CH2 Magazine: March 2022

Page 1

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

MARCH 2022

Featuring MODERN, MELLOW AND MARSHSIDE AT MORELAND VILLAGE REAL WOMEN RISE

REALTOR OF THE YEAR

2022 CONFERENCE EXPLORES AND ENCOURAGES THE EMPOWERMENT AND IMPACT OF WOMEN IN REAL ESTATE

MARCH 2022

SPLURGEWORTHY KITCHENS

,



C2 MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2022 3




6

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2022 7


8

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2022 9


10

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2022 11


12

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2022 13


14

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2022 15


16

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2022 17


18

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2022 19


20

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2022 21


22

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


23

FEBRUARY 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


32 IN BEAUFORT WITH BIRDIE JAMES Styled by Kaila Jeffcoat Hair and Makeup by True Beauty by Joanna Marie WHAT’S INSIDE

29

LOOK GOOD FOR YOUR AGE AT ANY AGE: PRACTICAL TIPS FOR ANYONE OLD ENOUGH TO CARE

67

SPLURGE-WORTHY KITCHENS: SURVEY REVEALS TRENDS THAT HOMEOWNERS ARE EMBRACING WITH THEIR CASH

96

WHAT IS MODERN WEALTH MANAGEMENT? LET FRED GASKIN AND HIS EXPERIENCED TEAM AT CHARLES SCHWAB & CO. MAKE THE INTRODUCTION.

105

SIBLING RIVERLY

113

ON A WING AND PRAYER: 25TH ANNUAL (WELL, MOSTLY ANNUAL) WINGFEST FLIES TO NEW NEST AT LOWCOUNTRY CELEBRATION PARK

115

HOPPING YACHTS FOR HOSPICE: HOSPICE CARE OF THE LOWCOUNTRY ANNOUNCES HIGHLY ANTICIPATED EXCLUSIVE EVENT

126

MUSICIANS IN BATHROOMS FEATURING VANNAH & THE RUMP SHAKERS

O N O U R C OV E R S CB2 CELEBRATE I BLUFFTON AND BEYOND!

CH2 CELEBRATE HILTON HEAD!

MARCH 2022

Featuring

plus

C2 HOME: MODERN, MELLOW AND MARSHSIDE AT MORELAND VILLAGE

REAL WOMEN RISE

LOOK GOOD FOR YOUR AGE AT ANY AGE C2 HOME FEATURE: MODERN, MELLOW AND MARSHSIDE AT MORELAND VILLAGE

REALTOR OF THE YEAR

SPLURGEWORTHY KITCHENS

ON THE CH2 COVER Hilton Head Realtor Association, Realtor of the Year, Jeff Hunt Photography by M. KAT

LUXURY LAUNDRY AND MUDROOMS MARCH 2022

MARCH 2022

2022 CONFERENCE EXPLORES AND ENCOURAGES THE EMPOWERMENT AND IMPACT OF WOMEN IN REAL ESTATE

REAL WOMEN RISE! 2022 CONFERENCE EXPLORES AND ENCOURAGES THE EMPOWERMENT AND IMPACT OF WOMEN IN REAL ESTATE

PRACTICAL TIPS FOR ANYONE OLD ENOUGH TO CARE

WHAT IS MODERN WEALTH MANAGEMENT? LET FRED GASKIN AND HIS EXPERIENCED TEAM AT CHARLES SCHWAB & CO. MAKE THE INTRODUCTION. MARCH 2022

ON THE CB2 COVER Caroline Molloy in Birdie James fashion. Photography by M.KAT.

42 JEFF HUNT For Jeff Hunt, Success is About Passion, Purpose, and People

59 REAL WOMEN RISE! 2022 conference explores and encourages the empowerment and impact of women in real estate

108 GET HAPPY AT WILD BIRDS UNLIMITED Discover the joys of backyard bird feeding and secure your ticket to the best show in town



NOPE ROPES

Copperhead Copperhead

GENIUSES AT WORK Snake Charmer Maggie Marie Washo

play

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

Head of Quietly Judging Carolyn Hunter Kostylo Master of Coin Marion Elizabeth Bowser

Water Moccasin or Cottonmouth

Rainmaker Kim Conrad Crouch Master Handshaker “Just Kandace” Cunningham

Water Moccasin or Cottonmouth

Lead Door Knocker Morgan Ambler Director of Attracting Talent Kaila Jeffcoat Mascot in Training Buoy Conrad Crouch Pritchard Giant Karen Jevon Daly The Gatekeepers Greta Von Bowser Vincent Von Bowser The Cut & Paste Crew Catherine Davies Aspiring Novelists Cheryl Alexander Amy Bartlett Jesse Blanco Becca Edwards Linda S. Hopkins Barry Kaufman Paula Magrini John McCann Lisa Sulka Tim Wood Lighting Experts M. Kat Photography Photography by Anne Krisztian Lonyai Find Us Here PO Box 22949 Hilton Head Island, SC 29925 843.689.2658 m.washo@celebratehiltonhead.com

MARCH 2022

LET’S TALK ABOUT SNAKES

O

nce the weather consistently hits about 60 degrees, I am on the lookout for snakes. Perhaps it is because I live in a neighborhood surrounded by pine trees and ponds where I regularly come across copperheads sunning on the sidewalk. When you see them, you become more aware. I remember my first encounter with a copperhead back in 2008. I was strolling through the Sea Pines Forest Preserve at dusk with friends and almost stepped on one very cleverly camouflaged in pine straw and dead leaves. A copperhead bite will not kill you, but it will send you to the emergency room and ruin your month. They like to come out at dusk, warm themselves on concrete or pavement, and hunt for their dinner. This is the time of day I am most careful—especially when walking my furry friends. A bite for a big dog is generally not a big deal, although it will still require a visit to your emergency vet, but it could be fatal for a small canine. Up until a few months ago, a had never seen a water moccasin (also called a cottonmouth) up close. Again, I was strolling through the Sea Pines Forest Preserve. These are large, fat snakes that do not generally bite humans but will if stepped on or messed with. Steer clear of these guys; their bite is much

worse than that of a copperhead, and you will need to head straight to the hospital at a very quick clip. The third most common venomous snake we have around these parts (it’s Talk Like a Cowboy Day at CH2), is the eastern diamondback rattlesnake. These lovelies have been known to camp under some porches and have been captured in the sand dunes around Port Royal Plantation a few times over the past decade. (Give it a quick Google search). While I have never seen one of these snakes in real life, if I did, I would run quickly in the other direction. None of this is meant to frighten our visitors or new residents but to serve as a friendly public service announcement to raise awareness for you and your pets as you wander the Lowcountry in search of new adventures. Most snakes you run across here are completely harmless. Just be on the lookout for these three and give them a wide berth.

MAGGIE WASHO Publisher / Editor-in-Chief

Be sure to follow us on Social Media

Instagram - @ch2hhimag Facebook - facebook.com/ch2magazine TikTok - @ch2mag YouTube - youtube.com/celebratehiltonhead




ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS

LOOK GOOD FOR YOUR AGE AT ANY AGE PRACTICAL TIPS FOR ANYONE OLD ENOUGH TO CARE

I

t’s official. I am a senior citizen. I got my Medicare card in the mail last month and metaphorically blew out 65 candles on the cake (we used six to avoid eyebrow singe or an unplanned upper lip wax). I still ate the frosting flowers first and licked my fingers, because you’re never too old to act five on your birthday. Now that I have made the full transition from hot young chick to lukewarm mature woman, it’s my hope that my inner beauty will shine through, ’cause the outer shell is


TIP 7: LIMIT SUN EXPOSURE MOST VISIBLE SIGNS OF AGING ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO SUN EXPOSURE. UVA RAYS NOT ONLY DAMAGE THE SURFACE OF YOUR SKIN BUT ALSO PENETRATE DEEPER TO BREAK DOWN COLLAGEN AND ELASTIN, THE PROTEINS RESPONSIBLE FOR KEEPING SKIN FIRM AND ELASTIC. WITH LESS COLLAGEN AND ELASTIN, YOUR SKIN LOSES ITS STRUCTURE AND FLEXIBILITY.

LOOK GOOD FOR YOUR AGE AT ANY AGE

quickly going south. While I disguise my gray hair with blonde highlights and work out religiously to defy gravity, there is no denying the lessthan-taut skin that comes as a side effect of six and a half decades on earth. It’s like living in a fun house, every mirror a shock or surprise. (This is why I avoid cameras; I prefer to live in denial.) While I can squint or lower the lights and get a glimpse of my younger, firmer self, grocery store clerks are starting to assume I qualify for discounts, which is nice … I guess. It’s only a matter of a few years before I’m certain I will be invisible. Still, I am told I “look good for my age,” a catchphrase I accept as a compliment. So, would you like to know my secret? If you are 30 and just seeing the first hint of a fine line, take heed. You are never too young to start preserving yourself, and what you do today will significantly influence the way you age going forth. For those of you who are past the initial shock of a few facial folds or the seemingly sudden redistribution of your best assets, take heart. It’s never too late to make repairs and take preventative action for the future. Aging is unavoidable, but we do have a smidgen of control over what happens next.

30

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

When it comes to appearances, most of us are looking for a magic wand—an instant fix that will handcuff Father Time and lock him in the closet—thus the $44,124 million anti-aging market. I’ll be the first to admit that I own an arsenal of over-priced miracle creams and so-called youth serums that claim to tighten, tone, lift, fill, disguise, or otherwise diminish fine lines and wrinkles. But I’ll spare you the list of products and services that may or may not be making a difference and, instead, focus on strategies that work from the inside out and cost little to no money. PRACTICAL TIPS FOR LOOKING YOUNGER AT ANY AGE • Wear a smile. Trust me. A few eye crinkles and nasal labial folds (smile lines around your mouth) point to happiness and inner joy, which


is always more attractive than bitchface, wouldn’t you agree? A genuine smile or hearty laugh will put a twinkle in your eye and give you a more youthful appearance naturally. • Stand up straight. Hunched over shoulders are a sure sign that you are O.L.D. (Young folks sitting in front of a computer screen all day, take note. The tendency is to slouch, and this will tell on you over time.) Besides making you look taller and trimmer, good posture is linked to selfconfidence which also projects a positive, more youthful appearance. • Eat well. Good nutritional choices make a difference not only in your weight and body composition, but in the appearance of your skin. The magic is in the antioxidants, which are abundant in fruits and vegetables. Fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids (think trout, salmon, and tuna) are also beneficial as they reduce inflammation and help keep your skin glowing. • Get some shut-eye. Beauty sleep is not a myth. Your body repairs itself during sleep, and good sleep leads to a long list of health benefits that will keep you looking (and feeling) younger than your years. • Drink up! Hydration is essential to healthy, more youthful-looking skin. This means drinking more water (six to eight glasses a day) and less alcohol. You will look younger, feel better, and probably drop a few pounds without even trying. For best results, in addition to drinking enough water, use hydrating skincare products. • Break a sweat/save your cells. Grab your gym gear or your walking shoes and get that blood circulating. Consistent exercise can slow the aging process by fending off muscle loss and improving sleep quality. It also helps on the cellular level. Put simply, at the tips of each of our chromosomes are telomeres, which control a cell’s aging process. As we age, these telomeres get shorter. Studies from the University of California San Francisco have found a link between regular exercise and the rate at which telomeres shorten or slow. (wellspring. edu, “Six Proven Ways Exercise Makes You Look Younger ...”) The more you exercise on a regular basis, the longer your cells will live, meaning you not only have a shot at a longer life, but you’ll look better living it. • Limit sun exposure. Most visible signs of aging are directly related to sun exposure. UVA rays not only damage the surface of your skin but also penetrate deeper to break down collagen and elastin, the proteins responsible for keeping skin firm and elastic. With less collagen and elastin, your skin loses its structure and flexibility. Tell-tale signs are wrinkles, sags, and spider veins. Slow down this damage by wearing a broadspectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Also remember to wear sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat, and seek shade whenever possible. • Adopt a cheerful attitude about aging. Studies reveal that keeping a positive attitude about aging may help prevent older adults from becoming frail, which in turn appears to keep their minds sharp. (myelder.com, “Getting Older Is Positive, Not Negative.”) And since when does frail or demented look youthful? The birthday fairy is coming every year whether you invite her or not, so stop and eat the buttercream roses. No matter how hard you work out at the gym or how many lotions you apply to your skin, wrinkles and sags will happen. Why not embrace the changes and be excited to greet another day?  C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

31


Styled by Kaila Jeffcoat + Michelle Taylor Modeled by Caroline Molloy Hair & Makeup by True Beauty by Joanna Marie Photography by M.Kat Special thanks to Harden Creative

IN BEAUFORT WITH

birdie james For this month’s fashion spread with the fabulous fashions of Birdie James, we headed up to Beaufort for a change of scenery. Special thanks to The Beaufort Inn for hosting us. Be sure to check out our website and social media channels for Behind the Scenes looks captured by Harden Creative.

*Pricing changes and human error occurs. Please see Birdie James for final pricing on all items*

32

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


Cleobella Dress $228, Baci Blazer $258, Victoria Dunn, Earrings $58

Cleobella Dress $258, Julie Vos Earrings $95, Julie Vos Bracelet $275


Baci Dress $178, One Grey Day Sweater $438, Julie Vos Necklace $495, Ornate Pattern Bracelet $210, Solid with Green Stone Bracelet $345, Leaf Pattern Bracelet $95


Mille Top $198, KUT Jeans $118, Selena King Earrings $305

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

35


Mille Dress $228, Mignonne Gavigan Earrings $295, Selena King Bracelet $390, Selena King Ring $190, Wyeth Hat $98

36

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


Cleobella Pajamas $228, Necklaces $498 each

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

37


Natalie Mastise Dress $278, Mignonne Gavigan Earrings $250


Ridley Rader Top $118, Ridley Rader Pants $188, Victoria Dunn Earrings $58

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

39



HOME & GARDEN CONTENT

48 SPECIAL FEATURES 42

JEFF HUNT For Jeff Hunt, success is about passion, purpose and people

48

MODERN, MELLOW AND MARSHSIDE AT MORELAND VILLAGE

59

REAL WOMEN RISE! 2022 conference explores and encourages the empowerment and impact of women in real estate

67

SPLURGE-WORTHY KITCHEN Survey reveals trends that homeowners are embracing with their cash

77

OLD SCHOOL MEETS NEW SCHOOL A family tradition three generations strong, Oceanside Electric is wired for today’s wireless world.

83

LUXURY LAUNDRY ROOMS & MUDROOMS

89

IT’S GOOD TO BE KING For Tyler Dykes, the Technology King of the Lowcountry, it’s all about giving customers the royal treatment.

90

GLASS HOUSES Lowcountry Shelving and Glass, and the father-son team at the helm, celebrate 30 years in business.

90

42

83


ART ICLE BY TIM WOOD PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

JeFF HUNT FOR JEFF HUNT, SUCCESS IS ABOUT PASSION, PURPOSE, AND PEOPLE

H

e has been an aircraft mechanic, owned a sportswear and a screen-printing business, and lived all over the Carolinas before making his dream move to Hilton Head Island in 2006. But real estate has always been in Jeff Hunt’s life. He learned at an early age the power of owning the keys to a home. “I grew up in a trailer park in the RaleighDurham area; I was around a lot of people who just accepted their destiny. But then as I got into sports in junior high. I had some more affluent friends, and I saw one kid had his own bedroom. This family had two cars, and I thought, ‘Why can’t I do that?’,” said

42

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


Jeff Hunt, a real estate agent with Dunes Real Estate, recently won Realtor of the Year.

Why Can’t I do That?


There is opportunity in any market. It’s all about being tenacious enough to be out there and fInding solutions. Hunt, leader of the Hunt and Associates team at Dunes Real Estate. “I heard my friend’s father talking about how he bought a rental house and how someone was going to pay him money to stay there, and how someone else’s money will pay off the house. And it just hit me. I didn’t understand why that couldn’t be me.” Hunt has been buying and selling real estate for the past 30 years, but he made it his full-time career focus once he moved to Hilton Head Island in 2006. Fifteen years later,

44

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

JEFF HUNT with inventory scarce and many Realtors throwing up a white flag of retreat, Hunt had the best year of his career in 2021, his fifth straight year leading Dunes Real Estate producers with close to 100 properties sold and $78 million in sales. That’s coming off a stellar 2020, where he closed on 87 properties and $35 million in sales. “There is opportunity in any market. It’s all about being tenacious enough to be out there and finding solutions. Find the agents that have the properties, pound the pavement,” he said. “When you come from my beginnings, you realize hard work and outworking everyone else is the absolute key. I work with my clients to clearly identify their goals and then just turn any problem into a solution. The work that comes with a market like this is going to scare off a lot of the folks who thought this was an easy paycheck. But I’ve been out there working it in every kind of market, so I’m relentless for my clients.” Relentlessness is in his DNA. Hunt thought sports was going to be his ticket to college and a better life. His football coaches thought he would also make a good wrestler, and they weren’t wrong. But he suffered a broken back at a state wrestling tourney that ended the pursuit of his college football dreams. “It was the single best thing that ever happened to me. It made me think realistically about what was next, what’s the


route to get out now?” He tried college for a year but could not afford it. He’d always had a fascination with airplanes and how they work, so he decided to scrape up $1,000 for aircraft school. “I didn’t have $1,000, so I went to my aunt and uncle behind my parents’ back and sold them on my plan. They each gave me $500, and it totally changed my life,” he said. “But I was always behind in paying for classes no matter how hard I worked. There was one woman in the bursar’s office, Vicky Mabe. She could have kicked me out eight different times, but she saw me cleaning cars at Hertz, saw I had this dream. And so she let me stay, got me to graduation even though I was still behind on payments. To have someone believe in me, to lift me up, was everything. I paid them off right quick, got a job at Piedmont Aerospace. But none of that was possible without all the folks who gave me that chance to stay in the game.” Hunt worked for Piedmont, which morphed into Eastern and then U.S. Air, for 25 years. He was smart with his money, bought, sold, and rented properties while also opening a pair of businesses in the Charlotte area. Life took an abrupt downturn after his first marriage ended in a bitter breakup. After years of visiting Hilton Head Island on weekends, Hunt decided to head here for a fresh start in 2006. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 45


JEFF HUNT

“I came here, fresh off a divorce, and I had lost everything. But I knew that I knew real estate and relationships, and I put it to work here,” Hunt said. “A woman I worked with had a sister; I actually met her while she was on her second date with another guy. I just started talking to them— definitely butted in. We talked for five hours that night.” That woman became his wife Christine when the couple married in 2015 after eight years of courtship. Hunt credits Christine with so much of his success. “She stuck with me through all the rough times, she just believed in me. I’d head out to meet new folks, and every day I’d tell her, ‘Today’s the day.’ She’d joke and ask why I said it every day. I don’t believe in excuses, don’t believe in, ‘I’ll try.’ I do, period. I just knew every person I meet, I’m closer to making that right connection.” Hunt said he has made it a point to learn as much from his failures as he could—and there were plenty.

46

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

“There is going to be more heartburn— more losers than winners in 2022. There is going to be emotional trauma with so many offers on every property,” he said. “I’ve always believed that attitude determines your altitude. This market is going to test your ability to have that positive attitude to the utmost levels, but you bring people up, keep them believing and you stabilize a lot of emotions until you get that win.” He finds himself thinking often of his favorite Kenny Rogers song, “The Greatest.” “It’s all about this boy, he goes out to a field with a ball and a bat. He throws the ball up in the air trying to hit it and misses three straight times. He doesn’t see that failure. When his mom calls him in for dinner, he tells her that the misses just made him see himself as the greatest pitcher instead.” It’s the kind of mindset that led his peers from the Hilton Head Area Association of Realtors® to name him the 2021 Realtor of the Year. “Jeff is one of the real ones. He is out there every day working on sales and relationships. I’ve done many deals with him. When you work with Jeff, you know you’re going to be treated right,” said one of the Realtors Hunt admires


This island is magical. I feel like I’m living a fairy tale. most, Charles Sampson of Charter One Realty. Sampson is a three-time winner of the award and said that while sales are a factor, nominations are much more about how you represent the community. “It’s about making a difference in the community, about getting in there and picking others up alongside all the work. And there’s no one better to exemplify that than Jeff. He has been non-stop here.” Hunt is proud of the award, but said his success is far from a one-person show. “We’re never successful by ourselves. It’s all about the folks I collaborate with that makes all this happen,” he said. “Working with folks like my broker Daniel Moskowitz or doing deals with long-time collaborators like Rick Saba or newer Realtors like Jenny Wells at Keller-Williams. This is the sum of the collaboration with many wonderful people.” Sampson said he first saw Hunt’s community impact when he went to drop off holiday donations, including some bicycles, for the Deep Well Project. “They directed me where to put the bikes, and I saw this warehouse with rows of bikes. I asked where they came from and they told me, ‘Oh, that’s Jeff Hunt.’ That kind of selflessness, that’s when you see this guy is the real deal.” Hunt has made it a point to make the bike donations for more than 30 years, working with retailers like Wal-Mart and sometimes going right to makers like Huffy. His work resulted in more than 300 bikes being donated last year to charities on Hilton Head Island and in Bluffton during a time when the cost of bikes had risen 40 percent. “I didn’t have this growing up. There was a junkyard behind the trailer park growing up, and I cobbled together a bunch of parts. I went to King’s department store, bought a socket set and built myself a bike out of all the spare parts. And riding that was a dream,” said Hunt, who can be seen riding bike trails regularly all across the island. “That’s freedom right there. We had one woman who used the bike we donated to get to work. It just brings me back to Vicky Mabe. One turn of the kaleidoscope can change everything in your life. If I can help you succeed, I know that I will succeed as well. When you lead with principle and purpose, there’s always going to be win around the corner.” As he hits his mid-50s, he knows it’s a time when others might be looking to slow down. Hunt said that’s just not in the cards for him and Christine. “We are go-go people. This island is magical. I feel like I’m living a fairy tale. The white sands, being able to walk to the beach or the Arts Center. Everyone is happy here because we know what we have,” he said. “This market, our industry, and our world has changed so much. Folks can work from anywhere now, and this is the best place out of anywhere. People are buying million-dollar houses sight unseen because of that. So, you adapt, and I love the challenges in that adapting. I love numbers, and I love people. Every day is a new chance to learn, to inspire, and be inspired.”  C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 47


Builder: Boshaw Residential. LLC

48

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

Architect: Pearce Scott Architects

Interior Designer: Kelly Caron Designs, ASID


CH2/CB2

M A R C H H O M E F E AT U R E :

MODERN, M E L LO W A N D MARSHSIDE AT M O R E L A N D VILLAGE A R T I C L E B Y PA U L A M AG R I N I P H OTO G R A P H Y BY A N N E

I

nstantly eye-catching due to its intriguing exterior palette, the Dima residence beckons visitors with its lodge-like style and lofty dimensions. Indoors, the great room is particularly captivating, featuring a reclaimed wood catwalk that spans the living and dining areas and connects second story bedrooms with a glass-enclosed study and outdoor observatory deck. “We imagined a tree-house effect with all the upper-level spaces and windows, our portal to all the surrounding marsh and nature views,” Lilah Dima said. She and husband Brett took their time choosing the ideal home site, privately nestled along the marshes of Moreland Village at Palmetto Bluff. “But all it took was

“The home’s intriguing exterior palette is reminiscent of a West Indies color scheme, a good match for the modern rustic theme,” advised Ron Boshaw, President, Boshaw Residential.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 49



The natural and manmade surfaces are strategically layered in the Dimas kitchen and great room. Interior designer Sara Wiley Boyles infused the dining area with nature accents and hints of Safari wildlife. Reclaimed wood features and the bright white palette combine in dramatic harmony.

a few hours for me to fall for this Southern sanctuary in the first place,” Brett said. He stayed briefly at the private community on his way to drop the Dimas’ son at college in Florida. “I wasn’t here more than a day when I called Lilah and told her this was the place.” Moreland Village did, in fact, become the place where they would build their second home with the goal to eventually relocate permanently to the Lowcountry. The Dimas promptly engaged with the Palmetto Bluff lifestyle, exploring the meandering nature and water trails, biking for miles throughout the property, and sampling the peaceful riverfront amenities. “We wanted our home here to be a reflection of Lowcountry nature and the outdoor

ambience we enjoy so much,” Lilah said. After discussing their vision with Ron Boshaw of Boshaw Residential, Brett and Lilah knew they had found the right match to steer their custom build. They worked with Pearce Scott Architects to develop their signature floor plan. Interior Designer Sara Wiley Boyles of Kelly Caron Designs, ASID, completed their dream team as they began their mission to blend classically modern architectural features with a rustic, nature-infused interior at their Moreland Village compound. Lilah’s design aptitude and vision ensured a delightfully productive collaboration with Sara’s experience and talent. “To describe this project as unique is probably an C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 51


M O D E R N, M E L LO W A N D M A R S H S I D E AT M O R E L A N D V I L L A G E understatement,” Boshaw said. “The great room is such a dynamic combination of features, from the towering catwalk flanked by two-story windows to the majestic columns and prominent fireplace and mantle.” Boshaw’s team tapped extensive Lowcountry resources to locate the right materials for the great room, kitchen, adjacent hallways and front foyer. “The reclaimed wood beams, catwalk, columns and mantle all create contrast against clean, lighter finishes in a distinctive way. We planned for the millwork details to integrate into the reclaimed pieces, creating drama in the space,” Boyles said. She elaborated on the interior finishes and palette inspired by the Dima’s affinity for nature and authentic design elements. “There’s a mix of Above left, the collaborative efforts by members of the Boshaw Residential team yielded 2022 LightHouse Awardwinning results for the Dima residence. Brass accents in the powder room mirror the gold themes prevalent in the kitchen and great room. Reclaimed wood ceiling beams and nature-themed elements greet guests in the Dimas’ front entry space.

52

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


The master suite features modern elegance, a soothing palette plus amazing marsh glimpses. All the comforts of a home spa are included in this sumptuous master bath. Spanning the Dimas’ great room, the novel catwalk allows sweeping views, inside and out. natural and manmade materials—quartzite, limestone, porcelain, concrete, and quartz. The kitchen countertops (Calacatta Matrarazzo Ipanema) set the tone for the color palette and soft greens that are used throughout the home,” Boyles said. “English Ivy cabinets accented by brass detailing on the hood and island tie into the brass tones used in the back kitchen metal backsplash and golds in the lighting in the main living areas,” she added. While Boyles curated the home’s inner habitat, the Boshaw build team coordinated exterior details for the main home and free-standing carriage house/garage. Brett and Lilah chose a rarely used combination of cream and ivy-green exterior paint,

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 53


Pops of pastel colors add warmth to this second story sanctuary. The influence of nature inspires striking companion bedroom hardware. mahogany entry accents, and brass fixtures to complement their wide range of outdoor living spaces. “Without a doubt, the Dimas made the most of their sweeping marsh views with the upper outdoor deck and large screened porch,” Boshaw said. “Plus, the winding, paved paths at the rear of the home are an amazing vantage point when it’s high tide and the sun’s setting.”

54

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

“We see ourselves enjoying those breathtaking marsh side views and other caveats of our Moreland retreat on a full-time basis in the not-too-distant future,” Brett said. He hopes to transition from his Wall Street career to the role of Lowcountry real estate agent over the next few years. Lilah plans to share her coaching skills in the south, both on ice with hockey players, and off ice as an


RN Certified Health Coach. The Dimas’ two children, Jake and Grace, are successfully pursuing their career goals and plan to join their parents often at their new address for more family adventures and holiday celebrations. Perhaps life in this consummate Palmetto Bluff haven is the stuff dreams are made of, after all.

Extensive outdoor living spaces like this screened porch bring the Dima family closer to the natural lowcoutnry habitat they treasure. Second-story “treehouse views” are endless and breathtaking, especially during high tide.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 55



C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 57



Article by Cheryl Alexander

2022 conference explores and encourages the empowerment and impact of women in real estate

R

EALTORS® from all over the state gather in Columbia this month for the REAL Women Conference, an event to empower women in South Carolina real estate to RISE (Reach, Inspire, Support, and Empower) to meet their challenges. Event host and Hilton Head Realtor Cindy Creamer, president of the South Carolina Association of REALTORS® (SCR), and other inspiring and motivational speakers share how they are advancing their careers, tackling issues, and becoming the trend setters in the industry. The last conference, held in 2018, was hosted by SCR president and Columbia Realtor Laura Derrick, and included speakers like National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) president Elizabeth Mendenhall, Fox News reporter Ainsley Earhardt, and Nephron Pharmaceuticals CEO Lou Kennedy, among others. “We’re really excited about this year’s keynote speaker, ABC News anchor Deborah Roberts as well as leaders from the National Association of REALTORS, including Leigh Brown and Leslie Rouda Smith,” Creamer said. “There are also multiple panels including a REALTOR Women’s Council Panel. We are also so happy and grateful to welcome back Great Southern Homes as a premier sponsor.” The event coincides with International Women’s Day celebrations on March 8 at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, and all South Carolina REALTOR members are welcome. In addition to the conference, attendees will enjoy a plated

lunch, photo booth, Happy Hour Hustle, a meet and greet with speakers, exciting door prize giveaways, and exhibitor space for sponsors of the event. “Our goal is to top the 2018 event,” Creamer said. “We created so much buzz and excitement at that event, and as the next female president of SCR, I aim to bring that energy and more back to the industry.” Women are making great strides in real estate a n d t h e R E A L Wo m e n Conference seeks to highlight and fuel this trend. According


Event host and Hilton Head Realtor Cindy Creamer, president of the South Carolina Association of REALTORS. (SCR)

to the NAR 2021 member profile, women account for 61 percent of brokers and 65 percent of fulltime sales agents. Why is it that the real estate industry is such a good fit for women? Creamer believes one reason is that there is no ceiling and no limit to what a woman can do or how much she can earn. “Women in real estate are essentially running their own business, setting their own work hours and workdays, so they are responsible for their own success,” she said. “A woman in this industry can decide how much and how hard she wants to work without anyone telling her what to do, so the sky is really the limit.” Kate Yachini, broker/Realtor at Carolina Realty Group and Hilton Head Area REALTORS® (HHAAOR) president, believes good Realtors do three things well: communicate, problem solve, and build relationships. “When I look at myself and my female peers, in addition to managing our own businesses, we are often managing a lot of household or family responsibilities,” she said. Yachini gives the example that in one evening, a woman might be negotiating a contract, cooking a meal for her family, showing a home to prospective buyers, and helping her children with homework. “The women Realtors I know tend to be highly practiced multitaskers,” she said. “There is a quote attributed to Lucille Ball that says, ‘If you want something done, ask a busy person to do it. The more things you do, the more you can do.’ Just like how objects in motion will stay in motion, so do people, and women Realtors tend to have a lot of momentum.” Jean Beck, CEO of HHAAOR, agrees that women are so successful as Realtors because women can multitask and juggle details—important abilities for real estate agents. “Women have superb organizational skills, and many women Realtors deeply understand the importance of relationship building,” Beck said. “The caring part of a woman’s personality allows her to be genuinely attuned to and concerned with the success and goals of their clients.” Karen Ryan, broker/owner of Weichert, REALTORS® Coastal Properties, oversees more than 180 Realtors in five 60

MARCH 2022 C2 MAGAZINE


“Just like how objects in motion will stay in motion, so do people, and women Realtors tend to have a lot of momentum.” “The women Realtors I know tend to be highly practiced multitaskers There is a quote attributed to Lucille Ball that says, ‘If you want something done, ask a busy person to do it,’” said Kate Yachini.

offices throughout the Lowcountry. She believes that one reason women make great Realtors is because women are great listeners. “When a client is talking about what they want in their home, women really hear them and uniquely understand the importance of the home beyond just an investment,” she said. “And sometimes women come from other careers or come to real estate later in life, so they are ready for something more. Their careers just take off.” A real estate transaction is comprised of many parts, and Beck believes that a woman’s ability to

listen and communicate are vital to solving the problems that may arise in the process. “A good Realtor must be able to communicate with all who are participating,” she said, “whether they are talking to a lender attorney or repairman. Women are typically very good at listening and communicating.” Though women currently dominate the industry, they are still not in the top tier for leadership. Yachini pointed out that real estate, like many industries, had a history of excluding women. “Today, fewer women sit at the helm of large real estate companies,” she said, “but that’s not just real estate. Women make up only 8 percent of CEOs at Fortune 500 companies.” Creamer believes this may be due to the innate demands of being a female in today’s society. “Because many women have so many other roles, such as mother, wife, caretaker, breadwinner, they may feel they don’t have the time,” she said. “But in the last few years, there has been a movement to change that limiting mindset. Those numbers are shifting rapidly as more women than ever are stepping into leadership roles.” Ryan agreed. “Women are running offices and rising to the top. I have found that real estate is attracting much more driven, successful women,” she said.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 61


Jean Beck, CEO of Hilton Head Area Association of Realtors.

Ryan added that four out of her five office managers are women. In addition to her real estate companies, she also owns two rental companies. Yachini pointed out that just as women were passed over for promotions in other fields, in competitive listing situations, female Realtors were often passed over based on the misconception that male Realtors had families to support. “I think the imbalance is changing in part due to the cultural shift in households,” she explained. “There are more dual-income families and female heads of households.” Beck believes that innovations in technology and the ability to do a transaction online have helped more women rise in the industry. “Because women now have more flexibility to manage all of the requirements of the transaction and still maintain other involvement, they are better able to

position themselves as leaders,” she said. And just as the REAL Women Conference underscores, women are rising to the top because they are so willing to help each other. Creamer said that because many women want to get involved, local Realtors are forming a Women’s Council of Real Estate—an arm of NAR—coming soon all over the state. “Our entire mission with this endeavor is to build leaders,” Creamer said. “The council will offer leadership training for those going into real estate or other industries.” The goal is to inspire as many as possible to get involved in national association and feel less intimidated as well as to provide a place for camaraderie and conversation. “As the 2022 president of Hilton Head Area REALTORS, I hope to inspire more women Realtors to consider leadership roles in our association and in real estate, Yachini said. “I also want to encourage Realtors to keep learning and to continue to elevate their businesses and our industry.” Creamer, too, is mentoring anyone who shows an interest in leadership. She educates them as to why the real estate industry is so good for women and teaches them that they must believe in themselves and surround themselves with likeminded, optimistic people to accomplish their goals. “I’m always looking for the next leaders,” she said. “I approach women all the time, looking for upcoming stars to replace those currently serving, and I actively teach the importance of involvement.”

Karen Ryan, broker/owner of Weichert, REALTORS® - Coastal Properties 62

MARCH 2022 C2 MAGAZINE


Ryan obviously values women’s voices in her company. She trains, mentors, and assists new and experienced agents to be more professional and gives them the skills necessary to be successful. “I am inspired by and truly enjoy mentoring others,” she said. “This industry gives an opportunity for empowerment and advancement that is not available in other industries.” Much of what Beck accomplishes at the HHAAOR is work with the members, peer to peer, on leadership skills so that when leaders are needed, women feel prepared and ready to serve. “One message I try to share with women Realtors is to know your value and be ready and able to communicate it,” Yachini said. “Also, let your clients know how much their support means to you and your business. That’s my recipe: know your worth, keep learning and growing, and express gratitude.” Creamer added, “Belief in yourself is number one. A successful woman leader believes in what she does and what she says; a successful woman leader inspires others to believe in her.”  For more information about the REAL Women Conference, visit realwomen.screaltors.org.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 63


64

MARCH 2022 C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 65



ARTICLE BY CHERYL ALEXANDER PHOTOS COURTESY OF RANDY JEFFCOAT BUILDERS

K

I

T C

SURVEY REVEALS TRENDS THAT HOMEOWNERS ARE EMBRACING WITH THEIR CASH

T

he average spend for major kitchen remodels increased in mid-2021 by 14 percent up to $40,000 and by 25 percent to $10,000 for minor kitchen remodels, compared to 2020. Spending for a kitchen size of 250 square feet or more continued its climb for the fourth year in a row, to $50,000, up from $45,000 in 2020, while a kitchen remodel of less than 250 square feet increased as well, up to $35,000 from $30,000. Almost half of renovating homeowners reported that the impetus for their kitchen spending was

H

E

N

S

simply that they had finally saved enough money to do so, with 30 percent reporting that having an old kitchen that deteriorated or broke down was their trigger to spend their money. So, where are most U.S. homeowners putting their cash in their kitchens? • Countertops are tops. Most renovation budgets are making countertops the priority. A Houzz survey of nearly 2,400 U.S. homeowners found that more than one-third of homeowners reportedly splurged on countertops. The most common feature improved during kitchen renovations, countertops were upgraded by 91 percent of homeowners. Other areas where renovators spent more than originally intended include appliances (27 percent), cabinets (23 percent), and backsplashes (20 percent). C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

67


Appliances are the second most common splurge during kitchen renovations (27 percent). Over a third of upgraded appliances include high-tech features (35 percent), up six percentage points from 2020.

• When it comes to types of countertops, homeowners are choosing materials based on the look and feel, durability and ease of cleaning, rather than cost. Engineered quartz and granite are the most popular countertop materials (42 and 24 percent, respectively), despite tax and pandemicinduced price increases. Interestingly, more than one in five renovators are selecting an island countertop that contrasts with their primary counters, and 35 percent of those have selected butcher block or wood slab as the contrasting feature, even though that material has also been impacted by the pandemic. Aesthetically, almost 40 percent of homeowners chose white for their countertops, up six percentage points from the previous year.

68

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

• Appliances get a boost from hightech features. Appliances are the second most common splurge during kitchen renovations (27 percent). Over a third of upgraded appliances include high-tech features (35 percent), up six percentage points from 2020. The most popular kitchen appliance features are wireless and smartphone controls. • Nearly 20 percent of homeowners installed beverage refrigerators in their renovated kitchens (up five percentage points) and 14 percent of homeowners are adding wine refrigerators. This increase is most likely connected to the upsurge in kitchen entertaining (56 percent), up four percentage points over the past year. • Cabinets are replaced or refinished. Cabinets are the number three splurge item, with almost a quarter of homeowners spending more than planned on the feature. Most are replacing all kitchen cabinets as part of a kitchen renovation (65 percent), while nearly a third chose to partially replace the kitchen cabinets. Among those homeowners opting for a partial cabinet upgrade, 65 percent are simply refinishing cabinet exteriors. • “It is clear that homeowners are willing to spend a little more to get exactly what they want in upgrades that are both beautiful and practical, despite rising prices of labor, products and materials,” said Marine Sargsyan, Houzz senior economist. “We’re seeing a rise in overall kitchen renovation spending as homeowners not only splurge on specific features but also make major modifications to the kitchen, many of which require the assistance of licensed home professionals. In fact, hiring rates for home professionals to complete these projects are the highest we’ve seen in four years.” • Professional help. Almost half of renovating homeowners change the layout of their kitchen and over one-third upgrade systems, such as electrical or plumbing, or modify walls. Considering the complexities of these projects, folks are increasingly turning to professionals. Overall hiring of kitchen renovation professionals has jumped to 89 percent from 85 percent in 2020, its highest level in four years. General contractors continue to be hired most frequently (53 percent), up significantly by four percentage points from 2021. Cabinetmakers, kitchen designers and interior designers are also being hired more frequently than last year. Additional insights from the 2022 U.S. Houzz Kitchen Trends Study include: • Islands are important. More than half of renovating homeowners either upgrade or add an island, while nearly


two in five still have no island at all. More than one quarter improve an existing island, up by three percentage points from the previous year—a significant increase. Remarkably, one fifth of homeowners say that a top activity at their kitchen islands is work (up four percentage points from 2021). Homeowners are making space for workplaces by stretching their islands more than seven feet in length (39 percent), up five percentage points from last year. Homeowners are also making the space brighter with most installing new light fixtures above islands (92 percent). • Layout choices among those who are changing their kitchen layout are consistent with 2020. The L shape is most popular (40 percent), followed by the U shape (31 percent) and then the galley style, which has two facing walls (13 percent). • White and gray are winners. White continues to lead as the top color for kitchen cabinets, backsplashes, and walls (41, 40 and 32 percent, respectively). Gray is the most common alternative to white, with 27 percent of renovating homeowners painting the kitchen walls gray, 13 percent installing gray flooring, and 11 percent opting for a gray backsplash. That said, blue, black, and green bring visual interest to the space through contrasting kitchen island cabinet colors. For the backsplash, 20 percent choose a multicolored backsplash, six percent choose blue, while a whopping 11 percent choose marble for their backsplash. For appliances, standard stainless is the overwhelming favorite (75 percent), up by three percentage points from the previous year. • Vinyl flooring is steps ahead. Vinyl or resilient flooring continues its rise for the third year in a row, nearly doubling in popularity since 2019 to 23 percent and surpassing ceramic and porcelain tile (19 percent), which declined by five percentage points and fell from first place. Hardwood now leads as the most popular flooring material in kitchens (25 percent). • Kitchen style. Transitional remains the premier style choice for renovated kitchens in 2022, up to 25 percent from 21 percent in 2020. Contemporary style has overtaken modern as the number two pick, while farmhouse style has dropped by two percentage points, chosen by only one in 10 kitchen renovators, declining further from its peak of 14 percent in 2019.  All data cited in this article comes from the 2022 U.S. Houzz Kitchen Trends Study.

1. Spending is on the rise 2. Pro hiring continues to climb 3. Consumers splurge on countertops 4. Vinyl flooring gains a foothold 5. White and gray dominate 6. Cabinets capture focus 7. Kitchen islands command attention 8. Marble backsplashes are gaining popularity 9. Beverage refrigerators are popping up 10. High-tech features find their way home C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

69



ARTICLE BY CHERYL ALEXANDER

M A I N T E N A N C E

C A L E N D A R

fter the wrath of winter, many homeowners look forward to getting outside to begin caring for their lawns. Check out this landscape maintenance schedule we’ve compiled to assist you: MARCH Lawns: For acid soil, lime your grass every couple of years. Use a soil test to find out how much to apply or 15 to 20 pounds of lime per 100 square feet of lawn area. Planting: Prepare planting beds for veggies, herbs and flowers. Apply a one- to threeinch layer of compost and work it into the upper three inches of soil. Azaleas: If azaleas aren’t planted by color, after they finish blooming, consider rearranging them by color for maximum effect, then prune and shape them for a better display next year. Pruning: Cut back ornamental grasses and old perennials before the new growth begins to appear. Compost the debris. APRIL Mulch: Remove and replace or freshen mulch. Lawns: Begin regular mowing, and trim only about the top third of the grass blades. Perennials: As soon as the new growth appears, divide and plant out perennials that bloom mid-summer through fall, such as daylilies, black-eyed Susans, sedums, and asters.

A

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

71


MARCH: Herbs: After frost, plant herbs generously. MAY Lawns: Begin regular fertilizing with the right fertilizer and application amount for your grass type. Pruning: Prune spring-flowering shrubs like azaleas, forsythias and lilacs as needed, immediately after they finish flowering. Once plants have leafed out, make a final pruning to cut the limb or shoot back to live wood. Annuals: Plant summer annuals, such as petunias, marigolds, salvia, and impatiens. Cleaning: Clean out water features such as fountains, ponds and water gardens. JUNE Water: Begin a regular irrigation schedule (at dawn and/or dusk) with special attention to hanging baskets, containers, and any new additions to your landscape. Houseplants: Place houseplants outside in the shade for some fresh air. Also remember to water and feed them. Mulch: Apply extra mulch around new plantings to reduce water loss and heat stress. Weeds: Perform a weekly inspection to find and eliminate weeds before they have a chance to take over. JULY Lawns: Raise the cutting height of your lawnmower to accommodate drought and heat. Birdbaths: Placing the bath near a small tree or large shrub keeps water cooler, provides shelter for the birds, and encourages use.

72

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

If azaleas aren’t planted by color, after they finish blooming, consider rearranging them by color for maximum effect, then prune and shape them for a better display next year.

Prevention: Keep up with preventative maintenance. Watch out for pests and diseases throughout the landscape. Pull any weeds as they appear. If you need to spray to control insects or plant disease, avoid doing so in the hottest part of the day to reduce the potential of damaging foliage. AUGUST Vegetables: Begin planting your fall vegetables. Make sure to water regularly. Lawns: If your grass is dry, wait until after it is watered or after it rains to mow. Iris and daylilies: Divide these spring-bloomers and prepare new beds. Annuals: Remove spent flowers on annuals to promote continued flowering. SEPTEMBER Fall planting: Begin planting trees and shrubs. Water: Adjust your watering schedule for cooler weather. Don’t allow containers to waterlog. Houseplants: Prepare houseplants to move indoors. Prune or re-pot them as needed. Treat for insects if necessary. OCTOBER Turf: Overseed warm-season grasses with annual ryegrass to enjoy a green lawn during winter months. Continue mowing the lawn as needed. When leaves begin to fall, use the mower to mulch them into the lawn. Color beds: Remove tired summer annuals, prepare the soil, plant, and fertilize cool-weather annuals. Plant spring-blooming bulbs. Fall greens: Sow mustard, collard, turnip, and lettuce seeds. NOVEMBER Compost: Use fallen leaves and plant debris for compost, mixing with a shovelful of soil and an optional handful of fertilizer. Sprinkle weekly with water if there is no rain and turn the pile regularly. Lawns: Fertilize tall fescue and other cool-season lawns with a quality lawn fertilizer that contains timedrelease nitrogen to prevent burn. Cleaning: Clean rain gutters and downspouts. Clean and store garden tools and decor for winter. DECEMBER Lime: If the soil is acidic, your landscape could benefit from an application of lime. Irrigation: Adjust your watering schedule, reducing irrigation time by half when night temperatures remain in the 40s or below. Cleaning: Clean and service the lawn mower before storing it for winter. Pressure wash the deck. Apply paint on scratches and bare metal. Change the oil and filters. Add stabilized fuel. Grease the bearings. Sharpen the blades. Remove the battery and put it on a trickle charger.


Clean and store batteries of cordless power equipment in a climate-controlled area. Lithium-ion batteries should be stored with a 50 percent charge. Nickelbased batteries can be stored at any state of charge. JANUARY Plan: Sketch out new garden beds and other outdoor projects for the upcoming year. Create supply lists and locate sources. Planting: Order seeds and seedstarting supplies. Tools: Clean and sharpen all garden tools. Service the engines on power equipment. FEBRUARY Turf: Choose a dry day to mow and inspect for weeds. Either hand-pull them or apply spot applications of post-emergence herbicides. Make sure you follow label directions and check that the product is approved for your grass type. Planting: Plant any new shrubs and trees in new spots or remove and replace unattractive/dead plants. Prune trees: Prune trees and shrubs (except for maples and birches) to remove dead, diseased or damaged limbs, and to create a strong branch structure in young trees. Do not aggressively prune spring flowering trees and shrubs at this time. 

LAWN MAINTENANCE BY SEASON EARLY SPRING • Sharpen mower blades. Have a backup blade (about $20) so that a sharp one is always on hand. • Tune up your mower with a new sparkplug ($3 to $5) and air filter ($5 to $10). • Buy fresh gas. • Clean up your lawn. SPRING • Be ready for the first mow and don’t mow when the grass is wet. • Fertilize your lawn. • Aerate your lawn by punching small holes so water, fertilizers, and oxygen reach grass roots. • Apply a pre-emergent herbicide. EARLY SUMMER • Watch out for grubs. If you see more than 10 per square foot, your lawn should be treated with a chemical pesticide. • Mow often enough so you’re removing no more than one-third of the grass blade. • Weeds that have escaped an herbicide application should be removed with a garden fork. SUMMER • Set your mower blade height to three inches. • Apply deep and infrequent watering. • At least once each month, clean underneath your mower to prevent spreading lawn diseases. • Regularly rake up any leaves, twigs, and debris. EARLY FALL • Patch bare or thin spots in your lawn. • Plant new trees and shrubs and overseed cool-season grasses. FALL • Keep your lawn free of leaves and other debris, so they don’t kill the grass. • Clean up your garden.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

73


74

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

75



Article by Barry Kaufman Photography by m.kat

comments from customers about how great their work is and how professional they are,” Linda said. “That’s what we really love. We love doing service work.” And while the nature of that service work has changed quite a bit since Frey started, he’s proving that Oceanside Electric is ready to leap into the wired and wireless future.

John Frey, owner of Oceanside Electric

OLD SCHOOL meets NEW SCHOOL A FAMILY TRADITION THREE GENERATIONS STRONG, OCEANSIDE ELECTRIC IS WIRED FOR TODAY’S WIRELESS WORLD.

J

ohn Frey’s grandfather started Frey Electric in 1921 in Cincinnati. Back in those days, electrical work was fairly straightforward business. You had a power line, a breaker box, and an outlet. Pretty straightforward. Even by the time John entered the business, the electrical industry hadn’t changed in any truly revolutionary way. “I actually started in high school and worked all through high school for the family business,” he said. “When I started, it was literally just switches and plugs in houses. Now, we get into houses, and everything is Wi-Fi controlled. They want USB plugs by their nightstands. They want drop stations for smart watches and iPads in their closets… It’s vastly different than when I was 19 years old doing electrical work.” What hasn’t changed is a commitment to service that Frey inherited from his father and grandfather. It’s an old-school approach that has set Oceanside Electric, the company he started on Hilton Head Island, apart from a very crowded pack. “We return phone calls. We show up as promised. We actually send clients a calendar invitation, and we stay in touch with them,” Frey said. It seems like a simple thing. But as anyone who has dealt with an electrician during this era of the overextended contractor will tell you, it makes a world of difference. A NEW TRADITION While the family business had been good to him, Frey had always felt something calling him to the South Carolina Lowcountry. “We had vacationed down here for years and had talked about it for a long time,” he said. “Finally, we made the leap.” “Our kids were juniors and seniors when we moved down here, and they both wanted to go to college in South Carolina. That was a big part of our decision,” added wife Linda, who works side-by-side with Frey at Oceanside. Making their way south from Cincinnati, where Frey’s brothers continue to run the family business, John and Linda landed on Hilton Head Island. “Obviously, it was hard to leave the family business,” he said. “But we did so knowing that we had this goal in mind down here. We’re still doing my grandpa’s work.” With the launch of Oceanside Electric, John and Linda formed a team that include five field technicians and a dispatcher to canvas the Lowcountry and offer exceptional service. “The guys that work for us, we get so many

WIRED FOR GROWTH In addition to launching his own electrical business, Frey’s grandfather was a keen inventor. Among his innovations were a specialized outlet designed for hanging electric clocks and specialized cable clips that held wires on to studs in the days before staples. It’s clear that forward-thinking philosophy carried down through the generations. “You either have to change with the times or let someone else do that work,” Frey said. “If you’re going to stick to basic electrical work, you’re going to miss an opportunity for growth.” Instead, Oceanside Electric has embraced the new technological advancements in the home. Along with the aforementioned Wi-Fi controlled smart devices and USB-ready outlets, their technicians are walking along the leading edge of technology, installing specialized outlets for golf cart chargers, wiring homes for backup generators in case of disaster, and pushing the boundaries of what an electric company does. “Focusing on service work as we do, you have to be able to stay on top of those kinds of changes. To do that, you need employees who are knowledgeable about that kind of technology, and we have that,” Frey said. “I’ve been doing this for 34 years now. Our oldest employee is only 30. This is a generation that grew up with that stuff.” As such, Oceanside’s technicians can do far more than just adding an outlet. They can set up data to a TV, coordinate lighting with your smart home, and even set up your Nest or Ring camera on your home’s network. “These innovations are such a great opportunity for homeowners, and our guys are very comfortable with all the technology behind it,” Frey said. And that’s in addition to your ceiling fans, smoke detectors and extra outlets that you’d expect. Whatever it takes to create satisfied customers, they’ll do it. “We love going into homes and doing things—with minimal damage—that make homeowners happy,” Linda said, summing up the mission statement perfectly. To find out what three generations of experience and an unwavering commitment to service can do for your home, visit oceanside-electric.com. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 77



T

hanks to COVID-19 and all its minion variants, over the past few years, home is not just where the heart is. It is where everything is. And everyone. Kids in quarantine with books and papers strewn everywhere, virtually learning at the dining room table. Spouses that used to travel for work suddenly wearing out the home office and maybe their socks. The brand-new Peloton Bike+ you succumbed to purchasing when you realized you were never going back to the gym, taking up precious space in the living room. Zoom calls in little nooks where you hope no one can find you. I mean, even the family dog is over it. When it comes to interior design trends for 2022, Kelly Hughes, owner of Kelly Hughes Interiors, laughed and said, “Number one is patience! I am used to working with a client for eight to 10 weeks to get things done in a timely fashion. Now, it is more like eight months to a year. With the supply chain disrupted, it disrupts the momentum of the design process.” Hughes also joked that she often

DECOR TRENDS FOR 2022

ARTICLE BY BECCA EDWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN MCMANUS

“Anyone who was forced to be home during lockdown ended up taking a very detailed look around the home, and this changed people’s perspective on what their home can offer. More than ever, people want their home to be their sanctuary.” C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 79


DECOR TRENDS FOR 2022 “I am seeing more people bringing old things back to life,” Hughes said. “You can repaint or repurpose a piece of furniture like your bedside table and move it into your office and completely transform it. And a vase does not need to be a vase. It can serve another purpose.” feels like a marriage counselor these days. “Designs have to be adjusted, and selections are not just based on what looks good or what is in the budget but on what is available. With that comes frustrated clients, and nobody wants to add more frustration to anyone’s life or business.” Hughes, who majored in art and design at the University of California in Santa Cruz, established her interior design business on Hilton Head Island in 2006. Specializing in interior redesign, new construction, furniture and accessory packages, home staging and improving market attraction for short-term rental properties, her passion is creating each space to reflect the desires and needs of her clients. “I’m dedicated to every project—large or small,” she said. She is also dedicated to staying on trend and, in addition to patience, she has noticed six other home decor trends for this year. Outdoor spaces “I am definitely seeing more outdoors living spaces,” Hughes said. “With COVID, people are trying to entertain outside more. Also, outdoor spaces

80

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

are a great way to add square footage to your home. And, because we live on Hilton Head, we can enjoy our outdoor spaces most months of the year.” Creating a sanctuary “Also because of COVID, family members are home more,” Hughes said. “Anyone who was forced to be home during lockdown ended up taking a very detailed look around the home, and this changed people’s perspective on what their home can offer. More than ever, people want their home to be their sanctuary. That means looking at every facet of your life and your home and creating harmony.” More functionality and maximizing spaces With the sense that people want to make their home their sanctuary also comes the need to make the home more functional. “You want a peaceful productive place, so the best thing you can do is get highly organized. That alone will make you fall in love with your house all over again. I’m seeing more closet and drawer organizers and functional furniture,” said Hughes, who also added that this can be as simple as changing a room’s layout. “Rearranging the furniture can completely change the flow of the house. I simply moved furniture around for two clients who ended up taking their houses off the market because they liked the new flow so much.”


Warmer tones As far as color palates go, Hughes is seeing clients gravitate to warmer hues. “Cool tones are out. Gray was used and abused. Don’t get me wrong. I love gray, and gray is here to stay, but not to the level it has been used. And people want a warmer gray. I am also seeing desert tones. People get tired of one trend and go in the opposite direction, and that’s what we’re seeing.” Reclaimed wood is still popular, but people are choosing a darker stain and darker wood tones throughout the home. “People are looking for a cozier home. Again, they want a sanctuary,” Hughes said. Carpe diem designs In effort to improve functionality, people are paying more attention to forgotten spaces like that random coat closet or utilitarian spaces like the laundry room, Hughes explained. “People want to be very efficient and want every room in the house, even the laundry room or mudroom, to be aesthetically pleasing at the same time.” What this translates to in the home decor world is people seizing the opportunity to make every nook and cranny of their home thoughtfully and artfully utilized. “Take laundry rooms, for example. People are taking an everyday mundane experience like washing and drying clothes and trying to make it an experience by having a well-decorated laundry room,” Hughes said. Repurposing Not just the spaces are getting a makeover. “I am seeing more people bringing old things back to life,” Hughes said. “You can repaint or repurpose a piece of furniture like your bedside table and move it into your office and completely transform it. And a vase does not need to be a vase. It can serve another purpose.” Breaking the rules Perhaps another sign of the times and many of us being truly over COVID is our last decor trend for 2022—People breaking the design rules. “A lot of the rules are going out the window,” Hughes said. “People are mixing metals. They are mixing genres. They are layering old with new and playing on texture. No longer is decorating about working within the constraints of design rules. It is a more ‘anything goes’ mentality. You can color outside the lines. You can think outside the box. And this makes design more fun. I am seeing a lot more creativity.” 

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 81



ARTICLE BY BECCA EDWARDS PHOTOS COURTESY OF RANDY JEFFCOAT BUILDERS

Luxury Laundry Rooms & Mudrooms T

he Conners; Fuller House; And Just Like That. Like so many of our favorite shows, the laundry room and mudroom are getting a reboot. Gone are the days when these once utilitarian spaces were synonymous with smelly, dingy, and/or a catch-all for discarded stuff. Basic sink basins with faucets with lackluster finishes and functionality—86’d. Cheap, industrial flooring with a little “lipstick on a pig” treatment by a “There is no place like home” door mat—Sayonara. Canned lighting and fluorescent lightbulbs—Well, you get the idea, it’s all “Na, na na nana na na, hey hey, goodbye,” and hello to luxury laundry rooms and mudrooms.


“Luxury laundry rooms and mudrooms are a thing,” said Jake Gartner, CEO and owner of Hammerhead Custom Builders. “Back in the day, the laundry room would get second-tier lighting or flooring, but now they are getting tied into the rest of the house, especially the kitchen.” “We have noticed our clients are really focusing on their laundry rooms and mudrooms and making them both attractive and functional. Also, because of where we live, we have heard of mudrooms referred to as sand rooms, which we thought was funny,” said Christa Fortney, project administrator and customer liaison of Hammerhead Custom Builders. Likewise, Shelley Wilkins, owner of S. Wilkins Interior Design, says her clients are looking to freshen up their laundry rooms or mudrooms. “I mean think about it. The laundry room is like Grand Central Station there is so much going on in there. And you might spend two to three hours doing laundry, so of course you want it to be nice.” Gartner, Fortney and Wilkins proceeded to lay out the trends they are seeing for today’s revamped laundry room and mudroom. CUSTOM MADE The overarching theme for laundry rooms and mudrooms in 2022 is custom made. “Lockers for the kids, window bench seats, folding islands, cabinetry—it’s all custom made these days,” Wilkins said. Gartner agreed. “Everything now is custom built to the homeowner’s specific preferences.” CABINETRY With the trend of more custom made room elements, cabinetry takes center stage. Not only are cabinets being built to the client’s specific needs, but people are choosing bolder cabinet colors and nicer hardware. “Laundry rooms are fun. They’re more personal and can reflect the homeowner’s personality,” Wilkins said. “Clients are not just choosing basic white but rather a fun color like navy. The laundry room or mudroom is not a public space like the living room or dining room. You can make it about you and make it colorful,” Fortney said. WALL COLORS AND WALLPAPER As far as wall colors go, Fortney said, “There’s no real change in wall colors. Because we live on the coast, still a lot of blues and whites, but there is a trend away from gray. Browns are back.” Also, she and Wilkins said people are now selecting expensive wallpaper as another way to add color and texture to the room. ACCOUTREMENTS Then you have what Gartner calls accoutrements. Apparently, homeowners have washed their hands of outdated appliances and are taking a new approach to laundry duties. “Ironing boards are passé. People are now doing steam closets and heated towel racks,” Gartner said. “We are also installing gas-powered dryers.” 84

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


Luxury Laundry Rooms & Mudrooms COUNTERTOPS AND BACKSPLASHES Hammerhead is also putting in more high end countertops and backsplashes. Referring to a recent project Hammerhead completed on Sandhill Crane, Fortney showed a picture of a laundry room with beautiful mosaic tile. “We also have clients that will continue high end countertop materials like quartz or granite to the backsplash,” she said. ARTWORK Many of Wilkins’ interior design clients are choosing artwork. “My clients are choosing nice pieces that make the laundry room or mudroom feel like a true room,” she said. FLOORING Flooring is another way homeowners can make the laundry room or mudroom not look like an after-thought but rather part of the home’s overall design concept. “One thing to consider is the same flooring throughout. For example, continuing the same wood flooring from the kitchen to the mudroom so that the look is cohesive and continuous,” Fortney said. LIGHTING Similarly, Wilkins said her clients are also livening up their lighting. Agreeing, Gartner said, “No more basic lighting. It is much more upscale. We are seeing ornate lighting, sconces

and even chandeliers. We’re installing automated lighting packages with motion detection and night lights that are under the cabinets and are diffused so it gives off a soft light.” WASHER AND DRYERS Because homeowners want to be efficient and avoid messy mounds of laundry, more people are installing more than one washer and dryer in the laundry room, as well as additional ones in the master closet or upstairs. Also, people are pickier about their appliances. “People like what they like,” Gartner said. “The difference now is, with more custom made cabinetry, we can give people exactly what they want.” DOG FRIENDLY Dogs are also getting in on the luxury laundry room and mudroom movement. Wilkins is using furniture designers like Bobby McAlpine who designs consoles that include a dog bed and has seen an increase in pet doors. “We have included a lot of dog-washing stations in the laundry room or mudroom as well as custom built dog kennels and feeding stations incorporated into the cabinetry or room,” Fortney said. COMFORT “Because of COVID, everyone is spending more time at home. People care about comfort. It hasn’t hit Hilton Head yet, per se, but where design is trending is rather than hard edges, you will see rounder design elements— not traditional, but softer in general,” Fortney said. The main take-away is that laundry rooms and mudrooms are no longer a forgotten space. They have value now. People may think of laundry as a chore and something they do not really like to do, but at least it can be a pretty and functional space.” 

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

85


86

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

87



 Tyler Dykes, owner

we can do is help with your computer. But really what we can do is make your home work for you, so you don’t have to work for your home.” That means taking a top-down approach to your smart home, integrating everything from your thermostat and security system to lighting and home theater and making them simple to use. “Today, technology isn’t just one thing. It’s in everything. And that’s where we want to meet our customers,” Dykes said. “We let you control it all from the palm of your hand for full home customization.” Uniting all these quarrelsome kingdoms comes naturally for Dykes, a Cornell dropout and former United States Marine. For him, technology has been a part of his life since almost the beginning. “I was rebuilding computers when I was six years old, coding at 12 and teaching people how to use computers as long as I can remember,” he said. “As a tactical air defense controller in the Marine Corps, I was coordinating air strikes, radio signals and working with a lot of different technologies.” After ending his active service with the Marine Corps, Dykes continued his pursuit of technological mastery, founding a firm that gave

Technology King of the Lowcountry

IT’S GOOD TO BE KING For Tyler Dykes, the Technology King of the Lowcountry, it’s all about giving customers the royal treatment.

B

efore Tyler Dykes came to sit on the throne, the technology kingdom was in disarray, plunged into chaos by incompatible operating systems, mind-bogglingly complicated protocols and processing power that was sluggish at best. All was chaos, as hardware, software, home automation and audio/video waged war on one another through error messages and laggy connections. And then the king came and unified this kingdom under his protection, creating harmony and prosperity where there had been frustration and chaos. Okay, so maybe we’re overdramatizing this. But the fact is, as the Technology King of the Lowcountry, Tyler Dykes has made it his goal to bring together all these different facets of modern tech. “It’s all about caring and focusing on customers and teaching them how to use technology,” he said. “A lot of people think all

customers the tools they need to control their own computers. “We would do repairs and speed up machines, but deeper than that I wanted to take the time to help people understand what I’m doing and why so they can do it in the future,” he said. “My goal with computer repair is not to temporarily fix the issue, but to permanently fix the issue so they never need me again.” That focus on computer repair expanded to encompass the full scope of today’s technology, and under Dykes’ reign computers, smart homes, theaters and more were united under one banner of comprehensive service. “When you’re a king, you have to stretch out and do a little bit of everything,” he said. And he has the know-how to do a little bit of everything better than anyone else. “We’re new to the business, but definitely not new to technology.” For more information, visit lowcountrytechnologyking.com.

ARTICLE BY BARRY KAU FMA N // PHOTOGR A PHY BY M.KAT C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 89


Mike and Robert Rivers of Lowcountry Shelving and Glass. The business recently celebrated thirty years.


ARTICLE BY BARRY KAUFMAN . PHOTOGRAPHY BY MKAT

Glass Houses LOWCOUNTRY SHELVING AND GLASS, AND THE FATHER-SON TEAM AT THE HELM, CELEBRATE 30 YEARS IN BUSINESS.

T

he year was 1992, and Mike and Jane Rivers were waking up for the first time in full control of their destiny. Mike, the Ridgeland native, began his career on the island at Sea Pines 20 years prior, like so many others had back then, and had spent the ensuing decades forging a name for himself as an expert at glass and shelving. For 20 years, he had been building other peoples’ legacies. On that day in 1992, he and Jane began building their own. “It was tricky at first, we ran the business from our Hilton Head Plantation den for the first five years. Then we moved into a warehouse that didn’t even have a bathroom,” said Rivers with a laugh. “We just busted our tail, started slow and had good growth. Thirty years have passed, a span of time that has seen competitors come and go. The company they started that day, Lowcountry Shelving and Glass, has ebbed and flowed with the changes in the economy, weathering the downturn of 2008 and basking in the resurgence of the last few years. And for the last 14 years, they have been lucky enough to share this adventure with their son Robert. “When he came on board, I breathed a sigh of relief,” Mike said. “Before he came along, we didn’t really have anyone who had our backs.” THE NEXT GENERATION Before he officially became part of the team, Robert had already earned his sweat equity with the company, working on the job site in one capacity or another since he was 12 years old. “I worked with every different crew to learn all of our products and installations inside and out,” Robert said. “I went off to Clemson knowing I was going to come back and work with my parents.” Armed with a degree in financial

management, Robert returned to the island eager to join Mike and Jane in building the legacy of Lowcountry Shelving and Glass. That it happened at the peak of the economic downturn turned out to be a perfect trial by fire. “When I started here full time, we were probably down to five or six people. We did whatever it took to keep our doors open,” Robert said. “There are 19 of us now, and it’s a tight-knit group of people. There’s no one person who can get this done. Not me. Not my dad. It takes all of us.” It takes each of those people to handle the massive workload that the company has enjoyed over the last few years as Robert has consciously expanded their customer base. “We probably work for 130 different contractors and remodelers around here,” Robert said. “We’re blessed with those relationships, but that means about 25 jobs a day. It’s a lot of moving pieces.” And Mike and Jane are thrilled with what their son has done to expand the company. “We’ve probably doubled in

size over the last 10 years. It’s a team effort,” Mike said. And with that expansion comes one of his favorite parts of the job. “Nothing makes me feel better than driving down 278 and seeing one of our bright white trucks.” A PASSION FOR QUALITY We said it’s one of Mike’s favorite parts of the job. By far, the greatest pride in his work comes in seeing the craftsmanship that their installers put into each job. “We stress quality,” he said. “It’s all about believing in ourselves and knowing we can deliver a quality product. And returning phone calls. I hate an answering machine.” It’s a work ethic that Mike passed down to Robert in the most organic way possible. Not by telling him how things should be done, but by showing up. “You do whatever it takes,” Robert said. “I grew up watching him get up in the wee hours and go to work.” That still holds true. While Robert is generally in by 5 a.m. to get started on the day, he’s usually greeted by his dad, who has already been there for an hour. “He showed me how you have to put in the work. Don’t let anyone outwork you. And take care of your people.” That dedication to quality shows in each job, whether it’s a frameless shower, a beautiful and functional closet system or even some of the more esoteric jobs they’ll take on such as crafting a wine room. Regardless of the project, it’s going to be installed with the utmost attention to quality and a job done right. Perhaps most important, in this era of supply chain shortages, it will actually get done. Foreseeing the issues down the road, Robert and Mike were able to bulk up their inventory and seek out other vendors to make sure they had product on hand. It’s dedication to a job done right that comes from two generations of leadership. Parents and son—Mike, Jane, and Robert— have carried their business forward on a foundation of hard work, dedication and service. For 30 years, it has transformed Lowcountry homes. And that legacy will continue, carried on the Rivers family name. For more information, visit lowcountryshelvingandglass.com.

Robert Rivers began working in the family business at a young age, before heading to Clemson. Photo circa 1990

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 91



Article by Cheryl Alexander

The Jewelry of your Home Hardware upgrades are an easy way to update your home

I

ncreasing your home’s value need not break the bank, nor should it always involve big-ticket items like remodeling a bathroom or kitchen or even replacing a floor. To put it simply, think about three basic renovation categories: remodeling, refinishing, and redressing. Redressing is the category that is easiest to accomplish and costs the least. Installing new cabinet hardware, new doorknobs, new faucets, and new accessories can give your home an affordable and fun mini makeover. Here are a few tips to consider for a home redress:

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 93


The Jewelry of your Home

CONSISTENCY IS KEY In your home’s design—just like in your wardrobe— things are better if they complement each other in some way. So, select a finish or two that match each other and use those details throughout your entire home, especially if you have an open concept design. All things considered, though, you can mix and match hardware; just follow some basic guidelines and remember hardware is the

94

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

jewelry of your home. It’s a small detail, but it has a big impact. Mixing hardware finishes adds a bit of style and dimension and sometimes can infuse your personality. However, mixing and matching is an art that will require you to not only know how and when to do it as well as when not to. Stay true to the design rule that says interest = good; clutter = bad. Here are a few dos and don’ts to consider: DO abide by the rule of threes. Visually, details in threes are more satisfying than not, so use up to three metal finishes per room. If your space is a large one, you might can get away with four, but be careful not to create clutter. DO mix shiny finishes with matte, and warm finishes with cool. “Opposites attract” is true in hardware, too. Mixing polished chrome and polished nickel can add subtle dimension to a space. DO emphasize an accent piece by contrasting both style and finish. For example, a room full of modern black hardware can be accented with a single vintage brass or gold piece. DO pick two or three finishes and use them throughout your entire home. Choose one or two as your dominant finishes and then use a third as an accent. DO create additional contrast by also mixing complementary shapes.


DO buy the best quality you can afford. Hardware is an important feature that should look and feel good. Since the investment is relatively small, invest in the best looking, best quality you can. DON’T mix too many styles and finishes in the same room. If the finishes are different then the styles should at least be similar. The exception here is if you’re accentuating a single piece. DON’T introduce new finishes in every room of the house. If you’ve already mixed a couple of finishes in one room, don’t add any more to the other rooms as the intention is to create flow with hardware as the connecting force. Too much becomes too choppy. DON’T go too far. For example, combining circles and squares can enhance the contrast, but any more than this will become overwhelming. When mixing shapes and finishes, rely on focused combinations. DON’T forget to complement your exterior hardware with the rest of your home. GO MODERN, BUT CLASSIC Accessories and hardware are somewhat inexpensive ways to enjoy design trends, unlike painting an entire room a bright green that you’ll likely grow tired of quickly. If you just absolutely love that crazy drawer pull and can’t live without it, then go right ahead. However, since the whole point of redressing is to update and modernize, then try to select clean, modern pieces that will stay stylish for years to come. COMBINE FLAIR AND FUNCTION As much as you want your hardware and fixtures to look great, don’t forget about function. These are details that you’ll apply daily, so make sure they will stand up to the demands you’ll make on them. Test cabinet knobs and pulls for comfortable grip to ensure that you won’t be frustrated with your choice. Make sure the faucet is the right size for the sink so you won’t constantly have a mess to clean up. You can enjoy both flair and function, just don’t forego one for the other. BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS Use your creativity to find great hardware in places you might not consider. For example, just because you are replacing kitchen hardware doesn’t mean you have to stay in the kitchen section. Go for some untraditional functionality, such as a cool bathroom towel bar on your kitchen island for easy access to dishtowels or install modern cabinet knobs and pulls on a dated dresser or armoire or use bathroom hooks and racks in your mud and laundry room. TAKE IT OUTSIDE Your front door is the first detail people see when they visit, and studies reveal that replacing your front door and hardware is one of the best return-on-investment (ROI) projects for your home. A new door handle, knocker, mail slot and light fixture will make your house stand out from the crowd and add instant curb appeal. Best of all, these simple updates won’t stress your wallet and won’t stress your brain. You can take your time and have a little fun planning what your final look will be. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 95


Branch Leader, Fred Gaskin


AR T I C LE BY B ARRY KAU FMAN P H OTO G RAPH Y BY M.KAT

WHAT IS MODERN WEALTH MANAGEMENT? LET FRED GASKIN AND HIS EXPERIENCED TEAM AT CHARLES SCHWAB & CO. MAKE THE INTRODUCTION.

I

nnovation and technological changes have combined to be more disruptive than anyone could have imagined 20 years ago. Few industries have been more positively impacted than financial services. Whether being able to send money with your mobile phone, trade stocks for zero commissions, invest in broad portfolios of stocks, bonds, and/or commodities for almost zero costs across the globe, the individual investor has been a clear beneficiary of these changes. Many industry insiders believe we may still be in the very early stages of what should be a continuous cycle of change accruing to the individual investor. Few would argue that no one firm has shown more leadership or done more for the individual investor over the last several decades than Schwab. In business for over 50 years, Schwab has been an industry pioneer by consistently driving down costs, improving market access, and providing investors education, tools, and products that have helped change the industry. “The investment business is very competitive, and Schwab differentiates itself by providing full service at a competitive cost. We can meet investors where they want to be met,” said Fred Gaskin, independent branch leader of the Charles Schwab Bluffton branch. “Some of our clients just want access to the resources Schwab has online. Some of them want to really partner with us to help them make informed and confident decisions. A lot of clients feel better knowing who they can call for help.”


Charles Schwab’s newest financial consultants in Bluffton, Benjamin Witcher and Hampton Long

The Bluffton branch has been open almost three years and has gotten off to a very strong start with Gaskin at the helm and expanding recently to welcome financial consultants Hampton Long and Benjamin Witcher. They are uniquely positioned to help investors in the Lowcountry. “I feel like we’ve assembled a high-value team that differentiates us from other firms in the area,” Gaskin said. “We work very hard providing value to the client through strong relationships, excellent service, and a drive to help them meet their goals and objectives.” It’s a team-based approach focused on leveraging their combined strengths of almost 60 years of experience in the industry and relying on each other to ensure their clients receive

98

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

advice to help reach their financial goals. If you’re the type who simply wants to manage your own investment through Schwab’s robust suite of tools on their software, web, and mobile trading platforms, it’s still comforting to know there are seasoned professionals like Gaskin and his team who are available to provide support. “Working with clients involves a process, and that process starts with a conversation,” Gaskin said. “One approach does not fit everybody, so it starts with a discussion about goals and objectives.” That discussion can take many forms. For example, the impending retiree who has all the puzzle pieces in place and just wants to make sure they’re on the right track. “They have assets and income sources, so with their situation, it’s more or less helping to best allocate those assets,” Gaskin said. “I tell them, ‘You’ve played the game of life and you’ve won.’ Our job is to help organize those investments so they can live their life.” But it’s with those investors who are dipping their toes in the water for the first time, or even those who still have questions, that Schwab, to quote Gaskin, “really shines.” “For those people, it’s really about education more than anything else—teaching them the rules


The Charles Schwab Bluffton Team (from left to right): Benjamin Witcher, Hampton Long and Fred Gaskin.

of success and providing them information to help make appropriate/good decisions early,” he said. The majority of the clients who have come to rely on the Bluffton branch of Schwab lie somewhere in the middle. For them, Gaskin knows that first conversation is perhaps the most important. “That first conversation is really important. It gives us a chance to hear from the client about not just their goals and objectives, but also about their fears and concerns. It’s about working together with the client to establish realistic expectations; for example, does your investment strategy support your goals? It’s often about identifying the preferred level of risk and developing an appropriate asset allocation framework,” Gaskin said. And it’s interesting to see how that conversation and that relationship still play a vital role in investing. While there are plenty of folks who take advantage of Schwab’s tools to run their own investments (some, Gaskin says, have been clients of the firm for decades and haven’t spoken to anyone in person all that time, opting to do everything online), there is a younger generation of investors who value that hightouch experience. “One surprising change lately is how despite having all this technology at their disposal and knowing how to work it all, younger investors value working with a person,” Gaskin said. “They want that person who’s there to show them that they’re doing appropriate/suitable things.” It’s not the only change that Gaskin has seen in his nearly four decades of providing sound financial advice. He’s stayed at the forefront as investing has grown to encompass stocks, mutual funds, Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs), fractional share trading, and high-technology platforms and analytics. And while each has added its own dynamic to the investing picture, Gaskin understands that it ultimately boils down to one thing. “At the end of the day, what our clients have always wanted is value,” he said. “That’s at the crux of what we do.” To find out how Gaskin and the team at Charles Schwab’s Bluffton branch can help you reach your financial goals, call (843) 473-3620. 0222-275H C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 99



G

E

C

T

T

I

N

G

R

I

D

O

F

BUG OFF

C

ombating pests in the Lowcountry is a fact of life, and most of us aren’t really interested in co-existing with pesky critters; we just want them gone! There are options to consider when it comes to ridding your space (both indoors and outdoors) of the crawling, creepy creatures that no one wants around. First, decide which method you’ll use: natural or chemical. Both can resolve pest issues to varying degrees of effectiveness depending on the scale of the infestation and the type of pest. Some methods are easily do-it-yourself projects, but some are best left to the professionals. NATURAL PEST CONTROL MEASURES Hygienic pest control A clean home is key. Pests seek out places with an abundant food source, as well as a safe breeding environment. To make your home inhospitable for creepy crawlies and rodents, use these tips • Clean all surfaces after eating. • Clean table, countertops, and cooking surfaces and put all scraps in the trash or garbage disposal.

R

E

E

P Y

C

R

I

T

T

E

R

S

• Don’t leave dirty dishes out anywhere. • Stick to a regular cleaning schedule, including hard-to-reach areas, such as behind large kitchen appliances. • Store food in tightly sealed containers. • Keep bathrooms clean. • Install window screens. • Seal any holes/cracks in internal and external walls. Ignoring basic home hygiene will render any other types of pest control ineffective, and the pests will soon be back in greater numbers. Although a clean home will deter many pests, some of the more stubborn variety will laugh in the face of your cleanliness. This is where you must rely on the strength of other pest control. Biological pest control Biological control methods can also be seen as natural solutions as they do not rely on the use of pesticides or other chemicals; they simply take advantage of the hierarchy within nature. • Natural predators. People have relied on natural predators to control pest populations since the fourth century B.C., demonstrating its effectiveness. This tactic is commonly used by gardeners seeking

Article By Cheryl Alexander


to control a pest population without the use of chemicals. One of the most well-known and widely used applications of this method is the use of ladybugs to control, or remove, aphid infestations. • Microorganisms. Another popular natural method used in outdoor areas and gardens is the placement of beneficial microorganisms. Unlike the use of natural predators, using microorganisms to control pests is a preemptive method. When a helpful microorganism is in a symbiotic relationship with a plant, it will actively protect the plant by deterring pests and destroying harmful bacteria and fungi. PHYSICAL PEST CONTROL METHODS Physical pest control methods rely on the trapping, killing, and removal of both insect and rodent pests. • Elimination of breeding grounds. When looking for a place to infest, pests prefer to hide in a place that provides food and a safe breeding ground. Eliminating one or both factors will greatly increase your chances of removing pests. The best way, as already mentioned, is to keep your home clean, dry, and warm. Eliminating dirty, dark, damp areas will severely limit the housing options for pests in your home. • Poison bait. A popular and highly effective method, there are many pest-specific poisons to choose from. Pest control poison normally comes in one of two states: granules or gels. Regardless of the type, poisoned bait is placed in areas that show signs of pest activity and will either be eaten directly or carried back to the nest. If you have young children or pets, make sure they cannot access any area where the poison is in use. Some commercial poisons can lead to serious health issues if ingested. • Trap planting. Trap planting is a method of pest control which involves the planting of a decoy plant to which the pests are more attracted and can be efficient if used to keep pests away from a personal vegetable garden or a specific variety of flowerbed. • Traps. Using physical traps to control pests is possibly the most recognizable pest control measure for larger pests. They range in complexity (from simple fly paper to more complex baited traps), and they are mostly used to deal with rodents, birds, other small animals, and insects. Trap placement should be in areas that show signs of pest activity. You must

102

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

BUG OFF

check the traps regularly to remove any creature that has been caught, as well as to replace or reset the used traps. CHEMICAL PEST CONTROL METHODS The most effective and widely used types of pest control are chemical pesticides to tackle rodent and insect infestations. Regardless of which type of pesticide is being used, if self-applying, read and follow the instructions carefully since most are highly toxic. If you are hiring a professional to apply the chemicals, be sure to adhere to any follow-up measures they recommend. • Insecticides. Insecticides kill insects such as ants, cockroaches, and flies. Most commercially available insecticides are either spray- or granule-based, and while both will kill insects, they each have a particular area of expertise. Granulated insecticides are excellent for dealing with pests, such as ants and any other pests that build nests in hard-to-reach areas or actively scavenge for food. The granules are mistaken as food and are carried back into the nest or are just eaten directly. The poison is usually fast-acting, so most insects die shortly after ingesting it. Sprays are best used to fight flying and biting pests such as fleas. Most insects will die within minutes of encountering an insecticide spray, but some stubborn bugs may require multiple treatments before giving up. • Rodenticides. Rodenticides are a highly lethal type of pesticide, more commonly known as rat poison. They


are much stronger than the other pesticides due to the caution that rodents show when they encounter a suspicious food source. Due to this need for increased lethality, rodenticides are effective against all mammals when ingested. This includes rats, cats, dogs, and other scavengers. Since rat poison is so toxic and poses a threat to other animals, read and follow the instructions given by the manufacturer to keep your pets and children safe. • Fogging. Fogging pest control is another alternative against adult flying insects such as mosquitoes, flies, moths, or flying ants. This method is applied by a special ULV fogging machine through the infested areas. It’s called ULV (ultra-low volume) as it spreads a small amount of the insecticides. The advantage of fogging is that it’s considered to be environmentally friendly, it’s odorless, and it doesn’t leave any residues that are difficult to clean. • Heat treatment. A chemical-free option which has been gaining popularity in the field of pest control, the heat method is used for fleas, bed bugs, and other insects. During a heat treatment service, the infested area will be gradually heated to a temperature of 130-140 degrees F. The rising temperature will eliminate the creepy crawlies at every stage of development (eggs, larvae, and adults). This is a great option if you have children or pets and are not keen on the idea of scattering poison throughout your home. • Fumigation. Fumigation is the nuclear option when it comes to eliminating pests. During a fumigation service, your home will be sealed for 48-72 hours while a large amount of strong pesticide is sprayed into your home. This process will not only kill adult pests but will also kill any insect eggs or larvae that are present. Since the pesticide in use is so potent, you cannot remain in your home during the fumigation and must air the property for at least one day before returning. Once you’ve embarked upon a method of pest control, observe all safety precautions and continue with any follow-up treatment and a regular schedule to ensure your home is bug- and pest-free for the duration. 

BENEFITS OF NATURAL METHODS • Natural products do not contain potentially harmful chemicals. • Once natural insect predators become established, your plants will have long-lasting protection. • Insects cannot develop a resistance to predators. • Natural products are often environmentally friendly. DISADVANTAGES OF NATURAL METHODS • It can be difficult to kill the entire population of pests. • Pest populations may move or spread over a larger area. • The use of natural predators and microorganisms is a reactive rather than a preventive measure, so there is more time for the infestation to grow.

• • • •

BENEFITS OF CHEMICAL METHODS Pesticides are relatively inexpensive. Chemical methods are often more reliable. Chemical pest control products are easy to use. They are fast-acting.

DISADVANTAGES OF CHEMICAL METHODS • Insects can develop a natural resistance to chemical pesticides over time. • Using pesticides can leave residue on plants, which can cause health issues. • They are highly toxic and can cause severe health issues if ingested. • Groundwater may become contaminated through heavy use of pesticides.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

103



ARTICLE BY BECCA EDWARDS

SIBLING

RIvaLRy

I

posted the following questions to the cyber universe: “Do any of your children argue? What do you do to resolve the issue?” The answers were pretty funny. Alicia Daly responded, “I’ll let you know if and when it ever resolves…” Lauren Dooley said, “Show me the way … I can certainly provide more than enough examples.” Linda Fraser’s solution: “Large T-shirt. Put them in it together until a resolution.” And perhaps my favorite is from Miki Reeve: “Make them hold hands and be quiet for five minutes. Meanwhile, pop a glass

of wine and watch the clock. For every sound they make, add a minute. By the end, everyone is laughing at the ridiculousness of it all.” I know when my daughters, Ransom (14), Ruth Love (13) and Camellia (11), argue the internal mom shaming begins. I tend to take it personally, as if I did something wrong as a parent and failed to teach my daughters key concepts like compassion, sisterhood and conflict-resolution. But, in truth, no matter how good a parent you are or how morally and socially evolved your children are, siblings argue. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

105


SIBLING

RIvaLRy What we as parents must recognize is that sibling fighting is a natural result of sibling rivalry. (So don’t believe that mom who says, “Oh my kids never fight.” She is really a unicorn disguised as a mom.) Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, writes, “Try to see it from your kids’ perspective. Your oldest child was once the sole focus of your attention. His requests were answered with haste, and he didn’t have to share his time or toys with anyone. Then, his sister came along—a stranger to him, for all intents and purposes—and now Mommy is slower to pour his milk because she’s feeding baby, and he has to wait for Daddy to finish changing baby’s diaper before they can play with Legos together. As the kiddos get older, they vie for the same toys, and as younger sister becomes more independent, she gets tired of being bossed around by big brother.” McCready is certified in positive discipline (because apparently that’s a thing), and according to her bio, she has taught over 75,000 families worldwide. She is also the author of such books as If I have to Tell You One More Time: The Revolutionary Program That Gets Your Kids to Listen Without Nagging, Reminding or Yelling (um, sign me up coach) and The Me, Me, Me Epidemic: A Step-by-Step

106

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

Guide to Raising Capable, Grateful Kids in an Over-Entitled World (yep). Though she admits no one can stop sibling rivalry entirely, she does list six tips to minimizing it that I will sum up for you. Lose the labels. It is easy to fall into giving your children labels, especially unintentionally. Labels can come in the form of titles like “our straight-A student” or “our little soccer star.” Labels can come in the form of character traits like “artistic” or “responsible.” And although children have distinct personalities and tendencies, by labeling, you are creating comparisons and disparities. Try to congratulate all your children on their positive attributes and accomplishments and encourage siblings to root for each other. I would note here to also let your children know it is okay to be different from each other and that everyone has their strengths and weaknesses. Arrange for attention. According to McCready, “One of the key reasons kids fight is to gain their parents’ attention—in their eyes, even negative attention is better than nothing.” Of course, as parents we want to encourage positive attention and we can do this by consciously setting aside 10 to 15 minutes a day for each child. I realize this can be hard. I get it. Again, I have three daughters. My advice is to take stock of what activities your children like individually and then see if there is an overlap in everyday family activities. For example, my middle child likes to cook, so we spend 20 minutes a night talking and cooking dinner together.


Try to congratulate all your children on their positive attributes and accomplishments and encourage siblings to root for each other. I would note here to also let your children know it is okay to be different from each other and that everyone has their strengths and weaknesses. Prepare for peace. This one surprised me. McCready recommends not putting your children in time out when they argue. Instead, she recommends teaching conflict-resolution skills. One way to do this is once tempers have subsided and everyone is calmer to re-enact what started the argument and practice roleplaying using more positive words and actions. She also encourages parents to talk to their children about “I feel” statements such as “I feel sad when so-and-so doesn’t want to play with me.” Lastly, it is important to teach children to walk away and take 10 or so breaths to diffuse an argument. Stay out of squabbles. This one is super difficult for me, but McCready encourages parents to ignore it when their children argue. “By ignoring the tussle, you don’t reward negative behavior with your attention, and most importantly, you give them a chance to work it out on their own.” Calm the conflict. If your children cannot reach an agreement or if the argument escalates, a parent is forced to step in. In this case, you will want to separate the children, let them take their calming breaths, then bring them back together. Ask them to take turns using their “I feel” statement, and then work collectively to come up with a solution. The key here, McCready explains, is to not take sides. Put them all in the same boat. If a solution cannot be reached, McCready recommends an “all in the same boat” statement, meaning everyone experiences the same outcome or consequences. The example she uses is, “Either you can take turns with the game, or I will put it away for the rest of the day.”  Becca Edwards is a wellness professional, freelance writer, and owner of Female IQ (femaleIQ.com).

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

107


A wide variety of avian caps make great gifts for a bird enthusiast.

Sean Ryan, owner of Wild Birds Unlimted at Festival Centre Wild Birds Unlimited offers an abundance of hummingbird feeders.

Quirky bird houses on display.

Start the day off with coffee in one of the these adorable bird mugs.


ARTICLE BY LINDA S. HOPKINS - PHOTOGRAPHY BY M.KAT

G E T

H A P PY

AT

WILd birds unlimited DISCOVER THE JOYS OF BACKYARD BIRD FEEDING AND SECURE YOUR TICKET TO THE BEST SHOW IN TOWN

hile we are bombarded with instant information and streaming entertainment every day, you may find it shocking to learn that one of the most riveting shows on Earth is taking place right outside your backdoor— no account, no digital subscription, no Wi-Fi required. You can watch free of charge any time, but when you’re ready to tune in more closely, pick up everything you need at Wild Birds Unlimited (WBU), located at Festival Centre on Hilton Head Island, and prepare to binge-watch the birds in your backyard. “Sometimes the world gets so fast, slowing down and watching them for 10 or 15 minutes just helps,” said local WBU franchise owner, Sean Ryan. And if anyone needs the world to slow down, it might just be Ryan, a single father of four teens, ages 15-19. It was Ryan’s wife Jessica who first encouraged him to get into the bird feeding business. “She wanted to be a small business owner, and she loved feeding the birds,” Ryan said. The couple purchased their first WBU store in Hickory, N.C. in 2019. A year later, they bought the High Point, N.C. store, and in November of 2020, they purchased the Hilton Head Island location. Jessica passed away in January of 2021, but Ryan has no regrets about the business they started together, and he plans to continue growing it. “We have intentions of opening a second location in Bluffton,” he said.

W

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

109


Meanwhile, Ryan’s primary career is in technology program management, and he is currently in a position that allows him to work from home. “So, I’m doing that and doing this and raising kids,” he said. If you’re wondering why in the world this man would continue building his bird empire when he has so many other irons in the fire, it’s all about the joy of the job. “If you think about all the jobs you’ve had in your life, this is one of the few I’ve ever had where pretty much everything about it is positive,” he said. “This store is our customers’ happy place. “From a customer service and customer engagement point of view, everything that happens in the store is enjoyable,” he continued. “And we take care of the customer. A number of our products have lifetime guarantees. So, if it’s broken, we fix it or replace it. It doesn’t matter if it’s 10 years old. Just bring it in to our team, and we will work with you to get it right.”

A buildyour-own bird feeding station with interchangable parts.

WHY FEED THE BIRDS? Cornell Lab of Ornithology, in collaboration with other researchers, has published a new study that evaluates the populations of more than 500 North American bird species. The results are nothing short of shocking! Today, the skies over North America are home to nearly three billion fewer birds than they were in 1970, which means that almost one out of every four birds has disappeared from our lives over the past 50 years. The study also revealed steep declines among some traditionally abundant and common backyard birds, such as robins, finches, orioles and sparrows. WBU is committed to help bring birds back. And each one of us can make a difference. Find out more at wbu.com/bring-birdsback/. WHAT TO FEED THE BIRDS According to the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), birds consume up to 10,000 calories a day (the human equivalent of a 155,000-calorie diet!), so backyard bird feeders are a helpful supplement for wild birds’ feeding requirements. It gives them a place to be and keeps them coming back, Ryan explained. “Usually, if you

110

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


get your feeders up, the birds come back again and again. You’ll see the same ones, and you’ll see the babies. You sort of build your own little ecosystem.” When it comes to selecting seed, quality matters—another reason to shop at WBU. Birds are remarkably proficient at assessing potential food items for nutritional content and quality, according to the NWF. If you watch your feeder closely, you may observe the birds lightly rattling individual seeds in their bills to weigh and taste them before deciding whether to drop them to the ground or eat them. WBU is your local source for the highest quality seed as well as feeders and other equipment needed to keep your backyard birds happy and coming back for more. “We have pure seed, and we have blends,” Ryan said. “All of our blends are no-waste. Other stores may sell you a 20-lb. bag for less, but there is a lot of filler and junk seed that the birds won’t eat. There’s no filler in any of our feed.” HOW TO FEED THE BIRDS Need some help selecting and setting up your feeders? Save yourself a Google search and tap into the human knowledge base at WBU. “I have amazing people who work here who enjoy coming to work and sharing it,” Ryan said. Mark Bottini manages the Hilton Head Island store. Staff members include Nan, Laura, Mary, Ashley, and Tom. “They are the secret to the store. They are the experts on birding in the area,” Ryan said. “We can help you set up your bird feeding stations for maximum enjoyment,” Ryan said. “We have solutions to help you figure out how to feed the birds where you need to feed them—whether it’s hardware or hot seed or other products, we can help solve your problems and enjoy your hobby. “At the end of the day, why would you come to us? Quality. Experience. And we’re doing good in the world. You do a business like this because it feels good, it’s doing good, and it’s helping others feel good,” Ryan said. “You have this multiplication of joy that tends to come with this little store that sells birdseed.” In a world overwhelmed with technology, bird feeding provides a muchneeded escape from daily stressors. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced birder, Ryan and his knowledgeable staff at WBU are there to help you enhance your birding experience and get more enjoyment from all that nature has to offer. Stop by today and discover your new happy place. Wild Birds Unlimited Hilton Head is located at Festival Centre, 45 Pembroke Dr., Hilton Head Island. For more information, visit hiltonhead.wbu.com. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

111



Article by Barry Kaufman

On a Wing and Prayer 25TH ANNUAL (WELL, MOSTLY ANNUAL) WINGFEST FLIES TO NEW NEST AT LOWCOUNTRY CELEBRATION PARK

T

hose of you with long memories will recall one of the greatest celebrations we used to enjoy back in the before times. Back when masks were a Halloween-only accessory, hand sanitizer was only for germophobes, and COVID-19 sounded like something you’d name a robot. In those bright and cheery times, people would come from miles around every year to sample the most delectable, savory treat known to man: the chicken wing. They called this celebration WingFest, and for thousands, it was the must-attend event of the year. Then one day, it was just gone, victim of social gathering restrictions handed down by the state governor just nine days before the twenty-fifth WingFest was to arrive. For two years, we ate our wings in silence and solitude, dreaming of the day we could once again join our fellow islanders in deliciously fried exultation. Ladies and gentlemen, the good times are here again. After a two-year hiatus, WingFest will return on March 19. Or, as organizer Joe Cain so cleverly put it, “It’s only taken us 27 years to do the twenty-fifth WingFest.” Wing lovers will once again rejoice in the mouth-watering cavalcade of different flavors presented by local restaurants, with standbys like Wild Wing Café, One Hot Mama’s and the Hilton Head Firefighters as well as newcomers like Driftwood Eatery and returning favorites like Captain Woody’s. From fiery to fancy and everything in between, the wings will soar with flavors beyond imagination, proving once and for all that the Lowcountry is back. “We’ve been able to do some smaller events, and we did the oyster festival back in November, but being able to finally put on the twenty-fifth WingFest is pretty exciting,” Cain said. “And this year, it’s better than ever.” And while, yes, it is his job as organizer and famed WingFest hype man to say that, that isn’t just hyperbole. This year’s event will, in fact, wingfest ad 22.pdf

1

2/9/22

11:31 AM

WelcOme TO FlavOrTOWn! C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Where: SHELTER COVE PARK (39 Shelter Cove Lane) When: SATURDAY MARCH 19, 2022 11-5 PM •

Hilton Head area restaurants cooking up their best wings!

Admission: $8 (10 and under FREE) Info: 843-681-7273 www.HILTONHEADWINGFEST.com •

Bands: The Chiggers • True Gentlemen • Naked Karate Girls All proceeds benefit the Hilton Head Island Rec Children’s scholarship fund

While legally we wouldn’t dare say that the WingFest poster draws direct inspiration from any donkey sauce-slinging TV chefs, you have to admit the resemblance is uncanny. Drawn by Cain’s cousin Charlie, this year’s artwork continues the festival’s whimsical tradition of Buffalo-inspired artwork.

Orchid of One Hot Mama’s holds up the Wingfest trophy

be bigger than ever, moving to the wide-open spaces of Lowcountry Celebration Park for the first time. “It’s not only a bigger venue, but there’s also so much more opportunity for people who want to walk or bike there,” Cain said. “We were a little scared at first, having all that extra space. But we think we’re going to need it.” He’s not wrong. Apart from two years of pent up demand sure to drive up attendance, this year’s event will include a performance by Naked Karate Girls (who, we feel compelled to point out for the sake of this being a family publication, will be clothed). Mainstays of the Tiki Hut’s July Fourth bacchanalia, NKG will be joined by the Chiggers and True Gentlemen in creating a pulse-pounding festival atmosphere. A panel of judges will select their favorite, and attendees will be able to vote for their people’s choice award winner, but the wings won’t be the only things victorious after the twenty-fifth WingFest rolls into town. The Wing Eating Contest will make its grand return, testing your ability to throw back wings. It’s been a long time coming, but at last islanders can rejoice. WingFest is back, and the world is a delicious place once again.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 113



HOPPING YACHTS FOR HOSPICE

Lynsey Rini, Courtney Daniels, Cindy Creamer, Jenny Brasington, Kacey Floyd, James Dismond

Hospice Care of the Lowcountry announces highly anticipated exclusive event

I

f spending an evening hopping more than 20 luxury sailing vessels in the name of charity sounds like your kind of event, then the Yacht Hop, benefitting Hospice Care of the Lowcountry (HCL), is for you. For 16 years, locals and visitors have been looking forward to the Yacht Hop, a premier luxury event hosted this year at the Inland Harbour in Wexford. “We are delighted to be able to have Yacht Hop this year at Wexford,” said Jenny Brasington, executive director, HCL. “This year’s Yacht Hop represents so much—most importantly our fortieth year of operation in the community.” From 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on May 14, guests will tour 21 lavish yachts. Each vessel ranges in length from 35 feet to upwards of 66 feet and in price from $150,000 upwards of $2.5 million. “This year, yacht hop will be more exclusive and have more

ARTICLE BY CHERYL ALEXANDER PHOTOGRAPHY BY KACEY FLOYD

YACHT AND MOKE PROVIDED BY JASON AND CINDY BULLOCK, OWNERS OF CAROLINA RIDES, SPONSORS OF YACHT HOP 2022.

C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 115


Jenny Brasington, Cindy Creamer, James Dismond, Lynsey Rini, Courtney Daniels

yachts than any other previous year,” said Cindy Creamer, board of directors HCL and Yacht Hop committee chair. “As the committee says, it’s no longer just a special event; it’s an experience.” “We are very excited to bring this awesome experience to our friends and neighbors,” said James Dismond, director of business development HCL. “It is truly the premier luxury event on the island.” On each of the lavish yachts, event patrons will be served mouthwatering hors d’oeuvres and masterfully crafted cocktails prepared by some of the area’s most acclaimed chefs, showcasing Lowcountry cuisine and Southern hospitality. “We are thrilled to show our support by participating in this year’s Yacht Hop, showcasing the club and the

116

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

talents of our award-winning executive chef, Josh O’Neill,” said Jessica Burt, manager at The Golf Club at Indigo Run. Hospice Care of the Lowcountry is a fantastic communitydriven organization that has touched our club family and our loved ones.” In addition to enjoying the food and libations, attendees can mingle with other guests around the multi-level venue overlooking the Inland Harbour, listen to live music, lounge on the VIP lawn or the VIP scenic overlook, and bid on exclusive event items and luxury vacations during the live auction before the night draws to a close. The 2022 Yacht Hop’s premier sponsors are Winslow Design Custom Kitchens, Hilton Head Bicycles, and the Great Frameup. “The Team at Winslow Design Studio is honored to support Hospice Care of the Low Country,” said Charmayne Winslow, owner. “The end of life often comes too soon and unexpectedly. A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer brought Hospice into my life as my husband was losing his. In my 30 years as an emergency and ICU RN, I learned the quality of death matters just as much as one’s quality of life. Hospice helped in providing that and more to his life and mine as his caregiver. Because of the care, compassion, and understanding, they will always have a place in my heart.” “My wife and I are personally connected to Hospice Care of the Lowcountry,” said Jim Hall of Hilton Head Bicycles. “When we saw an opportunity to give back, it was an easy decision. Plus, we get to hop yachts while supporting a phenomenal organization.” “It promises to be a fabulous, elevated evening to celebrate 40 years of Hospice Care of the Lowcountry,” Dismond said.


Jenny Brasington, Cindy Creamer

The island’s first hospice began more than 40 years ago where a roundtable of individuals was discussing the futures of their aging family members and friends and the fact that there was no island support. From that conversation, a volunteer network was formed that eventually evolved into today’s HCL—a $3 million dollar organization that serves 300350 patients annually. The volunteers and staff at HCL pride themselves on their core values: “It’s not about dying; it’s about living.” “Our pursuit of excellence never ends.” And their slogan, “Hospice Care is your choice and our privilege.” “When I was asked to be the event chair of this committee, it was an easy yes,” Creamer said. “Yacht Hop embodies the Lowcountry Life that I sell every day as a Realtor. It’s a fivestar event that you don’t want to miss.” A limited number of tickets will be sold, making this an exclusive charity event. Two levels of participation are available: General admission tickets (5:30-8:30 p.m.) are $250, and a variety of Sponsor/VIP tickets (4-8:30 p.m.) are still available at $7,500 and lower. “HCL is committed and connected to our community,” Dismond said. “Yacht Hop is a magnificent event for our supporters to come together and enjoy themselves while supporting HCL.” For more information, visit hospicecarelc.org/sponsor-yachthop, call (843) 760-2296, or email jdismond@hospicecarelc.org. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 117


M A Y O R

Hilton Head Island Mayor Photography by M.Kat

A Note from John McCann

BEACH IMPROVEMENTS UNDERWAY

B

ehind its residents, one of Hilton Head Island’s greatest assets is its beach. This sandy 12-mile jewel brings residents out for relaxation and evening strolls. It also attracts thousands of visitors who want to come and enjoy long mornings and afternoons watching the ocean lap the shore. Over the years, the town has invested in this environmental asset with renourishment projects and the development of award-winning beach parks. Recently, we made another significant investment that we hope will enhance the beach experience for all beach visitors. That investment was hiring Marc Robson as our dedicated beach operations manager. Marc matched the qualifications we sought— someone with knowledge and experience in customer service and hospitality; someone with supervisory experience, environmental knowledge (especially as it relates to beaches), and the ability to help us achieve our vision of having a world-class beach. Marc joined our team six months ago and hit the ground running. He is leading the town’s new Beach Operations Team consisting of a supervisor (Keith Fallon) and two investigative techs (Nick O’Neal and Chuck Hall). They are all a part of our Facilities Management Department, which is responsible for maintaining all town facilities and property. Marc’s background includes over 32 years of experience in law enforcement with the Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department and the Bluffton Police Department. He retired from those departments but responded to our advertisement. Marc brought

< Bluffton Mayor

enthusiasm, fresh ideas and a love for Hilton Head Island’s beaches. Marc and the team he is leading are working with other town staff, Shore Beach Services, sea turtle tracking groups, hotels and other businesses to maintain and uplift our beach and beach parks. Since coming together, the team has toured several beach towns, reviewed beach operations plans used by other towns across the country, and examined thousands of pictures and beach designs, all to come up with a refreshed vision for our beach and beach parks.

A Note from Lisa Sulka

M AY O R

DON RYAN CENTER FOR INNOVATION TURNS DREAMS INTO STARTUPS

E

stablishing your own business might seem like a daunting process. However, if you are willing to take action, you can turn your business idea into a startup. Of course, this process will take time and research. Here are some basic steps to begin establishing your new business:

1. Form a clear vision. Keep in mind that the best business ideas are the ones that try to solve a specific problem. 2. Research the market. To ensure that your startup will succeed, you will need to research the market. Is there enough audience for your product, and how much competition you will face? Take a look at what your competitors are offering. 3. Determine your target audience. By defining your target audience, you can take specific actions that cater to this audience’s needs, thus beginning to build your much-needed customer base. 4. Reach out to industry insiders. In the beginning, you will have a lot of questions and doubts. One of the best ways to solve these is to reach

Photography by Krisztian Lonyai

118

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


MARC ROBSON

We’ve already started seeing some great work from this team, other town staff, and groups we work with to create positive beach experiences for residents and visitors. Some recent improvements include installation of beach mats at Alder Lane beach access and replacement of dozens of beach markers and stay off the dunes signs. The public will see improvements at all our beach parks such as upgrades in park restrooms, landscaping, parking lot restriping and mat installations at other beach parks. The team is exploring other enhancements and programs such as Adopt a Beach and Adopt a Basket, where groups can help with beach cleanup efforts, as well as a beach wheelchair loaner program. Our ultimate vision is to make sure our beach is in top-notch shape. With all the improvements Marc and his team are making, and with other beach projects town staff has underway, we hope you come away from the beach with the most pleasant experience ever.  A Note from Lisa Sulka continued out to various industry insiders and hear what they have to say. Their expertise and experience will give you pointers on how to get through this challenging process. 5. Protect your idea. Your startup’s intellectual property, or IP, includes your patents and trademarks. By securing it from the beginning, you can protect your company from all the others that might try to copy you. 6. Write a business plan. Since you have already conducted market research, you already have the data you need to support your ideas and vision. 7. Define your team. One person cannot undertake all the responsibilities of a business. For this reason, you need to figure out what talents are required for the smooth operation of your business and how large your team should be. 8. Determine your financing options. The most important step for funding your startup is to find how you will finance your project. All these steps allow you to build a secure base for the establishment of your startup. The Don Ryan Center for Innovation is here to support your startup and allow you to find the success. To get started, call (843) 540-0405 or visit DonRyanInfo@townofbluffton.com for more information. C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022

119



This & That

C2 Magazine • March 2022 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

WINGS A R T I C L E

B Y

J E S S E

B L A N C O

I

’m regularly amused by people who get, ummmm, how can I put this, upset? Whenever I am asked about a “favorite” anything. It is not at all uncommon to have someone ask me what my “Top Five” burgers are, for example. When I name five they either agree or ask for two or three more until I get to their favorite. I get it, and 98 percent of the time, I am more than glad to share my opinions about whatever the case may be. I’m glad to discuss when someone disagrees, but good luck getting me to say your favorite deserves top billing on my list if it wasn’t there already. That’s why it is my list. You have yours, and I have mine, right? I share all of that in an attempt to avoid hate mail generated by the list I am about to share. In honor of the twenty-fifth anniversary of Hilton Head Island’s beloved Wingfest coming up on March 19 at Shelter Cove Community Park, I present to you my favorite spots for chicken wings in the Lowcountry. As always, this is not a ranking. Sometimes I prefer one over another, but I love them all equally.

JESSE BLANCO EATING SOME WINGS AT THE DRY DOCK.

HINCHEY’S WINGS

DRY DOCK’S WINGS

The Dry Dock Seafood and Spirits. I’m starting with Dry Dock because it was my biggest surprise. I rolled in there last year on a Sunday to watch some NFL football and immediately loved the vibe. Then I ordered some wings and was thoroughly impressed. How much so? I shared those wings with someone who was about to leave. When they left, I ordered more. I loved them.

“all that fancy food,” if someone mentions a dive bar with great wings to me, I might leave you planted mid-sentence and drive over there. My only disappointment was the fact that R Bar is hardly a dive. Not at all. It’s a sports bar with great sports bar food. Late at night, it’s a favorite hangout for Bluffton’s F&B crowd. What more proof do you need? The food is great. The wings are outstanding as well.

Hinchey’s Chicago Bar and Grill. Very literally on the heels of that Dry Dock experience, I mentioned it to my friend Melissa. “Have you tried Hinchey’s? Those are my favorite,” she said. At the time, I had not, but I did in short order, and they were absolutely as advertised. If you’ve never been, Hinchey’s has a pub feel going on—lots of TVs, of course, for ballgames. The wings are outstanding in all your traditional flavors. Give ’em a spin.

One Hot Mama’s. The proof that this list is not a ranking is right here. I deliberately left One Hot Mama’s for last to prove that point. One Hot Mama’s’ wings (and BBQ for that matter) are well known for their consistency and amazingness. Grilled, fried, flavors, sides, all of it. Orchid knows what’s up with them all. Everyone knows about One Hot Mama’s. It has been a Lowcountry staple for many years. If you don’t know, well, now you do. Get over there and get your wing on.

R Bar, Bluffton. I discovered R Bar years ago when a young lady told me it was her favorite dive bar in Bluffton with great wings. “It's a regular date night spot for us,” she said. For all the heat I take in Savannah for eating

Got a wing I should know about? I am always listening, even when I am not agreeing. Give me a shout at tips@ eatitandlikeit.com.

C2 MAGAZINE MARCH 2022

121


This & That

Dr. Shane Harpham, owner of Sea Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, is a 2022 candidate for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) Man and Woman of the Year campaign. This is the tenth anniversary of the campaign in the Lowcountry and is a 10-week philanthropic fundraising competition. The campaign kicked off on February 7 and runs through April 30. The mission of LLS is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. To support Dr. Shane in this campaign, please visit pages.lls.org/mwoy/sav/savannah22/SeaKidsSmile.

The Hilton Head Choral Society will celebrate its fortyfifth season and the twentieth year with artistic director Tim Reynolds in a special concert “For We Wish You Music” at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 1 at First Presbyterian Church, 540 William Hilton Parkway, Hilton Head Island. The concert will celebrate the long history of the HHCS as the oldest performing arts organization in our community and look back at the last 20 years with Tim. The 2021-22 season is the maestro’s final season with the HHCS. This walk down memory lane will celebrate music of Gershwin, Sondheim, Handel and much more. These festive selections, performed by the chorus and orchestra, will make for a celebratory night to remember. For the health and safety of all, patrons, volunteers, and performers will be required to provide proof of vaccination. Patrons are encouraged to submit vaccination proof in advance to tickets@hiltonheadchoralsociety. org or by mail to HHCS, P.O. Box 22235, Hilton Head Island, SC 29925. Tickets are $15-$40 and may be purchased online or at the door, if available. To purchase tickets or for more information, call (843) 341-3818, visit hiltonheadchoralsociety.org, or email tickets@hiltonheadchoralsociety.org. 122

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE


This & That

C2 Magazine • March 2022 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

The Hampton County Arts Council is pleased to announce they have been approved to receive an American Rescue Plan grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to help the arts and cultural sector recover from the pandemic. The small, rural arts agency is recommended to receive $150,000 and may use this funding to ensure equitable pay for artists and administrators, to support salaries and wages, as well as covering other operating costs and maintaining facilities. Money is also provided to marketing and promotional efforts to encourage attendance and participation in arts programming.

Great news for all garden lovers! The board of the All Saints Garden Tour has announced that the thirty-third All Saints Garden Tour will be held on Saturday, May 21. The tour will include six beautiful gardens, many with water views, on Hilton Head Island and in Bluffton. This year, there will just be a Garden Tour; other traditional events associated with the tour (the luncheon, bake sale, and boutique) are suspended due to the uncertainties associated with COVID variants. As usual, proceeds from the tour will support six local charities. Details will be available at allsaintsgardentour.com. Mark your calendars for Saturday, May 21, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Watch for the colorful red poppies on posters and the ticket locations in April.

C2 MAGAZINE MARCH 2022

123


This & That

The Hilton Head Symphony Orchestra (HHSO) and its music director, John Morris Russell, have agreed to a three-year extension of their contract. This will guarantee Maestro Russell’s leadership relationship with the HHSO through the 2024-2025 concert season.

124

MARCH 2022

C2 MAGAZINE

C2 Magazine • March 2022 Edition A Series of Fortunate Events, interesting news and a hodge-podge of other items. You know…this and that! If you would like to submit something for this special section, please email hunter@celebratehiltonhead.com. If we have room and it’s appropriate for public consumption, we’ll be happy to oblige.

Whip Salon HHI is pleased to announce the opening of a fourth location, now offering services on Hilton Head Island in the Circle Building, (1040 William Hilton Parkway), just off Sea Pines Circle. Joining the team is celebrity hairstylist Dennis Stokley. The salon will host a grand opening party Thursday, March 10, from 6-8 p.m. The event is open to the public and will feature drinks, a DJ, raffles and door prizes.

Hampton Long has recently joined the Charles Schwab office in Bluffton as a financial consultant. In his new role, he will provide wealth management and investing help and guidance to Schwab clients through financial planning discussions and personalized portfolio consultations.


This & That

Some struggling Hilton Head Island families will not just be receiving a helping hand from Deep Well Project. With the launch of the new program “Wellspring,” select families will also be receiving a strong hand up. Wellspring is a new initiative funded in part by a grant from the Community Foundation of the Lowcountry that will initially serve select low-income families on Hilton Head Island. It is a comprehensive, long-term program designed to move families from crisis to stability to self-sufficiency. As part of the new program, Deep Well will seek partnerships with other local nonprofits to help ensure success: Literacy Center/Bluffton Self Help, Volunteers in Medicine, Lowcountry Legal Volunteers, The Children’s Center, and Technical College of the Lowcountry, along with other local agencies. Key to the Wellspring initiative will be a bilingual social worker to direct the program. Deep Well has already begun the recruitment process and welcomes résumés from qualified applicants. For more information, contact Sandy Gillis, Deep Well’s executive director, at (843) 785-2849 or email her at deepwellprojecthhi@gmail.com.

The Emily Geiger Chapter, National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution, recently honored Kelly Jardin, May River High School, as the winner of the “Outstanding Teacher of American History” with a certificate, monetary award, and history books for her classroom. The Emily Geiger Chapter with members from Bluffton and surrounding areas of Beaufort County organizes and supports historic preservation, local patriotic activities, and educational outreach through literacy, scholarships, and awards. For information on the Emily Geiger Chapter, visit emilygeigernsdar.org. C2 MAGAZINE MARCH 2022

125



I S C IANS MU in bathrooms MUSICIANS: JOHN O’GORMAN (JOHNNY O), SAVANNAH EDWARDS (SAVANNAH E) UNCLE MIKE BAND: VANNAH & THE RUMP SHAKERS

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y M . K AT

What’s your sign? John O’Gorman: Gemini Savannah Edwards: Cancer Uncle Mike: I don’t use astrology.


Most underrated song that, in your opinion, should be a classic? JO: “Manic Mechanic”—ZZ Top! SE: “King of Wishful Thinking,” by Go West. Amazing song! UM: “Gimme Little Sign,” Brenton Wood Biggest compliment you’ve ever gotten from a fan? JO: Peggy Nicholas paid us the biggest compliment, in my opinion. She says that she and all her friends live for Friday nights at the Okatie Ale House! SE: Every compliment means something special. We love them like they love us! Favorite piece to perform? SE: That’s tough. I love singing powerful women songs— Bonnie Raitt, Linda Ronstadt, Stevie Nicks. UM: “To Be With You,” Mr. Big What do you sing in the shower? JO: I don’t sing in the shower. I prefer to crank tunes and jam out! SE: My new favorite go-to shower song is “Good Kisser,” by Lake Street Dive. Amazing lead vocalist. UM: Nothing. I’m listening and learning. Favorite cereal JO: Captain Crunch SE: Fruity Pebbles UM: CW Post At what venue do you most like to perform? JO: Cork’s

128

MARCH 2022 C2 MAGAZINE

SE: All the promenade venues are great, but our most loyal fans are at Okatie Ale House. UM: Okatie Ale House Most requested song at shows? JO: Folks love it when Savannah does Dua Lipa and Lizzo! SE: “Brown Eyed Girl,” but it’s okay because we “don’t know it.” UM: “Gimme One Reason” First concert you attended? JO: Rossington Collins Band, junior year in high school, Garden State Arts Center SE: The band Orleans known for “Dance with Me.” We play their song “Still the one” and love it! UM: Spyro Gyra, Infinity Hall, Norfolk, Connecticut Favorite artist? JO: Always an Eric Clapton fan, but Jude Cole is the most underrated and under-appreciated singer, guitar player, and songwriter of all time. SE: Lake Street Dive Place you go to get away from it all? JO: Key West SE: My car. Isn’t it everyone’s self-therapy spot? Just me? UM: My wife’s side, anywhere on earth. Do you tweet, gram or book? What’s your handle? JO: I don’t tweet. Facebook is all the social media I know.


SE: Facebook: Vannah & the Rump Shakers; Instagram: vannahrumpshakers UM: I do not. Who would star as you in the epic retelling of your life? JO: Randy Travis SE: Please be Kristen Wiig! UM: My son First instrument you learned to play? JO: I’ve only ever played guitar. I try drums and piano, but not well. SE: None. Does half-*ss tambourine count? UM: Drums Song you were thrilled to finally master? JO: I had a student one time that wanted to learn the guitar solo for “Hotel California,” so I had to master it. SE: “Bobby McGee” UM: “Broon’s Bane,” Rush What do you wish you knew more about? JO: I wish I knew more about working on cars. SE: The afterlife. Isn’t it just the most intriguing question? UM: How to be better. What animal do you most identify with? JO: My old dog Jude, who was a Weimaraner SE: Lioness. Protective. Nurturing. Proud. UM: Kangal If you got super famous and had to change your name, what would your new name be? JO: I like my name and don’t plan on ever changing it. Thanks, Mom and Dad! SE: Well, they call me Savannah E nowadays. Can’t imagine it being anything else. UM: Stephen Zephner III What famous musician would you love to play/sing a duet with? JO: Would love to do a duo with Eric Clapton. SE: Johnny Lang or Justin Nozuka UM: Stacy Lattisaw—perfect combination  C2 MAGAZINE

MARCH 2022 129


MARCH 2022 EVERY TUESDAY! SEA PINES FARMERS MARKET

FARMERS MARKET AT HONEY HORN

Sea Pines Shopping Center 10am-2pm

Coastal Discovery 9am-1pm

8

6

9

HAPPY NATIONAL DENTIST DAY!

3

4-6

LIVE LIFE STRONG KICK OFF EVENT

LEGALLY BLONDE, JR. THE MUSICAL Main Stage Community Theatre March 4-6 This show is recommended for audiences of all ages.

15 Captains Rd. Bluffton 5:30-7:30pm

THURSDAYS

12

BLUFFTON FARMERS MARKET

HILTON HEAD SHAMROCK RUN

Green Street in Old Town Bluffton Every Thursday 12-5pm

New York City Pizza at Heritage Plaza 7:30am – 10:30am (843) 757-8520.

wingfest ad 22.pdf

13 13

16

WEDNESDAYS

THE HILTON HEAD ISLAND ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE The parade will proudly march down Pope Avenue at 3pm

20

1

2/9/22

11:31 AM

19

17

LIVE MUSIC BY ROSS2 & FRIENDS The North End Pour House Port Royal Plaza (843) 681-4143

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Where: SHELTER COVE PARK (39 Shelter Cove Lane) When: SATURDAY MARCH 19, 2022 11-5 PM •

Hilton Head area restaurants cooking up their best wings!

Admission: $8 (10 and under FREE) Info: 843-681-7273 www.HILTONHEADWINGFEST.com •

Bands: The Chiggers • True Gentlemen • Naked Karate Girls

HILTON HEAD ISLAND WINGFEST Lowcountry Celebration Park 11am-5pm Admission $8 (children 10 and under are FREE)

All proceeds benefit the Hilton Head Island Rec Children’s scholarship fund

21

23 & 24 LAGOS ‘BEYOND THE SEA’ TRUNK SHOW AT FORSYTHE JEWELERS The Shops at Sea Pines Center March 23, 10am to 7pm, and Thursday, March 24, 10am to 5pm Enjoy a complimentary gift with your LAGOS purchase.

27

1

MONDAYS LOBSTER NIGHT! The North End Pour House Port Royal Plaza *Reservations Required (843) 681-4143

30

THURSDAYS PRIME RIB,CHOPS & OSSO BUCCO NIGHT! The North End Pour House Port Royal Plaza (843) 681-4143

26 HILTON HEAD ISLAND WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL Lowcountry Celebration Park 12pm-3pm The Public Tasting features more than 250 world-class wines sourced from across the globe, and chefs in action at the Sysco Outdoor Gourmet Challenge. Tickets- $65 hiltonheadwineandfood. com/

EVENTS 130

MARCH 2022 C2 MAGAZINE




Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.