Page 1

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

MAY 2019

Cute Clothes for the Carpool Lane

(AND FOR OTHER STUFF MOMS DO)

8

DO’S AND DON’TS FOR DIVORCING PARENTS

MAY 2019

The Future is

Now! WHAT’S NEW IN PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

Happ Moth y Daye! r’s

DO YOU HAVE A BITING TODDLER? READ THIS STORY PG 63

THE LAST CALL

A REMINDER TO CALL YO’ MAMA WHILE YOU CAN

MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS

FEATURING JOHN MORRIS RUSSELL

5 drinks

WITH MOLLY HORNBEAK DIRECTOR OF THE BLUFFTON BOYS & GIRLS CLUB


CONTENTS 05.19 “

There was never any doubt in my mind that my mother loved me, just that she had difficulty accepting me without wanting to wave some magic wand and change me into her dream daughter.”- PAGE 43

P16

EDITOR’S NOTE Musings on this issue

P18

A WORD FROM OUR MAYORS Lisa Sulka of Bluffton and John McCann of Hilton Head update you on town happenings.

P21

THIS & THAT

P29

5 DRINKS WITH Miss Molly O. Hornbeak, director of the Boys & Girls Club of Bluffton

P43

THE LAST CALL A reminder to call yo’ mama while you can.

P47

MY THREE DAUGHTERS ARE SO DIFFERENT

P51

SCHOOL IS OUT, AND SUMMER CAMPS ARE IN SESSION!

P32 CUTE CLOTHES FOR THE CARPOOL LANE (AND FOR OTHER STUFF MOMS DO) Mary Elaine outfitted by Birdie James

Happ y Mothe Day! r’s

DO YOU HAVE A BITING TODDLER?

Cute Clothes for the Carpool Lane

8

DO’S AND DON’TS

MAY 2019

READ THIS STORY PG 67

THE LAST CALL

A REMINDER TO CALL YO’ MAMA WHILE YOU CAN

DO YOU HAVE A BITING TODDLER? READ THIS STORY PG 67

THE LAST CALL

A REMINDER TO CALL YO’ MAMA WHILE YOU CAN

(AND OTHER STUFF MOMS DO)

MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS

FEATURING JOHN MORRIS RUSSELL

FOR DIVORCING PARENTS

drinks WITH MOLLY

Now!

HORNBEAK

FEATURING JOHN MORRIS RUSSELL

The Future is NOW!

WHAT’S NEW IN PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

MAY 2019

MAY 2019

5

DO’S AND DON’TS

The Future is

DIRECTOR OF THE BLUFFTON BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

WHAT’S NEW IN PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

Happ y Mothe Day! r’s

5 WITH drinks MOLLY HORNBEAK DIRECTOR OF THE BLUFFTON BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

ON OUR COVERS Photography by M.Kat Styled by Kaila Jeffcoat Clothing by Palmettoes and Gigi’s Boutique Hair & Makeup by Salon Karma Special thanks to Halo Model & Talent Agency

14

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

SMOOTH MOVES

P92

MIXX ON MAIN The neighborhood eatery that knows you by name

P98

AR WORKSHOP Everybody’s doing it!

P103

LOGGERHEAD LANDING An escape within an escape

P104

MORE THAN JUST AN ALL-NATURAL SLICE New York City Pizza: everything you want in Italian food and nothing you don’t.

P108

GET THE PARTY STARTED AT GIFTED When getting ready for your next big soiree, your first stop should be Gifted Hilton Head.

P57

P113

P61

P118

P65

P122

THE FUTURE IS NOW! What’s new in pediatric dentistry

DOES YOUR TODDLER BITE?

FOR DIVORCING PARENTS

Cute Clothes for the Carpool Lane

MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS

(AND OTHER STUFF MOMS DO)

8

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

MAY 2019

P89

HASKINS & CO. Where life meets style and girls go to have fun

P68

COASTAL TREASURES Let us entertain you!

P75

LOWCOUNTRY ATTORNEYS

P85

8 DO’S AND DON’TS FOR DIVORCING PARENTS

AMOS HUMMELL The man behind the Mayfest poster MODERN BARN A fresh approach to home décor and gifts SANDWICHES, OMENS AND FISH A writer, a publisher and two culinary men of the sea hit the briny blue like wolves among the sheepshead.

P126

MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS Featuring John Morris Russell, conductor of the Hilton Head Island Symphony Orchestra


GENIUSES AT WORK

play

Architect of Ideas Maggie Marie Washo Technology Mastermind Carolyn Hunter Kostylo Financial Warden Marion Elizabeth Bowser

FROM THE EDITOR

Strategic Partnership Overlord Ashton Kelley Harmon Influencer-In-Residence Kim Conrad Crouch Culture Maven “Just Kandace” Wightman In-house Jeweler on Retainer Kaila Jeffcoat Intimacy Mentor Lucille Rosita Gonzalez Washo The Gatekeeper Greta Von Bowser The Real Yard Cats Grey and Dae May The Cut & Paste Crew Jeff Cline Catherine Colby Fran Sherman Robin Ross Monica “Mika” St. John Writing Specialists Meredith Bannon, Esq. Lisa Carroll Becca Edwards Andrea Gannon Linda S. Hopkins Barry Kaufman James F. Mason, DDS John McCann Beth Ann Prince Lisa Sulka

Find Us Here PO Box 22949 Hilton Head Island, SC 29925 843.816.7022 kandace@celebratehiltonhead.com

F

or me, May means celebrating moms—even more than Memorial Day weekend, going to the beach or the start of summer fun. Think about it: none of you would be here reading this without your mom, right? (Technically you wouldn’t be here without dad either, but we’ll get to that next month.) ;-) This issue is our yearly salute to the women who kiss the boo-boos, clean the house, make the dinner and take care of the pets—with an air of selfsacrifice and devotion that’s instinctual. Raising children is the most important job women will ever have, and 56 percent of mothers are doing it while holding down a “real job” simultaneously. How do they do it? At the expense of themselves, most of the time. So, thank (or offer to help) a mom today. One of the things that’s stayed with me through the years is my mom always talking about a friend of hers who would come over and just “hold the baby” (I was one of five, so there was always a baby to hold) so she could do those little things like shower, put in more laundry, start dinner, etc. It really does take a village; the little ones are all-consuming for the first few years. At the magazine, we’ve watched Kim’s little girl Palmer grow up into a precocious almost three-yearold. And as of this issue, Ashton’s little Campbell attended her first creative meeting at only four months. (Both little ladies make a guest appearance in this month’s fashion spread). Even though I knew my future did not have tiny humans in it, for some reason I’ve always felt the need to help out my CH2 moms with flexible schedules and an open invite to bring babies and toddlers to work. I know it’s not possible in every profession, but when possible, employers would be well served by investing in their employees and their families. For this month’s “Five Drinks with” feature, Barry asked me if I knew any famous moms. My mind immediately went to Molly O. Hornbeak, the director of the Bluffton Boys & Girls Club for the last 20 years. I first crossed paths with “Miss Molly” back in 2010 as we worked on being the talent (and I use the term loosely) for Strive to Excel’s Dancing with the Stars fundraiser. Immediately upon making

2 01 9

her acquaintance, I felt we had known each other for years. She has the warm yet no-nonsense personality of someone you want to know and would like to be more like. In her 20 years at the Boys & Girls Club, she’s been a mama of sorts to thousands of kids. If you read one thing in this issue, read that one on page 29. For another must-read in this issue, check out Linda Hopkins’ article on page 43. In “The Last Call, A Reminder to Call Yo Mama While you Still Can,” Hopkins shares with us the moment she should have picked up the phone and gives us the not-sosubtle reminder that life is precious, and tomorrow is guaranteed to no one. So, say what you need to say to the people who matter before it’s too late. I may be getting a little pushy here, but if you feel compelled to read three things in this issue, flip all the way back to page 122 and join Linh Craig, Brody Weaver, Barry Kaufman and me on an adventure to catch fresh fish for CQ’s and Old Fort Pub. Also, be sure to subscribe to CH2- Celebrate Hilton Head’s YouTube channel, for a behind-the-scenes video of our day on the sea. While we are talking about videos, just a reminder that a lot of the stories we share every month have Behind the Scenes videos to accompany them; they are released monthly on our Facebook page, on our YouTube channel, and they even pop up when you are reading our online issue on issuu.com. Just look for this symbol throughout the magazine to denote additional online content. Welp, that’s all I got, folks. I am now off to spend some quality time with my four-legged child at the beach—like a good mom should! Cheers!

Special Online Content Alert! www.youtube.com/ celebratehiltonhead

MAGGIE WASHO Publisher / Editor-in-Chief

B

Lighting Experts M. Kat Photography Tr Media World

M AY


Hilton Head Island Mayor

<

M A Y O R

A Note from John McCann

BATTER UP FOR PARKS AND RECREATION PLANNING

M

ost of you who know me know of my lifelong passion for our country’s “national pastime” and of my diehard support for the New York Yankees. While their season may not have gotten off to the best of starts, the commencement of their opening day several weeks ago always represents a very exciting time for me. Not only is this time of year exciting because the Major League is back at play, it is also the time of year that we have some of the best weather on the Island. Many people actively enjoy our pathways, parks, and beaches at this time of year. This time of year is also special because it’s the season that Island youngsters take to the diamonds and play baseball. The Hilton Head Island baseball program is open to all boys and girls ages five to 13 who will play weekly games at Crossings Park. This excellent program organized by the Hilton Head Baseball Association via an agreement with the Island Rec Center is dedicated to creating a fun and safe environment for young athletes so they can learn fundamentals of the game and improve their baseball and life skills for success on and off the field. Several weeks ago, Town Manager Steve Riley and I had the Photography by M.Kat

< Bluffton Mayor

Photography by M.Kat

A Note from Lisa Sulka

WHY THE HERITAGE MATTERS TO BLUFFTON

T

his time of year is the start to many of our festivals and events. The RBC Heritage presented by Boeing, held in April, seems to be the beginning of this exciting time. Always the week after the Masters Tournament, the many volunteers and staff of the Heritage Foundation work tirelessly year-round to provide an amazing weeklong tournament on Hilton Head Island. So, I am sure you are 18

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

M AY O R asking, “Why should Bluffton care when the event is held on the island?” Did you know that more than one third of the volunteers come from Bluffton; that the scholarships presented to graduating seniors include Bluffton students; that many nonprofits that benefit from this tournament are based in Bluffton; that both high schools are involved in volunteering, and, in return, the foundation makes a donation to each; that ticket sales in Bluffton continue to rise? On top of this, our businesses see an increase during the week of the tournament, as a high number of visitors have found Bluffton and come across the bridge or river to shop, dine, tour our historic treasures, or just sit in one of our many parks and enjoy the scenery. So, you can now see why we are all excited that this incredible annual tournament takes place minutes from Bluffton. If you watched this tournament on TV, or if you were there witnessing the incredible talented professionals, please remember that while a trophy and a winning check were presented, the real winners are the many people and nonprofits who are helped as a result of the success of the Heritage Foundation’s giving programs: the Heritage Champions Fore Charity, Birdies for Charity, and our South Carolina License Plate Program. Since 1987, $41 million has been distributed to people in need, including hundreds of outstanding students through our Heritage Scholars program. This is a tournament that will continue to improve the lives of our residents and enhance our business and nonprofit communities, so I urge you to support these efforts. If you are looking for a way to help the tournament in the future, visit the website and see how you can plug in, perhaps volunteer, or see if any of the nonprofits in our town are areas where you can give back. The website is www.heritageclassicfoundation.com, and you can find them on social media sites as well. 


RECREATION WILL BE A MAJOR PART OF THE TOWN’S COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, WHICH WE ARE PREPARING TO UPDATE. pleasure of throwing out the first pitch at the association’s opening day of the spring 2019 season. This exciting event highlighted how important recreational opportunities are in achieving the high quality of life that all Island residents enjoy. It also emphasized how we need to continue examining the ways in which we can enhance these recreational opportunities into the future. Recreation will be a major part of the Town’s Comprehensive Plan, which we are preparing to update. In doing so, we will be undertaking an extensive study of our parks and recreational amenities. This will ultimately result in a master plan of what facilities, programs and services we should be providing to meet the needs of our community for the next ten years. I would encourage any resident who is interested in recreational opportunities to come out and participate during the public engagement portions of this process. Doing so will help to ensure that your voices and the voices of our Island youth are heard and incorporated into this plan. Now, let’s get outside and play ball! 

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

19


This & That

C2 Magazine • May 2019 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

S

OUTDOOR ART FESTIVAL PLANNED AT SHELTER COVE HARBOUR & MARINA

helter Cove Harbour & Marina on Hilton Head Island will be the site of The Shelter Cove Harbour & Hilton Head Island Art Festival this Memorial Day weekend— Saturday and Sunday (May 25-26)—presented by Nash Gallery. The outdoor art festival will take place around the harbor and marina promenade from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. both days, rain or shine, and admission is free. Based at Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina, Nash Gallery features the handcrafted works of more than 400 North American craftsmen. Family-owned and operated since 1989, Nash Gallery began as The Trilogy Gallery. Current owners Dale and Lynn Alexander purchased the gallery from Lynn’s family in 2003. The Alexanders procure artwork from Canada and the U.S. and at several juried festivals to keep up with all the latest trends in American craft. Guests of the Memorial Day outdoor festival can expect to find works in pottery, glass, wood, jewelry, etc.—all made in the USA. It will be a weekend experience of fine art, food, music and shopping at Shelter Cove Harbour and Marina. Artists interested in having their work displayed at the festival can pick up applications at Nash Gallery or online at www.HiltonHeadArtFestival.com. For more information, call (843) 785-6424. The Darius Rucker Intercollegiate golf tournament took place March 8-10 on Long Cove Club’s newly restored golf courses. Seventeen top teams from around the country traveled to Hilton Head Island to compete in the No. 1 women’s collegiate event in the country. No. 19 Florida State women’s golf took the 2019 Darius Rucker Intercollegiate title, carding a 285 (+1) to claim their first tournament win of the 2018-19 season. Florida State’s Frida Kinhult, a freshman, became the fourth freshman in eight years to win the individual crown, shooting a 204 (-9) for the tournament. For the full list of results, visit the Golf Stat website: www.results. golfstat.com/public/leaderboards/gsnav.cfm?pg=participants&tid=17683 Members of the local community are invited to partner with a Special Olympics Athlete raising money to compete in his or her sport. Each team will be given its own page and online link to share via social media and email. Donors can support a specific team by making online contributions. The dance party will be held on June 1st, 2019, from 6 – 8 pm at Sparkleberry Lane on Hilton Head Island. Participating athletes will dance in a mini dance-a-thon, themed as “Dancing Out Loud.” If you are interested in joining a team, please contact Kathy at (843) 422-5747. She will introduce you to your local Special Olympics Athlete, and you will receive a link to personalize your online page (assistance is available for this if needed). If you would like to support a team, please https://www.classy. org/campaign/dancing-out-loud/ c226208

On March 14, Cameron & Cameron Custom Homes proudly announced their new ownership and rebranding to Element Construction, following the unexpected passing of the original owner, Nathan Cameron, nearly two years ago. Element Construction is owned by partners Andrea Eldred and Brandon Edwards. Along with their existing staff, they will continue the legacy the firm has built over the past decade as a boutique custom homebuilder, while expanding their portfolio into custom commercial spaces. Their new name, Element Construction, is derived from the importance placed on each “element” or piece of the puzzle that becomes your home—everything from the team members you choose to work with to each individual light fixture, faucet and knob you select to make the home yours.

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

21


This & That

C2 Magazine • May 2019 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

WINE DOWN WEDNESDAYS AT VILLAGE AT WEXFORD

O

n Wednesday, May 8, the Village at Wexford will be holding “Wine Down Wednesday”—a unique wine tasting experience with live music on the patio that will give participants the opportunity to enjoy a wide variety of wines from VAW’s merchants. The event will take place from 5-8 p.m. at the Village at Wexford, located at 1000 William Hilton Parkway on Hilton Head Island. Tickets are available online at EventBrite at $10/person, and include a souvenir glass and wine tastings at all participating merchants. Limited tickets will be sold at the door for $15. Proceeds will benefit Hilton Head Heroes, a 501(c)(3) organization, bringing families with children suffering from life-threatening illness to Hilton Head Island for cost-free vacations. For information and to purchase tickets, visit www.villageatwexford.com or visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/villageatwexford. A photo ID is required to participate in the Wine Tasting.

The Town of Hilton Head Island Fire Rescue recently received the Insurance Services Office (ISO) rating of Class 2—an improvement from the last rating of 3 in 2012. Fire Rescue’s improved PPC classification is a result of the Town of Hilton Head Island’s continued commitment to provide quality service to its citizens. Fire Rescue suggests that both home and business owners contact their insurance agents to inquire about a reduction of their annual premium based on the upgrade to a Class 2 PPC rating.

Adventure Pediatrics welcomes Kylie Balzer, Christy Bowers, and Lindsey Coats (pictured left to right) to their team. Balzer graduated from USC Beaufort with a hospitality degree. She has worked in dentistry for four years and recently got married. Bowers is originally from Rock Hill, S.C. She brings 30-plus years of clinical management experience in dentistry. Coats, a 10-year Lowcountry resident, brings eight years of experience in dentistry and enjoys spending time with her dog. Kylie Balzer, Christy Bowers, Lindsey Coats

The May River Theatre returns in its nineteenth season to present Love Letters, by A.R Gurney, an emotional play that tugs alternately at the funny bone and the heart-strings. It tells the story of two childhood friends and their life-long correspondence. It is a tender reflection of shared nostalgia, missed opportunities and deep closeness. Love Letters establishes the characters without the aid of set, costume, or movement. Because of MRT’s desire to make a splash with their return to the stage after an 18-month hiatus due to Town Hall renovations, they approached Daniel and Debbie Cort, who have a history with MRT and a well-deserved reputation as outstanding performers. The show’s format is a departure from their previous roles which include leads in The Pajama Game, Man of La Mancha, and The Addams Family. MRT supporters familiar with their theatrical accomplishments have the fortuitous opportunity to enjoy the Corts’ first non-musical performance together. The show runs May 2-5 (Thurs.-Sat., 7 p.m., Sun. matinee, 2 p.m.) Tickets ($27) www. mayrivertheatre.com or (843) 815-5581. Donations: May River Theatre, PO Box 1674, Bluffton, SC 29910.

Warner Peacock, chairman and CEO of Peacock Automotive, has been named the Jasper County Chamber of Commerce Business Person of the Year. The announcement came during the chamber’s March 28 banquet at the Chelsea Plantation. Jill Jauch, advertising and marketing manager for Peacock Automotive, accepted the award on behalf of Peacock, who was in Florida on business.

Heidi Daly, owner and instructor, is pleased to announce the opening of Advanced Aesthetics Academy at 176 Dermis Ave. in Hardeeville, S.C. The Academy will focus on an all-encompassing program with instruction in aesthetic treatments, clinical rotations, and all the functions of a spa including client service, inventory and retailing. Daly, a longtime resident of Hilton Head Island, has been an instructor for nine years and in practice for over 13 years. Enrollment applications are being accepted. For more information, visit www.theadvancedaestheticsacademy.com or call (843) 784-3376.

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

23


This & That

C2 Magazine • May 2019 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

K

athleen Bateson is the recipient of the 2019 S.C. Arts Commission’s 2019 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award for the Arts in the Individual category, which is “open to individuals who have demonstrated exceptional achievement and statewide impact through their leadership, support, and advancement of the arts.” Bateson is president, CEO and executive producer of the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, a 2006 past Verner award recipient in the organization category. She is past president of the S.C. Arts Alliance board and served as the first chair of the Arts & Cultural Council of Hilton Head. She currently serves as chair of the Community Foundation of the Lowcountry’s Women in Philanthropy. The 2019 Verner Awards will be presented with the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards at South Carolina Arts Awards Day sponsored by Colonial Life on Wednesday, May 1, in a morning ceremony at the USC Alumni Center in Columbia. The S.C. Arts Foundation will honor the recipients afterward during an honors luncheon. Kieran Staunton has been promoted to the position of head golf professional at Berkeley Hall Club. He joined Berkeley Hall in May 2017 as an assistant golf professional and received his Class A PGA professional certification in February 2019. A native of Surrey, England, he has played on the European Tour, European Challenge Tour and Web.com Tour.

24

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

The Bluffton Police Department was presented with the Agency of the Year award in at the 2018 DUI Enforcement Recognition and 2018 Law Enforcement Driving Under the Influence (DUI) Challenge ceremonies held in March 2019. This is an annual event presented by the South Carolina Department of Public Safety that recognizes law enforcement agencies across the state for DUI arrests, DUI victim services, and anti-underage drinking programs.


This & That

T

C2 Magazine • May 2019 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

he Breeze, Hilton Head Island’s public trolley service operated by the Lowcountry Regional Transportation Authority (LRTA), returned to the island for its 2019 season on April 1. Enhancements to The Breeze for the 2019 season include: an additional trolley vehicle, matching the nostalgic style of the existing Breeze trolleys, complete with wooden interiors and seating; a revised route that includes new stops at the Village at Wexford and the Hilton Head Island Motorcoach Resort, joining the existing stops at Coligny Beach Park/Coligny Plaza, the resort areas of South Forest Beach, Park Plaza, Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina, and Shelter Cove Towne Center; and updated service times, with trolleys starting at 1 p.m. every day of the week, providing service until 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. The cost to ride The Breeze continues to be just $1 per trip per passenger, regardless of the destination or length of the trip. Passengers are encouraged to download and use the system’s two mobile apps: BreezePass to prepurchase trolley fares (including 7- and 30-day electronic passes for discounted trips) and CatchTheBreeze to track the trolleys in realtime for the next pickup. For more information, visit www.breezetrolley.com and www. palmettobreezetransit.com.

The Market at the Village at Wexford, an outdoor Farmers Market featuring local homegrown fruits and vegetables, fresh baked goods, meats, soups, delicacies and more, will be re-opening for the season on May 1 and will be open every Wednesday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. through the first Wednesday in September. The Village at Wexford is located at 1000 William Hilton Parkway on Hilton Head Island. For more information about The Market at the Village at Wexford and a complete listing of vendors this season, visit https://www.facebook.com/ villageatwexford. If you are interested in being a vendor at The Market at The Village at Wexford, contact Michele at shoessox@aol.com.

Just Glow Spray Tanning announces the addition of its newest team member, Stephany Voss, formerly of Bluffton Bronze spray tanning. Voss joins Just Glow founder Lisa Lewellen in her desire to provide an alternative to traditional tanning, offering multiple types of spray-tan options.

The Sonesta Resort Hilton Head Island has expanded its sales and catering team with the addition of Lindsay Wooten as conference services manager. In her new position, Wooten is responsible for coordinating meetings, conventions and events at the resort.

Local specialty running store, Palmetto Running Company, has been named one of the 2019 Best Running Stores in America. With over 15,000 nominations and stores around the country, they have finished in the Top 50. The company will attend the final awards and conference in El Conquistador, Tucson, in May 2019. Winning stores were selected using scoring criteria including online ratings provided by consumers, a questionnaire completed by nominated stores, and sponsoring vendor feedback, as well as a “secret shop” by contest judges. The secret shop analyzes the store’s greeting, fitting process, sales associate knowledge, store appearance, store operations, purchase details, and the overall experience.

Months of speaker curation and preparation have led up to the next TEDxHiltonHead event, which shares the community’s ideas worth spreading. The locally organized event is centered around this year’s theme of reinvention and features 20 inspiring local and regional speakers.

WHAT: TEDxHiltonHead Reinvention 2019. TED is a non-profit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks. WHEN: Saturday May 11. Registration starts at 8:15 a.m. Live program runs 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. WHERE: SoundWaves, the new Hilton Head Symphony Orchestra Performing Arts Center, 7 Lagoon Road, Suite 100. TICKETS: $75, includes presentations, continental breakfast and catered lunch. Tickets are available at http://bit.ly/tedxhhi2019. Advance purchase recommended.

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

25


This & That

C2 Magazine • May 2019 Edition

Wells Fargo Advisors has, once again, designated Jason B. Ford, managing director-investments, as a member of the firm’s Premier Advisor program for the fourth year. The Premier Advisor designation is held by a select group of financial advisors who have met or exceeded the firm’s standards of three or more of the following: length of service with the firm, completion of educational components, business production, and professionalism.

Professional Tennis Registry (PTR) is pleased to welcome Milena Stephens as its new education administrative coordinator. In this position, Stephens will ensure that every member has the resources to be fully prepared for a certification workshop or event, serving as the liaison between hosts and participants to guarantee each has the best possible and most rewarding experience.

Long Cove Club has hired John Soulia as executive chef. Soulia brings more than 21 years of culinary leadership and management to the team, including six years as director of food and beverage at Berkeley Hall and highly successful tenures at Belfair and Hampton Hall Club.

The International Junior Golf Academy (IJGA), the oldest, independent junior golf academy in the nation, is proud to announce that Jonathan Yarwood, director of golf and instruction, has been named to GOLF Magazine’s Top 100 Teachers in America, the longest-running list of elite teachers (25 years and counting.) Yarwood, a British PGA Master Professional, is one of 16 new members on the list this year.

Do you have a wedding announcement, career move, special event or charitable cause to announce? Email one to two sentences along with a photo to hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com

26

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE


Molly and Barry meet at the bar on a busy night at Sigler’s Rotisserie in Bluffton.

5 DRINKS WITH:

molly o.

5

hornbeak a DIRECTOR OF THE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF BLUFFTON

For 20 years, “Miss Molly” has been a fearless force for change in Bluffton. Through her constant effort and boundless enthusiasm, she has forged a path for the Boys & Girls Club of Bluffton that has taken it from a handful of dilapidated trailers to a beautiful and everexpanding facility. SHE’S DRINKING: CLUB SODA LIKE THE POSITIVE ROLE MODEL SHE IS

I’M DRINKING: WOODLAND RESERVE

Article by Barry Kaufman Photography by M.Kat

long the way, she’s touched thousands of lives, shaping vulnerable youth into successful adults. From pounding the pavement raising funds to spending one-on-one time with a child in need, she is tireless in her love for the club she’s been a part of for 20 years. As we sat down at Sigler’s Rotisserie for a few drinks and some oysters Rockefeller, she’d just wrapped three hours spent counseling a child. Barry Kaufman: Is that typically part of your day? Miss Molly: I never know how my day is going to go. I have some things I have to do, but as soon as I walk in the door the whole thing turns into something else. It’s a big part of my job. It doesn’t just stop with the children. It’s the parents and the staff; it goes on and on. BK: How long have you been doing this? MH: Since 1998. I’ve been the one and only director of the Boys & Girls Club of Bluffton for 20 years. I’m working on my second 20. I’m excited about that. When they hired me, they had already signed up 250 children. They hired the staff, then they came and looked for the director. BK: That is pretty much the definition of the cart before the horse. MH: Yes. They interviewed me at Hilton Head, and we opened up in the schools at M.C. Riley. And the summertime is the worst time you can open up a Boys & Girls Club. It’s very intense, and it’s 7:00 to 7:00—long days. I went to see the club at M.C. Riley and just observed for the first couple of days. Then I went home and cried for the next couple of days. I did not know what I had gotten myself into. My husband said, “If you can make a difference in one child’s life, you’ve done a lot.” So, I stuck with it, and when I went back, I suspended 24 children. They were outrageous—having fights with each other,

drawing blood, and half of them were brothers and sisters with different names. I didn’t know any of that. So, when I went back, I said, “You, you, you and you are suspended. Outta here. Suspended—two to three days.”

everything that we do is about building character. BK: What happened after you kicked those 24 kids out? MH: The parents all said to them, “You better get back in there and do what that woman tells you to do.” Where else can you get daycare for $45 a year? I’m very adamant that we’re not a babysitting service. Everything that we do is about building character. We have a five-part program: character leadership development; healthy lifestyles; the arts; sports, fitness and recreation; and education and career development. We have probably dozens of programs that support that. And everything we do, we measure. Because if I can prove to you the impact, then investing in the future is easy for our donors. BK: How do you measure that? MH: We have evidence-based programs that we measure, pre- and post-tests, they’re journaling what they think. I’ll give you a line of questions about a particular goal we have, and then, at the end, we give you the same test and see how you answered it differently. BK: What were those early years like? MH: We spent that first summer in the schools. M.C. Riley was only one elementary school in Bluffton, and it was bursting at the seams. They probably had a thousand children in a school that only held 700. Of course, they had to have mobile classrooms in the back. The next thing I know, they were C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

29


5 DRINKS WITH: molly hornbeak building Bluffton Elementary, so half those kids were going to go out there, which freed up the mobiles. I went to the principal and said, “Look. Being in the school wasn’t easy. Our hands were tied. We were programming in really limited spaces. My office was literally a closet.” He said, “You got something there. It’s going to keep growing around here, and it would probably be easier to keep them here than lose them and try to get them back.” So, he gave us 11 mobiles. Each one was a designated program area: technology, art, games, my office, canteen … it was like a village. So that worked out. Five years later we were falling through the floors of the mobile units. They were dilapidated. These babies deserve a clean environment. I went to my board to see about a facility, and they

30

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

told me there was no money in this area. I said, “Tell you what, give me one hour out into the community. If I come back with a substantial amount of money, would you think about doing a capital campaign so we can build a facility?” My CEO at the time said, “Oh, let her go.” Little did they know I had my friend Harry Gilmore on speed dial, and I said, “I’m coming to get the check.” And he brought me back a $50,000 check. He made it very clear to the board at that time that I was the only woman he’d ever given this amount of money to. BK: Is it tough juggling that level of strategic planning and fundraising against one-on-one time with kids? MH: I will stop everything when it comes to that child, if it’s serious. Otherwise, I have a great team of people. They will tell you they bleed blue. So, I get to concentrate on the funds and my vision for this organization. BK: And what is that vision? MH: I love to serve Bluffton. The growth that’s taking place in Bluffton, I have 500 kids on the waiting list, and it is killing me. One of the things we realized is a lot of the children are not reading on grade level. So, we decided to test everyone that’s a member in order to target those reading 25-50 percentile below grade level and put them in our reading program. It was mind-boggling to find out that’s how they build prisons. They determine whether that child is reading by the third

grade, and if he’s not, that’s how they decide how many prisons they need. We can’t save the world, but we can chip away at it a little bit. Every child in this program for a year or more is reading at two grades above. We had a donor say, “You keep turning out those numbers, I’ll fund this program.” They wanted to remain anonymous, but they’re funding our reading program and have for the last six years. And now I have 100 kids that can’t get in. I don’t have space. So, I’m screaming, “We need to expand.” They finally decided to run a campaign to build a literacy center. My vision is run a campaign to generate a $6 million

my vision is to run a campaign to generate a $6 million endowment... we raised $650,000 and extended one wing for the literacy project...i’m excited about that.


endowment so we can live. I’m tired of begging. I’ve been begging for 20 years. And sure enough, we raised $650,000 and extended one wing for the literacy project. That’s going to free up our current IT program to expand technology. I’m excited about that. I have kids today who have been there 20 years say, “Miss Molly, when we were in those trailers, all you talked about was building this facility. We never thought you were going to do it.” BK: That’s got to be interesting, seeing kids who grew up in your programs as adults. MH: I have a second generation now. I have their babies. The amazing thing is that they’ve come home. You know? Especially those that drove you crazy when you were trying to help them understand. The only children that I knew really well are the ones that got into trouble. Now, when their children come in acting like their parents did when I had them, I pull their files and say, “Let me show you what your mommy and daddy did—what you’re not going to do.” BK: What gets you up in the morning? MH: I can’t wait to see what God has in store for me. Because I am committed. I’m being used by the Almighty to do this job. What a wonderful gift and a blessing to know what your purpose is. I’m ready for anything that comes my way but putting God first—that’s how I operate. When you walk into the facility, it says on the wall, “I believe in God and the right to worship according to my own faith and religion. I believe in America and the American way of life and the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. I believe in fair play and sportsmanship. I believe my Boys & Girls Club stands for all these things.” It was not easy to get that on the wall. My board of directors said we don’t want to offend anyone who comes across the threshold with that. BK: When was this? MH: When we were opening the club in 2005. I told them, “I would like for you to open your billfolds and take out a dollar bill and read where it says in God we Trust. Are you offended? No? Let them put it up.”

families, church and community, if any of them have a weakness, that allows guns and drugs to infiltrate that child’s life. So, I would make sure that those were strong. BK: And how do you do that? MH: I don’t know if I have the solution to those problems, but I feel like if I had that kind of freedom, I could make a huge impact on these babies in this community. I always said that being where I am, I want the Boys & Girls Club of Bluffton to be nationally known. BK: When your second 20 years are over, what do you think are going to be the big highlights of your career? MH: The children say to me, and I don’t think this, because I don’t take any credit for what happens in Boys & Girls Club, “Molly you’re a legacy. You know that, don’t you?” I say, “No, I don’t know that.” BK: What does a legacy mean to you? MH: Maybe I’ve made a difference in the community. And it wasn’t easy. They talk about a cumyah and a binyah. When you’re a cumyah, nobody trusts you. That’s one of the things I can say: I’ve been who I am from start to finish. They trust me. I think that’s a huge accomplishment. I had to have a couple native islanders to endorse me in order to even reach that level. Being part of this organization, if somebody gives me two dollars and says you need to buy two red crayons, you can believe I’m buying two red crayons. It’s that trust. And I’m excited to show them that investment. I think that the best thing to invest in is our future. I have the best team—I really do. And it takes that kind of effort to pull that off. The community is what makes this club so outstanding. When you have that support from the community, the sky’s the limit. Our slogan is to build a better Bluffton one child at a time. And we’re doing that. 

BK: There’s a tendency to think kids these days are worse. Are you seeing that? MH: What I see is that the mothers are young, and the grandmothers are younger. The family structure makes a huge difference in how these babies are being guided and directed. They are lacking that GPS that a child needs. For the most part, they’re dysfunctional families. They don’t have the mother and the father. And the lack of male role models is huge. I witness today more single dads than I ever have. It seems like the women are taking off first. I don’t understand a mother that can desert a child. BK: Was it tough raising a kid while raising several hundred other kids? MH: Actually, it was a blessing to my daughter. She was praying for a sister or brother. Little did she know she was going to get 250 of them. You better be careful what you pray for. She grew up in the club with me, and she did cheerleading and fell in love with the children. And they fell in love with her. BK: Is your disciplinary style similar with your own kids and kids in the club? MH: When I accepted this job, I had no clue about the Boys & Girls Club and what that was. I operated from my heart and my soul—in what I believed in, in raising children. I went to my CPO and said, “You haven’t been around to see if I’m doing anything right.” And he said to me, “Some people can pick up the ball and run with it. And some people can’t. I have clubs that have been in existence much longer than you’ve been around, and you’re doing much better. I have to monitor them. I don’t worry about you.” BK: If budget and reality were no constraints, what would be the dream for you? MH: I would put that armor of protection all around those children. If you look at that child and the four cornerstones: schools, C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

31


P

H

O T O

G

R

A

P

H

Y

B Y

M

.

K A T

e T U

C CH2 stylist approved!

Styling by Kaila Jeffcoat Hair & Makeup by Salon Karma Classic Car courtesy of Carolyn K. Modeled by Mary Elaine of Halo Model & Talent

Subscribe to Celebrate Hilton Headâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s YouTube channel and check out the Behind the Scenes video for this shoot!

s E h T LOor f e th L o r a Po e N a

C Cl

Prices change and human error occurs- please see store listed for official pricing on all items.

(and for other stuff moms do)


THE PLAYFUL MOM Velvet Heart Demin romper $83, Twine and Twig necklace $135, Bracelet $30, Earrings $33, Coconuts sandals $80

OUTFIT T IP:

Available at Gigi’s Boutique

IT’S ABOUT TO BE ALL SORTS OF HOT IN THE SOUTH, AND THIS SHORT CHAMBRAY ROMPER IS PERFECT FOR KEEPING YOUR COOL.

Meet Mary Elaine: Actual mom of two and part-time model.

Meet Palmer Pritchard: Speed demon.

LOOK! POCKETS!

OUTFIT T IP: CUTE FLATS IN A VARIETY OF STYLES ARE A MUST FOR MOMS.


THE WINE/ COCKTAIL HOUR ON THE PORCH WITH GIRLFRIENDS MOM

! Copperhead snakeskin print to remind everyone to watch where you are stepping for the next four months.

LISTEN! RAISING CHILDREN IS HARD. THE MOST DIFFICULT JOB YOU’LL EVER DO — AND THE MOST IMPORTANT, TOO. SOMETIMES ALL MAMA NEEDS IS A GLASS OF WINE AND SOME GOOD GOSSIP ON THE FRONT PORCH WITH HER BEST FRIEND. NO JUDGMENT HERE.

Lysse Orange snakeskin blouse $98, Elliott Lauren Off-white pants $159.95, Necklace $129, Earrings $29, Bracelet $49 Available at Pink Pineapple

MACHINE WASHABLE JEANS.


! ALL MACHINE WASHABLE

COMFORT FIRST This outfit looks like a million bucks but feels like pajamas.

THE WORKING MOM Birdie James label Navy Tank $38, Birdie James label Navy blouse $78, Birdie James label White pant $98, Selena King earrings $265, Selena King cuff $285, GiGi New York bag $325, Clutch $175 Available at Birdie James

UTe s E h T LO

C

C

This giant bag is great for spare outfits, diapers, binkies, cookies, bottles, stuffed animals, and everything else you need to cart around for your little darling. It also includes a smaller bag that can double as a clutch for your keys, phone and lip-gloss. Bonus: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monogrammed, so everyone will know the spare outfits, diapers, binkies, cookies, bottles stuffed animals, keys, phone and lip-gloss are YOURS.


OUTFIT T IP:

Foxcroft white shirt $95, Turquoise Sail to Sable lemon sweater $135, Liverpool white pants $95, Sheridan Mia yellow shoes $165, Red Carpet sunglasses $19.95, Yellow TMRW Studio crossbody $225

A BEAUTIFUL POP OF COLOR ADDED WITH A BASIC BEADED NECKLACE COMPLETES THIS CASUAL SUNDAYFUNDAY LOOK.

Available at Palmettoes

THE BOAT ING/ PICNIC MOM

! THE CARPOOL MOM  We love it when a mom/daughter duo goes all matchymatchy with the ensembles.

Cooler for beer and cheese. Er, em … juice and Goldfish crackers

Xirena red top $161, Xirena red pants $157, Diane Cotton necklace $300, Think Royln white cooler $188 Available at dluxe


Prices change and human error occurs- please see store listed for official pricing on all items.

! The blue of the hat matches the blue of Campbell’s eyes. Coincidence? We think not.

THE DERBY MOM THE PLAYGROUND MOM

OUTFIT T IP: Meet Campbell Harmon Patrizia Luca dress $98, Necklace $58, Mark Jenkins wedges $99, Toucan Collection hat $106 Available at So Sandra

PRINTED ROMPER HIDES STAINS. YAAAAAASSSS!

Isn’t she just the cutest?

A ball for playtime. DUH.

fab’rik label romper $72, Qupid wedges $37, Necklace $18 Available at fab’rik

POCKETS. POCKETS. POCKETS. POCKETS.


THE DATE NIGHT OUT WITH DAD MOM She + Sky dress $49, Kendra Scott earrings $65, Mud Pie clutch $14.99, Kendra Scott necklace $65

The perfect outfit for a night out with Dad. (Because moms need time away from their children for their sanity.)

Available at Too Belles Boutique

! OUTFIT T IP: CLUTCH FOR KEYS, PHONE, LIPSTICK, AND BUG SPRAY. (BECAUSE WE LIVE IN THE SOUTH, AND THE BUGS ARE BAD RIGHT NOW.)

Form fitted, sexy but fun dress for a night out with Dad. Cute and comfy wedges that Mom could wear with a more laid-back look. #getitgurl #lookinfly


THE STAY-ATHOME MOM Kerisma sweater $69, Dear John shorts $68, Rebels sandals $79, Necklace $29 Saylor Betty earrings $24 Available at Haskins & Co.

OUTFIT T IP: SHORTS THAT AREN’T TOO SHORT. LET’S BE HONEST: NO MOM WANTS HER BUM HANGING OUT WHILE TRYING TO DO ALL THE THINGS MOMS HAVE TO DO IN A DAY.

MACHINE WASHABLE SHORTS.

Sandals are comfy and can be worn with other outfits.


OUTFIT T IP: CROSSBODY BAG KEEPS MOM’S HANDS FREE FOR VIDEOING, KISSING BOO-BOOS, BUCKLING KIDS IN CAR SEATS, AND HOLDING SLEEPY BABES.

THE SIDELINE MOM Sideline style to watch your soccer superstar score.

This shirt is a subtle reminder to the little ones of who is in charge. (That’s right!) Blank Paige t-shirt $48, J Brand jeans $228, White sneakers $80, Clutch/ crossbody $32, Erimish Apple Watch band $80 Available at Coastal Bliss

!

These pants have a little stretch, so they stay up when bending over to help kids.


the last call A REMINDER TO CALL YO’ MAMA WHILE YOU CAN

article by linda s. hopkins

“ B E H I N D A L L YO U R S T O R I E S I S A LW AY S Y O U R M O T H E R ’ S S T O R Y. BECAUSE HERS IS W H E R E YO U R S B E G A N .” —  M I T C H A L B O M

i

have very few regrets in life, but the one that I find most difficult to put behind me is one that can’t be rectified. It was nothing I said or didn’t say. It was nothing I did wrong. But the memory stirs in the corner of my consciousness as a vivid reminder of the uncertainty each day brings.

I remember clearly the Tuesday night in June of 1987 when Mama called. She wasn’t feeling well, but nothing she said indicated any real need for concern. In retrospect, she may have hinted, but she didn’t ask me to come for a visit or make any melodramatic statements that would lead me to believe I needed to rush to her bedside. She was home and seemingly “fine.” Two days went by; the next call I got was from my aunt—my mother’s sister: Mama was in the hospital and I should come. While packing


the last call Linda Hopkins’ mementos and old photographs of her mother.

a bag and making arrangements to head to Atlanta where she lived, the last call came. My mother was gone—with less than 15 minutes’ notice. The phone now dead in my hand, a dark reality set in that I would never hear her voice again, never again get to go home. Her sudden demise at age 57 was the single most devastating blow I had ever sustained at that point in life. What hurt most was that I didn’t get to say goodbye … or thank you, I’m sorry, I forgive you, I love you. I tell you this not to gain sympathy or jerk tears. It’s been a long time ago, and I’m not in a maudlin mood. I tell you this to remind you that you only get one mother in this life. And when she’s gone, you will miss her—even if you don’t have a perfect relationship, even if you don’t think her absence will impact your life. I believe this because of the somewhat tumultuous relationship I had with mine and how very much I have missed her over the past 30 years … since the last call. I don’t have a Mommy Dearest story. My mother never abused me. She disciplined me, and sometimes that meant a trip to the “switch tree.” But her intent was never to inflict harm, only to teach me to bear the

44

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

HER SUDDEN DEMISE AT AGE 57 WAS THE SINGLE MOST DEVASTATING BLOW I HAD EVER SUSTAINED AT THAT POINT IN LIFE. WHAT HURT MOST WAS THAT I DIDN’T GET TO SAY GOODBYE … OR THANK YOU, I’M SORRY, I FORGIVE YOU, I LOVE YOU.


consequences of my actions. She taught me well. She baked cakes, and I licked the beaters. She worked to put food on the table and clothes on my back and to pay for my education. She took care of me when I was sick and tried to provide the basics. (She made a mean bowl of Campbell’s tomato soup.) She gave me my first sex education lesson with hand-drawn pictures. She taught me to shave my legs and bought me my first pair of stockings. She did all the things moms are technically supposed to do for their daughters except one: notice me. I craved her approval, her praise, her attention, but it seemed she had none left over to give. I spent most of my childhood and early teen years with a house key in my pocket, making my way on my own. With a sick and often missing father and a worn out, frazzled, distraught mother, I searched for my place in the sun—my spotlight, which frequently appeared in the eyes of men as I came of age. I made mistakes as all young people do. I made choices, some of which I am proud and some I regret. And I forgive myself for needing what I needed and finding a way to get that. When Mama did turn her attention to me, it was usually with a critical eye: my lipstick was too bright, my skirt wrinkled, my hair stringy, my nails too long… Looking back as an adult, it’s clear to me that our differences were rooted in mixed messages and unmet needs—nothing intentional but evident in the rearview. She wanted a better life for me than what she had, but in her attempt to push me, she only drove me to rebel. While she meant well, her vision for me did not match my own, hence, a level of tension lived between us: the bitter taste of my self-appointed guilt and need to jump ever higher, mingled with a vague sense of her growing disappointment as I missed the mark. There was never any doubt in my mind that my mother loved me, just that she had difficulty accepting me without wanting to wave some magic wand and change me into her dream daughter— the one with a more relaxed, less sensitive temperament, the one with a career or perhaps the one who lived in a house around the corner with babies on her hip. I’m so sorry, Mom, but none of that is who I am—not then and not now. Still, for years after my mother’s death, every time something important happened in my life or I felt the need for advice, I would reach for the phone and begin dialing her number before remembering the line had long ago been disconnected.

STILL, FOR YEARS AFTER MY MOTHER’S DEATH, EVERY TIME SOMETHING IMPORTANT HAPPENED IN MY LIFE OR I FELT THE NEED FOR ADVICE, I WOULD REACH FOR THE PHONE AND BEGIN DIALING HER NUMBER BEFORE REMEMBERING THE LINE HAD LONG AGO BEEN DISCONNECTED. As I reflect on my story, I realize now that Mama had her own story to tell, and hers unquestionably became part of mine. It helps to remember that she was once a young woman like I was then—a daughter with her own set of insecurities and measuring sticks, dashed hopes and dreams shaping her worldview, hardening her soft spots, casting a cloud over her sunny outlook, diluting her humor, testing her strength. Yet she had the fortitude to go on—to put one foot in front of the other, to show up, to live courageously and be who she was and who she was called upon to be. If I could speak to her one last time, I would tell her, “I see you now, and I hope you can finally see me. Our stories are one and the same.” If you have a living mother, whatever your relationship might be, consider giving her a call. Set your differences aside if you can … before it’s too late … before you, too, get the last call.  C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

45


MyThreeDaughters Could Not Be More Different

ARTICLE BY BECCA EDWARDS

W

hen Ransom was born at 5:55 a.m. on May 8, 2007, she came into this world screaming. Stubborn almost to the point of being inconsolable, she only ceased fussing when she was swaddled so tight she looked more like a burrito than a baby or when I sang “Amazing Grace” as she nursed and drifted to peaceful, albeit fleeting, sleep. No matter what gadget I bought out of desperation from Target or from Island Child, she cried. No matter which anti-colicdiet approved food I tried to enhance my breastmilk with or fed her, she cried. And no matter how many times I read new-mom, hyped-up help books like “Baby Wise” or consulted my pediatrician for some solution, she cried. She did not stop crying until she was six months old and, ironically, the same day I found out I was pregnant with our second child. When Ruth Love was born at 10:55 p.m. on August 26, 2008, she came into this world laughing. Happy almost to the point of elation, she only ceased smiling, giggling or cooing when she slept—which quite often was blanket-less and tucked in a Baby Björn as I followed Ransom around from room to room— or when she was nursing or devouring a carton of “bluelillies” (Ruth Love’s name for blueberries). No matter if she fell or if Ransom was rough with her, she was joyful. No matter if I opted out of the 5:00 a.m. feeding and waited until 6:30 a.m., she was joyful. And no matter if her “night night” (a small white blankie with a fuzzy lamb head attached to it) fell out of her crib or if (under the pediatrician’s advice) we snipped the tip of her pacifier, she was joyful. Even today she only frowns when someone like her sister Camellia upsets her. When Camellia was born at 4:55 p.m. (yes, all three where born at 55 minutes) on December 20, 2010, she came into this world not breathing properly, and even still her tiny, preemie fingers gripped my index finger as if to say, “I’m going to be OK, Mommy.” Premature to the point that she was almost airlifted to MUSC, she scared her father and me terribly until the hospital staff was able to stabilize her. She continued to worry us for months. No matter if she gained above and beyond what the pediatrician expected, we worried. No

1

2 3

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

47


matter if she met the daily touch. Every member of requirement of wet diapers, our family exhibits a differwe worried. No matter if, ent primary and secondary albeit much later than her love language. sisters, she hit a milestone And finally, there is like saying her first word, the nurture-versus-nature we worried. Because of debate. We were more the amount of fear we new-parent neurotic with experienced regarding her Ransom, and in our effort health that first year, I am to make everything perfect, not sure if I will ever totally or perhaps as cool, calm not worry about her, but I and collected as we were will tell you she—more than pre-kids, we probably my other children—seems inadvertently made her the most resilient, and in cry. But also, she is a byher own subtle ways she the-book Taurus (i.e. bull continues to grip my index headed), and aspects of her finger and tell me, “I’m personality, like her love for going to be OK, Mommy.” the visual arts and wearing The way each of my a bandana like Rosie the daughters came into this Riveter, are presumably world is very indicative embedded in her DNA. of their personality. As a With Ruth Love, we were doula, I share this with my too tired to worry if her clients not so much as to pacifier fell on the floor or if pigeonhole a child at birth her diaper was pushing the but to encourage parents limits of max capacity, but to, despite all that is going I am convinced she would on during labor, observe have been her happy-gotheir child from his or her lucky self even if we had first breath. Even when been helicopter parents. children are raised by the And with Camellia, because same parents, under the we worried so much, I Rebecca Edwards with her three daughters Ransom, Camellia, and Ruth Love. same circumstances and, as believe she subconsciously in my case, relatively close developed a fighter’s spirit, together, their personalities but that does not explain vastly range. her zeal for singing. She simply My three daughters could not be more thrives on belting out ABBA. different. This could be due in part to the Because of all these factors, I have a behavior traits and patterns associated different relationship with each of my girls with birth order. Psychology Today and therefore parent each one differently. writes, “Birth order has a powerful impact For example, if I need for Ransom to upon children’s emotions, behavior and complete a chore like cleaning up her personality development… the firstborn room, I have to make it fun or else she child can end up feeling very pressured will buck the system. But if I am fun with to succeed and become a perfectionist, Ruth Love, who is already lighthearted, often equating love with success.” This her room probably would not get cleaned observation is certainly true with Ransom. because she would think, “Well, if Mom No matter if we are hiking, cooking or isn’t serious about this, then why should I doing a craft project, she feels compelled be?” With Camellia, it would be a toss up to take the lead and best her sisters. as to whether she would clean her room The article continues with, “The or not depending on her mood and other secondborn child benefits from calmer, distractions at the time. more self-confident parents and enjoys Though I must customize my parenting special attention as the baby. He also tactics for each child, my overarching hope has the advantage of learning from, and is that I teach each one the same basic yet modeling, his idolized older sibling.” The crucial principles like kindness, honesty article goes on to describe the dilemma and self-worth even if I have to take of the middle child, which happens to different paths to get to the same place. also be our second, hitting a chord with And ultimately, I endeavor to maintain a us writing, “She is not the oldest and not healthy, happy and consistent relationship the youngest, so she must struggle to attention, is quick to fight for what is hers with my children and let each one know establish her own unique identity.” It is and learns quickly. how much I love and respect them because In addition to giving credence to what this world needs, now maybe more in this regard we see Ruth Love struggle often and an issue we are constantly the birth-order theory, we embrace than ever, is love and respect.  some truth to the five love languages addressing in our family. As for the last child, the baby, and philosophy, which divides the way we Becca Edwards is a wellness in our case, Big Deal Camellia, we have express and receive love into receiving professional, freelance writer, and witnessed stereotypical behavior of the gifts, quality time, words of affirmation, owner of b.e.WELL+b.e.CREATIVE youngest. She likes to be the center of acts of service (devotion), and physical (bewellbecreative.com).

Even when children are raised by the same parents, under the same circumstances and, as in my case, relatively close together, their personalities vastly range.

48

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE


HILTON HEAD ISL AND & BLUFFTON · LISTINGS *Prices change as human errors occur- Please see business listed for offical pricing on all summer camps

ALLIANCE DANCE ACADEMY Princess Camp I : June 3-7 Monday thru Friday 11:00-4:00. Each day we celebrate a different Princess through crafts, books, music, movies and dance! Animal Action Camp: July 22-26 Monday thru Friday from 11:00-4:00. Each day we celebrate a different Animal through crafts, books, music, movies and dance! Princess Camp II: August 5-9 Monday thru Friday 11:00-4:00. Each day we celebrate a different Princess through crafts, books, music, movies and dance. $200 per child for your first camp Receive a 10% discount for each additional camp /child. Space is limited, don’t miss out! ARTS CENTER OF COASTAL CAROLINA STEAM Tinker Camp Session I: June 10-14 Session II: July 8-12 STEAM Summer Camp is an exciting and hands-on learning opportunity for youth, with a special emphasis on the STEAM curriculum areas (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics). Campers will learn about concepts such as geometry, engineering, circuits, forces of motion, and simple machines, while creating projects like “Cranky Contraptions” and “Pendulum Paintings.” (Session 1 and 2 will complete different projects!) Ages 7-12; Tuition $130 Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, 14 Shelter Cove Lane, HHI, SC 29928 Contact: Alana Adams, 843-686-3945, ext. 205 http://www.artshhi.com/workshops Take the Stage! Performing Arts Camp Session I: June 17-21 Session II: July 15-19 Explore music, dance and drama in this one-week camp. Students will work with professional artists in our Black Box Theatre and will be exposed to a variety of performing art forms. They will create a mini showcase performance on Friday! Ages 6-8 & 9-13; Tuition $110 Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, 14 Shelter Cove Lane, HHI, SC 29928 Contact: Alana Adams, 843-686-3945, ext. 205 http://www.artshhi.com/workshops Mixed-Up Masterpieces Visual Arts Camp Session I: June 17-21 Session II: July 15-19 Students will study folk and fine art from all around the world that will inspire both traditional and unusual 2D and 3D masterpieces. A mini-showcase exhibit/reception will be held on Friday. Ages 6-8 (10am-12:15pm) & 9-13 (12:45-3pm); Tuition $110 Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, 14 Shelter Cove Lane, HHI, SC 29928 Contact: Alana Adams, 843-686-3945, ext. 205 http://www.artshhi.com/workshops Theatre Camp Session I: July 22-26 Session II: August 5-9 Campers will experience a mini-production and will not only be the cast but will also be the production crew, learn how to understand and develop characters, create sets and props, and design costumes. They will perform for family and friends on Friday afternoon.

52

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

Ages 9-14; Tuition $210 Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, 14 Shelter Cove Lane, HHI, SC 29928 Contact: Alana Adams, 843-686-3945, ext. 205 http://www.artshhi.com/workshops Kids N’ Clay Camp July 22-25, Aug. 2 Students will expand their imaginations as they explore the exciting world of clay and learn a variety of ceramic hand-building techniques including pinch, slab, coil, surface decoration, glazing, and more! Ages 7-12; Tuition $115 Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, 14 Shelter Cove Lane, HHI, SC 29928 Contact: Alana Adams, 843-686-3945, ext. 205 http://www.artshhi.com/workshops STEAM Digital Arts Camp July 29-August 2 During this week-long STEAM camp, students will learn art and design techniques using technology such as graphic design, 3D modeling, 3D printing, and virtual reality. Laying the basic foundations to understand and use these new tools, we will cover all facets of 3D printing from 3D scanning, 3D modeling, preparing files, and finally, the 3-D printing process. Students will also have an opportunity to experiment with virtual-reality design using web-based platforms. Ages 9-16; $130 Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, 14 Shelter Cove Lane, HHI, SC 29928 Contact: Alana Adams, 843-686-3945, ext. 205 http://www.artshhi.com/workshops Legally Blonde Dance and Drama Camp July 29-August 2 Play your part this summer at the Arts Center! During this exciting week, students will learn a variety of dance and drama techniques while working with the Dance Captain of the Arts Center’s summer production Legally Blonde. The musical is based on the hit 2001 comedy film about a pampered, cosmetics-minded Bel Air girl named Elle, who chases her ex-beau to Harvard’s law school and finds herself excelling in academia. *Intermediate dance skills required. Ages 10-16; Tuition $120 Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, 14 Shelter Cove Lane, HHI, SC 29928 Contact: Alana Adams, 843-686-3945, ext. 205 http://www.artshhi.com/workshops AR WORKSHOP Join us at AR Workshop for creative and crafty Summer ARt Camps! Morning or afternoon sessions are offered. (June 10th-August 16th) Camp is $180 per registrant and runs from Monday-Thursday. Our camps are designed for girls and boys, ages 7-14. Kids will create 4 DIY youth projects and a DIY camp t-shirt over the course of the camp! Participants will be able to customize and choose their project paint colors from our decor line of paints! We also offer an optional Friday half-day camp. Check our calendar to register! www. arworkshop. com/hiltonhead Kids are encouraged to bring a snack and drink to enjoy during breaks.


BLUFFTON SCHOOL OF DANCE SOAR this summer with engaging camps and classes that focus on expanding your imagination and performance! Ages 2-13 will experience 4-wks of exciting classes and learn a short dance to perform under the stage lights at BSOD. Preschoolers will delight in camps full of imagination, crafts and performing - Dollies in Paris, Woodland Fairies, Mermaids and Princesses, there is a BSOD Preschool Camp for every dancer. 1st-5th graders arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t left out at BSOD - they get their own full-day dance camps where they design their entire show. Visit www.blufftonschoolofdance.com for info on dates and registration. HILTON HEAD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY Eagle Basketball Camp Session 1 May 28-31 9:00am-12:00pm | rising 3rd -8th grade (boys & girls) Players receive individual and group instruction through fun games and drills designed to improve and enhance their skill set. Contact Kenny Conroy at kconroy@hhca.org. Summer Stock Junior Theater Camp May 29-June 8 *Auditions for larger roles take place May 6. Must be registered for camp to audition. See times at registration | rising 4th-9th grade HHCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second annual Summer Stock Junior Theater Camp focuses on building a high-caliber show synonymous with HHCA productions. Summer Stock students will perform G2K Once Upon a Mattress to a paying audience on June 7 and 8 at 7:00 PM. Limited to 50. Contact: Michelle McElroy at mmcelroy@hhca.org. Creativity! Art Camp Session 1 June 10-14 Various times available | rising 1st-6th grade Young artists will have fun while being challenged to create with various materials. Each session will provide the opportunity to dive deep into the processes of multi-media art making, mosaics, acrylic painting on canvas, ceramics, culinary arts, creating art from nature and sand art.

We will also explore experimental arts and various crafts while improving our observation and discovery skills! Sign up early so materials can be ordered accordingly. Morning, afternoon and all -day camps available for both sessions. Contact LouAnne Barrett at lbarrett@hhca.org. Eagle Volleyball Camp June 10-14 1:00-4:00pm | rising 4th-8th grade This camp is designed for players at all skill levels. Players will work on the fundamentals of volleyball through fun games and activities. Athletes will receive one-on-one instruction, group instruction, and team direction. Contact Aaron Mau at amau@hhca.org. Team Volleyball Camp June 17-19 9:00am-3:00pm | not age specific, skill based This action-packed camp offers skill training and team play for intermediate to advanced players. The camp is based on skill level and is not age specific. Contact Steve Desimone at desimone.steve@gmail.com Eagle Baseball Camp June 17-20 8:30-11:30am | rising 2nd-8th grade This camp offers athletes a great way to improve their individual fundamentals while having fun and competing. Players will receive instruction in fielding, throwing and hitting, and each player will participate in various competitions throughout the week. Contact Matt Smith at msmith@hhca.org. M.A.D. Camp (Music | Art | Drama) June 17-21 1:00-4:00pm | ages 6-11 M.A.D. camp is an introduction to the elements of show production, scene-work, set-design, creation and decoration. It culminates in an endof the-week performance, with each child featured in a speaking and/or singing role. Each child is automatically cast in the show and will receive a script and script-learning MP3, offering two methods to learn their lines. All children, regardless of age or reading prowess can be ACTive

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

53


in the play! Outdoor play and lots of musical activities, brainy breaks and games are included in our learning week. Contact Beth Green at bgreen@hhca.org Hilton Head Jazz Clinic June 24-28 1:00-4:00pm | ages 10-14 with 1 year playing experience recommended The 5th annual Hilton Head Jazz Clinic is a combination of private lessons and small combos, with instruction in theory and improvisation. Geared towards students beginning their journey into jazz and improvisation, it includes a three-hour daily jazz clinic with college jazz camp alumni and local music professionals, a full-day music trip to Savannah and a finale performance. Contact James Berry at contact@hhjazzcamp.com. Mythical Creatures Art Camp June 24-28 9:00am-12:00pm | rising 1st-8th grade Let your imagination run wild as we explore the world of mythical creatures throughout a fun-filled week creating mythical creature art! Limited to 16. Contact Kelly Knight at kknight@hhca.or Eagle Football Camp June 24-28 9:00am-12:00pm | rising 5th-8th grade Players will receive skill training and instruction in the fundamentals of

54

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

the game. Camp will be led by HHCA Head Football Coach Ron Peduzzi, who has over 30 years of experience coaching at the collegiate and high school level. Contact Ron Peduzzi at rpeduzzi@hhca.org Hilton Head Jazz Guitar Institute June 24-28 1:00-4:00pm | 14-18 years old with 2+ years of guitar experience This week-long program includes a 3-hour daily jazz guitar clinic with professional jazz guitarist Dr. Tim Fischer, a full-day music trip to Savannah and a finale performance. This new program helps the guitarist grasp how to play jazz in a non-competitive setting and improve upon reading, ensemble-playing, and improvisation. It is highly recommended for guitarists who also plan to attend the Hilton Head Jazz Camp. A discount is provided to those who enroll in both camps. Contact James Berry at contact@hhjazzcamp.org. Hilton Head Jazz Camp July 8-13 9:00am-4:00pm | 14-20 years old with 3+ years of experience This premier week-long, full-day Jazz Camp with 16 full-time professional faculty and guest artists offers a combination of large big bands, small combos, theory, improv, elective courses, masterclasses and performances, including 2 major culminating performances. The camp is geared towards intermediate to advanced middle and high school students. Tuition includes daily chef-catered lunch, all daytime activities, faculty recital, a special mid-week masterclass at The Jazz Corner and two complimentary tickets to the Finale performance. Contact James Berry at contact@hhjazzcamp.org. Coach Mauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Multi Sport Camp July 15-19 1:00-4:00pm | rising 3rd-8th grade This fun, high-energy camp consists of multiple sports and games for any athlete at any level. Time will be spent inside and outside, and will include mini-workouts, basketball, volleyball, soccer, baseball, kickball and lots of fun games and activities. Contact Aaron Mau at amau@hhca.org. Contact Aaron Mau at amau@hhca.org.


Eagle Basketball Camp Session 2 July 15-19 9:00am-12:00pm | rising 3rd -8th grade (boys & girls) Players receive individual and group instruction through fun games and drills designed to improve and enhance their skill set. Contact Aaron Mau at amau@hhca.org. Creativity! Art Camp Session 2 July 22-26 Various times available | rising 1st-6th grade Young artists will have fun while being challenged to create with various materials. Each session will provide the opportunity to dive deep into the processes of multi-media art making, mosaics, acrylic painting on canvas, ceramics, culinary arts, creating art from nature and sand art. We will also explore experimental arts and various crafts while improving our observation and discovery skills! Sign up early so materials can be ordered accordingly. Morning, afternoon and all-day camps available for both sessions. Contact LouAnne Barrett at lbarrett@hhca.org. HILTON HEAD COMMUNITY CHURCH Power UP! Adventure Week 2019 Monday, July 22 - Thursday, July 25 9:00a - Noon Ages 4 to Rising 5th grade Lunch included! Four action-packed mornings of fun, games and learning that God gives us everything we need. Cost is $20 per child with a maximum of $50 per family. 860 William Hilton Parkway, HHI - (843) 806-3399 (Mile Marker 9 at Fresh Market & Hargray Campus) hiltonheadislandcc.org ¡ kids@hiltonheadislandcc.org ISLAND REC CENTER Athletic Camps and Clinics For Youth Ages 5-18

Whether you are looking for an all-summer long or a week-long activity, we have your family covered! Island Rec offers a wide variety of athletics on land and in the water. Visit islandreccenter.org for complete details and pricing. All Day Summer Camp June 3- Aug. 16, Mon-Fri, 7:30am-6pm Summer camp is a drop-in program with swimming, games, arts & crafts, and more every day. Field trips are taken weekly based on the theme of the week. KIDS COLLEGE Each week of camp offers a different theme and field trip: Please join us and our fabulous staff for a fun-filled summer where we will explore different cultures, foods, and experiences from around the world. Your child will be entertained with many fun activities, crafts, games and field trips. Your child will be going on at least two field trips a week, some of them include trips to swimming, bowling, dolphin cruise, bee city, Coastal Discovery Museum and more. In-house programs include waterslide days, ice cream parties, special guests and more. Most field trips are included in our weekly price that also includes kid-friendly breakfast, lunch, and snacks every day. Call (843) 757-9150 today for more info. Space is filling up fast! OUTSIDE HILTON HEAD Adventure Island Outside Hilton Head at Shelter Cove Marina. A fun boat ride to remote Page Island is just the beginning. Once there, teens will kayak through tidal marshes and investigate the islandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s habitat. Other activities may include fishing, crabbing, tubing and games. Awesome hands-on exploration of the coastal environment for ages 12-15. Bring a bagged lunch. Wed. and Fri., 8 a.m.-1 p.m., thru midAugust. (843) 686-6996. outsidehiltonhead.com.

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

55


Coastal Carolina Camp Outside Hilton Head, Shelter Cove Marina. A fun, engaging adventure day camp for children ages 7-14. Daily activities may include kayaking, crabbing, water trampoline, environmental discovery and beachcombing. Plus lots of games that provide a great introduction to the Carolina salt marsh ecosystem and loads of fun. For over 30 years, an award-winning camp. Two- day camp, Tues. & Wed., 8:30-11:30am Kid’s Waterfun Day Outside Hilton Head at Shelter Cove Marina. A three-hour program that is filled with games, kayaking, swimming and the water trampoline! Ages 7 and up. Fridays, 9 a.m.-noon, thru mid-August. (843) 6866996. outsidehiltonhead.com. Surf Camp Join the Outside Surf School and master the waves. This educational camp emphasizes safety and the fundamentals of surfing. Basic instruction is offered on boogie boards, surf boards and stand-up paddleboards. Call for weekly schedule. (843) 686-6996. outsidehiltonhead.com.

Teen Stand Up Paddle Board Adventure Outside Hilton Head at Shelter Cove Marina. Two hours of on-the-water fun. Teens can try stand-up paddleboarding for a day of confidence-boosting, outdoor fun. Tues. & Thurs., 2-4 p.m., mid-June thru mid-Aug. (843) 686-6996. outsidehiltonhead.com. Teen Tube Night Outside Hilton Head at Shelter Cove Marina. 90 minutes of awesome tubing fun along the Lowcountry’s most pristine and picturesque waterways. Mon. and Wed., 6:15 p.m.-7:45 p.m. through mid-Aug. (843) 6866996. outsidehiltonhead.com. THE SANDBOX July 1-26, 2019 (Please call 843-842-7645 to reserve your spot) Children will enjoy supervised play time in the Museum, fun activities and crafts pertaining to their week’s theme, educational activities that stimulate their senses during the summer, messy fun outside (if applicable to each week ‘s theme) as well as air conditioned play inside. (In the event of rain, extended pre-planned activities/crafts will take place inside) Weekly and Daily Pricing                           

Weekly: 8:30-11:30am/Monday-Friday                             Member:$125                            Non Member: $160                                                            Week of July 1st (no camp on July 4th) Member: $100                            Non-Member:$128    Week of July 22nd (No camp on July 24th, (“Christmas in July event”) Member: $100                            Non Member: $128                                                                               Daily: 8:30-11:30am                                                        Member: $30    Member sibling: $20                       Non Member: $40    Non member sibling: $30                                                    Camp Details •    Ages 3-10 •    Morning Camp is 8:30am-11:30am •    Held Monday-Friday with the exception of the week of July 1st (no camp July 4th) and July 22nd (July 24th (Wednesday) due to “Christmas in July” special event) •    Children will be supervised according to a 1:5 ratio of Coordinator to children •    Everyone goes home with at least one completed project/craft at the end of the week Camp Guidelines • The Sandbox will provide a mid-morning snack • All children attending camp must be potty trained and demonstrate full independence in the bathroom • Registration and full payment required to hold your camp spot •    Cancellations made outside of 48 hours will receive full refund less $5 processing fee, within 48 hours will receive refund less 25% SMITH STEARNS TENNIS ACADEMY Experience elite training in a highperformance setting so students can prepare for upcoming tournaments and develop their game to achieve their tennis goals. Smith Stearns Tennis Academy provides junior tennis camps for students of all levels. The camps will offer comprehensive drilling, various types of point play, match play, strategy, on and off court fitness, and yoga/deep stretching. Fun summer activities are added throughout the summer. Boarding and non-boarding options are available. Dates: May 27th through August 31st Times: Monday through Friday - 8:0010:00 am & 2:00-5:00 pm, Saturday - 8:0010:00 am Website: www.smithstearns.com To register: contact Director of Admissions, Joanie Hyndman - (843) 3634789 or info@smithstearns.com.

56

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE


the future is now Dr. Jim Mason and Lindsey Coats with a happy patient at Adventure Pediatric Dentistry in Bluffton

What’ new ins pediat dentis ric try BY J AMES F. MASO N, DD S

“When did going to the dentist become such a cool experience?” These words came from the father of a beautiful 13-year-old girl named Claire who just finished her appointment. When Claire first started coming to the dentist several years ago, she reacted the way most young children do—with some anxiety, some nervousness, and a whole lot of wondering if it would hurt.

“I have seen dentistry, especially pediatric dentistry, change so much over the past few years and wish it could have been that way for me,” Claire’s father said. “Just the technology alone and the implementation of it to the children’s advantage has made it so much easier to get the kids to want to come back.” Claire and her family are talking about the revolution in pediatric dentistry that has taken place over the past few years across the country. The whole experience of going to the dentist has been changed into a brouhaha of pleasant experiences. Even though in the past 50 years there has been a significant decline in cavities, dental decay continues to be one of the most common ailments in the U.S. Among children and adolescents, having a dental cavity is four to five times more common than having asthma. And because of this prevalence, much research has gone into how to combat this epidemic and help children in the best possible way. Pediatric dentistry is now one of the hottest fields due to the change of culture. Dentophobia (the fear of dentists) is real, but

we are working to change this and believe the current technology is part of the solution. New advances in preventing cavities, as well as how we fix them, has improved pediatric dentistry. Did you know that many cavities, when diagnosed early enough, can be reversible and never have to be drilled? Advances such as silver diamine fluoride (aka black fluoride), remineralization therapy, and lasers have revolutionized dentistry. The Solea® laser allows us to do routine procedures without having to give a “shot” and often without having to use the dental drill. In fact, Claire may never know the drill in her life. Aside from general anxiety, the three things people are afraid of at the dentist are: pain, vibration, and noise. With the Solea laser, you do not have any of those; it pretty much feels like air and a little water blowing on your mouth and teeth. Over 98 percent of fillings can be done without any shots at all. When you don’t develop the fear and anxiety that most people have—when you don’t have the opportunity to become afraid of the drill and the C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

59


When you don’t develop the fear and anxiety that most people have— when you don’t have the opportunity to become afraid of the drill and the shots—then walking into the dental office is a whole different experience.

shots—then walking into the dental office is a whole different experience. Being able to stop cavities from getting any bigger, or “freezing” them, is a complete game-changer as well. If a child is afraid of the dentist, for whatever reason, why sedate them when treatment can be postponed using silver diamine fluoride until either that baby tooth falls out or the dental relationship is established so that the procedure can be done comfortably in the office? Remineralization therapy enables dentists to use various modalities and therapies to “fix” cavities before they get too large. By controlling the pH of the mouth, some of the cavities your dentist points out can disappear or be prevented from advancing into the tooth. The ability to treat the cavities in this manner varies from person to person based on a number of factors. But those patients who can avoid getting a filling are all extremely thankful! Simply put, the food children eat today is not the same as it was even a generation ago. The addition of hormones, pesticides, and antibiotics along with the consumption of sugary beverages has raised the number of cavities we see on a daily basis. But we are finally getting the tools we need to level the playing field against dental decay. With the advancements of digital dentistry, dentists can collaborate to 60

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

ensure the highest quality care. By working together, they can coordinate care like never before, making it easier on patients and maximizing their best possible outcome. Having the orthodontist take off the wires and then send the patient for a cleaning helps to prevent cavities, and coordinating with the endodontists (root canal dentists) for same-day treatment following trauma are just two examples of how dentists are able to work together to the greater benefit of the patient. In the spirit of collaboration, Dr. Shane Harpham from Sea Island Smiles and I met recently to talk over different treatment ideas and to see how, by working together, we can both help children of the Lowcountry prevent cavities. This type of relationship combines resources and lets the patients receive the advantage of multiple practices. By utilizing a national database of doctors, we also have instant access to other pediatric dentists from around the country and even the world. The advice we all share: brush and floss daily and go see one of the talented dentists here in Beaufort County!  James F. Mason (Dr. Jim) is a board certified pediatric dental specialist. His practice, Adventure Pediatric Dentistry, is located at 337 Buckwalter Place Blvd. in Bluffton. Visit www. adventurepediatricdentistry.com or call (843) 815-6000 for more information.


You worry you will become a social pariah with the parents of non-biters, who also conveniently have perfect Instagram posts of their children with their hair brushed, actually wearing clothes that match. You ask yourself, “Did I labor for [fill in the blank] hours just to give birth to Cujo?” And you question your best course of action. I remember the first time my daughter Ransom (now 12) bit me. At the time, she was 15 months old. We were in the Verizon store buying a new cell phone. What should have taken 20 minutes took two hours, so I do not blame my little lady for getting a little annoyed. But when she bit my shoulder, it stunned me and left a mark. My gut reaction was to bite her back and show her how much biting hurt, but then I remembered a Martin Luther King, Jr. quote: “An eye for an eye leaves everyone blind.” I couldn’t bite her back. To do so would promote violence and be the antithesis of what I wanted to teach her at that very moment. And yet I did not want to have Mike Tyson for a daughter. So, Ransom and I had our first public timeout right there in the Verizon store. We were both embarrassed, and she never bit me again. Flash forward, and Ransom is now around the age of three. She and her twoyear-old sister Ruth Love are duking it out for the children’s book, Moo, Baa, La, La, La, by Sandra Boyton. I did not want to be a helicopter parent and overly intervene before they had the chance to work it out on their own. Instead, I tried to give them cues to help them reach a resolution. It went something like this:

DS

It bites when you have a child who bites.

B Y B EC C A E D W

AR

N I T I G B

[SCENE: Ransom and Ruth Love playing tug of war over the book and screaming.] ME: Ransom, can you please use your words and ask Ruth Love for the book? RANSOM: Ruth Love, give me book. ME: Ransom, can you please try using the word ‘please’ to ask for the book. RANSOM: Please book now, Ruth Love. RUTH LOVE: No. RANSOM: No! [CHOMP].

B C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

63


Ransom proceeded to bite Ruth Love’s arm in such a way that she could have scored a role as a zombie on The Walking Dead. That’s when I thought, “Houston, we have a problem.” So, I did some research and read an interesting article about toddlers who bite. Apparently, some precocious toddlers might actually be experiencing thoughts and emotions without the vocabulary or speaking ability to express them. When I read this I thought, “Maybe my kid is not a killer. She’s just smart.” I also thought, “We have to get ahead of this.” According to the National Association for the Education of Young Children, children bite for a variety of reasons. To: • Relieve pain from teething. • Explore cause and effect. • Experience the sensation of biting. • Satisfy a need for oral-motor stimulation. • Imitate other children and adults. • Feel strong and in control. • Get attention. • Act in self-defense. • Communicate needs and desires, such as hunger or fatigue. • Communicate or express difficult feelings, such as frustration, anger, confusion, or fear.

• •

64

To prevent biting, NAEYC recommends the following: Have age-appropriate expectations for your child’s behavior based on his or her current skills and abilities. Make sure your child’s schedule, routines, and transitions are predictable and consistent. At meal and bedtimes, try to do things in the same way and at the same times. Young children thrive when they know what will happen next. Offer activities and materials that allow your child to relax and release tension. Some children like yoga or deep breathing. Offer playdough, foam balls, bubbles, soft music, and other stress-reducing items. Use positive guidance strategies to help your child develop

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

self-control. For example, offer gentle reminders, phrased in a way that tells them what behaviors are expected: “Be sure to hang up your coat on the hook.” “You can each have a bucket to use in the sandbox.” “Put a small dot of toothpaste on your brush. You won’t need much to get your teeth clean.” • Provide items to bite, such as teething rings or clean, wet, cold washcloths stored in the refrigerator. This helps children learn what they can bite safely without hurting anyone else. In our daughter’s case, we spoke with our pediatrician and her Montessori teachers and came up with a plan of action we, as parents, could sink our teeth into. Ultimately, Ransom never bit anyone again. This plan included her teachers talking to her entire class about biting and Ransom understanding that just like it was not okay to bite her baby sister or her mom, it was not okay to bite her classmates. We also talked to her about not hurting the people you love and laid out consequences such as timeout and no “night, night” (her blankie) for an hour if she bit again. My biggest takeaway from the experience is this: When it comes to parenting, you cannot be knee-jerk reactive—e.g. bite back, yell or spank. You have to be proactive. I am not saying I am not sometimes guilty of losing my temper, and (full disclosure), I admit I have a potty mouth. But it is important to have a plan in place when you see your child exhibit less-than-ideal behavior. Also, quite often as a mom, I think I have to be the sole developer and implementer of the plan, mainly because I have more interaction with my children than my husband during the week (thanks to my ability to work from home). Plus, things happen in real time, and I need to be responsive. But then I remember how important it is to include my spouse and seek the help of professionals like pediatricians and teachers. It’s then that, collectively, we take a bite out of whatever issue needs to be addressed.


s n R i k s a H & o C

W H E R E L I F E M E E TS STY L E A N D G I R L S G O TO H AV E F U N

ocking a pair of white jeans, a light blue seersucker top, and a classic jean jacket, Brody Haskins Kenneweg smiles for the camera. Wherever you see her—whether she’s at her Coligny Plaza boutique and gift shop (Haskins & Co.), tooling about town, or dressed up for a fancy party—she has that relaxed, comfortable-in-my-skin way about her that most women envy.


QA variety of

V

accessories, shoes and bags are available to accompany the clothing selections at Haskins & Co.

Saylor Betty earrings in summer shades of turquoise.

“My tag line is ‘Where Life Meets and at different price points, Kenneweg Style,’” Kenneweg said. “Life comes first. said. “Our clothes tend to be comfortable It’s about being who you are and having and timeless. I’ll pull in jewelry to be our your wardrobe sort of go along with that— trendy thing.” You’ll find nationally known having pieces that work for you and where brands such as Kendra Scott along with you are in your life.” As a busy wife, mother handmade pieces from small suppliers as and business owner, she is walking her well as local and regional artists. Don’t see talk every day and helping other women exactly what you had in mind? Kenneweg see how they, too, can look stylish and and her store manager, Lucy Berry, have comfortable wherever life takes them. created their own jewelry line, Three Four “Comfort is my thing. I love ‘grocery Collective, which is featured in the store, store dresses’” (a dress you can throw on and they will be happy to make something and wear while out running errands and to your exact specifications. Choose from just be at ease). “I also like clothes that can a small selection of underpinnings, shoes, be timeless. We have things in the store handbags, and sunglasses, and you’ll be that are on-trend, like bell sleeves, for looking chic from head to toe. example. But I do like pieces that you can With her warm, inviting personality, keep and work with for a long time—like thoughtfully acquired merchandise, and this shirt,” she said, opening her jacket to affordable pricing, it’s not a surprise reveal the cute top she was that what matters most wearing. “I’ve had this for Kenneweg is how her So, what will you find at to years. I love it. Seersucker customers feel. “For me, Haskins & Co.? Just about more than anything, I is good forever.” But when she shops any kind of outfit you might want to hear that people for the store, Kenneweg need, from that “grocery had a good time at the isn’t shopping for herself. store. Even if you don’t store dress” to cute She’s shopping for the anything, I just want shorts, classic tops, comfy buy customer whose lifestyle everyone to feel welcome,” rompers, maxi dresses, she knows or envisions. Kenneweg said. The place and jumpsuits—most of where she always felt most “I’ve never been crazy into fashion, but I love which can be dressed up or comfortable and welcome shopping, which makes down to match a variety of was at her grandmother’s this perfect for me. People sitting on the porch occasions from a backyard house, ask me if I love clothes, swing. So, she put a porch picnic to a cruise to a but what I love is people. swing in the store. “It reminds wedding reception. I love shopping for people. me of that home feeling.” That’s what’s fun for me.” In addition, she has a So, what will you find at Haskins & Co.? small fridge, so there’s always complimentary Just about any kind of outfit you might refreshment (beer, wine, water) for people need, from that “grocery store dress” to who are shopping. “My favorite thing is cute shorts, classic tops, comfy rompers, building relationships—with people who live maxi dresses, and jumpsuits—most of here and people who don’t,” Kenneweg said. which can be dressed up or down to match The Coligny Plaza location is perfect a variety of occasions from a backyard for Haskins & Co., lending an opportunity picnic to a cruise to a wedding reception. to serve local clients as well as seasonal Kenneweg takes great pride in the visitors who frequently find the store quality of her merchandise and stands when coming off the beach or dining in behind what she sells. She also focuses nearby restaurants. Locals and visitors on fit and attracts women ages 20 to 70. alike appreciate the broad selection of gift Clothing is not too revealing or clingy—think items she carries, including bath products, easy wear, functional clothes for a subtle soaps, candles, painted signs, Corkcicle style statement or a big splash, all within an tumblers, cards, kids’ clothing, toys, and affordable price range (everything under much more. $200, the majority $50-$100). But it’s the hospitality and the customer Jewelry? Why, yes! When it comes service that draw people back again and to accessorizing, Haskins & Co. has what again. A group of lady golfers who were on you need to wake up your wardrobe— vacation came in one March morning and 68

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

U

Bright floral dresses and tops on display at the cozy Coligny Plaza shop.

had some fun shopping and sipping mimosas (Kenneweg just happened to have the ingredients on hand) before their tee time. Finding clothing and gifts for themselves and their loved ones, they left happy and with the promise to be back next visit. Another island visitor reached out from afar after being invited to attend Easter celebrations at the White House. While she could have shopped anywhere, she was compelled by what she had seen at Haskins & Co. while vacationing on Hilton Head Island. Texting photos, Kenneweg was able to pull together a few outfits for all the associated events so that the customer could look and feel comfortable and confident throughout. And she’s doing the same for locals with a program called the Frock Box. Too busy, too tired, or not in the mood to make the trip down to Coligny? Kenneweg will put together a box of items especially for you, deliver it, and then pick up anything you decide not to keep. One thing is certain: you’ll never be bored shopping at Haskins & Co., because the inventory changes from week to week. Whether you are a local resident, a frequent visitor, or a first-time area guest, stop in and meet Kenneweg; add to your wardrobe or stock up on gifts at this darling Coligny Plaza shop, where life meets style and girls go to have fun.  Haskins & Co. is located at 1 N. Forest Beach Dr., on the ocean-facing side of Coligny Plaza on Hilton Head Island. For more information, visit www.haskinssupply. com or call (843) 295-9003.


Kathy Kaess welcomes guests to Coastal Treasures on a rainy day in April. The umbrella she’s holding is brilliant – check out the Coastal Treasures Behind the Scenes video on Celebrate Hilton Head’s YouTube channel to see how it really keeps you dry, even after you come in from the rain. (Or if you are reading from our digital issue, click the yellow and teal PLAY button!)


Coastal Treasures L E T U S E N T E R TA I N YO U !

ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS I PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

“S

ome people go sky diving. Some people go ziplining. And some people go shopping—for entertainment!” said Kathy Kaess, store manager at Coastal Treasures, the iconic Hilton Head Island gift shop with one of the Lowcountry’s most coveted addresses. “We are so fortunate to be here in Harbour Town. I feel like we have such versatility every day of the year, no matter what crowd we are entertaining, we can make our customers happy.” Kaess knows that selecting a gift isn’t always easy, especially if you want it to reflect the care and love you feel for the intended recipient. While they say it’s the thought that counts, most of us agree that receiving a thoughtfully chosen gift is what really matters. So, Kaess has done some of the thinking for you. Whether it’s a card, a candle, a serving platter, a bracelet, a garden statue, a flower vase, a tote bag, a cell phone charger, a children’s book, or a doggie dish, she’s more than a little excited to share the unique collection of gift items she has procured for your entertainment pleasure! And we’re not talking just any old souvenirs. Although you will find affordable vacation mementos, Hilton Head Islandbranded merchandise, and fun gifts for your friends back home, there’s no denying that quality lives at Coastal Treasures. The store’s tagline, “Elegant Living, Thoughtful Giving,” is an apt description of their mission to provide a discriminating selection of sophisticated home décor, tableware, jewelry and other items anyone would be proud to give or thrilled to receive. Upon entering Coastal Treasures, your first reaction is likely to be something like a kid in the candy store: so many temptations! But as you explore, you will find merchandise neatly arranged by category and/or designer, drawing your attention to items that most clearly strike your fancy. One of the first displays you may notice is the lovely selection of Mariposa tableware and home accessories—elegant gifts that speak for themselves—alongside a colorful collection of Le Cadeaux dinnerware and decorative serving pieces sure to enliven your next soiree or light up the eyes of anyone on the receiving end of such a magnificent gift. London designer Katie Loxton also has a small but prominent presence at Coastal Treasures with a selection of pouches, wristlets, eyeglass cases and other chic, everyday accessories—“little luxuries and stylish treats worth wishing for,” her brand mantra. On a practical note, you are sure to enjoy the artful display of paper vase covers that quickly convert any container to a decorative vessel. Expandable vases, luminary lanterns for candles, and wine glass shades also make unusual gifts for hosts and hostesses. You’ll want a stash for yourself, too, in an array of colors and patterns, for impromptu gatherings, festive moments, or decorating your daily life. And then there is the “techy” table, featuring Kikkerland gifts such as emergency chargers, phone mounts, travel cases Turn the page for some gift ideas for Mom! -B

for electronics, bicycle repair kits, eyeglass tools, and much more. Look to the store’s back corner and find gifts for your furry friends. (If your pup is tagging along, stop by for snacks and water at the entrance—free to all who pass, no purchase required.) But for all the fabulous and fun merchandise, what truly makes the Coastal Treasures experience is the friendly, relaxed atmosphere. “We’ve always been very focused on customer service,” Kaess said. “We’re also cognizant of turning over merchandise so that every time you visit, you see something new.” Whether you are a local resident or one of our seasonal guests, mosey on down to Harbour Town and stop by Coastal Treasures, where you are bound to find the perfect gifts for your family and friends—and perhaps even a present for yourself. That’s entertainment!  Coastal Treasures is located at Harbour Town Yacht Club in Sea Pines Resort, 149 Lighthouse Rd., Suite F, Hilton Head Island. For more information, call (843) 671-3643, visit www. coastaltreasures-hiltonhead.com and/or follow on Facebook at coastaltreasureshhi.

Teddy the Golden Retriever enjoys treats from Coastal Treasures Doggie Bar and stares down a mean old alligator.


Everyday Bling and Serious Fun For that special someone—your mom, your best friend, your wife or girlfriend—you can never go wrong with jewelry. Coastal Treasures takes pride in the lines chosen to suit every woman’s taste, at price points to make every pocketbook happy. Take a peek at these exquisite offerings:

GIFT IDEAS FOR MOM FROM

Coastal Treasures

MY SAINT MY HERO, a line of inspirational, wearable blessings, speaks to the heart and soul of both the giver and the wearer. Founded on the belief that God is real, prayer works, and love heals, part of the proceeds of your purchase will go to benefit a variety of charitable service organizations and youth ministries.

CHRISTINA KOBER DESIGNS is a line to celebrate, comfort and inspire you. Choose a delicate handmade piece as an expression of who you are—perfect worn alone or layered with your existing everyday jewelry.

MEGHAN BROWNE STYLE, which Kaess describes as “trendy, cool, hip and happening,” is an ever-evolving skillful mix of playful sophistication that will enhance your wardrobe and personal style.

JOHN MEDEIROS, the store’s jewelry anchor, is a collection of high-quality, handmade, intricate and long-lasting jewelry, in premium finishes, with high quality stones that defy distinction from their more expensive fine-jewelry counterparts.

LES GEORGETTES BY ALTESSE invites you to discover the colorful universe by combining customizable jewelry with interchangeable leather inserts to match your outfit, your handbag, or your mood!

PEARLY GIRLS features casual, updated pearl necklaces and bracelets, combining lustrous freshwater pearls with charms, creating unique jewelry categorized somewhere between fine and fun.

LITTLE FISH BOATEAK, handcrafted with love in the Lowcountry, is fun fashion jewelry to add that perfect pop of color and texture to your outfits and expand your accessories wardrobe.

MARY SHERIDAN, a local artist known for her work with the Sea Turtle patrol, is creating “take the sand home” charms, each with a tiny bit of sand from our local beaches tucked inside—a delightful vacation memento or gift.

72

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

SHINELIFE brings a touch of personal and faith-based inspiration in the form of delicate jewelry, designed for daily wear, perfect as standalone pieces or layered with other favorites.

GARDI WOOD, a St. Simons, Ga.-based designer, supplies freshwater pearl rings and gold bracelets to delight the lover of understated elegance.


M AY 2019 L O W C O U N T R Y

ATTORNEYS

PG.76

PG.78

PG.80

PG.83

BANNON LAW GROUP, LLC

DILLS LAW FIRM RUTH & MACNEILLE, P.A.

VAUX MARSCHER BERGLIND, PA

COFFEYKUBEC, LLP

AKINS LAW FIRM, LLC

PG.77

PG.79

PG.81

BERRY & CARR

BUTLER & COLLEGE, LLC

SVALINA LAW FIRM


MEREDITH & JIM BANNON B A N N O N L A W G R O U P, L L C annon Law Group is Bluffton. Attorneys Jim and Meredith Bannon have called Bluffton home for the last 11 years. Jim, like many Hilton Head area transplants, is from Pennsylvania. He grew up in State College and attended Penn State University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in theatre. He met Meredith, a child of a career Army officer, in their second year of law school at the University of Miami. Meredith found her way to Miami after graduating cum laude from Tulane University in New Orleans with a Bachelor of Science in management and sociology. Needless to say, their backgrounds are quite different, but each complements the other. The Bannons set out to find fortune, fame, and trial experience in Northwest Arizona, as prosecutors. Jim focused on major drug crimes; Meredith focused on sex crimes against children. Upon landing in the Lowcountry, Jim and Meredith would help the Fourteenth Circuit Solicitor’s Office found the Career Criminal Team, with Meredith handling the prosecution of every murder in Beaufort County in 2012. The siren call of private practice sang, and Jim has enjoyed a thriving criminal and personal injury practice

B

DALE AKINS A K I N S L AW F I R M , L L C ale Akins is a trial lawyer and is licensed in all state and federal courts in South Carolina and Georgia. He is rated AV® Preeminent™ by MartindaleHubbell and has earned a reputation for excellence and integrity. He has also been selected as a South Carolina Super Lawyer in the Plaintiff’s Counsel category and has lectured on several occasions as part of continuing legal education programs. He is an associate of the American Board of Trial Advocates and is on the LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell list of Top Lawyers in South Carolina. Mr. Akins graduated from Furman University in 1988 and earned his law degree from Mercer University in 1991. He has practiced in Beaufort County since that time. He and his wife, Sally, who is also an attorney practicing in Savannah, Georgia, have lived in Rose Hill since 1994. Mr. Akins has provided aggressive, legal representation for nearly 30 years, mainly in the Lowcountry and Coastal Empire, and currently maintains a dynamic

D

practice in the heart of Old Town Bluffton, focusing on serious personal injury, wrongful death and bad faith insurance cases. He offers his clients rigorous representation and personalized focus and attention. He believes it is of paramount importance in any case to keep the client’s best interest at the forefront through innovative and ethical means, and he persistently advocates for his clients to ensure that they receive maximum recovery and the compensation they deserve. He has handled hundreds of cases and has a great deal of experience and skill, both in and out of the courtroom. If you find yourself in times of trial, consider the Akins Law Firm. Akins Law Firm, LLC 6 Johnston Way, Second Floor Bluffton, SC 29910 Telephone (843) 757-7574 Fax (843) 757-7601 dakins@hargray.com daleakinslaw.com

for the past six years. Jim can provide advice based on his years of experience in all criminal matters ranging from DUIs to federal drug charges. Meredith entered private practice in 2013 and focuses on real estate closings and real estate litigation. She enjoys welcoming new neighbors into the community and talking about what good fortune one has to live in such an amazing place. Meredith further helps her clients by advising homeowners associations on risk liability and collections work. Jim is the president of the board of the Literacy Center of the Lowcountry, while Meredith is a board member of Hopeful Horizons, our local child advocacy center. They have an active first-grader who pushes them to give back to the community and reinvest in all those they encounter. Their story is similar to that of a lot of Blufftonians: they didn’t realize they found home until they found Bluffton. 10 Westbury Pkwy., Unit A Bluffton, SC 29910 (843) 815-4505 www.bannonlawgroup.com


LUKE PAULICK, MICHAEL BENNETT, PATRICK CARR AND DAVID H. BERRY

BERRY & CARR erry & Carr provides their clients with the highest level of legal representation and personal service, tailored to meet their individual needs. Serving the Lowcountry since 1985, they now have two offices on Hilton Head Island as well as a Beaufort location. The law firm of Berry & Carr represents clients in personal injury and wrongful death cases and has experienced trial lawyers and savvy negotiators. Named partners David Berry and Patrick Carr each served as lead counsel in more than 100 jury trials. Berry, the founder of Berry and Carr, is licensed in four states: Ohio, South Carolina, Georgia, and South Dakota, as well as all federal courts in those jurisdictions. His areas of expertise include personal

B

injury, workers compensation and automobile accidents. Berry is also a Diplomate with the American Association of Justice and is a South Carolina Certified Civil Mediator. Patrick Carr, a Certified South Carolina Circuit Court Mediator, works with continuing legal education programs focusing on automobile accident litigation and civil litigation techniques in South Carolina. He and David Berry have obtained some of the highest personal injury verdicts in Beaufort County. Luke Paulick and Michael Bennett joined the firm with experience in immigration law, civil litigation and criminal defense. Paulick began his law career in 2013 and has since been recognized by

the American Bar Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Immigration Justice Project. Bennett is admitted to practice by the Supreme Court of South Carolina, the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina and the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Together, these experienced and tenacious attorneys know how to fully investigate your injury, negotiate with insurance companies and other at-fault parties, and make sure your claim is fully and properly valued. www.HiltonHeadLawyers.com (843) 686-5432


DILLS LAW FIRM ills Law Firm, LLC is a boutique law firm located in the Bluffton Promenade, in the heart of Old Town Bluffton.  Established in 2018 by Rob Dills after being an associate at The Law Office of Dean B. Bell, the firm is uniquely built on offering premier, results-oriented service to its clients in the Lowcountry.  Focused on providing an alternative to the hourly billing standard of other firms, it instead offers primarily flat-fee and subscription legal services.  By taking this approach, Dills Law Firm is able to provide efficient service to its clients at fair rates. Rob Dills earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of South Carolina in 2009 and his JD from the University of Dayton School of Law in 2014. He is a member of the South Carolina Bar, the Beaufort County Bar, and the Hilton Head Bar. He has also served on the South Carolina Drone Task Force and is a member for the South Carolina Solo & Small Firm Council. The firm focuses on providing the best service possible in the areas of real estate, estate planning and administration, and corporate law. By concentrating the firm on these areas, the Dills Law Firm can provide each client with the attention and care they need for some of the biggest moments and decisions in their lives. Their goal is to not just to be the best attorneys, but to be your attorney.

D

4 State of Mind St., Suite 200 Bluffton, SC 29910 (843) 868-8210 www.DillsLawFirm.com

RUTH & MACNEILLE, P.A uth & MacNeille, P.A. was re-organized as a professional association in 1987 as a successor to the Dowling Law Firm that was formed in 1948. The firm’s varied practice consists of both non-litigation and litigation legal matters including: Estate Planning, Wills & Trusts, Probate Administration, Divorce & Family Law and Homeowner Association representation. The firm occupies attractive office facilities at 10 Office Way, Suite 200 on Hilton Head Island, located in the South Island’s Pope Avenue business area. Attorney Douglas W. MacNeille graduated from Lawrenceville School, University of Virginia and Southwestern University School of Law; he resides on Hilton Head Island where

R

he has practiced law since 1984. MacNeille is a member of the South Carolina Bar and the States District Court for South Carolina, and the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. He and his paralegal, Beth Meeder, strive to give their clients the prompt and individual attention expected in a strong lawyer-client relationship. Please visit our website or feel free to give us a call to discuss your legal needs and questions. 10 Office Way, Suite 200 Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 (843) 785-4251 www.ruthandmacneille.com


BUTLER & COLLEGE, LLC t Butler & College, LLC, we focus our practice on helping businesses, individuals, and families with their real estate and estate planning needs in a manner that is honest, affordable, and customer-oriented. Our firm has deep community ties and six convenient locations along the coast of South Carolinaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;stretching from Myrtle Beach to Bluffton. When it comes to real estate, it is important to understand the role of an attorney in buying, selling, or refinancing a home. At Butler & College, LLC, we are with you from contracting to closing. Our seasoned attorneys and legal staff have established reputations as proven performers while continuously adhering to the highest standards of quality and service. Estate plans can be as simple

A

or as elaborate as the client needs or desires. We customize plans that provide for your loved ones in the event of your death and ensure that you retain control over your medical care and financial well-being should you become ill or disabled. Butler & College, LLC is happy to provide initial consultations free of charge. The firm created B&C Commercial to offer individuals and businesses across the Lowcountry an alternative to large, costly law firms. B&C Commercial utilizes state-ofthe-art technology and cutting-edge practice management software to serve our clients more efficiently, more attentively, and in the most cost-effective way possible. B&C Commercial focuses on commercial real estate services, business services, and legal consulting for businesses.

Butler & College, LLC is your partner for real estate closing success and thoughtful estate planning and business services. Bluffton Office: Ashley Adams Brown, Esq. Managing Attorney for the Greater HHI/Bluffton/Savannah Area 10 Pinckney Colony Rd. Bldg. 300, Ste. 300 Bluffton, SC 29909 (843) 277-6220 (843) 410-5607 www.bandclawfirm.com


R I C K M A R S C H E R , TA B O R VAU X , A N D M A R K B E R G L I N D

VAUX MARSCHER BERGLIND, PA aux Marscher Berglind, PA is deeply rooted in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. The law firm was established in 1973 by Roberts Vaux. Over the years, the firm has provided legal services to thousands of individuals and businesses in Beaufort County, Jasper County and the surrounding areas. Rick Marscher was born and raised in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. He focuses his practice on real estate. Tabor Vaux, son of Roberts Vaux, was also born and raised in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. He focuses his practice on personal injury. Mark Berglind joined the law firm in 2008 and focuses his practice on workers’ compensation and personal injury. Rick, Tabor and Mark take pride in their Lowcountry

V

community, and the firm is actively engaged in community events and programs. In addition to real estate, personal injury and workers’ compensation, the lawyers at Vaux Marscher Berglind, PA offer the best legal services in many other areas including probate, estate planning, family law, criminal law, corporate law, and general litigation. The attorneys and staff members institute a team approach to understanding and resolving their clients’ needs. Collectively, the team works to offer insightful legal counsel and diligent representation to each and every client. The lawyers at Vaux Marscher Berglind, PA, have more than 100 years of combined experience and use that experience to assist

their clients with their legal needs. Whether a client is injured in a motor vehicle accident or buying his or her first home, experience allows the lawyers at Vaux Marscher Berglind, PA to confidently and efficiently handle their needs and goals. Their clients always come first. Vaux Marscher Berglind, PA currently has offices in Old Town Bluffton, Okatie and Charleston. 1251 May River Road, Bluffton, SC 29910 (843) 757-2888 www.vmblawfirm.com


SAMMY SVALINA SVA L I N A

urn on the television virtually any time and you’re likely to be bombarded with ads from various personal injury attorneys promising big settlements. But you will not see Sammy Svalina. Svalina has been practicing law in the Lowcountry for 28 years, and he always gives his best effort to prevent being lumped in with the stereotype of the ambulance-chasing attorney. “I’m just a storyteller,” he said. “My job is to tell my clients’ stories in a truthful and compelling way that resonates with the jury.” And he does love to tell a story. Svalina was born in Chicago, but his family moved to Beaufort in 1968, just before his fourth birthday, and he has called the Lowcountry home ever since. After attending Washington and Lee University in Virginia, serving in the U.S. Army Signal Corps, and earning his law degree from the University of South Carolina, Svalina had opportunities to leave the Lowcountry but elected to stay

T

LAW

FIRM

put and join his father, Sam, in the family practice in Beaufort. The elder Svalina passed away in 2013, but Sammy continues to practice through the Svalina Law Firm, using the skills his father taught him—and a few tricks he has picked up along the way—to serve clients throughout Beaufort, Jasper, Colleton and Hampton Counties. “I learned the value of credibility and how to get the true facts across to a jury through my dad,” Svalina said. “How important it is to deal with facts and be truthful. That’s what people come to hear in cases.” Svalina is board certified through the National Board of Trial Advocacy—one of 37 attorneys in South Carolina who can make that claim and the only one in Beaufort County—which is another fact that separates him from the big-talking attorneys on your TV. “We’ve had some great lawyers who have retired in Beaufort and in Charleston that I’ve gone against,” Svalina said. “When you see lawyers this good, you

better be good or you’re going to get your butt kicked all the time. Preparation is the key. And when you think you’re prepared, you need to prepare more. Svalina has been trying cases for over 27 years. His law firm primarily focuses on workers’ compensation, serious motor vehicle collisions, nursing home malpractice, wrongful death suits and personal injury matters. Beaufort Office 601 Bladen Street P.O. Drawer 1207 Beaufort, SC 29901 (843) 524-0333

Bluffton Office 110 Traders Cross Bluffton, SC 29909 (843) 837-7800

www.svalinalawfirm.com


COFFEYKUBEC, LLP offeyKubec combines local knowledge and world-class experience in providing legal services to the Lowcountry. As the fresh new face of law on Hilton Head Island, the team of Maureen Coffey, Ed Kubec and Leighanne Kubec brings more than 60 years of collective legal experience to their practice, which includes criminal defense, civil litigation, business transactions, personal injury, marital law and custody disputes, employment discrimination and immigration. A native islander, Maureen Coffey has served as the municipal court judge for the Town of Hilton Head Island for the last 18 years. Maureenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practice includes criminal defense, personal injury and employment discrimination, as well as marital law and immigration. Maureen cofounded the Lowcountry Legal Clinic, which offers legal aid to those unable to afford counsel. Maureen is also the founder of the WeSaidYes app, aimed at reducing the number of sexual assaults taking place on college campuses. Maureen received her BA from Vanderbilt University and her JD from the George Mason School of Law; she has

C

been licensed to practice law in the State of South Carolina since 1994. The husband and wife team of Ed and Leighanne Kubec, practiced law in Los Angeles for 15 years in their respective fields: Ed as an entertainment attorney and Leighanne working on multimillion-dollar personal injury cases under the mentorship of Larry Feldman and Jerome Ringler, two of the top trial lawyers in America. After vacationing on Hilton Head Island since 1977, the Kubecs moved to the area with their children in 2005 to be closer to family. Ed Kubec has a diverse practice, representing clients in corporate law and civil litigation, encompassing a broad range of business, real estate, intellectual property, and employment-related disputes. He has extensive experience in both federal and state court litigations. Prior to entering private practice on Hilton Head Island, Ed was general counsel and subsequently executive managing officer for a South Carolina-based financial institution. Ed is a graduate of Wake Forest University and Fordham University School of Law, and is admitted to practice in South Carolina, New

York and California. Leighanne Kubec received her law degree from Fordham University in New York City, after graduating cum laude from Boston College. She is licensed to practice law in New York, California and South Carolina. Her current practice includes personal injury, marital and special education law. She is a member of the Council of Parent Attorneys & Advocates (COPAA) and is passionately involved in the development of The Island Academy of Hilton Head, an educationallyinnovative K-12 learning program designed to combine rigorous academics with creativity, empowerment and imagination. CoffeyKubec, LLP 1 Corpus Christi Drive, Suite 105 Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 (843) 422-4488 www.CoffeyKubec.com


WRITTEN BY BETH ANN PR I NC E

8

DOs & DON’Ts

DE S I G N BY MI KA STJ O HN

for DIVORCING

PARENTS

A

s a family court lawyer, I dedicate a great deal of my practice to custody and visitation issues. One of the first orders of business is discussing with a client his or her custody goals. Part of determining a client’s goals is exploring the reasons why he or she seeks a certain custodial arrangement. Invariably, the client expresses that he or she wants what is best for the children. I believe most parties truly are trying to do what they believe is best for their kids, but there are many misconceptions about what is best. It helps for me to explain the various options along with the pros and cons of each. We also spend time discussing how to best help kids navigate the process. The visitation model of every other weekend to fathers was based entirely on practicality and an outdated family model of one parent working outside the home (usually the father) and the other parent working as a homemaker (usually the mother). Unfortunately, because this model became ingrained in our culture, a lot of clients mistakenly believe it is what’s best for kids. Modern studies show that is not necessarily true. As a result, many states are moving toward a presumption of shared or equal custody. South Carolina is not one of those states, but our family courts have taken note of the trend.

The most important factor in reducing stress for kids and minimizing the negative impact of divorce is for parents to get along and have a healthy relationship with each other. Helping my client maintain a positive relationship with the other parent is an important part of my job. Sometimes, such as in cases where abuse or addiction is present, that is not possible, and we must do whatever is necessary to protect the children. Thankfully, most cases are not that extreme. Divorcing parents can use the following do’s and don’ts as a general guideline to find common ground and minimize any negative impact on their children:

1

Do not speak negatively about the other parent. This is one of the golden rules. Children absorb information like sponges. It confuses them to hear one parent speak negatively about the other, because the child loves that parent. That confusion can cause additional stress and anxiety in an already uncertain time. It is good common sense to refrain from disparaging the other parent to your kids and is a huge consideration for judges. Don’t do it. It’s bad for your kids and bad for your custody case. Do encourage a positive relationship with the other parent. It is shockingly common for kids to begin resisting visiting with one parent because they feel it will make the other parent “mad.” For example, if you are the mother, and the father has visitation every other weekend, do not interrogate your kids about what they did all weekend with Dad. Don’t make snide comments if he is taking them to expensive places or indulging them in fun activities. Children can often end up feeling guilty about enjoying their time with Dad if they feel Mom does not approve. Do not ever coach your kids on what to say. Custody battles inevitably involve a Guardian ad Litem, who is an attorney appointed by the court to investigate the custody issues and report their findings to the court. They are often referred to as the attorney for the children, advocating for what is in the children’s best interest. Too often one parent will accuse the other of coaching the children on what to say, including (falsely) accusing one parent of abusive behavior. While it should be obvious that this is a terrible idea, it bears repeating: It is damaging to your kids and damaging to your custody case. Don’t think the guardian and the attorneys won’t notice if the kids were coached. They will.MAY 2019 85 C2 MAGAZINE

2

3


4

Do not talk to your kids about the custody case. Of course, you can and should tell the kids if you are getting divorced, but it is important to do it in an appropriate way. The kids need to know that Mom and Dad are going to live separately because they can get along better that way, and that both parents love them very much. If you need more detailed suggestions on exactly what to say, ask for help from a professional. Good literature and many Internet sources are available to help guide you on this topic. The general idea is to make sure the kids know they don’t need to worry, and although things will change, that doesn’t have to be a bad thing. Children are amazingly resilient.

5

Do focus on what matters. I cannot stress this enough. Pick your battles. Ultimately, you chose the other parent. Absent extraordinary circumstances, the other parent is capable of helping with homework, feeding your kids sufficiently nutritious foods, and getting your kids to bed at a decent time. The court usually does not micromanage exact bedtimes and dietary habits. The court is not interested in how bad one parent might be at “new math.” This is where compromise is important. There is no one right way to raise a child, and parents will inevitably differ in certain areas. However, if a parent completely fails in one or more of these areas, that can be serious and must not be overlooked.

6

Do attend your kids’ functions, even if the other parent will be there. Unless there is a legitimate safety issue, don’t avoid going to school or sports functions because the other parent will be present. You are the adults. If you are able to sit together like grownups, please do. If you can’t, then sit on other side of the bleachers if you must. But don’t stay home because it’s easier to avoid the other parent. Put your kids first. Whatever you do, do not get into a confrontation with the other parent in public.

86

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

7

Don’t make your kids be a messenger. Don’t let your kids transfer child support payments. Don’t ask them to relay important information between you. Your kids should never be placed in the role of a go-between. By asking your children to do this, you are ultimately relaying the message that you cannot and will not communicate directly with the other parent. Your kids should not be burdened with your responsibility.

8

Do be civil to the other parent—always. I know, I know, I know. It’s hard sometimes. Do it anyway. Behave in a manner at all times as if every word you say will be recorded and played in court. You do not want your children to absorb or assimilate your negative feelings about the other parent. You will never regret taking the high road and being civil, even if you are not treated the same way in return. Divorce is stressful, but by following these tips, you can gain control over how the divorce will affect your kids. Knowing your kids are okay will provide you invaluable peace of mind and will help build the foundation for successful co-parenting in the future. 

Beth Ann Prince is a family law attorney at Prince Law Firm, located at 200 Central Avenue, Suite B, on Hilton Head Island. For more information, visit www.bethprincelawfirm.com or call (843) 681-9000.


87

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE


h t o o m s

Moves BY MEREDITH BANNON, ESQ.

I

help people move into their dream homes or sell their former dream homes every day. I see the stress. I do all I can to minimize the strain. I intellectually understand all the parts of purchasing and selling property. And this month, I dove in and re-experienced the stress of buying a new house, selling the old and, yes, the horror of moving. I now have a new appreciation for the emotional side of purchasing and selling property. So, I owe an apology to all of my clients that I have talked off the ledge, that I have shaken my head at when they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t follow my advice, to the clients I thought were mentally unbalanced but, in reality, were just moving. I get it. I am you. I am a bundle of nerves, and I am officially over it. We moved less than five miles within Bluffton, but the pain, stress and emotional shutdown all showed up. Did I mention we got a puppy too? At the time of publication, I should be calmly holding all my possessions that bring me joy and placing them in their new, organized, clean, color-coordinated bins. Meanwhile, if you actually follow the tips I give professionally as listed below, you can avoid the heartache and wine bills I have incurred:


1

Find a lender you like.

Don’t worry about rates and terms. If you like your lender and feel you can tell them what you want without judgment (e.g. I need to include the cost of building a pool to be my best self this summer), they will find you the best rate and terms. Sometimes, you don’t even know certain loan products exist unless your lender tells you. Thus, find one you like and who will come to your pool parties. You are paying them, and they want your business. Insider tip: Make sure you have a prequalification letter on letterhead prior to visiting those new houses—it strengthens your offer and helps you avoid disappointment.

2

Find a real estate agent you like and stick with them. If you are selling your house, select a

Realtor at least a month prior to your anticipated “go live” date. An experienced real estate agent will tell you what to fix, what to declutter (they don’t care about the joy your possessions bring at this point—just the money!), and how to stage. This is priceless. Tiny little fixes pay big returns on the market (returns that can go toward that tiki bar at the end of your new pool). Typically, as a seller, you will be paying both Realtor commissions. Ask your Realtor how they are going to market, how they are going to differentiate your listing, and what a realistic timeline is. Your Realtor should be your truth speaker—even if it is sometimes brutal.

3 4 5 6

If you are a purchaser, a real estate agent is vital. You are not paying their commission, yet they will only represent your interest. Choose one and stick with them. A purchaser’s real estate agent will find listings you may have overlooked and help broker stronger deals.

Pick a strong team.

Sense a trend here? The difference between a good and bad closing experience lies in the team you field. An insurance agent and an attorney who know the market and have to see you in Publix can save you money and heartache. Don’t skimp on services here. Do not assume that all attorneys or insurance companies are the same. Choosing the cheapest option can result in delays, frustration and inaccuracies. Your Realtor will have recommendations for both—ask them honestly who will be responsive and protect your deal.

Plan ahead.

Where are you going to put your stuff the day of closing? Where are you going to sleep? Are you going to be in town to sign your paperwork? Figuring out the practical part will make the transactional part go smoothly.

Take deep breaths. Once you have a contract, there is still the stress of repairs, financing, and the actual logistics of moving. Remember that everyone wants the deal to close. Some may say it is because no one gets paid unless the deal closes, but that is just ugliness talking (did I mention I am looking at the high-end tile option for the pool?). As an attorney and a functioning member of society, I’m excited for my clients and want to protect them. They become part of my clan, and we are fiercely protective. I enjoy working with the team of lenders, Realtors, buyers, sellers, and various shaman to get the deal closed.  Meredith Bannon is a practicing Blufftonbased attorney. For more information, visit www.bannonlawgroup.com or call (843) 815-4505

90

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE


ave! D y e H

’Sup, Sam?

Hi y! Cath

The Neighborhood Eatery that Knows You by Name

ON MAIN

A

ny restaurant can serve good food. But what makes a good restaurant great is the combination of tasty food, friendly service, and an inviting atmosphere. Many people would say it’s an overall feeling—the kind you get at Mixx on Main, one of Hilton Head Island’s most beloved neighborhood eateries—named a 2018 Next Door Favorite—located, where else, but Main Street. Open just shy of a year, the cozy bistro and bar has quickly become a popular stop for local residents, especially the north-end neighborhoods. “It’s truly become and has a Cheers kind of vibe,” managing partner Patsy Delello said. Like the fictional bar in the popular 1980s sitcom, Mixx on Main aims to be a real neighborhood institution. “We know probably 70 percent of our customers by name,” managing partner Chris Kingston added. “We really enjoy seeing that everyday customer and being part of the community.” The restaurant’s menu concept is a masterful blend of all-American favorites, Mexican fare, Italian specialties, fun bar food, and more (thus the name Mixx). Whether you’re in the mood for a steaming bowl of their award-winning white chicken chili, a taco salad, a burger, a sizzling sirloin steak, a plate of authentic spaghetti and meatballs, a lobster tail, or fresh grilled shrimp, you’re sure to find exactly what you’re craving. According to Delello, because of the eclectic menu that boasts over 60 items, plus at least five daily lunch specials and just as many dinner specials, customers can and do come in multiple times during the week and have a completely different experience each visit. Frequenting the restaurant are business men and women,

by Linda S. Hopkins


Regular customers enjoy happy hour on a busy March evening at Mixx on Main.


THE RESTAURANT’S MENU CONCEPT IS A MASTERFUL BLEND OF ALL-AMERICAN FAVORITES, MEXICAN FARE, ITALIAN SPECIALTIES, FUN BAR FOOD, AND MORE (THUS THE NAME MIXX).

Miguel and Pancho Martinez serve up a variety of tasty entrées daily.

“YOU CAN ALSO COME IN FOR A QUICK LUNCH—WE CAN GET YOU IN AND OUT.”

“ladies who lunch,” the after-golf crowd, couples out for date night (or a nice, quiet dinner), happy hour enthusiasts (4-6:30 p.m.), and families too busy or too tired to cook. “You can also come in for a quick lunch—we can get you in and out,” Kingston said, which is especially meaningful for employees of area businesses. “For as small as we are, we are very versatile and efficient and can accommodate the experience you want, whether you are in a hurry or wish to linger. People say we have service down to a science.” Aside from the diverse menu and top-notch service, the small, intimate venue also lends itself to a variety of dining experiences, including a vibrant bar scene where you can order anything from cocktails and bar food (wings, baskets, nachos…) to a full-course dinner, while watching sports or socializing with your neighbors; an inviting covered patio where you can breathe in the fresh Lowcountry air, enjoy conversations and mingle over delicious food; and a main dining room where you can relax and relish the company of friends and family over a satisfying, no-stress meal. Partners Delello and Kingston are perhaps most excited to introduce their new evening menu, featuring more entrées, while still offering all the items on the lunch and bar menus and maintaining the comfortable, casual ambiance. “We’re not changing the menu, we’re just presenting it in a different way,” Delello assured. “We will continue to have all the original favorites and more!” “And if there’s something we’ve served you in the past that you don’t see on the menu, please ask. We’ll be happy to accommodate you,” Kingston added. Along with their obvious culinary genius, Delello and Kingston bring a wealth of restaurant management experience to the table and a shared Patti Cat vision of what a neighborhood eatery should be. Delello, originally from Lynch are reg New York, has been a resident of Hilton Head Island and familiar face on the local restaurant scene for over 30 years. He has the advantage of longevity here and an intimate understanding of his community and customer base. Kingston, a Bluffton resident for two years, comes from Atlanta, Ga. where he ran two popular restaurants and gained the skills to manage the kind of energetic venture he and his partner have embarked upon here. Together, they have established a team of experienced, enthusiastic cooks and servers who enjoy making their customers happy. “We really pride ourselves on training our staff that the customer truly does come first,” Delello said. “We try to address each customer as they walk out the door; there’s not a day that goes by that we don’t hear, ‘Gosh, everybody is so friendly here!’ And that’s what keeps them coming back!” “We are obviously being praised for our food, but if there is something another restaurant does just as well, we step it up a bit with our service and personality,” Kingston said. “It’s very consistent, and we’re going to stay consistent with our product and our service.” Apart from serving fresh-made food in a warm, welcoming manner, being a good neighbor includes extending good will to the community outside the realm of the restaurant, which Delello and Kingston do by supporting local churches and charities. They recently participated in a bowling tournament to support Osprey Village, a local organization that provides a residential setting for adults with various disabilities. In addition, according to Kingston, they have contributed over $2,000 in gift certificates to areawide charitable functions and are looking to organize a charity golf tournament in the future. As Mixx on Main continues striving to become your neighborhood favorite, they are working on parking solutions and urge you to come in even if the lot appears full. Stop by frequently, and stay tuned for more exciting updates, because this restaurant is here to stay and is only going to keep getting better. If you haven’t yet ventured to Mixx on Main, head on over for lunch or dinner and introduce yourself. They want to know you!  Mixx on Main is located at 87 Main Street, Hilton Head Island and is open six days a week (Monday-Saturday). Lunch is served from 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; dinner service begins at 5, with happy hour from 4-6:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.mixxonmain.com or call (843) 842-Mixx (6499).

94

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE


Bobby and Dee G. are twice a week regulars because “Dee does not cook.”

ON MAIN

p hrim thing s g ome zlin “Siz trying s nn?” ,A or time s i h t new

“Getcha‘ b ack to work in no time, D an!”

talano and Emmy gulars at Mixx on Main.

Patti Catalano and Emmy Lynch are regulars at Mixx on Main.

“WE KNOW PROBABLY 70 PERCENT OF OUR CUSTOMERS BY NAME.”

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

95


FLOORING TO LAST. Luxury vinyl plank flooring was used throughout the interior of the home instead of hardwood for a very specific reason: Leia, the 115-pound Great Dane. Dog toenails can do a number on hardwood floors, so Toomer went the more practical route.

At Home in

JAIME AND LEIA

Old Town Bluffton Jaime Toomer finds the right fit with Built Right Homes PHOTOGRAPHY BY LUKE ANDREWS, COURTESY OF BUILT RIGHT HOMES

W

hen Jaime Toomer decided to build her first house from the ground up, she knew she wanted a Lowcountrystyle home that was durable and fit her lifestyle. When not at MUSC working as a nurse, Toomer spends as much free time as possible boating on the May River. Aunt to several nieces and nephews and mom to a giant Great Dane named Leia, she wanted a no-fuss, no-muss home, in close proximity to the water, that fit all of her favorite people. Oh, and there was one other thing: the home had to be finished in about seven months, as it would be hosting the groomsmen the weekend of her sister’s wedding. “November 11 was burned into my brain,” said Lisa Lapinski, co-owner of Built Right Homes with her husband Kevin. “Come hell or highwater, we had to get Jaime’s house finished in time for the wedding weekend.” “We broke ground in April,” Toomer said. “I was at the RBC Heritage, and Lisa was sending me photos of the concrete being poured.”

96

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

Updates from Built Right Homes were weekly, and sometimes even more frequent, making the whole progression comfortable and smooth. “I had heard horror stories from everyone about attempting to build a house from the ground up,” Toomer said. “That just wasn’t my experience at all. Kevin and Lisa made everything so simple— even when it came to choosing tile (which can be overwhelming for anyone who has ever ventured into one of those giant warehouses). Lisa did all the legwork and just gave me three options in the color and style I had mentioned liking. They really took the stress out of the project and made the whole process fun.” Living in the historic district of Bluffton has its own particular set of challenges, and Toomer was impressed that Kevin was completely prepared every step of the way. “There were no hold-ups, or hiccups; the house was done on time, and I absolutely love it,” Toomer said, sitting with Leia on the front porch of her new home at 10 Dane Lane in Old Town Bluffton.


LITTL E EX T R A TOU C HES T HAT M A K E A DI F F E R E N C E I N TH E F I N I S H E D P R O DU C T. . .

SPLASH IT UP! Originally, the kitchen was completed without a backsplash as part of the design, and when it was finished, Toomer agreed it needed something. Lisa went hunting to find the perfect art deco backsplash. Adding the gray beveled arabesque tile gave the kitchen the pop it needed and offers a stunning look paired with the quartz countertops.

TILE WITH STYLE. Toomer knew she wanted subway tile in the master bath but left it up to Kevin and Lisa to jazz it up. The team at Built Right paired the subway tile with a deco glass mosaic inlay and multi-toned gray hexagon shower floor, introducing subtle color in the mostly white scheme. Lisa enjoyed working with the team at May River Flooring to pull all her design ideas together.

EXTRA TOUCHES BY BUILT RIGHT HOMES The living area focal point features a custom build with an electric fireplace, accented with Buttboard™ trim and a unique reclaimed wood mantel, handselected by Matt Mitchell of Built Right Homes. The Lapinskis saw that the room just needed that little something else and decided this would be a great gift for Toomer. The area doubles as additional seating for get-togethers around the fireplace and storage for knick-knacks.

THE PERFECT TABLE. After months of searching, Toomer was having trouble finding just the right table for the eat-in kitchen. Kevin Lapinski took note and decided to build her one—at just the right size and in the perfect finish to accent her Lowcountry home.

Kevin and Lisa Lapinski, owners of Built Right Homes, offer a unique experience for their clients with their creative talents. They are dedicated to making sure your home is built right, on schedule, and within your budget. From start to finish, their process is easy: it’s about listening to the client to ensure their home is built for their lifestyle. This team is deeply committed to the success of each home they build. Building your first home or your dream home, the Built Right Homes team will be with you through the entire process. For more information visit their website at www.brhbluffton.com.

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

97


AR

Christine Clegg, owner of AR Workshop in the Village at Wexford

WORKSHOP

Everybody’s Doing It!

T

here are two kinds of people in the world: artsy/ craftsy DIYers and the rest of us. The good news is, AR Workshop is for everybody, from the HGTV Joanna Gaines wanna-be to the most craft-averse. All you need is an open mind and about three hours. The rest is easy, and the result will leave you amazed and ready for more. Anders Ruff (AR) Workshop, founded by Maureen Anders and Adria Ruff, now with over 100 franchises nationwide, is a hands-on DIY studio, offering a variety of home décor projects that are stylish, classic and ontrend. Since August of 2018, Hilton Head Island franchise owner Christine Clegg has been hosting the popular new workshops at her studio in the Village at Wexford, much to the delight of area residents and visitors jumping on the DIY bandwagon or simply looking for something different to do. It’s fast becoming a happening girls’-night-out spot, as well as a venue for group outings, team-building events, fundraisers, couples’ date nights (yes men are welcome, too!), bachelorette parties, mother/daughter bonding experiences, youth workshops, and even children’s parties. The buzz about town has gotten louder as people of all ages and skill levels have discovered a new happy place, where the cares of the world and pressures of the day magically vanish amidst a flurry of creative energy, camaraderie, and newfound confidence. The vibe is farmhouse chic—think plank signs, pedestal trays, bath trays, lazy Susans, centerpiece boxes, canvas wall hangings, pillows, chunky knit blankets, tote

BY LINDA S. HOPKINS Paintbrushes at the ready


A mother and her two daughters spend a Saturday afternoon in March bonding and building.

Signage outside the Village at Wexford location

Completed projects adorn the space to show DIYers whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible.

The chunky blanket classes were a hit all winter long at AR Worshop.


bags and more. But the projects are as varied and versatile as the people who make them. “People are surprised that they can make different projects or the same one and have a completely customized piece at the end,” Clegg said. “And you get to take it home. It’s one and done.” Whether you want to make something for yourself or someone else, you’ll find a workshop project that just suits the intended use or the occasion. Choose from a vast array of designs including sports, holiday and special occasion themes: for spring, think golf and Mother’s Day! Give your mom or that special lady in your life something you made or the gift of a shared experience. AR Workshop projects also make perfect gifts for brides, new moms, and everyone on your birthday and holiday lists.

What to expect

Even the apron hooks are crafty, made of upside-down hanging hammers in pale blue.

Various tools, screws and parts sit on each table, ready for arriving guests.

100

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

On a recent Wednesday night, I invited a friend to join me for my first AR Workshop experience. We showed up with a bottle of wine, a box of crackers, and a little fear and trepidation. Donning our aprons and waiting for further instructions, we soon discovered that most of the participants were like us—either new to the workshop or inexperienced and slightly insecure about what was to come. When registering for the class, which we did within the required 24-hour advance timeframe, we had selected our projects and designs, including the customization, which for many items is a name or initial but can be more. (I chose to make a lazy Susan for my stepdaughter, incorporating her family name into the pineapple hospitality symbol.) While the design selection is quite extensive, with three days’ advance notice, you can request a completely unique stencil—maybe a family saying or an inspirational message you like. The possibilities are endless, according to Clegg. As class began, we were given a brief description of various techniques we might use to achieve the look and feel we desired for our plank projects. We got to see examples of completed projects along with sample boards of stains, paint colors and finishes. Wooden pieces are precut, so you won’t be wielding any dangerous power tools. Small, portable drills are used for installing hardware on some pieces, but with supervision and a little hand-holding, operation is a piece of cake and perfectly safe. If you’re not artistically inclined and you’ve never painted anything other than perhaps your toenails, the first 10 minutes of decision-making can be a bit scary. Nobody wants to get it wrong! But you soon learn that you can’t really make a mistake. The entire project is guided and controlled just enough to give you the confidence you need to truly produce something that is all your own. Your table assistant is there every step of the way to help you make the necessary selections and to encourage you to lighten up and enjoy the process. Before you know it, you are sanding, stenciling, and painting like a pro, and at the end, you marvel at what you just created. Morning, afternoon and evening classes are offered, and special events can always be arranged. (See www.arworkshop.com/hiltonhead for current offerings.) Groups of 18 or more can reserve the entire workshop for a private event. Groups of six can reserve a table at any of the pre-scheduled classes. But don’t be afraid to come alone. Lots of people do, according to Clegg. The friendly, open atmosphere lends itself to conversation and interaction along with a sense of accomplishment and empowerment that is sure to have you telling all your friends and coming back for more. If the kids need something wholesome to do this summer, AR Workshop will be hosting a series of four-day summer camps, June-August, for children ages 7-14. Participants will create one project per day, Clegg explained. Most adult projects range from $40-$70, and children’s projects range from $40$45. All materials, tools, and instruction are included. Participants are invited to bring snacks, sodas, wine, or whatever they like to make their time at AR Workshop both relaxing and enjoyable. But you can just bring yourself and have plenty of good, clean fun. Clegg, a wife, mother and 27-year Hilton Head Island resident, always enjoyed art as a hobby. She and her 14-year-old daughter Courtney have enjoyed making DIY projects throughout the years and now have a place to share the fun with others. With a background in accounting, Clegg is perfectly suited to business ownership and is thrilled with her new career, doing what she loves. “The DIY trend is here to stay,” she said. “People enjoy being able to make something and personalize it. It’s a creative outlet, plus it’s something entertaining to do.” 


Christine helps a customer with her project. A DIYer starts painting her lazy Susan.

Morning, afternoon and evening classes are offered, and special events can always be arranged. Groups of 18 or more can reserve the entire workshop for a private event.

Visit www.arworkshop.com/hiltonhead for current offerings.

AR

Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Doing It!

WORKSHOP

AR Workshop is located at 1000 William Hilton Parkway, Unit E8, in the Village at Wexford on Hilton Head Island. For more information, visit www.arworkshop.com/hiltonhead or call (843) 802-4071. Follow on Facebook and Instagram @arworkshophiltonheadsc for discounts, promotions, and giveaways.

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

101


LOGGERHEAD LANDING AN ESCAPE WITHIN AN ESCAPE

ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN

W

e all need an escape every now and again. Even those of us fortunate enough to already live on an island where most of the country goes to escape. We need just that one afternoon in the sun, with the roar of the ocean accompanying great live music, a drink in our hand and our toes in the sand. It’s as necessary to the soul as the air we breathe is to the body. It reminds us why we live here; it centers us and reinvigorates us. It’s that moment of pure, blissful rapture that drove the folks at Marriott to completely reinvent the classic beach bar when they created Loggerhead Landing. If you haven’t been since it was relaunched as Loggerhead Landing, you’re missing out on the quintessential beach bar experience. Nearly $300,000 was spent to transform the sprawling outdoor space, including a new rooftop and entirely new bar, with amenities all around geared towards granting you your moment of bliss. The new wraparound bar gives everyone a stunning view of the water, just above dunes that roll right up to the patio. Wide open spaces let you dip your toes in the sand while you sip a cold beverage. Standalone gas firepits to one side come on when the sun goes down, letting you enjoy the outdoor bliss well into evening. And live music fills the air five nights a week, from the steel drums of Dean St. Hilaire to the masterful acoustic tunes of Tommy Sims. It’s a lot to take in. You might need to come back a few times. “I don’t think you can really point to any one thing we did during the renovations as something we’re most proud of, but we can say it’s the experience,” Raffael Ormeggio, Marriott Vacation Club’s director of operations, said. “We’ve raised the bar. You come, sit down, and everything from your drink to the service to the view, is fantastic. I think the overall construction and renovation provide the base, but creating this atmosphere is the thing we’re most proud of.” And that atmosphere is one that lets you truly unwind in style. The updated décor informs an oceanside oasis that’s a little more polished than your average “beers-on-the-sand” style watering hole. Here, the emphasis is on the beach and the sheer joy of the experience. For further proof, one need only take a look at the beverage list. The array of frozen drinks tantalizes with classics from daiquiris to margaritas to next-level versions of those standbys, like the Coronita, a classic margarita infused with Corona—or the Miami Vice, the perfect blend of a daiquiri and a piña colada. The cocktails are equally inspired with everything from rum runners to the signature “tipsy turtles” carefully prepared using fresh, tasty spirits, aromatics and bitters. And if you can’t decide, make your own. The “Create a Cocktail” option allows you to pick your base, your fruit and your floater for a truly individualized taste sensation. And to prove it’s not your average “beers-on-the-sand-style” watering hole, an extensive list of beers is offered, running the gamut from sunny-day standbys to crafty suds that let even the pickiest of hopheads quench their thirst. Add to this a broad selection of red, white and bubbly wine, and you have a drink list that’s miles beyond the ordinary beach bar.

That same dedication to flavor and variety can be found on the food menu, which benefits heavily from the nearby kitchen at Dolphin Grille. Pair that beachside cocktail with something from their delectable selection of wraps, sandwiches, finger foods and salads, like the thick and juicy grande burger, sizzling chicken quesadilla or light and fresh mahi wrap. All of these elements add up to what is, simply put, the classic beach bar—perfected. It’s here you can let your hair down, enjoy the sunshine, breathe in the salty air, enjoy live music and meet with friends. “You come here on a summer day, when we have the steel drums playing, and you could be anywhere in the Caribbean,” Ormeggio said. “You could be in Jamaica, for all you know. It’s an escape from an escape.” And ultimately, couldn’t we all use an escape every now and again?  Loggerhead Landing is located at Marriott’s Grande Ocean, 51 South Forest Beach Dr., Hilton Head Island.

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

103


NEW YORK C I T Y P I ZZ A : EV ERYT HI N G YO U WA N T I N I TA L I A N FO O D A N D N OTH I N G YO U D ON’T

MORE THAN JUST AN

Article by Barry Kaufman Photography by m.kat

L L A AL R U T A N ICE L A S sk any New Yorker, and they’ll tell you New York City’s pizza is the best in the world. They may not have invented it, but they certainly perfected it. At its ideal, a slice of real NYC pizza represents a perfect balance of fresh mozzarella bubbling over a layer of robust red sauce, all spread over a foldable thin dough that rises to perfection with just the right amount of crust.


MADE TO ORDER A pizza is hand-tossed and made-to-order at the New York City Pizza location at Shelter Cove Town Centre


Pat Hornak (Operations Manager), Robert Saxton (Owner) and Mike Sakuta (Director of Culinary Operations) sit in a booth at the Shelter Cove location, making plans for the soon-to-open second location in Bluffton at Buckwalter Plaza.

X

A fresh pizza loaded with toppings comes out of the oven. Some say it’s an artform. Some say it’s the product of generations spent perfecting the recipe. Some will even say it’s inherent to the Big Apple’s municipal water source, but one bite of New York City Pizza, and you’ll know they have it all. “My partner and I started this 24 years ago to give people what we grew up on in New York and New Jersey. It was always homemade with everything made in-house, and we’ve been doing that since day one,” Robert Saxton, NYCP’s owner, said. Growing up around first- and second-generation immigrants from Naples, Italy, Saxton was raised on Italian street food that embraced its old-world roots. “Whether it be the meatballs or the red sauce, all of those recipes started in somebody’s kitchen and then progressed into pizzerias and restaurants.” That pedigree of Italian cooking informs every item on New York City Pizza’s menu, from the signature pies to the authentic Italian dishes. But the venerable pizzeria still found a way to reinvent itself, announcing last year that all their restaurants were switching to all-natural, preservative-free ingredients, only sourced from the best Italian vendors. “We took our stores to a new level—all-natural, no preservatives and no GMO’s. This is how I eat at home, and we want to feed our customers the same way,” Saxton said. And that’s not just in the pizzas; it’s in every corner of the surprisingly diverse menu. Prior to opening New York City Pizza back in 1996, Saxton and his partner ran a string of fine-dining trattorias from Charleston to Savannah. With NYCP, they’ve taken some of that fine-dining experience and given it a casual flair. “It’s a little bit of both,” Saxton said. “We wanted to give people great food with the end result being a great experience.” So, don’t think just because it’s a pizza place you’re not going to get mouth-wateringly authentic Italian cuisine. From the tried-and-true spaghetti with meatballs to the slow-marinated and perfectly textured calamari on a bed of linguini to the kaleidoscope of flavors that is the eggplant rollatini, every bite is a masterclass in taste. NYCP is more than just amazing pizza. And with the emphasis on house-made, allnatural buns, the heroes are a true piece of authentic NYC gourmet street food. Start with the ham, salami, capicola and provolone on The Italian and work your way down the list. But the dish that gets top billing right there on the sign is the pizza. Saxton tends to go with the classic slice of cheese, but he gets that having it your way is what pizza is all about. “I’ve seen people order 8, 9, 10 toppings on a pie,” he said. “We were the first ones to offer margherita pizzas down here, and I remember my GM at the time getting mad because people wanted pepperoni on it. I told him to just let it go. It’s just like a sommelier might tell you, there’s no right or wrong. Whatever you like. If you want it, you got it.” 106

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

ALL AL R U T NA ICE SL

And obviously, what the dining public wants is more of their favorite New York City Pizza. Popular demand fueled steady expansion in the restaurant’s 24 years, starting on the island and then spreading to Bluffton with the opening of the Belfair Town Village location nine years ago, then Charleston in 2013. Their Shelter Cove location positioned them perfectly to take advantage of the new waterfront park. And their new location on Buckwalter gives them the ability to deliver virtually anywhere in Bluffton, including Sun City and New Riverside. But what of the original location, smack dab in the heart of the biggest redevelopment project on the island? That has to be a challenge, right? “To say the least,” Saxton said with a laugh. “But there’s light at the end of the tunnel, and we’re still open for business.” And that light comes in the form of a magnificent remodel of the Pope Avenue store with plans for an open-air rooftop bar that will transform the second floor of the restaurant and provide private party space. On the main strip of the south end, this promises to be the new hotspot once the Coligny district reemerges from construction. Until then, you can still enjoy a taste of authentic Italian pizza, heroes, pasta and more at six locations around the Lowcountry.  For more information, visit www.newyorkcitypizza.com.


T

INSALATA CAPRESE Fresh mozzarella, roasted tomato and basil, drizzled with extra virgin olive oil


y t r a P e h t Get d at e t r a t S

D E T F I G


Heading to a baby shower? Then you definitely need to head to Gifted, where a whole corner of the store is devoted to a massive selection of the soft, the cuddly and the guaranteed to elicit happy giggles from the new bundle of joy.

When getting ready for your next big soirée, your first stop should be Gifted Hilton Head. ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN

T

he advent of spring means that party season is in full swing. A glance over your social calendar for the next few months will show a packed schedule of birthday parties, bridal showers, baby showers and your classic, “It’s warm out so let’s day-drink” parties. While each of those events offers another opportunity to get out among friends, it also means the opportunity to shine when you show up to the shindig with the perfect present. That opportunity awaits at Gifted Hilton Head. The carefully curated collection of owner Meredith Taylor offers up a treasure trove representing the latest, hottest and most exciting gifts, clothing and jewelry. Each visit offers something new from the ever-revolving selection, making it your one-stop pre-party shop. Take a few laps around the store (and you’ll need them—it’s almost impossible to see everything in one go) and you’ll embark on a journey of discovery through some of the coolest gift items in the world, priced to be the perfect bringalong to your next party.

The Fitcap is an ingenious cap perfect for cyclists or your always-on-thego friends.


Tea towels emblazoned with sayings both heartwarming and snarky

The jewelry selection alone demands you stop and pick up a little something for yourself.

“Uno de 50 is hot as a pistol right now,” Taylor said, her eyes on a sparkling collection of hand-made jewelry from the trendy Madrid-based line. “Everybody loves it, and it looks good on every age group. It’s perfect for our coastal, casual lifestyle.”

110

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

Let’s start with that all-important “just because” party. If you want to make a statement at these social soirees, you’re going to want to come in swinging with the perfect hostess gift. “Gosh, where do you start?” Taylor said with a laugh. Browse among the aisles, and odds are good that “perfect” will jump out at you. Tea towels emblazoned with sayings both heartwarming and snarky; stylish limestone coasters that absorb and look great doing it; kitchen accessories from cheese boards to Nora Fleming serving platters you can customize to make your own; scented candles crafted from wine bottles…. And if your hostess is the more active type, there’s the always-popular and super affordable Fitzips and Fitcaps. At $7.99, the Fitzip is a stylish waistband that expands in size to hold everything you need for a workout. And the Fitcap is an ingenious cap perfect for cyclists or your always-on-the-go friends. “We sell out of those constantly,” Taylor said. “They fit everybody, they have a nice big brim, and they fold up. And they’re great for travel too.” The Fitcap is popular with the guys as well, making it a good host gift. And if you’re in the market for that, there’s plenty at Gifted with golf-themed goods from books to unique golf club bottle openers. Heading to a baby shower? Then you definitely need to head to Gifted, where a whole corner of the store is devoted to a massive selection of the soft, the cuddly and the guaranteed to elicit happy giggles from the new bundle of joy. Stuffed animals that beg to be snuggled, and some that talk back to you in adorably cutesy voices, share shelf space with books, blankets and baby gear you won’t find anywhere else. And each and every item is chosen for quality. “We have the best baby gifts,” Taylor said, picking up a pillow-soft neutral onesie made with organic fibers. “These are darling.” And the quality of gifts you’ll find at Gifted is only matched by the price point. We’re not sure what retail magic Taylor weaves as she amasses her goods, but it’s very easy to walk out of here with the perfect gift and plenty of money in your pocket. Or it would be if not for the fact that you’re going to want to pick up a few things for yourself while you’re there. After all, if you’re headed to a party, you want to look fabulous when you get there, right? The clothing line covers everything from beach accessories to travel-ready wear like shawls and wraps that won’t break the bank. Try on one of the ever-popular Bordeaux wraps, and you’ll quickly learn why it’s a constant presence among the rotating lineup of fashionable outerware. And the jewelry selection alone demands you stop and pick up a little something for yourself. “Uno de 50 is hot as a pistol right now,” Taylor said, her eyes on a sparkling collection of hand-made jewelry from the trendy Madrid-based line. “Everybody loves it, and it looks good on every age group. It’s perfect for our coastal, casual lifestyle.” Speaking of perfect for the beach, you’ll want to check out the Save the Girls cross-body purse. The stylish way to keep sand off of your cell, this on-trend bag employs an ingenious touchscreen that lets you talk, text and browse without ever taking out your phone. It’s just one of the countless perfect gifts that jumps out at you as you browse, growing increasingly enamored as you go. Once you find that perfect gift, the super-friendly “Gifted Girls” will gladly wrap it beautifully for you. It’s all part of the Gifted experience. Party season is giving season, and if you’re going to do giving right, you’ll want to make your first stop Gifted Hilton Head.  Gifted Hilton Head is located at 1000 William Hilton Parkway in the Village at Wexford. For more information, visit www. giftedhiltonhead.com or call (843) 842-8787.


THE MAN BEHIND THE

MAYFEST POSTER

L

ARTICLE BY LISA CARROLL

ocal artist Amos Hummell has colored outside the lines of convention for over four decades. His artwork is bright, busy and energetic, just like Amos. Hummell’s illustration for this year’s Mayfest highlights the uniqueness of the event, while encompassing all the charm and beauty of historic Bluffton.


Amos on stage at Living Colors

Indian Princess When he was approached to create the Mayfest poster, Hummell saw it as a unique opportunity to try something new. “The idea was to make something busy, colorful and happy,” he said. “I tried to capture the main icons that purvey the show: tents, music, cooking—and, of course, the ugly dog.” Hummell first drew the graphic freehand, then it was digitally mixed and enhanced for print. “Usually, most of my artwork has heavy black line work,” Hummell said. “That didn’t work with this one. It was too much to use the black lines in there; so, I left them out. It’s very unlike what I usually do, but I’m thrilled with how it turned out.” To say that Hummell is an unconventional artist would be

114

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

an understatement. “I don’t know any rules,” he admits. “I’m always trying different things, and I never work on any single platform.” Recently, Hummell was commissioned to create a piece for the Bluffton Oyster Trail in front of The Corner Perk. “All the other artists were painting their oyster, but not me,” he said. “I was going to steam-punk my oyster.” His three-dimensional oyster now stands on display at four-feet tall outside of the coffee shop, right in the heart of Old Town Bluffton. As a child, Hummell dreamed of becoming a cartoonist. He was raised on an animal sanctuary in Simpsonville, South Carolina—a place he still visits today. He spent one year in


Amos’ art of Calhoun Street from the River

Early pic of Jacob Preston and Lynne Hummell at Living Colors

culinary school in Asheville before hitchhiking back home to South Carolina. “I rolled into Myrtle Beach and didn’t even put my backpack down,” he laughed. “I jumped into the back of a pickup on its way to the Lowcountry, and I’ve been here ever since.” His journey to the Lowcountry led him to open a small studio adjacent to Eggs N Tricities in Old Town Bluffton. In 2005, Hummell transformed the exterior of his studio into an outdoor theater called Living Colors. For two years, the third Friday of the month was spent entertaining passersby with an interactive art display. “The paintings would talk and blow smoke, or release confetti,” he said. “I never took down the stage; I only kept adding to it.” The eight-by-eight stage featured all recycled material and artwork. Locals and tourists alike would pull up for impromptu performances. “There were definitely no rehearsals,” he recalled. “It was lively, free and colorful; you couldn’t go wrong.” After closing his studio in 2008, Hummell returned to food and beverage on Hilton Head Island. But with several decades of bartending behind him, he eventually decided it was time to focus on his artwork full-time. “I promised the universe that I will create art every day and never complain about it ever again,” he shared. “I want to take a more rock ’n’ roll approach to artwork.” Today, Hummell has switched gears to prepare for the busy tourist season ahead. And he has taken strides to become a more accessible artist, including the use of a local printer, which allows him to create posters that offer more variety to his customers at a better price point. Hummell also utilizes social media to share sketches and gauge what his followers think. He currently lives on Hilton Head Island with his wife, Lynne. The forty-first Mayfest takes place on Saturday, May 11, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. This free event is open to the public and coordinated by The Rotary Club of Bluffton. Mayfest features more than 200 artists and food vendors. The event will include a pie-eating contest, doughnut-eating contest and the twenty-sixth annual Ugly Dog Competition. For more information about the event, visit www. blufftonmayfest.com. 

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

115


A CHORUS LINE SPRING’S SINGULAR SENSATION

A

Article By Andrea Gannon I Photography by TR Media World

s the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina’s number one audience choice for a musical for the 2018-19 Theater Season, A Chorus Line is an enduring favorite and arguably one of the most iconic shows of the American stage. Running from May 1 through June 2, the Arts Center’s spring musical sensation will bring these beloved characters, songs, and stories to the stage. Created by Michael Bennett, with a brilliant score by Marvin Hamlisch and Edward Kleban, and book by James Kirkwood and Nicholas Dante, A Chorus Line is inspired by real experiences. Bennett, who directed and choreographed the original production, famously gathered his dancer friends for late-night taping sessions where they told their own stories about their experiences going from show to show with little job security beyond the hope of a long run. In the original production, many of the performers who gathered for those evenings played a version of themselves. Director Casey Colgan, who knows the show inside and out, having directed it three times and performed it in the international and national tours, said, “By the end of the evening, A Chorus Line has pulled off a huge achievement in that we feel we really come to know these individuals—none of them a stereotype, cliché or a billboard for some cause or other. We understand them and are rooting for them.” The trick to each character is, of course, to start with authenticity. In fact, the creation of A Chorus Line famously sprouted from actual interviews with Broadway performers who candidly, vulnerably told their stories of growing up, becoming dancers, and wanting a chance on that definitive white line. When everyone ditches the studio-dance garb and suits up for the penultimate blockbuster production number, “One,” complete with top hats and sequins, it’s both dazzling entertainment in its own right and a distillation of every great showstopper that ever was. The Arts Center has slightly modernized the look of the finale costume in of-the-moment shimmering rose gold. Eight hundred and fifty performers auditioned for the Arts Center’s production of A Chorus Line, in New York City and also on Hilton Head Island, with a resulting cast of 23 splendidly talented professionals who are making the island their home for a month of rehearsals and five weeks of performances. Memorable musical numbers include “What I Did for Love,” “I Can Do That,” “At the Ballet,” “The Music and the Mirror,” and “I Hope I Get It.” A brilliantly complex fusion of song, dance, and compellingly authentic drama, A Chorus Line is an achingly beautiful, joyously uplifting show that strikes an unforgettable chord in audiences and speaks to the power of music to connect us all.  Tickets for preview performances May 1-2 are $49 for adults and $36 for children ages 5-15. Regular performances, May 3-June 2, are $59 for adults and $46 for children ages 5-15. To purchase, visit www.artshhi.com or call (843) 842-ARTS (2787). C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

117


B

A fresh approach to home décor and gifts BY LINDA S. HOPKINS

B

Barn modern

Deena Paradiso, owner of Modern Barn

This donkey print may or may not be there by the time you read this, because the publisher just had to buy one of the two for her sister Amy. How cute is he!?

D

ecorating a new home or sprucing up a room? You know that shelf that is calling for a curio, the sofa begging for a throw pillow, or the bare countertop asking for a pop of color? Head on over to Modern Barn, Hilton Head Island’s newest home décor darling on New Orleans Rd. And don’t let the name fool you! While Modern Barn’s merchandise has a farmhouse flair, you may be surprised by the broad scope of appeal, regardless of your decorating style. Whether your taste is modern or traditional, coastal or country, something is sure to speak to your aesthetic. It’s always important to surround yourself with items you love, and that is where the story of Modern Barn began. After relocating to Hilton Head Island five years ago, when Deena Paradiso set out to decorate her new house in Sea Pines, she was after something different from the coastal theme popular in many area homes. She was going for a clean, sleek, and inviting look. “I’m a little bit modern, a little bit country. It was hard for me to find accent pieces that fit my style,” she said. After exploring local resources with minimal success, she found herself shopping at specialty chain stores, antique markets and online, which got her entrepreneurial juices stirring. The former school teacher/guidance counselor, wife, and mother of two boys (ages 13 and 8), was looking to open a business and had been exploring several possibilities, from a retail clothing boutique to a candy shop. “I worked in retail in my young life—while in college and grad school. I always had that entrepreneurial spirit,” she said. Owning a business was a lifelong ambition, like a burning ember, and Paradiso’s market gap discovery fanned the flames. Opening Modern Barn in June of 2018, she is fulfilling a dream and filling a niche. “There are other home


décor stores in the area but nothing with this theme,” she said. “My store feels different, and our prices are reasonable.” THE PRETTY AND THE PRACTICAL A stroll through Modern Barn is a bit of what you expect mingled with the unexpected. Yes, you will find wooden signs, country-style kitchenware, and tea towels with cute sayings. But look further and you will find much more: a small kitchen rug, a doormat, a deliciously scented candle, fun T-shirt, or Lowcountrythemed memento. How about a faux floral arrangement to brighten a small corner of your world or give as a hostess gift? Modern Barn doesn’t pretend to be your one-stop home décor store, but Paradiso loves playing a supporting role. “Clean and simple—our products are fresh and modern, mixed with our love for everything farmhouse,” she said. Quick to point out that she is not an interior designer, she added, “I’m more of a retail, knick-knack, fun kind of store.” But at the same time, she has a keen eye for merchandise, is good at accessorizing, and can help you find items to create an interior that is both personalized and chic. In response to customer demand, Paradiso recently added a nook for simple and affordable clothing that includes comfortable denim, casual tops, a few handbags, and a small line of jewelry. With the exception of the denim (a steal at under $100), nothing else clothing-wise is over

$40. The selection is small and purposely relaxed, because that’s how Paradiso rolls. “I’m not a fancy girl. Give me my jeans and my flip-flops,” she said. With a nod to her personal style, Paradiso has also made a deliberate effort to keep the space clutterfree and customer-friendly. “A lot of these stores are chock-ful of inventory, and I hate shopping like that. We’re trying to keep things kind of sleek and open looking. But that’s the challenge with inventory. We try to change pieces as much as we can while continuing to offer the kinds of merchandise people want.” Paradiso is gauging her success by the number of repeat customers she’s seeing—people coming in just to say hi, to chit-chat, or to buy a gift. “What makes me happiest is when I have return customers come in,” she said. Perhaps most astounding to her is the way word is spreading. “I’m a little off the beaten path,” she said. Some customers see the shop from the adjacent leisure path and stop off on their bicycles. Others discover it while visiting the surrounding restaurants and shops. “I’ve had tourists who found me, and I’ve shipped to them during the year,” she added. She also offers water and samples of Alabama Sweet Tea, making Modern Barn a refreshing

In response to customer demand, Paradiso recently added a nook for simple and affordable clothing that includes comfortable denim, casual tops, a few handbags, and a small line of jewelry.

3

1

2


stop for everyone. “I’m really developing relationships with my customers,” she said. Paradiso’s warmth and ease also add to the charm of your shopping experience. “Home décor, just like clothing, is a very personal thing. We don’t push you or try to sell. I don’t want somebody feeling pressured or buying something and returning it,” she said. Modern Barn is all about relaxed simplicity and comfort. Practicality is important—nothing too precious or delicate. Many of the items are both decorative and functional, while maintaining a sense of sophistication and style. New merchandise is arriving daily— kitchenware, glassware, spring garden faux flowers, and clothing suitable for the season. Modern Barn invites you to stop in frequently to see what’s new, or just say hi to Paradiso and enjoy a sip of sweet tea!  Modern Barn is located at 37 New Orleans Rd., Suite B on Hilton Head Island. Store hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday. For more information or to sign up for access to sales and special events, visit www.modernbarnhhi. com or call (843) 802-2837. Follow on Facebook or Instagram for updated photos of current merchandise.

7

8

4

5

6

You will find wooden signs, country-style kitchenware, and tea towels with cute sayings. But look further and you will find much more: a small kitchen rug, a doormat, a deliciously scented candle, fun T-shirt, or Lowcountry-themed memento.


Broderick “Brodie” Weaver, executive chef at Old Fort Pub.

A WRITER, A PUBLISHER AND TWO CULINARY MEN OF THE SEA HIT THE BRINY BLUE LIKE WOLVES AMONG THE SHEEPSHEAD.


ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT he day began, as all great days do, with sandwiches, omens and the promise of catching fish. The sandwiches came courtesy of this magazine’s publisher, Maggie Washo, who not only invited me along on this fishing trip but plied me, Linh Craig and Broderick “Brodie” Weaver with tasty Publix goodness. Craig and Weaver are the general manager and executive chef, respectively, at CQ’s and Old Fort Pub, and this fishing trip is just one of many the pair embark on as they hunt down the ocean’s tastiest entrées to serve at their restaurants. On the menu today were sheepshead—not quite the massive game fish that fill the sportsman’s fantasies, but certainly big enough to feed hungry restaurant patrons until the next trip out in a few days. Silvery in color and slashed in an array of black stripes, they would be beautiful were it not for their permanent toothy grins, like a Raiders fan wearing a set of Billy Bob novelty teeth. Catching the sheepshead meant traveling out to a sunken barge in an undisclosed location just off the coast of Tybee Island, a long-lost wreck where the fish prefer to school, safe from every predator save man. Getting there meant leaving Alljoy Landing at 6:30 a.m., when the rising sun was just painting the skies over the May River with its blessed palate of orange, pink, blue and colors no one has named yet. It was this early hour that allowed us to spy an omen, a dazzling rocket of green fire that lazily traversed the sky above the bridge connecting Pinckney Island with the mainland. Spitting off tendrils of emerald flame, it seemed like it should have pierced the heavens in the blink of an eye. Instead, it moved at the same Lowcountry pace as the early morning traffic on the bridge below it. Despite feverishly documenting every moment for our respective Instagram feeds, neither Maggie nor I captured this heavenly sign, transfixed as we were by this slow-moving wonder. It would turn out later that this phenomenon had been seen as far away as Tennessee and Florida as it split the sky, but in that moment, it felt like the heavens firing off one good luck charm in four-leaf-clover green for the four of us in that boat. But the sandwiches and omens were just the preamble. The day was really about catching fish. Or, more accurately in my case, attempting to catch fish.

T

Alljoy landing 6:30 a.m.

The adventure begins.


%*$&#ing bluefish

%*$&#ing bluefish “We have to get out here before the charter captains do,” said Craig

“Reely?!”

Wreck is here.

Barry and his suicidal black sea bass. Nice try, bass.

A toadfish that looked like it had been stitched together out of Mickey Rourke's cast-off facial bones.

124

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE

Not good eating.

as his boat, the Reel Knotty, ramped off the waves while we sped toward the undisclosed location. Revealed only as a pattern of dotted lines on the GPS marking where the Reel Knotty had been before, this prized fishing spot seems to be an open secret among fishermen. My angling-addicted father-in-law would later grill me on its location, but even having seen the GPS, I could only describe it in the vaguest terms. Eventually, the GPS would see us in the middle of that knot, meaning it was time to put down the buoy. Or rather, it was time to put down the buoy for the first time. A floating yellow bobber encircled by nylon rope; the buoy had a tendency to get carried on underwater currents. That, coupled with the imprecise nature of the depth finder, required several tries before Craig and Weaver were satisfied they were in the right spot. “Are you sure I’m on it?” Weaver called over the rumbling idle of the outboards. “You’re behind it, just off the back side on the right of it,” Craig called back. Then, seeing something in the electronic dots of the depth finder that the rest of us couldn’t see, he changed his mind. Weaver rolled the anchor in and, again, set it down. This exact exchange happened, by my reckoning, 12 times. Eventually, however, we would find a comfortable spot for the buoy and commence with the fishing, tenderly pulling angry fiddler crabs from a bucket to use as bait. “Grab them from the back,” Craig explained to me, recognizing me for the complete novice I was. I will point out for the record that I was only seriously pinched once, and what’s more, I made the first catch of the day. He was a sickly looking little black sea bass who seemed to have only taken my bait in the hopes of being caught and put out of his misery, but he was mine. Joke’s on him—we threw him back. He would represent a running theme of the day. While everyone else was pulling in sparkling-if-slightly-derpy-looking sheepshead, I managed to snag one suicidal black sea bass, a toadfish that looked like it had been stitched together out of Mickey Rourke’s cast-off facial bones, and one bluefish. But if that meant one less bluefish underneath our boat, I was happy to contribute. “%*$&#ing bluefish,” all of us said at one point or another. One of the few animals in nature that could truly be categorized as a “jerk,” bluefish love nothing more than chasing after shiny underwater objects and chomping the space above or below them with their sharp teeth.Seeing the weights on our fishing lines as sufficiently shiny, they would routinely bite through the monofilament just for what ichthyologists refer to as “the hell of it.” I failed to maintain a proper count, but I’m confident we lost at least three dozen lead weights to these teeming subaquatic jerkweeds. Eventually, and mostly due to Maggie hogging the lucky yellow fishing rod, we were able to pull in a respectable catch of sheepshead. But for Craig and Weaver, who knew that tonight’s special was riding on our haul, it wasn’t enough. They were going in.


Rice or risotto

Linh Craig suiting up for the dive. Into the deep.

I first met Linh Craig and Brodie Weaver several years ago, interviewing them for a piece I was writing on CQ’s. Standing among the oaken walls and floors of the iconic Sea Pines restaurant, they had talked about the fishing trips they embark on whenever possible, and, in hindsight I didn’t appreciate what they were saying as much as I should have. I was still flying high off of the delectable dinner-prep aromas I’d encountered in the kitchen, so I greeted the stories about their regular diving trips with enthusiasm, but perhaps not the right degree of awe. Here they were, two guys in charge of two of the busiest restaurants on the island, and they were so devoted to their craft that they were willing to dive headlong into murky waters just to provide their patrons truly fresh seafood. They could cut corners. They could order from a wholesaler who had kept their wares on ice for God knows how long. But they didn’t. They would rather come face-to-face with a tiger shark 50 feet below than serve crappy seafood. That’s a dedication you don’t see often. Sitting there at the conn of the Reel Knotty while these two suited up for their dive, I finally appreciated what they do for their customers. “So, what are you going to do with these sheepshead?” I asked Brodie while he jammed his feet into a pair of flippers. “It depends. We’ll do this as a special, but at CQs it might be with some rice. I think Kynif (Rogers, head chef at Old Fort Pub) was going to try this with some risotto,” he said. He rattled off a few other accompaniments, but I’m suddenly realizing I tend to go into a fugue state when people start talking about food. The pair were underwater for nearly 45 minutes. They captured every moment on GoPro, which you can either watch on this magazine’s website or on a loop at CQ’s (they put the footage up on the TVs, which is pretty ingenious). During that time, Maggie and I gamely threw a few lines in but caught nothing. Weaver had warned us the change in tides would mean the sheepshead would stop feeding, and he was tragically correct. We followed the rings of bubbles from our captain and first mate as they traversed the wreck. We clucked our tongues at the three-story yacht that roared perilously close to our boat, ignoring the diver down flag. We ate our sandwiches. And eventually, Craigs and Weaver’s heads bobbed up from the waves. When they emerged back onto the deck, they carried on their backs a dozen sheepshead. With spearguns and fearlessness, they’d easily quadrupled the number of fish we’d be taking home. Linked together on a wide steel loop, these fish were today’s catch and tonight’s special. With smiles beaming from ear to ear, our hosts had once again braved the depths in search of the kind of fresh-from-the-ocean seafood most places only pretend to offer. It’s a huge undertaking and one that most people, like myself, won’t fully appreciate just by being told about it. But hopefully next time you order the specials at CQs or Old Fort Pub, you’ll think for a moment about the distance this restaurant manager and chef travel, and the depths to which they go, to fulfill a promise to their guests. The day began with sandwiches and omens. It ended with gourmet cuisine. You can’t ask for a better day than that. 

Sheepshead... tonight's special served with rice or risotto. Still not sure. Ok... risotto.

C2 MAGAZINE

MAY

2019

125


I S C MUin bathroomsIANS MUSICIAN: JOHN MORRIS RUSSELL, CONDUCTOR OF THE HILTON HEAD SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

What’s your sign? Gemini Most underrated song that, in your opinion, should be a classic: Schubert’s Symphony No. 4 - the Tragic. It is fantastic. Biggest compliment you’ve ever gotten from a fan? There are so many I can’t keep track. But seriously, those who come to the concerts and say the performance was life-changing. I’ve had two people who’ve actually proposed at a concert because it was so meaningful for them. Music is a doorway-of-life experience.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y M . K AT Special thanks to Brock and Elizabeth Rowley


What is your favorite song to perform? Whatever I’m doing next!

B

What do you sing in the shower? I usually don’t, but if it’s really early in the morning and my voice is low enough, I can do “Commendatore” from Don Giovanni. Favorite cereal? Scotch. [laughs]. Probably oatmeal.

Brekafast of Champions At what venue do you most like to perform?

If I’m looking into the future, I would say the Hilton Head Island/Bluffton Performing Arts Center that’s going to open yay! sometime in the 2020s. !

N

W h at a c l a s s i

Most requested song at shows? “Free Bird”

c

B

First concert you attended? Dvorak Symphony No. 8 in 1968 at the Cleveland Orchestra— the concert that changed my life. Favorite artist? Rhiannon Giddens, former member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops. She is an amazing artist and a wonderful person. Place you go to get away from it all? Right here on the beaches of Hilton Head Island. Do you tweet, gram or book? What’s your handle? Totally a Facebook junkie. You can’t miss me @ JohnMorrisRussell—the guy with three first names. Finish this verse as if it were the hook of a song: “Sally went down to the bayou...” Lookin’ for a man to kill; and when she couldn’t find one, she got a bottle and a pill.” Who would star as you in the epic retelling of your life on film? Hmmm … Harrison Ford, but like 30 years ago. First instrument you learned to play? The trumpet Song you were thrilled to finally master? “The Rite of Spring,” by Igor Stravinsky. I take that back. You don’t master that; it masters you. What do you wish you knew more about? Physics. My daughter is taking physics right now, and she kind of shares with me what she’s learning. I cannot make heads or tails of it. I understand that it exists, and I would really like to understand how everything interacts in the universe. What famous musician would you love to sing a duet with? I’ve already fulfilled my fantasy, I got to perform a little thing with Amy Grant. What animal do you most identify with? I’m fascinated by dolphins and their ability to swim and interact at different levels. They are also incredibly intelligent. If you got super-famous and you had to change your name, what would your new name be? Doctor Badd (two d’s).

128

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE


M AY SUNDAY

2 0 1 9

MONDAY

TUESDAY

1

EVERY THURSDAY

MAY 1- JUNE 2 A CHORUS LINE Arts Center of Coastal Carolina Show times vary May 3-June 2 are $59 for adults and $46 for children ages 5-15. www.artshhi.com

SPRING MUSIC & TASTE ON THE HARBOUR Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina; 6-9pm May 2- The Hilton Head Plantation Big Band May 9 - The Headliners May 16 - Deas Guyz ShelterCoveHiltonHead.com

5

SEASON FINALE AT SOUNDWAVES SoundWaves at Coligny 3-5pm (843) 842-2055 www.hhso.org

6

EXPECT THE UNEXPECTING ART EXHIBIT SoBA Gallery 6 Church Street in Old Town Bluffton May 6-June 2 3-5pm sobagallery.com

12 HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY!

7

EVERY DAY!

FIESTA DE MAYO FESTIVAL Shelter Cove Community Park 12-8pm Event for the whole family! (843) 681-2393

27 MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY Shelter Cove Veteran’s Memorial Park 10:30am

HILTON HEAD CHORAL SOCIETY PRESENTS AMERICA SINGS First Presbyterian Church at 7pm All seats are reserved (843) 341-3818

2-5 “LOVE LETTERS”, STARRING DANIEL AND DEBBIE CORT May River Theatre Ulmer Auditorium 7pm & Sunday Matinee at 2pm (843) 815-5581

8&9

9 VENTURESOUTH INTEREST MEETING Frankie Bones 11:30am-1:30pm Calhoun Street Tavern 5:30-7:30pm

15

venturesouth.vc/events

FRIDAY

SMOKEHOUSE 20TH BIRTHDAY BASH! 12-6pm Live Music All Day, Kids Bouncy House, Chair Fighters, Raffle and Roll Back Pricing Buffet. Come and Get it!

16

23 CAROLINA DREAMERS CAR CLUB CRUISE-IN Shelter Cove Lane 5-8pm No costs, no reservations carolinadreamers.info

4

3&4

11 MAYFEST – 41ST BLUFFTON VILLAGE FESTIVAL Old Town Bluffton 11am-5pm The event will feature more than 200 artists and food vendors. blufftonmayfest.com

18 ALL SAINTS 2019 GARDEN TOUR All Saints Episcopal Church 10am-4pm Tickets are $35 allsaintsgardentour.com

or call (843) 681-8333.

palmettoquiltguild.org

22

SATURDAY

FORSYTHE JEWELERS NEW YORK DESIGNERS TRUNK SHOW Forsythe Jewelers 9am Join us to celebrate the very best collections from our New York-based designers. forsythejewelers.biz

PALMETTO QUILT GUILD MEETING Hilton Head Beach and Tennis Club 12-3pm Open to members and guests

WONDERFUL WEDNESDAY! Permanent Cosmetics/Sungate Medical Spa 5-7pm Blepharoplasty, Bubbles & Brows! (843) 422-4141

26

THURSDAY

IN STORE MOTHER’S DAY EVENT Quinn’s Diamond Jewelers May 8: 5-8pm May 9: 11-4pm (843) 342-6663 diamondland.com

AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMS The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Lowcountry 3-7pm (843) 379-5430 or bgclowcountry.org

21

19

WEDNESDAY

24 LIVE MUSIC BY THE CHIGGERS Street Meet Cafe Kickoff to Memorial Day Weekend 8-10pm (843) 842-2570

29

EVERY DAY!

GREGG RUSSELL CONCERTS Under the Oak Tree in Harbour Town May 29 – August 23 Monday-Friday 8-9:30pm seapines.com

TRAIL RIDES THROUGH THE SEA PINES FOREST PRESERVE Lawton Stables 10am Reservations are required. (843) 671-2586 or.lawtonstables.com

25-26 ART FESTIVALPRESENTED BY NASH GALLERY Shelter Cove Harbour & Marina 10am-6pm Rain or shine, Admission is free A weekend experience of fine art, food, music and shopping! More than 400 North American craftsmen (843) 785-6424

E V E N T S 130

MAY 2019

C2 MAGAZINE


Profile for CH2/ CB2

Celebrate Hilton Head and Celebrate Bluffton & Beyond - May 2019 Issue  

Editor's Note, A Word from our Mayor: John McCann from Hilton Head Island, 5 Drinks with Molly O. Hornbeck, This and That, Musicians In Bath...

Celebrate Hilton Head and Celebrate Bluffton & Beyond - May 2019 Issue  

Editor's Note, A Word from our Mayor: John McCann from Hilton Head Island, 5 Drinks with Molly O. Hornbeck, This and That, Musicians In Bath...

Profile for celebrat