw acknowledged that his company has thrived because they align their efforts with the right partners. To create the stunning Songer-Santos residence he teamed with Court Atkins Group and Sara Wiley Boyles of Kelly Caron Design ASID. Court Atkins Group president William Court said once his team had received the green light from the county to move ahead with the home design, they focused on the clients’ vision of fully leveraging the deep-water backdrop within a home for all seasons. “Outdoor porch living is at a premium and gives way to a wonderful pool terrace,” he noted. “Other highlights are a private master wing, functional working office space over the garage, and (of course) the second floor is dedicated to the “girls of the family.”

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Is this really a mud room? Looks pretty immaculate to us!

Where Stephanie and Scott say good-bye to cares of the day.

The owners’ entry is a prelude to the casual yet elegant vibe at this lowcoutnry retreat

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he finishing touches to the consummate resort home interior, guided by designer Sara Wiley Boyles, include a light bright palette, modern finishes, textured fabrics and an ethereal coastal vibe. “We worked with the open floor plan and ambient light to create a home environment that is harmonious with the waterfront setting, yet functional too,” she said. Stephanie, Scott and the girls continue their busy lifestyle at their new address in Moss Creek, with days full of homework, HHCA team sports, Zoom business conferences, slumber parties and adult entertaining. “But the pace is so much more relaxed here,” Stephanie said. “There really is no place like home in the Lowcountry.”

Bonus spaces allow one more layer of comfy, classy options for relaxing in Moss Creek.

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ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN

The New Look of the Old World THE RIPPLING TEXTURE OF SAND, LIME AND OYSTER SHELL HAS DEFINED THE LOWCOUNTRY FOR CENTURIES. NOW SAVANNAH SURFACES IS BRINGING THAT LOOK AND FEEL INTO THE 21ST CENTURY.

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t’s been said that necessity is the mother of invention. And in 2005, the City of Beaufort had one huge necessity. “They were rebuilding the waterfront and wanted to lay down something similar to what they originally had, which was form-poured tabby,” said Savannah Surfaces owner Jonathan Rhangos. There was just one catch. “Over time, mother nature had taken its toll on the original tabby, so it was heaving and cracking. And they asked us to find a solution that they wouldn’t have to come back and repair in five to ten years.” The City of Beaufort had come to the right place. As the Lowcountry’s premiere provider of stone, tiles, pavers, bricks and anything else you need for interior or exterior surfaces, Savannah Surfaces is well-versed in balancing beauty and durability. The situation called for a solution. What Savannah Surfaces came up with was something so much bigger than just one park. “We said, ‘Why not try making tabby as a modular paver?’ That way it won’t crack or degrade over time. And if it does it’s an easy fix,” Rhangos said. “So that’s what we did.” Whereas traditional tabby is poured in large molds, as it has been for centuries, Savannah Surfaces found a way to pour the blend of shells, sand and lime and into a paver-depth mold. Once the material hardens, they buff off the top and expose the beautiful oyster shells underneath. It’s the same material as the tabby that has come to serve as a visual shorthand for our region, just smarter. Their new product line, Old World Tabby, was born. The modular nature of this new product meant that it was easier

Old World Tabby Savannah Surfaces found a way to pour the blend of shells, sand and lime into a paver-depth mold. C2 MAGAZINE

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The New Look of the Old World Old World Tabby on display a variety of shades at Savannah Surfaces. than ever for builders and remodelers to infuse a home’s design with tabby, giving it that signature look of the Lowcountry. And if you’ve noticed how incredibly popular tabby accents and walkways are in new-build and renovated homes lately, you can imagine how quickly demand grew. “The only drawback is that it’s labor intensive,” Rhangos said. “We quickly found out we could only produce a certain amount. We produce it, then we sell out.” Once again, necessity reared its head and Savannah Surfaces was more than ready for the challenge of invention. What they needed was something that carried the distinctive look and feel of tabby, its contrast of gritty sand and sparkling oyster, but could be mass produced. This time, what they would create would prove popular far beyond the Lowcountry. “We came up with the idea of doing it in porcelain, so we went to Italy and had them digitally imprint the original onto porcelain tile,” Rhangos said. “So, it looks amazing, but it can be mass produced, and it has no absorption, so it’s low-maintenance and very easy to clean.” The skeptical among you might be thinking that a photograph digitally imprinted onto tile can’t possibly look and feel like the real thing. Which makes it unfortunate that you can’t physically put your hands on one of these Old World Tabby tiles through a magazine. Because in person, the effect is astonishing.

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Old World Tabby was used at the Waterfront Park in Beaufort, South Carolina. Get as close as you like, run your fingers across its surface. On some intellectual level you’ll know that it’s actually a tile, but your fingertips and your eyes will argue vehemently that what you’re touching is the same classic tabby used in countless Lowcountry homes throughout history. Every tactile nuance of tabby is there, the grit and the luster. It’s just more cost effective. “As you go into making this as a massproduced product, it’s much easier to install, plus it’s very durable and has a very good price point,” Rhangos said. “So, people who wanted the product, but didn’t have the budget for it now had a vehicle to use tabby.” These new tiles have already turned up in scores of different projects, ideally suited for pool decks, lanais, accent walls, and even driveways. As with the first time they poured tabby into paver molds, Savannah Surfaces knew they were onto something much bigger. Setting up a wholesale company for this ingenious new product, they began exporting the look and feel of Lowcountry

tabby across the country. Hundreds of distributors now sell tabby in more than 20 states as well as a few Caribbean islands. “The goal is to go nationwide in the next two years,” Rhangos said. But beyond simply selling a product, with Old World Tabby, Savannah Surfaces is introducing the world to the unique beauty found in Lowcountry homes. “We wanted to create a product that was indigenous to the area,” Rhangos said. “We have a lot of sand here, but not a lot of rock quarries. So, we wanted something that felt like part of the area and told the story. Because it does. Tabby has a real history in the Southeast … and people are always interested in Southern stories.” Visit savannahsurfaces.com or savannahsurfaceswholesale.com to view the full range of Old World Tabby.

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AR T I C L E BY CH E RYL ALE XANDE R

achieving • englightenment TOP T RENDS IN IN T E R IOR LIGHT IN G

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f any one feature in your home can make it look drab and outdated, it’s the lighting. Old fixtures, out of style chandeliers, and boring lamps can detract from the beauty of any space. The good news is that changing out or adding new fixtures is an easy fix that will bring new sparkle and shine to your home. Perhaps you want to illuminate your kitchen island, add some flair to the foyer, or put some panache on your patio—no worries. With today’s options, updating your lighting can be fun and uncomplicated. Achieving enlightenment is steps away. Lights are a major design element that allow us to manipulate the atmosphere of our homes simply by carefully positioning them and thoughtfully selecting the fixtures. Each room should have its own distinctive lighting; the perfect lights for the kitchen or living room may not work in the bedroom or bath. Sometimes we replace our lighting options due to upgrades in technology. When advances in fixtures and bulbs are introduced, we want them in our homes. Then, too, our styles fluctuate with trends and generations, from vintage to farmhouse, Art Deco to mid-century modern, etc. This year’s trending light options offer some notable changes you might want to include in a soft home makeover that will make a big difference. Before you begin, consider the following tips to help you select a beautiful fixture that fits the space: • Calculate correct size. Consider the size of your room and select the right sized fixture to achieve proper illumination and maintain style continuity. To figure out the ideal dimensions for a statement chandelier, a good rule of thumb is to add the width and length of a room and use this number in inches as the approximate diameter of the chandelier. Example: If a room is 12 feet wide and 16 feet long, add 12+16=28. The minimum width would then be 28 inches.

• Perfect placement. Use oversized pendants to proportionately accommodate large kitchen islands and open dining areas. Use thin and sleek LED lighting to provide the correct proportion for visual balance without overshadowing a vanity area. When replacing vanity lighting, linear designs offer a variety of installation options. When spacing allows, cluster pendants at varying heights to create a cozy living space. • Flexibility with adjustable fixtures. New adjustable fixtures are now available that can be tailored to accommodate the dimensions of the space. By simply twisting or turning these fixtures, they can adapt to your space and personal style preferences. The flexibility of these interactive pieces allows more options when selecting home décor and more opportunity to maximize space and investment. READY, SET, SHOP After considering these factors, it’s time to start shopping for some great new options as well as some updated, trusty favorites: • Mixed metals. Whether on a single fixture or within a space, mixing metals such as gold, silver, brass, rose gold, or copper is a great way to create a vibe that’s both balanced and visually pleasing. Pair “like” metals—warm hues with other warm hues and cold hues with other cold hues. Also combine different textures for a rich effect. For example, mix matte with polished or hammered


Vintage Edison-style bulbs demonstrate that some things just don’t go out of style. Their shape makes the bulbs especially homey, so they’re perfect for the family room and kitchen.

finishes. While mixing metals is a great design trend to create interest and depth in your space and create the “collector’s” effect, do it conservatively or it can look mismatched. • Refined retro and industrial. Being inspired by the past is not a new design trend, and industrial no longer means “unfinished.” A new decade brings sleek, sexy shapes and simple, utilitarian, and Scandinavian touches. Look for retro fixtures with artful details in neutral colors like white, black, and gray, and materials like wood, steel, concrete, plaster, and resin. These lighting designs are popular for over the kitchen island, above the dining table, or on the wall, and can become a piece of art or the centerpiece of a room. • Vintage Edison-style bulbs. Vintage Edison-style bulbs demonstrate that some things just don’t go out of style. Their shape makes the bulbs especially homey, so they’re perfect for the family room and kitchen. These bulbs are also available in LED if you want a more energy-efficient, longer-lasting fixture. However, if the authentic retro experience is more your style, for less than $5 you can still get the incandescent bulbs. Use this style to add warmth and softness to a retro/ industrial interior. For maximum effect, use a system of lights rather than single bulbs. For instance, find a chandelier that uses Edison-style bulbs or construct a row of connected Edison lights above your kitchen work area. • Mid-century modern and art deco. More and more midcentury and Art Deco lights are making an appearance. Both styles emphasize clean lines, unique designs, and a balance of form and art. Art deco lighting focuses on sharp lines and cool geometry. Mid-century modern lights revolve around natural shapes that integrate function and aesthetics. Look for sleek geometry and daring silhouettes that will make an artful presentation. • Bigger is better. In certain areas, big fixtures are making big statements. While scale is important, modern trends are leaning toward fixtures with big impact. Beyond lighting, these lights are centerpieces. Some have ornate designs 90

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achieving • englightenment that demand all the attention in a space. For best results, use such a fixture in a central area where it can create the maximum effect. You can balance it with smaller fixtures around the room to create a nice overall effect. • Artisanal glass. Lighting fixtures with an artisanal glass celebrate the time-honored technique of molding cut glass into sophisticated shapes and exquisitely transparent forms. Just about anywhere you shop, expect to see glass bubbles. Whether they cluster or cascade, glass bubbles bring whimsy and wonderment to any space. They are available in both clear and iridescent versions. • Smart lights. Several lighting products in today’s market go beyond the average by integrating smart home technology. This trend is now gaining ground, and lights are one of the easiest ways to dive into it. Smart bulbs can completely transform the way your home looks, and you can control them from an app on your phone. The app enables you to change the brightness of the bulbs, and if the bulbs have colored LEDs, you can change their colors too. You can have one light for watching movies, another for dinnertime, and yet another for reading. Switching from one to another is as simple as tapping a smartphone or speaking to your voice-activated personal assistant.

In certain areas, big fixtures are making big statements. While scale is important, modern trends are leaning toward fixtures with big impact. Beyond lighting, these lights are centerpieces. Some have ornate designs that demand all the attention in a space. • LED lights. More efficient and environmentally friendly LED lights are now easier to find in a wider variety of styles than ever. They come in multiple colors, levels of brightness, and shapes. While they will save money in the long run, the purchase cost is comparatively still quite high. Consider replacing one fixture at a time with LED lights. As you consider all these terrific new options, though, don’t feel urgency. The best lighting design is the one that you’ll love and that works well in your home, whether you are simply renovating or building something new. 

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ARTICLE BY CHERYL ALEXANDER

Selecting A Real Estate Agent THE KEY TO YOUR NEW HOME

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uying or selling a house is a major life decision, financially and emotionally. Plus, you’re going to be spending a lot of time with your real estate agent, so find someone you like. Working with an agent who’s been referred to you by someone you trust will allow you feel more comfortable with the process; people whom your friends and family like are most likely going to be people you get along with. But if you can’t find an agent you like through a referral, we’ve compiled some information to help you find just the right person to represent you in this process. In areas where signs are permitted, you might enjoy driving around and looking at neighborhoods where you can get names of agents from “for sale” signs. You might also enjoy attending

some open houses and meeting the attending agents in person to see if you connect with them on a personal level. You can always use online search engines, such as realtor.com and zillow.com to get ideas. When you choose an agent, you’ll be asked to sign a buyer’s agreement (for buyers) or a listing agreement (for sellers). Signing with an agent means they are generally obligated to act in your best interest. However, sometimes the buyer’s agent is also the listing agent on a property or vice versa. This situation is known as dual agency, and it’s legal in many states, including South Carolina. South Carolina law states, “A licensee may act as a disclosed dual agent only with the prior informed and written consent of all parties.” This can, however, create a conflict of interest, so you must

decide whether you want to work with someone who’s not representing only you in the transaction. So, what should you look for in a real estate agent? • Make sure your agent is licensed in South Carolina—or wherever you are buying/selling a home—by checking the real estate commission website for that state. Notice whether they have the designation of “Realtor.” This means that beyond being licensed, they are members of the National Association of Realtors and take an oath to adhere to a strict code of ethics, aimed at protecting their clients. • Make sure they have solid knowledge of the market in your area so that they can relay information regarding how long houses typically take to sell and whether they’re mostly selling at, above, or below asking price.


MAKE SURE YOUR AGENT HAS AN EXTENDED PROFESSIONAL NETWORK. THIS CAN HELP ATTRACT BUYERS IF YOU’RE SELLING AND GIVE YOU AN EDGE WHEN HOUSES MAY BE COMING ON THE MARKET IF YOU’RE BUYING.

A knowledgeable agent will price your home properly so that it doesn’t sit idle for too long. • Make sure your chosen agent will have time to devote to your investment. Someone who has taken on too many projects may not give you the attention you desire. Make sure they know your preferred method of communication: text messages, emails, or phone calls? A little of each? Time is usually of the essence in real estate transactions, so you and your agent should be on the same page. Select an agent who will be able to show you houses at times that are convenient for you. • Make sure your agent has an extended professional network. This can help attract buyers if you’re selling and give you an edge when houses may be coming on the market if you’re buying. Plus, a veteran agent can usually help put your mind at ease during every step of the buying/ selling process. • If you’re selling your house, make sure yours and your agent’s expectations align. Make sure your property is appropriately priced by inquiring about recent sales of homes like yours in the neighborhood. You and your agent should be on the same page about attracting potential buyers to quickly sell your home. • Make sure you are working with someone who understands your comfort level, both financially and emotionally. And notice any red flags, such as an agent who seems to be pushing a particular property or neighborhood. A real estate agent must employ compassion and understanding, it’s important to work with a person you like and can be honest with, and one who will be honest with you. Choose someone who understands what you want and will put your needs first. • Make sure you understand how the agent will be paid. Typically, the seller pays the real estate commission, which the listing agent splits with the buyer’s agent (usually five to six percent of the sale price). Sellers can sometimes negotiate lower rates, especially for a higherpriced properties, according to the Consumer Federation of America. SPECIFIC TIPS FOR BUYERS Here are a few things for buyers to consider: • What challenges are buyers facing in today’s market? A good agent should set realistic expectations by explaining what kind of competition you’ll face from other buyers considering the availability of listed homes. 94

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• How will your agent assist you in finding listed homes in your price range? Your agent should be able to give specific examples of how they’ve recently helped other similar buyers and give you a sense of how they can meet your needs. • H ow w i l l yo u r a g e n t m a ke competitive offers and negotiate the best deal? Your agent should make sure you stay grounded within your budget and goals. SPECIFIC TIPS FOR SELLERS Here are a few things for sellers to consider: • What are the comparable listings in your area? Your agent should be able to provide a comparative market analysis, showing homes like yours that were sold in the last six months. • What is your home worth and why? Your agent may not be the one who recommends the highest price. Choose an agent who can back up their recommendation with market knowledge. • What improvements should you make to your home? Your home may require some upgrades to sell, depending on the local real estate market. Your agent should be able to give you solid advice about what your home needs and the return on investment for making those improvements. • How will your home be marketed? Your agent will likely list your home on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) and real estate websites, such as Zillow. Get details about other promotional tools they might use such as photos, video tours, open houses, and advertising. The level of marketing required to sell a home depends on the market. Sometimes less marketing is necessary if there are more buyers than homes for sale. BOTTOM LINE The great way to find a good real estate agent is to get a recommendation from someone you know and trust. If that’s not an option, there are other alternatives. Interview at least three prospective agents and select the one who will represent your best interests through the entire process. Decide on someone you’re comfortable working with, who’s experienced enough to negotiate on your behalf, and who will represent your best interests. Hiring a professional real estate agent will allow you to make smart decisions and avoid costly mistakes.  C2 MAGAZINE

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after A bright white finish on the cabinets “N-Hances” the room and immediately enlarges the space.

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ARTICLE By Barry Kaufman

Take a Fresh Look at

YOUR KITCHEN Think a brand-new kitchen is impossible on a budget? You just need to N-Hance your thinking.

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ou and your kitchen have been through a lot together these past couple of years. You’ve tried your hand at sourdough. You’ve made more banana bread than anyone could eat in a lifetime. You’ve made your “nacho table,” even if you immediately regretted it (melted cheese, it turns out, is hard to clean up).

before

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Take a Fresh Look at

YOUR KITCHEN You’ve probably spent more time in your kitchen lately than you ever have before. And if there’s one lesson we’ve all learned from the past couple of years, it’s that familiarity breeds contempt. Now, having been confined to your kitchen for so long, all you see is a collection of dated cabinets and faded countertops. But having blown all your stimulus money on a Jet Ski (or, if you’re boring, food and shelter), is this really the time for a full-blown refresh on your kitchen? Especially now, when contractors are about as easy to find as leprechauns and unicorns (and roughly as expensive)? To put it bluntly, yes. It’s the perfect time for a kitchen refresh. Because it doesn’t cost as much as you think, and the company that can deliver it for you has a 10-year track record of satisfied customers. Andrew Ambler launched N-Hance locally a decade ago, starting with the simple premise that a kitchen remodel doesn’t need to be costly and take months. “It’s professional cabinet refacing from beginning to end, and I have guys who have been with me since the beginning,” he said. Transforming hundreds of kitchens every year, the team at N-Hance narrows in on the key factors that make a huge difference in a kitchen. Simply want to change the colors of your existing cabinets? Their refinishing is a breeze. Need

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Jose Marti, Andrew Ambler, Cristian Zavala, Cesar Cortez, Luis Rosado, Gerson Calderon, and Dustin Lamontagne. something a little more? Just swap out cabinet doors, hardware and finishes. With the team at N-Hance, you have a decade of experience creating fabulous kitchens at your disposal. “Ten years ago, people still liked a stained, wood-toned cabinet. That’s really changed to where about 95 percent of what we do now is a painted cabinet,” Ambler said, pointing out just one of the many ways kitchens have changed since he started. He also points out the rising popularity of a total reface, replacing arched or raised panel cabinet doors with shaker or recessed paneled doors. As you may have guessed, Ambler is a little obsessed with staying on top of the latest styles. “I’m a little neurotic,” he said with a laugh. But the results speak for themselves. Each kitchen N-Hance touches is transformed into something incredible, with just a few precisely applied changes creating


Transforming hundreds of kitchens every year, the team at N-Hance narrows in on the key factors that make a huge difference in a kitchen.

the maximum effect. For you, it means the look and feel of a completely renovated kitchen without the weeks spent preparing meals on a hotplate in the living room. “We’re in your home and out of there in three to five days,” Ambler said. “We don’t want to displace you. We want it to be completely seamless.” It also means you can rest easy knowing you’ve spent your money wisely, preserving what worked in your kitchen while enhancing everything else. And you won’t have to worry about the usual “waiting for the other shoe to drop” that can come with a full-blown renovation project. “When we give an estimate, we stick by that price,” Ambler said. It means an easier, more costeffective experience and a gorgeous new kitchen for you. For N-Hance, it has meant word of mouth that has carried the company through its first decade. “We don’t overbook, we don’t overpromise,” Ambler said. “The main thing is doing a good job, standing by our work and always keeping to our schedule … that’s reflected in the referrals we have received over the past 10 years.”  For more information, visit nhance. com/lowcountry or call (843) 715-8420 to schedule an estimate. C2 MAGAZINE

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HOME

EXPERTS YOUR LOCAL RESOURCE BOOK

EVERYTHING FROM CABINETS AND FLOORING TO INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE! MARk LYNCH, MiCHELLE ELLiOTT, DAViD ABNEY, ALLiANCE ROOFiNG, MAY RiVER PRESSURE wASHiNG, DACiA ALLEN, LYNN SHEALY, TiERRA SCHAFFER, DAViD LOPEz, HEATHER A. BAkER, jEFF HUNT, ALi HEAVENER, LENA SELLS, COLONiAL SOUTH iNSURANCE, AND BETH DEANGELiS



GENERAL CONTRACTOR

DAV I D A B N E Y

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A B N E Y

o truly experience the legacy of David Abney and DH Abney Company, Inc., you need only take a walk around Old Town Bluffton. You’ll see it in the classical Lowcountry charm of the cottages on Guildford Place in Stock Farm, or in the majestic commercial properties toward the edge of the river on Calhoun

C O M PA N Y Street. It’s in the vibrant downtown atmosphere of The Promenade, where Calhoun Street Tavern and FARM have ignited the culinary passion of the Lowcountry. It’s in the intriguing contemporary lines of Five Red Cedar. In short, it is everywhere. But then, so is Abney. “I have two employees, and we are on site all the time,” he

said. “Every day is different. We’ll be doing site prep one day, building trim the next … it never gets old.” If there is one line that runs through all these magnificent structures that D.H. Abney has created over the years, it is a dedication to quality. “We build high-end custom homes, and we build iconic commercial buildings, but above all we want everything to be appealing, to stand out, and to stand the test of time,” he said. As the son of a developer and residential builder, Abney has lived the classic story of the builder born with a hammer in his hand. Working at his father’s side, the younger Abney grew up on construction sites, learning the trade from the ground up. When it came time to begin building his own legacy, he started just up the shore from us, restoring historic homes in Charleston. “Taking something that was centuries old, restoring and repairing it so it still kept that historic look but with modern finishes, electrical, ductwork … it was a wonderful experience,” he said. And just as he had on all those construction sites growing up, Abney continued to absorb knowledge and experience on the job. “Even at that young age I was a skilled carpenter just from having grown up in the industry. But learning from all of these master craftsmen took my trade to the next level.” He brought that appreciation for quality construction and Lowcountry craftsmanship back with him when he returned to the area to raise his two daughters with his wife Kristy. And he’s been transforming the Lowcountry, one inspired structure at a time, ever since. (843) 683-7873 dhabney.com


ROOFING when it comes to making sure things get done correctly the first time. We are the roofer of choice islandwide, bringing our customers quality work and customer service others in the industry can’t match. Our team has been named the island’s favorite roofer three years in a row. You can count on us to provide top-notch roofing installations, repairs, and updates. Whether you have a minor roofing repair or need new roof installation on your construction project, we are the team to turn to. Contact us today or stop by our showroom to learn more about the roofing services we provide or to schedule an appointment.

A LLI A N CE

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t Alliance Roofing, we do more than install and repair roofs. We provide every customer with high-quality service and superior workmanship. Customer satisfaction is our number one priority, and we strive to make sure you’re happy with the results. Since 1995, our team has been doing everything

PRESSURE WASHING

R O O FI NG we can to exceed your expectations. Residential roofing is our specialty at Alliance Roofing. We’ve completed projects both big and small for homeowners around Hilton Head Island. Paul Bailey, owner, is a second generation Hilton Head builder, which brings an area of expertise to the roofing industry that is extremely beneficial

The Roofer to Trust on Hilton Head Island Since 1995 132 Island Dr. Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 (843) 689-9400 Allianceroofingllc.com

MAY RIVER PRESSURE WASHING

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ubba and Krista Flanders, owners of May River Pressure Washing, were raised in the Lowcountry in families of successful construction companies. The couple wanted to start a business to show their appreciation for the wellbuilt homes and businesses in the area. After much research and hard work, they decided to open May River Pressure Washing. “Our goal is to bring out the beauty of your home and environment. Using the most efficient and environmentally friendly products, equipment, and methods, we are here to help homeowners bring out the true value of their property,” Krista Flanders said. May River Pressure Washing serves all of Hilton Head Island, Bluffton, and Okatie; services include house washing, driveways, fences, gutters, patios/porches, brick/

concrete, and more. Using a hot water wash system, they work year-round and can tackle jobs of all sizes. “Coming from a construction background, we know what you put into your home and want to help you maintain it. We also know the true meaning of keeping things local and supporting our community. We are proud to be from the area and will continue to raise our family here,” Krista said. “We are here to serve you and are excited about the future of this business. We look forward to hearing from you!” For more information, check out May River Pressure Washing LLC on Facebook or visit their website, mayriverpressurewashing.com, for some amazing before and after photos. Mention this ad for 10% OFF all services. (843) 415-6545 Mayriverpressurewashing.com


REAL ESTATE

DAC I A A L L E N K E L L E R W I L L I A M S R E A LT Y

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IT IS ALL ABOUT THE WHY!

am Dacia Allen, full-time resident of Palmetto Dunes and lover of Hilton Head Island. I am in the “Helping People” business. Being an educator for 23 years and a Realtor for six years has taught me strong core values: Integrity is demonstrating strong moral principles and doing the right thing when no one is watching you. It is respecting others’ opinions, acknowledging mistakes, and becoming a role model for others. Communication is best demonstrated when a client has a question or concern and has reached out to you—when do you get back to them? I strive to answer

their calls, texts or emails within minutes. I know that when they get the information they need, they will know how important they are to me. Communication builds trust. Honesty is listening to your client, finding a specific home with certain criteria and telling them facts about that property and always doing your “homework.” I want my clients to find their forever home, and it usually does not happen like a TV show where they see three properties and pick one. Passion and dedication should describe how you love doing what you do. I love showing and selling homes, but the most important part is dedicating my energy to finding “the one.” I tell my clients that I want to help them become my island neighbors! That is so rewarding! Professionalism is the foundation of my business. I value my relationships with my clients, my service providers, my fellow Realtors, my local restaurants and shops! I put my clients in touch with a local network to make their transition easy. When you shine the spotlight on others, you will also start to glow. I want this experience to be as rewarding to them as it is to me! Buying and selling a home is a lifechanging experience. That is WHY I am dedicated to providing exceptional, personalized service to all my clients! 6 Lafayette Place, Suite 203 Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 (234) 575-1020 www.daciasellshiltonhead.com daciasellshiltonhead@gmail.com


LYNN SHEALY HERMAN & DAVIS PROPERTIES CHARTER ONE REALTY

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Georgia native, from Washington, Ga., Lynn Shealy fell in love with the Lowcountry 28 years ago while coming here for vacations with her family. She moved to Bluffton 16 years ago with her husband and raised two daughters. Shealy’s past career in vacation rentals and home construction made it an easy transition to selling real estate. Her experience has proven invaluable to her clients throughout the entire real estate process.

REAL ESTATE

on Hilton Head Island a superb accomplishment, especially in a hyper real estate market. Lynn was able to listen and meet our property requirements. We are so happy with our new house!” - Kevin & Trish Naughten Whether buying or selling, please call Lynn so she can help you start living your best Lowcountry life today! 5 Park Lane Hilton Head Island, SC (843) 422-5026 Lynn@hermananddavis.com

See what Lynn’s clients say: “Lynn’s local real estate knowledge, expertise, and patience made searching for and finding our retirement home

TIERRA SCHAFFER HERMAN & DAVIS PROPERTIES, CHARTER ONE REALTY

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REAL ESTATE

f you are looking for a Realtor, look no more,” say Tierra Schaffer’s clients, Helen and Dennis Kistler. “She is smart, determined, and extremely knowledgeable; she communicates often, and most important to us, she is trustworthy.” Schaffer is known for going the extra mile to ensure her clients have the best possible outcome with the sale or purchase of a property. Originally from Allentown, Pa., Tierra earned her degree from Penn State and moved to Hilton Head Island in 2013. She is a graduate of the Hilton Head Chamber of Commerce Leadership Class, a certified ambassador on Hilton Head Island and in Bluffton, and recently earned recognition

from the National Association of Realtors for practicing real estate at the highest professional standard. When facing a challenging market like today, Schaffer’s hard work, experience, and the ability to think outside the box puts her clients at a distinct advantage. If you want to work with the BEST, look no further! 5 Park Lane Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 (843) 422-3610 tierra@hermananddavis.com


LANDSCAPING

DAV I D L O P E Z FAT H E R N AT U R E L A N D S C A P E & H A R D S C A P E

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f there is one secret to growing lush, colorful gardens and creating landscapes that capture attention, it is this: the strongest plants grow from the richest soil. Their seeds are sown with care and cultivated with dedication and love. David Lopez knows this secret, because it is not only how he has grown his business, Father Nature, from a one-man show into a regional landscaping powerhouse, it is also how he was raised. Originally eyeing a career path in anesthesiology, his life was changed when his father passed

away in 2013. A landscaper himself, Lopez’s father left behind a legacy of hard work and a customer base who had come to depend on his expertise. “He had a few customers and some equipment, so I decided to continue that out of high school as a way to pay for college,” Lopez said. What became a way to make ends meet for a time became a passion and an outlet for the young entrepreneur to hone his ambitions. “I liked helping people and meeting people and working outdoors. I realized pretty early on that I didn’t

want to be stuck indoors,” he said. “I still plan on going to college for a business degree, but until then, I’ve been able to meet a lot of people who have given me great advice.” Now in its fifth year, Father Nature has quickly grown, based on Lopez’s own entrepreneurial instincts and the business advice he’s been given along the way. That handful of clients he inherited from his dad has blossomed into more than 200 local lawns, landscapes and gardens under the care of Lopez and his eight employees. Likewise, the slate of offerings Father Nature provides has flourished. “I’m thankful for everything I’ve learned along the way,” Lopez said, noting that Father Nature can now provide a complete design for your outdoor spaces including hardscaping, pavers, irrigation systems, turf and much more. “Plus, I have employees who bring a ton of experience to the team and equipment that allows us to pretty much do anything.” One thing they can do is celebrate, having won Best of HomeAdvisor in 2019. “That was exciting,” Lopez said. “We’ve had a lot of good reviews to thank for that.” Along with a business, Lopez has built a family, with his wife and two daughters joining him in his love for helping in the community. And family, after all, is how all this got started. “I think my dad would be very proud,” Lopez said. “I’ve been able to do a lot.” To see the full range of services Father Nature provides, visit fathernatureinc.com.


ALI HEAVENER

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HOMEBUILDER

L E N N A R

CO R P O R AT I O N

ot everyone in the homebuilding industry has a master’s degree in psychology, but Ali Heavener is not like most in her industry. A highly sought-after professional with more than 15 years’ experience acquiring land, leading teams, and executing on beautiful communities and homes, she is in a class by herself. Although a degree in clinical psychology is not typical in the homebuilding industry, it has proven to be helpful and certainly contributes to her success. “As a leader, my degree has really helped me to have empathy and understanding, and develop strong teams,” Heavener said. “I always strive to have a team of people who have the desire to grow. I want to surround myself with good people, and hard-working professionals who are successful.” Having recently joined Lennar Corporation, as a division manager, Heavener has definitely succeeded in that. A national home builder that leads the industry in revenue, Lennar was established in 1954 and has had the privilege of helping

hundreds of thousands of families across America move into the next stage of their lives with a new quality home in 30 states across the United States. “I am pleased to have the opportunity to join a corporate culture that is undoubtedly one of a kind and, without question, the best in the industry,” Heavener said. “Lennar’s commitment to quality, value and integrity is the underlying foundation upon which we were built. And today, with more than 60 years of experience behind us, this commitment continues to guide us forward.” Locally, Lennar has been building homes in almost every submarket across Charleston and Myrtle Beach since 2001, earning four consecutive Best New Home Builder awards from the Post & Courier’s Charleston Choice Awards. In 2021, the Coastal Carolinas division announced the expansion into the Savannah and Hilton Head markets, with the first community in the Bluffton area starting this year. (843) 505-7275 lennar.com

HEATHER A. BAKER (SUGARBAKER)

E R A E V E R G R E E N R E A L E S TAT E CO M PA N Y

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REAL ESTATE

riginally from Greenville, S.C., Heather Baker’s main goal is to make every client a client for life. As a successful, full-time Realtor® in the Lowcountry for the past 16 years, she has extensive knowledge of Beaufort and Jasper counties. You may hear the locals call her “Sugarbaker.” She has answered to that nickname for almost 20 years. (Northern friends used to tell her that she reminded them of the ladies from the show, Designing Women, whose company was Sugarbaker & Associates.) A Lowcountry resident for over 20 years, Baker has been married to her husband Larry for 25 years. Because Larry is an Air Force Veteran, assisting military families with housing is close to her heart. Baker is a graduate of Winthrop University where she earned her Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communications. She has been recognized with 2017-2020 ERA Circle of Achievement Awards and the 2016 ERA Leader’s Circle Award. She is a Certified Negotiation Expert, ERA Distinctive Properties Certified Consultant, Accredited Buyer’s Representative, Certified Military Residential Specialist, Military Relocation Professional, and Cartus Certified

Network Affinity Specialist with USAA and Navy Federal. A member of the Beaufort County MLS, South Carolina Association of Realtors, and National Association of Realtors, Baker has served on the Hilton Head Area Realtors’ board of directors since 2013 and was president in 2020. In 2018, she was voted Hilton Head Area Realtor’s “Realtor of the Year.” In addition, she has served on the South Carolina Realtors board of directors, is a 2018 graduate of South Carolina REALTORS Leadership Academy, a longstanding recipient of the REALTOR Service Award and supports her industry through participation as a Major Investor and membership in the President’s Circle. Baker is a strong advocate of giving back to her community and supports various local charities and schools throughout Jasper and Beaufort counties. She is a member of Zeta Tau Alpha Coastal Islands Alumnae Chapter and the Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary. She also participates in Realtors Helping Real People, Zeta Tau Alpha Foundation and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. ERA Evergreen Real Estate Company (843) 441-2787


R E A L E S TAT E

JEFF HUNT

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or some, the allure of Hilton Head Island lies in its white sandy beaches and its laidback lifestyle. But for many, the true draw of Hilton Head Island is the potential it represents for creating a better life. Each property represents opportunity, whether it’s to invest now in a place to eventually call home or

E S T A T E

to create new revenue streams from the always-lucrative rental market. Jeff Hunt is a Realtor who understands all of those perspectives and has made it his mission to help customers discover their true potential on Hilton Head Island, no matter what form that potential takes. For more than 30 years, Jeff Hunt

and Dunes Real Estate have been at the forefront of Hilton Head Island real estate. He has established himself as not only an industry leader, but as a leading voice in the local market. It’s a mantle that comes naturally to Hunt, having owned and operated several successful multi-million-dollar businesses over the course of his career. That business acumen allows him to truly serve as an advisor to his clients, helping them navigate the income potential of a rental or walking them through tax strategies as they prepare to buy or sell property. And that, ultimately, is what it’s all in service to: being 100 percent customer centered. For Hunt, his role goes far beyond simply serving as an agent for buyer or seller. “For me, that philosophy of being 100 percent customer-centered means walking people through the process, helping them to create value and solving problems,” he said. That dedication to service extends even beyond his own clients to reach the entire community. Every year in December, you’ll find Jeff Hunt purchasing bicycles for his annual donation to the Deep Well Project, as well as soliciting donations from his fellow real estate professionals to purchase helmets to help area children experience the joy and freedom of owning a bike. This annual event has become so successful, with 150 bikes donated last year, he’s extended his bike donations to include the Hilton Head Island Boys & Girls Club in years past. The difference with Jeff Hunt is dedication. Dedication to his fellow real estate professionals, dedication to his community and dedication to his clients, helping them discover their own real estate potential on an island he has called home for 15 years. Jeff Hunt & Associates – Dunes Real Estate 6 Queens Folly Road, Hilton Head Island (843) 422-5933 or (843) 842-0896 jeffh.dunesrealestate.com.


INSURANCE Greg Castner, Rob Hummel, Kristen Chao, Jake Veldran, Courtenay Shaw, Cathy Farmer, Cheryl Borghi, Nicholas Borghi, and Darren Greenlee (not pictured.)

markets. We look forward to continuing to grow our customer base in the Lowcountry for many years to come as our clients become friends and our friends become clients. HHI Office 15 Hospital Center Common, Suite 200E Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 (843) 785-7455

COLONIAL SOUTH INSURANCE

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olonial South Insurance is a locally owned independent insurance agency, specializing in homeowners, automobile, flood, umbrella and commercial insurance services. Since 2011, our agency has had the great privilege of serving the Lowcountry communities’

Bluffton Office 142B Burnt Church Road Bluffton, SC 29910 (843) 757-7455 www.colonialsouthinsurance.com

insurance needs. We pride ourselves on putting the customer first by providing top-notch customer service to meet each individual’s unique and complex insurance needs. Along with great customer service, we partner with a variety of the top insurance carriers in the South Carolina and Georgia

LENA SELLS

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K E L L E R W I L L I A M S R E A LT Y

ove for the Lowcountry and its beauty comes naturally to Lena Sells. “In my opinion, this is the prettiest place in the world, and I love seeing people fall in love with the Lowcountry,” she said. “This spring/summer, I think we have seen the biggest wave of new folks relocating to the Lowcountry, and it is fascinating to see our beautiful place grow and become loved.” It was a love she discovered for herself after moving to America 12 years ago from her native Moldova. Her real estate career began in 2012, working with her husband’s firm, which invested in tax liens and deeds. Helping people stay in their property and get out of bad financial situations led to flipping homes, which helped Sells segue into her new career. Embracing a philosophy of “Work like a Captain, Play Like a Pirate,” Sells balances her love of her business with the joy of experiencing all that Hilton Head

REAL ESTATE

Island has to offer, along with her husband and three children. Her endless drive and ambition proved exceptionally useful in her new role, contributing to her selection as one of 50 “Wonder Women of Housing” by The Mortgage Reports. “This past May, I was the second highest sales agent in all of the Carolinas for Keller Williams,” Sells said. “That’s going up against bigger, booming cities like Charlotte, N.C., Charleston, S.C., and Greenville, S.C. And I took the No. 2 spot in one of the hottest months of the year, in one of the hottest years of the decade.” Working like a captain, playing like a pirate and selling like a wonder woman, Lena Sells is living the American dream. 8 Lafayette Place, Suite 203 Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 (843) 415-5977


BETH DEANGELIS COASTAL LIVING TEAM- KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY WHO WE ARE For Beth DeAngelis and The Coastal Living Team, our clients come first. We listen to your unique needs, learn about your lifestyle and motivation behind making a move, and then put our knowledge of the real estate market and our expertise in the communities of the Lowcountry together so we can deliver a rewarding experience for our buyer and seller clients.

REAL ESTATE

WHAT WE DO With our team in place, we are well positioned not only to successfully negotiate the terms of the sale but also then diligently follow up, handle the details of the home buying/selling process, and ultimately deliver on the commitment we make to our clients for a successful closing when they entrust us with their real estate needs. That commitment is taken

seriously by Beth and her team to always be your best source of information and service in this ever-changing and often challenging market. Our promise to you: Your Property, Our Priority. WE ARE GRATEFUL I am grateful to my team for their dedication to our clients. That dedication allows us to consistently sit among the top 1% of the area Realtors in the Hilton Head Island/Bluffton market and, for two years running, the No.1 Team in all the Carolinas Region for Keller Williams. Our passion for real estate never sleeps, and it would be my privilege to help new clients realize their goals and dreams. (843) 271-4254 searchhiltonheadhomes.com



Are You Ready for

MAXIMALISM IS THE NEW MINIMALISM Article by Cheryl Alexander

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ike most trends, interior design styles come on the heels of other trends, as reactions—even backlashes—to the opposite. For the past decade, we’ve been driven by the stark, austere perfectionism of minimalist design, which can be quite beautiful and soothing when it’s done properly. But there is also a starkness to it, an unlived-in, sterile, and museum-like quality which makes it much less practical for everyday life. Recently we’ve not only had to make our homes our places of refuge and to raise our families, but we’ve also had to set up impromptu home offices and take “staycations” in the backyard. Achieving and maintaining the meticulous habits required of minimalism are simply unrealistic when one truly “lives” in a space. Enter maximalism For those who’ve been a bit starved for interiors teeming with color and pattern, meet your new best friend. Experts think it’s no coincidence that maximalism started trending during the pandemic. While being quarantined at home, people have been inclined to decorate their homes in a way that makes them


Are You Ready for feel good and that reminds them of special memories, hence the shift to maximalism. To look at a maximalist home is to get a sense of what the inside of a person’s brain might look like. You’ll likely encounter the places they’ve visited, their heritage, the random objects they’ve amassed over a lifetime. You’ll see the kind of details that lend a “cozy” factor to an interior, which makes sense when considering that people have been spending more time at home. Make no mistake, though. Maximalism isn’t about filling every square inch in your home with stuff, hoarding items and overstuffing rooms. It is more about the art of combining colors, prints, and eclectic embellishments. While minimalism is generally thought to be serene and quiet, maximalism is a more vocal style, composed of repetition, mixed patterns, saturated colors, intricate graphic details, and excessive, one-of-akind possessions and excessive but curated collections. Maximalism encourages utilizing space in the boldest, most ornate way possible, reminiscent of the stately English home interiors. However, the bold colors and modern accents are what updates maximalist style and makes it modern. Elements of maximalism When maxing out your home style, keep in mind that it’s all about you and what makes you unique. It’s entirely more personal than minimalism. As people, we are more than just one thing; we’re at once wonderfully complicated and multifaceted, so our home décor can reflect just that. This style lets your personality and experiences shine through much more effortlessly than in a minimalist space.

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THE BEST WAY TO ADOPT THE MORE-IS-MORE TREND IS TO START SLOW. ADDING COLOR, LAYERING PATTERNS, AND DISPLAYING SENTIMENTAL PIECES OF DECOR IS A GOOD PLACE TO BEGIN. PERHAPS START WITH BOOKS, THROW CUSHIONS, AND PLANTS. THEN SELECT A FAVORITE OBJECT TO PUT ON TOP OF YOUR STACK OF BOOKS.

Some key characteristics of maximalism to keep in mind are: • Layering • Repetitive patterns in prints such as florals, abstract, and animal prints • Rich, bold colors • Unique statement pieces • Mixing and matching of textures and colors • Multiples of items like books, statues, artworks etc. • Blending of styles—oftentimes but not limited to classic, eclectic, and boho Experts mention that combining rugs, wallpapers, paintings, and photos can be a great start for curating a maximalist room. Add furniture in different patterns and colors—with each layer sharing the story of your home or the people who occupy the space and filling it with the things you love in a way that can make you happy. When your home is full of all the things that you like, it can boost your mood, make you happier, and provide lots of different stimuli to let your eye wander around the space. How to achieve the look you want The best way to adopt the more-is-more trend is to start slow. Adding color, layering patterns, and displaying sentimental pieces of decor is a good place to begin. Perhaps start with books, throw cushions, and plants. Then select a favorite object to put on top of your stack of books. The idea is to add a few pieces at a time, ensuring that colors, textures, and patterns all work together and not against one another. If your space is small, then layering as opposed to spreading will be required. This means that the pieces you choose need to play off one another. Select items that have similar patterns or shapes to create a sense of cohesion.


For instance, your couch and your bookshelf might both have rounded edges, or you can pick pillows that match the pattern on your rug. If you already own a lot of extra accessories, consider filling a bookcase to create a sense of order. In a room with a stone or brick wall and a sleek wood floor, an exciting mix of mismatched seating will enhance the eclectic vibe. To anchor the space, place a patterned rug to pull the array of colors together. Consider covering one of the walls in a mixture of meaningful art or photographs that tell a family story or a story about your travels. Any bright, stark white room can set the stage for an explosion of color and pattern. Select curtains, rugs, and accent pillows that each feature a distinct pattern, utilizing three mainstays to blend them beautifully together: scale— choose items that each feature a different size of the same motif; color—choose pieces that feature the same hues in equal intensity; offset the bold patterns with solid color—for example, put bold curtains against the white wall and rugs and pillows up against solid color or metallic furnishings. Adding wallpaper, curtains, and decorative accessories in a rainbow of hues and motifs can help you max out your current decor. If you already have a room filled mostly with neutral-hued furniture, bring in some floral print curtains that burst in shades of red, green, pink, and yellow to draw the eyes across the room. On the wall behind the sofa, put some blue and white pagoda-

patterned wallpaper (or some other wildly delicious pattern that sits in stunning contrast from the other prints and textures in the room). Then use luxurious metallic finishes and colorful decorative pillows help to connect the dots between the extreme prints. Dressing up your walls and floors (and ceilings) may be the most fun way to rock the more is more trend. Nothing says maximalism like chinoiserie wallpaper on your dining room ceiling. Cover a wall (literally) with your favorite things, including treasured photos or mismatched art. Place little objects from your collection of travels or that tell the story of your work history or some other fascinating piece of you throughout the room, taking care to curate and arrange them in a way that appeals to your eyes and strums your heartstrings. Put animal prints, such as leopard and snake, on floors or as tablecloths, to serve as neutral bases for a maximalist space. The colors of the prints themselves aren’t over the top, so mixing these patterns can create a maximalist feeling in the room that isn’t too obnoxious or noisy. Keep in mind that even maximalist spaces need to have some negative space, which can help ensure the room doesn’t feel too busy. You can create negative space by leaving some parts of the walls blank, by having open space on shelves, or by making sure flooring is visible under a rug. Now is the time to mix and match to your heart’s content and allow your space to reflect who you are and how you’ve lived and experienced your life. And make sure to relish and savor in it for as long as you can because you never know what trend will be right around the corner. 

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Cindy Creamer is photographed in her Wexford home.

ARTICLE BY CHERYL ALEXANDER PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

Strong, Committed, ready to Serve ISLAND REALTOR®, INDUSTRY LEADER CINDY CREAMER

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etting a high bar and breaking barriers are qualities synonymous with Cindy Creamer’s brand of real estate. As only the eighth female president in the 77-year history of the South Carolina REALTORS® (SCR), her platform of strength, commitment, and readiness to serve resonates loudly, and not just with her peers. For Creamer, real estate is about a lot more than just

buying or selling a home; it is about advocating for her clients and advocating for the protection and promotion of private property rights. A Hilton Head Island resident for 40 years, Creamer received her real estate license in 2006 and is currently affiliated with Dunes Real Estate. Prior to real estate, she worked in sales and marketing and helped open the island’s first Marriott in Shipyard.


Strong, Committed, ready to Serve

After raising her children, Creamer’s husband, Mark (owner of Palatial Homes Design) suggested she get into real estate. “At the time, I really knew nothing about the industry,” Creamer said, “but because I have lived here for so long, I know all the communities (I have lived in seven different Hilton Head communities). And because

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I had such encouragement from my husband, I have been able to build a solid business in a place I truly love.” Aside from her husband, Creamer has surrounded herself with people she can learn from. She credits her mentors for helping move her forward. Early in her career, Creamer met the late Frank Nero—a friend, client, and mentor—with whom she could discuss the industry and economy. She also credits Charleston Realtor and SCR past president David Kent as her leadership mentor. “David is a great Realtor and friend as well as a role model and industry leader who helped me understand that I must work hard and give back to my profession,” Creamer said. Since commencing on this path 15 years ago, she has immersed herself in the industry like few others, which she believes has been the key to her success as a leader. Creamer believes that community involvement and being knowledgeable and up to date in the industry are paramount. “Knowledge is a priority for me,” she said. “There is nothing more important I can offer my clients than information. I educate myself in all aspects of this industry, whether it impacts the local market, such as flood insurance, or something broader, such as regulations and legislation at the state and federal level. All of it impacts my clients, and the more I know and understand, the better job I can do for them.” This kind of passion is what elevates Creamer and what allows people to see her ability to lead. Her passion for service began locally with different community organizations such as currently serving as a board member for Hospice Care of the Lowcountry and former chair of the Town of Hilton Head Venue Committee. From there she shifted her focus to real


estate industry boards where she became a board member for Hilton Head Area Realtors® (HHAR). “My desire to serve my industry was ignited as a board member,” she explained, “and I moved from membership to leadership by being elected first as treasurer, then in 2015 as president of Hilton Head Area Realtors.” Creamer’s next leadership role was as SCR regional vice president, representing Beaufort County—a board position which she sustained for two years. While serving in the regional role, Creamer was nominated by the membership and successfully delivered a second term as president of her local association. Then in 2019, Kent and Jean Beck (CEO of HHAR) encouraged her to step into a state leadership role by running for secretary of SCR, which with 28,000 members is the largest trade organization in South Carolina. In 2020, Creamer was elected SCR treasurer; in 2021, presidentelect; and now, in 2022, she’ll serve as president of the state organization—the first president from Hilton Head Island since 2008. While earning those leadership positions alone sets her apart professionally, it is what the roles mean to her that allows her to provide exceptional service to her clients. Creamer’s platform of advocacy means going to Washington D.C. every May to attend the National Association of Realtors® (NAR) convention and meet with legislators to advocate on behalf of housing and real estate—an area where she has made great strides. She feels confident educating local councilpersons and state legislators on what is important to consumers. Creamer has lobbied to ensure home and flood insurance are kept reasonable so that people can afford to own homes. She strives to hold the government accountable so that they realize how their decisions trickle down to South Carolina consumers. “What happens along the way,” said Creamer, “is that you begin to see the impact you have as a group of Realtors who are driven by working for the good of their clients. Then you can’t stop. You meet other likeminded people, mentors, and leaders and admire them and their skill at leadership and service and that motivates you to continue.” Creamer’s energy and excitement are palpable. Her clients, both new and

returning, understand that she gives back to the community and industry, and they respect her for her service. Terry Korte, partner, Lighthouse Harbour Properties LLC, shared, “As a longtime client of Cindy’s who has bought and sold multiple properties on Hilton Head Island, I’ve grown to not only respect her superior skill set as an agent but, just as important, her tireless dedication and commitment to the community. It comes as no surprise that Cindy has risen to the very top as president of the South Carolina Realtors Association. Her colleagues and the South Carolina real estate community at large will no doubt benefit greatly from her leadership.” “Cindy’s exceptionalism is forged through her unwavering commitment to the clients and community she serves,” said Daniel Moskowitz, Creamer’s broker-in-charge at Dunes Real Estate. “Her brilliance is admired through the grace and poise of navigating her extraordinary achievements as a topproducing agent, while remaining more accessible to her clients than most industry peers.” Creamer also loves talking about service opportunities with her peers, she strives to help them understand the impact they can have, and she hopes to inspire other industry professionals to give back. “I’m always looking for the next leader,” Creamer said, “and for the person who will replace me. In doing so, I can ensure that there is a great leadership team in place, working together for the good of the island and the state. Being the voice of real estate and earning the respect of the town, county and state legislators is huge. The NAR is the nation’s largest trade organization, and legislators covet our support.” Creamer’s commitment to her clients allows her to help people achieve their dream of homeownership—for many the most significant purchase of their lives. Her knowledge and persistence help protect private property rights, make housing attainable for everyone, and ensure that the government is doing right by consumers. Her best advice to fellow Realtors is simple: “Believe in yourself or no one else will. Never stop learning because knowledge is power. Be committed, surround yourself with like-minded, positive people and empower others. And if you really want to make a difference, get involved.”  C2 MAGAZINE

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Article By Tim Wood

Food, Family and Fun at Center of Month-Long Italian Party

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estival organizers, like the rest of the Lowcountry and the world, have faced overwhelming challenges over the past 19 months. Trying to keep events like Zinfest and the Italian Heritage Festival on track in the middle of a pandemic is like watching a Rocky Marciano heavyweight title fight. “That makes it all the more fun when we get out and get together,” said John DeCecco, president of the Italian-American Club of Hilton Head Island, the organizers of two big local events in October. “Johnny D,” as he’s affectionately known, said there has never been a better time to celebrate Italian heritage. COVID may have won a round in canceling the event last year, but it could never knock out the Italian spirit behind the pair of celebrations. “We are fighters, and we’ve all been through the ringer. But no matter the heritage, we have all fought through a lot here. We’re due a couple big days of fun, family and food and drink.” The festivities kick off on October 13 with the Zin Experience with Italian Flair, a night of wine tasting held at the Shore House at the Omni Oceanfront Resort. The night is filled with the liquid tastes of Italy set to be explored on the Palmetto Dunes deck overlooking the ocean. Guests have access to wine stations featuring selections of zinfandels, as well as an array of reds, whites and Proseccos. Zinfandel is a variety of black-skinned wine grape most widely grown in California, but wine connoisseurs have shown it to be the genetic equivalent of the Primitivo variety grown in Apulia, the “heel” of the geographical Italian boot. “It’s a wonderful wine that deserves the spotlight, but we honor all wines on this night,” DeCecco said. “We’re thrilled with the variety this year. Our distributors have really outdone themselves. It’s a big win for our guests.” Wine experts will be on hand to pour their favorite wines and describe what makes them their favorites. Full bottles of your favorites will be available for purchase. The event runs from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $25 and include a spread of hors d’oeuvres to accompany the wines almost as perfectly as the sunset. “It always proves to be a magical night, just a great way to get our celebration underway,” DeCecco said. Ten days later, the fun shifts to the Honey Horn grounds at the Coastal Discovery Museum for the eleventh annual Italian Heritage Festival. The event was designed in the tradition of New York’s Feast of San Gennaro, a day of food, music and

togetherness to celebrate the rich heritage of Italian Americans. The festival features food from a vast array of dishes for purchase from local eateries, i n c l u d i n g M u l b e r r y St re e t Trattoria, Michael Anthony’s, SERG Group restaurants Frankie Bone’s and Giuseppi’s Pizza and Pasta, and New York City Pizza. A $6 ticket gets you access to a full selection of traditional Italian recipes filled with cheeses, breads, pasta, fish, meatballs and sausage, along with sweets like gelato, biscotti and zeppolis and beverages like Peroni and wine to top off the perfect day of gluttony. A kids’ play area will also be part of the day to keep the young ones entertained in between meals. “I’ll tell you, our vendors don’t skimp on their dishes. They always come strong for this day. We’re so proud of the relationships we’ve built through the years. They truly make this a family affair,” DeCecco said. Music will be provided this year by the 16-member Hilton Head Plantation Big Band, who took over for long-time festival performers Larry and Claudette Tanelli after Larry passed away in 2020. “Those are big shoes to fill, Larry and Claudette always did a wonderful job for us,” said Paul Caimano, festival chairman for the past eight years. “We had entertainers from across the country wanting to perform at the festival, but the Big Band really won us over. I think they’ll honor Larry wonderfully.” DeCecco said the festival has become a staple on Hilton Head because it celebrates the deep family roots that are a foundation of Italian-American upbringings. “I grew up in the North End of Providence, Rhode Island and growing up in the 1950s and ’60s, my grandparents came from Italy. The pride, dignity and love they had for their heritage was only

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“GO BIG OR GO HOME, YOU KNOW? THAT’S THE ONLY WAY WE KNOW,” DECECCO SAID OF THE FEAT THAT HE SAID SYMBOLIZES THE ENERGY PUT INTO THE FESTIVAL PLANNING. matched by the love they had for America,” said DeCecco, a secondgeneration Italian American. “They came here for the American Dream, the opportunity they didn’t have in Italy. But one thing that they made sure they kept intact in America was the Sunday dinner. “You had to be there, period. It was all about food, family and fun. Boy, did we have a good time,” he said. “I ate two Sunday dinners with my grandparents. I’d start at my mom’s parents’ house for lunch, then go to my father’s parents’ later for dinner. Those full bellies, the incredible memories, that’s the atmosphere we create at the festival.” Plus, there will once again be a silent auction where festival goers can bid on great prizes like restaurant gift cards and golf outings, with all proceeds going to support the club’s community charity efforts. The event draws upwards of 3,000 people annually, with the biggest crowd coming in 2017 when the club organized the breaking of the Guinness World Record for the largest meatball, a 1,707-pound creation of chef Joe Sullivan cooked inside a specially designed pod (built by club member Kevin Lawless) and a custom-built oven. “Go big or go home, you know? That’s the only way we know,” DeCecco said of the feat that he said symbolizes the energy put into the festival planning. “It’s a Herculean effort our club members and volunteers put in, but it’s all for a great cause that we believe in so much. The members of this club believe in community first, and the festival helps us meet that mission.”

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The IAC funds six $1,000 scholarships given to area students annually, just one of the many ways the club gives back to the community. DeCecco is proud that even though COVID canceled last year’s event, club members raised enough money among themselves to fully fund the scholarships in 2020. The club is an independent organization that began under the UNICO National umbrella but has operated as a standalone group for the past 17 years. “UNICO, Sons of Italy, all the national groups, we all honor our heritage. We just found this was the best way to make the most impact locally, to direct the most funds back into the community,” DeCecco said of the club’s independence. The IAC was part of the movement that led the state to create a law officially designating October as Italian-American Heritage month in South Carolina. And DeCecco and the 130plus members also worked with the Town of Hilton Head to create a sister-city agreement with Verona, Italy, a relationship sealed after 240 club members joined town officials in a goodwill trip to Verona in 2019. “There are so many benefits that come from these relationships, from student exchanges to worker exchanges to sharing ideas and our best efforts in keeping our heritage thriving,” DeCecco said. The club meets Thursdays at Il Carpaccio on Hilton Head Island’s north end. New members are always welcome. To purchase tickets to Zinfest and the Italian-American Heritage and to get more information on the club, visit iachh. org. Tickets to Zinfest can also be purchased at the Hilton Head Wine and Spirits Shop at Shelter Cove prior to the event. 




This & That

C2 Magazine • October 2021 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

Are You Ready for Some Oysters? It is our pleasure to announce that there will be an Annual Community Thanksgiving Dinner at Hudson’s Seafood House on the Docks on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event is sponsored by St. Andrew ByThe-Sea United Methodist Church and Hudson’s Seafood House on the Docks, located off Squire Pope Road on Skull Creek. Celebrate the meaning of Thanksgiving with a free community Thanksgiving dinner, with turkey, dressing, and all the trimmings, served family style. Everyone is welcome! Come alone or bring the whole family. It’s always a place to meet new and old friends. The celebration, filled with food, fellowship and entertainment, is free to all. Donations are gratefully accepted and benefit Deep Well, Bluffton Self Help, and Second Helpings. Please call (843) 505-1370 for more information, to volunteer, donate, or even if you need a ride that day, or you may visit the website at CommunityThanksgiving. com.

Pete O’Reilly, new owner of Apple Appliance Center on Hilton Head Island, is thrilled to lead his knowledgeable sales staff and talented service team. After years of learning from the best in retail, most recently Circa Lighting in Savannah, he is committed to the exceptional reputation Apple Appliance Center has established in the Hilton Head Island and Bluffton area. Stop by the showroom at 20 Capital Drive on Hilton Head Island.

Article by Jesse Blanco

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s I write this, we are officially about 36 hours into the fall. You remember that day, don’t you? It had just rained for three days straight, and we got our first taste of something resembling cool morning temperatures. Glorious. Ironically, it was also the day I had a chat with Joe Cain, special events coordinator at the Island Recreation Center. If you’ve lived on the island for any length of time, then you very likely know everything they do at the Rec Center year round to raise money to help area children. Their facility is spectacular. Obviously, there are recreational opportunities for the island’s kids, but also educational. Pre-school and afterschool programs are a big part of what they do. Their events year round are generally fundraisers; it takes more than a few bucks to make their world go round. Maybe their biggest event of the year is coming up in a few weeks, certainly their most popular. The Hilton Head Island Oyster Festival is back to full speed in 2021. “Last year we had it at Honey Horn,” Cain said. “It was much smaller obviously. We had about 200 people.” That’s a far cry from the thousands they entertained in 2019, but everyone understands why that happened. We were lucky to see a 2020 version of the event at all. That’s all behind us. Time to look forward to what promises to be another great event in November 2021. “We are moving Saturday’s main event to Celebration Park,” Cain said. “We think that will lead to a larger turn out. It’s closer to the beach, and it’s the south end of the island.” Cain said the Oyster Festival has been ready for a larger footprint for some time, but options on the island were limited. Yes, there’s the ever-popular Honey Horn location, but the sentiment

was you needed to at least see water or otherwise be near water when hosting an oyster festival. Make sense to me. If you’ve attended before, you are in for more of the same stuff we’ve enjoyed in the past—live music, oysters, other seafood items, food for the kids in a family atmosphere that rivals anything you can attend on Hilton Head Island. All of that is Saturday, November 13, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Celebration Park. Friday night, November 12, from 5 to 8 p.m., there’s a smaller all-you-can-eat event at Shelter Cove Community Park. It’s a nice way to enjoy a beautiful sunset and some oysters, Lowcountry boil, or pulled pork. Food will be provided by Roy’s Place Catering. Cain said that by the end of the weekend, they’ll pull about eight tons of oyster shells away from the festival. They are taken to an island location where they are required to dry out in the sun for six weeks. Then they go right back into the water off the island’s shore to get back to work. Either way, if you love oysters, it’s a great weekend for you. If you like contributing to the bottom line of one of the island’s best non-profits, well then it’s a great weekend for you as well. The Hilton Head Oyster Festival will be held November 12 and 13 on Hilton Head Island. You can find more information now at hiltonheadoysterfestival.com.

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This & That

Fall Spectacular! A Musical Cabaret After a year of virtual performances, Hilton Head Preparatory School’s award-winning performing arts department is thrilled to have the opportunity to perform live in our third annual Fall Spectacular! A Musical Cabaret, October 5, 6 and 7 at 7:30 p.m., at Hilton Head Prep’s own Main Street Theatre. This hour-long musical revue is performed cabaret style and features Hilton Head Prep’s wealth of talented actors, dancers, musicians, and singers. From the youngest to the oldest, these students shine as they perform classic and contemporary hits from Broadway, TV and film musicals. Despite the challenges of last year, Patti Maurer led the Hilton Head Prep Performing Arts Department with innovative virtual master classes, three filmed productions and won the following Broadway Regional World Regional 2020 Awards: Arts Director of the Decade – Patti Maurer; Lighting Design of the Decade – John Dowbiggin, Beauty and the Beast; Production of a Musical of the Decade (Lowcountry) – Beauty and the Beast; Theatre Company of the Decade, Top Streaming Production/Performance (Lowcountry), and Volunteer of the Decade – Anne Middleton. Current Prep senior Anthony Sayneh also won the award for Best Actor in the SCISA Statewide OneAct Drama Competition. It was a very productive and rewarding year, and Prep is ready to get back on stage! Veteran Hilton Head Prep solo performers JP Carr, Cassie Cohen, Calvin Middleton, Jared Reuben, Hayes Wilkinson and Anthony Sayneh lead the cast of 60 students. Joining them are several new brilliantly talented students including Beatriz Santos Maylinch from Brazil. Under the direction of Lauren Stuligross, the harmonies are poignant in “The New World,” “When I Grow Up,” and “Happiness,” and Maurer’s choreography promises several showstopping moments in “Sit Down, You’re Rocking the Boat,” “Easy Street,” “We Go Together,” and “Consider Yourself.” The production will include the Hilton Head Prep Orchestra under the direction of Catherine Klimoff playing a variety of music from Vivaldi to the Best of Queen, and the Prep Band under the direction of Brandon Thompson playing their rendition of “Tequila” entitled “Chicken Nuggets” and “Africa” by Toto. These are just a few of the highlights from Hilton Head Prep’s Fall Spectacular, A Musical Cabaret, live on stage October 5, 6 and 7 at 7:30 p.m. at the Main Street Theatre, coinciding with the Town of Hilton Head Island’s celebration of arts and culture, “Crescendo.” Tickets are $10/adult, $5/student on sale at hhprep.org and at the door. C2 MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2021

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C2 Magazine • October 2021 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

GET OUT THE AQUA NET AND THE SPANDEX: THIS YEAR’S GRAND MOTORING FILM FESTIVAL IS OFFERING A THROWBACK THRILL RIDE TO THE BIG ’80S. When you think of classic cars, you might cast your mind back to the bold art deco stylings of the post-war era. You might revisit the sleek chromed-out lines of the great American muscle car. But for a new generation, it’s the futuristic slickness and sharp angles of the 1980s that define what a classic car looks like. In the ’80s, everything was bigger, louder and more outrageous, and that attitude was perfectly expressed in the cars of that era. The fierce tiger-striped side panels of the Testarossa. The flying doors and street-hugging profile of the Countach. There had never been anything like it before, and there hasn’t been since. When the Grand Motoring Film Festival returns to the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina this year from 5-9 p.m. November 4, it will serve as a

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fully immersive love letter to that big ’80s style. “The cars from that era are just so distinctive, and we wanted to not only bring our festival goers back to that era; we wanted to celebrate everything about the culture that produced them,” said festival organizer Guy Smith. The static displays on hand will celebrate the inimitable style of the decade. Along with the aforementioned Italian dream cars, you’ll see other iconic autos of the ’80s including the De Tomaso Pantera, Porsche 911 Turbo, and Mazda MX5. But the cars themselves are only part of it. Taking center stage during this night of retro elegance will be The Secret Race Across America celebrating the Cannonball Run, the famous (or perhaps infamous) transcontinental race that inspired some of the era’s most iconic automotive movies. That will be preceded by the short films Highway Violence, and Wolf of the Autostrada, a pair of cinematic throwbacks drenched in ’80s nostalgia. “The Cannonball had, of course, been run for years before the ’80s, but when Hollywood discovered it, people just couldn’t get enough,” Smith said. “The films we have on hand represent a chance for people to discover the people and the race behind some of their favorite movies.” Adding to the nostalgia will be a chance to step back into the neon-drenched 8-bit glory of the arcade with a big screen update of the white-knuckle racing games that made the era famous. You’ll practically feel the tokens jingling in your pocket as you skid across the finish line in pursuit of bragging rights. Then, afterwards, you can toast your checkered flag with hors d’ oeuvres, cocktails and the red carpet elegance that has defined the Grand Motoring Film Festival since its inception. Tickets for this annual celebration of the automotive and cinematic arts are now on sale at grandmotoring.com.


Callawassie Island has acquired Clayton Rollison as executive chef. Hilton Head Island born and raised, Rollison is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park and boasts an impressive résumé that precedes his latest move to the exclusive coastal community.

For those who don’t sing and play for your supper, John Prine may not be a household name. However, for many musicians playing and singing every night, John Prine is their Shakespeare or Hemingway. Prine penned some of the greatest American songs of all time. Some of his bigger hits like “Angel From Montgomery” were covered by the likes of Bonnie Raitt, Bette Midler and Miranda Lambert. This incredible songwriter will be honored on October 8 at Coligny Theatre for “A Tribute to John Prine,” featuring Matt Eckstine and the Slowcounty Allstars, Jessica Sheridan, Craig Coyne, Mike Korbar and John Cranford. Tickets available now at prinetribute.eventbrite.com.

Local nonprofit, NAMI Lowcountry, has welcomed John DuPont III as their new chairman of the board. DuPont is an experienced, retired senior enlisted military leader with 20 years of experience in the U.S. Army and 17 years in the Special Forces community. Currently, DuPont is the director of operations at Strauss Global and lives on Hilton Head Island with his wife and two children. C2 MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2021

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Hilton Head Island Mayor Photography by M.Kat

A Note from John McCann

IT’S TIME TO CELEBRATE ARTS AND CULTURE

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ctober is National Arts and Humanities Month, the coastto-coast collective recognition of the importance of culture in America. Launched by Americans for the Arts more than 30 years ago, this month-long celebration hopes to achieve the goals of focusing on equitable access to the arts for all; encouraging diverse communities to participate in the arts; allowing governments and businesses to show their support of the arts; and raising public awareness about the role the arts and humanities play in our communities and lives. Locally, our arts and culture community is a vital component to our identity and quality of life for our residents. The local economic impact of our non-profit cultural organizations is $39.1 million dollars for Hilton Head Island alone. This is comparable with communities four times the size of our population, and this doesn’t even count our for-profit galleries and music venues. Our town stresses the importance of arts and culture through activities that honor the efforts of artists, historians, teachers, and cultural groups working to make the arts and humanities a part of everyone’s life. Each month, for instance, Jenn McEwen, the

< Bluffton Mayor

director of our Office of Culture Affairs, highlights the work of Lowcountry artists in local media and shares how their work contributes to our goals. We partner with different artists on projects at local schools, in our parks, and in other spaces. These relationships have

A Note from Lisa Sulka

M AY O R

HONORING A COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE CHAMPION

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o many in Bluffton, she was Aunt Jennie. To others, she was the nurse who made sure every child in our community had their vaccinations, especially against intestinal parasites. To U.S. senators, she was their tour guide through the poorest communities, exposing the desperate living conditions of her neighbors. To the Ku Klux Klan, she was a force who defended her health clinic and boss, Dr. Donald Gatch. To her neighbors, she was Miss Kitty, who has left a legacy of serving others. The Town of Bluffton officially renamed its Watershed Management Building the Jennie Kitty Municipal Building, Thursday, September 9. Jennie Kitty, worked at the former Bluffton Health Clinic at 1261 May River Road, which was, until recently, the town’s Watershed Management Building. For three decades, Kitty tirelessly advocated for health initiatives throughout Bluffton’s African American community and the Lowcountry. She was a champion of community health. Kitty was a prominent nurse in the Lowcountry’s African American community. She also was a midwife for nearly 40 children, who were born in Bluffton and the region as their mothers were unable to travel to

Photography by Krisztian Lonyai

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resulted in large, colorful murals featuring powerful national and local figures and public art adorning our parks. Five years ago, the Arts Council of Hilton Head launched our local Crescendo celebration of arts and culture on our island. This festival is our own month-long celebration of our cultural community in coordination with National Arts and Humanities Month. Crescendo starts on October 10 with La Isla’s Latin Music Festival at Shelter Cove Park and closes on November 13 with the spectacular Hilton Head Island Lantern Parade. The celebration features over 100 visual arts, theatre, music, dance, history and literary events in between. I invite you to check out culturehhi.org, the town’s website for all things arts and culture, for a full calendar of the happenings that will take place. It is an honor to experience the creativity and ingenuity of our cultural community. I look forward to seeing each of you at the many events this month.

A Note from Lisa Sulka continued

nearest hospital. She worked at the Bluffton Health Clinic under the supervision of Dr. Donald E. Gatch. Dr. Gatch worked with the region’s underserved communities and, received threats from the Ku Klux Klan because of his work and the attention he brought to the living conditions, malnutrition, and inadequate healthcare in South Carolina. During some of these threats, Kitty mobilized her neighbors to keep watch over the clinic and Dr. Gatch’s family. Among the work for which she is most renowned was her effort throughout the community to eradicate intestinal parasites (i.e., whipworms). In 1969, she led U.S. Senator Fritz Hollings on a tour of the poor living conditions in Bluffton. This visit and the subsequent national media coverage resulted in establishing the Beaufort-Jasper Comprehensive Health Clinic. Founded in 1970, this clinic still provides health services to the economically challenged residents of the Lowcountry. Kitty’s motto, derived from the hymn, “If I Can Help Somebody,” was, “If I can help someone as I travel along the way, then my living shall not be in vain.” Kitty died March 4, 2021. She was 90 years old, and she helped countless people along her journey.

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I S C IANS MU in bathrooms MUS I C I A N : AZACH N N A STEVENS BARNES MUSICIAN: P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M . K AT 136

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What’s your sign? Sagittarius Most underrated song that, in your opinion, should be a classic? “Honey Come Over,” by Rocky Block Biggest compliment you’ve ever gotten from a fan? That I sound like Amy Winehouse. Favorite piece to perform? “My Mind,” by Yebba Smith What do you sing in the shower? Don’t tell anyone, but definitely Jimmy Buffet. Favorite cereal? Honestly, I’m not really a big milk fan, but I’ll always eat the marshmallows out of Lucky Charms. At what venue do you most like to perform? Lincoln & South; they’re just so sweet over there! Most requested song at shows? “Valarie,” for sure. First concert you attended? Justin Bieber ... ha ha, I know. Favorite artist? That’s a tough one. Amy Winehouse. Place you go to get away from it all? My truck Do you tweet, gram or book? What’s your handle? They’re all @annabarnesmusic. Who would star as you in the epic retelling of your life on film? Drew Barrymore First instrument you learned to play? Piano Song you were thrilled to finally master? “Yeah!” by Usher What do you wish you knew more about? I wish I were bilingual. What animal do you most identify with? A seal If you got super famous and had to change your name, what would your new name be? I actually use my middle name as my stage name, so I already kind of feel like Hanna Montana. What famous musician would you love to sing a duet with? Harry Styles  C2 MAGAZINE

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